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Sample records for high-energy radiation ii

  1. Residual stress analysis of aluminium welds with high energy synchrotron radiation at the HARWI II beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Torben; Martins, Rene V.; Schreyer, Andreas [GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In civil aircraft production advanced welding techniques, like laser beam welding or friction stir welding, are used to reduce weight and production costs. By the welding process residual stresses are introduced in the weld zone and the surrounding area. These stresses may depend on diverse factors and can have disadvantageous influence on the service performance of the weld. For strain scanning GKSS research centre built up the high energy materials science beamline HARWI II at HASYLAB. The use of high energetic photons from about 80 keV-120 keV enables diffraction experiments in transmission geometry, which provides the information about the macroscopic stresses. A large sample-detector-distance ensures a high angular resolution for the peak position determination. The heavy load diffractometer allows making use of massive sample environments. For example laser beam welded t- and butt-joints were investigated with high spatial resolution. The large grain size of the specimen makes the measurements with high spatial resolution more difficult due to the poor grain statistics. The influences of the gauge volume size and grain statistics on the strain measurements were systematically investigated. For the t-joint configuration two dimensional stress maps were calculated from the data. For the near future an in-situ FSW experiment is planed to investigate the metallophysical processes during the welding.

  2. Radiation containment at a 1 MW high energy electron accelerator: Status of LCLS-II radiation physics design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, M. Santana; Blaha, J.; Guetg, M. W.; Li, Z.; Liu, J. C.; Mao, S. X.; Nicolas, L.; Rokni, S. H.; Xiao, S.; Ge, L.

    2017-09-01

    LCLS-II will add a 4 GeV, 1 MHz, SCRF electron accelerator in the first 700 meters of the SLAC 2-mile Linac, as well as adjustable gap polarized undulators in the down-beam electron lines, to produce tunable, fully coherent X-rays in programmable bunch patterns. This facility will work in unison with the existing Linac Coherent Light Source, which uses the legacy copper cavities in the last third of the linac to deliver electrons between 2 and 17 GeV to an undulator line. The upgrade plan includes new beam lines, five stages of state of the art collimation that shall clean the high-power beam well up-beam of the radio-sensitive undulators, and new electron and photon beam dumps. This paper describes the challenges encountered to define efficient measures to protect machine, personnel, public and the environment from the potentially destructive power of the beam, while maximizing the reuse of existing components and infrastructure, and allowing for complex operational modes.

  3. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part II: Bonner sphere spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegel, B; Bedogni, R; Caresana, M; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Ferrarini, M; Hohmann, E; Hranitzky, C; Kasper, A; Khurana, S; Mares, V; Reginatto, M; Rollet, S; Rühm, W; Schardt, D; Silari, M; Simmer, G; Weitzenegger, E

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005–2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. A major task of the CONRAD Work Package “complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces” was to organise a benchmark exercise in a workplace field at a high-energy particle accelerator where neutrons are the dominant radiation component. The CONRAD benchmark exercise took place at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in July 2006. In this paper, the results of the spectrometry using four extended -range Bonner sphere spectrometers of four different institutes are reported. Outside Cave A the neutron spectra were measured with three spectrometers at six selected positions and ambient dose equivalent values were derived for use in the intercomparison with other area monitors and dosemeters. At a common position all three spectrometers were used to allow a direct comparison of their results which acts as an int...

  4. Semiconductor High-Energy Radiation Scintillation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kastalsky, A; Spivak, B

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation produces electron-hole pairs in a direct-gap semiconductor material that subsequently recombine producing infrared light to be registered by a photo-detector. The key issue is how to make the semiconductor essentially transparent to its own infrared light, so that photons generated deep inside the semiconductor could reach its surface without tangible attenuation. We discuss two ways to accomplish this, one based on doping the semiconductor with shallow impurities of one polarity type, preferably donors, the other by heterostructure bandgap engineering. The proposed semiconductor scintillator combines the best properties of currently existing radiation detectors and can be used for both simple radiation monitoring, like a Geiger counter, and for high-resolution spectrography of the high-energy radiation. The most important advantage of the proposed detector is its fast response time, about 1 ns, essentially limited only by the recombi...

  5. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic

  6. High-energy radiation from old pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,we study nonthermal high energy radiation from old rotation-powered pulsars with ages greater than 106 yr based on the revised outer gap model.In this model,the inclination angle and geometry of the magnetic field have been taken into account,and the fractional size f of the outer gap is determined by the electron/positron pair production process.The cascade process caused by the back-flowing particles moving from the outer gap to the star will produce the observed nonthermal X-ray emission,and the relativistic particles accelerated in the outer gap will produce gamma-rays via curvature radiation.For nine old pulsars which have been detected to have nonthermal X-rays,we first use the observed nonthermal X-ray emission to estimate reasonable inclination angles,and then estimate their gamma-ray emissions.We also study the possibilities of gamma-ray emissions from other old rotation-powered pulsars.We compare our predicted gamma-ray flux with the sensitivities of AGILE and Fermi.

  7. Is the electron radiation length constant at high energies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, H D; Uggerhøj, U I; Biino, C; Ballestrero, S; Mangiarotti, A; Sona, P; Ketel, T J; Vilakazi, Z Z

    2003-07-04

    Experimental results for the radiative energy loss of 149, 207, and 287 GeV electrons in a thin Ir target are presented. From the data we conclude that at high energies the radiation length increases in accordance with the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) theory and thus electrons become more penetrating the higher the energy. The increase of the radiation length as a result of the LPM effect has a significant impact on the behavior of high-energy electromagnetic showers.

  8. The High Energy Radiation Pattern from BFKLex

    CERN Document Server

    Chachamis, G

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a recent study on high-energy jet production in the multi-Regge limit done with the use of the Monte Carlo event generator BFKLex which includes collinear improvements in the form of double-log contributions. We will show results for the average transverse momentum and azimuthal angle of the final state jets when at least one of them is very forward in rapidity and another one is very backward. We also discuss the introduction of a new observable which accounts for the average rapidity ratio among subsequent emissions.

  9. Radiative Corrections to High Energy Lepton Bremsstrahlung on Heavy Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, A B

    2008-01-01

    One-loop radiative corrections to the leptonic tensor in high energy bremsstrahlung on heavy nuclei are calculated. Virtual and real photon radiation is taken into account. Double bremsstrahlung is simulated by means of Monte Carlo. Numerical results are presented for the case of muon bremsstrahlung in conditions of the COMPASS experiment at CERN.

  10. Compilation of radiation damage test data part III: materials used around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Beynel, P; Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1982-01-01

    For pt.II see CERN report 79-08 (1979). This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins.

  11. Operational radiation protection in high-energy physics accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokni, S H; Fassò, A; Liu, J C

    2009-11-01

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  12. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ULTRASHORT HIGH-ENERGY RADIATION AND MATTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A J

    2004-01-15

    The workshop is intended as a forum to discuss the latest experimental, theoretical and computational results related to the interaction of high energy radiation with matter. High energy is intended to mean soft x-ray and beyond, but important new results from visible systems will be incorporated. The workshop will be interdisciplinary amongst scientists from many fields, including: plasma physics; x-ray physics and optics; solid state physics and material science; biology ; quantum optics. Topics will include, among other subjects: understanding damage thresholds for x-ray interactions with matter developing {approx} 5 keV x-ray sources to investigate damage; developing {approx} 100 keV Thomsom sources for material studies; developing short pulse (100 fs and less) x-ray diagnostics; developing novel X-ray optics; and developing models for the response of biological samples to ultra intense, sub ps x-rays high-energy radiation.

  13. High-energy radiation from thunderstorms and lightning with LOFT

    CERN Document Server

    Marisaldi, M; Brandt, S; Briggs, M S; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Campana, R; Carlson, B E; Celestin, S; Connaughton, V; Cummer, S A; Dwyer, J R; Fishman, G J; Fullekrug, M; Fuschino, F; Gjesteland, T; Neubert, T; Østgaard, N; Tavani, M

    2015-01-01

    This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of high-energy radiation from thunderstorms and lightning. For a summary, we refer to the paper.

  14. Counting Extra Dimensions Magnetic Cherenkov Radiation from High Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Domokos, Gabor K; Kövesi-Domokos, S; Erdas, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    In theories which require a space of dimension d > 4, there is a natural mechanism of suppressing neutrino masses: while Standard Model fields are confined to a 3-brane, right handed neutrinos live in the bulk. Due to Kaluza-Klein excitations, the effective magnetic moments of neutrinos are enhanced. The effective magnetic moment is a monotonically growing function of the energy of the neutrino: consequently, high energy neutrinos can emit observable amounts of magnetic Cherenkov radiation. By observing the energy dependence of the magnetic Cherenkov radiation, one may be able to determine the number of compactified dimensions.

  15. Dosimetry in radiation fields around high-energy proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; Silari, M; Theis, C

    2008-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry at high-energy proton accelerators is a difficult task because of the complexity of the stray radiation field. A good knowledge of this mixed radiation field is very important to be able to select the type of detectors (active and/or passive) to be employed for routine area monitoring and to choose the personal dosimeter legally required for estimating the effective dose received by individuals. At the same time, the response function of the detectors to the mixed field must be thoroughly understood. A proper calibration of a device, which may involve a complex series of measurements in various reference fields, is needed. Monte Carlo simulations provide a complementary – and sometimes the principal – mean of determining the response function. The ambient dose equivalent rates during operation range from a few hundreds of μSv per year to a few mSv per year. To measure such rates one needs detectors of high sensitivity and/or capable of integrating over long periods. The main challenge...

  16. Beam Comissioning of the PEP-II High Energy Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wienands, U.; Anderson, S.; Assmann, R.; Bharadwaj, V.; Cai, Y.; Clendenin, J.; Corredoura, P.; Decker, F.J.; Donald, M.; Ecklund, S.; Emma, P.; Erickson, R.; Fox, J.; Fieguth, T.; Fisher, A.; Heifets,, S.; Hill, A.; Himel, T.; Iverson, R.; Johnson, R.; Judkins, J.; Krejcik, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lee, M.; Mattison, T.; Minty, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Phinney, N.; Placidi, M.; Prabhakar, S.; Ross, M.; Smith, S.; Schwarz, H.; Stanek, M.; Teytelman, D.; Traller, R.; Turner, J.; Zimmermann, F.; Barry, W.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Corlett, J.; Decking, W.; Furman, M.; Nishimura, H.; Portmann, G.; Rimmer, R.; Zholents, A.; Zisman, M.; Kozanecki, W.; Hofmann, A.; Zotter, B.; Steier, C.; Bialowons, W.; Lomperski, M.; Lumpkin, A.; Reichel, I.; Safranek, J.; Smith, V.; Tighe, R.; Sullivan, M.; Byrd, J.; Li, D.

    1998-11-12

    The PEP-II High Energy Ring (HER), a 9 GeV electron storage ring, has been in commissioning since spring 1997. Initial beam commissioning activities focused on systems checkout and commissioning and on determining the behavior of the machine systems at high beam currents. This phase culminated with the accumulation of 0.75 A of stored beam-sufficient to achieve design luminosity--in January 1998 after 3.5 months of beam time. Collisions with the 3 GeV positron beam of the Low Energy Ring (LER) were achieved in Summer of 1998. At high beam currents, collective instabilities have been seen. Since then, commissioning activities for the HER have shifted in focus towards characterization of the machine and a rigorous program to understand the machine and the beam dynamics is presently underway.

  17. Accelerated Hematopoietic Toxicity by High Energy 56Fe Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Trani, Daniela; Doiron, Kathryn; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Kallakury, Bhaskar V. S.; Kolesnick, Richard; Cole, Michael F.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There is little information on the relative toxicity of highly charged (Z) high-energy (HZE) radiation in animal models compared to γ or x-rays, and the general assumption based on in vitro studies has been that acute toxicity is substantially greater. Methods C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 56Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon), and acute (within 30 d) toxicity compared to that of γ rays or protons (1 GeV). To assess relative hematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicity, the effects of 56Fe ions were compared to γ rays using complete blood count (CBC), bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage colony forming unit (GM-CFU), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis in bone marrow, and intestinal crypt survival. Results Although onset was more rapid, 56Fe ions were only slightly more toxic than γ rays or protons with lethal dose (LD)50/30 (a radiation dose at which 50% lethality occurs at 30-day) values of 5.8, 7.25, and 6.8 Gy respectively with relative biologic effectiveness for 56Fe ions of 1.25 and 1.06 for protons. Conclusions 56Fe radiation caused accelerated and more severe hematopoietic toxicity. Early mortality correlated with more profound leukopenia and subsequent sepsis. Results indicate that there is selective enhanced toxicity to bone marrow progenitor cells, which are typically resistant to γ rays, and bone marrow stem cells, because intestinal crypt cells did not show increased HZE toxicity. PMID:22077279

  18. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T K; Colgate, S; Li, H; Bulmer, R H; Pino, J

    2011-03-08

    We show that accretion disks around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) could account for the enormous power in observed ultra high energy cosmic rays {approx}10{sup 20} eV (UHEs). In our model, cosmic rays are produced by quasi-steady acceleration of ions in magnetic structures previously proposed to explain jets around Active Galactic Nuclei with supermassive black holes. Steady acceleration requires that an AGN accretion disk act as a dynamo, which we show to follow from a modified Standard Model in which the magnetic torque of the dynamo replaces viscosity as the dominant mechanism accounting for angular momentum conservation during accretion. A black hole of mass M{sub BH} produces a steady dynamo voltage V {proportional_to} {radical}M{sub BH} giving V {approx} 10{sup 20} volts for M{sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8} solar masses. The voltage V reappears as an inductive electric field at the advancing nose of a dynamo-driven jet, where plasma instability inherent in collisionless runaway acceleration allows ions to be steadily accelerated to energies {approx} V, finally ejected as cosmic rays. Transient events can produce much higher energies. The predicted disk radiation is similar to the Standard Model. Unique predictions concern the remarkable collimation of jets and emissions from the jet/radiolobe structure. Given MBH and the accretion rate, the model makes 7 predictions roughly consistent with data: (1) the jet length; (2) the jet radius; (3) the steady-state cosmic ray energy spectrum; (4) the maximum energy in this spectrum; (5) the UHE cosmic ray intensity on Earth; (6) electron synchrotron wavelengths; and (7) the power in synchrotron radiation. These qualitative successes motivate new computer simulations, experiments and data analysis to provide a quantitative verification of the model.

  19. Phoswich scintillator for proton and gamma radiation of high energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tengblad, O.; Borge, M. J. G.; Briz, J. A.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Cruz, C.; Gugliermina, V.; Nacher, E.; Perea, A.; Sanchez del Rio, J.; Nieves, M. Turrion [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Nilsson, T.; Johansson, H. T.; Bergstroem, J.; Blomberg, E.; Buelling, A.; Gallneby, E.; Hagdahl, J.; Jansson, L.; Jareteg, K.; Masgren, R. [Department of fundamental Physics, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); and others

    2011-11-30

    We present here a Phoswich scintillator design to achieve both high resolution gamma ray detection, and good efficiency for high energy protons. There are recent developments of new high resolution scintillator materials. Especially the LaBr3(Ce) and LaCl3(Ce) crystals have very good energy resolution in the order of 3% for 662 keV gamma radiation. In addition, these materials exhibit a very good light output (63 and 32 photons/keV respectively).A demonstrator detector in the form of an Al cylinder of 24 mm diameter and a total length of 80 mm with 2 mm wall thickness, containing a LaBr3(Ce) crystal of 20 mm diameter and 30 mm length directly coupled to a LaCl3(Ce) crystal of 50 mm length, and closed with a glass window of 5 mm, was delivered by Saint Gobain. To the glass window a Hamamatsu R5380 Photomultiplier tube (PMT) was coupled using silicon optical grease.

  20. Novel epoxy formulations for high energy radiation curable composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaro, G.; Calderaro, E.; Tomarchio, E.; Dispenza, C.

    2005-03-01

    It has been widely recognised that high energy radiation can be effectively applied to the cure of epoxy resins in applications as composite matrices or structural adhesives with improvements in product quality and/or reduction in production costs. In the presence of suitable initiators, polymerisation of epoxies occurs via cationic mechanism, thus restricting the choice of the resin system components to species which do not contain electron donor groups. The present investigation is aimed to identify suitable co-monomers to be formulated with an epoxy resin, resulting in different cure reaction kinetics and application properties of the cured resin. In particular, four different anhydride types, three dicarboxylic and one tetracarboxylic, have been formulated at the same weight ratio with a diglydilether of bisphenol F and a photo-initiator. Resin samples, irradiated at different integrated doses, have been characterised with solubility tests, dynamic-mechanical thermal analysis and three point flexural tests, showing a response which is strongly affected by the specific chemical structure of the anhydride co-monomer. Post-irradiation thermal treatments carried out on samples irradiated at the lower dose suggest different reaction patterns, with different controlling factors depending on the activation mechanism (temperature or γ-rays).

  1. Galactic black hole binaries: High-energy radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, J. E.; Grindlay, J. E.; Harmon, B. A.; Hua, X.-M.; Kazanas, D.; McConnell, M.

    1997-05-01

    Observations of galactic black hole candidates made by the instruments aboard the Compton GRO in the hard X-ray and γ-ray bands have significantly enhanced our knowledge of the phenomenology of the emission from these objects. Understanding these observations presents a formidable challenge to theoretical models of the accretion flow onto the compact object and of the physical mechanisms that generate high-energy radiation. Here we summarize the current state of observations and theoretical interpretation of the emission from black hole candidates above 20 keV. The all-sky monitoring capability of BATSE allows, for the first time, nearly continuous studies of the high-energy emission from more than a dosen black hole candidates. These long-term datasets are particularly well-suited to multi-wavelength comparison studies, from the radio upward in frequency (Zhang et al. 1997a, these proceedings). Energy spectral evolution and/or spectral state transitions have been observed from many of the black hole candidates. Moderately deep searches of the galactic plane suggest a deficit of weak γ-ray transients. Such population studies have implications for the origin of black hole binaries and the nature of accretion events. Observations above 50 keV from OSSE demonstrate that in the γ-ray band there exist two spectral states that appear to be the extensions of the X-ray low (hard) and high (soft), or perhaps very high, states. The former state cuts off with e-folding energy ~100 keV and has its peak luminosity near this energy; thus substantial corrections need to be made to historical estimates of the bolometric luminosity of black holes in the ``low'' state. In contrast, in the X-ray high (soft) state, the luminosity peaks in the soft X-rays and the spectrum extends with an unbroken power law, even up to energies above 500 keV in some cases. COMPTEL has detected emission above 750 keV from Cyg X-1 and the transient GRO J0422+32. In both cases the data suggest that an

  2. Influence of Heat-radiating on Multi-photon Compton Scattering High-energy Electron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; WANG Xin-min

    2007-01-01

    Using the model of the inverse Compton scattering between high-energy electrons and heat-radiation photons, the influence of heat-radiating photons on multi-photon Compton scattering high-energy electrons is studied . The results show that the energy loss, power loss, light resistance and light pressure of the high-energy electron formed by heat radiating are all proportional to the temperature T4 of the vacuum cavity of the electron,the Lorentz factor γ2 of the high-energy electrons, the scattering section of the electron and the number of photons acting at the same time with high-energy electrons. A good method for lessening the energy loss of the high-energy electron by using the one-photon Compton scattering between high-energy electrons and heat radiation photons is proposed.

  3. Secondary radiation dose during high-energy total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, M.; Raczkowski, M. [Lower Silesian Oncology Center, Medical Physics Department, Wroclaw (Poland); Polaczek-Grelik, K. [University of Silesia, Medical Physics Department, Katowice (Poland); Szafron, B.; Konefal, A.; Zipper, W. [University of Silesia, Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Katowice (Poland)

    2014-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the additional dose from secondary neutrons and γ-rays generated during total body irradiation (TBI) using a medical linac X-ray beam. Nuclear reactions that occur in the accelerator construction during emission of high-energy beams in teleradiotherapy are the source of secondary radiation. Induced activity is dependent on the half-lives of the generated radionuclides, whereas neutron flux accompanies the treatment process only. The TBI procedure using a 18 MV beam (Clinac 2100) was considered. Lateral and anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior fractions were investigated during delivery of 2 Gy of therapeutic dose. Neutron and photon flux densities were measured using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and semiconductor spectrometry. The secondary dose was estimated applying the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. The main contribution to the secondary dose is associated with fast neutrons. The main sources of γ-radiation are the following: {sup 56}Mn in the stainless steel and {sup 187}W of the collimation system as well as positron emitters, activated via (n,γ) and (γ,n) processes, respectively. In addition to 12 Gy of therapeutic dose, the patient could receive 57.43 mSv in the studied conditions, including 4.63 μSv from activated radionuclides. Neutron dose is mainly influenced by the time of beam emission. However, it is moderated by long source-surface distances (SSD) and application of plexiglass plates covering the patient body during treatment. Secondary radiation gives the whole body a dose, which should be taken into consideration especially when one fraction of irradiation does not cover the whole body at once. (orig.) [German] Die zusaetzliche Dosis durch sekundaere Neutronen- und γ-Strahlung waehrend der Ganzkoerperbestrahlung mit Roentgenstrahlung aus medizinischen Linearbeschleunigern wurde abgeschaetzt. Bei der Emission hochenergetischer Strahlen zur Teletherapie finden hauptsaechlich im Beschleuniger

  4. A comparison of the radio data and model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation. I - The high energy electron distribution in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. II - East-west asymmetry in the radiation belts as a function of Jovian longitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pater, I.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison has been made between detailed model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation and the radio data at wavelengths of 6, 21, and 50 cm. The calculations were performed for a Jovian longitude of 200 deg and were based on the multipole field configurations as derived from the Pioneer data. The electron distribution in the inner magnetosphere was derived as a function of energy, pitch angle, and spatial coordinates. In addition, the hot region or east-west asymmetry in the radiation belts is investigated. It is suggested that this asymmetry is due to the combined effect of an overabundance of electrons at jovicentric longitudes of 240-360 deg and the existence of a dusk-to-dawn directed electric field over the inner magnetosphere generated by the wind system in the upper atmosphere.

  5. Radiation Shielding at High-Energy Electron and Proton Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Cossairt, J.Donald; /Fermilab; Liu, James C.; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The goal of accelerator shielding design is to protect the workers, general public, and the environment against unnecessary prompt radiation from accelerator operations. Additionally, shielding at accelerators may also be used to reduce the unwanted background in experimental detectors, to protect equipment against radiation damage, and to protect workers from potential exposure to the induced radioactivity in the machine components. The shielding design for prompt radiation hazards is the main subject of this chapter.

  6. Radiative Corrections to $W$ Pair Production at High Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Anlauf, H; Himmler, A; Manakos, P; Mannel, T

    1993-01-01

    Radiative Corrections to $W$ Pair Production and effects of finite width of the $W$ bosons are studied using the Monte Carlo {\\tt WOPPER}. As an example the influence of QED radiative corrections on the reconstruction of the $W$ helicities at LEP 200 and a future 500 GeV $e^+ e^-$ collider is discussed.

  7. High Energy/LET Radiation EEE Parts Certification Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    Certifying electronic components is a very involved process. It includes pre-coordination with the radiation test facility for time, schedule and cost, as well as intimate work with designers to develop test procedures and hardware. It also involves work with radiation engineers to understand the effects of the radiation field on the test article/setup as well as the analysis and production of a test report. The technical content of traditional ionizing radiation testing protocol is in wide use and generally follows established standards (ref. Appendix C). This document is not intended to cover all these areas but to cover the methodology of using Variable Depth Bragg Peak (VDBP) to accomplish the goal of characterizing an electronic component. The Variable Depth Bragg Peak (VDBP) test method is primarily used for deep space applications of electronics. However, it can be used on any part for any radiation environment, especially those parts where the sensitive volume cannot be reached by the radiation beam. An example of this problem would be issues that arise in de-lidding of parts or in parts with flip-chip designs, etc. The VDBP method is ideally suited to test modern avionics designs which increasingly incorporate commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts and units. Johnson Space Center (JSC) developed software provides assistance to users in developing the radiation characterization data from the raw test data.

  8. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.; Seaton, Michael; Todorov, Ilian; Nordlund, Kai; Dove, Martin T.; Trachenko, Kostya

    2014-02-28

    Zirconia has been viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and was consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as a nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with the account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely disjoint from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  9. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarkadoula, Evangelia [Queen Mary, University of London; Devanathan, Ram [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Weber, William J [ORNL; Seaton, M [Daresbury Laboratory, UK; Todorov, I T [Daresbury Laboratory, UK; Nordlund, Kai [University of Helsinki; Dove, Martin T [Queen Mary, University of London; Trachenko, Kostya [Queen Mary, University of London

    2014-01-01

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We nd that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  10. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: Modeling results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarkadoula, E., E-mail: zarkadoulae@ornl.gov [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); SEPnet, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Devanathan, R. [Nuclear Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Weber, W. J. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Scientific Computing Department, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Nordlund, K. [University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Dove, M. T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Trachenko, K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); SEPnet, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-28

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1–0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution, and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  11. Separated high-energy electron beams using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Farley, F J M; Picasso, Emilio

    1972-01-01

    Electrons with kinetic energy in the 100 GeV range may be separated from other particles by using their energy-loss due to synchrotron radiation in a high-field magnet. In this paper the associated fluctuations in energy and angle are shown to be small enough for the method to be useful. Detailed design formulae are presented for several magnet configurations. (7 refs).

  12. Structural Analysis of Semiconducting Polymers Exposed to High Energy Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Vaselabadi, Saeed; Mahadevapuram, Nikhila; Shakarisaz, David; Strzalka, Joseph; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Stein, Gila

    2015-03-01

    Semicrystalline polymers are used in low-cost electronics such as solar cells, thin film transistors, and light-emitting diodes. Their optoelectronic performance in these devices is partly dictated by molecular ordering and nanoscale structure, where the latter is particularly difficult to control. We used atom-beam radiation to crosslink the polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) into nanoscale and microscale patterns. Ionizing radiation sources generate intermolecular cross-links that render the polymer insoluble in organic solvents. Grazing-incidence Wide-angle X-ray Scattering (GIWAXS) was used to investigate the effects of irradiation on molecular ordering of poly(3-hexylthiophene). We found that crosslinking will disrupt intermolecular ordering (reduce crystallinity and crystalline grain sizes). We also found that X-ray exposure during the WAXS measurements can induce the crosslinking through a similar mechanism, and we propose a simple method to test for the damage caused by these measurements. As an example, we find that poly (3-hexylthiophene) has measurable cross-links after 20 sec exposure to 7.35 keV radiation with flux of 1 *1011 photons/sec at an incident angle of 0.5° .

  13. Models for High-Energy Radiation from Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. E. Romero; M. M. Reynoso

    2011-03-01

    We discuss on the modelling of blazar jets as emitters of multiwavelength radiation with the implementation of a lepto-hadronic treatment. Assuming that injection of non-thermal electrons and protons can take place at the base of the jet, the stationary particle distributions can be found using an inhomogeneous one-dimensional transport equation with cooling and convection. The goal of this approach is to replace the widely used one-zone purely leptonic approximation by a more realistic model. We argue that the rapid variability observed in emission from blazars can be obtained as a result of interaction of the jet with obstacles, i.e., molecular clouds and stars. Long term variability is likely related to changes in the injection and physical conditions in the acceleration region.

  14. Interaction of Repetitively Pulsed High Energy Laser Radiation With Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, Manfred

    1986-10-01

    The paper is concerned with laser target interaction processes involving new methods of improving the overall energy balance. As expected theoretically, this can be achieved with high repetition rate pulsed lasers even for initially highly reflecting materials, such as metals. Experiments were performed by using a pulsed CO2 laser at mean powers up to 2 kW and repetition rates up to 100 Hz. The rates of temperature rise of aluminium for example were thereby increased by lore than a factor of 3 as compared to cw-radiation of comparable power density. Similar improvements were found for the overall absorptivities that were increased by this method by more than an order of magnitude.

  15. Radiation Fields in High Energy Accelerators and their impact on Single Event Effects

    CERN Document Server

    García Alía, Rubén; Wrobel, Frédéric; Brugger, Markus

    Including calculation models and measurements for a variety of electronic components and their concerned radiation environments, this thesis describes the complex radiation field present in the surrounding of a high-energy hadron accelerator and assesses the risks related to it in terms of Single Event Effects (SEE). It is shown that this poses not only a serious threat to the respective operation of modern accelerators but also highlights the impact on other high-energy radiation environments such as those for ground and avionics applications. Different LHC-like radiation environments are described in terms of their hadron composition and energy spectra. They are compared with other environments relevant for electronic component operation such as the ground-level, avionics or proton belt. The main characteristic of the high-energy accelerator radiation field is its mixed nature, both in terms of hadron types and energy interval. The threat to electronics ranges from neutrons of thermal energies to GeV hadron...

  16. Transition radiation at radio frequencies from ultra-high energy neutrino-induced showers

    CERN Document Server

    Motloch, Pavel; Privitera, Paolo; Zas, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Coherent radiation at radio frequencies from high-energy showers fully contained in a dense radio-transparent medium - like ice, salt or regolith - has been extensively investigated as a promising technique to search for ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos. Additional emission in the form of transition radiation may occur when a neutrino-induced shower produced close to the Earth surface emerges from the ground into atmospheric air. We present the first detailed evaluation of transition radiation from high-energy showers crossing the boundary between two different media. We found that transition radiation is sizable over a wide solid angle and coherent up to $\\sim$ 1 GHz. These properties encourage further work to evaluate the potential of a large-aperture UHE neutrino experiment based on detection of transition radiation.

  17. Field calibration studies for ionisation chambers in mixed high-energy radiation fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, C; Forkel-Wirth, D; Fuerstner, M; Mayer, S; Otto, Th; Roesler, S; Vincke, H

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of ambient doses at work places around high-energy accelerators is a challenging task due the complexity of the mixed stray radiation fields encountered. At CERN, mainly Centronics IG5 high-pressure ionisation chambers are used to monitor radiation exposure in mixed fields. The monitors are calibrated in the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent H*(10) using standard, source-generated photon- and neutron fields. However, the relationship between ionisation chamber reading and ambient dose equivalent in a mixed high-energy radiation field can only be assessed if the spectral response to every component and the field composition is known. Therefore, comprehensive studies were performed at the CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility where the spectral fluence for each particle type has been assessed with Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, studies have been performed in an accessible controlled radiation area in the vicinity of a beam loss point of CERN's proton synchrotron. The comparison of measurements and calculations has shown reasonable agreement for most exposure conditions. The results indicate that conventionally calibrated ionisation chambers can give satisfactory response in terms of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields at high-energy accelerators in many cases. These studies are one step towards establishing a method of 'field calibration' of radiation protection instruments in which Monte Carlo simulations will be used to establish a correct correlation between the response of specific detectors to a given high-energy radiation field.

  18. Complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bilski, P; D'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2006-01-01

    This report outlines the research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterization of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators and the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities under the auspices of the COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry (CONRAD) project funded by the European Commission.

  19. Amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors for dosimetry of high-energy ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O.I. [Institute of Materials, Lviv (Ukraine). Dept. of New Perspective Developments

    1995-10-01

    The possible application of amorphous chalogenide semiconductors as radiation-sensitive elements of high-energy (E>1 MeV) dosimetry systems are analyzed. It is shown that some of these materials are characterized by a broader region of absorbed doses and low-temperature thresholds of radiation induced bleaching than conventional colouring oxide glasses. (author).

  20. High energy radiation from black holes gamma rays, cosmic rays, and neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Bright gamma-ray flares observed from sources far beyond our Milky Way Galaxy are best explained if enormous amounts of energy are liberated by black holes. The highest- energy particles in nature--the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays--cannot be confined by the Milky Way's magnetic field, and must originate from sources outside our Galaxy. Understanding these energetic radiations requires an extensive theoretical framework involving the radiation physics and strong-field gravity of black holes. In High Energy Radiation from Black Holes, Charles Dermer and Govind Menon present a systemat

  1. Dose equivalent measurements in mixed and time varying radiation fields around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields behind the shielding of high-energy accelerators are a challenging task. Several radiation components (photons, neutrons, charged particles, muons, etc.), spanning a wide range of energies, contribute to the total dose equivalent. The radiation fields are produced by beam losses interacting with structural material during the acceleration or at the ejection to experimental areas or other accelerators. The particle beam is usually not continuous but separated in "bunches" or pulses, which further complicates dose measurements at high-energy accelerators. An ideal dosimeter for operational radiation protection should measure dose equivalent for any composition of radiation components in the entire energy range even when the field is strongly pulsed. The objective of this work was to find out if an ionisation chamber operated as a "recombination chamber" and a TEPC instrument using the variance-covariance method ("Sievert Instrument") are capable ...

  2. Dose equivalent measurements in mixed and time varying radiation fields around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields behind the shielding of high-energy accelerators are a challenging task. Several radiation components (photons, neutrons, charged particles, muons, etc.), spanning a wide range of energies, contribute to the total dose equivalent. The radiation fields are produced by beam losses interacting with structural material during the acceleration or at the ejection to experimental areas or other accelerators. The particle beam is usually not continuous but separated in "bunches" or pulses, which further complicates dose measurements at high-energy accelerators. An ideal dosimeter for operational radiation protection should measure dose equivalent for any composition of radiation components in the entire energy range even when the field is strongly pulsed. The objective of this work was to find out if an ionisation chamber operated as a "recombination chamber" and a TEPC instrument using the variance-covariance method ("Sievert Instrument") are capable ...

  3. Gravitational Radiation from Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays in Models with Large Extra Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, B; Bleicher, M; Koch, Ben; Drescher, Hans-Joachim; Bleicher, Marcus

    2006-01-01

    The effects of classical gravitational radiation in models with large extra dimensions are investigated for ultra high energy cosmic rays (CRs). The cross sections are implemented into a simulation package (SENECA) for high energy hadron induced CR air showers. We predict that gravitational radiation from quasi-elastic scattering could be observed at incident CR energies above $10^9$ GeV for a setting with more than two extra dimensions. It is further shown that this gravitational energy loss can alter the energy reconstruction for CR energies $E_{\\rm CR}\\ge 5\\cdot 10^9$ GeV.

  4. Radiation-hard silicon photonics for high energy physics and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics (SiPh) is currently being investigated as a promising technology for future radiation hard optical links. The possibility of integrating SiPh devices with electronics and/or silicon particle sensors as well as an expected very high resistance against radiation damage make this technology particularly interesting for potential use close to the interaction points in future in high energy physics experiments and other radiation-sensitive applications. The presentation will summarize the outcomes of the research on radiation hard SiPh conducted within the ICE-DIP projected.

  5. Evaluation of highly ionizing components in high-energy nucleon radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Khan, Ferdous

    1989-01-01

    The data and models for nuclear fragment recoil distribution produced by high-energy nuclear events in tissue are reviewed. Results for linear energy transfer distributions in soft tissue are derived, and a simple model is developed for use in radiation studies and risk estimates.

  6. Study on radiation damage to high energy accelerator components by irradiation in a nuclear reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, Helmut; Casta, J; Van de Voorde, M H

    1975-01-01

    The structural and other components used in high energy accelerators are continuously exposed to a wide spectrum of high energy particles and electromagnetic radiation. The resulting radiation damage may severely influence the functional capability of accelerator facilities. In order to arrive at an estimate of the service life of various materials in the radiation field, simulating experiments have to be carried out in a nuclear reactor. A large number of organic and inorganic materials, electronic components, metals, etc., intended specifically for use in 400 GeV proton synchrotron of CERN near Geneva, were irradiated in the ASTRA reactor in Seibersdorf near Vienna. The paper reports on the irradiation facilities available in this reactor for this purpose, on the dosimetry methods used, on the most important materials irradiated and on the results obtained in these experiments. (14 refs).

  7. Operational radiation protection in high-energy physics accelerators: implementation of ALARA in design and operation of accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassò, A; Rokni, S

    2009-11-01

    This paper considers the historical evolution of the concept of optimisation of radiation exposures, as commonly expressed by the acronym ALARA, and discusses its application to various aspects of radiation protection at high-energy accelerators.

  8. Study of Radiation Damage in Lead Tungstate Crystals Using Intense High Energy Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Batarin, V; Butler, J; Cheung, H; Datsko, V S; Davidenko, A; Derevshchikov, A A; Dzhelyadin, R I; Fomin, Y; Frolov, V; Goncharenko, Yu M; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Khroustalev, K; Konoplyannikov, A K; Konstantinov, A S; Kravtsov, V; Kubota, Y; Leontiev, V M; Lukanin, V S; Maisheev, V; Matulenko, Yu A; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Mikhalin, N; Minaev, N G; Mochalov, V; Morozov, D A; Mountain, R; Nogach, L V; Pikalov, V A; Ryazantsev, A; Semenov, P A; Shestermanov, K E; Soloviev, L; Solovyanov, V L; Stone, S; Ukhanov, M N; Uzunian, A V; Vasilev, A; Yakutin, A; Yarba, J V

    2003-01-01

    We report on the effects of radiation on the light output of lead tungstate crystals. The crystals were irradiated by pure, intense high energy electron and hadron beams as well as by a mixture of hadrons, neutrons and gammas. The crystals were manufactured in Bogoroditsk, Apatity (both Russia), and Shanghai (China). These studies were carried out at the 70-GeV proton accelerator in Protvino.

  9. Study of radiation damage in lead tungstate crystals using intense high-energy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batarin, V.A.; Brennan, T.; Butler, J.; Cheung, H.; Datsko, V.S.; Davidenko, A.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Dzhelyadin, R.I.; Fomin, Y.V.; Frolov, V.; Goncharenko, Y.M.; Grishin, V.N.; Kachanov, V.A.; Khodyrev, V.Y.; Khroustalev, K.; Konoplyannikov, A.K.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kubota, Y.; Leontiev, V.M.; Lukanin, V.S.; Maisheev, V.A.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Melnick, Y.M.; Meschanin, A.P.; Mikhalin, N.E.; Minaev, N.G.; Mochalov, V.V.; Morozov, D.A.; Mountain, R.; Nogach, L.V.; Pikalov, V.A.; Ryazantsev, A.V.; Semenov, P.A. E-mail: semenov@mx.ihep.su; Shestermanov, K.E.; Soloviev, L.F.; Solovianov, V.L.; Stone, S.; Ukhanov, M.N.; Uzunian, A.V.; Vasiliev, A.N.; Yakutin, A.E.; Yarba, J

    2003-10-21

    We report on the effects of radiation on the light output of lead tungstate crystals. The crystals were irradiated by pure, intense high-energy electron and hadron beams as well as by a mixture of hadrons, neutrons and gammas. The crystals were manufactured in Bogoroditsk, Apatity (both Russia), and Shanghai (China). These studies were carried out at the 70-GeV proton accelerator in Protvino.

  10. Final Design And Manufacturing of the PEP II High Energy Ring Arc Bellows Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, Nadine R.; Kulikov, Artem; /SLAC; Corlett, John; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-09-01

    A novel RF shield bellows module developed at SLAC has been successfully manufactured and installed in the PEP-II High Energy Ring (HER). Tests indicate that the module meets its performance and operational requirements. The primary function of the bellows module is to allow for thermal expansion of the chambers and for lateral, longitudinal and angular offsets due to tolerances and alignment, while providing RF continuity between adjoining chambers. An update on the Arc bellows module for the PEP-II High Energy Ring is presented. Final design, manufacturing issues, material and coating selection, and tribological and RF testing are discussed. Performance and operational requirements are also reviewed. The RF shield design has been proven during assembly to allow for large manufacturing tolerances without reducing the mechanical spring force below required values. In addition, the RF shield maintains electrical contact even with large misalignments across the module.

  11. Effects of high-energy-pulse-electron beam radiation on biomacromolecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To study the molecular mechanism of high mutation frequency induced by high-energy-pulse-electron (HEPE) beam radiation, the effects of HEPE radiation on yeast cells, plasma membrane, plasmid DNA, and protein activity were investigated by means of cell counting, gel electrophoresis, AO/EB double fluorescent staining, etc. The results showed that the viability of yeast cells declined statistically with increase of absorbed doses. The half lethal dose (LD50) was 134 Gy. HEPE beam radiation had little influence on the function of plasma membrane and protein, while it could induce much DNA damage of single strand breaks (SSB) and double strand breaks (DSB) that were required for gene mutation. The G-value for DSB formation of HEPE beam radiation in aqueous solution was 5.7 times higher than that caused by 60Co gamma rays. HEPE can be a new effective method for induced mutation breeding and deserves further research in the future.

  12. Radiation hygienization of cattle and swine slurry with high energy electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Krzysztof; Olszewska, Halina; Paluszak, Zbigniew; Zimek, Zbigniew; Kałuska, Iwona; Skowron, Karolina Jadwiga

    2013-06-01

    The research was carried out to assess the efficiency of radiation hygienization of cattle and swine slurry of different density using the high energy electron beam based on the inactivation rate of Salmonella ssp, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp and Ascaris suum eggs. The experiment was conducted with use of the linear electron accelerator Elektronika 10/10 in Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw. The inoculated slurry samples underwent hygienization with high energy electron beam of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 kGy. Numbers of reisolated bacteria were determined according to the MPN method, using typical microbiological media. Theoretical lethal doses, D90 doses and hygienization efficiency of high energy electron beam were determined. The theoretical lethal doses for all tested bacteria ranged from 3.63 to 8.84 kGy and for A. suum eggs from 4.07 to 5.83 kGy. Salmonella rods turned out to be the most sensitive and Enterococcus spp were the most resistant to electron beam hygienization. The effectiveness or radiation hygienization was lower in cattle than in swine slurry and in thick than in thin one. Also the species or even the serotype of bacteria determined the dose needed to inactivation of microorganisms.

  13. A radiation belt monitor for the High Energy Transient Experiment Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, D. H.; Wenzel, K. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prigozhin, G. Y.; Doty, J.; Ricker, G.

    1993-01-01

    A Radiation Belt Monitor (RBM) sensitive to protons and electrons with energy approximately greater than 0.5 MeV has been designed for the High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE) satellite in order to: first, control the on-off configuration of the experiments (i.e. those susceptible to proton damage); and second, to indicate the presence of proton and/or electron events that could masquerade as legitimate high energy photon events. One of the two RBM channels has an enhanced sensitivity to electrons. Each channel of the RBM, based on a PIN silicon diode, requires a typical power of 6 milliwatts. Tests have been performed with protons with energies from approximately 0.1 to 2.5 MeV (generated by a Cockcroft-Walton linear accelerator via the d(d,p)t reaction), and with electrons with energies up to 1 MeV (from a 1.0 microcurie Bi-207 source).

  14. Radiation of high-energy electrons near crystallographic axes and planes of a diamond crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, R.O.; Avakyan, E.O.; Avetisyan, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    The paper is devoted to the experimental study of high-energy electrons interaction with diamond crystals of different thicknesses at small incident angles with respect to crystallographic axes and planes. The effect of the so-called channeling phenomenon on the process of electron radiation in a crystal is studied. Results of the measurements of 4.5. GeV electrons radiation spectra at incident angles approximately O are given. For comparison, we have also presented the spectrum of the radiation on an amorphous target /sup 12/C of similar thickness. Results indicate that the low-energy part of spectra greatly surpass the amorphous spectrum with a pronounced peak structure, with peak widths being noticeably wider in the case of axial channeling than in the planar case. Spectra are measured by a No.I(Tl) total absorption detector. The experiment is performed on the Yerevan electron synchrotron beam with small angular divergence.

  15. SAS-2 observations of the high energy gamma radiation from the Vela region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data from a scan of the galactic plane by the SAS-B high energy gamma ray experiment in the region 250 deg smaller than 12 smaller than 290 deg show a statistically significant excess over the general radiation from the galactic plane for gamma radiation of energy larger than 100 MeV. If the enhanced gamma radiation results from interactions of cosmic rays with galactic matter, as the energy spectrum suggests, it seems reasonable to associate the enhancement with large scale galactic features, such as spiral arm segments in that direction, or with the region surrounding the Vela supernova remnant with which PSR 0833-45 is associated. If the excess is attributed to cosmic rays released from the supernova interacting with the interstellar matter in that region, than on the order of 3 x 10 to the 50th power ergs would have been released by that supernova in the form of cosmic rays.

  16. Radiation tolerant fiber optic humidity sensors for High Energy Physics applications

    CERN Document Server

    Berruti, Gaia Maria; Cusano, Andrea

    This work is devoted to the development of fiber optic humidity sensors to be applied in high-energy physics applications and in particular in experiments currently running at CERN. The high radiation level resulting from the operation of the accelerator at full luminosity can cause serious performance deterioration of the silicon sensors which are responsible for the particle tracking. To increase their lifetime, the sensors must be kept cold at temperatures below 0 C. At such low temperatures, any condensation risk has to be prevented and a precise thermal and hygrometric control of the air filling and surrounding the tracker detector cold volumes is mandatory. The technologies proposed at CERN for relative humidity monitoring are mainly based on capacitive sensing elements which are not designed with radiation resistance characteristic. In this scenario, fiber optic sensors seem to be perfectly suitable. Indeed, the fiber itself, if properly selected, can tolerate a very high level of radiation, optical fi...

  17. Modeling high-energy radiation damage in nuclear and fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trachenko, K., E-mail: k.trachenko@qmul.ac.uk [School of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Zarkadoula, E. [School of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Todorov, I.T. [Computational Science and Engineering Department, CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury WA44AD (United Kingdom); Dove, M.T. [School of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Dunstan, D.J. [School of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Nordlund, K. [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-04-15

    We discuss molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of high-energy radiation damage in materials relevant for encapsulation of nuclear waste and materials to be used in fusion reactors, including several important oxides and iron. We study various stages of evolution and relaxation of 100-200 keV collision cascades, and identify reversible elastic and irreversible inelastic structural changes. The elastic expansion of the lattice around the cascade is explained in terms of anharmonicity of interatomic interactions. The remaining irreversible structural change is related to resistance to amorphization by radiation damage. This resistance is quantified by the number of remaining defect atoms in the damaged structure. We discuss how MD simulations can predict experimental resistance to amorphization, including the important case of highly resistant materials. Finally, we discuss our current work to simulate radiation damage of MeV energies and system sizes of the order of billion atoms using massive parallel computing facilities.

  18. Calibration of the Accuscan II IN Vivo System for High Energy Lung Counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovard R. Perry; David L. Georgeson

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the April 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for high energy lung counting. The source used for the calibration was a NIST traceable lung set manufactured at the University of Cincinnati UCLL43AMEU & UCSL43AMEU containing Am-241 and Eu-152 with energies from 26 keV to 1408 keV. The lung set was used in conjunction with a Realistic Torso phantom. The phantom was placed on the RMC II counting table (with pins removed) between the v-ridges on the backwall of the Accuscan II counter. The top of the detector housing was positioned perpendicular to the junction of the phantom clavicle with the sternum. This position places the approximate center line of the detector housing with the center of the lungs. The energy and efficiency calibrations were performed using a Realistic Torso phantom (Appendix I) and the University of Cincinnati lung set. This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibration including performance verification and validation counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for high energy lung counting and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.

  19. Apolipoprotein E expression and behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nelson, G.A.; Slater, J.M.; Pearlstein, R.D. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States). Medical Center; Vazquez, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Laskowitz, D.T. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center

    2002-12-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a lipid binding protein that plays an important role in tissue repair following brain injury. In the present studies, we have investigated whether apoE affects the behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation. Sixteen male apoE knockout (KO) mice and sixteen genetically matched wild-type (WT) C57BL mice were used in this experiment. Half of the KO and half of the WT animals were irradiated with 600 MeV/amu iron particles (2 Gy whole body). The effect of irradiation on motor coordination and stamina (Rotarod test), exploratory behavior (open field test), and spatial working and reference memory (Morris water maze) was assessed. Rotarod test: Performance was adversely affected by radiation exposure in both KO and WT groups at 30 d after irradiation. By 60 d after radiation, the radiation effect was lost in WT, but still apparent in irradiated KO mice. Open field test: Radiation reduced open field exploratory activity 14, 28, 56, 84, and 168 d after irradiation of KO mice, but had no effect on WT mice. Morris water maze: Radiation adversely affected spatial working memory in the KO mice, but had no discernible effect in the WT mice as assessed 180 d after irradiation. In contrast, irradiated WT mice showed marked impairment of spatial reference memory in comparison to non-irradiated mice, while no effect of radiation was observed in KO mice. These studies show that apoE expression influences the behavioral toxicity of HZE particle radiation and suggest that apoE plays a role in the repair/recovery from radiation injury of the central nervous system (CNS). ApoE deficiency may exacerbate the previously reported effects of HZE particle radiation in accelerating the brain aging process. (author)

  20. High-energy electrons in the inner radiation belt of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilova, R. N.; Gusev, A. A.; Pugacheva, G. I.; Titenkov, A. F.

    1982-08-01

    Measurements of electron fluxes with energies greater than 40 MeV obtained by Kosmos 490, Salut 6, and Interkosmos 17 satellites at heights of 270-500 km in the Brazilian anomaly region are discussed. The observed electron flux is explained in terms of the decomposition of pi meson, produced by the interaction between high-energy protons (0.35-1 GeV) of the inner radiation belt and atoms of the residual atmosphere. A formula describing the electron flux is presented.

  1. The COS-B experiment and mission. [high energy extraterrestrial gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The COS-B satellite carries a single experiment, capable of detecting gamma rays with energies greater than 30 MeV to study the spatial, energy, and time characteristics of high-energy radiation of galactic and extragalactic origin. The capability to search for gamma ray pulsations is enhanced by the inclusion in the payload of a proportional counter sensitive of X-rays of 2 to 12 keV. The experiment was calibrated using particle accelerators. The results of these measurements are presented, and the performance of the system in orbit is discussed.

  2. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  3. Search for Point Sources of High Energy Neutrinos with Final Data from AMANDA-II

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Adams, J; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, J; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Baret, B; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Bazo Alba, J L; Beattie, K; Becka, T; Becker, J K; Becker, K H; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Blaufuss, E; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bolmont, J; Boser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Breder, D; Burgess, T; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Davour, A; Day, C T; Depaepe, O; De Clercq, C; Demirors, L; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; De Vries-Uiterweerd, G; De Young, T; Díaz-Veléz, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Duvoort, M R; Edwards, W R; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegard, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Ganugapati, R; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Gozzini, R; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Gro, A; Grullon, S; Gunasingha, R M; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Hardtke, R; Hasegawa, Y; Heise, J; Helbing, K; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hodges, J; Hoffman, K D; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hughey, B; Hul, J P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hundertmark, S; Hussain, S; Imlay, R L; Inaba, M; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kawai, H; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Kühn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Lauer, R; Leich, H; Leier, D; Lewis, C; Lucke, A; Lundberg, J; Lunemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McParland, C P; Meagher, K; Meli, A; Merck, M; Messarius, T; Mészáros, P; Miyamoto, H; Mohr, A; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Munich, K; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Nieen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Patton, S; Pérez de los Heros, C; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Potthoff, N; Pretz, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Razzaque, S; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Robbins, W J; Rodríguez, J; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Roucelle, C; Rutledge, D; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H G; Sarkar, S; Satalecka, K; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Schultz, O; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Smith, A J; Song, C; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stanev, T; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoufer, M C; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sulanke, K H; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taboada, I; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Tluczykont, M; Toale, P A; Tosi, D; Turcan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; Viscomi, V; Vogt, C; Voigt, B; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Walter, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebusch, C H; Wiedemann, C; Wikström, G; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S

    2008-01-01

    We present a search for point sources of high energy neutrinos using 3.8 years of data recorded by the AMANDA-II neutrino telescope during 2000-2006. Applying muon track reconstruction and quality criteria, we select 6595 candidate events, predominantly from atmospheric neutrinos. Our search reveals no indications of a neutrino point source. We place the most stringent limits to date on E$^{-2}$ neutrino fluxes from points in the Northern Sky, with an average upper limit of E$^{2}\\Phi_{\

  4. Evaluation of risk from space radiation with high-energy heavy ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F.; Kim, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    The most challenging radiation in space consists of fully ionized atomic elements with high energy for which only the few lowest energy ions can be stopped in shielding materials. The health risk from exposure to these ions and their secondary radiations generated in shield materials is poorly understood since there are few human data and a systematic study in relevant animal model systems has not been made. The accuracy of risk prediction is described as the major limiting factor in the management of space radiation risk. The expected impact of systematic studies is examined using the limited available biological data and models. Given the limitations of current predictions, models must be developed that are able to incorporate the required fundamental scientific data into accurate risk estimates. The important radiation components that can be provided for laboratory testing are identified. The use of ground-based accelerator beams to simulate space radiation is explained and quantitative scientific constraints on such facilities are derived. Three facilities, one each in the United States, in Germany and in Japan, currently have the partial capability to satisfy these constraints. A facility has been proposed using the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster Synchrotron in the United States; in conjuction with other on-site accelerators, it will be able to provide the full range of heavy ion beams and energies required.

  5. Distributed Optical Fiber Radiation and Temperature Sensing at High Energy Accelerators and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090137; Brugger, Markus

    The aim of this Thesis is to investigate the feasibility of a distributed optical fiber radiation sensing system to be used at high energy physics accelerators and experiments where complex mixed-field environments are present. In particular, after having characterized the response of a selection of radiation sensitive optical fibers to ionizing radiation coming from a 60Co source, the results of distributed optical fiber radiation measurements in a mixed-field environment are presented along with the method to actually estimate the dose variation. This study demonstrates that distributed optical fiber dosimetry in the above mentioned mixed-field radiation environment is feasible, allowing to detect dose variations of about 10-15 Gy with a 1 m spatial resolution. The proof of principle has fully succeeded and we can now tackle the challenge of an industrial installation taking into account that some optimizations need to be done both on the control unit of the system as well as on the choice of the sensing f...

  6. Design of two digital radiation tolerant integrated circuits for high energy physics experiments data readout

    CERN Document Server

    Bonacini, Sandro

    2003-01-01

    High Energy Physics research (HEP) involves the design of readout electron- ics for its experiments, which generate a high radiation ¯eld in the detectors. The several integrated circuits placed in the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments' environment have to resist the radiation and carry out their normal operation. In this thesis I will describe in detail what, during my 10-months partic- ipation in the digital section of the Microelectronics group at CERN, I had the possibility to work on: - The design of a radiation-tolerant data readout digital integrated cir- cuit in a 0.25 ¹m CMOS technology, called \\the Kchip", for the CMS preshower front-end system. This will be described in Chapter 3. - The design of a radiation-tolerant SRAM integrated circuit in a 0.13 ¹m CMOS technology, for technology radiation testing purposes and fu- ture applications in the HEP ¯eld. The SRAM will be described in Chapter 4. All the work has carried out under the supervision and with the help of Dr. Kostas Klouki...

  7. Refractive lenses as a beam diagnostics tool for high-energy synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Weitkamp, T; Drakopoulos, M; Souvorov, A; Snigireva, I; Snigirev, A; Guenzler, F; Schrör, C; Lengeler, B

    2001-01-01

    Parabolic compound refractive lenses (CRLs) for hard X rays have been used to image the electron beam at undulator and bending-magnet beamlines at the ESRF. The measurements yield the shape and size of the synchrotron radiation source, and show that CRLs with paraboloid surface shape can be used as a beam diagnostics tool at high-energy electron storage rings. The optical resolution of the imaging setup can be as small as 4 mu m. This is smaller than typical values of the electron beam size in third-generation synchrotron sources. We report measurements at two ESRF beamlines and resolution calculations taking into account the properties of synchrotron radiation and the transmission characteristics of the CRLs used.

  8. A self-powered thin-film radiation detector using intrinsic high-energy current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zygmanski, Piotr, E-mail: pzygmanski@LROC.HARVARD.EDU, E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Sajo, Erno, E-mail: pzygmanski@LROC.HARVARD.EDU, E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The authors introduce a radiation detection method that relies on high-energy current (HEC) formed by secondary charged particles in the detector material, which induces conduction current in an external readout circuit. Direct energy conversion of the incident radiation powers the signal formation without the need for external bias voltage or amplification. The detector the authors consider is a thin-film multilayer device, composed of alternating disparate electrically conductive and insulating layers. The optimal design of HEC detectors consists of microscopic or nanoscopic structures. Methods: Theoretical and computational developments are presented to illustrate the salient properties of the HEC detector and to demonstrate its feasibility. In this work, the authors examine single-sandwiched and periodic layers of Cu and Al, and Au and Al, ranging in thickness from 100 nm to 300 μm and separated by similarly sized dielectric gaps, exposed to 120 kVp x-ray beam (half-value thickness of 4.1 mm of Al). The energy deposition characteristics and the high-energy current were determined using radiation transport computations. Results: The authors found that in a dual-layer configuration, the signal is in the measurable range. For a defined total detector thickness in a multilayer structure, the signal sharply increases with decreasing thickness of the high-Z conductive layers. This paper focuses on the computational results while a companion paper reports the experimental findings. Conclusions: Significant advantages of the device are that it does not require external power supply and amplification to create a measurable signal; it can be made in any size and geometry, including very thin (sub-millimeter to submicron) flexible curvilinear forms, and it is inexpensive. Potential applications include medical dosimetry (both in vivo and external), radiation protection, and other settings where one or more of the above qualities are desired.

  9. The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) Facility onboard China's Future Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S N

    2014-01-01

    The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility is one of several space astronomy payloads of the cosmic lighthouse program onboard China's Space Station, which is planned for operation starting around 2020 for about 10 years. The main scientific objectives of HERD are indirect dark matter search, precise cosmic ray spectrum and composition measurements up to the knee energy, and high energy gamma-ray monitoring and survey. HERD is composed of a 3-D cubic calorimeter (CALO) surrounded by microstrip silicon trackers (STKs) from five sides except the bottom. CALO is made of about 10$^4$ cubes of LYSO crystals, corresponding to about 55 radiation lengths and 3 nuclear interaction lengths, respectively. The top STK microstrips of seven X-Y layers are sandwiched with tungsten converters to make precise directional measurements of incoming electrons and gamma-rays. In the baseline design, each of the four side SKTs is made of only three layers microstrips. All STKs will also be used for measuring the cha...

  10. Ultrahigh gain AlGaN/GaN high energy radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howgate, J.D.; Schoell, S.J.; Schaefer, S.; Stutzmann, M.; Sharp, I.D. [Walter Schottky Institut and Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hofstetter, M.; Schmid, M.; Thalhammer, S. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Zizak, I. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hable, V.; Greubel, C.; Dollinger, G. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Due to its remarkable tolerance to high energy ionizing radiation, GaN has recently attracted attention as a promising material for dosimetry applications. However, materials issues that lead to persistent photoconductivity, poor sensitivity, and requirements for large operational voltages have been hurdles to realization of the full potential of this material. Here we demonstrate that the introduction of a two-dimensional electron gas channel, through the addition of AlGaN/GaN heterointerfaces, can be used to create intrinsic amplification of the number of electrons that can be collected from single ionization events, yielding exceptionally large sensitivities in ultralow dose rate regimes. Furthermore, anomalous photo-responses, which severely limit response times of GaN-based devices, can be eliminated using these heterostructures. Measurements using focused monochromatic synchrotron radiation at 1-20 keV, as well as focused 20 MeV protons, reveal that these devices provide the capability for high sensitivity and resolution real time monitoring, which is competitive with and complementary to state-of-the-art detectors. Therefore, AlGaN/GaN heterostructure devices are extremely promising for future applications in fields ranging from high energy physics to medical imaging. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Search for Ultra-High-Energy Neutrinos with AMANDA-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Ahrens, J.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baret, B.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Becka, T.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Beimforde, M.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bolmont, J.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Braun, J.; Burgess, T.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Davour, A.; Day, C. T.; De Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Edwards, W. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Gozzini, R.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, D.; Hardtke, R.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hauschildt, T.; Heise, J.; Helbing, K.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G. C.; Hodges, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hommez, B.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Hughey, B.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Inaba, M.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kawai, H.; Kelley, J. L.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Kitamura, N.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kuehn, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Lauer, R.; Leich, H.; Leier, D.; Liubarsky, I.; Lundberg, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McCauley, T.; McParland, C. P.; Meagher, K.; Meli, A.; Messarius, T.; Mészáros, P.; Miyamoto, H.; Montaruli, T.; Morey, A.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Münich, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Olivas, A.; Ono, M.; Patton, S.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Pohl, A. C.; Porrata, R.; Pretz, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Razzaque, S.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Robbins, S.; Robbins, W. J.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Roucelle, C.; Rutledge, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schultz, O.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Smith, A. J.; Song, C.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoufer, M. C.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sumner, T. J.; Swillens, Q.; Taboada, I.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Tluczykont, M.; Toale, P. A.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Overloop, A.; Viscomi, V.; Vogt, C.; Voigt, B.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Waldmann, H.; Waldenmaier, T.; Walter, M.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wendt, C.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wiedemann, C.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zornoza, J. D.; IceCube Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    A search for diffuse neutrinos with energies in excess of 105 GeV is conducted with AMANDA-II data recorded between 2000 and 2002. Above 107 GeV, the Earth is essentially opaque to neutrinos. This fact, combined with the limited overburden of the AMANDA-II detector (roughly 1.5 km), concentrates these ultra-high-energy neutrinos at the horizon. The primary background for this analysis is bundles of downgoing, high-energy muons from the interaction of cosmic rays in the atmosphere. No statistically significant excess above the expected background is seen in the data, and an upper limit is set on the diffuse all-flavor neutrino flux of E2Φ90% CL < 2.7 × 10-7 GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1 valid over the energy range of 2 × 105 to 109 GeV. A number of models that predict neutrino fluxes from active galactic nuclei are excluded at the 90% confidence level.

  12. Search for Ultra High-Energy Neutrinos with AMANDA-II

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M; Ahrens, J; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baret, B; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Becka, T; Becker, J K; Becker, K H; Beimforde, M; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Blaufuss, E; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bolmont, J; Böser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Braun, J; Burgess, T; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Davour, A; Day, C T; De Clercq, C; Demirrs, L; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; De Young, T; Díaz-Veléz, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Duvoort, M R; Edwards, W R; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Ganugapati, R; Geenen, H; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Gozzini, R; Griesel, T; Gro, A; Grullon, S; Gunasingha, R M; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Hardtke, D; Hardtke, R; Hasegawa, Y; Hauschildt, T; Heise, J; Helbing, K; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hodges, J; Hoffman, K D; Hommez, B; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Hughey, B; Hul, J P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hundertmark, S; Inaba, M; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kawai, H; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kitamura, N; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Kpke, L; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Kühn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Lauer, R; Leich, H; Leier, D; Liubarsky, I; Lundberg, J; Lunemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McCauley, T; McParland, C P; Meagher, K; Meli, A; Messarius, T; Mszros, P; Miyamoto, H; Montaruli, T; Mor, A; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Munich, K; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Nieen, P; Nygren, D R; Olivas, A; Ono, M; Patton, S; Prezdelos Heros, C; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Pretz, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Razzaque, S; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Robbins, S; Robbins, W J; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Roucelle, C; Rutledge, D; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H G; Sarkar, S; Satalecka, K; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Schultz, O; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Smith, A J; Song, C; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoufer, M C; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sulanke, K H; Sullivan, G W; Sumner, T J; Swillens, Q; Taboada, I; Tarasova; Tepe, A; Thollander, L; Tilav, S; Tluczykont, M; Toale, P A; Tosi, D; Turan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; Viscomi, V; Vogt, C; Voigt, B; Wagner, W; Walck, C; Waldmann, H; Waldenmaier, T; Walter, M; Wang, Y R; Wendt, C; Wiebusch, C H; Wiedemann, C; Wikstrm, G; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; De Dios-Zornoza-Gomez, Juan

    2007-01-01

    A search for diffuse neutrinos with energies in excess of 10^5 GeV is conducted with AMANDA-II data recorded between 2000 and 2002. Above 10^7 GeV, the Earth is essentially opaque to neutrinos. This fact, combined with the limited overburden of the AMANDA-II detector (roughly 1.5 km), concentrates these ultra high-energy neutrinos at the horizon. The primary background for this analysis is bundles of downgoing, high-energy muons from the interaction of cosmic rays in the atmosphere. No statistically significant excess above the expected background is seen in the data, and an upper limit is set on the diffuse all-flavor neutrino flux of E^{-2} $\\Phi$_{90%CL} < 2.7 $\\times$ 10^{-7} GeV cm^{-2} s^{-1} sr^{-1} valid over the energy range of 2 $\\times$ 10^5 GeV to 10^9 GeV. A number of models which predict neutrino fluxes from active galactic nuclei are excluded at the 90% confidence level.

  13. Neutron spectra and dose equivalents calculated in tissue for high-energy radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Neutrons are by-products of high-energy radiation therapy and a source of dose to normal tissues. Thus, the presence of neutrons increases a patient's risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer. Although neutrons have been thoroughly studied in air, little research has been focused on neutrons at depths in the patient where radiosensitive structures may exist, resulting in wide variations in neutron dose equivalents between studies. In this study, we characterized properties of neutrons produced during high-energy radiation therapy as a function of their depth in tissue and for different field sizes and different source-to-surface distances (SSD). We used a previously developed Monte Carlo model of an accelerator operated at 18 MV to calculate the neutron fluences, energy spectra, quality factors, and dose equivalents in air and in tissue at depths ranging from 0.1 to 25 cm. In conjunction with the sharply decreasing dose equivalent with increased depth in tissue, the authors found that the neutron energy spectrum changed drastically as a function of depth in tissue. The neutron fluence decreased gradually as the depth increased, while the average neutron energy decreased sharply with increasing depth until a depth of approximately 7.5 cm in tissue, after which it remained nearly constant. There was minimal variation in the quality factor as a function of depth. At a given depth in tissue, the neutron dose equivalent increased slightly with increasing field size and decreasing SSD; however, the percentage depth-dose equivalent curve remained constant outside the primary photon field. Because the neutron dose equivalent, fluence, and energy spectrum changed substantially with depth in tissue, we concluded that when the neutron dose equivalent is being determined at a depth within a patient, the spectrum and quality factor used should be appropriate for depth rather than for in-air conditions. Alternately, an appropriate percent depth-dose equivalent curve

  14. Radiation effects on semiconductor devices in high energy heavy ion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belousov, Anton

    2014-10-20

    Radiation effects on semiconductor devices in GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research are becoming more and more significant with the increase of beam intensity due to upgrades. Moreover a new accelerator is being constructed on the basis of GSI within the project of facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR). Beam intensities will be increased by factor of 100 and energies by factor of 10. Radiation fields in the vicinity of beam lines will increase more than 2 orders of magnitude and so will the effects on semiconductor devices. It is necessary to carry out a study of radiation effects on semiconductor devices considering specific properties of radiation typical for high energy heavy ion accelerators. Radiation effects on electronics in accelerator environment may be divided into two categories: short-term temporary effects and long-term permanent degradation. Both may become critical for proper operation of some electronic devices. This study is focused on radiation damage to CCD cameras in radiation environment of heavy ion accelerator. Series of experiments with irradiation of devices under test (DUTs) by secondary particles produced during ion beam losses were done for this study. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to simulate the experiment conditions and conditions expected in future accelerator. Corresponding comparisons and conclusions were done. Another device typical for accelerator facilities - industrial Ethernet switch was tested in similar conditions during this study. Series of direct irradiations of CCD and MOS transistors with heavy ion beams were done as well. Typical energies of the primary ion beams were 0.5-1 GeV/u. Ion species: from Na to U. Intensities of the beam up to 10{sup 9} ions/spill with spill length of 200-300 ns. Criteria of reliability and lifetime of DUTs in specific radiation conditions were formulated, basing on experimental results of the study. Predictions of electronic device reliability and lifetime were

  15. Universality, maximum radiation, and absorption in high-energy collisions of black holes with spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperhake, Ulrich; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Pretorius, Frans

    2013-07-26

    We explore the impact of black hole spins on the dynamics of high-energy black hole collisions. We report results from numerical simulations with γ factors up to 2.49 and dimensionless spin parameter χ=+0.85, +0.6, 0, -0.6, -0.85. We find that the scattering threshold becomes independent of spin at large center-of-mass energies, confirming previous conjectures that structure does not matter in ultrarelativistic collisions. It has further been argued that in this limit all of the kinetic energy of the system may be radiated by fine tuning the impact parameter to threshold. On the contrary, we find that only about 60% of the kinetic energy is radiated for γ=2.49. By monitoring apparent horizons before and after scattering events we show that the "missing energy" is absorbed by the individual black holes in the encounter, and moreover the individual black-hole spins change significantly. We support this conclusion with perturbative calculations. An extrapolation of our results to the limit γ→∞ suggests that about half of the center-of-mass energy of the system can be emitted in gravitational radiation, while the rest must be converted into rest-mass and spin energy.

  16. Shielding for Critical Organs and Radiation Exposure Dose Distribution in Patients with High Energy Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Sung Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    High energy photon beams from medical linear accelerators produce large scattered radiation by various components of the treatment head, collimator and walls or objects in the treatment room including the patient. These scattered radiation do not provide therapeutic dose and are considered a hazard from the radiation safety perspective. Scattered dose of therapeutic high energy radiation beams are contributed significant unwanted dose to the patient. ICRP take the position that a dose of 500mGy may cause abortion at any stage of pregnancy and that radiation detriment to the fetus includes risk of mental retardation with a possible threshold in the dose response relationship around 100 mGy for the gestational period. The ICRP principle of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) was recommended for protection of occupation upon the linear no-threshold dose response hypothesis for cancer induction. We suggest this ALARA principle be applied to the fetus and testicle in therapeutic treatment. Radiation dose outside a photon treatment filed is mostly due to scattered photons . This scattered dose is a function of the distance from the beam edge, treatment geometry, primary photon energy, and depth in the patient. The need for effective shielding of the fetus and testicle is reinforced when young patients are treated with external beam radiation therapy and then shielding designed to reduce the scattered photon dose to normal organs have to considered. Irradiation was performed in phantom using high energy photon beams produced by a Varian 2100C/D medical linear accelerator (Varian Oncology Systems, Polo Alto, CA) located at the Yonsei Cancer Center. The composite phantom used was comprised of a commercially available anthropomorphic Rando phantom (Phantom Laboratory Inc., Salem, YN) and a rectangular solid polystyrene phantom of dimensions 30cm x 30cm x 20cm. The anthropomorphic Rando phantom represents an average man made from tissue equivalent materials that is

  17. High-energy response of the PRESCILA and WENDI-II neutron rem meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsher, Richard H; McLean, Thomas D

    2008-01-01

    WENDI-II was designed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) specifically as a wide-range rem meter, suitable for applications at particle accelerators, with response extension to 5 GeV. PRESCILA was also designed at LANL, mainly as a lightweight alternative to traditional rem meters, but has shown excellent response characteristics above 20 MeV. This Note summarises measurements performed over a span of 4 y to characterise the high-energy neutron response (>20 MeV) of these meters to several hundred million electron volts. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic beams utilised as part of this study were produced by the cyclotron facilities at the Université Catholique de Louvain (33 and 60 MeV) and the T. Svedberg Laboratory ( 46, 95, 143 and 173 MeV). In addition, measurements were also conducted at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, 800 MeV spallation neutron source, in broad energy fields with an average energy of 345 MeV. For the sake of completeness, data collected between 2.5 and 19 MeV in monoenergetic neutron fields at the German Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) facility are also included in this study.

  18. Forecasting the High Energy Electron Radiation Belts Using Physics Based Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions waves play an important role in the loss and acceleration of electrons in the radiation belts. Here we present results from the SPACECAST project to forecast the high energy electron radiation belts using physics based models in the UK and France. The forecasting models include wave-particle interactions, radial diffusion, and losses by Coulomb collisions, and highlight the importance of various types of wave-particle interactions. The system is driven by a time series of the Kp index derived from solar wind data and ground based magnetometers and provides a forecast of the radiation belts up to 3 hours ahead, updated every hour. We show that during the storm of 8-9 March, 2012 the forecasts were able to reproduce the electron flux at geostationary orbit measured by GOES 13 to within a factor of two initially, and to within a factor of 10 later on during the event. By including wave-particle interactions between L* = 6.5 and 8 the forecast of the electron flux at geostationary orbit was significantly improved for the month of March 2012. We show examples of particle injection into the slot region, and relativistic flux drop-outs and suggest that flux drop outs are more likely to be associated with magnetopause motion than losses due to wave-particle interactions. To improve the forecasts we have developed a new database of whistler mode chorus waves from 5 different satellite missions. We present data on the power spectra of the waves as a function of magnetic local time, latitude and radial distance, and present pitch angle and energy diffusion coefficients for use in global models. We show that waves at different latitudes result in structure in the diffusion rates and we illustrate the effects on the trapped electron flux. We present forecasting skill scores which show quantitatively that including wave-particle interactions improves our ability to forecast the high energy electron radiation belt. Finally we suggest several areas where

  19. Microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation with associated extremely low photon flux densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, A.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation in extremely low flux density conditions. With wide deployment in mind, potential applications range from nuclear non-proliferation, to hospital radiation-safety. The daunting challenge is the low level of photon flux densities - emerging from a Scintillation Crystal (SC) on to a ~1 mm-square detector, which are a factor of 10000 or so lower than those acceptable to recently reported photonic chips (including `single-photon detection' chips), due to a combination of low Lux, small detector size, and short duration SC output pulses - on the order of 1 μs. These challenges are attempted to be overcome by the design of an innovative `System on a Chip' type microchip, with high detector sensitivity, and effective coupling from the SC to the photodetector. The microchip houses a tiny n+ diff p-epi photodiode (PD) as well as the associated analog amplification and other related circuitry, all fabricated in 0.5micron, 3-metal 2-poly CMOS technology. The amplification, together with pulse-shaping of the photocurrent-induced voltage signal, is achieved through a tandem of two capacitively coupled, double-cascode amplifiers. Included in the paper are theoretical estimates and experimental results.

  20. Effects of Spin on High-energy Radiation from Accreting Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Riordan, Michael; Pe'er, Asaf; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2016-11-01

    Observations of jets in X-ray binaries show a correlation between radio power and black hole spin. This correlation, if confirmed, points toward the idea that relativistic jets may be powered by the rotational energy of black holes. In order to examine this further, we perform general relativistic radiative transport calculations on magnetically arrested accretion flows, which are known to produce powerful jets via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism. We find that the X-ray and γ-ray emission strongly depend on spin and inclination angle. Surprisingly, the high-energy power does not show the same dependence on spin as the BZ jet power, but instead can be understood as a redshift effect. In particular, photons observed perpendicular to the spin axis suffer little net redshift until originating from close to the horizon. Such observers see deeper into the hot, dense, highly magnetized inner disk region. This effect is largest for rapidly rotating black holes due to a combination of frame dragging and decreasing horizon radius. While the X-ray emission is dominated by the near horizon region, the near-infrared (NIR) radiation originates at larger radii. Therefore, the ratio of X-ray to NIR power is an observational signature of black hole spin.

  1. A low power high speed radiation hard serializer for High Energy Physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080243; Marchioro, Alessandro; Ottavi, Marco

    This Ph.D. thesis focuses on the development and the characterization of novel solutions for electronic systems for high-speed data transmission in extremely high radio-active environment (e.g. high energy physics application). The text proposes two alternative full-custom solutions for a fundamental enabling block for a lowpower serial data transmission system, the serializer. This block will find place in a future transceiver conceived for the future upgraded phase of the Large Hadron Collider, or LHC, at CERN. The first solution proposed, called “triple module redundancy”, is based on hardware redundancy, a well-known solution, to obtain protection against the temporary malfunctioning induced by radiation. In the second case a new architecture, called “code protected”, is proposed. This architecture takes advantage of the error correction code present in the data word to obtain radiation robustness on data and some parts of the control logic and to further reduce the power consumption. A test chip ...

  2. Baryon scattering at high energies: wave function, impact factor, and gluon radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bartels, J

    2007-01-01

    The scattering of a baryon consisting of three massive quarks is investigated in the high energy limit of perturbative QCD. A model of a relativistic proton-like wave function, dependent on valence quark longitudinal and transverse momenta and on quark helicities, is proposed, and we derive the baryon impact factors for two, three and four t-channel gluons. We find that the baryonic impact factor can be written as a sum of three pieces: in the first one a subsystem consisting of two of the three quarks behaves very much like the quark-antiquark pair in gamma* scattering, whereas the third quark acts as a spectator. The second term belongs to the odderon, whereas in the third (C-even) piece all three quarks participate in the scattering. This term is new and has no analogue in gamma* scattering. We also study the small x evolution of gluon radiation for each of these three terms. The first term follows the same pattern of gluon radiation as the gamma*-initiated quark-antiquark dipole, and, in particular, it co...

  3. Radiation protection challenges in the management of radioactive waste from high-energy accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrici, Luisa; Algoet, Yvon; Bruno, Luca; Magistris, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) has operated high-energy accelerators for fundamental physics research for nearly 60 y. The side-product of this activity is the radioactive waste, which is mainly generated as a result of preventive and corrective maintenance, upgrading activities and the dismantling of experiments or accelerator facilities. Prior to treatment and disposal, it is common practice to temporarily store radioactive waste on CERN's premises and it is a legal requirement that these storage facilities are safe and secure. Waste treatment typically includes sorting, segregation, volume and size reduction and packaging, which will depend on the type of component, its chemical composition, residual activity and possible surface contamination. At CERN, these activities are performed in a dedicated waste treatment centre under the supervision of the Radiation Protection Group. This paper gives an overview of the radiation protection challenges in the conception of a temporary storage and treatment centre for radioactive waste in an accelerator facility, based on the experience gained at CERN. The CERN approach consists of the classification of waste items into 'families' with similar radiological and physical-chemical properties. This classification allows the use of specific, family-dependent techniques for radiological characterisation and treatment, which are simultaneously efficient and compliant with best practices in radiation protection. The storage was planned on the basis of radiological and other possible hazards such as toxicity, pollution and fire load. Examples are given of technical choices for the treatment and radiological characterisation of selected waste families, which could be of interest to other accelerator facilities. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Prototypes of self-powered radiation detectors employing intrinsic high-energy current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zygmanski, Piotr, E-mail: pzygmanski@LROC.HARVARD.EDU; Briovio, Davide [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Sajo, Erno [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The authors experimentally investigate the effect of direct energy conversion of x-rays via selfpowered Auger- and photocurrent, potentially suitable to practical radiation detection and dosimetry in medical applications. Experimental results are compared to computational predictions. The detector the authors consider is a thin-film multilayer device, composed of alternating disparate electrically conductive and insulating layers. This paper focuses on the experiments while a companion paper introduces the fundamental concepts of high-energy current (HEC) detectors. Methods: The energy of ionizing radiation is directly converted to detector signal via electric current induced by high-energy secondary electrons generated in the detector material by the incident primary radiation. The HEC electrons also ionize the dielectric and the resultant charge carriers are selfcollected due to the contact potential of the disparate electrodes. Thus, an electric current is induced in the conductors in two different ways without the need for externally applied bias voltage or amplification. Thus, generated signal in turn is digitized by a data acquisition system. To determine the fundamental properties of the HEC detector and to demonstrate its feasibility for medical applications, the authors used a planar geometry composed of multilayer microstructures. Various detectors with up to seven conducting layers with different combinations of materials (250 μm Al, 35 μm Cu, 100 μm Pb) and air gaps (100 μm) were exposed to nearly plane-parallel 60–120 kVp x-ray beams. For the experimental design and verification, the authors performed coupled electron–photon radiation transport computations. The detector signal was measured using a commercial data acquisition system with 24 bits dynamic range, 0.4 fC sensitivity, and 0.9 ms sampling time. Results: Measured signals for the prototype detector varied depending on the number of layers, material type, and incident photon

  5. Study of genetic effects of high energy radiations with different ionizing capacities on extracellular phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, S E; Kalinin, V L; Kopylova, Y U; Krivisky, A S; Rybchin, V N; Shelegedin, V N

    1975-07-01

    The inactivating and mutagenic action of high-energy radiations with different ionizing capacities (gamma-rays, protons, alpha-particles and accelerated ions of 12C and 20Ne) was studied by using coliphages lambda11 and SD as subjects. In particular the role of irradiation conditions (broth suspension, pure buffer, dry samples) and of the host functions recA, exrA and polA was investigated. The dose-response curve of induced mutagenesis was studied by measuring the yield of vir mutants in lambda11 and plaque mutants in SD. The following results were obtained. (1) The inactivation kinetics of phages under the action of gamma-rays and protons was first order to a survival of 10(-7). Heavy ions also showed exponential inactivation kinetics to a survival of 10(-4). At higher doses of 20Ne ion bombardment some deviation from one-hit kinetics was observed. For dry samples of phages the dimensions of targets for all types of radiation were approximately proportional to the molecular weights of phage DNA's. For densely ionizing radiation (heavy ions) the inactivating action was 3-5 times weaker than for gamma-rays and protons. (2) Mutagenesis was observed for all types of radiation, but heavy ions were 1-5-2 times less efficient than gamma-rays. For both phages studied the dose-response curve of mutagenesis was non-linear. The dependence on the dose was near to parabolic for lambda11. For SD a plateau or maximum of mutagenesis was observed for the relative number of mutants at a survival of about 10(-4). (3) Host-cell functions recA and exrA were practically indifferent for survival of gamma-irradiated phage lambda11, but indispensable for mutagenesis. Mutation recAI3 abolished induced vir mutations totally and exrA- reduced them significantly. The absence of the function polA had a considerable influence on phage survival, but no effect on vir mutation yield (if compared at the same survival level). (4) In conditions of indirect action of gamma-rays no vir mutations were

  6. Innermost Van Allen Radiation Belt for High Energy Protons at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The high energy proton radiation belts of Saturn are energetically dominated by the source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), trapping of protons from beta decay of neutrons emitted from galactic cosmic ray nuclear interactions with the main rings. These belts were originally discovered in wide gaps between the A-ring, Janus/Epimetheus, Mimas, and Enceladus. The narrow F and G rings significant affected the CRAND protons but did not produce total depletion. Voyager 2 measurements subsequently revealed an outermost CRAND proton belt beyond Enceladus. Although the source rate is small, the trapping times limited by radial magnetospheric diffusion are very long, about ten years at peak measured flux inwards of the G ring, so large fluxes can accumulate unless otherwise limited in the trapping region by neutral gas, dust, and ring body interactions. One proposed final extension of the Cassini Orbiter mission would place perikrone in a 3000-km gap between the inner D ring and the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Experience with CRAND in the Earth's inner Van Allen proton belt suggests that a similar innermost belt might be found in this comparably wide region at Saturn. Radial dependence of magnetospheric diffusion, proximity to the ring neutron source, and northward magnetic offset of Saturn's magnetic equator from the ring plane could potentially produce peak fluxes several orders of magnitude higher than previously measured outside the main rings. Even brief passes through such an intense environment of highly penetrating protons would be a significant concern for spacecraft operations and science observations. Actual fluxes are limited by losses in Saturn's exospheric gas and in a dust environment likely comparable to that of the known CRAND proton belts. The first numerical model of this unexplored radiation belt is presented to determine limits on peak magnitude and radial profile of the proton flux distribution.

  7. Effects of Spin on High-Energy Radiation from Accreting Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Riordan, Michael O'; McKinney, Jonathan C

    2016-01-01

    Observations of jets in X-ray binaries show a correlation between radio power and black hole spin. This correlation, if confirmed, points towards the idea that relativistic jets may be powered by the rotational energy of black holes. In order to examine this further, we perform general-relativistic radiative transport calculations on magnetically arrested accretion flows, which are known to produce powerful jets via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism. We find that the X-ray and gamma-ray emission strongly depend on spin and inclination angle. Surprisingly, the high-energy power does not show the same dependence on spin as the BZ jet power, but instead can be understood as a redshift effect. In particular, photons observed perpendicular to the spin axis suffer little net redshift until originating from close to the horizon. Such observers see deeper into the hot, dense, highly-magnetized inner disk region. This effect is largest for rapidly rotating black holes due to a combination of frame dragging and decre...

  8. Use of high-energy radiation for degradation of environmental pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, R.D.; Patwardhan, M.

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of the project was to explore the advantages and/or limitations of high-energy radiation treatment as a method for degrading organic pollutants, particularly aryl halides, in an aqueous medium. The authors have done analyses of (60) Co-irradiated samples and kinetic studies using pulsed electron beams. For aryl halides containing no more than two fused rings, the main products detected are those of simple halogen replacement by hydrogen, although the amount of aryl halide destroyed was always greater than the total amount of products detected. To accomplish halogen replacement by H, the reaction solvent may not be pure water but must contain a hydrogen source such as an aliphatic alcohol. The absence of such an additive, results in products of aryl radical addition to aryl halide. The necessary amount of additive required is quite small for halobenzenes. With aryl halides of three (and presumably more than three) fused rings, the radical-anion intermediates either undergo conversion to halogen-containing dihydroarenes, or lose halogen to form radicals which resist reaction with H-donating additive and thus form dimers. When aryl halides are solubilized in micelle-forming detergent solutions, the detergent molecules serve as hydrogen atom sources. Conversions are highest with cationic detergents.

  9. Lattice with Smaller Momentum Compaction Factor for PEP-II High Energy Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Y; Nosochkov, Yu M

    2003-01-01

    At present, the PEP-II bunch length and vertical beta function at the Interaction Point (IP) are about of the same size. To increase luminosity, it is planned to gradually reduce the IP beta function. For the maximum effect, bunch length has to be also reduced to minimize luminosity loss caused by the hourglass effect at IP. One of the methods to achieve a smaller bunch length is to reduce momentum compaction factor. This paper discusses a lattice option for the High Energy Ring, where the nominal 60 degree cells in four arcs are replaced by 90 degree cells to reduce momentum compaction factor by 30% and bunch length by 16%. The increased focusing in 90 degree cells results in 40% stronger arc quadrupoles and 150% stronger arc sextupoles due to reduced dispersion and larger chromaticity. Tracking simulations predict that dynamic aperture for this lattice will be more than 10 times the rms size of a fully coupled beam for a horizontal emittance of 30 nm and IP beta function of 1cm. The lattice modification and...

  10. Search for point sources of high energy neutrinos with final data from AMANDA-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, J.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Baret, B.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Becka, T.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bolmont, J.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Breder, D.; Burgess, T.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Davour, A.; Day, C. T.; Depaepe, O.; de Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; De Young, T.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Edwards, W. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Gozzini, R.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hasegawa, Y.; Heise, J.; Helbing, K.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hodges, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hughey, B.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Hussain, S.; Imlay, R. L.; Inaba, M.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kawai, H.; Kelley, J. L.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kuehn, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Lauer, R.; Leich, H.; Leier, D.; Lewis, C.; Lucke, A.; Lundberg, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McParland, C. P.; Meagher, K.; Meli, A.; Merck, M.; Messarius, T.; Mészáros, P.; Miyamoto, H.; Mohr, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Münich, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; Ono, M.; Panknin, S.; Patton, S.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Pohl, A. C.; Porrata, R.; Potthoff, N.; Pretz, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Razzaque, S.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Robbins, W. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Roucelle, C.; Rutledge, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schultz, O.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Smith, A. J.; Song, C.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoufer, M. C.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taboada, I.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Tluczykont, M.; Toale, P. A.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; Viscomi, V.; Vogt, C.; Voigt, B.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Walter, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wiedemann, C.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.

    2009-03-01

    We present a search for point sources of high energy neutrinos using 3.8 yr of data recorded by AMANDA-II during 2000-2006. After reconstructing muon tracks and applying selection criteria designed to optimally retain neutrino-induced events originating in the northern sky, we arrive at a sample of 6595 candidate events, predominantly from atmospheric neutrinos with primary energy 100 GeV to 8 TeV. Our search of this sample reveals no indications of a neutrino point source. We place the most stringent limits to date on E-2 neutrino fluxes from points in the northern sky, with an average upper limit of E2Φνμ+ντ≤5.2×10-11TeVcm-2s-1 on the sum of νμ and ντ fluxes, assumed equal, over the energy range from 1.9 TeV to 2.5 PeV.

  11. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Transition radiation: scientific implications and applications in high-energy physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, Sergei P.

    2007-04-01

    In their pioneering work on transition radiation, Ginzburg and Frank showed for the first time that a charge may radiate electromagnetic waves not only because of its accelerated motion but also because of time variation of the phase velocity of electromagnetic waves in the ambient medium. This result is of very general importance for physics. For example, a charge at rest can radiate in a nonstationary medium. Transition radiation is widely used in high-energy particle detectors, mainly for identification of ultrarelativistic electrons in accelerator and collider experiments.

  12. Effect of high energy β-radiation and addition of triallyl isocyanurate on the selected properties of polylactide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Rafał

    2016-06-01

    Comparison of some changes occurring in polylactide (PLA) due to high energy β-radiation and addition of triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) was the main objective of the present study. It was found that irradiation of PLA by high energy β-radiation causes essential changes in its properties, that undergoes mainly degradation, to form a porous structure. The PLA degradation can be diminished by introduction into the polymer matrix of a low-molecular mass multifunctional compound like TAIC. Upon the electron radiation, effective crosslinking of PLA by TAIC occurs. Application of TAIC favorably influences hindering of the PLA degradation or, when the doses are very large, diminishes worsening of the PLA functional qualities. It was also found that the optimum crosslinking of PLA is obtained when the electron radiation doses of the range of 40-200 kGy are applied and the amount of TAIC equal 3-5 wt% is used.

  13. Effect of high energy β-radiation and addition of triallyl isocyanurate on the selected properties of polylactide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, Rafał, E-mail: malinowskirafal@gmail.com

    2016-06-15

    Comparison of some changes occurring in polylactide (PLA) due to high energy β-radiation and addition of triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) was the main objective of the present study. It was found that irradiation of PLA by high energy β-radiation causes essential changes in its properties, that undergoes mainly degradation, to form a porous structure. The PLA degradation can be diminished by introduction into the polymer matrix of a low-molecular mass multifunctional compound like TAIC. Upon the electron radiation, effective crosslinking of PLA by TAIC occurs. Application of TAIC favorably influences hindering of the PLA degradation or, when the doses are very large, diminishes worsening of the PLA functional qualities. It was also found that the optimum crosslinking of PLA is obtained when the electron radiation doses of the range of 40–200 kGy are applied and the amount of TAIC equal 3–5 wt% is used.

  14. Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, K.

    2011-05-04

    This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

  15. Proceedings of the 1984 workshop on high-energy excitations in condensed matter. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, R.N. (comp.)

    1984-12-01

    This volume covers electronic excitations, momentum distributions, high energy photons, and a wrap-up session. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  16. A radiation transfer model for the Milky Way: I. Radiation fields and application to high-energy astrophysics★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, C. C.; Yang, R.; Tuffs, R. J.; Natale, G.; Rushton, M.; Aharonian, F.

    2017-09-01

    We present a solution for the ultraviolet - submillimetre (submm) interstellar radiation fields (ISRFs) of the Milky Way (MW), derived from modelling COBE, IRAS and Planck maps of the all-sky emission in the near-, mid-, far-infrared and submm. The analysis uses the axisymmetric radiative transfer model that we have previously implemented to model the panchromatic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of star-forming galaxies in the nearby universe, but with a new methodology allowing for optimization of the radial and vertical geometry of stellar emissivity and dust opacity, as deduced from the highly resolved emission seen from the vantage point of the Sun. As such, this is the first self-consistent model of the broad-band continuum emission from the MW. In this paper, we present model predictions for the spatially integrated SED of the MW as seen from the Sun, showing good agreement with the data, and give a detailed description of the solutions for the distribution of ISRFs, as well as their physical origin, throughout the volume of the galaxy. We explore how the spatial and spectral distributions of our new predictions for the ISRF in the MW affects the amplitude and spectral distributions of the gamma rays produced via inverse Compton scattering for cosmic ray (CR) electrons situated at different positions in the galaxy, as well as the attenuation of the gamma rays due to interactions of the gamma-ray photons with photons of the ISRF. We also compare and contrast our solutions for the ISRF with those incorporated in the galprop package used for modelling the high-energy emission from CR in the MW.

  17. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part III: Instrument response

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, M; Beck, P; Bedogni, R; Cale, E; Caresana, M; Domingo, C; Donadille, L; Dubourg, N; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernández, F; Ferrarini, M; Fiechtner, A; Fuchs, A; García, M J; Golnik, N; Gutermuth, F; Khurana, S; Klages, Th; Latocha, M; Mares, V; Mayer, S; Radon, T; Reithmeier, H; Rollet, S; Roos, H; Rühm, W; Sandri, S; Schardt, D; Simmer, G; Spurný, F; Trompier, F; Villa-Grasa, C; Weitzenegger, E; Wiegel, B; Wielunski, M; Wissmann, F; Zechner, A; Zielczyński, M

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005–2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organizational framework for this project was provided by the European radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. Work Package 6 of CONRAD dealt with “complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces” and in this context it organised a benchmark exercise, which included both measurements and calculations, in a stray radiation field at a high-energy particle accelerator at GSI, Germany. The aim was to intercompare the response of several types of active detectors and passive dosemeters in a well-characterised workplace field. The Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation field and the experimental determination of the neutron spectra with various Bonner Sphere Spectrometers are discussed in Rollet et al. (2008) and in Wiegel et al. (2008). This paper focuses on the intercomparison of the response of the dosemeters in terms of ambient dose equivalent. Th...

  18. Movable radiation shields for the CLEO II silicon vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, D.J.; Ward, C.W.; Alexander, J.; Cherwinka, J.; Henderson, S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Cinabro, D. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fast, J. [Purdue University, Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Morrison, R. [University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); O`Neill, M. [CRPP, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada)

    1998-02-11

    Two movable tungsten radiation shields were installed on the beam pipe during the upgrade of the CLEO II detector, operating at the Cornell electron storage ring (CESR). This upgrade included the installation of a silicon vertex detector (SVX) and the purpose of the shields is to protect the SVX readout electronics from synchrotron radiation produced during injection and non-high-energy physics operation of CESR. Shield motion is controlled remotely by cables, keeping the associated motors and controls outside the detection volume. We discuss the design and performance of the radiation shields and the associated control system. (orig.). 8 refs.

  19. High energy pA collisions in the color glass condensate approach II. Quark production

    CERN Document Server

    Blaizot, J P; Venugopalan, R

    2004-01-01

    We compute the production of quark-antiquark pairs in high energy collisions between a small and a large projectile, as in proton-nucleus collisions, in the framework of the Color Glass Condensate. We derive a general expression for quark pair-production, which is not k_t-factorizable. However, k_t-factorization is recovered in the limit of large mass pairs or large quark--anti-quark momenta. Our results are amenable to a simple interpretation and suggest how multi-parton correlations at small x can be quantified in high-energy proton/deuteron-nucleus collisions.

  20. Origin of life: hypothesized roles of high-energy electrical discharges, infrared radiation, thermosynthesis and pre-photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, J T

    2012-12-01

    The hypothesis is proposed that during the organization of pre-biotic bacterial cell(s), high-energy electrical discharges, infrared radiation (IR), thermosynthesis and possibly pre-photosynthesis were central to the origin of life. High-energy electrical discharges generated some simple organic molecules available for the origin of life. Infrared radiation, both incoming to the Earth and generated on the cooling Earth with day/night and warming/cooling cycles, was a component of heat engine thermosynthesis before enzymes and the genetic code were present. Eventually, a primitive forerunner of photosynthesis and the capability to capture visible light emerged. In addition, the dual particle-wave nature of light is discussed from the perspective that life requires light acting both as a wave and particle.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation for radio detection of Ultra High Energy air shower cores by ANITA-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Amir

    ANITA is a balloon borne radio interferometer, originally built for detection of Ultra High Energy (UHE) neutrinos through Askaryan pulses induced by neutrinos in the deep ice. Besides searching for neutrinos, ANITA has successfully detected geomagnetic radiation from UHE cosmic ray air showers. The present work checks for the possibility of an additional method of UHE cosmic ray detection by ANITA. Highly vertical showers have shower maximum near the ice surface in Antarctica. The compact cores of these shower produce particle cascades inside the ice and consequently Askaryan radio pulses which may be detected by ANITA. A new Monte Carlo simulation SAM (SADE ANITA Monte Carlo) was developed to study this process. SAM includes a full ANITA instrument and flight model as well as two unique components required for the cosmic ray core simulation. 1) A simple model for radio emission by core initiated cascades in the Antarctic firn, including scaling of the RF emission with the shower and medium properties and a CORSIKA derived parametrization for the energy contained inside the core. 2) Due to the different event geometry, cosmic ray core induced RF signals are reflected from the bedrock and suffer more attenuation than the neutrino induced signals. Accordingly a Pan- Antarctic geo-statistical frequency dependent 3D RF attenuation model was developed based on temperature, chemistry and other physical properties of Antarctic ice. Using the aperture determined from SAM, an Auger UHE cosmic ray flux is expected to produce 7.4×10 -4 < 0.13 < 0.44 events during an ANITA-II flight exposure. There are considerable uncertainties in this estimate.

  2. Prototypes of Self-Powered Radiation Detectors Employing Intrinsic High-Energy Current (HEC) (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    external circuit is the electric current that constitutes the signal in the device. In the case of nonvacuum media high-energy leakage electrons from the...of spatial coordinate were computed and compared to experimental measurements. Net current is the arithmetic difference between the forward and the

  3. COS-B observations of the high energy gamma radiation from the galactic disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, J.

    1976-01-01

    During the first months of operation, COS-B has observed galactic high energy gamma rays from the galactic disc. In the galactic center and Vela regions the disc emission distribution was measured. From these data the existence of a local ( 1 kpc) and a distant ( 3 kpc) emitting region is apparent in the general direction of the inner galaxy.

  4. Highly biocompatible, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite synthesized in a solvothermal process driven by high energy density microwave radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolen D

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Dariusz Smolen1, Tadeusz Chudoba1, Iwona Malka1, Aleksandra Kedzierska1, Witold Lojkowski1, Wojciech Swieszkowski2, Krzysztof Jan Kurzydlowski2, Malgorzata Kolodziejczyk-Mierzynska3, Malgorzata Lewandowska-Szumiel31Polish Academy of Science, Institute of High Pressure Physics, Warsaw, Poland; 2Faculty of Materials Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland; 3Department of Histology and Embryology, Center of Biostructure Research, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, PolandAbstract: A microwave, solvothermal synthesis of highly biocompatible hydroxyapatite (HAp nanopowder was developed. The process was conducted in a microwave radiation field having a high energy density of 5 W/mL and over a time less than 2 minutes. The sample measurements included: powder X-ray diffraction, density, specific surface area, and chemical composition. The morphology and structure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The thermal behavior analysis was conducted using a simultaneous thermal analysis technique coupled with quadruple mass spectrometry. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy tests of heated samples were performed. A degradation test and a biocompatibility study in vitro using human osteoblast cells were also conducted. The developed method enables the synthesis of pure, fully crystalline hexagonal HAp nanopowder with a specific surface area close to 240 m2/g and a Ca/P molar ratio equal to 1.57. TEM measurements showed that this method results in particles with an average grain size below 6 nm. A 28-day degradation test conducted according to the ISO standard indicated a 22% loss of initial weight and a calcium ion concentration at 200 µmol/dm3 in the tris(hydroxymethylaminomethane hydrochloride test solution. The cytocompatibility of the obtained material was confirmed in a culture of human bone derived cells, both in an indirect test using the material

  5. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  6. Radiation-hard Silicon Photonics for Future High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2089774; Troska, Jan

    Collisions of proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN produce very high radiation levels in the innermost parts of the particle detectors and enormous amounts of measurement data. Thousands of radiation-hard optical links based on directly-modulated laser diodes are thus installed in the particle detectors to transmit the measurement data to the processing electronics. The radiation levels in the innermost regions of future particle detectors will be much higher than they are now. Alternative solutions to laser-based radiation-hard optical links have to be found since the performance of laser diodes decreases beyond the operation margin of the system when irradiated to sufficiently high radiation levels. Silicon Photonics (SiPh) is currently being investigated as a promising alternative technology. First tests have indeed shown that SiPh Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZMs) are relatively insensitive to a high neutron fluence. However, they showed a strong degradation when exposed to ionizing radiation. ...

  7. Jet Quenching in High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions by QCD Synchrotron-like Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shuryak, E V

    2003-01-01

    We consider synchrotron-like radiation in QCD by generalizing Schwinger's treatment of quantum synchrotron radiation in QED to the case of a constant chromomagnetic field. We suggest a novel mechanism for {\\em jet quenching} in heavy ion collisions, whereby high-$p_t$ partons get depleted through strong (classical) color fields. The latters are encountered in the color glass condensate or in the form of expanding shells of exploding sphalerons. Unlike bremsstrahlung radiation through multiple soft rescattering, synchrotron radiation converts a jet into a wide shower of soft gluons. We estimate the energy loss through this mechanism and suggest that it contributes significantly to the unexpectedly strong jet quenching observed at RHIC.

  8. High-Energy Radiation from Thunderstorms with ADELE: TGFs, Steps, and Glows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David M.; Kelley, Nicole; Martinez-McKinney, Forest; Zhang, Zi Yan; Hazelton, Bryna; Grefenstette, Brian; Splitt, Michael; Lazarus, Steven; Ulrich, William; Levine, Steven; Dwyer, Joseph; Schaal, Meagan; Saleh, Ziad; Cramer, Eric; Rassoul, Hamid; Cummer, Steven; Lu, Gaopeng; Shao, Xuan-Min; Ho, Cheng; Blakeslee, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The biggest challenge in the study of high-energy processes in thunderstorms is getting a detector to the vicinity of the electrically active regions of a storm. The Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) has been used to detect gamma rays from aircraft above storms and from a storm-chasing van on the ground. In August 2009, ADELE flew above Florida storms in a Gulfstream V jet, detecting the first terrestrial gamma-ray flash (TGF) seen from a plane and continuous glows of high-energy emission above thunderclouds. The presence of these glows suggests that a gradual process of relativistic runaway and feedback may help limit the total amount of charging in thunderstorms, in contrast to the traditional view that only lightning discharges compete with the charging process. The upper limits on TGF emission from intracloud and cloud-to-ground lightning from the ADELE flights demonstrated conclusively that a TGF of the sort seen from space is not associated with most lightning and not necessary to trigger it. In August 2010, observations from a van detected stepped-leader x-ray emission from at least four lightning strikes in ten days of operations. This mode of operation is therefore promising for future observations of the stepping process, although a more varied suite of instrumentation, in particular a flash-distance detector, would be useful. We will report on these results and on future possibilities for ADELE campaigns.

  9. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhotin, I P; Drozdov, A Y; Shprits, Y Y; Boynton, R J; Subbotin, D A; Balikhin, M A

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system has been tested for three extended time periods totalling several weeks of observations. The time periods involved periods of quiet, moderate, and strong geomagnetic activity and captured a range of dynamics typical of the radiation belts. The model has successfully simulated energetic electron fluxes for various magnetospheric conditions. Physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the discrepancies between the model results and observations are discussed.

  10. Reduction of phorbol ester content in jatropha cake using high energy gamma radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runumi Gogoi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an attempt has been made to remove phorbol ester present in jatropha cake by exposing it to gamma radiation. A sensitizer was also used to accelerate the degradation of phorbol esters. The phorbol ester content in the cake was estimated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. It was observed that gamma irradiation of the jatropha seed cake was effective in reducing the phorbol ester content. Originally, the phorbol ester content in the cake was found as 0.29 mg/g, which on exposure to radiation was reduced by 33.4% and 96% with radiation dose of 30 and 125 kGy respectively. The presence of a sensitizer was found to enhances the susceptibility of phorbol esters degradation by oxidative degradation on exposure to ionizing radiation.

  11. Measurements of High Energy X-Ray Dose Distributions Using Multi-Dimensional Fiber-Optic Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Dong Hyun; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Bongsoo; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Tack, Gye-Rae; Yi, Jeong Han; Kim, Sin; Cho, Hyosung

    In this study, we have fabricated multi-dimensional fiber-optic radiation detectors with organic scintillators, plastic optical fibers and photo-detectors such as photodiode array and a charge-coupled device. To measure the X-ray dose distributions of the clinical linear accelerator in the tissue-equivalent medium, we have fabricated polymethylmethacrylate phantoms which have one-dimensional and two-dimensional fiber-optic detector arrays inside. The one-dimensional and two-dimensional detector arrays can be used to measure percent depth doses and surface dose distributions of high energy X-ray in the phantom respectively.

  12. The high-energy radiation pattern from BFKLex with double-log collinear contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Chachamis, G

    2015-01-01

    We study high-energy jet production in the multi-Regge limit making use of the Monte Carlo event generator BFKLex which includes collinear improvements in the form of double-log contributions as presented in [1]. Making use of the anti-kt jet algorithm in the FastJet implementation, we present results for the average transverse momentum and azimuthal angle of the produced jets when two tagged forward/backward jets are present in the final state. We also introduce a new observable which accounts for the average rapidity separation among subsequent emissions. Results are presented, for comparison, at leading order and next-to-leading order, with the resummation of collinear double logs proposed in [2].

  13. Very high energy emission of Crab-like pulsars driven by the Cherenkov drift radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Osmanov, Z

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the generation of very high energy (VHE) emission in Crab-like pulsars driven by means of the feedback of Cherenkov drift waves on distribution of magnetospheric electrons. We have found that the unstable Cherenkov drift modes lead to the quasi-linear diffusion (QLD), keeping the pitch angles from vanishing, which in turn, maintains the synchrotron mechanism. Considering the Crab-like pulsars it has been shown that the growth rate of the Cherenkov drift instability (ChDI) is quite high, indicating high efficiency of the process. Analyzing the mechanism for the typical parameters we have found that the Cherenkov drift emission from the extreme UV to hard $X$-rays is strongly correlated with the VHE synchrotron emission in the GeV band.

  14. Short-pulse, high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Will

    2013-10-01

    Recent experimental results of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of ~GeV electrons driven by the 200TW HERCULES and the 400TW ASTRA-GEMINI laser systems and their subsequent generation of photons, positrons, and neutrons are presented. In LWFA, high-intensity (I >1019 W /cm2), ultra-short (τL Z target via bremsstrahlung into low-divergence (Z, the resulting Ne+ /Ne- ratio can approach unity, resulting in a near neutral density plasma jet. These quasi-neutral beams are presumed to retain the short-pulse (τL characteristic of the electron beam, resulting in a high peak density of ne- /e+ ~ 1016 cm-3 , making the source an excellent candidate for laboratory study of astrophysical leptonic jets. Alternatively, the electron beam can be interacted with a counter-propagating, ultra-high intensity (I >1021 W /cm2) laser pulse to undergo inverse Compton scattering and emit a high-peak brightness beam of high-energy photons. Preliminary results and experimental sensitivities of the electron-laser beam overlap are presented. The high-energy photon beams can be spectrally resolved using a forward Compton scattering spectrometer. Moreover, the photon flux can be characterized by a pixelated scintillator array and by nuclear activation and (γ,n) neutron measurements from the photons interacting with a secondary solid target. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA to support the yield estimates. This research was supported by DOE/NSF-PHY 0810979, NSF CAREER 1054164, DARPA AXiS N66001-11-1-4208, SF/DNDO F021166, and the Leverhulme Trust ECF-2011-383.

  15. Radiative Return Capabilities of a High-Energy, High-Luminosity $e^+e^-$ Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-01-01

    An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy $E_{CM}$ can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at $E_{CM}$ = 250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy $e^+e^-$ colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

  16. Vacuum Cherenkov Radiation In Quantum Electrodynamics With High-Energy Lorentz Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2011-01-01

    We study phenomena predicted by a renormalizable, CPT invariant extension of the Standard Model that contains higher-dimensional operators and violates Lorentz symmetry explicitly at energies greater than some scale Lambda_{L}. In particular, we consider the Cherenkov radiation in vacuo. In a rather general class of dispersion relations, there exists an energy threshold above which radiation is emitted. The threshold is enhanced in composite particles by a sort of kinematic screening mechanism. We study the energy loss and compare the predictions of our model with known experimental bounds on Lorentz violating parameters and observations of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. We argue that the scale of Lorentz violation Lambda_{L} (with preserved CPT invariance) can be smaller than the Planck scale, actually as small as 10^{14}-10^{15} GeV. Our model also predicts the Cherenkov radiation of neutral particles.

  17. Radiation-electromagnetic effect in germanium crystals irradiated with high-energy. cap alpha. particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikoin, I.K.; Babichenko, V.S.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.; Rzhanov, A.E.; Filippov, V.I.

    1984-05-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the radiation-electromagnetic effect in germanium crystals irradiated in a cyclotron with ..cap alpha.. particles of energies up to 40 MeV. The high excitation rate, the bulk nature of generation of nonequilibrium carriers and defects, and their spatial distributions gave rise to several special features in the dependence of the emf due to the radiation-electromagnetic effect on the particle flux, fluence, and parameters of samples. Theoretical calculations carried out allowing for the specific nature of the interaction of ..cap alpha.. particles with crystals agreed well with the experimental results. The radiation-electromagnetic effect could be used to obtain information on the nature of the spatial distribution of the density of nonequilibrium carriers along the trajectory of a particle in a crystal.

  18. Effect of high-energy radiation and alkali treatment on the properties of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foeldvary, Cs.M. E-mail: foldvary@iki.kfki.hu; Takacs, E.; Wojnarovits, L

    2003-06-01

    The effect of the treatment with NaOH or tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide solutions on preirradiated cotton-cellulose was investigated. Both the radiation and the treatment with alkali solutions caused loss of weight in cellulose; however, there was a synergism, a high weight loss was observed during alkali treatment of preirradiated samples. The radiation caused scissions of the cellulose chains and during the treatment with aqueous alkaline solutions some smaller fragments dissolved, resulting in a strong absorbance of the solutions with maximum at around 268 nm. It was attributed to the absorbance of aldehyde/keto groups.

  19. Drinking high-energy electrolytic water decreases internal radiation exposure caused by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear power plant disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawajiri Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster on March 11, 2011, caused radiation hazards throughout Fukushima Prefecture. Cesium was absorbed by soil and plants and transferred to livestock. Removing radioactive cesium from the bodies of farm animals and humans is essential. It has recently been reported that H2 scavenges reactive oxygen species and suppresses oxidative stress-related diseases. The hypothesis is that “active hydrogen” (hydrogen water scavenges active oxygen species. We hypothesized that high-energy electrolytic hydrogen water will effectively decontaminate cesium-exposed chickens. A test group of chickens drank high-energy electrolytic hydrogen water, while the control group drank regular water. Cesium contents in the test group were significantly lower than in the controlled one, possibly because more cesium excretion occurred in the test group than the control group. Lower 137Cs concentrations were found in test-group tissues than in control-group tissues, showing that high-energy electrolytic hydrogen water increased the rate of elimination of 137Cs incorporated into chicken tissue.

  20. Search for extraterrestrial point sources of high energy neutrinos with AMANDA-II using data collected in 2000-2002

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M; Bai, X; Bay, R; Bartelt, M; Barwick, S W; Becka, T; Becker, K H; Becker, J K; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Boersma, D J; Boser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Bouhali, O; Braun, J; Burgess, C; Burgess, T; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Collin, B; Conrad, J; Cooley, J; Cowen, D F; Davour, A; De Clercq, C; De Young, T R; Desiati, P; Ekstrom, P; Feser, T; Gaisser, T K; Ganugapati, R; Geenen, H; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Gross, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hardtke, D; Hardtke, R; Harenberg, T; Hauschildt, T; Helbing, K; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hodges, J; Hubert, D; Hughey, B; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hundertmark, S; Jacobsen, J; Kampert, K H; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kestel, M; Kohnen, G; Köpke, L; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kühn, K; Leich, H; Leuthold, M; Liubarsky, I; Lundberg, J; Madsen, J; Marciniewski, P; Matis, H S; McParland, C P; Messarius, T; Minaeva, Y; Miocinovic, P; Morse, R; Munich, K; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Neunhoffer, T; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogelman, H; Olbrechts, P; Pérez de los Heros, C; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richter, S; Rodríguez-Martino, J; Sander, H G; Schinarakis, K; Schlenstedt, S; Schneider, D; Schwarz, R; Silvestri, A; Solarz, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Steele, D; Steffen, P; Stokstad, R G; Sulanke, K H; Taboada, I; Tarasova, O; Thollander, L; Tilav, S; Wagner, W; Walck, C; Walter, M; Wang, Y R; Wendt, C; Wiebusch, C; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Yodh, G

    2005-01-01

    The results of a search for point sources of high energy neutrinos in the northern hemisphere using data collected by AMANDA-II in the years 2000, 2001 and 2002 are presented. In particular, a comparison with the single-year result previously published shows that the sensitivity was improved by a factor of 2.2. The muon neutrino flux upper limits on selected candidate sources, corresponding to an E^{-2} neutrino energy spectrum, are included. Sky grids were used to search for possible excesses above the background of cosmic ray induced atmospheric neutrinos. This search reveals no statistically significant excess for the three years considered.

  1. Radiation effects for high-energy protons and X-ray in integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, M.A.G.; Santos, R.B.B. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Medina, N.H.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lima, J.A. de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Cirne, K.H. [Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Electronic circuits are strongly influenced by ionizing radiation. The necessity to develop integrated circuits (IC's) featuring radiation hardness is largely growing to meet the stringent environment in space electronics [1]. This work aims to development a test platform to qualify electronic devices under the influence of high radiation dose, for aerospace applications. To understand the physical phenomena responsible for changes in devices exposed to ionizing radiation several kinds of radiation should then be considered, among them heavy ions, alpha particles, protons, gamma and X-rays. Radiation effects on the ICs are usually divided into three categories: Total Ionizing Dose (TID), a cumulative dose that shifts the threshold voltage and increases transistor's off-state current; Single Events Effects (SEE), a transient effect which can deposit charge directly into the device and disturb the properties of electronic circuits and Displacement Damage (DD) which can change the arrangement of the atoms in the lattice [2]. In this study we are investigating the radiation effects in rectangular-gate and circular-gate MOSFETs, manufactured with standard CMOS fabrication process, using particle beams produced in electrostatic tandem accelerators and X-rays. Initial tests for TID effects were performed using the 1.7 MV 5SDH tandem Pelletron accelerator of the Instituto de Fisica da USP with a proton beam of 2.6 MeV. The devices were exposed to different doses, varying the beam current, and irradiation time with the accumulated dose reaching up to Grad. To study the effect of X-rays on the electronic devices, an XRD-7000 (Shimadzu) X-ray setup was used as a primary X-ray source. The devices were irradiated with a total dose from krad to Grad using different dose rates. The results indicate that changes of the I-V characteristic curve are strongly dependents on the geometry of the devices. [1] Duzellier, S., Aerospace Science and Technology 9, p. 93

  2. The Sedentary Survey of Extreme High Energy Peaked BL Lacs. II. The Catalog and Spectral Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Giommi, P; Perri, M; Padovani, P

    2004-01-01

    The multi-frequency `Sedentary Survey' is a deep, statistically complete, radio flux limited sample comprising 150 BL Lacertae objects distinguished by their extremely high X-ray to radio flux ratio, ranging from five hundred to over five thousand times that of typical BL Lacs discovered in radio surveys. This paper presents the final, 100% identified, catalog together with the optical, X-ray and broad-band SEDs constructed combining literature multi-frequency data with non-simultaneous optical observations and BeppoSAX X-ray data, when available. The SEDs confirm that the peak of the synchrotron power in these objects is located at very high energies. BeppoSAX wide band X-ray observations show that, in most cases, the X-ray spectra are convex and well described by a logarithmic parabola model peaking (in a E f(E) vs E representation) between 0.02 to several keV. Owing to the high synchrotron energies involved most of the sources in the catalog are likely to be TeV emitters, with the closest and brightest one...

  3. High energy gamma-radiation from the galactic center due to neutralino annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Berezinsky, Veniamin Sergeevich; Mignola, G

    1994-01-01

    We study the NGS (Non-dissipative Gravitational Singularity) model, which successfully describes the non-linear stage of evolution of perturbations (see [1], [2] and references therein). This model predicts DM density distribution $\\rho(r) \\sim r^{-\\alpha}$ with $\\alpha \\simeq 1.8$ which holds from very small distances $r_{\\rm min} \\simeq 0.01~{\\rm pc}$ up to very large distances $r_{\\rm max} \\simeq 5~{\\rm Mpc}$. Assuming the neutralino to be a CDM particle, we calculate the annihilation of neutralinos in the vicinity of the singularity (Galactic Center). If neutralinos are the dominant component of DM in our Galaxy, the produced energy is enough to provide the whole observed activity of the GC. Neutralinos of the most general composition and of mass in the range $20~{\\rm GeV} \\leq m_\\c \\leq 1~{\\rm TeV}$ are considered. We find the neutralino compositions which give the relic density needed for the Mixed Dark Matter (MDM) model and we evaluate for these compositions the high-energy ($E_{\\gamma} > 100 ~{\\rm Me...

  4. Measurements of internal stresses in bond coating using high energy x-rays from synchrotron radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, K; Akiniwa, Y; Nishio, K; Kawamura, M; Okado, H

    2002-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) techniques enable high temperature combustion of turbines made of Ni-base alloy. TBC is made of zirconia top coating on NiCoCrAlY bond coating. The internal stresses in the bond coating play essential role in the delamination or fracture of TBC in service. With the X-rays from laboratory equipments, it is impossible to measure nondestructively the internal stress in the bond coating under the top coating. synchrotron radiations with a high energy and high brightness have a large penetration depth as compared with laboratory X-rays. Using the high energy X-rays from the synchrotron radiation, it is possible to measure the internal stress in the bond coating through the top coating. In this study, the furnace, which can heat a specimen to 1473 K, was developed for the stress measurement of the thermal barrier coatings. The internal stresses in the bond coating were measured at the room temperature, 773 K, 1073 K and 1373 K by using the 311 diffraction from Ni sub 3 Al with about 73...

  5. Diffraction Radiation Diagnostics for Moderate to High Energy Charged Particle Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorito, R B

    2001-01-01

    Diffraction radiation (DR) is produced when a charged particle passes throughan aperture or near a discontinuity in the media in which it is traveling. DRis closely related to transition radiation (TR), which is produced when acharged particle traverses the boundary between media with different dielectricconstants. In contrast to TR, which is now extensively used for beam diagnosticpurposes, the potential of DR as a non-interceptive, multi-parameter beamdiagnostic remains largely undeveloped. For diagnostic measurements it isuseful to observe backward reflected DR from an circular aperture or slitinclined with respect to the beam velocity. However, up to now, well foundedequations for the spectral-angular intensities of backward DR from suchapertures have not been available. We present a new derivation of the spectralangular intensity of backward DR produced from an inclined slit for twoorientations of the slit axis, i.e. perpendicular and parallel to the plane ofincidence. Our mathematical approach is genera...

  6. Noninvasive measurement of micron electron beam size of high energy using diffraction radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Naumenko, G A

    2003-01-01

    Treatments of the usage of diffraction radiation from the relativistic electrons moving though a conductive slit for the transverse beam size measurement encounter hard limitation of the method sensitivity for the electron energy larger than 1 GeV. We consider in this article a possibility of application of the artificial phase shift, which can take place when transverse electron position varies. This allows us to realize the measurements of transverse size of supper-relativistic electron beams with the small emittance.

  7. Radiation Induced Conductivity Of Space Used Polymers Under High Energy Electron Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Paulmier, T.; Dirassen, B.; Arnaout, M.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Polymers are widely used on spacecraft for different specific functions : thermal and electrical insulation, mechanical support, adhesion... These polymers are highly sensitive to radiation met in space. Their electric properties is especially significantly altered leading to very specific behaviour in term of charge transport and discharge processes. Different dedicated facilities have been developed at ONERA, with CNES support, for the characterisation of space used ...

  8. The Possibility of Noninvasive Micron High Energy Electron Beam Size Measurement Using Diffraction Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Naumenko, Gennady; Aryshev, Alexander; Cline, David B; Fukui, Yasuo; Hamatsu, Ryosuke; Hayano, Hitoshi; Karataev, Pavel; Muto, Toshiya; Potylitsyn, Alexander; Ross, Marc; Urakawa, Junji

    2005-01-01

    During the last years a noninvasive method for beam size measurement based on the optical diffraction radiation (ODR) has been in progress (P. Karataev, et al., Physical Review Letters 93, 244802 (2004). However this technique encounters with hard sensitivity limitation for electron energies larger than several GeV. For example, for SLAC conditions the sensitivity of this method is 4 orders smaller than an appropriate one. We suggest to use a "dis-phased" slit target, where two semi-planes are turned with respect to each other at a small "dis-phased" angle. In order to ensure the interference between the diverged radiation beams we use a cylindrical lens. This method has much better sensitivity and resolution. A "dis-phased" angle 10 milliradians gives the optimal sensitivity to 5 microns transversal beam size. The theoretical model for calculating the ODR radiation from such targets (including focusing by cylindrical lens) is presented. It is shown that the sensitivity of this method does not depend on the L...

  9. High-energy emission from non-relativistic radiative shocks: application to gamma-ray novae

    CERN Document Server

    Vurm, Indrek

    2016-01-01

    Multiwavelength radiation from relativistic particles accelerated at shocks in novae and other astrophysical sources carries a wealth of information about the outflow properties and the microphysical processes at work near the shocks. The observation of GeV gamma-rays from novae by Fermi/LAT demonstrates that the shocks in these systems can accelerate particles to energies of at least $\\sim 10$ GeV. The low-energy extension of the same non-thermal particle distribution inevitably gives rise to emission extending into the X-ray band. Above $\\gtrsim 10$ keV this radiation can escape the system without significant absorption/attenuation, and can potentially be detected by NuSTAR. We present theoretical models for hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission from radiative shocks in both leptonic and hadronic scenarios, accounting for the rapid evolution of the downstream properties due to the fast cooling of thermal plasma. Due to strong Coulomb cooling of the mildly relativistic electrons nominally responsible for produci...

  10. High energy emission of GRB 130427A: evidence for inverse Compton radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Zhang, Fu-Wen; Liang, Yun-Feng; He, Hao-Ning; Zhou, Bei; Yang, Rui-Zhi; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming

    2013-01-01

    A nearby super-luminous burst GRB 130427A was simultaneously detected by five $\\gamma$-ray space telescopes ({\\it Swift}, Fermi-GBM/LAT, Konus-Wind, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL and AGILE) and by three RAPTOR full-sky persistent monitors. The isotropic $\\gamma-$ray energy release is of $\\sim 10^{54}$ erg and the absence of a jet break in the X-ray afterglow lightcurve up to $t>7$ days suggests an intrinsic energy release of $> 10^{52}$ erg, rendering it the most powerful explosion among the GRBs with a redshift $z\\leq 0.5$. The emission above 100 MeV lasted about one day and four photons are at energies greater than 40 GeV. We show that the count rate of 100 MeV-100 GeV emission may be mainly accounted for by the forward shock synchrotron radiation and the inverse Compton radiation likely dominates at GeV-TeV energies. In particular, an inverse Compton radiation origin is established for the $\\sim (95.3,~47.3,~41.4)$ GeV photons arriving at $t\\sim (243,~256.3,~610.6)$ s after the trigger of Fermi-GBM. Interestingly, the ...

  11. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION OF GRB 130427A: EVIDENCE FOR INVERSE COMPTON RADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Zhang, Fu-Wen; He, Hao-Ning; Zhou, Bei; Yang, Rui-Zhi; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Tam, P. H. T. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liang, Yun-Feng, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn [Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Guangxi 530004 (China)

    2013-10-20

    A nearby superluminous burst GRB 130427A was simultaneously detected by six γ-ray space telescopes (Swift, the Fermi GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM)/Large Area Telescope, Konus-Wind, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, AGILE, and RHESSI) and by three RAPTOR full-sky persistent monitors. The isotropic γ-ray energy release is ∼10{sup 54} erg, rendering it the most powerful explosion among gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a redshift z ≤ 0.5. The emission above 100 MeV lasted about one day, and four photons are at energies greater than 40 GeV. We show that the count rate of 100 MeV-100 GeV emission may be mainly accounted for by the forward shock synchrotron radiation and the inverse Compton radiation likely dominates at GeV-TeV energies. In particular, an inverse Compton radiation origin is favored for the ∼(95.3, 47.3, 41.4, 38.5, 32) GeV photons arriving at t ∼ (243, 256.3, 610.6, 3409.8, 34366.2) s after the trigger of Fermi-GBM. Interestingly, the external inverse Compton scattering of the prompt emission (the second episode, i.e., t ∼ 120-260 s) by the forward-shock-accelerated electrons is expected to produce a few γ-rays at energies above 10 GeV, while five were detected in the same time interval. A possible unified model for the prompt soft γ-ray, optical, and GeV emission of GRB 130427A, GRB 080319B, and GRB 090902B is outlined. Implications of the null detection of >1 TeV neutrinos from GRB 130427A by IceCube are discussed.

  12. High-energy cosmic-ray electrons - A new measurement using transition-radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G.; Mueller, D.; Prince, T.

    1977-01-01

    A new detector for cosmic-ray electrons, consisting of a combination of a transition-radiation detector and a shower detector, has been constructed, calibrated at accelerator beams, and exposed in a balloon flight under 5 g/sq cm of atmosphere. The design of this instrument and the methods of data analysis are described. Preliminary results in the energy range 9-300 GeV are presented. The energy spectrum of electrons is found to be significantly steeper than that of protons, consistent with a long escape lifetime of cosmic rays in the galaxy.

  13. Implicit filtered PN for high-energy density thermal radiation transport using discontinuous Galerkin finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboure, Vincent M.; McClarren, Ryan G.; Hauck, Cory D.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we provide a fully-implicit implementation of the time-dependent, filtered spherical harmonics (FPN) equations for non-linear, thermal radiative transfer. We investigate local filtering strategies and analyze the effect of the filter on the conditioning of the system, showing in particular that the filter improves the convergence properties of the iterative solver. We also investigate numerically the rigorous error estimates derived in the linear setting, to determine whether they hold also for the non-linear case. Finally, we simulate a standard test problem on an unstructured mesh and make comparisons with implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) calculations.

  14. Implicit Filtered PN for High-Energy Density Thermal Radiation Transport using Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Laboure, Vincent M; Hauck, Cory D

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we provide a fully-implicit implementation of the time-dependent, filtered spherical harmonics (FPN) equations for non-linear, thermal radiative transfer. We investigate local filtering strategies and analyze the effect of the filter on the conditioning of the system in the streaming limit, showing in particular that the filter improves the convergence properties of the iterative solver. We also investigate numerically the rigorous error estimates derived in the linear setting, to determine whether they hold also for the non-linear case. Finally, we simulate a standard test problem on an unstructured mesh and make comparisons with implicit Monte-Carlo (IMC) calculations.

  15. Strangeness production in high-energy collisions and Hawking-Unruh radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Yassin, Hayam; Abo Elyazeed, Eman R.

    The assumption that the production of quark-antiquark pairs and their sequential string-breaking takes place, likely as a tunneling process, through the event horizon of the color confinement determines the freezeout temperature and gives a plausible interpretation for the thermal pattern of elementary and nucleus-nucleus collisions. When relating the black-hole electric charges to the baryon-chemical potentials, it was found that the phenomenologically deduced parameters from the ratios of various particle species and the higher-order moments of net-proton multiplicity in the statistical thermal models and Polyakov linear-sigma model agree well with the ones determined from the thermal radiation from charged black hole. Accordingly, the resulting freezeout conditions, such as normalized entropy density s/T3 = 7 and average energy per particle /≃ 1GeV, are confirmed at finite chemical potentials as well. Furthermore, the problem of strangeness production in elementary collisions can be interpreted by thermal particle production from the Hawking-Unruh radiation. Consequently, the freezeout temperature depends on the quark masses. This leads to a deviation from full equilibrium and thus a suppression of the strangeness production in the elementary collisions. But in nucleus-nucleus collisions, an average temperature should be introduced in order to dilute the quark masses. This nearly removes the strangeness suppression. An extension to finite chemical potentials is introduced. The particle ratios of kaon-to-pion (K+/π+), phi-to-kaon (ϕ/K‑) and antilambda-to-pion (Λ¯/π‑) are determined from Hawking-Unruh radiation and compared with the thermal calculations and the measurements in different experiments. We conclude that these particle ratios can be reproduced, at least qualitatively, as Hawking-Unruh radiation at finite chemical potential. With increasing energy, both K+/π+ and ϕ/K‑ keep their maximum values at low SPS energies. But the further energy

  16. Some aspects of radiation protection near high-energy proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Tuyn, Jan Willem Nicolaas

    1977-01-01

    The CERN site near Geneva borders Satigny and Meyrin in Switzerland and Saint-Genis-Pouilly and Prevention in France. The 600 MeV proton synchrocyclotron (SC) has been in operation since 1957, the 28 GeV proton synchrotron (PS) since 1960, and the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) since 1971. A fourth large accelerator, the 400 GeV super proton synchrotron (SPS), will soon be in service. The internal and external radiation protection problems caused by these machines, together with the solutions, are reviewed in the light of experience. (5 refs).

  17. High energy electron radiation effect on Ni/4H-SiC SBD and Ohmic contact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lin; Zhang Yi-Men; Zhang Yu-Ming; Han Chao; Ma Yong-Ji

    2009-01-01

    The Ni/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) and transfer length method (TLM) test patterns of Ni/4H-SiC Ohmic contacts were fabricated,and irradiated with 1 MeV electrons up to a dose of 3.43×1014 e/cm-2.After radiation,the forward currents of the SBDs at 2 V decreased by about 50%,and the reverse currents at -200 V increased by less than 30%.Schottky barrier height (φB) of the Ni/4H-SiC SBD increased from 1.20 eV to 1.21 eV under 0 V irradiation bias,and decreased from 1.25 eV to 1.19 eV under -30 V irradiation bias.The degradation of φB could be explained by the variation of interface states of Schottky contacts.The on-state resistance (Rs) and the reverse current increased with the dose,which can be ascribed to the radiation defects in bulk material.The specific contact resistance (ρc) of

  18. Problem of work on a high energy synchrotron submitted to large radiation dose

    CERN Document Server

    Gouiran, R

    1975-01-01

    Firstly, organic components have to be surveyed and eventually exchanged; secondly, work done by the staff in radioactive areas should be strictly controlled and minimized. To reach these goals radiation and radioactivity should not only be measured but also predicted years in advance. Radiation doses are computed, measured and predicted according to the proton loss pattern around the accelerator. A correlation scheme of doses versus accelerator operation is then deduced to predict the dose on any sensitive part of the accelerator. In the same way a radioactive pattern is computed, measured and accurately predicted in terms of dose rate. Work on the accelerator is studied in detail in order to forecast its duration and the corresponding dose absorbed by the staff. With these methods, it is easy now not only to predict the fate of the equipment and the doses to be received by the staff, but also to organize the work accordingly and possibly to program the accelerator operation (proton intensity and proton uses...

  19. An Appreciation for the Rabbit Ladderlike Modeling of Radiation-induced Lung Injury with High-energy X-Ray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Ming Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the utility of rabbit ladderlike model of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI for the future investigation of computed tomography perfusion. Methods: A total of 72 New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: 36 rabbits in the test group were administered 25 Gy of single fractionated radiation to the whole lung of unilateral lung; 36 rabbits in the control group were sham-radiated. All rabbits were subsequently sacrificed at 1, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 h, and 1, 2, 4, 8,1 6, 24 weeks after radiation, and then six specimens were extracted from the upper, middle and lower fields of the bilateral lungs. The pathological changes in these specimens were observed with light and electron microscopy; the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 in local lung tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: (1 Radiation-induced lung injury occurred in all rabbits in the test group. (2 Expression of TNF-a and TGF-β1 at 1 h and 48 h after radiation, demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the test and control groups (each P 0.05. At greater than 48 h postradiation the relative amount of collagen fibers in the test groups significantly differ from the control groups (each P < 0.05, correlating well with the time postradiation (r = 0.99318. Conclusions: A consistent and reliable rabbit model of RILI can be generated in gradient using 25 Gy of high-energy X-ray, which can simulate the development and evolution of RILI.

  20. Development of approximate shielding calculation method for high energy cosmic radiation on LEO satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sin, M. W.; Kim, M. H. [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    To calculate total dose effect on semi-conductor devices in satellite for a period of space mission effectively, two approximate calculation models for a comic radiation shielding were proposed. They are a sectoring method and a chord-length distribution method. When an approximate method was applied in this study, complex structure of satellite was described into multiple 1-dimensional slabs, structural materials were converted to reference material(aluminum), and the pre-calculated dose-depth conversion function was introduced to simplify the calculation process. Verification calculation was performed for orbit location and structure geometry of KITSAT-1 and compared with detailed 3-dimensional calculation results and experimental values. The calculation results from approximate method were estimated conservatively with acceptable error. However, results for satellite mission simulation were underestimated in total dose rate compared with experimental values.

  1. Absorption of Very High Energy $\\gamma$-Rays by Intergalactic Infrared Radiation A New Determination

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    1998-01-01

    We present a new calculation of the intergalactic gamma-ray absorption coefficient as a function of both energy and redshift. In reexamining this problem, we make use of a new, empirically based calculation (as opposed to previous model calculations) of the intergalactic infrared radiation field. We find smaller opacities than those given previously (Stecker & De Jager 1997). We apply our results to the new observations of the flaring gamma-ray spectra of Mrk421 and Mrk501, both at a redshift of apx. 0.03. Our new calculations indicate that there should be no significant curvature in the spectra of these sources for energies below 10 TeV, as indicated by recent observations. However, the intrinsic spectra of these sources should be harder by apx. 0.2 to 0.45 in the spectral index in the 1 to 10 TeV range with an intergalactic absorption cutoff above apx. 20 TeV.

  2. Radiation electromagnetic effect in germanium crystals under high-energy. cap alpha. -particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikoin, I.K.; Babichenko, V.S.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.; Rzhanov, A.E.; Filippov, V.I.

    1984-05-01

    Results of experimental investigation into radiation electromagnetic effect (REM) in samples of germanium crystals under approximately 40 MeV ..cap alpha..-particle irradiation in a cyclotron are presented. A high level of excitation, volumetric character of generation of non-equilibrium carriers and formation of defects as well as the form of their spatial distribution are shown to result in some peculiarities of the EMF of the REM effect on the particle flux, fluence and sample parameters. Agreement of theoretical calculations, conducted with account of specificity of ..cap alpha..-particle interaction with a crystal, and experimental data is obtained. It is revealed that the REM effect can be applied in obtaining data on spatial distribution of non-equilibrium carrier concentrations along the particle trajectory in the crystal.

  3. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker Readout with High Energy Collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker is the outermost of the three subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector. It contributes significantly to the precision of the momentum measurement of charged particles and to the identification of electrons. On the TRT front end electronics this is realized by discriminating the straw signal against two separate thresholds: a low one for tracking and a high one for electron identification. The electronics can also be configured to provide a trigger signal, which has been utilized to build a cosmic ray trigger that became extremely useful for the TRT as well as other subdetectors during ATLAS commissioning. This note will describe the TRT readout electronics and data acquisition, with emphasis on the experience gained during the first years of operation.

  4. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy/graphite fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    Publications and theses generated on composite research are listed. Surface energy changes of an epoxy based on tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM)/diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), T-300 graphite fiber and T-300/5208 (graphite fiber/epoxy) composites were investigated after irradiation with 0.5 MeV electrons. Electron spin resonance (ESR) investigations of line shapes and the radical decay behavior were made of an epoxy based on tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM)/diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), T-300 graphite fiber, and T-300/5208 (graphite fiber/epoxy) composites after irradiation with Co(60) gamma-radiation or 0.5 MeV electrons. The results of the experiments are discussed.

  5. Radiation tolerance study of a commercial 65 nm CMOS technology for high energy physics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lili; Gerardin, Simone; Bagatin, Marta; Bisello, Dario; Mattiazzo, Serena; Paccagnella, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the radiation tolerance study of a commercial 65 nm technology, which is a strong candidate for the Large Hadron Collider applications. After exposure to 3 MeV protons till 1 Grad dose, the 65 nm CMOS transistors, especially the pMOSFETs, showed severe long-term degradation mainly in the saturation drain currents. There were some differences between the degradation levels in the nMOSFETs and the pMOSFETs, which were likely attributed to the positive charges trapped in the gate spacers. After exposure to heavy ions till multiple strikes, the pMOSFETs did not show any sudden loss of drain currents, the degradations in the characteristics were negligible.

  6. Soft errors in 10-nm-scale magnetic tunnel junctions exposed to high-energy heavy-ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Makino, Takahiro; Onoda, Shinobu; Ohshima, Takeshi; Ikeda, Shoji; Sato, Hideo; Inocencio Enobio, Eli Christopher; Endoh, Tetsuo; Ohno, Hideo

    2017-08-01

    The influences of various types of high-energy heavy-ion radiation on 10-nm-scale CoFeB-MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicular easy axis have been investigated. In addition to possible latent damage, which has already been pointed out in previous studies, high-energy heavy-ion bombardments demonstrated that the magnetic tunnel junctions may exhibit clear flips between their high- and low-resistance states designed for a digital bit 1 or 0. It was also demonstrated that flipped magnetic tunnel junctions still may provide proper memory functions such as read, write, and hold capabilities. These two findings proved that high-energy heavy ions can produce recoverable bit flips in magnetic tunnel junctions, i.e., soft errors. Data analyses suggested that the resistance flips stem from magnetization reversals of the ferromagnetic layers and that each of them is caused by a single strike of heavy ions. It was concurrently found that an ion strike does not always result in a flip, suggesting a stochastic process behind the flip. Experimental data also showed that the flip phenomenon is dependent on the device and heavy-ion characteristics. Among them, the diameter of the device and the linear energy transfer of the heavy ions were revealed as the key parameters. From their dependences, the physical mechanism behind the flip was discussed. It is likely that a 10-nm-scale ferromagnetic disk loses its magnetization due to a local temperature increase induced by a single strike of heavy ions; this demagnetization is followed by a cooling period associated with a possible stochastic recovery process. On the basis of this hypothesis, a simple analytical model was developed, and it was found that the model accounts for the results reasonably well. This model also predicted that magnetic tunnel junctions provide sufficiently high soft-error reliability for use in space, highlighting their advantage over their counterpart conventional semiconductor memories.

  7. Additional dose assessment from the activation of high-energy linear accelerators used in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ateia Embarka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that medical linear accelerators generate activation products when operated above certain electron (photon energies. The aim of the present work is to assess the activation behavior of a medium-energy radiotherapy linear accelerator by applying in situ gamma-ray spectrometry and dose measurements, and to estimate the additional dose to radiotherapy staff on the basis of these results. Spectral analysis was performed parallel to dose rate measurements in the isocenter of the linear accelerator, immediately after the termination of irradiation. The following radioisotopes were detected by spectral analysis: 28Al, 62Cu, 56Mn, 64Cu, 187W, and 57Ni. The short-lived isotopes such as 28Al and 62Cu are the most important factors of the clinical routine, while the contribution to the radiation dose of medium-lived isotopes such as 56Mn, 57Ni, 64Cu, and 187W increases during the working day. Measured dose rates at the isocenter ranged from 2.2 µSv/h to 10 µSv/h in various measuring points of interest for the members of the radiotherapy staff. Within the period of 10 minutes, the dose rate decreased to values of 0.8 µSv/h. According to actual workloads in radiotherapy departments, a realistic exposure scenario was set, resulting in a maximal additional annual whole body dose to the radiotherapy staff of about 3.5 mSv.

  8. High-energy radiation from the impact of high-velocity clouds on the galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ana Laura; Romero, Gustavo Esteban; del Valle, Maŕıa Victoria

    2017-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) are HI clouds with velocities of more than 100 km s-1. These clouds do not partake of the differential Galactic rotation; a significant fraction of them are falling down towards the Galactic disk. The typical mass of these clouds is ˜ 104 M⊙, so in a collision with the disk energies of the order of ˜ 1051 erg can be released into the interstellar medium. Such collisions should produce strong shocks propagating through both the cloud and the disk. Under adequate conditions, these shocks can accelerate particles up to relativistic energies by Fermi mechanism. In this work, we study the hydrodynamical inter-actions and the relevant radiative processes (thermal and non-thermal) associated with HVC-disk collisions. We find that a shock propagating through a typical cloud should give rise to significant non-thermal radio emission, whereas the protons accelerated there diffuse and might emit elsewhere. A shock propagating through the disk, on the other hand, produces extended gamma-ray emission and injects protons with energies from 10 GeV to ˜1 TeV. Taking into account the injected mass rate of HI in our Galaxy by cloud bombardement, we found that ˜ 10 % of the Galactic cosmic ray power could be generated by these cloud-disk collisional events.

  9. Acceleration and radiation of ultra-high energy protons in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Vannoni, G; Gabici, S; Kelner, S R; Prosekin, A

    2009-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are believed to be capable to accelerate protons at accretion shocks to energies exceeding 10^18 eV. At these energies, the losses caused by interactions of cosmic rays with photons of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) become effective and determine the maximum energy of protons and the shape of the energy spectrum in the cutoff region. The aim of this work is the study of the formation of the energy spectrum of accelerated protons at accretion shocks of galaxy clusters and of the characteristics of their broad band emission. The proton energy distribution is calculated self-consistently via a time-dependent numerical treatment of the shock acceleration process which takes into account the proton energy losses due to interactions with the CMBR. We calculate the energy distribution of accelerated protons, as well as the flux of broad-band emission produced by secondary electrons and positrons via synchrotron and inverse Compton scattering processes. We find that the downstre...

  10. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker Readout with High Energy Collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector containing close to 350,000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) operated with a Xenon-based gas mixture. The TRT data acquisition uses two separate front-end ASICS: the ASDBLR (analog) and DTMROC (digital). The eight-channel ASDBLR (Amplifier, Shaper, Discriminator and BaseLine Restorer) provides a three level out using two thresholds: a low one for tracking and a high one for electron identification. Two ASDBLR chips input into a single, sixteen-channel DTMROC (Digital Time Measurement and ReadOut Chip), which encodes the time over low (high) threshold in 3.125 ns (25 ns) time steps in a programmable depth pipeline awaiting a level 1 trigger. When a level 1 trigger is received, three LHC bunch crossings worth of data (75 ns) are read out. The DTMROC also provides a "Fast-OR" signal of its inputs, which has been utilized to build a level 1 trigger for cosmic rays traversing the ATLAS Inner Detector. Th...

  11. Newborn Magnetars as sources of Gravitational Radiation: constraints from High Energy observations of Magnetar Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Dall'Osso, S; Osso, Simone Dall'; Stella, Luigi

    2007-01-01

    Soft Gamma Repeaters and the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars are believed to contain slowly spinning "magnetars". The enormous energy liberated in the 2004 Dece 27 giant flare from SGR 1806-20, together with the likely recurrence time of such events, points to an internal magnetic field strength ~ 10^{16} G. Such strong fields are expected to be generated by a coherent alpha-Omega dynamo in the early seconds after the Neutron Star formation, if its spin period is of a few milliseconds at most. A substantial deformation of the NS is caused by such fields and a newborn millisecond-spinning magnetar would thus radiate for a few days a strong gravitational wave signal. Such a signal may be detected with Advanced LIGO-class detectors up to the distance of the Virgo cluster, where ~ 1 magnetar per year are expected to form. Recent X-ray observations reveal that SNRs around magnetar candidates do not show evidence for a larger energy content than standard SNRs (Vink & Kuiper 2006). This is at variance with what would be...

  12. Nanoscale TiO₂-coated LPGs as radiation-tolerant humidity sensors for high-energy physics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consales, Marco; Berruti, Gaia; Borriello, Anna; Giordano, Michele; Buontempo, Salvatore; Breglio, Giovanni; Makovec, Alajos; Petagna, Paolo; Cusano, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    This Letter deals with a feasibility analysis for the development of radiation-tolerant fiber-optic humidity sensors based on long-period grating (LPG) technology to be applied in high-energy physics (HEP) experiments currently running at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). In particular, here we propose a high-sensitivity LPG sensor coated with a finely tuned titanium dioxide (TiO₂) thin layer (~100 nm thick) through the solgel deposition method. Relative humidity (RH) monitoring in the range 0%-75% and at four different temperatures (in the range -10°C-25°C) was carried out to assess sensor performance in real operative conditions required in typical experiments running at CERN. Experimental results demonstrate the very high RH sensitivities of the proposed device (up to 1.4 nm/% RH in correspondence to very low humidity levels), which turned out to be from one to three orders of magnitude higher than those exhibited by fiber Bragg grating sensors coated with micrometer-thin polyimide overlays. The radiation tolerance capability of the TiO₂-coated LPG sensor is also investigated by comparing the sensing performance before and after its exposure to a 1 Mrad dose of γ-ionizing radiation. Overall, the results collected demonstrate the strong potential of the proposed technology with regard to its future exploitation in HEP applications as a robust and valid alternative to the commercial (polymer-based) hygrometers currently used.

  13. An Appreciation for the Rabbit Ladderlike Modeling of Radiation-induced Lung Injury with High-energy X-Ray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Ming Fang; Chun-Hong Hu; Xiao-Yun Hu; Xuan-Jun Yao; Ping-Yan Qian; Ju-Ying Zhou; Jian Guo

    2015-01-01

    .99318).Conclusions:A consistent and reliable rabbit model of RILI can be generated in gradient using 25 Gy of high-energy X-ray,which can simulate the development and evolution of RILI.

  14. Radiation from Ag high energy density Z-pinch plasmas and applications to lasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, M. E., E-mail: mweller@unr.edu; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Petkov, E. E. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Apruzese, J. P.; Giuliani, J. L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States); Chuvatin, A. S. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-03-15

    Silver (Ag) wire arrays were recently introduced as efficient x-ray radiators and have been shown to create L-shell plasmas that have the highest electron temperature (>1.8 keV) observed on the Zebra generator so far and upwards of 30 kJ of energy output. In this paper, results of single planar wire arrays and double planar wire arrays of Ag and mixed Ag and Al that were tested on the UNR Zebra generator are presented and compared. To further understand how L-shell Ag plasma evolves in time, a time-gated x-ray spectrometer was designed and fielded, which has a spectral range of approximately 3.5–5.0 Å. With this, L-shell Ag as well as cold L{sub α} and L{sub β} Ag lines was captured and analyzed along with photoconducting diode (PCD) signals (>0.8 keV). Along with PCD signals, other signals, such as filtered XRD (>0.2 keV) and Si-diodes (SiD) (>9 keV), are analyzed covering a broad range of energies from a few eV to greater than 53 keV. The observation and analysis of cold L{sub α} and L{sub β} lines show possible correlations with electron beams and SiD signals. Recently, an interesting issue regarding these Ag plasmas is whether lasing occurs in the Ne-like soft x-ray range, and if so, at what gains? To help answer this question, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) kinetic model was utilized to calculate theoretical lasing gains. It is shown that the Ag L-shell plasma conditions produced on the Zebra generator at 1.7 maximum current may be adequate to produce gains as high as 6 cm{sup −1} for various 3p → 3s transitions. Other potential lasing transitions, including higher Rydberg states, are also included in detail. The overall importance of Ag wire arrays and plasmas is discussed.

  15. Kinetic Modeling of Radiative Turbulence in Relativistic Astrophysical Plasmas: Particle Acceleration and High-Energy Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, John

    In the near future, next-generation telescopes, covering most of the electromagnetic spectrum, will provide a view into the very earliest stages of galaxy formation. To accurately interpret these future observations, accurate and high-resolution simulations of the first stars and galaxies are vital. This proposal is centered on the formation of the first galaxies in the Universe and their observational signatures in preparation for these future observatories. This proposal has two overall goals: 1. To simulate the formation and evolution of a statistically significant sample of galaxies during the first billion years of the Universe, including all relevant astrophysics while resolving individual molecular clouds, in various cosmological environments. These simulations will utilize a sophisticated physical model of star and black hole formation and feedback, including radiation transport and magnetic fields, which will lead to the most realistic and resolved predictions for the early universe; 2. To predict the observational features of the first galaxies throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, allowing for optimal extraction of galaxy and dark matter halo properties from their photometry, imaging, and spectra; The proposed research plan addresses a timely and relevant issue to theoretically prepare for the interpretation of future observations of the first galaxies in the Universe. A suite of adaptive mesh refinement simulations will be used to follow the formation and evolution of thousands of galaxies observable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) that will be launched during the second year of this project. The simulations will have also tracked the formation and death of over 100,000 massive metal-free stars. Currently, there is a gap of two orders of magnitude in stellar mass between the smallest observed z > 6 galaxy and the largest simulated galaxy from "first principles", capturing its entire star formation history. This project will eliminate this

  16. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, J., E-mail: julianna.szabo@energia.mta.hu [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Energy Research, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Palfalvi, J.K. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Energy Research, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  17. Mechanisms Responsible for High Energy Radiation Induced Damage to Single-Stranded DNA Modified by Radiosensitizing 5-Halogenated Deoxyuridines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shoushan; Zhao, Peiwen; Zhang, Changzhe; Bu, Yuxiang

    2016-03-17

    Experimental studies showed that high energy radiation induced base release and DNA backbone breaks mainly occur at the neighboring 5' nucleotide when a single-stranded DNA is modified by radiosensitizing 5-halogenated deoxyuridines. However, no mechanism can be used to interpret these experimental observations. To better understand the radiosensitivity of 5-halogenated deoxyuridines, mechanisms involving hydrogen abstraction by the uracil-5-yl radical from the C2' and C3' positions of an adjacent nucleotide separately followed by the C3'-O3' or N-glycosidic bond rupture and the P-O3' bond breakage are investigated in the DNA sequence 5'-TU(•)-3' employing density functional theory calculations in the present study. It is found that hydrogen abstractions from both positions are comparable with the one from the C2' site slightly more favorable. The N-glycosidic bond cleavage in the neighboring 5' nucleotide following the internucleotide C2'-Ha abstraction is estimated to have the lowest activation free energies, indicating that the adjacent 5' base release dominates electron induced damage to single-stranded DNA incorporated by 5-halogenated deoxyuridines. Relative to the P-O3' bond breakage after the internucleotide C3'-H abstraction, the C3'-O3' bond rupture in the neighboring 5' nucleotide following the internucleotide C2'-Ha abstraction is predicted to have a lower activation free energy, implying that single-stranded DNA backbone breaks are prone to occur at the C3'-O3' bond site. The 5'-TU(•)-3' species has substantial electron affinity and can even capture a hydrated electron, forming the 5'-TU(-)-3' anion. However, the electron induced C3'-O3' bond rupture in 5'-TU(-)-3' anion via a pathway of internucleotide proton abstraction is only minor in both the gas phase and aqueous solution. The present theoretical predictions can interpret rationally experimental observations, thereby demonstrating that the mechanisms proposed here are responsible for high

  18. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  19. The effect of partially used high energy photon on intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Nam Joon; Seok, Jin Yong; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Choi, Ji Hun; Park, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    A selection of proper energy in treatment planning is very important because of having different dose distribution in body as photon energy. In generally, the low energy photon has been used in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H and N) cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of partially used high energy photon at posterior oblique fields on IMRT plan for H and N cancer. The study was carried out on 10 patients (nasopharyngeal cancer 5, tonsilar cancer 5) treated with IMRT in Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. CT images were acquired 3 mm of thickness in the same condition and the treatment plan was performed by Eclipse (Ver.7.1, Varian, Palo Alto, USA). Two plans were generated under same planing objectives, dose volume constraints, and eight fields setting: (1) The low energy plan (LEP) created using 6 MV beam alone, (2) the partially used high energy plan (PHEP) created partially using 15 MV beam at two posterior oblique fields with deeper penetration depths, while 6 MV beam was used at the rest of fields. The plans for LEP and PHEP were compared in terms of coverage, conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for planning target volume (PTV). For organs at risk (OARs), D{sub mean} and D{sub 50%} were analyzed on both parotid glands and D{sub max}, D{sub 1%} for spinal cord were analyzed. Integral dose (ID) and total monitor unit (MU) were compared as addition parameters. For the comparing dose to normal tissue of posterior neck, the posterior-normal tissue volume (P-NTV) was set on the patients respectively. The D{sub mean}, V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 25Gy} for P-NTV were evaluated by using dose volume histogram (DVH). The dose distributions were similar with regard to coverage, CI and HI for PTV between the LEP and PHEP. No evident difference was observed in the spinal cord. However, the D{sub mean}, D{sub 50%} for both parotid gland were slightly reduced by 0.6%, 0.7% in PHEP. The ID was reduced by 1

  20. Very-high-energy gamma radiation from supernova remnants as seen with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Bochow, Anne; Gast, Henning; Marandon, Vincent; Renaud, Matthieu; Hofmann, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma radiation has already been detected from several supernova remnants (SNRs). These objects, which are well-studied in radio, optical and X-ray wavelengths, constitute one of the most intriguing source classes in VHE astronomy. H.E.S.S., an array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes in Namibia, has recorded an extensive dataset of VHE gamma-ray observations covering the central region of the Milky Way, both from pointed observations as well as from the Galactic Plane Survey conducted in the inner region of the Galaxy. From radio observations, several hundred SNRs are known in the Milky Way, but until now only few of them have been identified as VHE gamma-ray emitters. Using the H.E.S.S. dataset and a large ensemble of radio SNRs localized in the inner region of the Galaxy, the standard framework that links the origin of cosmic rays to the gamma-ray visibility of SNRs can now be tested. Here we present the ensemble of investigated SNRs and discuss constraints...

  1. Laboratory measurements of materials in extreme conditions; The use of high energy radiation sources for high pressure studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cauble, R.; Remington, B.A.

    1998-06-01

    High energy lasers can be used to study material conditions that are appropriate fort inertial confinement fusion: that is, materials at high densities, temperatures, and pressures. Pulsed power devices can offer similar opportunities. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be a high energy multi-beam laser designed to achieve the thermonuclear ignition of a mm-scale DT-filled target in the laboratory. At the same time, NE will provide the physics community with a unique tool for the study of high energy density matter at states unreachable by any other laboratory technique. Here we describe how these lasers and pulsed power tools can contribute to investigations of high energy density matter in the areas of material properties and equations of state, extend present laboratory shock techniques such as high-speed jets to new regimes, and allow study of extreme conditions found in astrophysical phenomena.

  2. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusciac, D.; Bordy, J.-M.; Daures, J.; Blideanu, V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists' demands for high-energy (6 - 9 MeV) photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors) are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes), a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV) has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this "realistic" radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  3. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusciac D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists’ demands for high-energy (6 – 9 MeV photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes, a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this “realistic” radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  4. Theoretical and experimental studies of the radiative properties of matter at high energy densities and their application to the problems of inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, O. B.; Orlov, N. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    The paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies of the radiative properties of plasmas produced by heating and compression of various materials to high energy densities. The specific features of the theoretical plasma model known as the ion model, which is used to calculate the radiative characteristics of plasmas of complex chemical composition, are discussed. The theoretical approach based on this model is applied to the plasma produced during the explosion of the X-pinch wires. The theoretical estimate of the radiation efficiency is compared with the experimental data on the total energy yield from an X-pinch made of two different wires (NiCr and Alloy 188). The radiative characteristics of (C12 H16 O8) and (C8 H12 O6) plasmas are calculated for the temperature diagnostics of plasmas produced from porous targets employed in inertial confinement fusion experiments with the use of laser radiation and heavy-ion beams.

  5. A GPU-based Calculation Method for Near Field Effects of Cherenkov Radiation Induced by Ultra High Energy Cosmic Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Chia-Yu; Chen, Pisin

    2010-01-01

    The radio approach for detecting the ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos has become a mature field. The Cherenkov signals in radio detection are originated from the charge excess of particle showers due to Askaryan effect. The conventional way of calculating the Cherenkov pulses by making Fraunhofer approximation fails when the sizes of the elongated showers become comparable with the detection distances. We present a calculation method of Cherenkov pulses based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and attain a satisfying effeciency via the GPU- acceleration. Our method provides a straightforward way of the near field calculation, which would be important for ultra high energy particle showers, especailly the electromagnetic showers induced by the high energy leptons produced in the neutrino charge current interactions.

  6. The clinical potential of high energy, intensity and energy modulated electron beams optimized by simulated annealing for conformal radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Bill Jean, Jr.

    Purpose. The advent of new, so called IVth Generation, external beam radiation therapy treatment machines (e.g. Scanditronix' MM50 Racetrack Microtron) has raised the question of how the capabilities of these new machines might be exploited to produce extremely conformal dose distributions. Such machines possess the ability to produce electron energies as high as 50 MeV and, due to their scanned beam delivery of electron treatments, to modulate intensity and even energy, within a broad field. Materials and methods. Two patients with 'challenging' tumor geometries were selected from the patient archives of the Cancer Therapy and Research Center (CTRC), in San Antonio Texas. The treatment scheme that was tested allowed for twelve, energy and intensity modulated beams, equi-spaced about the patient-only intensity was modulated for the photon treatment. The elementary beams, incident from any of the twelve allowed directions, were assumed parallel, and the elementary electron beams were modeled by elementary beam data. The optimal arrangement of elementary beam energies and/or intensities was optimized by Szu-Hartley Fast Simulated Annealing Optimization. Optimized treatment plans were determined for each patient using both the high energy, intensity and energy modulated electron (HIEME) modality, and the 6 MV photon modality. The 'quality' of rival plans were scored using three different, popular objective functions which included Root Mean Square (RMS), Maximize Dose Subject to Dose and Volume Limitations (MDVL - Morrill et. al.), and Probability of Uncomplicated Tumor Control (PUTC) methods. The scores of the two optimized treatments (i.e. HIEME and intensity modulated photons) were compared to the score of the conventional plan with which the patient was actually treated. Results. The first patient evaluated presented a deeply located target volume, partially surrounding the spinal cord. A healthy right kidney was immediately adjacent to the tumor volume, separated

  7. High energy beam lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  8. Technology for radiation efficiency measurement of high-power halogen tungsten lamp used in calibration of high-energy laser energy meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ji Feng; Hu, Xiao Yang; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Chang, Yan

    2015-03-20

    The calibration method using a high-power halogen tungsten lamp as a calibration source has many advantages such as strong equivalence and high power, so it is very fit for the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. However, high-power halogen tungsten lamps after power-off still reserve much residual energy and continually radiate energy, which is difficult to be measured. Two measuring systems were found to solve the problems. One system is composed of an integrating sphere and two optical spectrometers, which can accurately characterize the radiative spectra and power-time variation of the halogen tungsten lamp. This measuring system was then calibrated using a normal halogen tungsten lamp made of the same material as the high-power halogen tungsten lamp. In this way, the radiation efficiency of the halogen tungsten lamp after power-off can be quantitatively measured. In the other measuring system, a wide-spectrum power meter was installed far away from the halogen tungsten lamp; thus, the lamp can be regarded as a point light source. The radiation efficiency of residual energy from the halogen tungsten lamp was computed on the basis of geometrical relations. The results show that the halogen tungsten lamp's radiation efficiency was improved with power-on time but did not change under constant power-on time/energy. All the tested halogen tungsten lamps reached 89.3% of radiation efficiency at 50 s after power-on. After power-off, the residual energy in the halogen tungsten lamp gradually dropped to less than 10% of the initial radiation power, and the radiation efficiency changed with time. The final total radiation energy was decided by the halogen tungsten lamp's radiation efficiency, the radiation efficiency of residual energy, and the total power consumption. The measuring uncertainty of total radiation energy was 2.4% (here, the confidence factor is two).

  9. Generation of intense X-radiation and high-energy-density matter by laser-accelerated electrons; Erzeugung von intensiver Roentgenstrahlung und Materie hoher Energiedichte durch Laserbeschleunigte Elektronen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Aim of this thesis was to study the processes of the interaction between highly intense short-pulse laser and matter. The focus lied thereby on the generation of intense X-radiation and warm dense matter. The studies performed for this thesis comprehend thereby the influence of laser parameters like energy, pulse length, focus size, and intensity as well as the influence of the target geometry on the interaction and generation of high-energy-density matter. In this thesis for this two selected experiments are presented. First a silver foil was used as target, in order to study the generation of radiation at 21 keV. Both bremsstrahlung and characteristic X-radiation were used in order to characterize the interaction. For the second experiment freely standing titanium wires were used as target. Hereby the focus lied on the characterization of the heated matter.

  10. The quantification of wound healing as a method to assess late radiation damage in primate skin exposed to high-energy protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    In an experiment examining the effects of space radiations on primates, different groups of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were exposed to single whole-body doses of 32- or 55-MeV protons. Survivors of those exposures, together with age-matched controls, have been monitored continuously since 1964 and 1965. Late effects of nominal proton doses ranging from 2-6 Gray have been measured in vitro using skin fibroblasts from the animals. A logical extension of that study is reported here, and it involves observations of wound healing after 3-mm diameter dermal punches were removed from the ears (pinnae) of control and irradiated monkeys. Tendencies in the reduction of competence to repair cutaneous wound have been revealed by the initial examinations of animals that received doses greater than 2 Gy more than 2 decades earlier. These trends indicate that this method of assessing radiation damage to skin exposed to high-energy radiations warrants further study.

  11. The Influence of Radiation Damage on the Deflection of High-Energy Beams in Bent Silicon Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Biino, C; Doble, Niels T; Elsener, K; Gatignon, L; Grafström, P; Mikkelsen, U; Kirsebom, K; Møller, S P; Uggerhøj, Erik; Worm, T

    1996-01-01

    Experimental results obtained for deflection of 450 GeV/c protons channeling along the {111} planes in a bent, strongly irradiated silicon crystal are presented. A comparison between the deflection efficiencies in irradiated areas and non-irradiated areas in the crystal shows that irradiation by 2.4 · 1020 protons/cm2 leads to a reduction of around 30 % in deflection efficiency. As a consequence, beam-splitting and extraction from an accelerator by means of a bent crystal are feasible solutions at high energies even for intense beams and during long periods.

  12. Limits on the high-energy gamma and neutrino fluxes from the SGR 1806-20 giant flare of 27 December 2004 with the AMANDA-II detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, A; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Ahrens, J; Andeen, K; Atlee, D W; Bahcall, J N; Bai, X; Baret, B; Bartelt, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Becka, T; Becker, J K; Becker, K-H; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Blaufuss, E; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bolmont, J; Böser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Braun, J; Burgess, C; Burgess, T; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Davour, A; Day, C T; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; Deyoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Duvoort, M R; Edwards, W R; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Feser, T; Filimonov, K; Fox, B D; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Ganugapati, R; Geenen, H; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Gozzini, R; Grullon, S; Gross, A; Gunasingha, R M; Gurtner, M; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Hardtke, D; Hardtke, R; Harenberg, T; Hart, J E; Hauschildt, T; Hays, D; Heise, J; Helbing, K; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hodges, J; Hoffman, K D; Hommez, B; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Hughey, B; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hundertmark, S; Hülss, J-P; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jones, A; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K-H; Karle, A; Kawai, H; Kelley, J L; Kestel, M; Kitamura, N; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Krasberg, M; Kuehn, K; Landsman, H; Leich, H; Liubarsky, I; Lundberg, J; Madsen, J; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McCauley, T; McParland, C P; Meli, A; Messarius, T; Mészáros, P; Miyamoto, H; Mokhtarani, A; Montaruli, T; Morey, A; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Münich, K; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogelman, H; Olbrechts, Ph; Olivas, A; Patton, S; Peña-Garay, C; Pérez de Los Heros, C; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Pretz, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Razzaque, S; Refflinghaus, F; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Robbins, S; Roth, P; Rott, C; Rutledge, D; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H-G; Sarkar, S; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Smith, A J; Solarz, M; Song, C; Sopher, J E; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Steffen, P; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoufer, M C; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sulanke, K-H; Sullivan, G W; Sumner, T J; Taboada, I; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Thollander, L; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Turcan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; Voigt, B; Wagner, W; Walck, C; Waldmann, H; Walter, M; Wang, Y-R; Wendt, C; Wiebusch, C H; Wikström, G; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zornoza, J D

    2006-12-01

    On 27 December 2004, a giant gamma flare from the Soft Gamma-Ray Repeater 1806-20 saturated many satellite gamma-ray detectors, being the brightest transient event ever observed in the Galaxy. AMANDA-II was used to search for down-going muons indicative of high-energy gammas and/or neutrinos from this object. The data revealed no significant signal, so upper limits (at 90% C.L.) on the normalization constant were set: 0.05(0.5) TeV-1 m;{-2} s;{-1} for gamma=-1.47 (-2) in the gamma flux and 0.4(6.1) TeV-1 m;{-2} s;{-1} for gamma=-1.47 (-2) in the high-energy neutrino flux.

  13. Performance of peanut mutants and their offspring generated from mixed high-energy particle field radiation and tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J S; Qiao, L X; Zhao, L S; Wang, P; Guo, B T; Liu, L X; Sui, J M

    2015-09-09

    To develop new ways to breed peanut, we irradiated seeds of the Luhua 11 cultivar with a mixed high-energy particle field at different doses. The embryonic leaflets were extracted as explants and incubated on somatic embryo induction medium and then on somatic embryo germination and regeneration medium. After being grafted, the M1-generation plants were transplanted, and seeds from each M1-generation plant were harvested. In the following year, the M2-generation seeds were planted separately. Some M2-generation plants showed distinct character segregation relative to the mutagenic parent in terms of vigor, fertility, plant height, branch number, and pod size and shape. M2-generation plants that had a high pod weight per plant tended to produce M3-generation offspring that also had a high pod weight per plant, much higher than that of the mutagenic parent, Luhua 11. M4-generation seeds varied greatly in quality, and 35 individuals with an increased fat content (>55%) were obtained. Overall, the results indicate that the combination of mutagenesis via mixed high-energy particle field exposure and tissue culture is promising for peanut breeding.

  14. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators: Implementation of ALARA in Design and Operation of Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasso, A.; Rokni, S.; /SLAC

    2011-06-30

    It used to happen often, to us accelerator radiation protection staff, to be asked by a new radiation worker: ?How much dose am I still allowed?? And we smiled looking at the shocked reaction to our answer: ?You are not allowed any dose?. Nowadays, also thanks to improved training programs, this kind of question has become less frequent, but it is still not always easy to convince workers that staying below the exposure limits is not sufficient. After all, radiation is still the only harmful agent for which this is true: for all other risks in everyday life, from road speed limits to concentration of hazardous chemicals in air and water, compliance to regulations is ensured by keeping below a certain value. It appears that a tendency is starting to develop to extend the radiation approach to other pollutants (1), but it will take some time before the new attitude makes it way into national legislations.

  15. Flare physics at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaty, R.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy processes, involving a rich variety of accelerated particle phenomena, lie at the core of the solar flare problem. The most direct manifestation of these processes are high-energy radiations, gamma rays, hard X-rays and neutrons, as well as the accelerated particles themselves, which can be detected in interplanetary space. In the study of astrophysics from the moon, the understanding of these processes should have great importance. The inner solar system environment is strongly influenced by activity on the sun; the physics of solar flares is of great intrinsic interest; and much high-energy astrophysics can be learned from investigations of flare physics at high energies.

  16. First results from the microwave air yield beam experiment (MAYBE: Measurement of GHz radiation for ultra-high energy cosmic ray detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzi V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of microwave emission from an electron-beam induced air plasma performed at the 3 MeV electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Results include the emission spectrum between 1 and 15 GHz, the polarization of the microwave radiation and the scaling of the emitted power with respect to beam intensity. MAYBE measurements provide further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

  17. High efficiency, high energy second-harmonic generation of Nd glass laser radiation in large aperture CsLiB sub 6 O sub 1 sub 0 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Kiriyama, H; Yamakawa, K

    2002-01-01

    We have demonstrated the generation of a high-energy green laser pulse using large aperture CsLiB sub 6 O sub 1 sub 0 (CLBO) crystals. A pulsed energy of 25 J at 532-nm was generated using the 1064-nm incident Nd:glass laser radiation with an energy of 34 J. High conversion efficiency of 74% at intensities of only 370 MW/cm sup 2 was obtained using a two-stage crystal architecture. This result represents the highest green pulse energy ever reported using the CLBO crystals. We discuss in detail the design and performance of SHG using CLBO crystals.

  18. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Salman [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Roser, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.

  19. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    CERN Document Server

    Habib, Salman; LeCompte, Tom; Marshall, Zach; Borgland, Anders; Viren, Brett; Nugent, Peter; Asai, Makoto; Bauerdick, Lothar; Finkel, Hal; Gottlieb, Steve; Hoeche, Stefan; Sheldon, Paul; Vay, Jean-Luc; Elmer, Peter; Kirby, Michael; Patton, Simon; Potekhin, Maxim; Yanny, Brian; Calafiura, Paolo; Dart, Eli; Gutsche, Oliver; Izubuchi, Taku; Lyon, Adam; Petravick, Don

    2015-01-01

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.

  20. Focusing high-energy x-rays by a PMMA compound x-ray lens on Beijing synchrotron radiation facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Le Zi-Chun; Liang Jing-Qiu; Dong Wen; Zhu Pei-Ping; Peng Liang-Qiang; Wang Wei-Biao; Huang Wan-Xia; Yuan Qing-Xi; Wang Jun-Yue

    2007-01-01

    The x-ray compound lens is a novel refractive x-ray optical device. This paper reports the authors' recent research on a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) compound x-ray lens. Firstly the designing and LIGA fabrication process for the PMMA compound x-ray lens are briefly described. Then, a method for theoretical analysis, as well as the experimental system for measurement is also introduced. Finally, the focusing spots for 8keV monochromatic x-rays by the PMMA compound x-ray lens are measured and analysed. According to the experimental results, it is concluded that the PMMA compound x-ray lens promises a good focusing performance under the high-energy x-rays.

  1. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Comic Rays and First High Energy Collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Degenhardt, J D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 130 μm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. The custom-made radiation-hard front-end electronics implements two thresholds to discriminate the signals: a low threshold (< 300 eV) for registering the passage of minimum ionizing particles, and a high threshold (> 6 keV) to flag the absorption of transition radiation X-rays. The TRT was successfully commissioned with data collected from several million cosmic ray muons. A specia...

  2. High-energy Gamma Rays from the Milky Way: Three-dimensional Spatial Models for the Cosmic-Ray and Radiation Field Densities in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, T. A.; Jóhannesson, G.; Moskalenko, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    High-energy γ-rays of interstellar origin are produced by the interaction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles with the diffuse gas and radiation fields in the Galaxy. The main features of this emission are well understood and are reproduced by existing CR propagation models employing 2D galactocentric cylindrically symmetrical geometry. However, the high-quality data from instruments like the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveal significant deviations from the model predictions on few to tens of degrees scales, indicating the need to include the details of the Galactic spiral structure and thus requiring 3D spatial modeling. In this paper, the high-energy interstellar emissions from the Galaxy are calculated using the new release of the GALPROP code employing 3D spatial models for the CR source and interstellar radiation field (ISRF) densities. Three models for the spatial distribution of CR sources are used that are differentiated by their relative proportion of input luminosity attributed to the smooth disk or spiral arms. Two ISRF models are developed based on stellar and dust spatial density distributions taken from the literature that reproduce local near- to far-infrared observations. The interstellar emission models that include arms and bulges for the CR source and ISRF densities provide plausible physical interpretations for features found in the residual maps from high-energy γ-ray data analysis. The 3D models for CR and ISRF densities provide a more realistic basis that can be used for the interpretation of the nonthermal interstellar emissions from the Galaxy.

  3. Discovery of Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Radiation from the BL Lac 1ES 0806+524

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Bautista, M; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Böttcher, M; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Butt, Y; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Celik, O; Cesarini, A; Chow, Y C; Ciupik, L; Cogan, P; Colin, P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Ergin, T; Falcone, A; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gall, D; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Hays, E; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, Philip; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Kildea, J; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nagai, T; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Petry, D; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Theiling, M; Toner, J A; Valcarcel, L; Varlotta, A; Vasilev, V V; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; White, R J; Williams, D A; Wissel, S; Wood, M; Zitzer, B

    2008-01-01

    The high-frequency-peaked BL-Lacertae object \\objectname{1ES 0806+524}, at redshift z=0.138, was observed in the very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray regime by VERITAS between November 2006 and April 2008. These data encompass the two-, and three-telescope commissioning phases, as well as observations with the full four-telescope array. \\objectname{1ES 0806+524} is detected with a statistical significance of 6.3 standard deviations from 245 excess events. Little or no measurable variability on monthly time scales is found. The photon spectrum for the period November 2007 to April 2008 can be characterized by a power law with photon index $3.6 \\pm 1.0_{\\mathrm{stat}} \\pm 0.3_{\\mathrm{sys}}$ between $\\sim$300 GeV and $\\sim$700 GeV. The integral flux above 300 GeV is $(2.2\\pm0.5_{\\mathrm{stat}}\\pm0.4_{\\mathrm{sys}})\\times10^{-12}\\:\\mathrm{cm}^{2}\\:\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ which corresponds to 1.8% of the Crab Nebula flux. Non contemporaneous multiwavelength observations are combined with the VHE data to produce a broadband ...

  4. Very High Energy Gamma-ray Radiation from the Stellar-mass Black Hole Cygnus X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Anderhub, H; Antoranz, P; Armada, A; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Böck, R K; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Coarasa, J A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Curtef, V; Danielyan, V; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; Delgado, C; De Los Reyes, R; Delotto, B; Domingo-Santamaria, E; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Flix, J; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fuchs, M; Galante, N; Garcia-Lopez, R J; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Giller, M; Göbel, F; Hakobyan, D; Hayashida, M; Hengstebeck, T; Herrero, A; Hohn, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Jacon, P; Jogler, T; Kosyra, R; Kranich, D; Kritzer, R; Laille, A; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, J; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mannheim, K; Mansutti, O; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Merck, C; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mizobuchi, S; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Ona-Wilhelmi, E; otte, N; Oya, I; Paneque, D; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rugamer, S; Saggion, A; Saitô, T; Sánchez, A; Sartori, P; Scalzotto, V; SCAPIN, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sillanpää, A; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; teshima, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wibig, T; Wittek, W; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J

    2007-01-01

    We report on the results from the observations in very high energy band (VHE, E>100 GeV) of the black hole X-ray binary (BHXB) Cygnus X-1. The observations were performed with the MAGIC telescope, for a total of 40 hours during 26 nights, spanning the period between June and November 2006. Searches for steady gamma-ray signals yielded no positive result and upper limits to the integral flux ranging between 1 and 2% of the Crab nebula flux, depending on the energy, have been established. We also analyzed each observation night independently, obtaining evidence of gamma-ray signals at the 4.0 standard deviations (sigma) significance level (3.2 sigma after trial correction) for 154 minutes effective on-time (EOT) between MJD 54002.875 and 54002.987, coinciding with an X-ray flare seen by RXTE, Swift and INTEGRAL. A search for faster-varying signals within a night resulted in an excess with a significance of 4.9 sigma (4.1 sigma after trial correction) for 79 minutes EOT between MJD 54002.928 and 54002.987. The m...

  5. Stability toward High Energy Radiation of Non-Proteinogenic Amino Acids: Implications for the Origins of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Hafez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of non-proteinogenic amino acids, most of them found quite commonly in the meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites, were subjected to solid state radiolysis in vacuum to a total radiation dose of 3.2 MGy corresponding to 23% of the total dose expected to be taken by organic molecules buried in asteroids and meteorites since the beginning of the solar system 4.6 × 109 years ago. The radiolyzed amino acids were studied by FT-IR spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and by polarimety and Optical Rotatory Dispersion (ORD. It is shown that an important fraction of each amino acid is able to “survive” the massive dose of radiation, while the enantiomeric excess is partially preserved. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that it is unsurprising to find amino acids even in enantiomeric excess in carbonaceous chondrites.

  6. Radiation sources with planar wire arrays and planar foils for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Astanovitsky, A.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Keim, S.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Chuvatin, A. S. [Laboratorie de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Rudakov, L. I. [Icarus Research Inc., Bethesda, Maryland 20824 (United States); Velikovich, A. L. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    This article reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research, each of them being a multi-year international effort. One of these is the development of innovative sources, such as planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator, which act mainly as a resistor, even though the physical mechanism of efficient magnetic energy conversion into radiation still remains unclear. We review the results of our extensive studies of PWAs. We also report the new results of the experimental comparison PWAs with planar foil liners (another promising alternative to wire array loads at multi-mega-ampere generators). Pioneered at UNR, the PWA Z-pinch loads have later been tested at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on the Saturn generator, on GIT-12 machine in Russia, and on the QiangGuang-1 generator in China, always successfully. Another of these is the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, which started in early 1980s with Zucker's experiments at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Successful continuation of this approach was the Load Current Multiplier (LCM) proposed by Chuvatin in collaboration with Rudakov and Weber from NRL. The 100 ns LCM was integrated into the Zebra generator, which almost doubled the plasma load current, from 0.9 to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum radiation source for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR [Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The first successful proof-of-the-principle experimental implementation of new hohlraum concept at university-scale generator Zebra/LCM is demonstrated. A numerical simulation capability with VisRaD code (from PRISM Co.) established at UNR allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics and provides the possibility of optimization of a new hohlraum. Future studies are discussed.

  7. Radiation sources with planar wire arrays and planar foils for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Safronova, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Esaulov, A. A.; Velikovich, A. L.; Shrestha, I.; Astanovitsky, A.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Keim, S.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M.

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research, each of them being a multi-year international effort. One of these is the development of innovative sources, such as planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator, which act mainly as a resistor, even though the physical mechanism of efficient magnetic energy conversion into radiation still remains unclear. We review the results of our extensive studies of PWAs. We also report the new results of the experimental comparison PWAs with planar foil liners (another promising alternative to wire array loads at multi-mega-ampere generators). Pioneered at UNR, the PWA Z-pinch loads have later been tested at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on the Saturn generator, on GIT-12 machine in Russia, and on the QiangGuang-1 generator in China, always successfully. Another of these is the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, which started in early 1980s with Zucker's experiments at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Successful continuation of this approach was the Load Current Multiplier (LCM) proposed by Chuvatin in collaboration with Rudakov and Weber from NRL. The 100 ns LCM was integrated into the Zebra generator, which almost doubled the plasma load current, from 0.9 to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum radiation source for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR [Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The first successful proof-of-the-principle experimental implementation of new hohlraum concept at university-scale generator Zebra/LCM is demonstrated. A numerical simulation capability with VisRaD code (from PRISM Co.) established at UNR allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics and provides the possibility of optimization of a new hohlraum. Future studies are discussed.

  8. Measurements of the high energy neutron component of cosmic radiation fields in aircraft using etched track dosemeters

    CERN Document Server

    Bartlett, D T; Tanner, R J; Steele, J D

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of the complex cosmic radiation field in aircraft at altitude are made with a passive survey meter comprising routine-use thermoluminescent detectors and etched track detectors. The energy dependence of response of the etched track detectors used to determine the neutron component has been characterized, partly, up to a neutron energy of 180 MeV. The neutron detectors are routinely calibrated in the CERN EC Ref.Field. The 15% determination level for total dose equivalent is 100 mu Sv. The evidence is that the passive survey meter provides a reliable determination of route dose. (41 refs).

  9. Paradigm Shift in Radiation Biology/Radiation Oncology-Exploitation of the "H₂O₂ Effect" for Radiotherapy Using Low-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) Radiation such as X-rays and High-Energy Electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-25

    Most radiation biologists/radiation oncologists have long accepted the concept that the biologic effects of radiation principally involve damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which is the critical target, as described in "Radiobiology for the Radiologist", by E.J. Hall and A.J. Giaccia [1]. Although the concepts of direct and indirect effects of radiation are fully applicable to low-LET (linear energy transfer) radioresistant tumor cells/normal tissues such as osteosarcoma cells and chondrocytes, it is believed that radiation-associated damage to DNA does not play a major role in the mechanism of cell death in low-LET radiosensitive tumors/normal tissues such as malignant lymphoma cells and lymphocytes. Hall and Giaccia describe lymphocytes as very radiosensitive, based largely on apoptosis subsequent to irradiation. As described in this review, apoptosis of lymphocytes and lymphoma cells is actually induced by the "hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) effect", which I propose in this review article for the first time. The mechanism of lymphocyte death via the H₂O₂ effect represents an ideal model to develop the enhancement method of radiosensitivity for radiation therapy of malignant neoplasms. In terms of imitating the high radiosensitivity of lymphocytes, osteosarcoma cells (representative of low-LET radioresistant cells) might be the ideal model for indicating the conversion of cells from radioresistant to radiosensitive utilizing the H₂O₂ effect. External beam radiation such as X-rays and high-energy electrons for use in modern radiotherapy are generally produced using a linear accelerator. We theorized that when tumors are irradiated in the presence of H₂O₂, the activities of anti-oxidative enzymes such as peroxidases and catalase are blocked and oxygen molecules are produced at the same time via the H₂O₂ effect, resulting in oxidative damage to low-LET radioresistant tumor cells, thereby rendering them highly sensitive to irradiation. In this

  10. Paradigm Shift in Radiation Biology/Radiation Oncology—Exploitation of the “H2O2 Effect” for Radiotherapy Using Low-LET (Linear Energy Transfer Radiation such as X-rays and High-Energy Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ogawa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most radiation biologists/radiation oncologists have long accepted the concept that the biologic effects of radiation principally involve damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, which is the critical target, as described in “Radiobiology for the Radiologist”, by E.J. Hall and A.J. Giaccia [1]. Although the concepts of direct and indirect effects of radiation are fully applicable to low-LET (linear energy transfer radioresistant tumor cells/normal tissues such as osteosarcoma cells and chondrocytes, it is believed that radiation-associated damage to DNA does not play a major role in the mechanism of cell death in low-LET radiosensitive tumors/normal tissues such as malignant lymphoma cells and lymphocytes. Hall and Giaccia describe lymphocytes as very radiosensitive, based largely on apoptosis subsequent to irradiation. As described in this review, apoptosis of lymphocytes and lymphoma cells is actually induced by the “hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 effect”, which I propose in this review article for the first time. The mechanism of lymphocyte death via the H2O2 effect represents an ideal model to develop the enhancement method of radiosensitivity for radiation therapy of malignant neoplasms. In terms of imitating the high radiosensitivity of lymphocytes, osteosarcoma cells (representative of low-LET radioresistant cells might be the ideal model for indicating the conversion of cells from radioresistant to radiosensitive utilizing the H2O2 effect. External beam radiation such as X-rays and high-energy electrons for use in modern radiotherapy are generally produced using a linear accelerator. We theorized that when tumors are irradiated in the presence of H2O2, the activities of anti-oxidative enzymes such as peroxidases and catalase are blocked and oxygen molecules are produced at the same time via the H2O2 effect, resulting in oxidative damage to low-LET radioresistant tumor cells, thereby rendering them highly sensitive to irradiation. In this

  11. High energy electron radiation effect on Ni and Ti/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes at room temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lin; Zhang Yi-Men; Zhang Yu-Ming; Han Chao; Ma Yong-Ji

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports that Ni and Ti/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) were fabricated and irradiated with 1 MeV electrons up to a dose of 3.43×1014 e/cm2. After radiation, the Schottky barrier height φB of the Ni/4H-SiC SBD increased from 1.20 eV to 1.21 eV, but decreased from 0.95 eV to 0.94 eV for the Ti/4H-SiC SBD. The degradation of φB could be explained by interface states of changed Schottky contacts. The on-state resistance RS of both diodes increased with the dose, which can be ascribed to the radiation defects. The reverse current of the Ni/4H-SiC SBD slightly increased, but for the Ti/4H-SiC SBD it basically remained the same. At room temperature, φB of the diodes recovered completely after one week, and the RS partly recovered.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary radiation exposure from high-energy photon therapy using an anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankl, Matthias; Macián-Juan, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    The development of intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatments delivering large amounts of monitor units (MUs) recently raised concern about higher risks for secondary malignancies. In this study, optimised combinations of several variance reduction techniques (VRTs) have been implemented in order to achieve a high precision in Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport simulations and the calculation of in- and out-of-field photon and neutron dose-equivalent distributions in an anthropomorphic phantom using MCNPX, v.2.7. The computer model included a Varian Clinac 2100C treatment head and a high-resolution head phantom. By means of the applied VRTs, a relative uncertainty for the photon dose-equivalent distribution of 8 MeV, has been calculated. Relative uncertainty, calculated for each voxel, could be kept below 5 % in average over all voxels of the phantom. Thus, a very detailed neutron dose distribution could be obtained. The achieved precision now allows a far better estimation of both photon and especially neutron doses out-of-field, where neutrons can become the predominant component of secondary radiation.

  13. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker With First High Energy pp and Pb-Pb Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 0.12-0.15 mm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. Custom-built analog and digital electronics is optimized to operate as luminosity increases to the LHC design. In this talk, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of LHC collisions. The first studies of the TRT detector response to the extremely hig...

  14. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker With First High Energy pp and Pb-Pb Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 0.12-0.15 mm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. Custom-built analog and digital electronics is optimized to operate as luminosity increases to the LHC design. In this talk, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of LHC collisions. The first studies of the TRT detector response to the extremely high track density conditions...

  15. The effect of high energy (HZE) particle radiation (Ar-40) on aging parameters of mouse hippocampus and retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Kato, K.; Corbett, R.; Stevenson, J.; Black, S.; Sapp, W.; Miquel, J.; Lindseth, K. A.; Benton, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Eight month old C57BL6 mice were exposed (head only) to 0.5 rad or 50 rads of Argon particles at the Lawrence Berkeley Radiation Facility, CA. Neuromotor performance was assessed monthly for six months beginning twelve weeks post-irradiation using a 'string test'. The decline in motor performance was dose-related and none of the animals was able to complete the task after four months of testing. Morphological changes were monitored six and twelve months post-irradiation by light and electron microscopy. The synaptic density in the CA-1 area of the hippocampus decreased six and twelve months after irradiation. The decrease after twelve months was less than after six months. The width of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of the retina increased with increasing dose. The number of blood vessels between the ONL and the ganglion layer decreased twelve months after irradiation and this area did not show significant accumulation of age pigment.

  16. High energy beam impact tests on a LHC tertiary collimator at the CERN high-radiation to materials facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely operate highly energetic particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. The requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, investigating the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting tertiary collimators (TCTs in the experimental regions is a fundamental issue for machine protection. An experimental test was designed to investigate the robustness and effects of beam accidents on a fully assembled collimator, based on accident scenarios in the LHC. This experiment, carried out at the CERN High-Radiation to Materials (HiRadMat facility, involved 440 GeV proton beam impacts of different intensities on the jaws of a horizontal TCT. This paper presents the experimental setup and the preliminary results obtained, together with some first outcomes from visual inspection and a comparison of such results with numerical simulations.

  17. A search for the analogue to Cherenkov radiation by high energy neutrinos at superluminal speeds in ICARUS

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M.; Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D.B.; Cocco, A.G.; Dabrowska, A.; Dequal, D.; Dermenev, A.; Dolfini, R.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Gibin, D.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Gninenko, S.; Guglielmi, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Holeczek, J.; Ivashkin, A.; Kisiel, J.; Kochanek, I.; Lagoda, J.; Mania, S.; Mannocchi, G.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Otwinowski, S.; Periale, L.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.R.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scaramelli, A.; Segreto, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Stefan, D.; Stepaniak, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Terrani, M.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Yang, X.; Zalewska, A.; Zaremba, K.; Cohen, A.

    2012-01-01

    The OPERA collaboration [1] has claimed evidence of superluminal propagation between CERN and the LNGS with . We find that the neutrino energy distribution of the ICARUS events in LAr agrees with the expectations from the Monte Carlo predictions from an unaffected energy distribution of beam from CERN. Our results therefore refute a superluminal interpretation of the OPERA result according to the Cohen and Glashow prediction [2] for a weak currents analog to Cherenkov radiation. In particular no events with a superluminal Cherenkov like e+e- pair or gamma emission have been directly observed inside the fiducial volume of the "bubble chamber like" ICARUS TPC-LAr detector, setting much stricter limits to the value of delta comparable with the one due to the observations from the SN1987A.

  18. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for high-energy density radiative transfer using flux-limited diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbird, Kelli D.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2017-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited radiative diffusion using the adjoint approach. The sensitivities computed are shown to agree with standard perturbation theory and require significantly less computational time. The adjoint approach saves the computational cost of one forward solve per sensitivity, making the method attractive when multiple sensitivities are of interest.

  19. Perspective of monochromatic gamma-ray line detection with the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xiaoyuan; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Qiang; Chang, Jin; Dong, Yong-Wei; Hu, Bing-Liang; Lü, Jun-Guang; Wang, Le; Wu, Bo-Bing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    HERD is the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to detect energetic cosmic ray nuclei, leptons and photons with a high energy resolution ($\\sim1\\%$ for electrons and photons and $20\\%$ for nuclei) and a large geometry factor ($>3\\, m^2sr$ for electrons and diffuse photons and $>2\\, m^2sr$ for nuclei). In this work we discuss the capability of HERD to detect monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray lines, based on simulations of the detector performance. It is shown that HERD will be one of the most sensitive instruments for monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray searches at energies between $\\sim10$ to a few hundred GeV. Above hundreds of GeV, Cherenkov telescopes will be more sensitive due to their large effective area. As a specific example, we show that a good portion of the parameter space of a supersymmetric dark matter model can be probed with HERD.

  20. Perspective of monochromatic gamma-ray line detection with the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyuan; Lamperstorfer, Anna S.; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Qiang; Chang, Jin; Dong, Yong-Wei; Hu, Bing-Liang; Lü, Jun-Guang; Wang, Le; Wu, Bo-Bing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-05-01

    HERD is the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to detect energetic cosmic ray nuclei, leptons and photons with a high energy resolution (∼1% for electrons and photons and 20% for nuclei) and a large geometry factor (>3 m2 sr for electrons and diffuse photons and > [2]m2 sr for nuclei). In this work we discuss the capability of HERD to detect monochromatic γ-ray lines, based on simulations of the detector performance. It is shown that HERD will be one of the most sensitive instruments for monochromatic γ-ray searches at energies between ∼ 10 to a few hundred GeV. Above hundreds of GeV, Cherenkov telescopes will be more sensitive due to their large effective area. As a specific example, we show that a good portion of the parameter space of a supersymmetric dark matter model can be probed with HERD.

  1. The effect of magnetic field strength on the time evolution of high energy bremsstrahlung radiation created by an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropponen, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)], E-mail: tommi.ropponen@phys.jyu.fi; Tarvainen, O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Jones, P.; Peura, P.; Kalvas, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Suominen, P. [Prizztech Ltd/Magnet Technology Centre, Tiedepuisto 4, FI-28600 Pori (Finland); Koivisto, H.; Arje, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)

    2009-03-11

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is one of the most used ion source types for high charge state heavy ion production. In ECR plasma the electrons are heated by radio frequency microwaves in order to provide ionization of neutral gases. As a consequence, ECR heating also generates very high electron energies (up to MeV region) which can produce a vast amount of bremsstrahlung radiation causing problems with radiation shielding and heating superconducting cryostat of an ECR ion source. To gain information about the time evolution of the electron energies in ECR plasma radial bremsstrahlung measurements were performed. JYFL 14 GHz ECR ion source was operated in pulsed mode and time evolution measurements were done with different axial magnetic field strengths with oxygen and argon plasmas. Bremsstrahlung data were analyzed with a time interval of 2 ms yielding information at unprecedented detail about the time evolution of high energy bremsstrahlung radiation from an ECR ion source. It was observed, for example, that reaching the steady state phase of the plasma bremsstrahlung requires several hundred milliseconds and the steady state time can be different with different gases.

  2. Installation of the pocket ONSEN system to the Belle II DAQ-testbench at KEK High Energy Accelerator Research Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautenbach, Klemens; Muenchow, David; Gessler, Thomas; Kuehn, Wolfgang; Lange, Jens Soeren; Spruck, Bjoern [Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The future Belle II experiment will reach a total luminosity of 8 . 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. With such high luminosities, the innermost detector, the Pixeldetector (PXD), will produce raw data rates of up to 20 GB/s. In order to reduce these rates, a high bandwidth data acquisition and data reduction system for the PXD is required. The so-called ONline SElection Node (ONSEN)-system will consist of 32 ATCA based Compute Nodes (CN) with Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA's. These will perform a Region Of Interest (ROI) selection based upon online track extrapolation from the outer detectors. A reduction factor >10 is planned. We present performance results of a first test with a ''pocket-ONSEN'' system, which represents a prototype system containing three CN (a ROI merger, a ROI processor and a data outsender) assembled in one μ TCA-shelf and was implemented as a testbench at KEK, Japan.

  3. Poster — Thur Eve — 18: Cherenkov Emission By High-Energy Radiation Therapy Beams: A Characterization Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlateva, Y.; El Naqa, I. [Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Quitoriano, N. [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    We investigate Cherenkov emission (CE) by radiotherapy beams via radiation dose-versus-CE correlation analyses, CE detection optimization by means of a spectral shift towards the near-infrared (NIR) window of biological tissue, and comparison of CE to on-board MV imaging. Dose-CE correlation was investigated via simulation and experiment. A Monte Carlo (MC) CE simulator was designed using Geant4. Experimental phantoms include: water; tissue-simulating phantom composed of water, Intralipid®, and beef blood; plastic phantom with solid water insert. The detector system comprises an optical fiber and diffraction-grating spectrometer incorporating a front/back-illuminated CCD. The NIR shift was carried out with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs), emitting at (650±10) nm. CE and MV images were acquired with a CMOS camera and electronic portal imaging device. MC and experimental studies indicate a strong linear dose-CE correlation (Pearson coefficient > 0.99). CE by an 18-MeV beam was effectively NIR-shifted in water and a tissue-simulating phantom, exhibiting a significant increase at 650 nm for QD depths up to 10 mm. CE images exhibited relative contrast superior to MV images by a factor of 30. Our work supports the potential for application of CE in radiotherapy online imaging for patient setup and treatment verification, since CE is intrinsic to the beam and non-ionizing and QDs can be used to improve CE detectability, potentially yielding image quality superior to MV imaging for the case of low-density-variability, low-optical-attenuation materials (ex: breast/oropharynx). Ongoing work involves microenvironment functionalization of QDs and application of multi-channel spectrometry for simultaneous acquisition of dosimetric and tumor oxygenation signals.

  4. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Sergey V

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant research utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Every two years, at the International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics, scientists interested in this emerging field discuss the progress in topics covering: - Stellar evolution, stellar envelopes, opacities, radiation transport - Planetary Interiors, high-pressure EOS, dense plasma atomic physics - Supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, exploding systems, strong shocks, turbulent mixing - Supernova remnants, shock processing, radiative shocks - Astrophysical jets, high-Mach-number flows, magnetized radiative jets, magnetic reconnection - Compact object accretion disks, x-ray photoionized plasmas - Ultrastrong fields, particle acceleration, collisionless shocks. These proceedings cover many of the invited and contributed papers presented at the 6th International Conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophys...

  5. Registration of the signal of a star and PCR sources optical radiation by means of the installation, aimed at the investigation of EAS of high energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Barnaveli, T T; Khaldeeva, I V; Chubenko, A P; Nesterova, N M; Barnaveli, T T

    2013-01-01

    With the help of the experimental installation aimed at the investigation of high energy cosmic rays (Tien-Shan high mountain laboratory) the signal of Solar and star optical radiation is registered. The signal is well provided statistically and possesses the strictly expressed maximum in the region of EAS sizes Ne 1.19 106 particles (primary energy Eo 1.33 1015 eV). This signal is the peak from gamma EAS, generated by gamma quanta from decay of pi zero mesons, photo produced by the Primary Cosmic Radiation (PCR) nuclei on the photons of stars and of PCR sources. The assumption is made, that exactly this process provides the main contribution in the formation of so called knee on the primary spectrum. Due to the universality and distinct maximum of this signal, its usage for independent and reliable calibration of the EAS installations, for the mutual calibration of these installations and, possibly, for the merger of experimental data obtained by means of these installations to increase the statistics, is pr...

  6. Theory of High-Energy Emission from the Pulsar/Be Star System PSR 1259-63. I. Radiation Mechanisms and Interaction Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Marco; Arons, Jonathan

    1997-03-01

    characteristics of the high-energy emission of the PSR B1259-63 system. This opens the possibility of obtaining for the first time constraints on the physical properties of the PSR B1259-63 pulsar wind and its interaction properties in a strongly time-variable nebular environment. By studying the time evolution of the pulsar cavity, we can constrain the magnitude and geometry of the mass outflow as the PSR B1259-63 orbits around its Be star companion. The pulsar/outflow interaction is most likely mediated by a collisionless shock at the internal boundary of the pulsar cavity. The system shows all the characteristics of a binary plerion being diffuse and compact near apastron and periastron, respectively. The PSR B1259-63 system is subject to different radiative regimes depending on whether synchrotron or inverse-Compton (IC) cooling dominates the radiation of electron/positron pairs (e+/- pairs) advected away from the inner boundary of the pulsar cavity. The highly nonthermal nature of the observed X-ray/soft γ-ray emission from the PSR B1259-63 system near periastron establishes the existence of an efficient particle acceleration mechanism within a timescale shown to be less than ~102-103 s. A synchrotron/IC model of emission of e+/- pairs accelerated at the inner shock front of the pulsar cavity and adiabatically expanding in the MHD flow provides an excellent explanation of the observed time-variable X-ray flux and spectrum from the PSR B1259-63 system. We find that the best model for the PSR B1259-63 system is consistent with the pulsar orbital plane being misaligned with the plane of a thick equatorial Be star outflow. The angular width of the equatorially enhanced Be star outflow is constrained to be ~50° at the pulsar distance, and the misalignment angle is >~25°. We calculate the intensity and spectrum of the high-energy emission for the whole PSR B1259-63 orbit and predict the characteristics of the emission near the apastron region based on the periastron results

  7. High atomic weight, high-energy radiation (HZE induces transcriptional responses shared with conventional stresses in addition to a core DSB response specific to clastogenic treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor eMissirian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants exhibit a robust transcriptional response to gamma radiation which includes the induction of transcripts required for homologous recombination and the suppression of transcripts that promote cell cycle progression. Various DNA damaging agents induce different spectra of DNA damage as well as collateral damage to other cellular components and therefore are not expected to provoke identical responses by the cell. Here we study the effects of two different types of ionizing radiation (IR treatment, HZE (1 GeV Fe26+ high mass, high charge, and high energy relativistic particles and gamma photons, on the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Both types of IR induce small clusters of radicals that can result in the formation of double strand breaks (DSBs, but HZE also produces linear arrays of extremely clustered damage. We performed these experiments across a range of time points (1.5 to 24 hours after irradiation in both wild-type plants and in mutants defective in the DSB-sensing protein kinase ATM. The two types of IR exhibit a shared double strand break-repair-related damage response, although they differ slightly in the timing, degree, and ATM-dependence of the response. The ATM-dependent, DNA metabolism-related transcripts of the DSB response were also induced by other DNA damaging agents, but were not induced by conventional stresses. Both Gamma and HZE irradiation induced, at 24 hours post-irradiation, ATM-dependent transcripts associated with a variety of conventional stresses; these were overrepresented for pathogen response, rather than DNA metabolism. In contrast, only HZE-irradiated plants, at 1.5 hr after irradiation, exhibited an additional and very extensive transcriptional response, shared with plants experiencing extended night. This response was not apparent in gamma-irradiated plants.

  8. High atomic weight, high-energy radiation (HZE) induces transcriptional responses shared with conventional stresses in addition to a core "DSB" response specific to clastogenic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missirian, Victor; Conklin, Phillip A; Culligan, Kevin M; Huefner, Neil D; Britt, Anne B

    2014-01-01

    Plants exhibit a robust transcriptional response to gamma radiation which includes the induction of transcripts required for homologous recombination and the suppression of transcripts that promote cell cycle progression. Various DNA damaging agents induce different spectra of DNA damage as well as "collateral" damage to other cellular components and therefore are not expected to provoke identical responses by the cell. Here we study the effects of two different types of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment, HZE (1 GeV Fe(26+) high mass, high charge, and high energy relativistic particles) and gamma photons, on the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Both types of IR induce small clusters of radicals that can result in the formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), but HZE also produces linear arrays of extremely clustered damage. We performed these experiments across a range of time points (1.5-24 h after irradiation) in both wild-type plants and in mutants defective in the DSB-sensing protein kinase ATM. The two types of IR exhibit a shared double strand break-repair-related damage response, although they differ slightly in the timing, degree, and ATM-dependence of the response. The ATM-dependent, DNA metabolism-related transcripts of the "DSB response" were also induced by other DNA damaging agents, but were not induced by conventional stresses. Both Gamma and HZE irradiation induced, at 24 h post-irradiation, ATM-dependent transcripts associated with a variety of conventional stresses; these were overrepresented for pathogen response, rather than DNA metabolism. In contrast, only HZE-irradiated plants, at 1.5 h after irradiation, exhibited an additional and very extensive transcriptional response, shared with plants experiencing "extended night." This response was not apparent in gamma-irradiated plants.

  9. Non-Linear Model for the Disturbance of Electronics in by High Energy Electron Plasmas in the Van Allen Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, William

    2009-11-01

    A model is presented that models the disturbance of electrical components by high energy electrons trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts; the model components consists of module computing the electron fluence rate given the altitude, the time of the year, and the sunspot number, a module that transports the electrons through the materials of the electrical component, and a module that computes the charge and electrical fields of the insulating materials as a function of time. A non-linear relationship (the Adameic-Calderwood equation) for the variation of the electrical conductivity with the electrical field strength is used as the field intensities can be quite high due to the small size of the electrical components and the high fluence rate of the electrons. The results show that the electric fields can often be as high as 10 MV/m in materials commonly used in cables such as Teflon and that the field can stay at high levels as long as an hour after the irradiation ends.

  10. Future scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.W. [comp.

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses future applications for high-energy lasers in the areas of astrophysics and space physics; hydrodynamics; material properties; plasma physics; radiation sources; and radiative properties.

  11. Coherent Radiation in Insertion Devices-II

    CERN Document Server

    Bessonov, E G

    2011-01-01

    We represent results of calculations of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of the relativistic bunch in an undulator with a vacuum chamber of arbitrary cross section with a new algorithm. This algorithm associated with direct calculations of electric field rather than the vector potential. CSR normalized to the incoherent one and compared with analytical calculations for a free space.

  12. Infrared [Fe II] Emission Lines from Radiative Atomic Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    [Fe II] emission lines are prominent in the infrared (IR), and they are important diagnostic tools for radiative atomic shocks. We investigate the emission characteristics of [Fe II] lines using a shock code developed by Raymond (1979) with updated atomic parameters. We first review general characteristics of IR [Fe II] emission lines from shocked gas, and derive [Fe II] line fluxes as a function of shock speed and ambient density. We have compiled the available IR [Fe II] line observations of interstellar shocks and compare them to the ratios predicted from our model. The sample includes both young and old supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud and several Herbig-Haro objects. We find that the observed ratios of IR [Fe II] lines generally fall on our grid of shock models, but the ratios of some mid-infrared lines, e.g., [Fe II] 35.35 um/[Fe II] 25.99 um, [Fe II] 5.340 um/[Fe II] 25.99 um, and [Fe II] 5.340 um/[Fe II] 17.94 um, are significantly offset from our model grid. We discuss ...

  13. Large numbers hypothesis. II - Electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper develops the theory of electromagnetic radiation in the units covariant formalism incorporating Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH). A direct field-to-particle technique is used to obtain the photon propagation equation which explicitly involves the photon replication rate. This replication rate is fixed uniquely by requiring that the form of a free-photon distribution function be preserved, as required by the 2.7 K cosmic radiation. One finds that with this particular photon replication rate the units covariant formalism developed in Paper I actually predicts that the ratio of photon number to proton number in the universe varies as t to the 1/4, precisely in accord with LNH. The cosmological red-shift law is also derived and it is shown to differ considerably from the standard form of (nu)(R) - const.

  14. SU-E-T-274: Radiation Therapy with Very High-Energy Electron (VHEE) Beams in the Presence of Metal Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C; Palma, B; Qu, B; Maxim, P; Loo, B; Bazalova, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Hardemark, B; Hynning, E [RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of metal implants on treatment plans for radiation therapy with very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams. Methods: The DOSXYZnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) codes were used to simulate 50–150MeV VHEE beam dose deposition and its effects on steel and titanium (Ti) heterogeneities in a water phantom. Heterogeneities of thicknesses ranging from 0.5cm to 2cm were placed at 10cm depth. MC was also used to calculate electron and photon spectra generated by the VHEE beams' interaction with metal heterogeneities. The original VMAT patient dose calculation was planned in Eclipse. Patient dose calculations with MC-generated beamlets were planned using a Matlab GUI and research version of RayStation. VHEE MC treatment planning was performed on water-only geometry and water with segmented prostheses (steel and Ti) geometries with 100MeV and 150MeV beams. Results: 100MeV PDD 5cm behind steel/Ti heterogeneity was 51% less than in the water-only phantom. For some cases, dose enhancement lateral to the borders of the phantom increased the dose by up to 22% in steel and 18% in Ti heterogeneities. The dose immediately behind steel heterogeneity decreased by an average of 6%, although for 150MeV, the steel heterogeneity created a 23% increase in dose directly behind it. The average dose immediately behind Ti heterogeneities increased 10%. The prostate VHEE plans resulted in mean dose decrease to the bowel (20%), bladder (7%), and the urethra (5%) compared to the 15MV VMAT plan. The average dose to the body with prosthetic implants was 5% higher than to the body without implants. Conclusion: Based on MC simulations, metallic implants introduce dose perturbations to VHEE beams from lateral scatter and backscatter. However, when performing clinical planning on a prostate case, the use of multiple beams and inverse planning still produces VHEE plans that are dosimetrically superior to photon VMAT plans. BW Loo and P Maxim received research support from

  15. High energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    Hadron collider studies will focus on: (i) the search for the top quark with the newly installed D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, (ii) the upgrade of the D0 detector to match the new main injector luminosity and (iii) R&D on silicon microstrip tracking devices for the SSC. High statistics studies of Z{sup 0} decay will continue with the OPAL detector at LEP. These studies will include a direct measurement of Z decay to neutrinos, the search for Higgs and heavy quark decays of Z. Preparations for the Large Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) to measure neutrino oscillations at LAMPF will focus on data acquisition and testing of photomultiplier tubes. In the theoretical area E. Ma will concentrate on mass-generating radiative mechanisms for light quarks and leptons in renormalizable gauge field theories. J. Wudka`s program includes a detailed investigation of the magnetic-flip approach to the solar neutrino.

  16. Observation of high energy electromagnetic dipole radiation in 14N+Ni reactions at Elab/A = 35 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamanos, N.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Freifelder, R. F.; Paul, P.; Stachel, J.; Awes, T. C.; Ferguson, R. L.; Obenshain, F. E.; Plasil, F.; Young, G. R.

    1986-06-01

    High energy photons (20γ+X reactions were unambiguously observed in a Pb-glass detector array. The measured angular distributions exhibit a predominant dipole pattern. This rules out statistical and/or nucleon-nucleon production mechanisms. The data indicate instead a more coherent production mechanism reflecting the direction of relative motion of target and projectile.

  17. Industry-relevant magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc ultra-high vacuum deposition system for in situ x-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth using high energy synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, J L; Thomson, W; Howard, B; Schell, N; Näslund, L-Å; Rogström, L; Johansson-Jõesaar, M P; Ghafoor, N; Odén, M; Nothnagel, E; Shepard, A; Greer, J; Birch, J

    2015-09-01

    We present an industry-relevant, large-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc deposition system purposefully designed for time-resolved in situ thin film deposition/annealing studies using high-energy (>50 keV), high photon flux (>10(12) ph/s) synchrotron radiation. The high photon flux, combined with a fast-acquisition-time (<1 s) two-dimensional (2D) detector, permits time-resolved in situ structural analysis of thin film formation processes. The high-energy synchrotron-radiation based x-rays result in small scattering angles (<11°), allowing large areas of reciprocal space to be imaged with a 2D detector. The system has been designed for use on the 1-tonne, ultra-high load, high-resolution hexapod at the P07 High Energy Materials Science beamline at PETRA III at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron in Hamburg, Germany. The deposition system includes standard features of a typical UHV deposition system plus a range of special features suited for synchrotron radiation studies and industry-relevant processes. We openly encourage the materials research community to contact us for collaborative opportunities using this unique and versatile scientific instrument.

  18. High energy astrophysical neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Athar, H.

    2002-01-01

    High energy neutrinos with energy typically greater than tens of thousands of GeV may originate from several astrophysical sources. The sources may include, for instance, our galaxy, the active centers of nearby galaxies, as well as possibly the distant sites of gamma ray bursts. I briefly review some aspects of production and propagation as well as prospects for observations of these high energy astrophysical neutrinos.

  19. Observation of high energy electromagnetic dipole radiation in /sup 14/N + Ni reactions at Esub(lab)/A = 35 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamanos, N.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Freifelder, R.F.; Paul, P.; Stachel, J.; Awes, T.C.; Ferguson, R.L.; Obenshain, F.E.; Plasil, F.; Young, G.R.

    1986-06-19

    High energy photons (20 < Esub(..gamma..) < 150 MeV) produced in inclusive /sup 14/N+Ni->..gamma..+X reactions were unambiguously observed in a Pb-glass detector array. The measured angular distributions exhibit a predominant dipole pattern. This rules out statistical and/or nucleon-nucleon production mechanisms. The data indicate instead a more coherent production mechanism reflecting the direction of relative motion of target and projectile.

  20. NIR Laser Radiation Induced Conformational Changes and Tunneling Lifetimes of High-Energy Conformers of Amino Acids in Low-Temperature Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazso, Gabor; Najbauer, Eszter E.; Magyarfalvi, Gabor; Tarczay, Gyorgy

    2013-06-01

    We review our recent results on combined matrix isolation FT-IR and NIR laser irradiation studies on glycine alanine, and cysteine. The OH and the NH stretching overtones of the low-energy conformers of these amino acids deposited in Ar, Kr, Xe, and N_{2} matrices were irradiated. At the expense of the irradiated conformer, other conformers were enriched and new, high-energy, formerly unobserved conformers were formed in the matrices. This enabled the separation and unambiguous assignment of the vibrational transitions of the different conformers. The main conversion paths and their efficiencies are described qualitatively showing that there are significant differences in different matrices. It was shown that the high-energy conformer decays in the matrix by H-atom tunneling. The lifetimes of the high-energy conformers in different matrices were measured. Based on our results we conclude that some theoretically predicted low-energy conformers of amino acids are likely even absent in low-energy matrices due to fast H-atom tunneling. G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Mol. Struct. 1025 (Light-Induced Processes in Cryogenic Matrices Special Issue) 33-42 (2012). G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Phys. Chem. A 116 (43) 10539-10547 (2012). G. Bazso, E. E. Najbauer, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Phys. Chem. A in press, DOI: 10.1021/jp400196b. E. E. Najbauer, G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay in preparation.

  1. Recent progress in the development of large area silica aerogel for use as RICH radiator in the Belle II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Nishida, Shohei; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    We report recent progress in the development of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter to be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector, which is currently being upgraded at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan. The production of approximately 450 aerogel tiles with refractive indices of either 1.045 or 1.055 was completed in May, 2014, and the tiles are now undergoing optical characterization. Installation of the aerogels was tested by installing them into a partial mock-up of the support structure.

  2. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  3. Radiative emission of solar features in Ca II K

    CERN Document Server

    Criscuoli, S; Fontenla, J; Giorgi, F; Rast, M; Solanki, S; Uitenbroek, H

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the radiative emission of different types of solar features in the spectral range of the Ca II K line. We analyzed full-disk 2k x 2k observations from the PSPT Precision Solar Photometric Telescope. The data were obtained by using three narrow-band interference filters that sample the Ca II K line with different pass bands. Two filters are centered in the line core, the other in the red wing of the line. We measured the intensity and contrast of various solar features, specifically quiet Sun (inter-network), network, enhanced network, plage, and bright plage (facula) regions. Moreover, we compared the results obtained with those derived from the numerical synthesis performed for the three PSPT filters with a widely used radiative code on a set of reference semi-empirical atmosphere models.

  4. Limits on the high-energy gamma and neutrino fluxes from the SGR 1806-20 giant flare of December 27th, 2004 with the AMANDA-II detector

    CERN Document Server

    Achterberg, A; Adams, J; Ahrens, J; Andeen, K; Atlee, D W; Bahcall, J N; Bai, X; Baret, B; Bartelt, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Becka, T; Becker, J K; Becker, K H; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Blaufuss, E; Boersma, D J; Böhm, C; Bolmont, J; Boser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Braun, J; Burgess, C; Burgess, T; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Davour, A; Day, C T; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; De Young, T R; Díaz-Veléz, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Duvoort, M R; Edwards, W R; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Feser, T; Filimonov, K; Fox, B D; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Ganugapati, R; Geenen, H; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Gozzini, R; Grullon, S; Gross, A; Gunasingha, R M; Gurtner, M; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Hardtke, D; Hardtke, R; Harenberg, T; Hart, J E; Hauschildt, T; Hays, D; Heise, J; Helbing, K; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hodges, J; Hoffman, K D; Hommez, B; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Hughey, B; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hundertmark, S; Hulss, J P; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jones, A; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K H; Karle, A; Kawai, H; Kelley, J L; Kestel, M; Kitamura, N; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Krasberg, M; Kühn, K; Landsman, H; Leich, H; Liubarsky, I; Lundberg, J; Madsen, J; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McCauley, T; McParland, C P; Meli, A; Messarius, T; Mészáros, P; Miyamoto, H; Mokhtarani, A; Montaruli, T; Morey, A; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Munich, K; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogelman, H; Olbrechts, P; Olivas, A; Patton, S; Peña-Garay, C; Perez de los Heros, C; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Pretz, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Razzaque, S; Reinghaus, F; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Robbins, S; Roth, P; Rott, C; Rutledge, D; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H G; Sarkar, S; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Smith, A J; Solarz, M; Song, C; Sopher, J E; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Steffen, P; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoufer, M C; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sulanke, K H; Sullivan, G W; Sumner, T J; Taboada, I; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Thollander, L; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Turcan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; Voigt, B; Wagner, W; Walck, C; Waldmann, H; Walter, M; Wang, Y R; Wendt, C; Wiebusch, C; Wikström, G; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; De Dios-Zornoza-Gomez, Juan

    2006-01-01

    On December 27th 2004, a giant gamma flare from the Soft Gamma-ray Repeater 1806-20 saturated many satellite gamma-ray detectors. This event was by more than two orders of magnitude the brightest cosmic transient ever observed. If the gamma emission extends up to TeV energies with a hard power law energy spectrum, photo-produced muons could be observed in surface and underground arrays. Moreover, high-energy neutrinos could have been produced during the SGR giant flare if there were substantial baryonic outflow from the magnetar. These high-energy neutrinos would have also produced muons in an underground array. AMANDA-II was used to search for downgoing muons indicative of high-energy gammas and/or neutrinos. The data revealed no significant signal. The upper limit on the gamma flux at 90% CL is dN/dE < 0.05 (0.5) TeV^-1 m^-2 s^-1 for gamma=-1.47 (-2). Similarly, we set limits on the normalization constant of the high-energy neutrino emission of 0.4 (6.1) TeV^-1 m^-2 s^-1 for gamma=-1.47 (-2).

  5. High-Energy Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutz, Michael

    1983-01-01

    Experimentalists in particle physics have long regarded computers as essential components of their apparatus. Theorists are now finding that significant advances in some areas can be accomplished only in partnership with a machine. Needs of experimentalists, interests of theorists, and specialized computers for high-energy experiments are…

  6. High energy battery. Hochenergiebatterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, H.; Beyermann, G.; Bulling, M.

    1992-03-26

    In a high energy battery with a large number of individual cells in a housing with a cooling medium flowing through it, it is proposed that the cooling medium should be guided so that it only affects one or both sides of the cells thermally.

  7. On Radiation Pressure in Static, Dusty H II Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draine, B. T.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation pressure acting on gas and dust causes H II regions to have central densities that are lower than the density near the ionized boundary. H II regions in static equilibrium comprise a family of similarity solutions with three parameters: β, γ, and the product Q 0 n rms; β characterizes the stellar spectrum, γ characterizes the dust/gas ratio, Q 0 is the stellar ionizing output (photons/s), and n rms is the rms density within the ionized region. Adopting standard values for β and γ, varying Q 0 n rms generates a one-parameter family of density profiles, ranging from nearly uniform density (small Q 0 n rms) to shell-like (large Q 0 n rms). When Q 0 n rms >~ 1052 cm-3 s-1, dusty H II regions have conspicuous central cavities, even if no stellar wind is present. For given β, γ, and Q 0 n rms, a fourth quantity, which can be Q 0, determines the overall size and density of the H II region. Examples of density and emissivity profiles are given. We show how quantities of interest—such as the peak-to-central emission measure ratio, the rms-to-mean density ratio, the edge-to-rms density ratio, and the fraction of the ionizing photons absorbed by the gas—depend on β, γ, and Q 0 n rms. For dusty H II regions, compression of the gas and dust into an ionized shell results in a substantial increase in the fraction of the stellar photons that actually ionize H (relative to a uniform-density H II region with the same dust/gas ratio and density n = n rms). We discuss the extent to which radial drift of dust grains in H II regions can alter the dust-to-gas ratio. The applicability of these solutions to real H II regions is discussed.

  8. Final Technical Report High Energy Physics at Belle and Belle II PI John Yelton, University of Florida Dates covered 06/01/2015 to 03/31/2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yelton, John [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The project involved data analysis of data taken with the Belle detector operating at KEKB accelerator, Japan. In addition commissionin of the Belle II detector, which is destined to replace the Belle detector.

  9. High Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    Audio Productions, Inc, New York

    1960-01-01

    Film about the different particle accelerators in the US. Nuclear research in the US has developed into a broad and well-balanced program.Tour of accelerator installations, accelerator development work now in progress and a number of typical experiments with high energy particles. Brookhaven, Cosmotron. Univ. Calif. Berkeley, Bevatron. Anti-proton experiment. Negative k meson experiment. Bubble chambers. A section on an electron accelerator. Projection of new accelerators. Princeton/Penn. build proton synchrotron. Argonne National Lab. Brookhaven, PS construction. Cambridge Electron Accelerator; Harvard/MIT. SLAC studying a linear accelerator. Other research at Madison, Wisconsin, Fixed Field Alternate Gradient Focusing. (FFAG) Oakridge, Tenn., cyclotron. Two-beam machine. Comments : Interesting overview of high energy particle accelerators installations in the US in these early years. .

  10. High Energy Processes in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, W

    2006-01-01

    Young pulsars produce relativistic winds which interact with matter ejected during the supernova explosion and the surrounding interstellar gas. Particles are accelerated to very high energies somewhere in the pulsar winds or at the shocks produced in collisions of the winds with the surrounding medium. As a result of interactions of relativistic leptons with the magnetic field and low energy radiation (of synchrotron origin, thermal, or microwave background), the non-thermal radiation is produced with the lowest possible energies up to $\\sim$100 TeV. The high energy (TeV) gamma-ray emission has been originally observed from the Crab Nebula and recently from several other objects. Recent observations by the HESS Cherenkov telescopes allow to study for the first time morphology of the sources of high energy emission, showing unexpected spectral features. They might be also interpreted as due to acceleration of hadrons. However, theory of particle acceleration in the PWNe and models for production of radiation ...

  11. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental shielding to the NSLS-II accelerators and the lessons learned from this process are presented.

  12. 高能重离子在聚合物中的辐照效应研究%Radiation effects in polymers induced by high energy heavy ion beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhiyong; LIU Qi; SUN Youmei; JIN Yunfan

    2005-01-01

    Ion irradiation of polymers can induce irreversible changes in their macroscopic properties such as electrical and optical properties and the surface-related mechanical properties. Electronic excitation, ionization, chains scission, cross-links and mass losses are accepted as the fundamental events that give rise to the observed macroscopic changes. Detailed and systematic study of radiation induced effects in polymers enriches not only the knowledge of ion-material interactions but also supplies new bases for polymeric materials synthesis through ion-beam technologies. Previous work has concentrated mainly on effects induced by low-ionization particles such as γ-rays and electrons. Since 1980,s the application of high energy heavy ion accelerators enables the use of high energy heavy ion as an irradiation source, and many new and exciting effects and phenomena have been revealed.Energetic heavy ions in matter lose energy mainly through electronic excitation and ionization. Compared to low-ionization particles, high energy heavy ion possesses higher LET(linear energy transfer) values which can reach several to several tens keV/nm. As most of the primary ionizations and excitations occur close to the ion trajectory in a core of a few nanometers in diameter, a continuous damaged zone along the ion path can be induced,in which all bonds inside the zone can be destroyed due to the high rate energy deposition. Studies on this particularity of high energy heavy ion irradiation and its effects in materials will cause great influence on industry as well as on our daily life.The previous work has revealed the great difference in the effects induced by high energy heavy ions compared to the other particles. It has been shown that under irradiation with lower LET particles gas release depends on molecular structure and material composition, whereas under irradiation with high LET particles, such as high energy heavy ions, it is not the case. Some materials that undergo

  13. Establishment of a mammalian cell line suitable for industrial production of recombinant protein using mutations induced by high-energy beam radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Yasuhito; Takagi, Keiichi; Terada, Satoshi

    2013-12-01

    Mammalian cells are extensively used for production of biopharmaceuticals. Most cells used in industry have infinite proliferative capacity, which provides a high number of cells and corresponding productivity. However, infinite cells will continue to multiply even after cell density reaches sufficient levels. This excess proliferation aggravates the culture environment and induces low productivity. Therefore, after cell density reaches sufficient levels, downregulation of proliferation would prevent such aggravation and extend the culture period and improve productivity. To realize such suitable proliferation, we aimed to establish a novel cell line whose proliferation was spontaneously downregulated after reaching a sufficient population level. Mutagenesis using high-energy beam irradiation was used. CHO-DP12 cells were irradiated with 2.5 Gy X-rays and screened with hydroxyurea and 5-fluorouracil to eliminate any cells multiplying after confluence and to concentrate desired mutants. One clone was established and named CHO-M1. Cell cycle analysis indicated that CHO-M1 cells had a similar cell cycle profile in the exponential growth phase, but cells rapidly accumulated in G1 phase just before confluence and did not progress through the cell cycle. This suggested that until confluence, proliferation of CHO-M1 was similar to parental CHO, but after confluence, it was inhibited and under G1 arrest. The specific antibody production rate of CHO-M1 was kept high, even after confluence, while that of parental CHO was drastically decreased in stationary phase. These results suggest that the desired cell line was successfully established and that high-energy beam irradiation could be an efficient mutagenic technique for breeding industrial cells.

  14. RADIATIVE LIFETIMES OF V I AND V II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Wood, M. P., E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu, E-mail: mpwood@wisc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    New radiative lifetimes are reported for 168 levels of V I ranging in energy from 18086 cm{sup –1} to 47702 cm{sup –1}, and for 31 levels of V II ranging in energy from 34593 cm{sup –1} to 47420 cm{sup –1}. These lifetimes are measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic/ionic beam as part of an ongoing study of the radiative properties of the iron group elements. All but two of the V II lifetimes have been measured before using modern laser-based methods, but a large fraction of the V I lifetimes are reported here for the first time. Comparison to earlier measurements is discussed. These new lifetimes are, for the most part, accurate to ±5%. They will be combined with branching fraction measurements to produce a large set of transition probabilities for V I and V II which are needed by the astrophysics community for stellar abundance determinations.

  15. High energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stanev, Todor

    2010-01-01

    Offers an accessible text and reference (a cosmic-ray manual) for graduate students entering the field and high-energy astrophysicists will find this an accessible cosmic-ray manual Easy to read for the general astronomer, the first part describes the standard model of cosmic rays based on our understanding of modern particle physics. Presents the acceleration scenario in some detail in supernovae explosions as well as in the passage of cosmic rays through the Galaxy. Compares experimental data in the atmosphere as well as underground are compared with theoretical models

  16. High energy electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhomchuk, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  17. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  18. Shielding high energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Graham Roger

    2001-01-01

    After introducing the subject of shielding high energy accelerators, point source, line-of-sight models, and in particular the Moyer model. are discussed. Their use in the shielding of proton and electron accelerators is demonstrated and their limitations noted. especially in relation to shielding in the forward direction provided by large, flat walls. The limitations of reducing problems to those using it cylindrical geometry description are stressed. Finally the use of different estimators for predicting dose is discussed. It is suggested that dose calculated from track-length estimators will generally give the most satisfactory estimate. (9 refs).

  19. A Mixed Analog-Digital Radiation Hard Technology for High Energy Physics Electronics: DMILL~(Durci~Mixte~sur~Isolant~Logico-Lineaire)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lugiez, F; Leray, J; Rouger, M; Fourches, N T; Musseau, O; Potheau, R

    2002-01-01

    %RD29 %title\\\\ \\\\Physics experiments under preparation with the future LHC require a fast, low noise, very rad-hard (>10 Mrad and >10$^{14}$ neutron/cm$^{2}$), mixed analog-digital microelectronics VLSI technology.\\\\ \\\\The DMILL microelectronics technology (RD29) was developed between 1990 and 1995 by a Consortium gathering the CEA and the firm Thomson-TCS, with the collaboration of IN2P3. The goal of the DMILL program, which is now completed, was to provide the High Energy Physics community, space industry, nuclear industry, and other applications, with an industrial very rad-hard mixed analog-digital microelectronics technology.\\\\ \\\\DMILL integrates mixed analog-digital very rad-hard (>10 Mrad and >10$^{14}$ neutron/cm$^{2}$) vertical bipolar, 0.8 $\\mu$m CMOS and 1.2 $\\mu$m PJFET transistors. Its SOI substrate and its dielectric trenches strongly reduce SEU sensitivity and completely eliminate any possibility of latch-up. Its four transistors are optimized to obtain low-noise features. DMILL also integrates...

  20. A mixed analog-digital radiation hard technology for high energy physics electronics DMILL (Durci Mixte sur Isolant Logico-Linéaire)

    CERN Document Server

    Beuville, E; Borgeaud, P; Fourches, N T; Rouger, M; Blanc, J P; Bruel, M; Delevoye-Orsier, E; Gautier, J; Du Port de Pontcharra, J; Truche, R; Dupont-Nivet, E; Flament, O; Leray, J L; Martin, J L; Montaron, J; Borel, G; Brice, J M; Chatagnon, P; Terrier, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Delpierre, P A; Habrard, M C; Potheau, R; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1992-01-01

    The high radiation level expected in the inner regions of the high luminosity LHC detectors (gamma and neutron) will require radiation hardened electronics. A consortium between the CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) and Thomson TMS (Thomson Composants Militaires et Spatiaux) has been created to push for the development and the industrialization of a nascent technology which looks particularly adapted to the needs of HEP electronics. This technology, currently under development at the LETI(CEA), uses a SIMOX substrate with an epitaxial silicon film. It includes CMOS, JFETs and vertical bipolar transistors with a potential multi-megarad hardness. The CMOS and bipolar transistors constitute a rad-hard BiCMOS which will be useful to design analog and digital high-speed architectures. JFETs, which have intrinsically high hardness behaviour and low noise performances even at low temperature will enable very rad-hard, low noise front end electronics to be designed. Present results, together with the improvemen...

  1. SU-D-BRF-02: In Situ Verification of Radiation Therapy Dose Distributions From High-Energy X-Rays Using PET Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q [Wu Xi Yi Ren Tumor Hosiptal, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China); Kai, L; Wang, X; Hua, B; Chui, L; Wang, Q [ChangAn Hospital, Xian, Shaanxi (China); Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the possibility of in situ verification of radiation therapy dose distributions using PET imaging based on the activity distribution of 11C and 15O produced via photonuclear reactions in patient irradiated by 45MV x-rays. Methods: The method is based on the photonuclear reactions in the most elemental composition {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O in body tissues irradiated by bremsstrahlung photons with energies up to 45 MeV, resulting primarily in {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O, which are positron-emitting nuclei. The induced positron activity distributions were obtained with a PET scanner in the same room of a LA45 accelerator (Top Grade Medical, Beijing, China). The experiments were performed with a brain phantom using realistic treatment plans. The phantom was scanned at 20min and 2-5min after irradiation for {sup 11}C and {sup 15}, respectively. The interval between the two scans was 20 minutes. The activity distributions of {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O within the irradiated volume can be separated from each other because the half-life is 20min and 2min for {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O, respectively. Three x-ray energies were used including 10MV, 25MV and 45MV. The radiation dose ranged from 1.0Gy to 10.0Gy per treatment. Results: It was confirmed that no activity was detected at 10 MV beam energy, which was far below the energy threshold for photonuclear reactions. At 25 MV x-ray activity distribution images were observed on PET, which needed much higher radiation dose in order to obtain good quality. For 45 MV photon beams, good quality activation images were obtained with 2-3Gy radiation dose, which is the typical daily dose for radiation therapy. Conclusion: The activity distribution of {sup 15}O and {sup 11}C could be used to derive the dose distribution of 45MV x-rays at the regular daily dose level. This method can potentially be used to verify in situ dose distributions of patients treated on the LA45 accelerator.

  2. Synthesis, structure and characterization of neutral coordination polymers of 5,5'-bistetrazole with copper(ii), zinc(ii) and cadmium(ii): a new route to reconcile oxygen balance and nitrogen content of high-energy MOFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sitong; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Li; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Tonglai

    2016-11-14

    Hydrothermal reactions of Cu(ii)/Zn(ii)/Cd(ii) with 5,5'-bistetrazole (H2BT) lead to three new energetic coordination polymers: [CuBT(H2O)]n (1), [ZnBT(H2O)2]n (2), and [CdBT(H2O)2]n (3). These crystal structures were determined by single X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 forms regular and compact 3-D frameworks and compounds 2-3 are 1-D chain structures. These compounds show prominent thermostability (Tdec = 349.1 °C for 1, 334.8 °C for 2, and 394.2 °C for 3) investigated by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Sensitivities towards impact and friction were measured. Compound 1 is sensitive to both impact and friction (100% explosion under the test conditions), while compounds 2-3 are sensitive to neither (0% explosion under the test conditions). The heats of detonation (ΔHdet) of 1-3 were calculated based on density functional theory (DFT). Compound 1 possesses the highest calculated ΔHdet (26.7267 kJ g(-1)) among the reported energetic MOFs. Moreover, compared with the reported energetic MOFs, compound 1 also has a good balance of high nitrogen content (51.46%) and high oxygen balance (-36.76%) as well as a very high crystal density of 2.505 g cm(-3).

  3. Radiation effects on II-VI compound-based detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cavallini, A; Dusi, W; Auricchio, N; Chirco, P; Zanarini, M; Siffert, P; Fougeres, P

    2002-01-01

    The performance of room temperature CdTe and CdZnTe detectors exposed to a radiation source can be strongly altered by the interaction of the ionizing particles and the material. Up to now, few experimental data are available on the response of II-VI compound detectors to different types of radiation sources. We have carried out a thorough investigation on the effects of gamma-rays, neutrons and electron irradiation both on CdTe : Cl and Cd sub 0 sub . sub 9 Zn sub 0 sub . sub 1 Te detectors. We have studied the detector response after radiation exposure by means of dark current measurements and of quantitative spectroscopic analyses at low and medium energies. The deep traps present in the material have been characterized by means of PICTS (photo-induced current transient spectroscopy) analyses, which allow to determine the trap apparent activation energy and capture cross-section. The evolution of the trap parameters with increasing irradiation doses has been monitored for all the different types of radiati...

  4. Commissioning and performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with first high energy pp and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schaepe, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 0.12-0.15 mm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. Custom-built analog and digital electronics is optimized to operate as luminosity increases to the LHC design. In this talk, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of LHC collisions. A comparison of the TRT response to two very different center of mass energy collisions (900 ...

  5. Commissioning and performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with first high energy pp and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schaepe, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 0.12-0.15 mm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. Custom-built analog and digital electronics is optimized to operate as luminosity increases to the LHC design. In this article, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of LHC collisions. The first studies of the TRT detector response to the extremely high track density conditi...

  6. Commissioning and performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with first high energy pp and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Stahlman, JM; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 0.12-0.15 mm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. Custom-built analog and digital electronics is optimized to operate as luminosity increases to the LHC design. In this talk, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of LHC collisions. A comparison of the TRT response to two very different center of ma...

  7. High energy astrophysical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Poggiani, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents ultraviolet and X-ray astronomy, gamma-ray astronomy, cosmic ray astronomy, neutrino astronomy, and gravitational wave astronomy as distinct research areas, focusing on the astrophysics targets and the requirements with respect to instrumentation and observation methods. The purpose of the book is to bridge the gap between the reference books and the specialized literature. For each type of astronomy, the discussion proceeds from the orders of magnitude for observable quantities. The physical principles of photon and particle detectors are then addressed, and the specific telescopes and combinations of detectors, presented. Finally the instruments and their limits are discussed with a view to assisting readers in the planning and execution of observations. Astronomical observations with high-energy photons and particles represent the newest additions to multimessenger astronomy and this book will be of value to all with an interest in the field.

  8. Performance of paint coatings in the radiation fields of nuclear reactors and of high energy particle accelerators and after contamination by radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, Helmut; Oesterle, K M; Van de Voorde, M

    1977-01-01

    Several commercially available two/component coating systems based on epoxy and polyurethane resin, as well as lithium silicate/zinc dust paint coatings, have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor up to a dose of 2*10/sup 9/ rad and in a 28 GeV proton accelerator up to a dose of 1*10/sup 9/ rad. Besides assessment by visual inspection, the irradiated specimens have been subjected to the impact hardness test, the infinitesimal hardness behaviour tests, the grid scarification test and to swelling tests in methanol and acetone. The decontaminability of these paint coatings after contamination with solutions containing Ca 45, S 35 and I 131 is also investigated. Very good results in respect of decontaminability and radiation resistance up to 1*10/sup 9/ rad have been obtained with a coating of polyurethane cross-linked with an aliphatic diisocyanate. (9 refs).

  9. Investigation on the long-term radiation hardness of low resistivity starting silicon materials for RT silicon detectors in high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.

    1994-02-01

    Relatively low resistivity (200 to 1000 {Omega}-cm) starting silicon materials have been studied in the search of room temperature neutron radiation-hard silicon detectors. It has been found that, moderate resistivity (300-700 {Omega}-cm) silicon detectors, after being irradiated to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 13} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}, are extremely stable in terms of the detector full depletion voltage (V{sub d}) or the net effective concentration of ionized space charges (N{sub eff} ---- there is little ``reverse annealing`` of N{sub eff} at RT and elevated temperatures as compared with large reverse annealing observed for high resistivity silicon detectors. Detectors with starting resistivity of 300-700 {Omega}-cm have been found to be stable, during the equivalent of one year RT anneal that would reach the saturation of the first stage of reverse anneal, within then N{sub eff} window of {vert_bar}N{sub eff}{vert_bar}{le} 2.5 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} (V{sub d} = 180 V for d = 300 {mu}m) in a working range of 5.0 {times} 10{sup 13} to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}, or a net neutron radiation tolerance of 1.0 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}. The observed effects are in very good agreement with an early proposed model, which predicted among others, that there might be an off set between the reverse annealing effect and the partial annealing of the P-V centers that leads to the partial recovery of the shallow impurity donors.

  10. FSU High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosper, Harrison B. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Adams, Todd [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Askew, Andrew [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Berg, Bernd [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Blessing, Susan K. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Okui, Takemichi [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Owens, Joseph F. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Reina, Laura [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Wahl, Horst D. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  11. Experimental simulation of radiation damage of polymers in space applications by cosmic-ray-type high energy heavy ions and the resulting changes in optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, U. H.; Ensinger, W.

    2015-12-01

    Devices operating in space, e.g. in satellites, are being hit by cosmic rays. These include so-called HZE-ions, with High mass (Z) and energy (E). These highly energetic heavy ions penetrate deeply into the materials and deposit a large amount of energy, typically several keV per nm range. Serious damage is created. In space vehicles, polymers are used which are degraded under ion bombardment. HZE ion irradiation can experimentally be simulated in large scale accelerators. In the present study, the radiation damage of aliphatic vinyl- and fluoro-polymers by heavy ions with energies in the GeV range is described. The ions cause bond scission and create volatile small molecular species, leading to considerable mass loss of the polymers. Since hydrogen, oxygen and fluorine-containing molecules are created and these elements are depleted, the remaining material is carbon-richer than the original polymers and contains conjugated CC double bonds. This process is investigated by measuring the optical band gap with UV-Vis absorption spectrometry as a function of ion fluence. The results show how the optical band gaps shift from the UV into the Vis region upon ion irradiation for the different polymers.

  12. Experimental simulation of radiation damage of polymers in space applications by cosmic-ray-type high energy heavy ions and the resulting changes in optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, U.H.; Ensinger, W., E-mail: ensinger@ca.tu-darmstadt.de

    2015-12-15

    Devices operating in space, e.g. in satellites, are being hit by cosmic rays. These include so-called HZE-ions, with High mass (Z) and energy (E). These highly energetic heavy ions penetrate deeply into the materials and deposit a large amount of energy, typically several keV per nm range. Serious damage is created. In space vehicles, polymers are used which are degraded under ion bombardment. HZE ion irradiation can experimentally be simulated in large scale accelerators. In the present study, the radiation damage of aliphatic vinyl- and fluoro-polymers by heavy ions with energies in the GeV range is described. The ions cause bond scission and create volatile small molecular species, leading to considerable mass loss of the polymers. Since hydrogen, oxygen and fluorine-containing molecules are created and these elements are depleted, the remaining material is carbon-richer than the original polymers and contains conjugated CC double bonds. This process is investigated by measuring the optical band gap with UV–Vis absorption spectrometry as a function of ion fluence. The results show how the optical band gaps shift from the UV into the Vis region upon ion irradiation for the different polymers.

  13. An experimental high energy physics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidos, J. A.; Loeffler, F. J.; McIlwain, R. L.; Miller, D. H.; Palfrey, T. R.; Shibata, E. I.

    1989-05-01

    The CLEO detector accumulated, (approximately 480,000 B-mesons) the world's largest sample of B decays, before being shutdown in May 1988 for the installation of CLEO II. This data sample came from 335 pb(-1) accumulated at the upsilon (4S). The Cornell Electron Storage Ring set new luminosity records, reaching 3.5 pb(-1) in a single day. These data are being intensively analyzed and 21 papers were given at the Baltimore APS meeting. Among the highlights are: confirmation of B(sup 0)(bar B)(sup 0) mixing; discovery of the charm-strange baryon xi (sub c)(sup 0); limits on b yields u decay; and non-observation of B yields p(bar p)pi(pi), which was reported by the ARGUS collaboration. The construction of CLEO II is proceeding on schedule. The new 1.5 T superconducting magnet has passed all tests and all of the detector elements have been installed. This includes a 7800 CsI crystals electromagnetic shower calorimeter. The data from the Gamma Ray Astrophysics experiment show a significant signal for high energy gamma ray emission from Cygnus X-3 and also confirm the previously reported anomalous period from Her X-1. Meanwhile, the old 6 mirror telescope has been refitted with 26 high resolution mirrors and improved fast electronics. GRANDE, the next generation detector based on the water Cherenkov technique, has been formally proposed to HEPAP. The detector will search for neutrino emission in the Southern Hemisphere and gamma radiation in the Northern Hemisphere.

  14. High energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  15. Measurement of linear energy transfer distribution at CERN-EU high- energy reference field facility with real-time radiation monitoring device III and its comparison with dosimetric telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Doke, T; Hara, K; Hayashi, T; Kikuchi, J; Suzuki, S; Terasawa, K

    2004-01-01

    The distributions of linear energy transfer for LET (LET/sub water/) in front of the 80-cm-thick concrete side shield at the CERN-EU high- energy reference field (CERF) facility were measured with a Si detector telescope named real-time radiation monitoring device-III (RRMD-III) covered with and without a 1 cm-thick acrylic plate. In these measurements, a difference of about 20% in the absorbed dose between the two LET/sub water/ distributions was observed as a result of protons, deuterons and tritons recoiled by neutrons. The LET/sub water/ distribution obtained using RRMD-III without the 1-cm-thick acrylic plate is compared with lineal energy distributions obtained using the dosimetric telescope (DOSTEL) detector under the same conditions. These dose equivalents are also compared with that obtained using HANDI TEPC which is used as the standard at the CERF facility. (26 refs).

  16. Neurological AdverseEffects after Radiation Therapyfor Stage II Seminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Ebbeskov Lauritsen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We report 3 cases of patients with testicular cancer and stage II seminoma who developed neurological symptoms with bilateral leg weakness about 4 to 9 months after radiation therapy (RT. They all received RT to the para-aortic lymph nodes with a total dose of 40 Gy (36 Gy + 4 Gy as a boost against the tumour bed with a conventional fractionation of2 Gy/day, 5 days per week. RT was applied as hockey-stick portals, also called L-fields. In 2 cases, the symptoms fully resolved. Therapeutic irradiation can cause significant injury to the peripheral nerves of the lumbosacral plexus and/or to the spinal cord. RT is believed to produce plexus injury by both direct toxic effects and secondary microinfarction of the nerves, but the exact pathophysiology of RT-induced injury is unclear. Since reported studies of radiation-induced neurological adverse effects are limited, it is difficult to estimate their frequency and outcome. The treatment of neurological symptoms due to RT is symptomatic.

  17. Direct Formation of the C5′-Radical in the Sugar-Phosphate Backbone of DNA by High Energy Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Amitava; Becker, David; Palmer, Brian J.; Heizer, Alicia N.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Neutral sugar radicals formed in DNA sugar-phosphate backbone are well-established as precursors of biologically important damage such as DNA-strand scission and crosslinking. In this work, we present electron spin resonance (ESR) evidence showing that the sugar radical at C5′ (C5′•) is one of the most abundant (ca. 30%) sugar radicals formed by γ- and Ar ion-beam irradiated hydrated DNA samples. Taking dimethyl phosphate as a model of sugar-phosphate backbone, ESR and theoretical (DFT) studies of γ-irradiated dimethyl phosphate were carried out. CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• is formed via deprotonation from the methyl group of directly ionized dimethyl phosphate at 77 K. Formation of CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• is independent of dimethyl phosphate concentration (neat or in aqueous solution) or pH. ESR spectra of C5′• found in DNA and of CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• do not show an observable β-phosphorous hyperfine coupling (HFC). Further, C5′• found in DNA does not show a significant C4′-H β–proton HFC. Applying the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d) method, a study of conformational dependence of the phosphorous HFC in CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• shows that in its minimum energy conformation, CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• has a negligible β-phosphorous HFC. Based on these results, formation of radiation-induced C5′• is proposed to occur via a very rapid deprotonation from the directly ionized sugar-phosphate backbone and rate of this deprotonation must be faster than that of energetically downhill transfer of the unpaired spin (hole) from ionized sugar-phosphate backbone to the DNA bases. Moreover, C5′• in irradiated DNA is found to be in a conformation that does not exhibit β proton or β phosphorous HFCs. PMID:22553971

  18. Large area radiation detectors based on II VI thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    The development of low temperature device technologies that have enabled flexible displays also present opportunities for flexible electronics and flexible integrated systems. Of particular interest are possible applications in flexible, low metal content, sensor systems for unattended ground sensors, smart medical bandages, electronic ID tags for geo-location, conformal antennas, neutron/gamma-ray/x-ray detectors, etc. In this talk, our efforts to develop novel CMOS integration schemes, circuits, memory, sensors as well as novel contacts, dielectrics and semiconductors for flexible electronics are presented. In particular, in this presentation we discuss fundamental materials properties including crystalline structure, interfacial reactions, doping, etc. defining performance and reliability of II-VI-based radiation sensors. We investigate the optimal thickness of a semiconductor diode for thin-film solid state thermal neutron detectors. Besides II-VI materials, we also evaluated several diode materials, Si, CdTe,GaAs, C (diamond), and ZnO, and two neutron converter materials,10B and 6LiF. We determine the minimum semiconductor thickness needed to achieve maximum neutron detection efficiency. By keeping the semiconductor thickness to a minimum, gamma rejection is kept as high as possible. In this way, we optimize detector performance for different thin-film semiconductor materials.

  19. Dynamics of high-energy protons in the inner radiation belt during the 24th solar cycle on the data of the ARINA and VSPLESK low-orbit experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrin, Sergey; Mayorova, Marina; Koldashov, Sergey; Galper, Arkady; Zharaspayev, Temir

    2016-07-01

    Results of analysis of the inner radiation belt proton fluxes obtained in ARINA and VSPLESK satellite experiments are presented in this report The ARINA experiment is carried out on board the Russian low-orbit spacecraft Resurs-DK1 (altitude ˜600 km, inclination 70°, since 2006 till 2016). The VSPLESK experiment was fulfilled on board the International Space Station (altitude ~400 km, inclination 52°, since 2008 till 2013). The instruments register high-energy electrons and protons with energy range 3-30 MeV for electrons and 30-100 MeV for protons. The spectrometers allow measuring the particle energy with resolution 10% and angular resolution 7°. In this work the distribution of proton flux in the inner radiation belt (1.15solar cycle and main part of the 24th one. It is observed that the proton intensity depends on the solar cycle phase (the minimum intensity value is in the solar maximum and vice versa) and varies 2-7 times for different L-shells.

  20. Probing QCD at high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Voutilainen, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    We review recent experimental work on probing QCD at high $p_{T}$ at the Tevatron and at the LHC. The Tevatron has just finished a long and illustrious career at the forefront of high energy physics, while the LHC now has its physics program in full swing and is producing results at a quick rate in a new energy regime. Many of the LHC measurements extend well into the TeV range, with potential sensitivity to new physics. The experimental systematics at the LHC are also becoming competitive with the Tevatron, making precision measurements of QCD possible. Measurements of inclusive jet, dijet and isolated prompt photon production can be used to test perturbative QCD predictions and to constrain parton distribution functions, as well as to measure the strong coupling constant. More exclusive topologies are used to constrain aspects of parton shower modeling, initial and final state radiation. Interest in boosted heavy resonances has resulted in novel studies of jet mass and subjet structure that also test pertu...

  1. Introduction to High-Energy Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosswog, Stephan; Bruggen, Marcus

    2003-04-01

    High-energy astrophysics covers cosmic phenomena that occur under the most extreme physical conditions. It explores the most violent events in the Universe: the explosion of stars, matter falling into black holes, and gamma-ray bursts - the most luminous explosions since the Big Bang. Driven by a wealth of new observations, the last decade has seen a large leap forward in our understanding of these phenomena. Exploring modern topics of high-energy astrophysics, such as supernovae, neutron stars, compact binary systems, gamma-ray bursts, and active galactic nuclei, this textbook is ideal for undergraduate students in high-energy astrophysics. It is a self-supporting, timely overview of this exciting field of research. Assuming a familiarity with basic physics, it introduces all other concepts, such as gas dynamics or radiation processes, in an instructive way. An extended appendix gives an overview of some of the most important high-energy astrophysics instruments, and each chapter ends with exercises.• New, up-to-date, introductory textbook providing a broad overview of high-energy phenomena and the many advances in our knowledge gained over the last decade • Written especially for undergraduate teaching use, it introduces the necessary physics and includes many exercises • This book fills a valuable niche at the advanced undergraduate level, providing professors with a new modern introduction to the subject

  2. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous type II plateau Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Pumo, M L; Spiro, S; Pastorello, A; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Manicò, G; Turatto, M

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe we infer explosion energies of $0.16$-$0.18$ foe, radii at explosion of $1.8$-$3.5 \\times 10^{13}$ cm, and ejected masses of $10$-$11.3$\\Msun. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range $\\sim 13.2$-$15.1$\\Msun\\, for SN 2003Z and $\\sim 11.4$-$12.9$\\Msun\\, for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way, enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that: a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP, b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explo...

  3. High-energy diffraction microscopy at the advanced photon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lienert, U.; Li, S. F.; Hefferan, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    The status of the High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (HEDM) program at the 1-ID beam line of the Advanced Photon Source is reported. HEDM applies high energy synchrotron radiation for the grain and sub-grain scale structural and mechanical characterization of polycrystalline bulk materials in situ...

  4. GEM applications outside high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Pinto, Serge

    2013-01-01

    From its invention in 1997, the Gas Electron Multiplier has been applied in nuclear and high energy physics experiments. Over time however, other applications have also exploited the favorable properties of GEMs. The use of GEMs in these applications will be explained in principle and practice. This paper reviews applications in research, beam instrumentation and homeland security. The detectors described measure neutral radiations such as photons, x-rays, gamma rays and neutrons, as well as all kinds of charged radiation. This paper provides an overview of the still expanding range of possibilities of this versatile detector concept.

  5. Theory of edge radiation. Part II: Advanced applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni; Schneidmiller, Evgeni; Yurkov, Mikhail

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we exploit a formalism to describe edge radiation, which relies on Fourier optics techniques [G. Geloni, V. Kocharyan, E. Saldin, E. Schneidmiller, M. Yurkov, Theory of edge radiation. Part I: foundations and basic applications, submitted for publication]. First, we apply our method to develop an analytical model to describe edge radiation in the presence of a vacuum chamber. Such model is based on the solution of the field equation with a tensor Green's function technique. In particular, explicit calculations for a circular vacuum chamber are reported. Second, we consider the use of edge radiation as a tool for electron-beam diagnostics. We discuss coherent edge radiation, extraction of edge radiation by a mirror, and other issues becoming important at high electron energy and long radiation wavelength. Based on this work we also study the impact of edge radiation on X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) setups and we discuss recent results.

  6. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous Type II plateau supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Spiro, S.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Manicò, G.; Turatto, M.

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe, we infer explosion energies of 0.16-0.18 foe, radii at explosion of 1.8-3.5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of 10-11.3 M⊙. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range ˜13.2-15.1 M⊙ for SN 2003Z and ˜11.4-12.9 M⊙ for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that (a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP; (b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explosions of red (or yellow) supergiant stars of low to intermediate mass; (c) some faint objects may also be explained as electron-capture SNe from massive super-asymptotic giant branch stars; and (d) LL SNe IIP form the underluminous tail of the SNe IIP family, where the main parameter `guiding' the distribution seems to be the ratio of the total explosion energy to the ejected mass. Further hydrodynamical studies should be performed and compared to a more extended sample of LL SNe IIP before drawing any conclusion on the relevance of fall-back to this class of events.

  7. Conference on High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Conference on High Energy Physics (HEP 2016) will be held from August 24 to 26, 2016 in Xi'an, China. This Conference will cover issues on High Energy Physics. It dedicates to creating a stage for exchanging the latest research results and sharing the advanced research methods. HEP 2016 will be an important platform for inspiring international and interdisciplinary exchange at the forefront of High Energy Physics. The Conference will bring together researchers, engineers, technicians and academicians from all over the world, and we cordially invite you to take this opportunity to join us for academic exchange and visit the ancient city of Xi’an.

  8. Effect of Solar Cycle Activity on High Energy Proton of Inner Radiation Belt in the Low Altitude Region%太阳周期活动对低高度内辐射带高能质子的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    师立勤; 林瑞淋; 刘四清; 郑惠南

    2012-01-01

    The NOAA-15 high energy proton observation from 1998 to 2011 is used to analyze the effect of solar cycle activity on high energy proton flux. The statistic research indicates that there is an inverse correlative relationship between the proton flux in inner radiation belt and solar activity. This anti-correlation is related to geomagnetic coordinates L and B, and more significant with the increasing of L and decreasing of B. There is also a phase lag between the solar activity and the proton flux. This hysteresis effect is more obvious in the region with smaller L or larger B. The lagcan reach one year in some regions. This hysteresis effect means it takes a long time to reach the dynamic balance between the source and the loss for the proton of inner radiation belt in the low altitude region. The unbalance between the source and loss is the reason why the intensity of proton flux at the same solar activity is different. The comparison with the result of AP8 model indicates the energetic proton flux from AP8 is higher than the satellite's observation in the region with large B, which suggests that the AP8 model may overstate the proton flux enhancement at inner radiation belt in the low altitude region if only the long-term variation of magnetic field is considered.%利用NOAA-15卫星1998年到2011年近13年的高能质子全向通量观测资料,分析了一个太阳活动周内,低高度内辐射带高能质子通量的分布变化特性及其物理原因,比较了观测结果与AP8模型的不同.研究表明,低高度内辐射带高能质子通量与太阳活动水平的反相关关系与磁壳参数L值及磁场B值有关;L值越低,B值越大的空间点,其高能质子通量与太阳活动水平的反向相关性越明显.高能质子通量随太阳活动水平的变化存在明显滞后现象,L值越高、B值越小的空间点,滞后现象就越明显,滞后严重时可以达到一年左右的时间;这种滞后现象反映出

  9. High Energy Density Capacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA?s future space science missions cannot be realized without the state of the art energy storage devices which require high energy density, high reliability, and...

  10. The AAVSO High Energy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Aaron

    2004-06-01

    The AAVSO is expanding its International Gamma-Ray Burst Network to incorporate other high energy objects such as blazars and magnetic cataclysmic variables (polars). The new AAVSO High Energy Network will be collaborating with the Global Telescope Network (GTN) to observe bright blazars in support of the upcoming GLAST mission. We also will be observing polars in support of the XMM mission. This new network will involve both visual and CCD obsrvers and is expected to last for many years.

  11. Ultra High Energy Nuclei Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Aloisio, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the problem of ultra high energy nuclei propagation in astrophysical backgrounds. We present a new analytical computation scheme based on the hypothesis of continuos energy losses in a kinetic formulation of the particles propagation. This scheme enables the computation of the fluxes of ultra high energy nuclei as well as the fluxes of secondaries (nuclei and nucleons) produced by the process of photo-disintegration suffered by nuclei.

  12. Why is High Energy Physics Lorentz Invariant?

    CERN Document Server

    Afshordi, Niayesh

    2015-01-01

    Despite the tremendous empirical success of equivalence principle, there are several theoretical motivations for existence of a preferred reference frame (or aether) in a consistent theory of quantum gravity. However, if quantum gravity had a preferred reference frame, why would high energy processes enjoy such a high degree of Lorentz symmetry? While this is often considered as an argument against aether, here I provide three independent arguments for why perturbative unitarity (or weak coupling) of the Lorentz-violating effective field theories put stringent constraints on possible observable violations of Lorentz symmetry at high energies. In particular, the interaction with the scalar graviton in a consistent low-energy theory of gravity and a (radiatively and dynamically) stable cosmological framework, leads to these constraints. The violation (quantified by the relative difference in maximum speed of propagation) is limited to $\\lesssim 10^{-10} E({\\rm eV})^{-4}$ (superseding all current empirical bound...

  13. On the backscatter of solar He II, 304 A radiation from interplanetary He/+/.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paresce, F.; Bowyer, S.

    1973-01-01

    Backscatter of solar He II, 304 A radiation by interplanetary positive helium ions is shown to be insufficient to account for recent observations of this airglow radiation in the night sky at rocket altitudes. In fact, for most viewing directions, the expected intensities probably fall well below the sensitivity threshold of existing extreme ultraviolet instrumentation.

  14. High Energy Particles in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Larsen, L

    2008-01-01

    Collective Ampere law interactions producing magnetic flux tubes piercing through sunspots into and then out of the solar corona allow for low energy nuclear reactions in a steady state and high energy particle reactions if a magnetic flux tube explodes in a violent event such as a solar flare. Filamentous flux tubes themselves are vortices of Ampere currents circulating around in a tornado fashion in a roughly cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field lines are parallel to and largely confined within the core of the vortex. The vortices may thereby be viewed as long current carrying coils surrounding magnetic flux and subject to inductive Faraday and Ampere laws. These laws set the energy scales of (i) low energy solar nuclear reactions which may regularly occur and (ii) high energy electro-weak interactions which occur when magnetic flux coils explode into violent episodic events such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections.

  15. High-energy astroparticle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Semikoz, A

    2010-01-01

    In these three lectures I discuss the present status of high-energy astroparticle physics including Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR), high-energy gamma rays, and neutrinos. The first lecture is devoted to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. After a brief introduction to UHECR I discuss the acceleration of charged particles to highest energies in the astrophysical objects, their propagation in the intergalactic space, recent observational results by the Auger and HiRes experiments, anisotropies of UHECR arrival directions, and secondary gamma rays produced by UHECR. In the second lecture I review recent results on TeV gamma rays. After a short introduction to detection techniques, I discuss recent exciting results of the H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and Milagro experiments on the point-like and diffuse sources of TeV gamma rays. A special section is devoted to the detection of extragalactic magnetic fields with TeV gammaray measurements. Finally, in the third lecture I discuss Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) neutrinos. I review t...

  16. High energy H- ion transport and stripping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During the Proton Driver design study based on an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac, a major concern is the feasibility of transport and injection of high energy H{sup -} ions because the energy of H{sup -} beam would be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This paper will focus on two key technical issues: (1) stripping losses during transport (including stripping by blackbody radiation, magnetic field and residual gases); (2) stripping efficiency of carbon foil during injection.

  17. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations - II. Radiative models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembolini, Federico; Elahi, Pascal Jahan; Pearce, Frazer R.; Power, Chris; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T.; Cui, Weiguang; Yepes, Gustavo; Beck, Alexander M.; Borgani, Stefano; Cunnama, Daniel; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G.; Murante, Giuseppe; Newton, Richard D. A.; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-07-01

    We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M_{200}^crit = 1.1 × 1015 h-1 M⊙) in a Λ cold dark matter universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modelling hydrodynamics with full radiative subgrid physics. These codes include smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH), spanning traditional and advanced SPH schemes, adaptive mesh and moving mesh codes. Our goal is to study the consistency between simulated clusters modelled with different radiative physical implementations - such as cooling, star formation and thermal active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We compare images of the cluster at z = 0, global properties such as mass, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. We find that, with respect to non-radiative simulations, dark matter is more centrally concentrated, the extent not simply depending on the presence/absence of AGN feedback. The scatter in global quantities is substantially higher than for non-radiative runs. Intriguingly, adding radiative physics seems to have washed away the marked code-based differences present in the entropy profile seen for non-radiative simulations in Sembolini et al.: radiative physics + classic SPH can produce entropy cores, at least in the case of non cool-core clusters. Furthermore, the inclusion/absence of AGN feedback is not the dividing line -as in the case of describing the stellar content - for whether a code produces an unrealistic temperature inversion and a falling central entropy profile. However, AGN feedback does strongly affect the overall stellar distribution, limiting the effect of overcooling and reducing sensibly the stellar fraction.

  18. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Lorella; Corcoran, Michael; Drake, Stephen; McGlynn, Thomas A.; Snowden, Stephen; Mukai, Koji; Cannizzo, John; Lochner, James; Rots, Arnold; Christian, Eric; Barthelmy, Scott; Palmer, David; Mitchell, John; Esposito, Joseph; Sreekumar, P.; Hua, Xin-Min; Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Chan, Kai-Wing; Soong, Yang; Barrett, Paul

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by the members of the USRA contract team during the 6 months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming 6 months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in astrophysics. Supported missions include advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-Ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) and others.

  19. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation II: Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Makito; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of the formation of globular clusters under ultraviolet (UV) background radiation. One-dimensional spherical symmetric radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations by Hasegawa et al. have demonstrated that the collapse of low-mass (10^6-10^7 solar masses) gas clouds exposed to intense UV radiation can lead to the formation of compact star clusters like globular clusters (GCs) if gas clouds contract with supersonic infall velocities. However, three-dimensional effects, such as the anisotropy of background radiation and the inhomogeneity in gas clouds, have not been studied so far. In this paper, we perform three-dimensional RHD simulations in a semi-cosmological context, and reconsider the formation of compact star clusters in strong UV radiation fields. As a result, we find that although anisotropic radiation fields bring an elongated shadow of neutral gas, almost spherical compact star clusters can be procreated from a "supersonic infall" cloud, since photo-dissociating radiation supp...

  20. Toxic variability and radiation sensitization by Pt(II) analogs in Salmonella typhimurium cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, R.C.; Khokhar, A.R.; Teicher, B.A.; Douple, E.B.

    1984-09-01

    A rationale is presented for the development of toxic, i.e., cytocidal, antitumor drugs as clinical hypoxic cell radiation sensitizers. Pt(II) complex-induced hypoxic cell radiation sensitization may occur from Pt(II) complex in free solution and Pt(II) bound to DNA. Although both the free solution and the bound compartments may operate, the free solution compartment is more likely amenable to experimental and clinical control in the case of systemically active Pt drugs. Assuming equivalent cell uptake of different Pt(II) complexes, the free solution compartment of Pt(II) sensitization can be increased by utilizing less toxic analogs of the antitumor drug cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II). One such less toxic Pt(II) sensitizer currently in clinical use is found to be cis-(1,1-cyclobutanedicarboxylato)diammineplatinum(II). A new finding of both clinical and mechanistic usefulness is described: irradiation of hypoxic solutions of four cis-Pt(II) complexes, but not two trans-Pt(II) complexes, creates products that cause toxicity in excees of the unirradiated solutions.

  1. High-energy fluxes of atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovskaya, T S; Sinegovsky, S I

    2013-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos from decays of mesons, produced in collisions of cosmic ray particles with air nuclei, form unavoidable background for detection of astrophysical neutrinos. More precise calculations of the high-energy neutrino spectrum are required since measurements in the IceCube experiment reach the intriguing energy region where a contribution of the prompt neutrinos and/or astrophysical ones should be discovered. Basing on the referent hadronic models QGSJET II-03, SIBYLL 2.1, we calculate high-energy spectra, both of the muon and electron atmospheric neutrinos, averaged over zenith-angles. The computation is made using three parameterizations of cosmic ray spectra which include the knee region. All calculations are compared with the atmospheric neutrino measurements by Frejus and IceCube. The prompt neutrino flux predictions obtained with thequark-gluon string model (QGSM) for the charm production by Kaidalov & Piskunova do not contradict to the IceCube measurements and upper limit on the astr...

  2. Mexican High Energy Physics Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Olivo, J. C.; Napsuciale, M.; Pérez-Angón, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Mexican High Energy Physics Network is one of CONACYT's thematic research networks, created with the aim of increasing the communication and cooperation of the scientific and technology communities of Mexico in strategic areas. In this report we review the evolution, challenges, achievements and opportunities faced by the network.

  3. Monolithic pixel detectors for high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Snoeys, W

    2013-01-01

    Monolithic pixel detectors integrating sensor matrix and readout in one piece of silicon have revolutionized imaging for consumer applications, but despite years of research they have not yet been widely adopted for high energy physics. Two major requirements for this application, radiation tolerance and low power consumption, require charge collection by drift for the most extreme radiation levels and an optimization of the collected signal charge over input capacitance ratio ( Q / C ). It is shown that monolithic detectors can achieve Q / C for low analog power consumption and even carryout the promise to practically eliminate analog power consumption, but combining suf fi cient Q / C , collection by drift, and integration of readout circuitry within the pixel remains a challenge. An overview is given of different approaches to address this challenge, with possible advantages and disadvantages.

  4. High energy astrophysics. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courvoisier, Thierry J.L. [Geneva Univ., Versoix (Switzerland). ISDC, Data Centre for Astrophysics

    2013-07-01

    Based on observational examples this book reveals and explains high-energy astrophysical processes. Presents the theory of astrophysical processes in a didactic approach by deriving equations step by step. With several attractive astronomical pictures. High-energy astrophysics has unveiled a Universe very different from that only known from optical observations. It has revealed many types of objects in which typical variability timescales are as short as years, months, days, and hours (in quasars, X-ray binaries, and other objects), and even down to milli-seconds in gamma ray bursts. The sources of energy that are encountered are only very seldom nuclear fusion, and most of the time gravitation, a paradox when one thinks that gravitation is, by many orders of magnitude, the weakest of the fundamental interactions. The understanding of these objects' physical conditions and the processes revealed by high-energy astrophysics in the last decades is nowadays part of astrophysicists' culture, even of those active in other domains of astronomy. This book evolved from lectures given to master and PhD students at the University of Geneva since the early 1990s. It aims at providing astronomers and physicists intending to be active in high-energy astrophysics a broad basis on which they should be able to build the more specific knowledge they will need. While in the first part of the book the physical processes are described and derived in detail, the second part studies astrophysical objects in which high-energy astrophysics plays a crucial role. This two-pronged approach will help students recognise physical processes by their observational signatures in contexts that may differ widely from those presented here.

  5. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 17: Radiation Protection II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  6. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations II: radiative models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sembolini, F

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M(supcrit)(sub200) = 1.1×10(sup15)h(sup-1)M) in a CDM universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modeling hydrodynamics with full radiative...

  7. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations II: radiative models

    CERN Document Server

    Sembolini, Federico; Pearce, Frazer R; Power, Chris; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T; Cui, Weiguang; Yepes, Gustavo; Beck, Alexander M; Borgani, Stefano; Cunnama, Daniel; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G; Murante, Giuseppe; Newton, Richard D A; Perret, Valentin; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-01-01

    We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M$_{200}^{\\rm crit}$ = 1.1$\\times$10$^{15}h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$) in a $\\Lambda$CDM universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modeling hydrodynamics with full radiative subgrid physics. These codes include Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), spanning traditional and advanced SPH schemes, adaptive mesh and moving mesh codes. Our goal is to study the consistency between simulated clusters modeled with different radiative physical implementations - such as cooling, star formation and AGN feedback. We compare images of the cluster at $z=0$, global properties such as mass, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. We find that, with respect to non-radiative simulations, dark matter is more centrally concentrated, the extent not simply depending on the presence/absence of AGN feedback. The scatter in global quantities is substantially higher than for non-radiative runs. Intriguingly, a...

  8. High-energy limit of quantum electrodynamics beyond Sudakov approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Penin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the high-energy behavior of the scattering amplitudes in quantum electrodynamics beyond the leading order of the small electron mass expansion in the leading logarithmic approximation. In contrast to the Sudakov logarithms, the mass-suppressed double-logarithmic radiative corrections are induced by a soft electron pair exchange and result in enhancement of the power-suppressed contribution, which dominates the amplitudes at extremely high energies. Possible applications of our result to the analysis of the high-energy processes in quantum chromodynamics is also discussed.

  9. High-energy limit of quantum electrodynamics beyond Sudakov approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penin, Alexander A., E-mail: penin@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    We study the high-energy behavior of the scattering amplitudes in quantum electrodynamics beyond the leading order of the small electron mass expansion in the leading logarithmic approximation. In contrast to the Sudakov logarithms, the mass-suppressed double-logarithmic radiative corrections are induced by a soft electron pair exchange and result in enhancement of the power-suppressed contribution, which dominates the amplitudes at extremely high energies. Possible applications of our result to the analysis of the high-energy processes in quantum chromodynamics is also discussed.

  10. Optimized undulator to generate low energy photons from medium to high energy accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Chiu, Mau-Sen; Luo, Hao-Wen; Yang, Chin-Kang; Huang, Jui-Che; Jan, Jyh-Chyuan; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2017-07-01

    While emitting low energy photons from a medium or high energy storage ring, the on-axis heat load on the beam line optics can become a critical issue. In addition, the heat load in the bending magnet chamber, especially in the vertical and circular polarization mode of operation may cause some concern. In this work, we compare the heat loads for the APPLE-II and the Knot-APPLE, both optimized to emit 10 eV photons from the 3 GeV TPS. Under this constraint the heat load analysis, synchrotron radiation performance and features in various polarization modes are presented. Additional consideration is given to beam dynamics effect.

  11. Ion irradiation and biomolecular radiation damage II. Indirect effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Su, Wenhui

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that damage of genome in a living cell by ionizing radiation is about one-third direct and two-thirds indirect. The former which has been introduced in our last paper, concerns direct energy deposition and ionizing reactions in the biomolecules; the latter results from radiation induced reactive species (mainly radicals) in the medium (mainly water) surrounding the biomolecules. In this review, a short description of ion implantation induced radical formation in water is presented. Then we summarize the aqueous radical reaction chemistry of DNA, protein and their components, followed by a brief introduction of biomolecular damage induced by secondary particles (ions and electron). Some downstream biological effects are also discussed.

  12. A New PLS-II In-Vacuum Undulator and Characterization of Undulator Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D-E; Park, K-H; Seo, H-S; Ha, T; Jeong, Y-G; Han, H-S; Lee, W W; Huang, J-Y; Nam, S; Kim, K-R; Shin, S

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the result of overall studies from development to characterization of undulator radiation. After three years of upgrading, PLS-II [1, 2] has been operating successfully since 21st March 2012. During the upgrade, we developed and installed an in-vacuum undulator (IVU) that generates brilliant X-ray beam. The IVU with 3 GeV electron beam generates undulator radiation up to ~ 21 keV using 11th higher harmonic. The characterizations of the undulator radiation at an X-ray beam line in PLS-II agreed well with the simulation. Based on this performance demonstration, the in-vacuum undulator is successfully operating at PLS-II.

  13. Gauge-independent Wigner functions. II. Inclusion of radiation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanainen, J.; Varró, S.; Serimaa, O. T.

    1987-04-01

    We investigate the effects of quantized radiation reaction fields on the motion of a charged particle using the gauge-independent Wigner operator (GIWO) and gauge-independent Wigner function (GIWF) introduced earlier [Phys. Rev. A 33, 2913 (1986)]. To complement the equation of motion of the GIWO, the Heisenberg equations of motion of the quantized electromagnetic fields are solved within the Markov approximation. After considering the operator orderings and orders of magnitude of the radiation reaction terms, we eliminate the quantum fields from the evolution equation of the GIWO, and obtain for the GIWF a closed equation containing relaxation terms. As an example of the formalism we derive a Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) for the GIWF of a particle in a constant magnetic field. To the order ħ 0 the classical radiation damping ensues, and the first quantum correction proportional to ħ emerges as diffusion. The diffusion operator turns out to be indefinite and the FPE consequently defies our attempts at a complete analysis, but we demonstrate that at least the coherent states constructed from the Landau levels exhibit a manifestly physical time evolution under the FPE. We point out that the GIWF calculated with quantized electromagnetic fields is divergent even if the fields are in the vacuum state, and suggest that the GIWF should be associated with the particle state by ignoring the quantized fields altogether.

  14. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation - II. Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Makito; Umemura, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    We explore the possibility of the formation of globular clusters (GCs) under ultraviolet (UV) background radiation. One-dimensional spherical symmetric radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations by Hasegawa et al. have demonstrated that the collapse of low-mass (106-7 M⊙) gas clouds exposed to intense UV radiation can lead to the formation of compact star clusters like GCs if gas clouds contract with supersonic infall velocities. However, three-dimensional effects, such as the anisotropy of background radiation and the inhomogeneity in gas clouds, have not been studied so far. In this paper, we perform three-dimensional RHD simulations in a semicosmological context, and reconsider the formation of compact star clusters in strong UV radiation fields. As a result, we find that although anisotropic radiation fields bring an elongated shadow of neutral gas, almost spherical compact star clusters can be procreated from a `supersonic infall' cloud, since photodissociating radiation suppresses the formation of hydrogen molecules in the shadowed regions and the regions are compressed by UV heated ambient gas. The properties of resultant star clusters match those of GCs. On the other hand, in weak UV radiation fields, dark-matter-dominated star clusters with low stellar density form due to the self-shielding effect as well as the positive feedback by ionizing photons. Thus, we conclude that the `supersonic infall' under a strong UV background is a potential mechanism to form GCs.

  15. High energy density aluminum battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  16. High energy density aluminum battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  17. A high energy physics perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  18. High energy astrophysics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Courvoisier, Thierry J -L

    2013-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics has unveiled a Universe very different from that only known from optical observations. It has revealed many types of objects in which typical variability timescales are as short as years, months, days, and hours (in quasars, X-ray binaries, and other objects), and even down to milli-seconds in gamma ray bursts. The sources of energy that are encountered are only very seldom nuclear fusion, and most of the time gravitation, a paradox when one thinks that gravitation is, by many orders of magnitude, the weakest of the fundamental interactions. The understanding of these objects' physical conditions and the processes revealed by high-energy astrophysics in the last decades is nowadays part of astrophysicists' culture, even of those active in other domains of astronomy. This book evolved from lectures given to master and PhD students at the University of Geneva since the early 1990s. It aims at providing astronomers and physicists intending to be active in high-energy astrophysics a broad...

  19. High-energy atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

    2010-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known...

  20. Quantum chromodynamics at high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Kovchegov, Yuri V

    2012-01-01

    Filling a gap in the current literature, this book is the first entirely dedicated to high energy QCD including parton saturation. It presents groundbreaking progress on the subject and describes many of the problems at the forefront of research, bringing postgraduate students, theorists and advanced experimentalists up to date with the current status of the field. A broad range of topics in high energy QCD are covered, most notably on the physics of parton saturation and the Color Glass Condensate (CGC). The material is presented in a pedagogical way, with numerous examples and exercises. Discussion ranges from the quasi-classical McLerran–Venugopalan model to the linear and non-linear BFKL/BK/JIMWLK small-x evolution equations. The authors adopt both a theoretical and experimental outlook and present the physics of strong interactions in a universal way, making it useful to physicists from various sub-communities and applicable to processes studied at high energy accelerators around the world.

  1. EXAFS spectra using synchrotron radiation of Cu (II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninama, Samrath; Mishra, A.

    2016-10-01

    EXAFS analysis of Cu (II) complex as a ligand of 2-methyl-3-[(bis-aniline(R) phenyl]- 3H-1, 5 benzodiazepine. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra have been recorded at the K-edge of Cu (II) using the energy dispersive EXAFS beam line at 2.5GeV Indus - 2 synchrotron source at RRCAT, Indore, India. A theoretical EXAFS data analysis is also carried out by Fourier analysis of experimental EXAFS data of the copper (II) complexes. This analysis includes details of the Fourier transform of the data and the extraction of metal-ligand bond length. Bond lengths determined from data analysis methods are compared with the bond lengths obtained from several other known techniques, namely, Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods. These data have also been calibrated by derivative method and bond lengths have also been obtained from Fourier transformation method and the results have been compared with the each other. The EXAFS data have been analyzed using the computer software Athena.

  2. Investigations in silicate glasses. I. Radiation damage. II. Optical nonlinearity. [Gamma rays and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, M.J.

    1976-11-15

    The investigation of two poorly understood but technologically important physical properties of silicate glasses and related materials is described. The use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance to investigate the nature of radiation-induced damage in glasses exposed to a variety of high-energy radiation sources is discussed first. Second, the measurement of the nonlinear index of refraction coefficient in a variety of optical materials related to the design of high-power laser systems is described. The radiation damage investigations rely heavily on the comparison of experimental results for different experimental situations. The comparison of EPR lineshapes, absolute spin densities and power saturation behavior is used to probe a variety of microscopic and macroscopic aspects of radiation damage in glasses. Comparison of radiation damage associated with exposure to gamma rays and fast neutrons (and combinations thereof) are interpreted in terms of the microscopic damage mechanisms which are expected to be associated with the specific radiations. Comparison of radiation damage behavior in different types of glasses is also interpreted in terms of the behavior expected for the specific materials. The body of data which is generated is found to be internally self-consistent and is also generally consistent with the radiation damage behavior expected for specific situations. A new and versatile technique for measuring the nonlinear index of refraction coefficient, n/sub 2/, in optical materials is described. The technique utilizes a 1 ns pulsed neodymium-glass laser system and time-resolved interferometry to determine the ratio of the coefficient n/sub 2/ of sample materials to the n/sub 2/ of CS/sub 2/. This method avoids some of the complications associated with performing absolute measurements of n/sub 2/ and allows the use of a relatively simple experimental technique. The measurements determine the nonlinear index ratios of the samples with an accuracy of about

  3. Black hole and hawking radiation by type-II Weyl fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovik, G. E.

    2016-11-01

    The type-II Weyl and type-II Dirac fermions may emerge behind the event horizon of black holes. Correspondingly, the black hole can be simulated by creation of the region with overtilted Weyl or Dirac cones. The filling of the electronic states inside the "black hole" is accompanied by Hawking radiation. The Hawking temperature in the Weyl semimetals can reach the room temperature, if the black hole region is sufficiently small, and thus the effective gravity at the horizon is large.

  4. Black hole and Hawking radiation by type-II Weyl fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Volovik, G E

    2016-01-01

    The type-II Weyl and type-II Dirac fermions may emerge behind the event horizon of black holes. Correspondingly the black hole can be simulated by creation of the region with overtilted Weyl or Dirac cones. The filling of the electronic states inside the "black hole" is accompanied by Hawking radiation. The Hawking temperature in the Weyl semimetals can reach the room temperature, if the black hole region is sufficiently small, and thus the effective gravity at the horizon is large.

  5. Enhanced radiation response in radioresistant MCF-7 cells by targeting peroxiredoxin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz AJG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthony Joseph Gomez Diaz,1 Daniel Tamae,2 Yun Yen,3 JianJian Li,4 Tieli Wang1 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University at Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, 2Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology, Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 3Department of Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA Abstract: In our previous study, we identified that a protein target, peroxiredoxin II (PrxII, is overexpressed in radioresistant MCF+FIR3 breast-cancer cells and found that its expression and function is associated with breast-cancer radiation sensitivity or resistance. Small interference RNA (siRNA targeting PrxII gene expression was able to sensitize MCF+FIR3 radioresistant breast-cancer cells to ionizing radiation. The major focus of this work was to investigate how the radiation response of MCF+FIR3 radioresistant cells was affected by the siRNA that inhibits PrxII gene expression. Our results, presented here, show that silencing PrxII gene expression increased cellular toxicity by altering cellular thiol status, inhibiting Ca2+ efflux from the cells, and perturbing the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. By combining radiotherapy and siRNA technology, we hope to develop new therapeutic strategies that may have potential to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents due to this technology's property of targeting to specific cancer-related genes. Keywords: siRNA, PrxII, radiation resistance, Ca2+, MCF+FIR3

  6. Polarized beams in high energy circular accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, A.W.

    1979-05-01

    In recent years, high energy physicists have become increasingly interested in the possible spin effects at high energies. To study those spin effects, it is desirable to have beams with high energy, high intensity and high polarization. In this talk, we briefly review the present status and the prospects for the near future of high energy polarized beams. 30 refs.

  7. HIGH ENERGY GASEOUS DISCHARGE DEVICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, V.

    1960-02-16

    The high-energy electrical discharge device described comprises an envelope, a pair of main discharge electrodes supported in opposition in the envelope, and a metallic shell symmetrically disposed around and spaced from the discharge path between the electrodes. The metallic shell comprises a first element of spaced helical turns of metallic material and a second element of spaced helical turns of methllic material insulatedly supported in superposition outside the first element and with the turns overlapping the gap between the turns of the first element.

  8. Simulation of High Energy Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Mashtakov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Under the scope of a CERN summer student project, a Geant4 physical model has been developed and committed to the Geant4 repository to allow precise simulation of high-energy muons and hadrons transport inside a material. Resulted angular distributions produced by this model have small deviations from those that were obtained by the Geant4 model used by default. High-energetic muons energy losses inside the CMS tracker have also been estimated and may vary from 0.05% up to 2.5%.

  9. High-energy neutrino astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halzen, Francis

    2017-03-01

    The chargeless, weakly interacting neutrinos are ideal astronomical messengers as they travel through space without scattering, absorption or deflection. But this weak interaction also makes them notoriously di cult to detect, leading to neutrino observatories requiring large-scale detectors. A few years ago, the IceCube experiment discovered neutrinos originating beyond the Sun with energies bracketed by those of the highest energy gamma rays and cosmic rays. I discuss how these high-energy neutrinos can be detected and what they can tell us about the origins of cosmic rays and about dark matter.

  10. PASOTRON high-energy microwave source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Schumacher, Robert W.; Butler, Jennifer M.; Hyman, Jay, Jr.; Santoru, Joseph; Watkins, Ron M.; Harvey, Robin J.; Dolezal, Franklin A.; Eisenhart, Robert L.; Schneider, Authur J.

    1992-04-01

    A unique, high-energy microwave source, called PASOTRON (Plasma-Assisted Slow-wave Oscillator), has been developed. The PASOTRON utilizes a long-pulse E-gun and plasma- filled slow-wave structure (SWS) to produce high-energy pulses from a simple, lightweight device that utilizes no externally produced magnetic fields. Long pulses are obtained from a novel E-gun that employs a low-pressure glow discharge to provide a stable, high current- density electron source. The electron accelerator consists of a high-perveance, multi-aperture array. The E-beam is operated in the ion-focused regime where the plasma filling the SWS space-charge neutralizes the beam, and the self-pinch force compresses the beamlets and increases the beam current density. A scale-model PASOTRON, operating as a backward- wave oscillator in C-band with a 100-kV E-beam, has produced output powers in the 3 to 5 MW range and pulse lengths of over 100 microsecond(s) ec, corresponding to an integrated energy per pulse of up to 500 J. The E-beam to microwave-radiation power conversion efficiency is about 20%.

  11. High energy electrodynamics in matter

    CERN Document Server

    Akhiezer, A I

    1996-01-01

    This study presents an interpretation of classical and quantum theories of fast charged particle radiation in an external field. Various methods describing the process of particle interaction with substance and external fields are analyzed, such as Born approximation, the Schwinger operator method and different versions of the quasi-classical approximation. Such problems as time evolution of an electromagnetic field applied to and emitting electrons, coherence length, radiation in the simplest external fields, Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation and the correspondence of different methods describing the interaction between fast particles and matter are also considered.

  12. Polylogarithmic representation of radiative and thermodynamic properties of thermal radiation in a given spectral range: II. Real-body radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2015-01-01

    The general analytical expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of a real-body are obtained in a finite range of frequencies at different temperatures. The frequency dependence of the spectral emissivity is represented as a power series. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and total emissivity are expressed in terms of the polylogarithm functions. The general expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions are applied for the study of thermal radiation of liquid and solid zirconium carbide. These functions are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity in the visible-near infrared range at the melting (freezing) point. The gaps between the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of liquid and solid zirconium carbide are observed. The g...

  13. Duke University high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  14. Overview. Department of High Energy Physics. Section 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coghen, T. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The activities of Department of High Energy Physics in 1994 have been presented. They cover a variety of problems of experimental and theoretical high energy elementary particle physics: hadronic and leptonic interactions with nucleons and nuclei (mainly characteristics of particle production , including heavy quark physics), e{sup +} e{sup -} interactions and tests of the Standard Model (also evaluations of radiative corrections), ultrarelativistic heavy ion interactions and search for the quark-gluon plasma, as well as spectra, composition and interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles.Research on detectors and development of apparatus for high energy physics experiments at future accelerators such as LHC or RHIC were also carried out. The short information about personnel employed in the Department, seminars, publication, conferences and reports is also given.

  15. Newton's 2nd Law, Radiation Reaction & Type II Einstein-Maxwell Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, Ezra T

    2011-01-01

    Considering perturbations off the Reissner-Nordstrom metric while keeping the perturbations in the class of type II Einstein-Maxwell metrics, we do a spherical harmonic expansion of all the variables up to the quadrupole term. This leads to a rather surprising results. Referring to the source of the metric as a type II particle (analogous to referring to a Schwarzschild-Reissner-Nordstrom or Kerr-Newman particle), we see immediately that the Bondi momentum of the particle take the classical form of mass times velocity plus an electromagnetic radiation reaction term while the Bondi mass loss equation become the classical gravitational and electromagnetic (electric and magnetic) dipole and quadrupole radiation. The Bondi momentum loss equation turns into Newtons second law of motion containing the Abraham, Lorentz, Dirac radiation reaction force plus a momentum recoil (rocket) force while the reality condition on the Bondi mass aspect yields the conservation of angular momentum.

  16. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  17. High-energy evolution to three loops

    CERN Document Server

    Caron-Huot, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The Balitsky-Kovchegov equation describes the high-energy growth of gauge theory scattering amplitudes as well as nonlinear saturation effects which stop it. We obtain the three-loop corrections to this equation in planar $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills theory. Our method exploits a recently established equivalence with the physics of soft wide-angle radiation, so-called non-global logarithms, and thus yields at the same time the three-loop evolution equation for non-global logarithms. As a by-product of our analysis, we develop a Lorentz-covariant method to subtract infrared and collinear divergences in cross-section calculations in the planar limit. We compare our result in the linear regime with a recent prediction for the so-called Pomeron trajectory, and compare its collinear limit with predictions from the spectrum of twist-two operators.

  18. Polylogarithmic Representation of Radiative and Thermodynamic Properties of Thermal Radiation in a Given Spectral Range: II. Real-Body Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    There are several classes of materials and space objects for which the frequency dependence of the spectral emissivity is represented as a power series. Therefore, the study of the properties of thermal radiation for these real bodies is an important task for both fundamental science and industrial applications. The general analytical expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of a real body are obtained in a finite range of frequencies at different temperatures. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and total emissivity are expressed in terms of the polylogarithm functions. The obtained general expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions are applied for the study of thermal radiation of liquid and solid zirconium carbide. These functions are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity in the visible and near-infrared range at the melting (freezing) point. The gaps between the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of liquid and solid zirconium carbide are observed. The general analytical expressions obtained can easily be presented in the wavenumber domain.

  19. Developments in high energy theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil Mukhi; Probir Roy

    2009-07-01

    This non-technical review article is aimed at readers with some physics back-ground, including beginning research students. It provides a panoramic view of the main theoretical developments in high energy physics since its inception more than half a century ago, a period in which experiments have spanned an enormous range of energies, theories have been developed leading up to the Standard Model, and proposals – including the radical paradigm of String Theory – have been made to go beyond the Standard Model. The list of references provided here is not intended to properly credit all original work but rather to supply the reader with a few pointers to the literature, specifically highlighting work done by Indian authors.

  20. High-energy atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drukarev, Evgeny G

    2016-01-01

    This self-contained text introduces readers to the field of high-energy atomic physics - a new regime of photon-atom interactions in which the photon energies significantly exceed the atomic or molecular binding energies, and which opened up with the recent advent of new synchrotron sources. From a theoretical point of view, a small-parameter characteristic of the bound system emerged, making it possible to perform analytic perturbative calculations that can in turn serve as benchmarks for more powerful numerical computations. The first part of the book introduces readers to the foundations of this new regime and its theoretical treatment. In particular, the validity of the small-parameter perturbation expansion and of the lowest-order approximation is critically reviewed. The following chapters then apply these insights to various atomic processes, such as photoionization as a many-body problem, dominant mechanisms for the production of ions at higher energies, Compton scattering and ionization accompanied b...

  1. A convective and radiative heat transfer analysis for the FIRE II forebody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greendyke, Robert B.; Hartung, Lin C.

    1993-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes flowfield solution method (LAURA code) using finite-rate chemistry and two-temperature thermal nonequilibrium was used in combination with two nonequilibrium radiative heat transfer codes to calculate heating for the FIRE II vehicle. An axisymmetric model of the actual body shape was used. One radiative heating code (NEQAIR) was used in uncoupled fashion with the flowfield solver's energy equations, while the other code (LORAN) was used in both coupled and uncoupled variations. Several trajectory points ranging from highly nonequilibrium flow to near-equilibrium flow were used for a study of both convective and radiative heating over the vehicle. Considerable variation in radiative heating was seen at the extremes, while agreement was good in the intermediate trajectory points. Total heat transfer calculations gave good comparison until the peak heating trajectory points were encountered, and returned to good agreement for the last two equilibrium points.

  2. Flux profile scanners for scattered high-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R. S.; Decowski, P.; Arroyo, C.; Breuer, M.; Celli, J.; Chudakov, E.; Kumar, K. S.; Olson, M.; Peterson, G. A.; Pope, K.; Ricci, J.; Savage, J.; Souder, P. A.

    2005-11-01

    The paper describes the design and performance of flux integrating Cherenkov scanners with air-core reflecting light guides used in a high-energy, high-flux electron scattering experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The scanners were highly radiation resistant and provided a good signal to background ratio leading to very good spatial resolution of the scattered electron flux profile scans.

  3. High Energy Gas Fracturing Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, R.

    2001-02-27

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

  4. Submicron CMOS technologies for high energy physics and space applications

    CERN Document Server

    Anelli, G; Faccio, F; Heijne, Erik H M; Jarron, Pierre; Kloukinas, Kostas C; Marchioro, A; Moreira, P; Snoeys, W

    2001-01-01

    The radiation environment present in some of today's High-Energy Physics (HEP) experiments and in space has a detrimental influence on the integrated circuits working in these environments. Special technologies, called radiation hardened, have been used in the past to prevent the radiation-induced degradation. In the last decades, the market of these special technologies has undergone a considerable shrinkage, rendering them less reliably available and far more expensive than today's mainstream technologies. An alternative approach is to use a deep submicron CMOS technology. The most sensitive part to radiation effects in a MOS transistor is the gate oxide. One way to reduce the effects of ionizing radiation in the gate oxide is to reduce its thickness, which is a natural trend in modern technologies. Submicron CMOS technologies seem therefore a good candidate for implementing radiation-hardened integrated circuits using a commercial, inexpensive technology. Nevertheless, a certain number of radiation-induced...

  5. Radio galaxies and the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaglia, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2007-03-15

    Among the possible sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are the hot-spots of Fanaroff-Rlley II radio galaxies. These regions meet the requirements of size, magnetic field intensity and presence of strong shocks for accelerating particles up to energies that exceed 10{sup 21} eV. On the other hand, the interaction with the photons of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation, the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min effect, dictates that the sources of particles with energy above 4x10{sup 19} eV must be within 130 Mpc, at most. There are not very many FR II radio galaxies within this distance, i.e. 15 objects. Once the statistics of events for detection of cosmic rays at these energies will have reached reasonable levels (see the Pierre Auger Experiment [J.W. Cronin, Nucl. Phys. B 138 (2005) 465]), looking for the arrival directions will either confirm or rule out the role of FR II hot-spots as sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays.

  6. Proceedings of the Specialists' Meeting on High Energy Nuclear Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahori, Tokio

    1992-03-01

    This report consists of the Proceedings of the Specialists' Meeting on High Energy Nuclear Data. The meeting was held on October 3-4, 1991, at the Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute with the participation of forty-odd specialists, who were the evaluators, theorists, experimentalists, and users of high energy nuclear data including the members of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The need of the nuclear data in the high energy region up to a few GeV was stressed in the meeting for many applications, such as spallation neutron sources for radioactive waste treatment, accelerator shielding design, medical isotope production, radiation therapy, the effects of space radiation on astronauts and their equipment, and the cosmic history of meteorites and other galactic substances. Although the neutron nuclear data below 20 MeV have been well evaluated for fission and fusion reactor applications, the nuclear data in the high energy region have never been prepared in Japan. With the view of producing an evaluated high energy nuclear data file, theoretical models and codes, available and necessary measurements, needs of nuclear data, and various applications were reviewed and discussed. The consensus, that the wide collaboration was necessary to produce the evaluated file and should be established, has been obtained.

  7. High Energy Computed Tomographic Inspection of Munitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED AD-E403 815 Technical Report AREIS-TR-16006 HIGH ENERGY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC INSPECTION OF MUNITIONS...REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) November 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HIGH ENERGY COMPUTED...otherwise be accomplished by other nondestructive testing methods. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Radiography High energy Computed tomography (CT

  8. Compliance of Bhabhatron-II telecobalt unit with IEC standard - Radiation safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, G; Kumar, Munish; Dash Sharma, P K; Sharma, D N; Chhokra, Kanta; Mishra, Bibekananda; Agarwal, S P; Kher, R K

    2009-04-28

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India designed and developed a telecobalt unit, which was named as Bhabhatron-II. In this paper, the results pertaining to radiation safety of indigenously developed Bhabhatron-II telecobalt unit are reported. The various tests were carried out as per requirements of International Electrotechnical Commission standard and acceptance criteria developed nationally. Various devices such as CaSO4:Dy based thermoluminescent dosimeters, farmer type ionization chamber, water phantom and radiographic films were used. All the parameters pertaining to radiation leakage/transmission were within the tolerance limits as per IEC-60601-2-11 standard except the collimator transmission through X collimators (upper jaw), which marginally exceeds the tolerance limit.

  9. High energy ion beam analysis at ARRONAX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koumeir, C.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N. [Subatech, Nantes (France); GIP ARRONAX, Saint-Herblain (France); Guertin, A.; Metivier, V.; Michel, N.; Ragreb, D.; Servagent, N. [Subatech, Nantes (France)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: ARRONAX, acronym for 'Accelerator for Research in Radiochemistry and Oncology at Nantes' is a high energy cyclotron. It is characterized by the acceleration of several types of particle beams: 68 MeV alpha, 15-35 MeV deuterons and 30-68 MeV protons. A platform was implemented on ARRONAX to perform non-destructive materials analysis with X and gamma rays emission (PIXE-PIGE). A proper selection of the projectile type and beam energy allows to analyze heavy and light elements in thin and thick samples. Our research activities are oriented along three axes: 1) Measurements of K X-ray production cross section for various elements to complement the databases at high energy. A first experiment has been conducted to measure these cross sections for copper and gold with protons energy between 34 and 68 MeV. 2) Study of the detection sensitivity which depends on the nuclear background and the Bremsstrahlung radiations. A dedicated shielding has been developed and detection limits below tens of μg/g/μC have been assessed using different referenced samples from IAEA. 3) Determination of concentration profile as function of the depth in a thick target. Using layered samples, we have showed for a target consisting of three different layers, the possibility to determine the sequence and thickness of each layer by using X and gamma rays measured respectively during and after irradiation. During this talk, I will present the characteristics and the capabilities of our platform. In the near future we intend to install the PIGE technique and use it with 15 MeV deuterons to analyze lightweight elements. (author)

  10. Radio Detection of Ultra High Energy Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, James J.

    2011-05-01

    Ultra high energy cosmic rays interact with the cosmic microwave background radiation, resulting in the production of energetic pions. These interactions result in energy loss by the incident cosmic ray leading to the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) feature in the cosmic ray spectrum at about 4×10^19 eV, and the decay of the charged pions produced in these interactions results in neutrinos known as Berezinskii-Zatsepin (BZ) neutrinos. These neutrinos interact only via the weak interaction, with negligible absorption over cosmic distances but interaction lengths in the Earth of a few hundred kilometers. When these neutrinos interact in a dense medium, the electromagnetic component of the resulting shower develops a negative charge excess due to Compton scattering of the electrons from the medium and depletion of positrons by in-flight annihilation. This macroscopic charge excess moves at nearly the speed of light, and its passage through a dielectric medium results in coherent Cherenkov radiation at radio wavelengths longer than the size of the radiating region. This process is known as the Askaryan mechanism, and has been observed in accelerator experiments. The radio pulse is impulsive, and can be detected over large volumes in materials with long radio attenuation lengths, most notably the cold ice in the Antarctic ice sheet. Upper limits on the neutrino flux obtained by the balloon-borne instrument ANITA are now approaching the expected flux, and prototype in-ice antenna arrays are now being deployed. Prospects for large detectors capable of detecting hundreds of these neutrinos will be discussed. This work is supported by NASA under grants NNX08AC17G and NNX11AC45G, by the NSF under grant PHY-0758082, and by the Ohio State Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (CCAPP).

  11. Chromosome damage induced by DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors combined with {gamma}-radiation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Maria Cristina P.; Dias, Francisca da Luz; Cecchi, Andrea O.; Antunes, Lusania M.G.; Takahashi, Catarina S. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Genetica

    1998-09-01

    Combined radiation and antineoplastic drug treatment have important applications in cancer therapy. In the present work, an evaluation was made of two known topoisomerase II inhibitors, doxorubicin (DXR) and mitoxantrone (MXN), with {gamma}-radiation. The effect of DXR or MXN on {gamma}radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were analyzed. Two concentrations of each drug, 0.5 and 1.0 {mu}g/ml DXR, and 0.02 and 0.04 {mu}g/ml MXN, were applied in combination with two doses of {gamma}-radiation (20 and 40 cGy). A significant potentiating effect on chromosomal aberrations was observed in CHO cells exposed to 1.0 {mu}g/ml DXR plus 40 cGy. In the other tests, the combination of {gamma}-radiation with DXR or MXN gave approximately additive effects. Reduced mitotic indices reflected higher toxicity of the drugs when combined with radiation. (author) 55 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.; e-mail: mcaraujo at spider.usp.br

  12. Analytic Models for Radiation Induced Loss in Optical Fibers II. A Physical Model,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    and identify by Mock number) PIEL GRUP UB.GR. Optical fibers Analytical models Radiation effects 19. ABSTRACT (ConinueII. anl mwr,f fneciua,, and...conditions specified in the derivation of the equations existed during the irradiations. This is because the functional form of the equations is not...tion is not necessarily incorrect. If one assumes a relatively simple form of re- covery as a function of time, such as an exponential recovery, it can

  13. Belle-II VXD radiation monitoring and beam abort with sCVD diamond sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, Lorenzo; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-07-01

    The Belle-II VerteX Detector (VXD) has been designed to improve the performances with respect to Belle and to cope with an unprecedented luminosity of 8 ×1035cm-2s-1 achievable by the SuperKEKB. Special care is needed to monitor both the radiation dose accumulated throughout the life of the experiment and the instantaneous radiation rate, in order to be able to promptly react to sudden spikes for the purpose of protecting the detectors. A radiation monitoring and beam abort system based on single-crystal diamond sensors is now under an active development for the VXD. The sensors will be placed in several key positions in the vicinity of the interaction region. The severe space limitations require a challenging remote readout of the sensors.

  14. Radiative transfer meets Bayesian statistics: where does a galaxy's [C II] emission come from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurso, G.; Saintonge, A.; Bisbas, T. G.; Viti, S.

    2017-01-01

    The [C II] 158 μm emission line can arise in all phases of the interstellar medium (ISM), therefore being able to disentangle the different contributions is an important yet unresolved problem when undertaking galaxy-wide, integrated [C II] observations. We present a new multiphase 3D radiative transfer interface that couples STARBURST99, a stellar spectrophotometric code, with the photoionization and astrochemistry codes MOCASSIN and 3D-PDR. We model entire star-forming regions, including the ionized, atomic, and molecular phases of the ISM, and apply a Bayesian inference methodology to parametrize how the fraction of the [C II] emission originating from molecular regions, f_{[C II],mol}, varies as a function of typical integrated properties of galaxies in the local Universe. The main parameters responsible for the variations of f_{[C II],mol} are specific star formation rate (SSFR), gas phase metallicity, H II region electron number density (ne), and dust mass fraction. For example, f_{[C II],mol} can increase from 60 to 80 per cent when either ne increases from 101.5 to 102.5 cm-3, or SSFR decreases from 10-9.6 to 10-10.6 yr-1. Our model predicts for the Milky Way that f_{[C II],mol} = 75.8 ± 5.9 per cent, in agreement with the measured value of 75 per cent. When applying the new prescription to a complete sample of galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey, we find that anywhere from 60 to 80 per cent of the total integrated [C II] emission arises from molecular regions.

  15. A novel 3D energetic MOF of high energy content: synthesis and superior explosive performance of a Pb(ii) compound with 5,5'-bistetrazole-1,1'-diolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yu; Jin, Bo; Peng, Rufang; Liu, Qiangqiang; Tan, Bisheng; Guo, Zhicheng; Zhao, Jun; Zhang, Qingchun

    2016-09-21

    The development of high-performance insensitive energetic materials is important because of the increasing demand for these materials in military and civilian applications. A novel 3D energetic metal-organic framework (MOF) of exceptionally high energy content, [Pb(BTO)(H2O)]n, was synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, featuring a three-dimensional parallelogram porous framework, where BTO represents 5,5'-bistetrazole-1,1'-diolate. The thermal stability and energetic properties were determined, exhibiting good thermostability (Td = 309.0 °C), excellent detonation pressure (P) of 53.06 GPa, a detonation velocity (D) of 9.204 km s(-1), and acceptable sensitivity to confirmed impact (IS = 7.5 J). Notably, the complex possesses unprecedented superior density than the reported energetic MOFs. The results highlight this new MOF as a potential energetic material.

  16. Experimental High Energy Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohlmann, Marcus [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics and Space Sciences

    2016-01-13

    This final report summarizes activities of the Florida Tech High Energy Physics group supported by DOE under grant #DE-SC0008024 during the period June 2012 – March 2015. We focused on one of the main HEP research thrusts at the Energy Frontier by participating in the CMS experiment. We were exploiting the tremendous physics opportunities at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and prepared for physics at its planned extension, the High-Luminosity LHC. The effort comprised a physics component with analysis of data from the first LHC run and contributions to the CMS Phase-2 upgrades in the muon endcap system (EMU) for the High-Luminosity LHC. The emphasis of our hardware work was the development of large-area Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) for the CMS forward muon upgrade. We built a production and testing site for such detectors at Florida Tech to complement future chamber production at CERN. The first full-scale CMS GE1/1 chamber prototype ever built outside of CERN was constructed at Florida Tech in summer 2013. We conducted two beam tests with GEM prototype chambers at CERN in 2012 and at FNAL in 2013 and reported the results at conferences and in publications. Principal Investigator Hohlmann served as chair of the collaboration board of the CMS GEM collaboration and as co-coordinator of the GEM detector working group. He edited and authored sections of the detector chapter of the Technical Design Report (TDR) for the GEM muon upgrade, which was approved by the LHCC and the CERN Research Board in 2015. During the course of the TDR approval process, the GEM project was also established as an official subsystem of the muon system by the CMS muon institution board. On the physics side, graduate student Kalakhety performed a Z' search in the dimuon channel with the 2011 and 2012 CMS datasets that utilized 20.6 fb⁻¹ of p-p collisions at √s = 8 TeV. For the dimuon channel alone, the 95% CL lower limits obtained on the mass of a Z' resonance are 2770 Ge

  17. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  18. UPR/Mayaguez High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, Hector [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Puerto Rico)

    2014-10-31

    This year the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez (UPRM) High Energy Physics (HEP) group continued with the ongoing research program outlined in the grant proposal. The program is centered on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the proton-proton (pp) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The main research focus is on data analysis and on the preparation for the High Luminosity (HL) LHC or experiment detector upgrade. The physics data analysis included Higgs Doublet Search and measurement of the (1) Λ0b branching fraction, (2) B meson mass, and (3) hyperon θ-b lifetime. The detector upgrade included work on the preparations for the Forward Pixel (FPIX) detector Silicon Sensor Testing in a production run at Fermilab. In addition, the group has taken responsibilities on the Software Release through our former research associate Dr. Eric Brownson who acted until last December as a Level Two Offline Manager for the CMS Upgrade. In support of the CMS data analysis activities carried out locally, the UPRM group has built and maintains an excellent Tier3 analysis center in Mayaguez. This allowed us to analyze large data samples and to continue the development of algorithms for the upgrade tracking robustness we started several years ago, and we plan to resume in the near future. This project involves computer simulation of the radiation damage to be suffered at the higher luminosities of the upgraded LHC. This year we continued to serve as a source of outstanding students for the field of high energy physics. Three of our graduate students finished their MS work in May, 2014, Their theses research were on data analysis of heavy quark b-physics. All of them are currently enrolled at Ph.D. physics program across the nation. One of them (Hector Moreno) at New Mexico University (Hector Moreno), one at University of New Hampshire (Sandra Santiesteban) and one at University of

  19. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics of accretion flows - II. Treating stiff source terms and exploring physical limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedig, C.; Zanotti, O.; Alic, D.

    2012-10-01

    We present the implementation of an implicit-explicit (IMEX) Runge-Kutta numerical scheme for general relativistic (GR) hydrodynamics coupled to an optically thick radiation field in two existing GR-(magneto)hydrodynamics codes. We argue that the necessity of such an improvement arises naturally in most astrophysically relevant regimes where the optical thickness is high as the equations become stiff. By performing several simple 1D tests, we verify the codes' new ability to deal with this stiffness and show consistency. Then, still in one spatial dimension, we compute a luminosity versus accretion rate diagram for the set-up of spherical accretion on to a Schwarzschild black hole and find good agreement with previous work which included more radiation processes than we currently have available. Lastly, we revisit the supersonic Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton (BHL) accretion in two dimensions where we can now present simulations of realistic temperatures, down to T ˜ 106 K or less. Here we find that radiation pressure plays an important role, but also that these highly dynamical set-ups push our approximate treatment towards the limit of physical applicability. The main features of radiation hydrodynamics BHL flows manifest as (i) an effective adiabatic index approaching γeff ˜ 4/3; (ii) accretion rates two orders of magnitude lower than without radiation pressure, but still super-Eddington; (iii) luminosity estimates around the Eddington limit, hence with an overall radiative efficiency as small as ηBHL˜10-2; (iv) strong departures from thermal equilibrium in shocked regions; (v) no appearance of the flip-flop instability. We conclude that the current optically thick approximation to the radiation transfer does give physically substantial improvements over the pure hydro also in set-ups departing from equilibrium, and, once accompanied by an optically thin treatment, is likely to provide a fundamental tool for investigating accretion flows in a large variety of

  20. Differential expression of Prx I and II in mouse testis and their up-regulation by radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keesook; Park, Ji-Sun; Kim, Yun-Jeong; Soo Lee, Yong Soo; Sook Hwang, Tae Sook; Kim, Dae-Joong; Park, Eun-Mi; Park, Young-Mee

    2002-08-16

    Testis is one of the most sensitive organs to ionizing radiation. The present study was designed to unravel the possible role of antioxidant proteins, peroxiredoxin I and II (Prx I and II) in the testis. Our results show that Prx I and II are constitutively expressed in the testis and their expression levels are decreased to some extent as the testis develops. Interestingly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed a preferential expression of Prx I and II in Leydig and Sertoli cells, respectively. Neither Prx I nor Prx II expression was obvious in the testicular germ cells including spermatogonia and spermatocytes. Ionizing radiation exerted oxidative stress on the testis and induced apoptosis primarily in the germ cells. When the irradiated testis was examined, the Prx system was found to be transiently up-regulated. Taken together, we suggest that the relative radiation-resistance of Leydig and Sertoli cells could be attributed in part to the antioxidant function of the Prx system in these cells.

  1. High Energy Emissions from Young Stellar Objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. C. Das; Ashok Ambastha

    2012-03-01

    X-ray emissions from Young Stellar Objects (YSO) are detected by many X-ray missions that are providing important information about their properties. However, their emission processes are not fully understood. In this research note, we propose a model for the generation of emissions from a YSO on the basis of a simple interaction between the YSO and its surrounding circumstellar accretion disc containing neutral gas and charged dust. It is assumed that the YSO has a weak dipole type magnetic field and its field lines are threaded into the circumstellar disc. Considering the motion of ions and charged dust particles in the presence of neutral gas, we show that the sheared dust-neutral gas velocities can lead to a current along the direction of ambient magnetic field. Magnitude of this current can become large and is capable of generating an electric field along the magnetic field lines. It is shown how the particles can gain energy up to MeV range and above, which can produce high-energy radiations from the YSO.

  2. Very-high energy emission from pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Breed, M; Harding, A K

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) display exponentially cutoff spectra with cutoffs falling in a narrow band around a few GeV. Early spectral modelling predicted spectral cutoffs at energies of up to 100 GeV, assuming curvature radiation. It was therefore not expected that pulsars would be visible in the very-high energy (VHE) regime (>100 GeV). The VERITAS announcement of the detection of pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar at energies up to 400 GeV (and now up to 1.5 TeV as detected by MAGIC) therefore raised important questions about our understanding of the electrodynamics and local environment of pulsars. H.E.S.S. has now detected pulsed emission from the Vela pulsar down to tens of GeV, making this the second pulsar detected by a ground-based Cherenkov telescope. Deep upper limits have also been obtained by VERITAS and MAGIC for the Geminga pulsar. We will review the latest developments in VHE pulsar science, including an overview of the latest observations, ...

  3. Theory of high-energy messengers

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the distant high-energy universe comes from photons, ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), high-energy neutrinos, and gravitational waves. The theory of high-energy messengers reviewed here focuses on the extragalactic background light at all wavelengths, cosmic rays and magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and neutrinos of extragalactic origin. Comparisons are drawn between the intensities of photons and UHECRs in intergalactic space, and the high-energy neutrinos recently detected with IceCube at about the Waxman-Bahcall flux. Source candidates for UHECRs and high-energy neutrinos are reviewed, focusing on star-forming and radio-loud active galaxies. HAWC and Advanced LIGO are just underway, with much anticipation.

  4. Theory of high-energy messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the distant high-energy universe comes from photons, ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), high-energy neutrinos, and gravitational waves. The theory of high-energy messengers reviewed here focuses on the extragalactic background light at all wavelengths, cosmic rays and magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and neutrinos of extragalactic origin. Comparisons are drawn between the intensities of photons and UHECRs in intergalactic space, and the high-energy neutrinos recently detected with IceCube at about the Waxman-Bahcall flux. Source candidates for UHECRs and high-energy neutrinos are reviewed, focusing on star-forming and radio-loud active galaxies. HAWC and Advanced LIGO are just underway, with much anticipation.

  5. High Energy Sources Observed with OMC

    CERN Document Server

    Risquez, D; Mas-Hesse, J M; Kuulkers, E

    2008-01-01

    The INTEGRAL Optical Monitoring Camera, OMC, has detected many high energy sources. We have obtained V-band fluxes and light curves for their counterparts. In the cases of previously unknown counterparts, we have searched for characteristic variations in optical sources around the high-energy target position. Results about the Galactic Bulge Monitoring, INTEGRAL Gamma-Ray sources (IGR), and other high energy sources are presented.

  6. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  7. Fast Electronics in High-Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigand, Clyde

    1958-08-08

    A brief review of fast electronics is given, leading up to the present state of the art. Cherenkov counters in high-energy physics are discussed, including an example of a velocity-selecting Cherenkov counter. An electronic device to aid in aligning external beams from high-energy accelerators is described. A scintillation-counter matrix to identify bubble chamber tracks is discussed. Some remarks on the future development of electronics in high-energy physics experiments are included.

  8. The ANSTO high energy heavy ion microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegele, Rainer; Cohen, David D.; Dytlewski, Nick

    1999-10-01

    Recently the construction of the ANSTO High Energy Heavy Ion Microprobe (HIMP) at the 10 MV ANTARES tandem accelerator has been completed. The high energy heavy ion microprobe focuses not only light ions at energies of 2-3 MeV, but is also capable of focusing heavy ions at high energies with ME/ q2 values up to 150 MeV amu and greater. First performance tests and results are reported here.

  9. Split School of High Energy Physics 2015

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Split School of High Energy Physics 2015 (SSHEP 2015) was held at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture (FESB), University of Split, from September 14 to September 18, 2015. SSHEP 2015 aimed at master and PhD students who were interested in topics pertaining to High Energy Physics. SSHEP 2015 is the sixth edition of the High Energy Physics School. Previous five editions were held at the Department of Physics, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  10. Radiative emission of solar features in the Ca II K line: comparison of measurements and models

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolli, I; Uitenbroek, H; Giorgi, F; Rast, M P; Solanki, S K

    2010-01-01

    We study the radiative emission of various types of solar features, such as quiet Sun, enhanced network, plage, and bright plage regions, identified on filtergrams taken in the Ca II K line. We analysed fulldisk images obtained with the PSPT, by using three interference filters that sample the Ca II K line with different bandpasses. We studied the dependence of the radiative emission of disk features on the filter bandpass. We also performed a NLTE spectral synthesis of the Ca II K line integrated over the bandpass of PSPT filters. The synthesis was carried out by utilizing both the PRD and CRD with the most recent set of semi­empirical atmosphere models in the literature and some earlier atmosphere models. We measured the CLV of intensity values for various solar features identified on PSPT images and compared the results obtained with those derived from the synthesis. We find that CRD calculations derived using the most recent quiet Sun model, on average, reproduce the measured values of the quiet Sun regi...

  11. High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is the primary archive for NASA missions dealing with extremely energetic phenomena, from...

  12. High Energy Solid State Laser Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A suite of laboratories with advanced spectroscopic and laser equipment, this facility develops materials and techniques for advanced solid state high energy lasers....

  13. High-Energy Astrophysics: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics is the study of objects and phenomena in space with energy densities much greater than that found in normal stars and galaxies. These include black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, hypernovae and gamma-ray bursts. A history and an overview of high-energy astrophysics will be presented, including a description of the objects that are observed. Observing techniques, space-borne missions in high-energy astrophysics and some recent discoveries will also be described. Several entirely new types of astronomy are being employed in high-energy astrophysics. These will be briefly described, along with some NASA missions currently under development.

  14. Focusing Optics for High-Energy X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leinert, U.; Schulze, C.; Honkimäki, V.;

    1998-01-01

    of the different set-ups are described and potential applications are discussed. First experiments were performed, investigating with high spatial resolution the residual strain gradients in layered polycrystalline materials. The results underline that focused high-energy synchrotron radiation can provide unique...... information on the mesoscopic scale to the materials scientist, complementary to existing techniques based on conventional X-ray sources, neutron scattering or electron microscopy....

  15. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  16. Risk Factors: Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation of certain wavelengths, called ionizing radiation, has enough energy to damage DNA and cause cancer. Ionizing radiation includes radon, x-rays, gamma rays, and other forms of high-energy radiation.

  17. Radiation Hard Silicon Particle Detectors for Phase-II LHC Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblakowska-Mucha, A.

    2017-02-01

    The major LHC upgrade is planned after ten years of accelerator operation. It is foreseen to significantly increase the luminosity of the current machine up to 1035 cm‑2s‑1 and operate as the upcoming High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) . The major detectors upgrade, called the Phase-II Upgrade, is also planned, a main reason being the aging processes caused by severe particle radiation. Within the RD50 Collaboration, a large Research and Development program has been underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance for HL-LHC trackers. In this summary, several results obtained during the testing of the devices after irradiation to HL-LHC levels are presented. Among the studied structures, one can find advanced sensors types like 3D silicon detectors, High-Voltage CMOS technologies, or sensors with intrinsic gain (LGAD). Based on these results, the RD50 Collaboration gives recommendation for the silicon detectors to be used in the detector upgrade.

  18. Studies of radiation fields of LCLS-II super conducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Leitner, M.; Ge, L.; Li, Z.; Xu, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Ross, M.; Carrasco, M.

    2016-09-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will be a hard X-ray Free Electron Laser whose linac can deliver a 1.2 MW CW electron beam with bunch rates up to 1 MHz. To efficiently generate such a high power beam, Super-Conducting Radio-Frequency (SCRF) cavities will be installed in the upstream portion of the existing 3 km Linac at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The 9-cell niobium cavities will be cooled at 2K inside 35 cryomodules, each containing a string of eight of those cavities followed by a quadrupole. The strong electromagnetic fields in the SCRF cavities will extract electrons from the cavity walls that may be accelerated. Most such dark current will be deposited locally, although some electrons may reach several neighboring cryomodules, gaining substantial energy before they hit a collimator or other aperture. The power deposited by the field emitted electrons and the associated showers may pose radiation and machine protection issues at the cryomodules and also in other areas of the accelerator. Simulation of these effects is therefore crucial for the design of the machine. The in-house code Track3P was used to simulate field emitted electrons from the LCLS-II cavities, and a sophisticated 3D model of the cryomodules including all cavities was written to transport radiation with the Fluka Monte Carlo code, which was linked to Track3P through custom-made routines. This setup was used to compute power deposition in components, prompt and residual radiation fields, and radioisotope inventories.

  19. SRAM-Based Passive Dosimeter for High-Energy Accelerator Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Makowski, D R; Napieralski, A; Swiercz, B P

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports a novel NVRAM-based neutron dose monitor (REM counter). The principle of this device is based on the radiation effect initiating the Single Event Upset SEU in high density microelectronic memories. Several batches of Non-Volatile memories from different manufactures were examined in various radiation environments, i.e. 241Am-Be (alpha,n) and Linear accelerators produced radiation fields. A suitable moderator was used to enhance the detector sensitivity. Further experiments were carried out in Linear Accelerators: Linac II, TTF2 and Beam Loss Environment of various Experimental Facilities at DESY Research Centre in Hamburg. A separate batch of SRAM was irradiated with 60Co-gamma rays up to a dose of about 60 Gy. No Single Event Upset (SEU) was registered. This validates, that gamma radiation has a negligible effect to trigger SEU in the SRAM. The proposed detector could be ideal for a neutron dose measurement produced by a high-energy electron linac, including synchrotron and Free Electron L...

  20. Annealing of natural metamict zircons: II high degree of radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, M

    1998-01-01

    In situ time-dependent high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction was used to study the amorphous to crystalline transition in natural zircons which are characterized by a high degree of radiation damage. It was possible to distinguish two stages of the annealing process: (i) the recovery of the heavily disturbed but still crystalline domains and (ii) the recrystallization of the amorphous regions. The first stage is very fast under the chosen experimental conditions and, at least apparently, is not thermally activated. The second stage is a diffusion-controlled process, whose products (zircon or zircon and zirconia phases) are strongly correlated to the annealing temperature.

  1. Considerations for NSLS-II Synchrotron Radiation Protection When Operating Damping Wigglers at Low Machine Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seletskiy, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Photon Sciences Dept.; Podobedov, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Photon Sciences Dept.

    2015-12-30

    The NSLS-II storage ring vacuum chamber, including frontends (FE) and beamlines (BL), is protected from possible damage from synchrotron radiation (SR) emitted from insertion devices (IDs) by a dedicated active interlock system (AIS). The system monitors electron beam position and angle and triggers a beam dump if the beam orbit is outside of the active interlock envelope (AIE). The AIE was calculated under the assumptions of 3 GeV beam energy and ID gaps set to their minimum operating values (i.e. “fully closed”). Recently it was proposed to perform machine studies that would ramp the stored beam energy significantly below the nominal operational value of 3 GeV. These studies may potentially include the use of NSLS-II damping wigglers (DWs) for electron beam emittance reduction and control.

  2. Preparation of poly(chitosan-acrylamide) flocculant using gamma radiation for adsorption of Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Alaaeldine Sh.; Ibrahim, Ahmed G.; Abdelhai, Farag; Elsharma, Emad M.; Metwally, Essam; Siyam, Tharwat

    2017-05-01

    Poly(chitosan-acrylamide), P(CTS-AAm), flocculant was prepared using gamma radiation and used for the adsorption of copper(II) and nickel(II) from aqueous solutions. The effect of reaction parameters, such as acetic acid, monomer and polymer concentrations, and absorbed dose, on the conversion percentage and intrinsic viscosity of P(CTS-AAm) was investigated. The prepared polymer was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared and Thermogravimetric analysis. The factors influencing copper(II) and nickel(II) adsorption on P(CTS-AAm), such as contact time, solution pH, polymer and metal ion concentrations, were also studied. The sorption capacity of P(CTS-AAm) was 196.84 mg/g and 63.15 mg/g for Cu(II) and Ni(II), respectively.

  3. A Parton Shower for High Energy Jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Rosenkrantz; Lonnblad, Leif; M. Smillie, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to match the multi-parton states generated by the High Energy Jets Monte Carlo with parton showers generated by the Ariadne program using the colour dipole model. The High Energy Jets program already includes a full resummation of soft divergences. Hence, in the matching...

  4. A Parton Shower for High Energy Jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Rosenkrantz; Lonnblad, Leif; M. Smillie, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to match the multi-parton states generated by the High Energy Jets Monte Carlo with parton showers generated by the Ariadne program using the colour dipole model. The High Energy Jets program already includes a full resummation of soft divergences. Hence, in the matching...

  5. Improved Beam Jitter Control Methods for High Energy Laser Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour...7540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239-18 ii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK iii Approved for public...Gyro FSM Fast Steering Mirror FX-LMS Filtered-X Least Mean Squares FX-RLS Filtered-X Recursive Least Square HEL High Energy Laser JCT

  6. Chromosome damage induced by DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors combined with g-radiation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina P. Araújo

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined radiation and antineoplastic drug treatment have important applications in cancer therapy. In the present work, an evaluation was made of two known topoisomerase II inhibitors, doxorubicin (DXR and mitoxantrone (MXN, with g-radiation. The effects of DXR or MXN on g-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells were analyzed. Two concentrations of each drug, 0.5 and 1.0 µg/ml DXR, and 0.02 and 0.04 µg/ml MXN, were applied in combination with two doses of g-radiation (20 and 40 cGy. A significant potentiating effect on chromosomal aberrations was observed in CHO cells exposed to 1.0 µg/ml DXR plus 40 cGy. In the other tests, the combination of g-radiation with DXR or MXN gave approximately additive effects. Reduced mitotic indices reflected higher toxicity of the drugs when combined with radiation.A associação de radiação ionizante com drogas antineoplásicas tem importante aplicação na terapia do câncer. No presente trabalho, foram avaliados os efeitos de dois inibidores de topoisomerase II, doxorubicina (DXR e mitoxantrona (MXN, sobre as aberrações cromossômicas induzidas pelas radiações-g em células do ovário de hamster chinês (CHO. Foram usadas as concentrações 0,5 e 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e 0,02 e 0,04 mg/ml de MXN, combinadas com duas doses de radiações gama (20 e 40 cGy. Um significativo efeito potenciador das aberrações cromossômicas foi observado em células CHO tratadas com 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e expostas a 40 cGy de radiação. Nos outros testes, a combinação da radiação-g com a DXR ou MXN apresentou um efeito próximo ao aditivo. A redução dos índices mitóticos refletiu a alta citotoxicidade das drogas quando combinadas às radiações-g.

  7. Large enhancement in high-energy photoionization of Fe XVII and missing continuum plasma opacity

    CERN Document Server

    Nahar, Sultana N

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at solving the outstanding problem of solar opacity, and radiation transport plasma models in general, we report substantial photoabsorption in the high-energy regime due to atomic core photo-excitations not heretofore considered. In extensive R-Matrix calculations of unprecedented complexity for an important iron ion Fe xvii (Fe$^{16+}$), with a wave function expansion of 99 Fe xviii (Fe$^{17+}$) LS core states from $n \\leq 4$ complexes (equivalent to 218 fine structure levels), we find: i) up to orders of magnitude enhancement in background photoionization cross sections, in addition to strongly peaked photo-excitation-of-core resonances not considered in current opacity models, and ii) demonstrate convergence with respect to successive core excitations. The resulting increase in the monochromatic continuum, and 35% in the Rosseland Mean Opacity, are compared with the "higher-than-predicted" iron opacity measured at the Sandia Z-pinch fusion device at solar interior conditions.

  8. Radiation dosimetry measurements with real time radiation monitoring device (RRMD)-II in Space Shuttle STS-79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, T; Doke, T; Hayashi, T; Kikuchi, J; Hasebe, N; Kashiwagi, T; Takashima, T; Takahashi, K; Nakano, T; Nagaoka, S; Takahashi, S; Yamanaka, H; Yamaguchi, K; Badhwar, G D

    1997-12-01

    The real-time measurement of radiation environment was made with an improved real-time radiation monitoring device (RRMD)-II onboard Space Shuttle STS-79 (S/MM#4: 4th Shuttle MIR Mission, at an inclination angle of 51.6 degrees and an altitude of 250-400km) for 199 h during 17-25 September, 1996. The observation of the detector covered the linear energy transfer (LET) range of 3.5-6000 keV/micrometer. The Shuttle orbital profile in this mission was equivalent to that of the currently planned Space Station, and provided an opportunity to investigate variations in count rate and dose equivalent rate depending on altitude, longitude, and latitude in detail. Particle count rate and dose equivalent rate were mapped geographically during the mission. Based on the map of count rate, an analysis was made by dividing whole region into three regions: South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region, high latitude region and other regions. The averaged absorbed dose rate during the mission was 39.3 microGy/day for a LET range of 3.5-6000 keV/micrometer. The corresponding average dose equivalent rates during the mission are estimated to be 293 microSv/day with quality factors from International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-Pub. 60 and 270 microSv/day with quality factors from ICRP-Pub. 26. The effective quality factors for ICRP-Pub. 60 and 26 are 7.45 and 6.88, respectively. From the present data for particles of LET > 3.5keV/micrometer, we conclude that the average dose equivalent rate is dominated by the contribution of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles. The dose-detector depth dependence was also investigated.

  9. Explanation for the low flux of high energy astrophysical muon-neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Pakvasa, Sandip; Mohanty, Subhendra

    2012-01-01

    We consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant neutrino sources; specifically, we consider (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac particles. This would provide a mechanism for the lack of high energy muons in the Icecube detector.

  10. Preliminary study of EEHG-based superradiant undulator radiation at the HLS-II storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei-Wei; Li, He-Ting; Wang, Lin

    2017-07-01

    We investigate storage ring-based Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) superradiant undulator radiation as a possible scheme to obtain shorter wavelengths at the HLS-II (Hefei Light Source-II) storage ring. In this paper we give the designation of the storage ring based EEHG up to the 26th harmonic, where 31 nm vacuum ultraviolet light is radiated from an 800 nm seeded laser. The novelty of our design is that both the two dispersion sections of EEHG are realized by the storage ring’s own magnet structure. In particular, the whole ring is used as the first dispersion section, and two modulators of the traditional EEHG can be done with the same undulator. These two dispersion sections are realized by changing the superperiod of the present lattice structure, and more precisely by changing the focusing strengths of the present structure. Since no additional magnets and chicanes are used, the beam circulates around the storage ring repeatedly, and thus this storage ring-based EEHG can have a higher repetition rate than a linac-based EEHG. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305170)

  11. Radiation-MHD models of elephant trunks and globules in H II regions

    CERN Document Server

    Mackey, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    We study the formation and evolution of pillars of dense gas, known as elephant trunks, at the boundaries of H II regions, formed by shadowing of ionising radiation by dense clumps. The effects of magnetic fields on this process are investigated using 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulations. For a simulation in which an initially uniform magnetic field of strength |B|=50 uG is oriented perpendicular to the radiation propagation direction, the field is swept into alignment with the pillar during its dynamical evolution, in agreement with observations of the "Pillars of Creation" in M16, and of some cometary globules. This effect is significantly enhanced when the simulation is re-run with a weaker field of 18 uG. A stronger field with |B|=160 uG is sufficient to prevent this evolution completely, also significantly affecting the photoionisation process. Using a larger simulation domain it is seen that the pillar formation models studied in Mackey & Lim (2010) ultimately evolve to cometary structures ...

  12. The effect of non ionising electromagnetic radiation on RAAF personnel during World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, J A

    1994-05-01

    Did exposure to non ionising electromagnetic radiation during World War II in the short term have a stimulating effect on the anterior pituitary gland, and in turn on the gonads of both sexes, since the figures obtained appeared to affect the sexes equally? Is it that the long-term effect of microwave radiation on personnel is to cause adenoma and carcinoma? Is this long-term effect similar to the long-term effect of X-rays on infants, children and adolescents? According to Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 1980 (page 1710): "X-rays to the head and neck in infancy, childhood or adolescence is associated with a high incidence of thyroid disease later in life. Nodular disease is found to be particularly common on 20% of patients at risk, and may not be apparent until 30 years or more after exposure. One-third of the nodular type are found to be carcinomatous." The effect of non ionising electromagnetic and microwave radiation on those who work in these fields certainly needs much more investigation. What will be the long-term effect of using micro-ovens on the rising generation?

  13. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blewett, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting.

  14. CERN and the high energy frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsesmelis Emmanuel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the particle physics programme at CERN at the high-energy frontier. Starting from the key open questions in particle physics and the large-scale science facilities existing at CERN, concentrating on the Large Hadron Collider(LHC, this paper goes on to present future possibilities for global projects in high energy physics. The paper presents options for future colliders, all being within the framework of the recently updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, and all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics. The paper concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward for high-energy physics research.

  15. High energy hadrons in extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonwar, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data on the high energy hadronic component in extensive air showers of energies approx. 10 to the 14 to 10 to the 16 eV when compared with expectations from Monte Carlo simulations have shown the observed showers to be deficient in high energy hadrons relative to simulated showers. An attempt is made to understand these anomalous features with more accurate comparison of observations with expectations, taking into account the details of the experimental system. Results obtained from this analysis and their implications for the high energy physics of particle interactions at energy approx. 10 to the 15 eV are presented.

  16. High energy physics in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Month, M.

    1985-10-16

    The US program in high energy physics from 1985 to 1995 is reviewed. The program depends primarily upon work at the national accelerator centers, but includes a modest but diversified nonaccelerator program. Involvement of universities is described. International cooperation in high energy physics is discussed, including the European, Japanese, USSR, and the People's Republic of China's programs. Finally, new facilities needed by the US high energy physics program are discussed, with particular emphasis given to a Superconducting Super Collider for achieving ever higher energies in the 20 TeV range. (LEW)

  17. CERN and the high energy frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsesmelis, Emmanuel

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the particle physics programme at CERN at the high-energy frontier. Starting from the key open questions in particle physics and the large-scale science facilities existing at CERN, concentrating on the Large Hadron Collider(LHC), this paper goes on to present future possibilities for global projects in high energy physics. The paper presents options for future colliders, all being within the framework of the recently updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, and all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics. The paper concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward for high-energy physics research.

  18. High Energy Single Frequency Fiber Laser at Low Repetition Rate Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase II project proposes a single frequency high energy fiber laser system operating at low repetition rate of 10 Hz to 1 kHz for coherent Lidar systems...

  19. A High Energy and High Efficiency Spectral Shaping Single Frequency Fiber Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase II project proposes a single frequency high energy fiber laser system for coherent Lidar systems for remote sensing. Current state-of-art...

  20. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowble, Barbara L., E-mail: bfowble@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Einck, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Kim, Danny N. [Athena Breast Health Network, Program Management Office, San Francisco, CA (United States); McCloskey, Susan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mayadev, Jyoti [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Yashar, Catheryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Chen, Steven L. [Department of Surgery, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Hwang, E. Shelley [Department of Surgery, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having {<=}10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  1. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  2. 1570 nm High Energy Fiber Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase I project proposes a single frequency high energy fiber laser for remote sensing. Current state-of-art technologies can not provide all features of...

  3. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.D.

    1989-10-01

    In this lecture I would like to trace how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to gigantic projects being hotly debated in Congress as well as in the scientific community.

  4. Organisation of high-energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kluyver, J C

    1981-01-01

    Tabulates details of major accelerator laboratories in western Europe, USA, and USSR, and describes the various organisations concerned with high-energy physics. The Dutch organisation uses the NIKHEF laboratory in Amsterdam and cooperates with CERN. (0 refs).

  5. High Energy Single Frequency Resonant Amplifier Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase I project proposes a single frequency high energy resonant amplifier for remote sensing. Current state-of-art technologies can not provide all...

  6. Studies In Theoretical High Energy Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keung, Wai Yee [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This is a final technical report for grant no. DE-SC0007948 describing research activities in theoretical high energy physics at University of Illinois at Chicago for the whole grant period from July 1, 2012 to March 31, 2017.

  7. On high energy tails in inelastic gases

    OpenAIRE

    Lambiotte, R.; Brenig, L.; Salazar, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    We study the formation of high energy tails in a one-dimensional kinetic model for granular gases, the so-called Inelastic Maxwell Model. We introduce a time- discretized version of the stochastic process, and show that continuous time implies larger fluctuations of the particles energies. This is due to a statistical relation between the number of inelastic collisions undergone by a particle and its average energy. This feature is responsible for the high energy tails in the model, as shown ...

  8. Institute for High Energy Density Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Alan [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-01-13

    The project objective was for the Institute of High Energy Density Science (IHEDS) at the University of Texas at Austin to help grow the High Energy Density (HED) science community, by connecting academia with the Z Facility (Z) and associated staff at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). IHEDS was originally motivated by common interests and complementary capabilities at SNL and the University of Texas System (UTX), in 2008.

  9. Future of high energy physics some aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Prokofiev, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises 26 carefully edited articles with well-referenced and up-to-date material written by many of the leading experts. These articles originated from presentations and dialogues at the second HKUST Institute for Advanced Study Program on High Energy Physics are organized into three aspects, Theory, Accelerator, and Experiment, focusing on in-depth analyses and technical aspects that are essential for the developments and expectations for the future high energy physics.

  10. A unified treatment of high energy interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, H.J.; Werner, K. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees; Hladik, M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees]|[SAP AG, Berlin (Germany); Ostapchenko, S. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Inst. of Nuclear Physics]|[Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees

    1999-11-01

    It is well known that high energy interactions as different as electron-positron annihilation, deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, proton-proton interactions, and nucleus-nucleus collisions have many features in common. Based upon this observation, a model for all these interactions is constructed which relies on the fundamental hypothesis that the behavior of high energy interactions is universal. (author) 19 refs.

  11. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  12. Synthesis, characterization, thermal behaviour and single crystal X-ray analysis of two new insensitive high energy density materials [8-hydroxyquinolinium 5-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)barbiturate (I) and 8-hydroxyquinolinium 5-(5-chloro-2,4-dinitrophenyl)-1,3-dimethyl barbiturate (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickkam, V.; Devi, P. Poornima; Kalaivani, D.

    2014-12-01

    Barbiturates I and II have been synthesized as maroon red and red orange coloured solids by mixing the ethanolic solutions of 2-chloro-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene ( TNCB), pyrimidine-2,4,6(1 H,3 H,5 H)-trione [barbituric acid ( BA)] and 8-hydroxyquinoline and 1,3-dichloro-4,6-dinitrobenzene ( DCDNB), 1,3-dimethylpyrimidine-2,4,6(1 H,3 H,5 H)-trione(1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid) and 8-hydroxyquinoline respectively. The structures of these two barbiturates have been predicted from the spectral studies (UV-VIS, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, mass) and elemental analysis. Qualitative tests have been carried out to infer the presence of nitrogen and nitro groups and also chlorine atom in barbiturate II. Slow evaporation of ethanol-dimethylsulphoxide/ethanol solutions of barbiturate I/barbiturate II at 293 K yielded good for X-Ray diffraction crystals. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of the crystals further confirm the putative structures of the barbiturates. The asymmetric unit of the barbiturate I comprises of 8-hydroxyquinolinium cation, 5-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) barbiturate anion and a molecule of dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), which is used as a recrystallizing solvent. It crystallizes in the triclinic system with space group (centrosymmetric). Barbiturate II crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with space group P212121 (non-centrosymmetric). Barbiturates I and II are stable towards an impact sensitivity test, when a weight of 2 kg mass hammer is dropped from a height of 160 cm of the instrument. TGA/ DTA analyses at four different heating rates (5, 10, 20, and 40 K/min) imply that they undergo exothermic decomposition (˜85%) in three different stages between 273 and 873 K. Activation energies for these decomposition processes have been calculated by employing Kissinger and Ozawa plots. Impact sensitivity test and activation energies have revealed that the titled barbiturates are insensitive high energy density materials ( IHEDMS).

  13. Spacecraft Power Beaming Using High-Energy Lasers, Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Sherif

    2008-04-01

    The lifetime of many spacecrafts are often limited by degradation of their electrical power subsystem, e.g. radiation-damaged solar arrays or failed batteries. Being able to beam power from terrestrial sites using high energy lasers, could alleviate this limitation, extending the lifetime of billions of dollars of satellite assets, as well as providing additional energy for electric propulsion that can be used for stationkeeping and orbital changes. In addition, extensive research at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) has shown the potential for annealing damaged solar cells using lasers. This paper describes that research and a proposed experiment to demonstrate the relevant concepts of high energy laser power beaming to an NPS-built and operated satellite. Preliminary results of ground experiment of laser illuminations of some of the solar panels of one of the spacecrafts are also presented.

  14. New Materials for Vacuum Chambers in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum chambers must fulfil ultra-high vacuum requirements while withstanding thermo-mechanical loads. This is particularly true in high energy particle accelerator where interactions of particles with matter may induce thermal load, material activation, background… The choice of the material of the vacuum chamber is crucial for the final application. Metals such as stainless steel, copper and aluminium are usually used. Even with outstanding mechanical and physical properties, beryllium is used for very specific applications because of its cost and toxicity.Ceramics such as alumina are usually used for fast magnet vacuum chambers. With the next generation of high energy physics accelerator generation such as CLIC and TLEP, the problematic of high cyclic thermal load induced by synchrotron radiation is raised. This paper aims at defining some figures of merit of different materials with respect to several load scenarios and presents briefly their vacuum compatibility.

  15. Composition of Primary Cosmic-Ray Nuclei at High Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M; Gahbauer, F; Hoppner, C; Hörandel, J R; Ichimura, M; Müller, D; Romero-Wolf, A

    2008-01-01

    The TRACER instrument (``Transition Radiation Array for Cosmic Energetic Radiation'') has been developed for direct measurements of the heavier primary cosmic-ray nuclei at high energies. The instrument had a successful long-duration balloon flight in Antarctica in 2003. The detector system and measurement process are described, details of the data analysis are discussed, and the individual energy spectra of the elements O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe (nuclear charge Z=8 to 26) are presented. The large geometric factor of TRACER and the use of a transition radiation detector make it possible to determine the spectra up to energies in excess of 10$^{14}$ eV per particle. A power-law fit to the individual energy spectra above 20 GeV per amu exhibits nearly the same spectral index ($\\sim$ 2.65 $\\pm$ 0.05) for all elements, without noticeable dependence on the elemental charge Z.

  16. Low and High Energy Asymptotic Behavior of Electroweak Corrections in Polarized $e^+ e^- \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ Process

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksejevs, A G; Bystritskiy, Yu M; Zykunov, V A

    2016-01-01

    Electroweak radiative corrections will play a major role in the analysis of several upcoming ultra-precision experiments such as Belle-II, so it is crucial to make sure that they are fully under control. The article outlines the recent developments in the theoretical and computational approaches to one-loop (NLO) electroweak radiative corrections to the parity--violating and forward--backward asymmetry in $e^+ e^- \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^- (\\gamma)$ process with longitudinally polarized electrons. We derive asymptotic expressions for low and high energy regions (well below or above Z-resonance, correspondingly) and analyze the leading contributions. For most of energy regions, our results are in excellent agreement with precise computer-algebra based calculation and can be used as a quicker alternative.

  17. A modal analysis for the acoustic radiation problems,II.Examples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhe

    2004-01-01

    The acoustic radiation modes and the field distribution modes describe the radiation patterns of a complex vibrating surface and the field distribution patterns respectively.The physical meanings of the acoustic radiation modes and the field distribution modes are revealed by numerical method. For a sphere body, a spinning body and a rectangular body, the geometrical patterns of the acoustic radiation modes and the field distribution modes are given.The radiation mode 1 represents the radiation behavior of a monopole radiator, the radiation modes 2 through 4 represent the radiation behavior of dipole radiators respectively, and the radiation modes 5 through 9 represent the radiation behavior of quadrapole radiators respectively. The acoustic radiation modes and the field distribution modes introduce the multi-pole decomposition method into discussion of the acoustic radiation problems.

  18. Compression and radiation of high-power short rf pulses. II. A novel antenna array design with combined compressor/radiator elements

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation of compressed high power short RF pulses using two different types of antennas: (i) A simple monopole antenna and (ii) a novel array design, where each of the elements is constructed by combining a compressor and a radiator. The studies on the monopole antenna demonstrate the possibility of a high power short RF pulse\\'s efficient radiation even using simple antennas. The studies on the novel array design demonstrate that a reduced size array with lower pulse distortion and power decay can be constructed by assembling the array from elements each of which integrates a compressor and a radiator. This design idea can be used with any type of antenna array; in this work it is applied to a phased array.

  19. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. II. Inclusion of Radiative Transfer with RADYN

    CERN Document Server

    da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Petrosian, Vahe'; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Solar flares involve complex processes that are coupled together and span a wide range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. Modeling such processes self-consistently has been a challenge in the past. Here we present such a model to simulate the coupling of high-energy particle kinetics with hydrodynamics of the atmospheric plasma. We combine the Stanford unified Fokker-Planck code that models particle acceleration, transport, and bremsstrahlung radiation with the RADYN hydrodynamic code that models the atmospheric response to collisional heating by non-thermal electrons through detailed radiative transfer calculations. We perform simulations using different injection electron spectra, including an {\\it ad hoc} power law and more realistic spectra predicted by the stochastic acceleration model due to turbulence or plasma waves. Surprisingly, stochastically accelerated electrons, even with energy flux $\\ll 10^{10}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, cause "explosive" chromospheric evaporation and drive stronger up- an...

  20. Radiatively Induced Type II seesaw and Vector-like 5/3 Charge Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Franceschini, R

    2013-01-01

    Understanding small neutrino masses in type II seesaw models with TeV scale SM triplet Higgs bosons requires that its coupling with the standard model Higgs doublet H be dialed down to be order eV to KeV, which is a fine-tuning by a factor of $10^{-11}-10^{-8}$ with respect to the weak scale. We present a SUSY extension of the type II seesaw model where this dimensionful small coupling is radiatively induced, thus making its smallness natural. This model has an exotic vector-like quark doublet which contains a quark X with electric charge 5/3 and a top partner t'. We discuss in details the phenomenology of the model paying special attention to the consequences of the interactions of the the exotic heavy quarks and the scalars of the model. Implications for neutrinoless double beta decay and for the LHC experiments are discussed in detail. Remarkably, in this model both the seesaw triplet and the heavy quarks can manifest at colliders in a host of different signatures, including some that significantly differ ...

  1. Aging of organic materials around high-energy particle accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavlet, Marc

    1997-08-01

    Around particle accelerators used for fundamental research on the basic structure of matter, materials and components are exposed to ionizing radiation caused by beam losses in the proton machines and by synchrotron radiation in the lepton machines. Furthermore, with the high-energy and high-intensity collisions produced from future colliders, radiation damage is also to be expected in particle-physics detectors. Therefore, for a safe and reliable operation, the radiation aging of most of the components has to be assessed prior to their selection. An extensive radiation-damage test program has been carried out at CERN for decades on a routine basis and many results have been published. The tests have mainly concentrated on magnet-coil insulations and cable-insulating materials; they are carried out in accordance with the IEC 544 standard which defines the mechanical tests to be performed and the methods of degradation evaluation. The mechanical tests are also used to assess the degradation of composite structural materials. Moreover, electrical properties of high-voltage insulations and optical properties of organic scintillators and wave guides have also been studied. Our long-term experience has pointed out many parameters to be taken into account for the estimate of the lifetime of components in the radiation environment of our accelerators. One of the main parameters is the dose-rate effect, but the influence of other parameters has sometimes to be taken into account.

  2. High-energy Nd:glass laser for oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutchenkov, Vyatcheslav A.; Utenkov, Boris I.; Zaitsev, V. K.; Bayanov, Valentin I.; Serebryakov, Victor A.

    1991-07-01

    The use of high energy solid state lasers for the treatment of human skin neoplasia was based on the experiments and clinic studies by Helsper and Goldman (1964), McGuff (1966). The heat of precise local volume is emitted due to the pulse laser radiation. The thermal effect results in the superficial necrosis of tissues with their integrity destruction, vascular repture accompanied by bloodstoke in some cases and by capillary embolism in others. Obvious tumour destruction is note only in case of high density irradiation. General tumour destruction depends on biological neoplasia features as well as the laser type.

  3. High energy x-ray reflectivity and scattering study from spectrum-x-gamma flight mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Frederiksen, P. Kk

    1993-01-01

    Line radiation from Fe K-alpha(1), Cu K-alpha(1), and Ag K-alpha(1) is used to study the high energy X-ray reflectivity and scattering behavior of flight-quality X-ray mirrors having various Al substrates. When both the specular and the scattered radiation are integrated, near theoretical...

  4. High energy x-ray reflectivity and scattering study from spectrum-x-gamma flight mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Frederiksen, P. Kk

    1993-01-01

    Line radiation from Fe K-alpha(1), Cu K-alpha(1), and Ag K-alpha(1) is used to study the high energy X-ray reflectivity and scattering behavior of flight-quality X-ray mirrors having various Al substrates. When both the specular and the scattered radiation are integrated, near theoretical...

  5. Cosmic absorption of ultra high energy particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, R.; Vereshchagin, G. V.; Xue, S.-S.

    2016-02-01

    This paper summarizes the limits on propagation of ultra high energy particles in the Universe, set up by their interactions with cosmic background of photons and neutrinos. By taking into account cosmic evolution of these backgrounds and considering appropriate interactions we derive the mean free path for ultra high energy photons, protons and neutrinos. For photons the relevant processes are the Breit-Wheeler process as well as the double pair production process. For protons the relevant reactions are the photopion production and the Bethe-Heitler process. We discuss the interplay between the energy loss length and mean free path for the Bethe-Heitler process. Neutrino opacity is determined by its scattering off the cosmic background neutrino. We compute for the first time the high energy neutrino horizon as a function of its energy.

  6. A High Energy Nuclear Database Proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, D A; Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-01-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interace. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from the Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for intertial confinement fusion and target a...

  7. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, D A B R

    2005-01-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and ...

  8. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsa, Z. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Institute for Theoretical Physics]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  9. [High Energy Physics: Research in high energy physics]. Annual report, FY 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barish, B C

    1982-12-31

    This report discusses high energy physics research on: Quantum chromodynamics; neutrinos; multiparticle spectrometers; inclusive scattering; Mark III detector; and cascade decays of phi resonances. (LSP)

  10. Interactions of radiation and adriamycin, bleomycin, mitomycin C or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II in intestinal crypt cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von der Maase, H

    1984-01-01

    The interactions of radiation and adriamycin (ADM), bleomycin (BLM), mitomycin C (MM-C), or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (cis-DDP) in mouse jejunal crypt cells were studied using the microcolony survival assay. ADM administered from 24 h before to 48 h after irradiation resulted in an almost...

  11. High Energy Sources Monitored with OMC

    CERN Document Server

    Risquez, D; Caballero-Garcia, M D; Alfonso-Garzon, J; Mas-Hesse, J M

    2008-01-01

    The Optical Monitoring Camera on-board INTEGRAL (OMC) provides Johnson V band photometry of any potentially variable source within its field of view. Taking advantage of the INTEGRAL capabilities allowing the simultaneous observation of different kind of objects in the optical, X and gamma rays bands, we have performed a study of the optical counterparts of different high-energy sources. Up to now, OMC has detected the optical counterpart for more than 100 sources from the High Energy Catalog (Ebisawa et al., 2003). The photometrically calibrated light curves produced by OMC can be accessed through our web portal at: http://sdc.laeff.inta.es/omc

  12. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Lee [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Greenwood, Zeno [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Wobisch, Marcus [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2013-06-28

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the DØ experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  13. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  14. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2015-09-28

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  15. Metrology, applications and methods with high energy CT systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlmann, N.; Voland, V.; Salamon, M.; Hebele, S.; Boehnel, M.; Reims, N.; Schmitt, M.; Kasperl, S. [Fraunhofer IIS/EZRT, Development Center X-Ray Technology, Flugplatzstrasse 75, 90768 Fürth (Germany); Hanke, R. [Chair of X-ray Microscopy, University of Würzburg - Physics and Astronomy (Germany)

    2014-02-18

    The increase of Computed Tomography (CT) as an applicable metrology and Non Destructive Testing (NDT) method raises interest on developing the application fields to larger objects, which were rarely used in the past due to their requirements on the imaging system. Especially the classical X-ray generation techniques based on standard equipment restricted the applications of CT to typical material penetration lengths of only a few cm of steel. Even with accelerator technology that offers a suitable way to overcome these restrictions just the 2D radioscopy technique found a widespread application. Beside the production and detection of photons in the MeV range itself, the achievable image quality is limited using standard detectors due to the dominating absorption effect of Compton Scattering at high energies. Especially for CT reconstruction purposes these effects have to be considered on the development path from 2D to 3D imaging. Most High Energy CT applications are therefore based on line detectors shielding scattered radiation to a maximum with an increase in imaging quality but with time consuming large volume scan capabilities. In this contribution we present the High-Energy X-ray Imaging project at the Fraunhofer Development Centre for X-ray Technology with the characterization and the potential of the CT-system according to metrological and other application capabilities.

  16. Extragalactic Absorption of High Energy $\\gamma$-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    1999-01-01

    The pair-production absorption of high-energy gamma-rays by intergalactic low-energy photons is expected to produce a high-energy cutoff in the spectra of extragalactic sources which is a sensitive function of redshift. We first discuss the expected absorption coefficient as a function of energy and redshift derived by Stecker and De Jager by making use of a new empirically based calculation of the spectral energy distribution of the intergalactic infrared radiation field as given by Malkan and Stecker. We then discuss the fact that new data on the high energy gamma-ray source Mrk 501 appear to show the amount of intergalactic absorption predicted. The implications of this new HEGRA data, should they be confirmed, are significant for the astrophysics of this source, implying that (1) there is no significant intrinsic absorption inside the source, and (2) the physics of the emission produces a power-law spectrum to energies above 20 TeV. As a further test for intergalactic absorption, we give a predicted spect...

  17. The first interdisciplinary experiments at the IMP high energy microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Guanghua; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Guo, Na; Liu, Wenjing; Ye, Fei; Sheng, Lina; Li, Qiang [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Li, Huiyun [Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China)

    2015-04-01

    The high energy beam of tens to hundred MeV/u ions possesses mm-to-cm penetration depth in materials and can be easily extracted into air without significant energy loss and beam scattering. Combination of high energy ions and microbeam technology facilitates the microprobe application to many practical studies in large scale samples. The IMP heavy ion microbeam facility has recently been integrated with microscopic positioning and targeting irradiation system. This paper introduced the first interdisciplinary experiments performed at the IMP microbeam facility using the beam of 80.5 MeV/u carbon ions. Bystander effect induction via medium transferring was not found in the micro-irradiation study using HeLa cells. The mouse irradiation experiment demonstrated that carbon irradiation of 10 Gy dose to its tuberomammillary nucleus did not impair the sleep nerve system. The fault injection attack on RSA (Rivest–Shamir–Adleman) decryption proved that the commercial field-programmable gate array chip is vulnerable in single event effect to low linear-energy-transfer carbon irradiation, and the attack can cause the leakage of RSA private key. This work demonstrates the potential of high energy microbeam in its application to biology, biomedical, radiation hardness, and information security studies.

  18. High Energy Electron Radiation Degradation of Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    relative spectral output of the Kratos source was determined. This procedure may be algebraically verified since the cell output current, i, is equal...A (cm2), then a unique voltage may be calculated for given values of 0 and C. Algebraically , this equation may be written as ~q A 77e ____ __ 8) C...position as necessary to achieve proper voltage. (d) Place solar cell on test block using plastic tweezers. (e) Start test program by typing " BASICA

  19. High energy radiation from aircraft-triggered lightning and thunderstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochkin, Pavlo; van Deursen, Alexander P. J.; de Boer, Alte I.; Bardet, Michiel; Boissin, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    In-flight Lightning Strike Damage Assessment System (ILDAS http://ildas.nlr.nl/) was developed in an EU FP6 project to provide information on threat that lightning poses to aircraft. The system contains one E-field and eight H-field sensors distributed over the fuselage. It has recently been extended to include two LaBr3 scintillation detectors. The scintillation detectors are sensitive to x-ray photons above 30 keV. The entire system is installed on an A-350 aircraft. When triggered by lightning and digitizes data synchronously with 10 ns intervals. Twelve continuously monitoring photon energy channels were implemented for X-ray detectors operating at slower rate (15 ms, pulse counting). In spring of 2014 and 2015 the aircraft flew through thunderstorm cells recording the data from the sensors. Total of 93 lightning strikes to the aircraft are recorded. Eighteen of them are also detected by WWLLN network. One strike consists of six individual strokes within 200 ms that were all synchronously identified by WWLLN. The WWLLN inter-stroke distance is much larger than the aircraft movement. Three of these strokes generated X-ray bursts. One exceptionally bright X-ray pulse of more than 8 MeV has been detected in association with another strike; it probably saturated the detector's photomultiplier. Neither long gamma-ray glow, nor positron annihilation have been detected during the campaign. An explanation is sought in the typical altitude profile of these test flights.

  20. High Energy Ion Acceleration by Extreme Laser Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-14

    was used instead. This code makes the assumption that the background ion and electron behaviour can be approximated with a fluid model whilst...electron behaviour occurring from this aperture was also published in High Power Laser Science and Engineering [4]. A significant breakthrough was also...acceleration to transparency. This was published in Physics of Plasmas [12]. Through one- dimensional modelling of the interaction, it was also

  1. CAN T TAURI STARS PRODUCE HIGH-ENERGY RADIATION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. del Valle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Las estrellas T Tauri son estrellas de baja masa de pre-secuencia principal. Estos objetos están rodeados por un disco de acreción y presentan una poderosa actividad magnética. Las estrellas T Tauri son copiosas emisoras de rayos X. Los rayos X se generan en eventos intensos de reconexión magnética. Ondas de choque fuertes pueden estar asociadas con la reconexión masiva del campo magnético. Estas ondas o la propia reconexión pueden acelerar partículas hasta energías relativistas, como se ha observado en el sol. Presentamos un modelo para la radiación de muy alta energía producida en la magnetósfera de las estrellas T Tauri. Discutimos si esta emisión es detectable o no con los telescopios de rayos gamma existentes.

  2. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. [UCLA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, Charles D.; Cline, David B.; Byers, N.; Ferrara, S.; Peccei, R.; Hauser, Jay; Muller, Thomas; Atac, Muzaffer; Slater, William; Cousins, Robert; Arisaka, Katsushi

    1992-01-01

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis, {bar P} decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the {phi} factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R D.

  3. Density Estimation Trees in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderlini, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Density Estimation Trees can play an important role in exploratory data analysis for multidimensional, multi-modal data models of large samples. I briefly discuss the algorithm, a self-optimization technique based on kernel density estimation, and some applications in High Energy Physics.

  4. Detecting ultra high energy neutrinos with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mevius, M.; Buitink, S.; Falcke, H.; Horandel, J.; James, C. W.; McFadden, R.; Scholten, O.; Singh, K.; Stappers, B.; ter Veen, S.

    2012-01-01

    The NuMoon project aims to detect signals of Ultra High Energy (UHE) Cosmic Rays with radio telescopes on Earth using the Lunar Cherenkov technique at low frequencies (similar to 150 MHz). The advantage of using low frequencies is the much larger effective detecting volume, with as trade-off the cut

  5. Technology arising from High-Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    An exibition was held as a part of the Meeting on Technology arising from High- Energy Physics (24-26 April 1974). The Proceedings (including a list of stands) were published as Yellow Report, CERN 74-9, vol. 1-2.

  6. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, K.

    1986-01-01

    A project for space observations of solar flares for the coming solar maximum phase is briefly described. The main objective is to make a comprehensive study of high energy phenomena of flares through simultaneous imagings in both hard and soft X-rays. The project will be performed with collaboration from US scientists. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) WG of ISAS (Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences) has extensively discussed future aspects of space observations of high energy phenomena of solar flares based on successful results of the Hinotori mission, and proposed a comprehensive research program for the next solar maximum, called the HESP (SOLAR-A) project. The objective of the HESP project is to make a comprehensive study of both high energy phenomena of flares and quiet structures including pre-flare states, which have been left uncovered by SMM and Hinotori. For such a study simultaneous imagings with better resolutions in space and time in a wide range of energy will be extremely important.

  7. High-Energy Physics: Exit America?

    CERN Multimedia

    Seife, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Budget cuts and cancellations threaten to end U.S. exploration of the particle frontier. Fermilab's Tevatron, due to shut down around 200, could be the last large particle accelerator in the United States; the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva should ensure European dominance of high-energy physics (3 pages)

  8. New challenges in high-energy particle radiobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M

    2014-03-01

    Densely ionizing radiation has always been a main topic in radiobiology. In fact, α-particles and neutrons are sources of radiation exposure for the general population and workers in nuclear power plants. More recently, high-energy protons and heavy ions attracted a large interest for two applications: hadrontherapy in oncology and space radiation protection in manned space missions. For many years, studies concentrated on measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the energetic particles for different end points, especially cell killing (for radiotherapy) and carcinogenesis (for late effects). Although more recently, it has been shown that densely ionizing radiation elicits signalling pathways quite distinct from those involved in the cell and tissue response to photons. The response of the microenvironment to charged particles is therefore under scrutiny, and both the damage in the target and non-target tissues are relevant. The role of individual susceptibility in therapy and risk is obviously a major topic in radiation research in general, and for ion radiobiology as well. Particle radiobiology is therefore now entering into a new phase, where beyond RBE, the tissue response is considered. These results may open new applications for both cancer therapy and protection in deep space.

  9. New challenges in high-energy particle radiobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Densely ionizing radiation has always been a main topic in radiobiology. In fact, α-particles and neutrons are sources of radiation exposure for the general population and workers in nuclear power plants. More recently, high-energy protons and heavy ions attracted a large interest for two applications: hadrontherapy in oncology and space radiation protection in manned space missions. For many years, studies concentrated on measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the energetic particles for different end points, especially cell killing (for radiotherapy) and carcinogenesis (for late effects). Although more recently, it has been shown that densely ionizing radiation elicits signalling pathways quite distinct from those involved in the cell and tissue response to photons. The response of the microenvironment to charged particles is therefore under scrutiny, and both the damage in the target and non-target tissues are relevant. The role of individual susceptibility in therapy and risk is obviously a major topic in radiation research in general, and for ion radiobiology as well. Particle radiobiology is therefore now entering into a new phase, where beyond RBE, the tissue response is considered. These results may open new applications for both cancer therapy and protection in deep space. PMID:24198199

  10. The FERRUM Project: experimental and theoretical transition rates of forbidden [Sc II] lines and radiative lifetimes of metastable Sc II levels

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, H; Lundin, P; Schef, P; Hibbert, A; Lundberg, H; Mannervik, S; Norlin, L -O; Royen, P

    2008-01-01

    Context. In many plasmas, long-lived metastable atomic levels are depopulated by collisions (quenched) before they decay radiatively. In low-density regions, however, the low collision rate may allow depopulation by electric dipole (E1) forbidden radiative transitions, so-called forbidden lines (mainly M1 and E2 transitions). If the atomic transition data are known, these lines are indicators of physical plasma conditions and used for abundance determination. Aims. Transition rates can be derived by combining relative intensities between the decay channels, so-called branching fractions (BFs), and the radiative lifetime of the common upper level. We use this approach for forbidden [Sc ii] lines, along with new calculations. Methods. Neither BFs for forbidden lines, nor lifetimes of metastable levels, are easily measured in a laboratory. Therefore, astrophysical BFs measured in Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra of the strontium filament of Eta Carinae are combined with lifetime measurements u...

  11. The Outcome of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Patients with Stage II Pancreatic Cancer (T3 or N1 Disease)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Chun, Misun; Kim, Myung Wook; Kim, Wook Hwan; Kang, Seok Yun; Kang, Seung Hee; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Sunyoung; Yang, Juno [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the outcome of postoperative radiation therapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for curatively resected stage II pancreatic cancer with T3 or N1 disease. Materials and Methods: Between January 1996 and December 2005, twenty-eight patients completed adjuvant radiation therapy at Ajou University Hospital. The patients had either pathologic T3 stage or N1 stage. The radiation target volume encompassed the initial tumor bed identified preoperatively, resection margin area and celiac nodal area. In the case of N1 patients, the radiation field extended to the lower margin of the L3 vertebra for covering both para-aortic lymph nodes bearing area. The median total radiation dose was 50 Gy. Ten patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Thirteen patients (46%) showed loco-regional recurrences. The celiac axis nodal area was the most frequent site (4 patients). Five patients showed both loco-regional recurrence and a distant metastasis. Patients with positive lymph nodes had a relatively high probability of a distant metastasis (57.1%). Patients that had a positive resection margin showed a relatively high local failure rate (57.1%). The median disease-free survival period of all patients was 6 months and the 1- and 2-year disease free survival rates were 27.4% and 8.2%, respectively. The median overall survival period was 9 months. The 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 31.6% and 15.8%, respectively. Conclusion: The pancreatic cancer patients with stage II had a high risk of local failure and a high risk of a distant metastasis. We suggest the concurrent use of an effective radiation-sensitizing chemotherapeutic drug and adjuvant chemotherapy after postoperative radiation therapy for the treatment of patients with stage II pancreatic cancer.

  12. High energy protons generation by two sequential laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Baifei, E-mail: bfshen@mail.shcnc.ac.cn, E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei, E-mail: bfshen@mail.shcnc.ac.cn, E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-04-15

    The sequential proton acceleration by two laser pulses of relativistic intensity is proposed to produce high energy protons. In the scheme, a relativistic super-Gaussian (SG) laser pulse followed by a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) pulse irradiates dense plasma attached by underdense plasma. A proton beam is produced from the target and accelerated in the radiation pressure regime by the short SG pulse and then trapped and re-accelerated in a special bubble driven by the LG pulse in the underdense plasma. The advantages of radiation pressure acceleration and LG transverse structure are combined to achieve the effective trapping and acceleration of protons. In a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, protons of 6.7 GeV are obtained from a 2 × 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} SG laser pulse and a LG pulse at a lower peak intensity.

  13. 5th International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kyrala, G.A

    2005-01-01

    During the past several years, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Research is underway in many areas, such as compressible hydrodynamic mixing, strong shock phenomena, radiation flow, radiative shocks and jets, complex opacities, equations o fstat, and relativistic plasmas. Beyond this current research and the papers it is producing, plans are being made for the application, to astrophysics-relevant research, of the 2 MJ National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; the 600 kj Ligne d'Intergration Laser (LIL) and the 2 MJ Laser Megajoule (LMJ) in Bordeaux, France; petawatt-range lasers now under construction around the world; and current and future Z pinches. The goal of this conference and these proceedings is to continue focusing and attention on this emerging research area. The conference brought together different scientists interested in this emerging new fi...

  14. Did high energy astrophysical sources contribute to Martian atmospheric loss?

    CERN Document Server

    Atri, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Mars is believed to have had a substantial atmosphere in the past. Atmospheric loss led to depressurization and cooling, and is thought to be the primary driving force responsible for the loss of liquid water from its surface. Recently, MAVEN observations have provided new insight into the physics of atmospheric loss induced by ICMEs and solar wind interacting with the Martian atmosphere. In addition to solar radiation, it is likely that its atmosphere has been exposed to radiation bursts from high-energy astrophysical sources which become highly probable on timescales of ~Gy and beyond. These sources are capable of significantly enhancing the rates of photoionization and charged particle-induced ionization in the upper atmosphere. Here, we explore the possibility of damage from Galactic Gamma Ray Bursts, nearby supernovae, encounter with dense interstellar clouds and extreme solar events. We use Monte Carlo simulations to model the interaction of charged particles and photons from astrophysical sources in th...

  15. Characterization of PbWO4 crystals for high-energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. J.; Park, H.; Kim, H. J.

    2016-09-01

    High-energy physics (HEP) experiments have employed many new types of scintillators. Specifically, bismuth germanate, thallium-doped cesium iodide, and lead tungstate (PbWO4, PWO) have been used for the L3 experiment; CLEO II, Belle and BES-III; and CMS, respectively. PWO has particularly beneficial properties, such as high density, fast decay time, short radiation length and radiation hardness. In this study, we tested the PWO crystals at low temperatures to determine their applicability in future calorimeters. Various crystals from the Proton Antiproton Annihilations at Darmstadt (PANDA) experiment in Giessen, the Bogoroditsk Techno-Chemical Plant (BTCP) in Russia and by Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS) in China were investigated. We studied the scintillation properties of PWO crystals, such as their X-ray luminescence, relative light yields, absolute light yields, energy resolutions, decay times and longitudinal uniformities of their light yields. In addition, we measured the temperature dependences of the light yields and decay times by using a 137Cs γ-ray source. The emission spectra of the PWO crystals consisted of a broad band from 350 nm to 700 nm, and the peak emission wavelength in each spectrum was 420 nm. The emission spectra of the PWO crystals from SICCAS were slightly shifted to longer wavelengths compared with those of the crystals from the other institutions.

  16. Future high energy physics experiments using RICH detectors: The next generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratcliff, B.N.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes some features of the new detectors now being constructed for use in high energy physics experiments that utilize RICH counters as a central element. The scope of this discussion is limited only to experiments which have been formally approved for construction as follows: (1) BaBar at PEP-II, which contains a quartz radiator DIRC counter; (2) CLEO III at the CESR upgrade, which utilizes a LiF/TEA Fast RICH; and (3) HERA-B at HERA, which uses a gas radiator RICH with either a TMAE- or a CsI-based photon detector. These experiments have much in common; all emphasize B-physics, run at the luminosity frontier, and plan to take first data either in 1998 or 1999. This review begins with a discussion of the physics goals and experimental context, and then explore the designs which have been chosen to confront the experimental issues. Particular emphasis is placed on the design and expected performance of the RICH detectors in these systems. Due to space limitations, only a few of the recent R and D results not covered elsewhere at the conference can be presented.

  17. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays threshold in Randers-Finsler space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Zhe; LI Xin

    2009-01-01

    Kinematics in Finsler space is used to study the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays particles through the cosmic microwave background radiation. We find that the GZK threshold is lifted dramatically in Randers-Finsler space. A tiny deformation of spacetime from Minkowskian to Finslerian allows more ultra-high energy cosmic rays particles to arrive at the earth. It is suggested that the lower bound of particle mass is related with the negative second invariant speed in Randers-Finsler space.

  18. Ultra High Energy Neutrino Signature in Top-Down Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Aloisio, R

    2006-01-01

    Neutrinos are the best candidates to test the extreme Universe and ideas beyond the Standard Model of particle Physics. Once produced, neutrinos do not suffer any kind of attenuation by intervening radiation fields like the Cosmic Microwave Background and are not affected by magnetic fields. In this sense neutrinos are useful messengers from the far and young Universe. In the present paper we will discuss a particular class of sources of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays introduced to explain the possible excess of events with energy larger than the Graisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off. These sources, collectively called top-down, share a common feature: UHE particles are produced in the decay or annihilation of superheavy, exotic, particles. As we will review in the present paper, the largest fraction of Ultra High Energy particles produced in the top-down scenario are neutrinos. The study of these radiation offers us a unique opportunity to test the exotic mechanisms of the top-down scenario.

  19. The secular variation of inner zone high energy proton environment in the SAA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Lun; PU; Zuyin; JIAO; Weixin; FU; suiyan

    2005-01-01

    A long-term variation of the inner zone high-energy proton environment at low orbits was investigated by DSTM using the adiabatic approximation of charge particle motion with NASA standard radiation models as reference states. The DST results show that over the past three decades the fluxes of high-energy protons at (1000 km in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) noticeably increased, the center region of proton SAA apparently moved westward and expanded. Calculations of the L-shell averaged lifetime of high-energy protons indicate that the DST provides a reasonable means for estimation of the secular variation of inner zone proton environment.

  20. PROGRESS OF HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV,A.V.

    2007-09-10

    The fundamental questions about QCD which can be directly answered at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) call for large integrated luminosities. The major goal of RHIC-I1 upgrade is to achieve a 10 fold increase in luminosity of Au ions at the top energy of 100 GeV/nucleon. Such a boost in luminosity for RHIC-II is achievable with implementation of high-energy electron cooling. The design of the higher-energy cooler for RHIC-II recently adopted a non-magnetized approach which requires a low temperature electron beam. Such electron beams will be produced with a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). Detailed simulations of the electron cooling process and numerical simulations of the electron beam transport including the cooling section were performed. An intensive R&D of various elements of the design is presently underway. Here, we summarize progress in these electron cooling efforts.

  1. Testing Type II Radiative Seesaw Model: from Dark Matter Detection to LHC Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Shu-Yuan; Liao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the testability of the type II radiative seesaw in which neutrino mass and dark matter (DM) are related at one-loop level. Under the constraints from DM relic density, direct and indirect detection, and invisible Higgs decays, we find three possible regions of DM mass $M_{s_1}$ that can survive the present and even the future experiments: (1) the Higgs resonance region with $M_{s_1}\\sim M_h/2$, (2) the Higgs region with $M_{s_1}\\sim M_h$, and (3) the coannihilation region with $M_{s_2}\\sim M_{s_1}$. Here $s_{1,2}$ are two scalar singlets with the lighter $s_1$ being the DM candidate. Based on DM properties and direct collider constraints, we choose three benchmark points to illustrate the testability of this model at LHC. We perform a detailed simulation of the four-lepton and tri-lepton signatures at 13 (14) TeV LHC. While both signatures are found to be promising at all benchmark points, the tri-lepton one is even better: it is possible to reach the $5\\sigma$ significance with an integrated lumin...

  2. On the Existence of Radiation Gauges in Petrov type II spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Price, L R; Whiting, B F; Price, Larry R.; Shankar, Karthik; Whiting, Bernard F.

    2006-01-01

    The radiation gauges used by Chrzanowski (his IRG/ORG) for metric reconstruction in the Kerr spacetime seem to be over-specified. Their specification consists of five conditions: four (which we treat here as) ``gauge'' conditions plus an additional condition on the trace of the metric perturbation. In this work, we utilize a newly developed form of the perturbed Einstein equations to establish a condition -- on a particular tetrad component of the stress-energy tensor -- under which one can impose the full IRG/ORG. In a Petrov type II background, imposing the IRG/ORG additionally requires (consistently) setting a particular component of the metric perturbation to zero ``by hand''. By contrast, in a generic type D background, gauge freedom can generally be used to achieve this. As a specific example, we work through the process of imposing the IRG in a Schwarzschild background, using a more traditional approach. Implications for metric reconstruction using the Teukolsky curvature perturbations in type D spacet...

  3. Diagnostic development in precise opacity measurement of radiatively heated Al plasma on Shenguang II laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yang [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Institute of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yang Jiamin; Zhang Jiyan [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Liu Jinsong; Yuan Xiao [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Institute of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jin Fengtao [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Department of Physics, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2009-04-15

    Simultaneous measurements of the self-emission spectrum, the backlighting source spectrum, and the transmission spectrum in one shot, which reduce the experimental uncertainties from shot-to-shot fluctuation, are essential for precise opacity experiments. In order to achieve precise absorption spectrum of Al plasmas, a special half sample sandwich target was designed and short backlighter was used to provide time- and space-resolving diagnostics on the Shenguang II high power laser facility. In the measurement, a cylindrical cavity with CH foam baffles was used to provide a clean x-ray radiation environment for sample heating. The x-ray source spectrum, the transmission spectrum, and the self-emission spectrum of the soft x-ray heated Al sample were recorded in one shot with a penta-erythritol tetrakis (hydroxymethy) methane C(CH{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (PET) crystal spectrometer by using the point-projection method. Experimental results have been compared with the calculation results of a detailed level accounting opacity code.

  4. Testing the type II radiative seesaw model: From dark matter detection to LHC signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shu-Yuan; Han, Zhi-Long; Liao, Yi

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the testability of the type II radiative seesaw in which neutrino mass and dark matter (DM) are related at one-loop level. Under the constraints from DM relic density, direct and indirect detection, and invisible Higgs decays, we find three possible regions of DM mass Ms1that can survive the present and even the future experiments: (1) the Higgs resonance region with Ms 1˜Mh/2 , (2) the Higgs region with Ms1˜Mh, and (3) the coannihilation region with Ms 2˜Ms 1. Here s1 ,2 are two scalar singlets with the lighter s1 being the DM candidate. Based on DM properties and direct collider constraints, we choose three benchmark points to illustrate the testability of this model at the LHC. We perform a detailed simulation of the four-lepton and trilepton signatures at 13(14) TeV LHC. While both signatures are found to be promising at all benchmark points, the trilepton one is even better: it is possible to reach the 5 σ significance with an integrated luminosity of 100 fb-1.

  5. Radiative lifetime measurements of some Tm I and Tm II levels by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Xinghao; Yu, Qi; Li, Yongfan; Gao, Yang; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 88 levels of Tm I in the energy range 22 791.176-48 547.98 cm-1 and 29 levels of Tm II in the range 27 294.79-65 612.85 cm-1 were measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-ablation plasma. The lifetime values obtained are in the range from 15.4 to 7900 ns for Tm I and from 36.5 to 1000 ns for Tm II. To the best of our knowledge, 77 lifetimes of Tm I and 22 lifetimes of Tm II are reported for the first time. Good agreements between the present results and the previous experimental values were achieved for both Tm I and Tm II.

  6. High Energy Neutrino Astronomy: Status and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Spiering, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The year 2008 has witnessed remarkable steps in developing high energy neutrino telescopes. IceCube at the South Pole has been deployed with 40 of its planned 80 strings and reached half a cubic kilometer instrumented volume, in the Mediterranean Sea the "first-stage" neutrino telescope ANTARES has been completed and takes data with 12 strings. The next years will be key years for opening the neutrino window to the high energy universe. IceCube is presently entering a region with realistic discovery potential. Early discoveries (or non-discoveries) with IceCube will strongly influence the design and the estimated discovery chances of the Northern equivalent KM3NeT. Following theoretical estimates, cubic kilometer telescopes may just scratch the regions of discovery. Therefore detectors presently planned should reach sensitivities substantially beyond those of IceCube.

  7. Cosmic ray antiprotons at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Martin Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons provide a powerful tool to probe dark matter annihilations in our galaxy. The sensitivity of this important channel is, however, diluted by sizable uncertainties in the secondary antiproton background. In this work, we improve the calculation of secondary antiproton production with a particular focus on the high energy regime. We employ the most recent collider data and identify a substantial increase of antiproton cross sections with energy. This increase is driven by the violation of Feynman scaling as well as by an enhanced strange hyperon production. The updated antiproton production cross sections are made publicly available for independent use in cosmic ray studies. In addition, we provide the correlation matrix of cross section uncertainties for the AMS-02 experiment. At high energies, the new cross sections improve the compatibility of the AMS-02 data with a pure secondary origin of antiprotons in cosmic rays.

  8. High-energy ion implantation for ULSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, K.; Komori, S.; Kuroi, T.; Akasaka, Y. (LSI R and D Lab., Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Itami (Japan))

    1991-07-01

    The ''well engineering'' of a retrograde twin well formed by high-energy ion implantation for 0.5 {mu}m CMOS is demonstrated to be quite useful in improving many device characteristics, such as leakage current reduction, soft-error immunity, low latchup susceptibility, smaller device isolation dimensions, etc. In forming a heavily doped buried layer by high-energy ion implantation, a drastic reduction in leakage current has been found. This would be caused by gettering of impurities or microdefects by secondary defects which are induced either by implantation of dopant itself (''self-gettering'') or by an additional implantation of oxygen, carbon or fluorine (''proximity gettering''). (orig.).

  9. Identifying the nature of high energy Astroparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Mora, Karen Salomé Caballero

    2016-01-01

    High energy Astroparticles include Cosmic Ray, gamma ray and neutrinos, all of them coming from the universe. The origin and production, acceleration and propagation mechanisms of ultrahigh-energy CR (up to $10^{20}$ eV) are still unknown. Knowledge on particle interactions taking place at those energies, useful for studying current theories on particle physics, can be obtained only from measurements of high energy astroparticles. In the present document some techniques on data analysis of mass composition of UHECR with the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. The relevance of the muon component of air showers produced by the primary CR, as well as some low energy simulations of that component, are explained.

  10. Cosmic Physics: The High Energy Frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic rays have been observed up to energies $10^8$ times larger than those of the best particle accelerators. Studies of astrophysical particles (hadrons, neutrinos and photons) at their highest observed energies have implications for fundamental physics as well as astrophysics. Thus, the cosmic high energy frontier is the nexus to new particle physics. This overview discusses recent advances being made in the physics and astrophysics of cosmic rays and cosmic gamma-rays at the highest observed energies as well as the related physics and astrophysics of very high energy cosmic neutrinos. These topics touch on questions of grand unification, violation of Lorentz invariance, as well as Planck scale physics and quantum gravity.

  11. High energy electron-positron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Ahmed

    1988-01-01

    With the termination of the physics program at PETRA, and with the start of TRISTAN and the SLC and later LEP, an era of e+e- physics has come to an end and a new one begins. The field is changing from a field of few specialists, to becoming one of the mainstream efforts of the high energy community. It seems appropriate at this moment to summarize what has been learned over the past years, in a way most useful to any high energy physicists, in particular to newcomers in the e+e- field. This is the purpose of the book. This book should be used as a reference for future workers in the field of

  12. High energy physics at UC Riverside

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

  13. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays: Strangelets?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐仁新; 吴飞

    2003-01-01

    The conjecture that ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are actually strangelets is discussed. Besides the reason that strangelets can do as cosmic rays beyond the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin-cutoff, another argument to support the conjecture is addressed by the study of formation of Te V-scale microscopic black holes when UHECRs bombarding bare strange stars. It is proposed that the exotic quark surface of a bare strange star could be an effective astro-laboratory in the investigations of the extra dimensions and of the detection of ultra-high-energy neutrino fluxes. The flux of neutrinos (and other point-like particles) with energy larger than 2.3 × 1020 eV could be expected to be smaller than 10-26 cm-2 s-1 if there are two extra spatial dimensions.

  14. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  15. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Dova, M T

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above E > 10 17 eV, is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the engines of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. This is a written version of a series of lectures devoted to UHECR at the 2013 CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics. We present anintroduction to acceleration mechanisms of charged particles to the highest energies in astrophysical objects, their propagation from the sources to Earth, and the experimental techniques for their detection. We also discuss some of the relevant observational results from Telescope Array and Pierre Auger Observatory. These experiments deal with particle interactions at energies orders of magnitude higher than achieved in terrestrial accelerators.

  16. New Prospects in High Energy Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandford, Roger; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-15

    Recent discoveries using TeV, X-ray and radio telescopes as well as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray arrays are leading to new insights into longstanding puzzles in high energy astrophysics. Many of these insights come from combining observations throughout the electromagnetic and other spectra as well as evidence assembled from different types of source to propose general principles. Issues discussed in this general overview include methods of accelerating relativistic particles, and amplifying magnetic field, the dynamics of relativistic outflows and the nature of the prime movers that power them. Observational approaches to distinguishing hadronic, leptonic and electromagnetic outflows and emission mechanisms are discussed along with probes of the velocity field and the confinement mechanisms. Observations with GLAST promise to be very prescriptive for addressing these problems.

  17. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-07

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition. At high baryon density and low temperature, large N{sub c} arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma.

  18. Explanation for the Low Flux of High Energy Astrophysical Muon Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakvasa, Sandip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Joshipura, Anjan; Mohanty, Subhendra [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India 380009 (India)

    2014-01-15

    There has been some concern about the unexpected paucity of cosmic high energy muon neutrinos in detectors probing the energy region beyond 1 PeV. As a possible solution we consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant sources; specifically, we consider: (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac particles. This would provide a mechanism for the reduction of high energy muon events in the IceCube detector, for example.

  19. Explanation for the low flux of high-energy astrophysical muon neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakvasa, Sandip; Joshipura, Anjan; Mohanty, Subhendra

    2013-04-26

    There has been some concern about the unexpected paucity of cosmic high-energy muon neutrinos in detectors probing the energy region beyond 1 PeV. As a possible solution we consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant sources; specifically, we consider (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac-particles. This would provide a mechanism for the reduction of high-energy muon events in the IceCube detector, for example.

  20. High-Energy Cosmology: gamma rays and neutrinos from beyond the galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, C D

    2006-01-01

    Our knowledge of the high-energy universe will change dramatically over the next several years as new astronomical detectors of high-energy radiation reach their design sensitivities. Besides Swift and HESS, which are already making important discoveries, these include the ground-based imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes VERITAS and MAGIC, the gamma-ray space telescopes GLAST and AGILE, and the particle observatories IceCube and Auger. A formalism for calculating statistical properties of cosmological gamma-ray sources is presented. Application is made to model calculations of the statistical distributions of gamma-ray and neutrino emission from beamed sources, specifically, long-duration GRBs, blazars, and extagalactic microquasars, and unbeamed sources, including normal galaxies, starburst galaxies and clusters. Expressions for the integrated intensities of faint beamed and unbeamed high-energy radiation sources are also derived. A toy model for the background intensity of radiation from dark-matter annihilati...

  1. Managing radiation degradation of CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Bissell, Bradley A.; Blackwell, William C.; Cameron, Robert A.; Chappell, Jon II.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Gage, Kenneth R.; Grant, Catherine E.; Harbison, Christine F.

    2005-01-01

    The CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory are vulnerable to radiation damage from low-energy protons scattered off the telescope's mirrors onto the focal plane. Following unexpected damage incurred early in the mission, the Chandra Team developed, implemented, and maintains a radiation-protection program. This program - involving scheduled radiation safing during radiation-belt passes, intervention based upon real-time space-weather conditions and radiation-environment modeling, and on-board radiation monitoring with autonomous radiation safing - has successfully managed the radiation damage to the CCDs. Since implementing the program, the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) has increased at an average annual rate of only 2.9x10^-6 (2.3%) for the front- illuminated CCDs and 0.95x10^-6 (6.5%) for the back-illuminated CCDs. This paper describes the current status of Chandra radiation-management program.

  2. Data Unfolding Methods in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    A selection of unfolding methods commonly used in High Energy Physics is compared. The methods discussed here are: bin-by-bin correction factors, matrix inversion, template fit, Tikhonov regularisation and two examples of iterative methods. Two procedures to choose the strength of the regularisation are tested, namely the L-curve scan and a scan of global correlation coefficients. The advantages and disadvantages of the unfolding methods and choices of the regularisation strength are discussed using a toy example.

  3. Surface spectroscopy using high energy heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, B.L.; Cocke, C.L.; Gray, T.J.; Justiniano, E.; Peercy, P.S.

    1983-04-01

    Surface atoms ionized by high energy heavy ions have been detected by time-of-flight and quadrupole mass spectroscopic techniques. The experimental arrangements are described and potential applications are suggested. Both techniques are demonstrated to produce significant improvements in the detection of atomic hydrogen, with the TOF method producing a nine order of magnitude increase in the sensitivity of atomic hydrogen compared to standard nuclear analysis methods.

  4. High energy bosons do not propagate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkov, M.A., E-mail: Kurkov@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Lizzi, Fedele, E-mail: fedele.lizzi@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Departament de Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria, Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Vassilevich, Dmitri, E-mail: dvassil@gmail.com [CMCC, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, S.P. (Brazil)

    2014-04-04

    We discuss the propagation of bosons (scalars, gauge fields and gravitons) at high energy in the context of the spectral action. Using heat kernel techniques, we find that in the high-momentum limit the quadratic part of the action does not contain positive powers of the derivatives. We interpret this as the fact that the two-point Green functions vanish for nearby points, where the proximity scale is given by the inverse of the cutoff.

  5. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-03-31

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac and AGS to RHIC to CERN-LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  6. High energy photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  7. High energy cosmic ray and neutrino astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic-rays with energies exceeding 10^{19} eV are referred to as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). The sources of these particles and their acceleration mechanism are unknown, and for many years have been the issue of much debate. The first part of this review describes the main constraints, that are implied by UHECR observations on the properties of candidate UHECR sources, the candidate sources, and the related main open questions. In order to address the challenges of identifying the UHECR sources and of probing the physical mechanisms driving them, a "multi-messenger" approach will most likely be required, combining electromagnetic, cosmic-ray and neutrino observations. The second part of the review is devoted to a discussion of high energy neutrino astronomy. It is shown that detectors, which are currently under construction, are expected to reach the effective mass required for the detection of high energy extra-Galactic neutrino sources, and may therefore play a key role in the near future in re...

  8. Advances in High Energy Materials (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. R. Nair

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Research and development efforts for realizing higher performance levels of high energy materials (HEMs are continued unabated all over the globe. Of late, it is becoming increasingly necessary to ensure that such materials are also eco-friendly. This has provided thrust to research in the area of force multiplying HEMs and compounds free from pollution causing components. Enhancement of the performance necessitates introduction of strained structure or increase in oxygen balance to achieve near stoichiometry. The search for environment friendly molecules is focused on chlorine free propellant compositions and lead free primary explosives. Energetic polymers offer added advantage of partitioning of energy and thus not necessitating the concentration of only solid components (HEMs and metal fuels in the formulations, to achieve higher performance, thereby leading to improvement in energetics without adversely affecting the processability and mechanical properties. During recent times, research in the area of insensitive explosives has received impetus particularly with the signature of STANAG. This paper gives a review of the all-round advances in the areas of HEMs encompassing oxidizers, high-energy dense materials, insensitive high-energy materials, polymers and plasticizers. Selected formulations based on these materials are also included.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(2, pp.137-151, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.327

  9. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kogler, Roman; Steder, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Data from high-energy physics experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. However, until recently no coherent strategy existed for data preservation and re-use, and many important and complex data sets have simply been lost. While the current focus is on the LHC at CERN, in the current period several important and unique experimental programs at other facilities are coming to an end, including those at HERA, b-factories and the Tevatron. To address this issue, an inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis (DPHEP) was convened at the end of 2008. The group now aims to publish a full and detailed review of the present status of data preservation in high energy physics. This contribution summarises the results of the DPHEP study group, describing the challenges of data preservation in high energy physics and the group's first conclusions and recommendations. The physics motivation for data preservation, generic computing and pre...

  10. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a particle radiation monitor II

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, C E; Bautz, M W; O'Dell, S L

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer is an instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the radiation belts and solar storms. The Chandra team has implemented procedures to protect ACIS during high-radiation events including autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor. Elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board monitor. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. In this paper, we explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  11. ACR Appropriateness Criteria for external beam radiation therapy treatment planning for clinically localized prostate cancer, part II of II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas G. Zaorsky, MD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: External beam radiation is a key component of the curative management of T1 and T2 prostate cancer. By combining the most recent medical literature, these Appropriateness Criteria can aid clinicians in determining the appropriate treatment delivery and personalized approaches for individual patients.

  12. Biological Effects of Laser Radiation. Volume II. Review of Our Studies on Biological Effects of Laser Radiation-1965-1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-17

    Ben Fine. 8. W.T. Ham,Jr., R.C. Williams, H.A. Mueller, Du Pont Guerry,III, A.M. Clarke and W.J. Geeraets, Effects of Laser Radiation on the Mammalian...and Applications course, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn Graduate Center, September, 1969 35. S. Fine and E. Klein, "Biological Effects of Laser

  13. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: II. Extragalactic far infrared background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using formula to describe the average spectrum of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 0.15-2.4 THz frequency interval at mean temperature T=18.5 K, the radiative and thermodynamic properties, such as the total emissivity, total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure are calculated. The value for the total intensity received in the 0.15-2.4 THz frequency interval is equal to 13.6 nW m-2 sr-1. This value is about 19.4 % of the total intensity expected from the energy released by stellar nucleosynthesis over cosmic history. The radiative and thermodynamic functions of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation are calculated at redshift z=1.5.

  14. Lasing action and extraordinary reduction in long radiative lifetime of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots using circular photonic crystal nanocavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Kung-Shu; Chang, Shu-Wei [Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS), Academia Sinica, 128 Academia Rd., Sec. 2 Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Hung, Wei-Chun; Chang, Chih-Chi; Lin, Wei-Hsun; Lin, Shih-Yen [Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS), Academia Sinica, 128 Academia Rd., Sec. 2 Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Shih, Min-Hsiung, E-mail: mhshih@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS), Academia Sinica, 128 Academia Rd., Sec. 2 Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-sen University (NSYSU), 70 Lienhai Rd., Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Lee, Po-Tsung [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yia-Chung [Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS), Academia Sinica, 128 Academia Rd., Sec. 2 Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University (NCKU), No. 1, University Rd., Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-31

    We demonstrated the lasing action and remarkable reduction in long radiative lifetimes of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots using a circular photonic-crystal nano-cavity with high Purcell factors. The associated enhancement in carrier recombination was surprisingly high and could even surpass type-I counterparts in similar conditions. These phenomena reveal that the type-II sample exhibited extremely low nonradiative recombination so that weak radiative transitions were more dominant than expected. The results indicate that type-II nanostructures may be advantageous for applications which require controllable radiative transitions but low nonradiative depletions.

  15. AMRH and High Energy Reinicke Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestakov, A I; Greenough, J A

    2001-05-14

    The authors describe AMRH results on a version of the Reinicke problem specified by the V and V group of LLNL's A-Div. The simulation models a point explosion with heat conduction. The problem specification requires that the heat conduction be replaced with diffusive radiation transport. The matter and radiation energy densities are tightly coupled.

  16. HELIX: The High Energy Light Isotope Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakely, Scott

    This is the lead proposal for a new suborbital program, HELIX (High-Energy Light Isotope eXperiment), designed to make measurements of the isotopic composition of light cosmic-ray nuclei from ~200 MeV/nuc to ~10 GeV/nuc. Past measurements of this kind have provided profound insights into the nature and origin of cosmic rays, revealing, for instance, information on acceleration and confinement time scales, and exposing some conspicuous discrepancies between solar and cosmic-ray abundances. The most detailed information currently available comes from the ACE/CRIS mission, but is restricted to energies below a few 100 MeV/nuc. HELIX aims at extending this energy range by over an order of magnitude, where, in most cases, no measurements of any kind exist, and where relativistic time dilation affects the apparent lifetime of radioactive clock nuclei. The HELIX measurements will provide essential information for understanding the propagation history of cosmic rays in the galaxy. This is crucial for properly interpreting several intriguing anomalies reported in recent cosmic-ray measurements, pertaining to the energy spectra of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei, and to the anomalous rise in the positron fraction at higher energy. HELIX employs a high-precision magnet spectrometer to provide measurements which are not achievable by any current or planned instrument. The superconducting magnet originally used for the HEAT payload in five successful high-altitude flights will be combined with state-of-the-art detectors to measure the charge, time-of-flight, magnetic rigidity, and velocity of cosmic-ray particles with high precision. The instrumentation includes plastic scintillators, silicon-strip detectors repurposed from Fermilab's CDF detector, a high-performance gas drift chamber, and a ring-imaging Cherenkov counter employing aerogel radiators and silicon photomultipliers. To reduce cost and technical risk, the HELIX program will be structured in two stages. The first

  17. Irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ice with high-energy ultraviolet photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuevo, Michel; Chen, Yu-Jung; Hu, Wei-Jie; Qiu, Jun-Ming; Wu, Shang-Ruei; Fung, Hok-Sum; Chu, Ching-Chi; Yih, Tai-Sone; Ip, Wing-Huen; Wu, C-Y Robert

    2014-02-01

    The detection of nucleobases, the informational subunits of DNA and RNA, in several meteorites suggests that these compounds of biological interest were formed via astrophysical, abiotic processes. This hypothesis is in agreement with recent laboratory studies of irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O-rich ices with vacuum UV photons emitted by an H2-discharge lamp in the 6.9-11.3 eV (110-180 nm) range at low temperature, shown to lead to the abiotic formation of several compounds including the nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine. In this work, we irradiated H2O:pyrimidine ice mixtures under astrophysically relevant conditions (14 K, ≤10(-9) torr) with high-energy UV photons provided by a synchrotron source in three different ranges: the 0(th) order light (4.1-49.6 eV, 25-300 nm), the He i line (21.2 eV, 58.4 nm), and the He ii line (40.8 eV, 30.4 nm). The photodestruction of pyrimidine was monitored with IR spectroscopy, and the samples recovered at room temperature were analyzed with liquid and gas chromatographies. Uracil and its precursor 4(3H)-pyrimidone were found in all samples, with absolute and relative abundances varying significantly from one sample to another. These results support a scenario in which compounds of biological interest can be formed and survive in environments subjected to high-energy UV radiation fields.

  18. HIGH ENERGY POLARIZATION OF BLAZARS: DETECTION PROSPECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, N. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pavlidou, V. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Fields, B. D. [Department of Astronomy and Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  19. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.D.

    1994-08-01

    Accelerators have been devised and built for two reasons: In the first place, by physicists who needed high energy particles in order to have a means to explore the interactions between particles that probe the fundamental elementary forces of nature. And conversely, sometimes accelerator builders produce new machines for higher energy than ever before just because it can be done, and then challenge potential users to make new discoveries with the new means at hand. These two approaches or motivations have gone hand in hand. This lecture traces how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to the gigantic projects of today. So far all the really high-energy machines built and planned in the world--except the SLC--have been ring accelerators and storage rings using the strong-focusing method. But this method has not removed the energy limit, it has only pushed it higher. It would seem unlikely that one can go beyond the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)--but in fact a workshop was held in Sicily in November 1991, concerned with the question of extrapolating to 100 TeV. Other acceleration and beam-forming methods are now being discussed--collective fields, laser acceleration, wake-field accelerators etc., all aimed primarily at making linear colliders possible and more attractive than with present radiofrequency methods. So far it is not entirely clear which of these schemes will dominate particle physics in the future--maybe something that has not been thought of as yet.

  20. Microbunch preserving in-line system for an APPLE II helical radiator at the LCLS baseline

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2011-01-01

    In a previous work we proposed a scheme for polarization control at the LCLS baseline, which exploited the microbunching from the planar undulator. After the baseline undulator, the electron beam is transported through a drift by a FODO focusing system, and through a short helical radiator. The microbunching structure can be preserved, and intense coherent radiation is emitted in the helical undulator at fundamental harmonic. The driving idea of this proposal is that the background linearly-polarized radiation from the baseline undulator is suppressed by spatial filtering. Filtering is achieved by letting radiation and electron beam through Be slits upstream of the helical radiator, where the radiation spot size is about ten times larger than the electron beam transverse size. Several changes considered in the present paper were made to improve the previous design. Slits are now placed immediately behind the helical radiator. The advantage is that the electron beam can be spoiled by the slits, and narrower sl...

  1. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  4. Predictions of High Energy Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Eight predictions of high energy experimental results are presented. The predictions contain the $Sigma ^+$ charge radius and results of two kinds of experiments using energetic pionic beams. In addition, predictions of the failure to find the following objects are presented: glueballs, pentaquarks, Strange Quark Matter, magnetic monopoles searched by their direct interaction with charges and the Higgs boson. The first seven predictions rely on the Regular Charge-Monopole Theory and the last one relies on mathematical inconsistencies of the Higgs Lagrangian density.

  5. Computing support for High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, P.; Yelton, J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-01

    This computing proposal (Task S) is submitted separately but in support of the High Energy Experiment (CLEO, Fermilab, CMS) and Theory tasks. The authors have built a very strong computing base at Florida over the past 8 years. In fact, computing has been one of the main contributions to their experimental collaborations, involving not just computing capacity for running Monte Carlos and data reduction, but participation in many computing initiatives, industrial partnerships, computing committees and collaborations. These facts justify the submission of a separate computing proposal.

  6. Symbolic modeling of high energy beam optics

    CERN Document Server

    Autin, Bruno

    1999-01-01

    A classical problem of computational physics consists of finding the minimum of a chi /sup 2/ like function of many variables. Powerful optimization algorithms have been developed but do not guarantee convergence towards an absolute minimum. Analytical methods can improve the insight into a physical problem but calculations quickly exceed the power of a human brain. There comes the interest of optical design of high energy particle accelerators. The physics background is sketched and emphasis is put on the methodology. In practice, algebraic models may not be precise enough but they usually provide excellent initial conditions for a final numerical optimization. (4 refs).

  7. Siberian Snakes in high-energy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mane, S R [Convergent Computing Inc, PO Box 561, Shoreham, NY 11786 (United States); Shatunov, Yu M [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Yokoya, K [National Laboratory for High-Energy Physics (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2005-09-01

    We review modern techniques to accelerate spin-polarized beams to high energy and to preserve their polarization in storage rings. Crucial to the success of such work is the use of so-called Siberian Snakes. We explain these devices and the reason for their necessity. Closely related to Snakes is the concept of 'spin rotators'. The designs and merits of several types of Snakes and spin rotators are examined. Theoretical work with Snakes and spin rotators, and experimental results from several storage rings, are reviewed, including the so-called Snake resonances. (topical review)

  8. High-energy cosmic-ray acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, M; de Paula, W; Duarte Chavez, J A; Gago, A M; Hakobyan, H; Jez, P; Monroy Montañez, J A; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Padilla Cabal, F; Pino Rozas, M; Rodriguez Patarroyo, D J; Romeo, G L; Saldaña-Salazar , U J; Velasquez, M; von Steinkirch, M

    2010-01-01

    We briefly review the basics of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray acceleration. The Hillas criterion is introduced as a geometrical criterion that must be fulfilled by potential acceleration sites, and energy losses are taken into account in order to obtain a more realistic scenario. The different available acceleration mechanisms are presented, with special emphasis on Fermi shock acceleration and its prediction of a power-law cosmic-ray energy spectrum. We conclude that first-order Fermi acceleration, though not entirely satisfactory, is the most promising mechanism for explaining the ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray flux.

  9. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac{endash}Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at CERN; {bar p}{endash}p collisions at FNAL; accelerator physics at Fermilab; development work for the SDC detector at SSC; TOPAZ; D-zero physics; physics beyond the standard model; and the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (RWR)

  10. Reclustering of high energy physics data

    CERN Document Server

    Schaller, M

    1999-01-01

    The coming high energy physics experiments will store Petabytes of data into object databases. Analysis jobs will frequently traverse collections containing millions of stored objects. Clustering is one of the most effective means $9 to enhance the performance of these applications. The paper presents a reclustering algorithm for independent objects contained in multiple possibly overlapping collections on secondary storage. The algorithm decomposes the stored $9 objects into a number of independent chunks and then maps these chunks to a traveling salesman problem. Under a set of realistic assumptions, the number of disk seeks is reduced almost to the theoretical minimum. Experimental results $9 obtained from a prototype are included. (17 refs).

  11. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherfoord, John P. [University of Arizona; Johns, Kenneth A. [University of Arizona; Shupe, Michael A. [University of Arizona; Cheu, Elliott C. [University of Arizona; Varnes, Erich W. [University of Arizona; Dienes, Keith [University of Arizona; Su, Shufang [University of Arizona; Toussaint, William Doug [University of Arizona; Sarcevic, Ina [University of Arizona

    2013-07-29

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  12. Horndeski/Galileon in High Energy Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Latosh, B N

    2016-01-01

    Horndeski/Galileons may be considered as a proper generalization of General Relativity in high energy regime. Thus one may search for manifestation of Galileons interaction in collision experiments. In this paper we give arguments supporting this thesis. Galileon scalar field do not interact with matter via Standard Model interactions, we discuss a mechanism that allows Galileons to have influence on particle collisions. We give reasons to narrow the whole class of Horndeski/Galileons models to one particular term - John term from Fab Four subclass - for this particular issue. We were able to establish the constraint on the model coupling constant.

  13. Energy spectra of high energy atmospheric neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, K.; Minorikawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on high energy neutrinos ( or = 1 TeV), a new calculation of atmospheric neutrino intensities was carried out taking into account EMC effects observed in P-A collisions by accelerator, recent measurement of primary cosmic ray spectrum and results of cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio. Other features of the present calculation are (1) taking into account kinematics of three body decays of kaons and charm particles in diffusion equations and (2) taking into account energy dependence of kaon production.

  14. Weak interactions at high energies. [Lectures, review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J.

    1978-08-01

    Review lectures are presented on the phenomenological implications of the modern spontaneously broken gauge theories of the weak and electromagnetic interactions, and some observations are made about which high energy experiments probe what aspects of gauge theories. Basic quantum chromodynamics phenomenology is covered including momentum dependent effective quark distributions, the transverse momentum cutoff, search for gluons as sources of hadron jets, the status and prospects for the spectroscopy of fundamental fermions and how fermions may be used to probe aspects of the weak and electromagnetic gauge theory, studies of intermediate vector bosons, and miscellaneous possibilities suggested by gauge theories from the Higgs bosons to speculations about proton decay. 187 references. (JFP)

  15. Predictions of High Energy Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Eight predictions of high energy experimental results are presented. The predictions contain the + charge radius and results of two kinds of experiments using energetic pionic beams. In addition, predictions of the failure to find the following objects are presented: glueballs, pentaquarks, Strange Quark Matter, magnetic monopoles searched by their direct interaction with charges and the Higgs boson. The first seven predictions rely on the Regular Charge-Monopole Theory and the last one relies on mathematical inconsistencies of the Higgs Lagrangian density.

  16. Proceedings of the third specialists` meeting on high energy nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukahori, Tokio [ed.

    1998-11-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the Third Specialists` Meeting on High Energy Nuclear Data. The meeting was held on March 30-31, 1998, at the Tokai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute with the participation of forty-odd specialists, who were the evaluators, theorists, experimentalists and users of high energy nuclear data including the members of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The need of the high energy nuclear data up to a few Gev has been stressed in the meeting for many applications, such as spallation neutron sources for radioactive waste treatment, accelerator shielding design, medical isotope production, radiation therapy, the effects of space radiation on astronauts and their equipments, and the cosmic history of meteorites and other galactic substances. Since the Second Specialists` Meeting in 1995, such an evaluation activity in Japan has been grown and the results are accumulated. Foreign activities of high energy nuclear data evaluation are also being increased. According to the above situation, with the view point of reviewing and validating an evaluated high energy nuclear data file, project of high energy nuclear data file production, differential and integral experiments, status of evaluation and reviewing methods, processing and transport calculation methods, benchmark tests, international trends, etc. were discussed. The 16 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  17. Progress in ultra high energy neutrino experiments using radio techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jiali [Physics department, Kunming University, Kunming, 650214 (China); Tiedt, Douglas [Physics department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD, 57701-3995 (United States)

    2013-05-23

    Studying the source of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) can provide important clues on the understanding of UHE particle physics, astrophysics, and other extremely energetic phenomena in the universe. However, charged CR particles are deflected by magnetic fields and can not point back to the source. Furthermore, UHECR charged particles above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff (about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV) suffer severe energy loss due to the interaction with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR). Consequently almost all the information carried by CR particles about their origin is lost. Neutrinos, which are neutral particles and have extremely weak interactions with other materials can arrive at the earth without deflection and absorption. Therefore UHE neutrinos can be traced back to the place where they are produced. Due to their weak interaction and ultra high energies (thus extremely low flux) the detection of UHE neutrinos requires a large collecting area and massive amounts of material. Cherenkov detection at radio frequency, which has long attenuation lengths and can travel freely in natural dense medium (ice, rock and salt et al), can fulfill the detection requirement. Many UHE neutrino experiments are being performed by radio techniques using natural ice, lunar, and salt as detection mediums. These experiments have obtained much data about radio production, propagation and detection, and the upper limit of UHE neutrino flux.

  18. A Model for High Energy Scattering in Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, T; Banks, Tom; Fischler, Willy

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for high energy two body scattering in a quantum theory of gravity. The model is applicable for center of mass energies higher than the relevant Planck scale. At impact parameters smaller than the Schwarzchild radius appropriate to the center of mass energy and total charge of the initial state, the cross section is dominated by an inelastic process in which a single large black hole is formed. The black hole then decays by Hawking radiation. The elastic cross section is highly suppressed at these impact parameters because of the small phase space for thermal decay into a high energy two body state. For very large impact parameter the amplitude is dominated by eikonalized single graviton exchange. At intermediate impact parameters the scattering is more complicated, but since the Schwarzchild radius grows with energy, we speculate that a more sophisticated eikonal calculation which uses the nonlinear classical solutions of the field equations may provide a good approximation at all larger i...

  19. Fifth high-energy heavy-ion study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    This was the fifth of a continuing series of summer studies held at LBL to discuss high energy heavy ion collisions. Recently, a similar meeting has been held on alternate years at GSI (Darmstadt); and, in 1979, we held a meeting at LBL exclusively devoted to ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. Two new features distinguish this study from earlier meetings in the series. First, the energy range for discussion was broadened by including collisions from about 20 MeV/nucleon to the highest available in the cosmic radiation. The lower range, particularly below 100 MeV/nucleon, will be under intense study in the near future with machines such as the upgraded Bevalac, Michigan State University Superconducting Cyclotron, GANIL in France, and the SC at CERN. Recently, the high energy collision regime has been expanded by the successful operation of the CERN ISR with alpha particles. Second, in addition to an extensive program of invited talks, we decided for the first time to actively solicit contributions. Forty-seven individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  20. Single event effects in high-energy accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Alía, Rubén; Brugger, Markus; Danzeca, Salvatore; Cerutti, Francesco; de Carvalho Saraiva, Joao Pedro; Denz, Reiner; Ferrari, Alfredo; Foro, Lionel L.; Peronnard, Paul; Røed, Ketil; Secondo, Raffaello; Steckert, Jens; Thurel, Yves; Toccafondo, Iacocpo; Uznanski, Slawosz

    2017-03-01

    The radiation environment encountered at high-energy hadron accelerators strongly differs from the environment relevant for space applications. The mixed-field expected at modern accelerators is composed of charged and neutral hadrons (protons, pions, kaons and neutrons), photons, electrons, positrons and muons, ranging from very low (thermal) energies up to the TeV range. This complex field, which is extensively simulated by Monte Carlo codes (e.g. FLUKA) is due to beam losses in the experimental areas, distributed along the machine (e.g. collimation points) and deriving from the interaction with the residual gas inside the beam pipe. The resulting intensity, energy distribution and proportion of the different particles largely depends on the distance and angle with respect to the interaction point as well as the amount of installed shielding material. Electronics operating in the vicinity of the accelerator will therefore be subject to both cumulative damage from radiation (total ionizing dose, displacement damage) as well as single event effects which can seriously compromise the operation of the machine. This, combined with the extensive use of commercial-off-the-shelf components due to budget, performance and availability reasons, results in the need to carefully characterize the response of the devices and systems to representative radiation conditions.