WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-energy photons detected

  1. Detection of distant AGN by MAGIC: the transparency of the Universe to high-energy photons

    CERN Document Server

    Roncadelli, Marco; Mansutti, Oriana

    2009-01-01

    The recent detection of blazar 3C279 by MAGIC has confirmed previous indications by H.E.S.S. that the Universe is more transparent to very-high-energy gamma rays than previously thought. We show that this fact can be reconciled with standard blazar emission models provided photon oscillations into a veri light Axion-Like Particle occur in extragalactic magnetic fields. A quantitative estimate of this effect explains the observed spectrum of 3C279. Our prediction can be tested in the near future by the satellite-borne GLAST detector as well as by the ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescpoes H.E.S.S., MAGIC, CANGAROO III, VERITAS and by the Extensive Air Shower arrays ARGO-YBJ and MILAGRO.

  2. High energy photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  3. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dustin, E-mail: djanders@caltech.edu [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm{sup 3} lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm{sup 3} LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  4. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dustin [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Apreysan, Artur [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Bornheim, Adi [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Duarte, Javier [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Newman, Harvey [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Pena, Cristian [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Spiropulu, Maria [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Trevor, Jason [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Xie, Si [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Zhu, Ren-Yuan [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  5. HIGH ENERGY POLARIZATION OF BLAZARS: DETECTION PROSPECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, N. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pavlidou, V. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Fields, B. D. [Department of Astronomy and Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  6. High Energy Polarization of Blazars : Detection Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Nachiketa; Fields, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (wit...

  7. The Pierre Auger observatory's project of detecting photons and neutrinos at very high energies; L'observatoire Pierre Auger vers la detection de photons et neutrinos a ultra haute energies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertou, X

    2001-11-01

    Cosmic radiations of ultra high energy (RCUHE, beyond 10{sup 18} eV) are difficult to study because of their low flux on the earth surface: about 1 photon per year and per km{sup 2}. The observatory Pierre Auger proposes to study RCUHE by designing 2 sites of 3000 km{sup 2} (one in each hemisphere) allowing the observation of the shower initiated by cosmic radiation by using 4 fluorescence telescopes and a network of 1600 Cherenkov detectors. The identification of the primary particle is a very delicate point, the detection of neutrino or photon at these energies would bring valuable information for the understanding of potential sources of RCUHE. The first part of this work presents the project and its assets to perform its task. The second part is dedicated to the description of the Cherenkov detectors, of the trigger system, and of the centralized data acquisition system. The last part present the prototype installation that is under construction at Macargue in Argentina. (A.C.)

  8. High-energy diffraction microscopy at the advanced photon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lienert, U.; Li, S. F.; Hefferan, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    The status of the High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (HEDM) program at the 1-ID beam line of the Advanced Photon Source is reported. HEDM applies high energy synchrotron radiation for the grain and sub-grain scale structural and mechanical characterization of polycrystalline bulk materials in situ...

  9. ATLAS event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background.

  10. Direct photon production in high-energy nuclear collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peitzmann, T.

    2016-01-01

    Direct photons have always been considered a promising probe for the very early phases of high-energy nuclear collisions. Prompt photons reveal information about the initial state and its possible modifications in nuclei. In this context they should be one of the best probes for effects of gluon sat

  11. Detecting ultra high energy neutrinos with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mevius, M.; Buitink, S.; Falcke, H.; Horandel, J.; James, C. W.; McFadden, R.; Scholten, O.; Singh, K.; Stappers, B.; ter Veen, S.

    2012-01-01

    The NuMoon project aims to detect signals of Ultra High Energy (UHE) Cosmic Rays with radio telescopes on Earth using the Lunar Cherenkov technique at low frequencies (similar to 150 MHz). The advantage of using low frequencies is the much larger effective detecting volume, with as trade-off the cut

  12. Effects of Photon Absorption in High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, Joshua; Somanathan, Sidharth; Fries, Ranier

    2014-09-01

    Photons are an important probe of the hot and dense nuclear matter created in high-energy collisions of nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since the mean free path of photons is larger than the size of the fireball of nuclear matter, final state interactions of photons are usually neglected. In light of recent tension between theoretical calculations and data from RHIC and LHC, we study the effect of reabsorption of photons on elliptic flow v2 and on the nuclear modification factor RAA. We consider photons emitted in primary hard collisions and thermal photons from quark-gluon plasma and hot hadron gas. We use the jet-quenching code PPM to simulate the propagation of those photons in a fireball of quark-gluon plasma and hot hadron gas created by collisions of heavy nuclei. For the absorption cross-sections we consider three different approaches: (a) Compton and pair production processes calculated by us in a static approximation, (b) the photon damping rates calculated by Thoma (1995), and (c) absorption rates derived from a recent photon calculation by van Hees et al.

  13. Design and construction of a high-energy photon polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Sparks, N.; Moriya, K.; Tucker, R. J.; Lee, R. J.; Thorpe, B. N.; Hodges, T.; Barbosa, F. J.; Sandoval, N.; Jones, R. T.

    2017-09-01

    We report on the design and construction of a high-energy photon polarimeter for measuring the degree of polarization of a linearly-polarized photon beam. The photon polarimeter uses the process of pair production on an atomic electron (triplet production). The azimuthal distribution of scattered atomic electrons following triplet production yields information regarding the degree of linear polarization of the incident photon beam. The polarimeter, operated in conjunction with a pair spectrometer, uses a silicon strip detector to measure the recoil electron distribution resulting from triplet photoproduction in a beryllium target foil. The analyzing power ΣA for the device using a 75 μm beryllium converter foil is about 0.2, with a relative systematic uncertainty in ΣA of 1.5%.

  14. Fermi Large Area Telescope Detection of Two Very-High-Energy (E>100 GeV) Gamma-ray Photons from the z = 1.1 Blazar PKS 0426-380

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Y T; Inoue, Y; Stawarz, L; Ajello, M; Dermer, C D; Wood, D L; Chekhtman, A; Fukazawa, Y; Mizuno, T; Ohno, M; Paneque, D; Thompson, D J

    2013-01-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detection of two very-high-energy (VHE, E>100 GeV) gamma-ray photons from the directional vicinity of the distant (redshift, z = 1.1) blazar PKS 0426-380. The null hypothesis probability that both the 134 and 122 GeV photons originate from unrelated sources can be rejected at the 6.1 sigma confidence level. We therefore claim that at least one of the two VHE photons is securely associated with the blazar, making PKS 0426-380 the most distant VHE emitter known to date. The results are in agreement with the most recent Fermi-LAT constraints on the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) intensity, which imply a $z \\simeq 1$ horizon for $\\simeq$ 100 GeV photons. The LAT detection of the two VHE gamma-rays coincided roughly with flaring states of the source, although we did not find an exact correspondence between the VHE photon arrival times and the flux maxima at lower gamma-ray energies. Modeling the gamma-ray continuum of PKS 0426-380 with daily bins revealed a sign...

  15. Gluino pair production in high-energy photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, S.; Klasen, M. [II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761, Hamburg (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    We study the potential of high-energy photon colliders for the production of gluino pairs within the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). In this model, the process {gamma}{gamma}{yields}gg is mediated by quark/squark box diagrams with enhancements for up-type quarks/squarks from their larger charges and for third generation squarks from their large mass splittings, generated by the mixing of left- and right-handed states. Far above threshold and in scenarios with very heavy squarks, resolved photons can contribute significantly at tree level. Taking into account the laser photon backscattering spectrum, electron and laser beam polarization effects, and current mass exclusion limits, we find that gluino pair production in high-energy photon collisions should be visible over large regions of the MSSM parameter space, contrary to what has been found for e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. In addition, the cross section rises rather steeply, so that a gluino mass determination with a precision of a few GeV should be feasible for a wide range of post-LEP benchmark points. (orig.)

  16. Gluino pair production in high-energy photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, S.; Klasen, M. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2003-03-01

    We study the potential of high-energy photon colliders for the production of gluino pairs within the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). In this model, the process {gamma}{gamma} {yields} gg is mediated by quark/squark box diagrams with enhancements for up-type quarks/squarks from their larger charges and for third generation squarks from their large mass splittings, generated by the mixing of left- and right-handed states. Far above threshold and in scenarios with very heavy squarks, resolved photons can contribute significantly at tree level. Taking into account the laser photon backscattering spectrum, electron and laser beam polarization effects, and current mass exclusion limits, we find that gluino pair production in high-energy photon collisions should be visible over large regions of the MSSM parameter space, contrary to what has been found for e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. In addition, the cross section rises rather steeply, so that a gluino mass determination with a precision of a few GeV should be feasible for a wide range of post-LEP benchmark points. (orig.)

  17. The Gamma Ray Imaging Detector of the AGILE satellite: A novel application of silicon trackers for detection of astrophysics high-energy photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappoldi, Andrea; AGILE Collaboration

    2009-10-01

    AGILE is a project of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) Scientific Program dedicated to Gamma ray astrophysics. It is designed to be a very light and compact instrument, capable of photon detections and imaging in both the 30 MeV-50 GeV and 18-60 keV energy ranges, with a large field of view (FOV is ˜3 and ˜1 sr, respectively). The core of the instrument (launched on April 23, 2007 from the Indian Space Research Organization's launch facility) is represented by the Gamma Ray Imaging Detector (GRID), which is a silicon tracker developed by the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), with a spatial resolution of ˜40 μm. The GRID performances have been studied by means of a GEANT Montecarlo, and tested with a dedicated calibration campaign using the tagged gamma beam available at Beam Test Facility (BTF) of INFN Frascati Laboratory.

  18. Modelling polychromatic high energy photon beams by superposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, P E; Hoban, P W; Murray, D C; Round, W H

    1989-09-01

    A unified three dimensional superposition approach to dose calculations used in treatment planning of polychromatic high energy photon beams in radiotherapy is developed. The approach we have used involves computing the dose at all points in a medium by superposing the dose spread array (DSA) from the interaction of a photon at a point in the medium with an array of data representing the TERMA (photon fluence times the photon energy) at points in the beam. The polychromatic nature of the beam is accounted for by modelling the beam as having ten spectral components. A "polychromatic dose spread array" (PDSA) for an interaction from a beam with this spectrum was derived. The TERMA array is calculated from a weighted average of the TERMA arrays for the ten photon energies to give a "polychromatic TERMA array". Thus the method accounts for the effect of beam hardening of the TERMA. But it does not account for the effect of beam hardening on the PDSA since a single PDSA (usually for the spectrum at the surface of the medium) is used at all depths. However, by considering measured and calculated beam central axis data, this model is shown to be adequate for computing depth doses for beams in a homogeneous medium penetrating to extreme radiological depths. A computation time advantage is gained because only one superposition per beam is required.

  19. High--Energy Photon--Hadron Scattering in Holographic QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Nishio, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an in-depth look at hadron high energy scattering by using gravity dual descriptions of strongly coupled gauge theories. Just like deeply inelastic scattering (DIS) and deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) serve as clean experimental probes into non-perturbative internal structure of hadrons, elastic scattering amplitude of a hadron and a (virtual) "photon" in gravity dual can be exploited as a theoretical probe. Since the scattering amplitude at sufficiently high energy (small Bjorken x) is dominated by parton contributions (= Pomeron contributions) even in strong coupling regime, there is a chance to learn a lesson for generalized parton distribution (GPD) by using gravity dual models. We begin with refining derivation of Brower-Polchinski-Strassler-Tan (BPST) Pomeron kernel in gravity dual, paying particular attention to the role played by complex spin variable j. The BPST Pomeron on warped spacetime consists of a Kaluza-Klein tower of 4D Pomerons with non-linear trajectories, and...

  20. Development of twin Ge detector for high energy photon measurement and its performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigetome, Yoshiaki; Harada, Hideo [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-03-01

    Prototype twin HPGe detector composed of two large HPGe crystals was developed to obtain better detection efficiency ({epsilon}) and P/T ratio, which was required for high energy photon spectroscopy. In this work, the performances of the twin HPGe detector were evaluated by computer simulation employing EGS4 code. (author)

  1. Coherent scattering of high-energy photon in a medium

    CERN Document Server

    Baier, V N

    2001-01-01

    The coherent scattering of photon in the Coulomb field (the Delbr\\"uck scattering) is considered for the momentum transfer $\\Delta \\ll m$ in the frame of the quasiclassical operator method. In high-energy region this process occurs over rather long distance. The process amplitude is calculated taking into account the multiple scattering of particles of the intermediate electron-positron pair in a medium. The result is the suppression of the process. Limiting cases of weak and strong effects of the multiple scattering are analyzed. The approach used is the generalization of the method developed by authors for consideration of the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect.

  2. New constraints on hidden photons using very high energy gamma-rays from the Crab Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zechlin, Hannes-Sebastian; Horns, Dieter [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Redondo, Javier [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Extensions of the current standard model of particle physics, in particular those based on string theory, typically predict a new U(1) gauge symmetry in a hidden sector. The corresponding gauge boson, often called hidden photon, naturally interacts with the ordinary photon via gauge kinetic mixing, leading to photon - hidden photon oscillations. In this framework, one expects photon disappearance as a function of the mass of the hidden photon and the mixing angle, loosely constrained from theory. Several experiments have been carried out or are planned to provide constraints on the mass-mixing plane. In this contribution we derive new constraints on the hidden photon parameters, using very high energy {gamma}-rays detected from the Crab Nebula, whose broad-band spectral characteristics are well understood. The very high energy {gamma}-ray observations offer the possibility to provide bounds in a broad mass range at a previously unexplored energy and distance scale. Using existing data that were taken with the HEGRA, H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and Whipple Cherenkov telescopes, we discuss our results in the context of current constraints and consider the possibilities of using astrophysical data to search for hidden photon signatures.

  3. Radiosurgery with high energy photon beams: a comparison among techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podgorsak, E.B.; Pike, G.B.; Olivier, A.; Pla, M.; Souhami, L.

    1989-03-01

    The presently known radiosurgical techniques with high energy photon beams are based either on the commercially available Gamma unit utilizing 201 stationary cobalt beams or on isocentric linear accelerators. The techniques using linear accelerators are divided into the single plane rotation, the multiple non-coplanar arcs, and the dynamic rotation. A brief description of these techniques is given, and their physical characteristics, such as precision of dose delivery, dose fall-off outside the target volume, and isodose distributions are discussed. It is shown that the multiple non-coplanar arcs technique and the dynamic rotation give dose distributions similar to those of the Gamma unit, which makes these two linear accelerator based techniques attractive alternatives to radiosurgery with the Gamma unit.22 references.

  4. Influence of Heat-radiating on Multi-photon Compton Scattering High-energy Electron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; WANG Xin-min

    2007-01-01

    Using the model of the inverse Compton scattering between high-energy electrons and heat-radiation photons, the influence of heat-radiating photons on multi-photon Compton scattering high-energy electrons is studied . The results show that the energy loss, power loss, light resistance and light pressure of the high-energy electron formed by heat radiating are all proportional to the temperature T4 of the vacuum cavity of the electron,the Lorentz factor γ2 of the high-energy electrons, the scattering section of the electron and the number of photons acting at the same time with high-energy electrons. A good method for lessening the energy loss of the high-energy electron by using the one-photon Compton scattering between high-energy electrons and heat radiation photons is proposed.

  5. Radio Detection of Ultra High Energy Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, James J.

    2011-05-01

    Ultra high energy cosmic rays interact with the cosmic microwave background radiation, resulting in the production of energetic pions. These interactions result in energy loss by the incident cosmic ray leading to the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) feature in the cosmic ray spectrum at about 4×10^19 eV, and the decay of the charged pions produced in these interactions results in neutrinos known as Berezinskii-Zatsepin (BZ) neutrinos. These neutrinos interact only via the weak interaction, with negligible absorption over cosmic distances but interaction lengths in the Earth of a few hundred kilometers. When these neutrinos interact in a dense medium, the electromagnetic component of the resulting shower develops a negative charge excess due to Compton scattering of the electrons from the medium and depletion of positrons by in-flight annihilation. This macroscopic charge excess moves at nearly the speed of light, and its passage through a dielectric medium results in coherent Cherenkov radiation at radio wavelengths longer than the size of the radiating region. This process is known as the Askaryan mechanism, and has been observed in accelerator experiments. The radio pulse is impulsive, and can be detected over large volumes in materials with long radio attenuation lengths, most notably the cold ice in the Antarctic ice sheet. Upper limits on the neutrino flux obtained by the balloon-borne instrument ANITA are now approaching the expected flux, and prototype in-ice antenna arrays are now being deployed. Prospects for large detectors capable of detecting hundreds of these neutrinos will be discussed. This work is supported by NASA under grants NNX08AC17G and NNX11AC45G, by the NSF under grant PHY-0758082, and by the Ohio State Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (CCAPP).

  6. Experimental investigations of the neutron contamination in high-energy photon fields at medical linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunckhorst, Elin

    2009-02-26

    The scope of this thesis was to develop a device for the detection of the photoneutron dose inside the high-energy photon field. The photoneutron contamination of a Siemens PRIMUS linear accelerator was investigated in detail in its 15 MV photon mode. The experimental examinations were performed with three ionisation chambers (a tissue equivalent chamber, a magnesium chamber and a {sup 10}B-coated magnesium chamber) and two types of thermoluminescence detectors (enriched with {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li, respectively). The detectors have different sensitivities to photons and neutrons and their combination allows the dose separation in a mixed neutron/photon field. The application of the ionisation chamber system, as well as the present TLD system for photoneutron detection in high-energy photon beams is a new approach. The TLD neutron sensitivity was found to be too low for a measurement inside the open photon field and the further investigation focused on the ionisation chambers. The three ionisation chambers were calibrated at different photon and neutron sources and a the borated magnesium chamber showed a very high response to thermal neutrons. For a cross check of the calibration, the three chambers were also used for dose separation of a boron neutron capture therapy beam where the exact determination of the thermal neutron dose is essential. Very accurate results were achieved for the thermal neutron dose component. At the linear accelerator the chamber system was reduced to a paired chamber system utilising the two magnesium chambers, since the fast neutron component was to small to be separated. The neutron calibration of the three chambers could not be applied, instead a conversion of measured thermal neutron signal by the borated chamber to Monte Carlo simulated total neutron dose was performed. Measurements for open fields in solid water and liquid water were performed with the paired chamber system. In larger depths the neutron dose could be determined

  7. ATLAS proton-proton event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background. The photons are indicated, in the different projections and views, by the clusters of energy shown in yellow.

  8. Conversion of zero point energy into high-energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivlev, B. I. [Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Instituto de Fisica, Av. Manuel Nava No. 6, Zona Universitaria, 78290 San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico)

    2016-11-01

    An unusual phenomenon, observed in experiments is studied. X-ray laser bursts of keV energy are emitted from a metal where long-living states, resulting in population inversion, are totally unexpected. Anomalous electron-photon states are revealed to be formed inside the metal. These states are associated with narrow, 10{sup -11} cm, potential well created by the local reduction of zero point electromagnetic energy. In contrast to analogous van der Waals potential well, leading to attraction of two hydrogen atoms, the depth of the anomalous well is on the order of 1 MeV. The states in that well are long-living which results in population inversion and subsequent laser generation observed. The X-ray emission, occurring in transitions to lower levels, is due to the conversion of zero point electromagnetic energy. (Author)

  9. Microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation with associated extremely low photon flux densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, A.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation in extremely low flux density conditions. With wide deployment in mind, potential applications range from nuclear non-proliferation, to hospital radiation-safety. The daunting challenge is the low level of photon flux densities - emerging from a Scintillation Crystal (SC) on to a ~1 mm-square detector, which are a factor of 10000 or so lower than those acceptable to recently reported photonic chips (including `single-photon detection' chips), due to a combination of low Lux, small detector size, and short duration SC output pulses - on the order of 1 μs. These challenges are attempted to be overcome by the design of an innovative `System on a Chip' type microchip, with high detector sensitivity, and effective coupling from the SC to the photodetector. The microchip houses a tiny n+ diff p-epi photodiode (PD) as well as the associated analog amplification and other related circuitry, all fabricated in 0.5micron, 3-metal 2-poly CMOS technology. The amplification, together with pulse-shaping of the photocurrent-induced voltage signal, is achieved through a tandem of two capacitively coupled, double-cascode amplifiers. Included in the paper are theoretical estimates and experimental results.

  10. Discrimination of converted photons and neutral pions at high energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Hong; WANG Jian; WANG Jian; WANG Xian-You; WANG Zheng; XU Ming; XU Wei-Wei; YANG Min; YAN Qi; CHEN Guo-Ming; TAO Jun-Quan; BIAN Jian-Guo; FAN Jia-Wei; LIANG Song; MENG Xiang-Wei; SHEN Yu-Qiao; TANG Zhi-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    In the LHC experiment,the H → γγ channel provides a clean final state with an effective mass peak that is reconstructed with great precision,despite the small branching ratio.As a consequence,the H → γγ channel is one of the most promising channels for the Higgs discovery in the very low mass region.In order to increase the sensitivity of the Higgs search,background rejection rate is very important,so γ/π0discrimination is one of the key points in the analysis.At least 40% of photons will convert with the experience of ATLAS and CMS.We constructed electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) in GEANT4 simulation,using 6variables which have different shapes between converted γ and π0,with the TMVA (Toolkit for Multivariate Data Analysis) to do the separation.With this method we can get 30% to 60% π0 rejection efficiency when keeping 90% converted γ efficiency,in the region of transverse momentum 15 GeV to 75 GeV,not only in MC sumulation but also in real data.

  11. Proposal to Build an Electron-Photon Facility at NAL and to Measure Photon Scattering at High Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorfan, D.E.; Flatte, S.M.; Heusch, C.A.; Luxton, G.; del Papa, C.; Seiden, A.

    1971-07-18

    a photon beam becoming available at NAL at an early date. We propose to participate actively, as we have done in the past, in the design and implementation of the electron-photon facility, and to perform at the earliest possible date an experiment which will yield information on three vitally important processes in photon scattering: (1) measurement of the total hadronic photon cross-section on nucleons and nuclei; (2) elastic photon scattering (proton compton effect); (3) inelastic photon scattering; as a byproduct, we will have data on yields of {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}{sup 0}, X{sup 0}, {omega}{sup 0}, ... through their 2{gamma} or 3{gamma} decay modes. The set of experiments proposed here, together with experiments proposed by other groups, will tell us not only about the structure of the hadrons, but about the behavior of the photon at high energies. It has the virtue of being accessible through one basic, well-integrated set of experimental equipment, as detailed. The facility as well as the detection apparatus is being developed in consultation with the MIT - Canada collaboration. Equipment may be shared, and some of the running may be able to proceed compatibly. The success of this program will depend crucially on the design of appropriate halo-free beam lines; and on the early design and testing of optimal shower detection equipment - for both energy measurement and localization (or trajectory reconstruction). Our group has considerable experience in both these areas. Shower detectors are being built in Santa Cruz and can be conveniently tested at nearby SLAC. Also, a beam designed by our group, which we feel is flexible, economical, and viable, is included in this proposal. The essential feature of our proposal is this: Our shower detection equipment can be tested and calibrated in available SLAC beams before the first turn-on of the NAL photon beam, and will be ready at that time. While information on the longitudinal and lateral shower spread can be

  12. Polarization and dissociation of a high energy photon-excited state in conjugated polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-xue, E-mail: sps_lixx@ujn.edu.cn

    2015-02-20

    We use the tight-binding Su–Schrieffer–Heeger model for the one-dimensional conjugated polymers to explore the static polarization behavior of a high energy photon-excited state under the electric field. An obvious reverse polarization is obtained although the electric field is weak. With the increase of field strength, the degree of polarization increases first and then decreases. When the electric field is strong enough, the excited state is dissociated into the polaron pair. In addition, the effects of electron–electron interaction and interchain coupling are also discussed. The results indicate that the electron–electron interaction could weaken the reverse polarization of the high energy photon-excited state, which tends to be dissociated into a high-energy exciton and a pair of solitons with the including of interchain coupling. - Highlights: • We explore the polarization of a high energy photon-excited state in polymers. • An obvious reverse polarization under the moderate electric field is obtained. • High energy photon-excited state is dissociated into polaron pair at strong field. • Increasing electron–electron interaction will weaken the reverse polarization. • Interchain coupling induces dissociation into high-energy exciton and solitons.

  13. Electromagnetic cascade in high energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of high energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when 3D effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and...

  14. High Energy Telescope With Neutron Detection Capabilities (HETn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, A.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Böhm, E.; Böttcher, s.; Connell, J. J.; Dröge, W.; Hassler, D. M.; Heber, B.; Lopate, C.; McKibben, R. B.; Steigies, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    The High-Energy Telescope with neutron detection capabilities (HETn) for the Solar Orbiter will measure and resolve energetic charged particles, in particular electrons, proton, and heavy ions up to Fe including selected isotopes up to energies equivalen to the penetration depth of 100 MeV protons. The full active anti-coincidence encloses detectors sensitive to 1-30 MeV neutrons and 0.5-5 MeV X-/gamma-rays. The sensor consists of the angle-detecting inclined sensors (ADIS) solid-state detector detector telescope utilizing a shared calorimeter for total energy and X-/gamma-ray measurement. A separate plastic detector provides sensitivity to neutrons via the recoil process. HETn will open a new window on solar eruptive events with its neutron detection capability and allows determination of high-energy close to the Sun. Timing and spectral information on neutral particles (neutrons and X-/gamma rays ), on relativistic electrons and high-energy heavy ions will provide new insights into the processes which accelerate particles to high energies at the sun and into transport processes between the source and the spacecraft in the near-Sun environment.

  15. Irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ice with high-energy ultraviolet photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuevo, Michel; Chen, Yu-Jung; Hu, Wei-Jie; Qiu, Jun-Ming; Wu, Shang-Ruei; Fung, Hok-Sum; Chu, Ching-Chi; Yih, Tai-Sone; Ip, Wing-Huen; Wu, C-Y Robert

    2014-02-01

    The detection of nucleobases, the informational subunits of DNA and RNA, in several meteorites suggests that these compounds of biological interest were formed via astrophysical, abiotic processes. This hypothesis is in agreement with recent laboratory studies of irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O-rich ices with vacuum UV photons emitted by an H2-discharge lamp in the 6.9-11.3 eV (110-180 nm) range at low temperature, shown to lead to the abiotic formation of several compounds including the nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine. In this work, we irradiated H2O:pyrimidine ice mixtures under astrophysically relevant conditions (14 K, ≤10(-9) torr) with high-energy UV photons provided by a synchrotron source in three different ranges: the 0(th) order light (4.1-49.6 eV, 25-300 nm), the He i line (21.2 eV, 58.4 nm), and the He ii line (40.8 eV, 30.4 nm). The photodestruction of pyrimidine was monitored with IR spectroscopy, and the samples recovered at room temperature were analyzed with liquid and gas chromatographies. Uracil and its precursor 4(3H)-pyrimidone were found in all samples, with absolute and relative abundances varying significantly from one sample to another. These results support a scenario in which compounds of biological interest can be formed and survive in environments subjected to high-energy UV radiation fields.

  16. Characterizing Invisible Electroweak Particles through Single-Photon Processes at High Energy $e^+e^-$ Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Seong Youl; Kalinowski, Jan; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Wang, Xing

    2015-01-01

    We explore the scenarios where the only accessible new states at the electroweak scale consist of a pair of color-singlet electroweak particles, whose masses are degenerate at the tree level and split only by electroweak symmetry breaking at the loop level. For the sake of illustration, we consider a supersymmetric model and study the following three representative cases with the lower-lying states as (a) two spin-1/2 Higgsino SU(2)$_L$ doublets, (b) a spin-1/2 wino SU(2)$_L$ triplet and (c) a spin-0 left-handed slepton SU(2)$_L$ doublet. Due to the mass-degeneracy, those lower-lying electroweak states are difficult to observe at the LHC and rather challenging to detect at the $e^+ e^-$ collider as well. We exploit the pair production in association with a hard photon radiation in high energy $e^+ e^-$ collisions. If kinematically accessible, such single-photon processes at $e^+e^-$ colliders with polarized beams enable us to characterize each scenario by measuring the energy and scattering angle of the assoc...

  17. Electromagnetic cascade in high-energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of high-energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high-energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when three-dimensional effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high-energy e-beam interacting with a counterstreaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  18. Detection of high-energy delayed gammas for nuclear waste packages characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrel, F., E-mail: frederick.carrel@cea.fr [CEA, LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Agelou, M.; Gmar, M.; Laine, F. [CEA, LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)

    2011-10-01

    Methods based on photon activation analysis (PAA) have been developed by CEA LIST for several years, in order to assay actinides inside nuclear waste packages. These techniques were primarily based on the detection of delayed neutrons emitted by fission products. To overcome some limitations related to neutrons, CEA LIST has worked on the detection of high-energy delayed gammas (E>3 MeV), which are simultaneously emitted by fission products along with delayed neutrons. Since the emission yield is more important for high-energy delayed gammas than delayed neutrons and because they are less sensitive to hydrogenous material, high-energy delayed gammas are a solution of interest in order to improve the accuracy of these techniques. In this article, we present new experimental results demonstrating the feasibility of high-energy delayed gamma detection for nuclear waste packages characterization. Experiments have been carried out in the PAA facility called SAPHIR, which is located in CEA Saclay. The most important part of our work has been carried out on an 870 l mock-up package. Some experimental techniques, initially based on delayed neutron detection (altitude scan, photofission tomography), have been successfully applied for the first time using high-energy delayed gamma detection.

  19. Photon and dilepton production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Takao Sakaguchi

    2015-05-01

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, obtained particularly at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  20. LHC collision event at CMS showing two high energy photons (CMS Higgs search)

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    11sec animation of a Higgs->GammaGamma candidate in CMS. Real CMS proton-proton collision events in which two high energy photons (dashed orange lines and towers) are observed. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of a Higgs boson but is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes.

  1. High-energy photon collisions at the LHC - dream or reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier / CNRS-IN2P3 / INPG, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France)

    2008-08-15

    We discuss the potential of high-energy photon collisions at the LHC for improving our understanding of QCD and studying the physics beyond the Standard Model. After reviewing briefly the legacy of past photoproduction experiments at LEP and HERA, we examine the gold-plated channels proposed for a photon collider at the ILC for their potential in a hadron collider environment. We stress that initial-state photon interactions have indeed been observed at RHIC and at the Tevatron. Three promising channels at the LHC are then presented in some detail: vector-meson production, measurements of possibly anomalous electroweak gauge-boson or top-quark couplings, and slepton production.

  2. High-energy photon collisions at the LHC dream or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, M.

    2008-08-01

    We discuss the potential of high-energy photon collisions at the LHC for improving our understanding of QCD and studying the physics beyond the Standard Model. After reviewing briefly the legacy of past photoproduction experiments at LEP and HERA, we examine the gold-plated channels proposed for a photon collider at the ILC for their potential in a hadron collider environment. We stress that initial-state photon interactions have indeed been observed at RHIC and at the Tevatron. Three promising channels at the LHC are then presented in some detail: vector-meson production, measurements of possibly anomalous electroweak gauge-boson or top-quark couplings, and slepton production.

  3. Propagation of extragalactic photons at ultra-high energy with the EleCa code

    CERN Document Server

    Settimo, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-high energy (UHE) photons play an important role as an independent probe of the photo-pion production mechanism by UHE cosmic rays. Their observation, or non-observation, may constrain astrophysical scenarios for the origin of UHECRs and help to understand the nature of the flux suppression observed by several experiments at energies above $10^{19.5}$ eV. Whereas the interaction length of UHE photons above $10^{17}$ eV ranges from a few hundred kpc up to tenths of Mpc, photons can interact with the extragalactic background radiation initiating the development of electromagnetic cascades which affect the fluxes of photons observed at Earth. The interpretation of the current experimental results rely on the simulations of the UHE photon propagation. In this paper, we present the novel Monte Carlo code EleCa to simulate the $Ele$ctromagnetic $Ca$scading initiated by high-energy photons and electrons. We provide an estimation of the surviving probability for photons inducing electromagnetic cascades as a fu...

  4. On production $e^{+}+e^{-}$-pairs by a high energy photon in collision with photons of a laser wave

    CERN Document Server

    Galynsky, M V; Galynskii, Mikhail; Sikach, Sergei

    1998-01-01

    We calculate the number of $e^+ e^-$-pairs produced by a Compton high energy photon in turn formed in the process $e + n \\gamma_0 -> e + \\gamma$ at simultaneous collision with several photons $\\gamma_0$ of the same laser beam initial electron beam and laser photons are helicity is considered. It is shown that taking into account nonlinear effects in the Compton backscattering leads to decreasing the threshold of production of $e^+ e^-$-pairs and increasing their number. The consideration is based on the direct calculation of matrix elements in the formalism of diagonal spin basis.

  5. Stringy Space-Time Foam and High-Energy Cosmic Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nick E

    2011-01-01

    In this review, I discuss briefly stringent tests of Lorentz-violating quantum space-time foam models inspired from String/Brane theories, provided by studies of high energy Photons from intense celestial sources, such as Active Galactic Nuclei or Gamma Ray Bursts. The theoretical models predict modifications to the radiation dispersion relations, which are quadratically suppressed by the string mass scale, and time delays in the arrival times of photons (assumed to be emitted more or less simultaneously from the source), which are proportional to the photon energy, so that the more energetic photons arrive later. Although the astrophysics at the source of these energetic photons is still not understood, and such non simultaneous arrivals, that have been observed recently, might well be due to non simultaneous emission as a result of conventional physics effects, nevertheless, rather surprisingly, the observed time delays can also fit excellently the stringy space-time foam scenarios, provided the space-time ...

  6. Automatic Quenching of High Energy gamma-ray Sources by Synchrotron Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, Lukasz; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Kirk, John; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.

    2007-02-02

    Here we investigate evolution of a magnetized system, in which continuously produced high energy emission undergoes annihilation on a soft photon field, such that the synchrotron radiation of the created electron-positron pairs increases number density of the soft photons. This situation is important in high energy astrophysics, because, for an extremely wide range of magnetic field strengths (nano to mega Gauss), it involves {gamma}-ray photons with energies between 0.3GeV and 30TeV. We derive and analyze the conditions for which the system is unstable to runaway production of soft photons and ultrarelativistic electrons, and for which it can reach a steady state with an optical depth to photon-photon annihilation larger than unity, as well those for which efficient pair loading of the emitting volume takes place. We also discuss the application of our analysis to a realistic situation involving astrophysical sources of a broad-band {gamma}-ray emission and briefly consider the particular case of sources close to active supermassive black holes.

  7. On the high-energy spectral component of TGFs detected by AGILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Galli, Marcello; Ursi, Alessandro; Tavani, Marco; Labanti, Claudio; Fuschino, Fabio; Østgaard, Nikolai; Cummer, Steven; Lyu, Fanchao

    2017-04-01

    We follow up on the latest results presented on TGFs with high-energy counts (>30 MeV) detected by the MCAL instrument onboard the AGILE satellite. The motivation is to provide a reliable assessment of the high-energy spectral component of TGFs, when energy calibration and instrumental effects such as dead time and pile-up are properly accounted for. We consider a dataset of 85 confirmed TGFs with simultaneous WWLLN association detected in the period March - June 2015, providing a sample of events unbiased by any additional selection criteria. Twenty events in this sample include at least one count with reconstructed energy larger than 30 MeV, with few photons with energy apparently above 100 MeV. We show that most of the counts with measured energy exceeding 40 MeV are compatible with pile-up of lower energy photons. However, the topology of the interactions in the detector active volume suggests that a likely scenario for the interpretation of these counts is the simultaneous interaction (within few microseconds) of a small number of photons with energies in the several tens-of-MeV range, rather than a large number of MeV photons.

  8. Prompt photon hadroproduction at high energies in the k{sub T}-factorization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatov, A V; Zotov, N P [D V Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119 992 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-02-15

    We consider the prompt photon production at high energy hadron colliders in the framework of the k{sub T}-factorization approach. The unintegrated quark and gluon distributions in a proton are determined using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. The conservative error analysis is performed. We investigate both inclusive prompt photon and prompt photon and associated muon production rates. In a standard model such events occur mainly due to the Compton scattering process where the final heavy (charm or bottom) quark produces a muon. The theoretical results are compared with recent experimental data taken by the D and CDF collaborations at Fermilab Tevatron. Our analysis also covers the azimuthal correlations between the produced prompt photon and muon which can provide an important information about non-collinear parton evolution in a proton. Finally, we extrapolate the theoretical predictions to CERN LHC energies.

  9. Prompt photon hadroproduction at high energies in the k{sub T}-factorization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatov, A.V.; Zotov, N.P. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    2005-09-01

    We consider the prompt photon production at high energy hadron colliders in the framework of k{sub T}-factorization approach. The unintegrated quark and gluon distributions in a proton are determined using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. The conservative error analysis is performed. We investigate both inclusive prompt photon and prompt photon and associated muon production rates. In standard model such events come mainly due to Compton scattering process where the final heavy (charm or bottom) quark produces a muon. The theoretical results are compared with recent experimental data taken by the DOe and CDF collaborations at Fermilab Tevatron. Our analysis also covers the azimuthal correlations between produced prompt photon and muon which can provide an important information about non-collinear parton evolution in a proton. Finally, we extrapolate the theoretical predictions to CERN LHC energies. (orig.)

  10. Prompt photon hadroproduction at high energies in the k_T-factorization approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lipatov, A V

    2005-01-01

    We consider the prompt photon production at high energy hadron colliders in the framework of k_T-factorization approach. The unintegrated quark and gluon distributions in a proton are determined using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. The conservative error analisys is performed. We investigate both inclusive prompt photon and prompt photon and associated muon production rates. In Standard Model such events come mainly due to Compton scattering process where the final heavy (charm or bottom) quark produces a muon. The theoretical results are compared with recent experimental data taken by the D0 and CDF collaborations at Fermilab Tevatron. Our analysis also covers the azimuthal correlations between produced prompt photon and muon which can provide an important information about non-collinear parton evolution in a proton. Finally, we extrapolate the theoretical predictions to CERN LHC energies.

  11. Simulating three-dimensional nonthermal high-energy photon emission in colliding-wind binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O., E-mail: klaus.reitberger@uibk.ac.at [Institut für Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut für Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    Massive stars in binary systems have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ rays. The emission is principally thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and accelerate relativistic particles which subsequently emit γ rays. On the basis of a three-dimensional distribution function of high-energy particles in the wind collision region—as obtained by a numerical hydrodynamics and particle transport model—we present the computation of the three-dimensional nonthermal photon emission for a given line of sight. Anisotropic inverse Compton emission is modeled using the target radiation field of both stars. Photons from relativistic bremsstrahlung and neutral pion decay are computed on the basis of local wind plasma densities. We also consider photon-photon opacity effects due to the dense radiation fields of the stars. Results are shown for different stellar separations of a given binary system comprising of a B star and a Wolf-Rayet star. The influence of orbital orientation with respect to the line of sight is also studied by using different orbital viewing angles. For the chosen electron-proton injection ratio of 10{sup –2}, we present the ensuing photon emission in terms of two-dimensional projections maps, spectral energy distributions, and integrated photon flux values in various energy bands. Here, we find a transition from hadron-dominated to lepton-dominated high-energy emission with increasing stellar separations. In addition, we confirm findings from previous analytic modeling that the spectral energy distribution varies significantly with orbital orientation.

  12. Optimized undulator to generate low energy photons from medium to high energy accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Chiu, Mau-Sen; Luo, Hao-Wen; Yang, Chin-Kang; Huang, Jui-Che; Jan, Jyh-Chyuan; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2017-07-01

    While emitting low energy photons from a medium or high energy storage ring, the on-axis heat load on the beam line optics can become a critical issue. In addition, the heat load in the bending magnet chamber, especially in the vertical and circular polarization mode of operation may cause some concern. In this work, we compare the heat loads for the APPLE-II and the Knot-APPLE, both optimized to emit 10 eV photons from the 3 GeV TPS. Under this constraint the heat load analysis, synchrotron radiation performance and features in various polarization modes are presented. Additional consideration is given to beam dynamics effect.

  13. The penetration, diffusion and energy deposition of high-energy photon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗正明; 勾成俊; WolframLaub

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new theory for calculating the transport of high-energy photons and their secondary charged particles. We call this new algorithm characteristic line method, which is completely analytic. Using this new method we cannot only accurately calculate the transport behaviour of energetic photons, but also precisely describes the transport behaviour and energy deposition of secondary electrons, photoelectrons, Compton recoil electrons and positron-electron pairs. Its calculation efficiency is much higher than that of the Monte Carlo method. The theory can be directly applied to layered media situation and obtain a pencil-beam-modelled solution. Therefore, it may be applied to clinical applications for radiation therapy.

  14. The penetration, diffusion and energy deposition of high-energy photon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zheng-Ming(罗正明); Gou Cheng-Jun(勾成俊); Wolfram Laub

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new theory for calculating the transport of high-energy photons and their secondary chargedparticles. We call this new algorithm characteristic line method, which is completely analytic. Using this new method wecannot only accurately calculate the transport behaviour of energetic photons, but also precisely describes the transportbehaviour and energy deposition of secondary electrons, photoelectrons, Compton recoil electrons and positron-electronpairs. Its calculation efficiency is much higher than that of the Monte Carlo method. The theory can be directlyapplied to layered media situation and obtain a pencil-beam-modelled solution. Therefore, it may be applied to clinicalapplications for radiation therapy.

  15. Radio Detection of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Falcke, Heino

    2008-01-01

    The radio technique for the detection of cosmic particles has seen a major revival in recent years. New and planned experiments in the lab and the field, such as GLUE, Anita, LUNASKA, Codalema, LOPES as well as sophisticated Monte Carlo experiments have produced a wealth of new information and I review here briefly some of the main results with the main focus on air showers. Radio emission of ultra-high energy cosmic particles offers a number of interesting advantages. Since radio waves suffer no attenuation, radio measurements allow the detection of very distant or highly inclined showers, can be used day and night, and provide a bolometric measure of the leptonic shower component. The LOPES experiment has detected the radio emission from cosmic rays, confirmed the geosynchrotron effect for extensive air showers, and provided a good calibration fomula to convert the radio signal into primary particle energy. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that also the shower maximum and the particle composition c...

  16. Dose conversion coefficients for high-energy photons, electrons, neutrons and protons

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y; Sato, O; Tanaka, S I; Tsuda, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, N

    2003-01-01

    In the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 Recommendations, radiation weighting factors were introduced in the place of quality factors, the tissue weighting factors were revised, and effective doses and equivalent doses of each tissues and organs were defined as the protection quantities. Dose conversion coefficients for photons, electrons and neutrons based on new ICRP recommendations were cited in the ICRP Publication 74, but the energy ranges of theses data were limited and there are no data for high energy radiations produced in accelerator facilities. For the purpose of designing the high intensity proton accelerator facilities at JAERI, the dose evaluation code system of high energy radiations based on the HERMES code was developed and the dose conversion coefficients of effective dose were evaluated for photons, neutrons and protons up to 10 GeV, and electrons up to 100 GeV. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalent were also evaluated using quality fact...

  17. Residual stress measurement with high energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winholtz, R. A.; Haeffner, D. R.; Green, R.E.L.; Varma, R.; Hammond, D.

    2000-03-02

    Preliminary measurements with high energy x-rays from the SRI CAT 1-ID beam line at the Advanced Photon show great promise for the measurement of stress and strain using diffraction. Comparisons are made with neutron measurements. Measurements of strains in a 2 mm thick 304 stainless steel weld show that excellent strain and spatial resolutions are possible. With 200 {micro}m slits, strain resolutions of 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} were achieved.

  18. Search for ultra high energy primary photons at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colalillo Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pierre Auger Observatory, located in Argentina, provides an unprecedented integrated aperture in the search for primary photons with energy above 1017 eV over a large portion of the southern sky. Such photons can be detected in principle via the air showers they initiate at such energies, using the complement of Auger Observatory detectors. We discuss the results obtained in diffuse and directional searches for primary photons in the EeV energy range.

  19. Search for ultra high energy primary photons at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colalillo, Roberta

    2016-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located in Argentina, provides an unprecedented integrated aperture in the search for primary photons with energy above 1017 eV over a large portion of the southern sky. Such photons can be detected in principle via the air showers they initiate at such energies, using the complement of Auger Observatory detectors. We discuss the results obtained in diffuse and directional searches for primary photons in the EeV energy range.

  20. High-energy photon collisions at the LHC - dream or reality?

    CERN Document Server

    Klasen, M

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the potential of high-energy photon collisions at the LHC for improving our understanding of QCD and studying the physics beyond the Standard Model. After reviewing briefly the legacy of past photoproduction experiments at LEP and HERA, we examine the gold-plated channels proposed for a photon collider at the ILC for their potential in a hadron collider environment. We stress that initial-state photon interactions have indeed been observed at RHIC and at the Tevatron. Three promising channels at the LHC are then presented in some detail: exclusive vector-meson production, measurements of possibly anomalous electroweak gauge-boson or top-quark couplings, and slepton production.

  1. Detection of artifacts from high energy bursts in neonatal EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sourya; Biswas, Arunava; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Majumdar, Arun Kumar; Majumdar, Bandana; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Detection of non-cerebral activities or artifacts, intermixed within the background EEG, is essential to discard them from subsequent pattern analysis. The problem is much harder in neonatal EEG, where the background EEG contains spikes, waves, and rapid fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. Existing artifact detection methods are mostly limited to detect only a subset of artifacts such as ocular, muscle or power line artifacts. Few methods integrate different modules, each for detection of one specific category of artifact. Furthermore, most of the reference approaches are implemented and tested on adult EEG recordings. Direct application of those methods on neonatal EEG causes performance deterioration, due to greater pattern variation and inherent complexity. A method for detection of a wide range of artifact categories in neonatal EEG is thus required. At the same time, the method should be specific enough to preserve the background EEG information. The current study describes a feature based classification approach to detect both repetitive (generated from ECG, EMG, pulse, respiration, etc.) and transient (generated from eye blinking, eye movement, patient movement, etc.) artifacts. It focuses on artifact detection within high energy burst patterns, instead of detecting artifacts within the complete background EEG with wide pattern variation. The objective is to find true burst patterns, which can later be used to identify the Burst-Suppression (BS) pattern, which is commonly observed during newborn seizure. Such selective artifact detection is proven to be more sensitive to artifacts and specific to bursts, compared to the existing artifact detection approaches applied on the complete background EEG. Several time domain, frequency domain, statistical features, and features generated by wavelet decomposition are analyzed to model the proposed bi-classification between burst and artifact segments. A feature selection method is also applied to select the

  2. Absorbed Dose and Collision Kerma Relationship for High-Energy Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibata, Claudio Hissao

    Historically, exposure has been used as an important quantity to specify X- or (gamma)- ray beams. For any photon beam the energy fluence is proportional to the exposure. Exposure can be calculated and/or measured if the spectrum of the beam is known and charged particle equilibrium (CPE) exists. For low energy photons (up to approximately 1 MeV), due to the existence of CPE, absorbed dose (D) is equal to the collision kerma (K(,c)). For megavoltage photons this equality is lost due to CPE failure, which also restricts the measurement of exposure. It is possible, though, to find a relationship between the absorbed dose and collision kerma when transient charged particle equilibrium (TCPE) exists. This basic idea was originally proposed by Roesch in 1958 and its refinement has been discussed by Attix in 1979 and 1983. The modified Roesch's formula which enables us to measure exposure even for high-energy photons is given by D = (beta) K(,c) (TURNEQ) K(,c) (1 + (mu)' ) where (mu)' is the effective linear attenuation coefficient and is the mean distance the secondary electrons carry kinetic energy in the direction of the photon beam while depositing it as absorbed dose. The symbol (beta) is the quotient of the absorbed dose and the collision kerma. The importance of Roesch's formula has been recognized and used implicitly in the recent dosimetry protocol of the AAPM (Task Group 21). However, the value used in the protocol is based on theoretical calculations which do not include photon scattering. As a result of the present effort the parameters (mu)' and have been determined experimentally, for the first time. The dependence of (beta) on several factors has been studied and (beta) has been obtained including the effects of scattering. Calculations were also performed for several photon energies and materials, using the Roesch method, which does not include photon scattering effects. Comparisons of measured and calculated values of show reasonable agreement.

  3. Search for ultra-high energy photons with AMIGA muon counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Nicolas Martin [Instituto de Tecnologias en Deteccion y Astroparticulas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie. (Germany); Collaboration: Pierre-Auger-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The study of the composition of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CR) is one of the topical problems of astroparticle physics. The discovery of UHE photons, i.e. photons with energies around 1 EeV, in primary cosmic rays could be of particular interest for the field of astroparticle physics, and also for fundamental physics, since they are tracers of the highest-energy processes in the Universe. For the search for UHE photons at the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), several parameters have been proposed to distinguish between primary hadrons and photons. One of the most promising approaches to search for primary gamma rays is the study of the muon component in extensive air showers (EAS) produced in the interaction between the CR and the nuclei in the atmosphere. The number of muons in showers induced by gamma primaries is an order of magnitude lower than the hadronic primaries counterpart. The AMIGA extension of the PAO, consisting of an array of buried scintillators counters, allows the study of the muons produced during the EAS development. In this talk, the sensitivity of the muon counters to photon-initiated EAS and the possible discrimination procedures are discussed using dedicated EAS simulations with software package CORSIKA, including the detector response using the Offline package developed by the Pierre Auger Collaboration.

  4. Thin film detection of High Energy Materials: Optical Pumping Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Barthwal, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    We present our work on High Energy Material detection based on thin film of Lithium using the phenomenon of Optical Pumping. The Li atoms present in the thin film are optically pumped to one of the ground hyperfine energy levels so that they can no more absorb light from the resonant light source. Now in presence of a RF signal, which quantifies the ambient magnetic field, this polarized atomic system is again randomized thus making it reabsorb the resonant light. This gives a quantified measurement of the magnetic field surrounding the thin film detector. This is then mapped to the presence of magnetic HEM and hence the HEM are detected. Our approach in this regard starts with verifying the stability of Lithium atoms in various solvents so as to get a suitable liquid medium to form a thin film. In this regard, various UV-visible characterization spectra are presented to finally approach a stable system for the detection. We have worked on around 10 polar and non- polar solvents to see the stability criteria....

  5. In-phantom neutron dose distribution for bladder cancer cases treated with high-energy photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, N. E.; Attalla, E. M.; Ammar, H.; Khalil, W.

    2011-06-01

    This work presents an estimation of the neutron dose distribution for common bladder cancer cases treated with high-energy photons of 15 MV therapy accelerators. Neutron doses were measured in an Alderson phantom, using TLD 700 and 600 thermoluminescence dosimeters, resembling bladder cancer cases treated with high-energy photons from 15 MV LINAC and having a treatment plan using the four-field pelvic box technique. Thermal neutron dose distribution in the target area and the surrounding tissue was estimated. The sensitivity of all detectors for both gamma and neutrons was estimated and used for correction of the TL reading. TLD detectors were irradiated with a Co60 gamma standard source and thermal neutrons at the irradiation facility of the National Institute for Standards (NIS). The TL to dose conversion factor was estimated in terms of both Co60 neutron equivalent dose and thermal neutron dose. The dose distribution of photo-neutrons throughout each target was estimated and presented in three-dimensional charts and isodose curves. The distribution was found to be non-isotropic through the target. It varied from a minimum of 0.23 mSv/h to a maximum of 2.07 mSv/h at 6 cm off-axis. The mean neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.63 mSv/h, which agrees with other published literature. The estimated average neutron equivalent to the bladder per administered therapeutic dose was found to be 0.39 mSv Gy-1, which is also in good agreement with published literature. As a consequence of a complete therapeutic treatment of 50 Gy high-energy photons at 15 MV, the total thermal neutron equivalent dose to the abdomen was found to be about 0.012 Sv.

  6. Associated photon and heavy quark production at high energy within k_T-factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Zotov, N P; Malyshev, M A

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the k_T-factorization approach, the production of prompt photons in association with a heavy (charm or beauty) quarks at high energies is studied. The consideration is based on the O(\\alpha \\alpha_s^2) off-shell amplitudes of gluon-gluon fusion and quark-(anti)quark interaction subprocesses. The unintegrated parton densities in a proton are determined using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. Our numerical predictions are compared with the D0 and CDF experimental data. Also we extend our results to LHC energies.

  7. Radiation-hard silicon photonics for high energy physics and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics (SiPh) is currently being investigated as a promising technology for future radiation hard optical links. The possibility of integrating SiPh devices with electronics and/or silicon particle sensors as well as an expected very high resistance against radiation damage make this technology particularly interesting for potential use close to the interaction points in future in high energy physics experiments and other radiation-sensitive applications. The presentation will summarize the outcomes of the research on radiation hard SiPh conducted within the ICE-DIP projected.

  8. Total Cross-sections at very high energies: from protons to photons

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, R M; Pancheri, G; Srivastava, Y N

    2010-01-01

    A model for both proton and photon total cross-sections is presented and compared with data. The model is based on the eikonal representation, with QCD mini-jets to drive the rise and soft gluon kt-resummation into the Infrared region to tame the excessive rise due to low-x perturbative gluons. We discuss the effects of a singular but integrable expression for the Infrared gluon spectrum on the high energy behaviour of the total cross-section expected in this model.

  9. ESRF-type lattice design and optimization for the High Energy Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Jiao, Yi; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2016-02-01

    A new generation of storage ring-based light sources, called diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), with emittance approaching the diffraction limit for multi-keV photons by means of multi-bend achromat lattices, has attracted extensive studies worldwide. Among various DLSR proposals, the hybrid multi-bend achromat concept developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) predicts an effective way of minimizing the emittance while keeping the required chromatic sextupole strengths to an achievable level. For the High Energy Photon Source planned to be built in Beijing, an ESRF-type lattice design consisting of 48 hybrid seven-bend achromats is proposed to reach emittance as low as 60 pm·rad with a circumference of about 1296 m. Sufficient dynamic aperture, allowing vertical on-axis injection, and moderate momentum acceptance are achieved simultaneously for a promising ring performance. Supported by NSFC (11475202, 11405187) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS (2015009)

  10. Relevance of the quark component in prompt photon and electroweak gauge boson production at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, S.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lipatov, A.V.; Zotov, N.P. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). D.V. Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics

    2009-04-15

    In the framework of the k{sub T}-factorization approach, we study the production of prompt photons and electroweak gauge bosons in high energy proton-(anti)proton collisions at modern colliders. Our consideration is based on the amplitude for the production of a single photon or W{sup {+-}}/Z{sup 0} boson associated with a quark pair in the fusion of two off-shell gluons. The quark component is taken into account separately using the quark-gluon scattering and quark-antiquark annihilation QCD subprocesses. Special attention is put on the contributions from the quarks involved into the earlier steps of the evolution cascade. Using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin formalism, we simulate this component and demonstrate that it plays an important role at both the Tevatron and LHC energies. Our theoretical results are compared with recent experimental data taken by the D diameter and CDF collaborations at the Tevatron. (orig.)

  11. PEPX-type lattice design and optimization for the High Energy Photon Source

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    A new generation of storage ring-based light source, called diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR), with the emittance approaching the diffraction limit for multi-keV photons by using the multi-bend achromat lattice, has attracted worldwide and extensive studies of several laboratories, and been seriously considered as a goal of upgrading the existing facilities in the imminent future. Among various DLSR proposals, the PEPX design based on the third-order achromat concept and with the special design of a high-beta injection straight section demonstrated that, it is feasible to achieve sufficient ring acceptance for off-axis injection in a DLSR. For the High Energy Photon Source planned to be built in Beijing, PEPX-type lattice has been designed and continuously improved. In this paper, we report the evolution of the PEPX-type design, and discuss the main issues relevant to the linear optics design and nonlinear optimization.

  12. Prompt photon hadroproduction at high energies in off-shell gluon-gluon fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Baranov, S P; Zotov, N P

    2007-01-01

    The amplitude for production of a single photon associated with quark pair in the fusion of two off-shell gluons is calculated. The matrix element found is applied to the inclusive prompt photon hadroproduction at high energies in the framework of kt-factorization QCD approach. The total and differential cross sections are calculated in both central and forward pseudo-rapidity regions. The conservative error analisys is performed. We used the unintegrated gluon distributions in a proton which were obtained from the full CCFM evolution equation as well as from the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. Theoretical results were compared with recent experimental data taken by the D0 and CDF collaborations at Fermilab Tevatron. Theoretical predictions for LHC energies are given.

  13. Acoustic detection of ultra-high energy cascades in ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeser, S.

    2006-12-08

    Current underwater optical neutrino telescopes are designed to detect neutrinos from astrophysical sources with energies in the TeV range. Due to the low fluxes and small cross sections, no high energy neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin have been observed so far. Only the Cherenkov neutrino detectors on the km{sup 3} scale that are currently under construction will have the necessary volume to observe these rare interactions. For the guaranteed source of neutrinos from interactions of the ultra-high energy cosmic at EeV energies rays with the ambient cosmic microwave background, event rates of only one per year are expected in these experiments. To measure the flux and verify the predicted cross sections of these cosmogenic neutrinos, an observed volume of the order of 100 km{sup 3} will be necessary, that will not be feasible with existing detection techniques. Alternative methods are required to build a detector on these scales. One promising idea is to record the acoustic waves generated in hadronic or electromagnetic cascades following the neutrino interaction. The higher amplitudes of the sonic signal and the large expected absorption length of sound favour South Polar ice instead of sea water as a medium. The prerequisites for an estimate of the potential of such a detector are suitable acoustic sensors, a verification of the model of thermo-acoustic sound generation and a determination of the acoustic properties of the ice. In a theoretical derivation the mechanism of thermo-elastic excitation of acoustic waves was shown to be equivalent for isotropic solids and liquids. Following a detailed analysis of the existing knowledge a simulation study of a hybrid optical-radio-acoustic detector has been performed. Ultrasonic sensors dedicated to in-ice application were developed and have been used to record acoustic signals from intense proton and laser beams in water and ice. With the obtained experience, the hitherto largest array of acoustic sensors and

  14. EleCa: A Monte Carlo code for the propagation of extragalactic photons at ultra-high energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settimo, Mariangela [University of Siegen (Germany); De Domenico, Manlio [Laboratory of Complex Systems, Scuola Superiore di Catania and INFN (Italy); Lyberis, Haris [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Ultra high energy photons, above 10{sup 17}–10{sup 18}eV, can interact with the extragalactic background radiation leading to the development of electromagnetic cascades. A Monte Carlo code to simulate the electromagnetic cascades initiated by high-energy photons and electrons is presented. Results from simulations and their impact on the predicted flux at Earth are discussed in different astrophysical scenarios.

  15. A study of photons at ultra high energy using Auger surface detector

    CERN Document Server

    Decerprit, Guillaume; Parizot, E

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method to derive an upper limit on the ultra-high-energy (UHE) photon flux above a given energy, using the Auger SD events. As previous studies, it takes advantage of the fundamental differences between showers induced by hadrons and showers induced by photons (signal rise time, slope of the Lateral Distribution Function, radius of curvature), but it uses photon shower simulations adapted to the actually observed SD events, on an event-by-event basis. In particular, we find that a limited number of simulations per event allows to reach an upper limit that is very close to the ideal case that would be obtained with an infinite number of simulations. For instance, 10 simulated showers per event are sufficient to reach an upper limit only 10 percent higher than the ideal one. As an illustration, we apply this method to the SD events reconstructed above 55 EeV, which provides an optimized upper limit on the photon flux above 150 EeV, and indicate how this can be easily extended to the lower-energ...

  16. Production of Forward Rapidity Photons in High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Jalilian-Marian, J

    2005-01-01

    We consider production of prompt photons in high energy gold-gold and deuteron-gold collisions in the forward rapidity region of RHIC ($y \\sim 3.8$). In this kinematics, the projectile partons typically have large $x_{bj}$ while the target partons are mostly at very small $x_{bj}$ so that the primary partonic collisions involve valence quarks from the projectile and gluons from the target. We take the target nucleus to be a Color Glass Condensate while the projectile deuteron or nucleus is treated as a dilute system of partons. We show that the photon production cross section can be written as a convolution of a quark-nucleus scattering cross section, involving a quark anti-quark dipole, with the Leading Order quark-photon fragmentation function. We consider different models of the quark anti-quark dipole and show that measurement of photons in the forward rapidity region at RHIC can distinguish between different parameterizations of the dipole cross section as well as help clarify the role of parton coalesce...

  17. Radio Detection of High-Energy Cosmic Rays: LOPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haungs, A.; Apel, W. D.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Heck, D.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Nehls, S.; Obenland, R.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Plewnia, S.; Rebel, H.; Schieler, H.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Bähren, L.; Butcher, H.; de Bruyn, G.; de Vos, C. M.; Falcke, H.; Kant, G. W.; Koopman, Y.; Pepping, H. J.; Schoonderbeek, G.; van Capellen, W.; Wijnholds, S.; Bercuci, A.; Brancus, I. M.; Mitrica, B.; Petcu, M.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Bertaina, M.; Chiavassa, A.; di Pierro, F.; Navarra, G.; Valchierotti, S.; Biermann, P. L.; Horneffer, A.; Huege, T.; Zensus, J. A.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Kolotaev, Y.; Over, S.; Walkowiak, W.; Zimmermann, D.; Buitink, S.; Kuijpers, J.; Lafebre, S.; Nigl, A.; Petrovic, J.; Gemmeke, H.; Krömer, O.; Ghia, P. L.; Morello, C.; Trinchero, G. C.; Glasstetter, R.; Kampert, K.-H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Roth, M.; Stümpert, M.; Klein, U.; Risse, A.; Zabierowski, J.

    The detection of radio pulses emitted in the atmosphere during the air shower development of high-energy primary cosmic rays is the task of the LOPES (LOFAR Prototype Station) project. LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) is a new digital radio interferometer under development using high bandwidth ADCs and fast data processing to filter out most of the interference. By storing the whole waveform information in digital form transient events like air showers can be analyzed even after they have been recorded. To test this technology and to demonstrate its ability to measure air showers a LOPES is set up to operate in conjunction with an existing air shower experiment (KASCADE-Grande). The LOPES antennas are operating in the frequency range of 40-80 MHz. For several air-shower events a coincident and coherent signal has been found and a preliminary analysis has already been performed. The main goal of further investigations is to calibrate the radio signal with help of the observables of the individual air-showers given by KASCADE-Grande.

  18. Prospects for detecting ultra-high-energy particles with FAST

    CERN Document Server

    James, C W; Ekers, R D

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the highest-energy particles in nature, the ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays, is still unknown. In order to resolve this mystery, very large detectors are required to probe the low flux of these particles - or to detect the as-yet unobserved flux of UHE neutrinos predicted from their interactions. The `lunar Askaryan technique' is a method to do both. When energetic particles interact in a dense medium, the Askaryan effect produces intense coherent pulses of radiation in the MHz--GHz range. By using radio telescopes to observe the Moon and look for nanosecond pulses, the entire visible lunar surface ($20$ million km$^2$) can be used as an UHE particle detector. A large effective area over a broad bandwidth is the primary telescope requirement for lunar observations, which makes large single-aperture instruments such as the Five-Hundred-Meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) well-suited to the technique. In this contribution, we describe the lunar Askaryan technique and its unique obs...

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET detectors for high-energy photon beams using the PENELOPE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panettieri, Vanessa [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Duch, Maria Amor [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jornet, Nuria [Servei de RadiofIsica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Ginjaume, Merce [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Carrasco, Pablo [Servei de RadiofIsica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Badal, Andreu [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ortega, Xavier [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ribas, Montserrat [Servei de RadiofIsica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-01-07

    The aim of this work was the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the response of commercially available dosimeters based on metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) for radiotherapeutic photon beams using the PENELOPE code. The studied Thomson and Nielsen TN-502-RD MOSFETs have a very small sensitive area of 0.04 mm{sup 2} and a thickness of 0.5 {mu}m which is placed on a flat kapton base and covered by a rounded layer of black epoxy resin. The influence of different metallic and Plastic water(TM) build-up caps, together with the orientation of the detector have been investigated for the specific application of MOSFET detectors for entrance in vivo dosimetry. Additionally, the energy dependence of MOSFET detectors for different high-energy photon beams (with energy >1.25 MeV) has been calculated. Calculations were carried out for simulated 6 MV and 18 MV x-ray beams generated by a Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator, a Co-60 photon beam from a Theratron 780 unit, and monoenergetic photon beams ranging from 2 MeV to 10 MeV. The results of the validation of the simulated photon beams show that the average difference between MC results and reference data is negligible, within 0.3%. MC simulated results of the effect of the build-up caps on the MOSFET response are in good agreement with experimental measurements, within the uncertainties. In particular, for the 18 MV photon beam the response of the detectors under a tungsten cap is 48% higher than for a 2 cm Plastic water(TM) cap and approximately 26% higher when a brass cap is used. This effect is demonstrated to be caused by positron production in the build-up caps of higher atomic number. This work also shows that the MOSFET detectors produce a higher signal when their rounded side is facing the beam (up to 6%) and that there is a significant variation (up to 50%) in the response of the MOSFET for photon energies in the studied energy range. All the results have shown that the PENELOPE code system

  20. Heavy quark production in photon-Pomeron interactions at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, M. M. [Instituto Federal de Ciencia, Educacao e Tecnologia Farroupilha, Campus Sao Borja, Rua Otaviano Castilho Mendes, 355, CEP 97670-000, Sao Borja, RS (Brazil); Goncalves, V. P. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica - IFM, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-900, RS (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    The diffractive heavy quark cross sections are estimated considering photon-Pomeron interactions in hadron - hadron at RHIC, Tevatron, and CERN LHC energies. We assume the validity of the hard diffractive factorization and calculate the charm and bottom total cross sections and rapidity distributions using the diffractive parton distribution functions of the Pomeron obtained by the H1 Collaboration at DESY-HERA. Such processes are sensitive to the gluon content of the Pomeron at high energies and are a good place to constrain the behavior of this distribution. We also compare our predictions with those obtained using the dipole model, and verify that these processes are a good test of the different mechanisms for heavy quarks diffractive production at hadron colliders.

  1. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  2. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y., E-mail: cycjty@sophie.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Fuji, Hino, Tokyo 191-8502 (Japan); Fujiwara, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M. [Nuclear Professional School, the University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Tomita, H. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshihara, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  3. Prospects of hydroacoustic detection of ultra-high and extremely high energy cosmic neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedenko, L. G.; Karlik, Ya. S.; Learned, J. G.; Svet, V. D.; Zheleznykh, I. M.

    2001-07-01

    The prospects of construction of deep underwater neutrino telescopes in the world's oceans for the goals of ultra-high and super-high energy neutrino astrophysics (astronomy) using acoustic technologies are reviewed. The effective detection volume of the acoustic neutrino telescopes can be far greater than a cubic kilometer for extreme energies. In recent years, it was proposed that an existing hydroacoustic array of 2400 hydrophones in the Pacific Ocean near Kamchatka Peninsula could be used as a test base for an acoustic neutrino telescope SADCO (Sea-based Acoustic Detector of Cosmic Objects) which should be capable of detecting acoustic signals produced in water by the cosmic neutrinos with energies 1019-21 eV (e.g., topological defect neutrinos). We report on simulations of super-high energy electron-hadron and electron-photon cascades with the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect taken into account. Acoustic signals emitted by neutrino-induced cascades with energies 1020-21 eV were calculated. The possibilities of using a converted hydroacoustic station MG-10 (MG-10M) of 132 hydrophones as a basic module for a deep water acoustic neutrino detector with the threshold detection energy 1015 eV in the Mediterranean Sea are analyzed (with the aim of searching for neutrinos with energies 1015-16 eV from Active Galactic Nuclei). .

  4. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janek, S [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, R [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Jonsson, C [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Brahme, A [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-11-21

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O but also {sup 13}N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery

  5. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek, S.; Svensson, R.; Jonsson, C.; Brahme, A.

    2006-11-01

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in 11C and 15O but also 13N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of 12C, 16O and 14N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated 12C, 16O and 14N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery verification by means of PET imaging seems to be

  6. MAGIC detects activity from PKS 1424+240 at very-high-energy gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2017-03-01

    The MAGIC telescopes have observed an increase in the very-high-energy (VHE; > 50 GeV) gamma-ray flux from PKS 1424+240, RA: 14:27:00.4 and DEC: +23:48:00, J2000.0 (Wenger, M. et al., 2000, A & AS, v.143, 9). The preliminary analysis of the MAGIC data taken on 2017/03/09, indicates an integral photon flux of (7.6 +/- 2.3) x 10^-11 [cm^-2/s] above 70 GeV. The estimated flux corresponds to 10+/-3 % of the Crab Nebula integral flux above the same energy threshold (70 GeV), and shows a hint of elevated flux in comparison with the previous detections (Archambault, S. et al., 2014, ApJL, 785,1, L16 and the references therein).

  7. Low-versus high-energy photon beams in radiotherapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, R L; Robinow, J S; Shaw, E G; Kline, R W; Suman, V J; Ilstrup, D M; Lee, R E

    1993-01-01

    This retrospective study analyzed the outcome of lung cancer patients who were treated with either 4-MV or 10-MV photons. From October 1979 through December 1982, 126 patients with locally advanced, unresectable or medically inoperable, nonmetastatic non-small cell lung cancer were treated in a prospective trial in which they were randomly assigned to one of three chemotherapy combinations and thoracic radiotherapy. The patients were stratified by cell type, extent of operation, age, sex, and status of supraclavicular lymph nodes. All patients were followed until death or for a minimum of 4.8 years. Of the 102 evaluable patients, 98 were treated with either 4-MV or 10-MV photons (49 patients in each group). Outcomes examined included best primary tumor response, time to first local (in-field) recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. No significant differences were detected between the patients treated with 4-MV or 10-MV photons for several important prognostic and treatment factors or for any of the study outcomes, including first local (in-field) recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. For the group of 98 patients treated with either 4-MV or 10-MV photons, the estimated 2-year freedom from first local (in-field) recurrence was 47.7%. The estimated 2-year disease-free and overall survivals were 21.6% and 28.6%, respectively.

  8. The High-Energy Behavior of Photon, Neutrino and Proton Cross Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Arguelles, Carlos A; Will, Logan; Kroll, Mike; Reno, Mary Hall

    2015-01-01

    By combining the color dipole model of the nucleon with the assumption that cross sections behave asymptotically as $\\ln^2(s)$, we are able to describe the data for photon, neutrino and hadron interactions with protons at all energies, $s$ is the center-of-mass energy of the interacting particles. Specifically, we extrapolate the perturbative QCD calculations into the regime of small fractional parton momenta $x$ using a color dipole description of the proton target that guarantees an asymptotic $\\ln^2(s)$ behavior of all cross sections. The ambiguity of introducing a parametrization associated with the dipole approximation is mitigated by the requirement that the saturation of the small-$x$ structure functions produces $\\ln^2(s)$-behaved asymptotic cross sections, in agreement with the data. The same formalism allows us to calculate the cross section for the hadronic pair production of charm particles. The results, in particular those for the high-energy neutrino and charm cross sections, are relevant for ev...

  9. Comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo calculations of multi-photon effects in bremsstrahlung emission by high-energy electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangiarotti, Alessio; Sona, Pietro; Ballestrero, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Approximate analytical calculations of multi-photon effects in the spectrum of total radiated energy by high-energy electrons crossing thin targets are compared to the results of Monte Carlo type simulations. The limits of validity of the analytical expressions found in the literature are establi...

  10. Comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo calculations of multi-photon effects in bremsstrahlung emission by high-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangiarotti, A. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Coimbra (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Sona, P., E-mail: pietro.sona@fi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Polo Scientifico, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Ballestrero, S. [Department of Physics University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa); CERN PH/ADT, Geneve (Switzerland); Uggerhoj, U.I.; Andersen, K.K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2012-10-15

    Approximate analytical calculations of multi-photon effects in the spectrum of total radiated energy by high-energy electrons crossing thin targets are compared to the results of Monte Carlo type simulations. The limits of validity of the analytical expressions found in the literature are established. The separate contributions to spectral distortion of electromagnetic processes other than bremsstrahlung are also studied in detail.

  11. Photonuclear dose calculations for high-energy photon beams from Siemens and Varian linacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibani, Omar; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie

    2003-08-01

    The dose from photon-induced nuclear particles (neutrons, protons, and alpha particles) generated by high-energy photon beams from medical linacs is investigated. Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNPX code are performed for three different photon beams from two different machines: Siemens 18 MV, Varian 15 MV, and Varian 18 MV. The linac head components are simulated in detail. The dose distributions from photons, neutrons, protons, and alpha particles are calculated in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Neutrons are generated in both the linac head and the phantom. This study includes (a) field size effects, (b) off-axis dose profiles, (c) neutron contribution from the linac head, (d) dose contribution from capture gamma rays, (e) phantom heterogeneity effects, and (f) effects of primary electron energy shift. Results are presented in terms of absolute dose distributions and also in terms of DER (dose equivalent ratio). The DER is the maximum dose from the particle (neutron, proton, or alpha) divided by the maximum photon dose, multiplied by the particle quality factor and the modulation scaling factor. The total DER including neutrons, protons, and alphas is about 0.66 cSv/Gy for the Siemens 18 MV beam (10 cm x 10 cm). The neutron DER decreases with decreasing field size while the proton (or alpha) DER does not vary significantly except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field. Both Varian beams (15 and 18 MV) produce more neutrons, protons, and alphas particles than the Siemens 18 MV beam. This is mainly due to their higher primary electron energies: 15 and 18.3 MeV, respectively, vs 14 MeV for the Siemens 18 MV beam. For all beams, neutrons contribute more than 75% of the total DER, except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field (approximately 50%). The total DER is 1.52 and 2.86 cSv/Gy for the 15 and 18 MV Varian beams (10 cm x 10 cm), respectively. Media with relatively high-Z elements like bone may increase the dose from heavy charged particles by a factor 4. The total DER is sensitive to

  12. Simulation of ultra-high energy photon propagation with PRESHOWER 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, P.; Engel, R.; Pysz, A.; Wilczyński, H.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we describe a new release of the PRESHOWER program, a tool for Monte Carlo simulation of propagation of ultra-high energy photons in the magnetic field of the Earth. The PRESHOWER program is designed to calculate magnetic pair production and bremsstrahlung and should be used together with other programs to simulate extensive air showers induced by photons. The main new features of the PRESHOWER code include a much faster algorithm applied in the procedures of simulating the processes of gamma conversion and bremsstrahlung, update of the geomagnetic field model, and a minor correction. The new simulation procedure increases the flexibility of the code so that it can also be applied to other magnetic field configurations such as, for example, encountered in the vicinity of the sun or neutron stars. Program summaryProgram title: PRESHOWER 2.0 Catalog identifier: ADWG_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWG_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3968 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 37198 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C, FORTRAN 77. Computer: Intel-Pentium based PC. Operating system: Linux or Unix. RAM:Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 173 (2005) 71 Nature of problem: Simulation of a cascade of particles initiated by UHE photon in magnetic field. Solution method: The primary photon is tracked until its conversion into an e+ e- pair. If conversion occurs each individual particle in the resultant preshower is checked for either bremsstrahlung radiation (electrons) or secondary gamma conversion (photons). Reasons for new version: Slow and outdated algorithm in the old version (a significant speed up is possible); Extension of the program to allow

  13. The Escape of High-Energy Photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.

    1997-01-01

    Eleven bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by BATSE have also been seen at much higher energies by EGRET, six at energies above 10 MeV. Such observations imply that these bursts are optically thin to photon-photon pair production at all observed energies. For bursts more than about 30pc away, internal transparency can be achieved only if the source is moving with a relativistic bulk Lorentz factor $\\Gamma\\gg 1$, or if the radiation is highly beamed. Early calculations of $\\gamma\\gamma\\to e^+e^-$ considerations for GRBs were limited to cases of a beam with opening half-angle $\\Thetab\\sim 1/\\Gamma$, or expansions of infinitely thin spherical shells. This paper presents our extension of pair production optical depth calculations in relativistically expanding sources to more general geometries, including shells of finite thickness and arbitrary opening angle. The problem is reduced analytically to a single integral in the broadly applicable case of observing photons along the axis of the expansion. We find th...

  14. EleCa: a Monte Carlo code for the propagation of extragalactic photons at ultra-high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Settimo, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    Ultra high energy photons play an important role as an independent probe of the photo-pion production mechanism by UHE cosmic rays. Their observation, or non-observation, may constrain astrophysical scenarios for the origin of UHECRs and help to understand the nature of the flux suppression observed by several experiments at energies above 10$^{19.5}$ eV. Whereas the interaction length of UHE photons above 10$^{17}$ eV is only of a few hundred kpc up to tenths of Mpc, photons can interact with the extragalactic background radiation leading to the development of electromagnetic cascades which affect the fluxes of photons observed at Earth. The interpretation of the current experimental results rely on the simulations of the UHE photon propagation. In this contribution, we present the novel Monte Carlo code "EleCa" to simulate the \\emph{Ele}ctromagnetic \\emph{Ca}scading initiated by high-energy photons and electrons. The distance within which we expect to observe UHE photons is discussed and the flux of GZK pho...

  15. A comparison of phantom scatter from flattened and flattening filter free high-energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Neil, E-mail: neil.richmond@stees.nhs.uk [Department of Medical Physics, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom); Allen, Vince [The Northern Centre for Cancer Care, The Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Daniel, Jim [Department of Medical Physics, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom); Dacey, Rob [The Northern Centre for Cancer Care, The Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Walker, Chris [Department of Medical Physics, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams have different dosimetric properties from those of flattened beams. The aim of this work was to characterize the collimator scatter (S{sub c}) and total scatter (S{sub cp}) from 3 FFF beams of differing quality indices and use the resulting mathematical fits to generate phantom scatter (S{sub p}) data. The similarities and differences between S{sub p} of flattened and FFF beams are described. S{sub c} and S{sub cp} data were measured for 3 flattened and 3 FFF high-energy photon beams (Varian 6 and 10 MV and Elekta 6 MV). These data were fitted to logarithmic power law functions with 4 numerical coefficients. The agreement between our experimentally determined flattened beam S{sub p} and published data was within ± 1.2% for all 3 beams investigated and all field sizes from 4 × 4 to 40 × 40 cm{sup 2}. For the FFF beams, S{sub p} was only within 1% of the same flattened beam published data for field sizes between 6 × 6 and 14 × 14 cm{sup 2}. Outside this range, the differences were much greater, reaching − 3.2%, − 4.5%, and − 4.3% for the fields of 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} for the Varian 6-MV, Varian 10-MV, and Elekta 6-MV FFF beams, respectively. The FFF beam S{sub p} increased more slowly with increasing field size than that of the published and measured flattened beam of a similar reference field size quality index, i.e., there is less Phantom Scatter than that found with flattened beams for a given field size. This difference can be explained when the fluence profiles of the flattened and FFF beams are considered. The FFF beam has greatly reduced fluence off axis, especially as field size increases, compared with the flattened beam profile; hence, less scatter is generated in the phantom reaching the central axis.

  16. Do high-energy neutrinos travel faster than photons in a discrete space-time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, She-Sheng

    2011-12-01

    The recent OPERA measurement of high-energy neutrino velocity, once independently verified, implies new physics in the neutrino sector. We revisit the theoretical inconsistency of the fundamental high-energy cutoff attributing to quantum gravity with the parity-violating gauge symmetry of local quantum field theory describing neutrinos. This inconsistency suggests high-dimension operators of neutrino interactions. Based on these studies, we try to view the OPERA result, high-energy neutrino oscillations and indicate to observe the restoration of parity conservation by measuring the asymmetry of high-energy neutrinos colliding with left- and right-handed polarized electrons.

  17. Do high-energy neutrinos travel faster than photons in a discrete space-time?

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, She-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    The recent OPERA measurement of high-energy neutrino velocity, once independently verified, implies new physics in the neutrino sector. We revisit the theoretical inconsistency of the fundamental high-energy cutoff attributing to quantum gravity with the parity-violating gauge symmetry of local quantum field theory describing neutrinos. This inconsistency suggests high-dimension operators of neutrino interactions. Based on these studies, we try to view the OPERA result, high-energy neutrino oscillations and indicate to observe the restoration of parity conservation by measuring the asymmetry of high-energy neutrinos colliding with left- and right-handed polarized electrons.

  18. A Study on Selection Performance for High Energy Photons in CMS towards the 13 TeV LHC Run

    CERN Document Server

    Scerri, Dale

    2014-01-01

    The 13 TeV run for the LHC is expected to occur in the beginning of 2015 with a higher number of interactions per bunch crossing and a reduced bunch crossing time spacing. These harsher conditions are expected to affect the photon selection performance especially for high energy photons involved in BSM processes like the Graviton decay. This work summarizes a preliminary study of this performance using 13 TeV Monte Carlo Randall Sundrum Graviton samples with different pileup scenarios corresponding to the coming 13 TeV run conditions. Especially the efficiency for the selection and the energy resolution are investigated.

  19. In-beam PET at high-energy photon beams: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H.; Enghardt, W.

    2006-04-01

    For radiation therapy with carbon ion beams, either for the stable isotope 12C or for the radioactive one 11C, it has been demonstrated that the β+-activity distribution created or deposited, respectively, within the irradiated volume can be visualized by means of positron emission tomography (PET). The PET images provide valuable information for quality assurance and precision improvement of ion therapy. Dedicated PET scanners have been integrated into treatment sites at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (HIMAC), Japan, and the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany, to make PET imaging feasible during therapeutic irradiation (in-beam PET). A similar technique may be worthwhile for radiotherapy with high-energy bremsstrahlung. In addition to monitoring the dose delivery process which in-beam PET has been primarily developed for, it may be expected that radiation response of tissue can be detected by means of in-beam PET. We investigate the applicability of PET for treatment control in the case of using bremsstrahlung spectra produced by 15-50 MeV electrons. Target volume activation due to (γ, n) reactions at energies above 20 MeV yields moderate β+-activity levels, which can be employed for imaging. The radiation from positrons produced by pair production is not presently usable because the detectors are overloaded due to the low duty factor of medical electron linear accelerators. However, the degradation of images caused by positron motion between creation and annihilation seems to be tolerable.

  20. Radio detection of cosmic-ray air showers and high-energy neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Frank G.

    2017-03-01

    In the last fifteen years radio detection made it back to the list of promising techniques for extensive air showers, firstly, due to the installation and successful operation of digital radio experiments and, secondly, due to the quantitative understanding of the radio emission from atmospheric particle cascades. The radio technique has an energy threshold of about 100 PeV, which coincides with the energy at which a transition from the highest-energy galactic sources to the even more energetic extragalactic cosmic rays is assumed. Thus, radio detectors are particularly useful to study the highest-energy galactic particles and ultra-high-energy extragalactic particles of all types. Recent measurements by various antenna arrays like LOPES, CODALEMA, AERA, LOFAR, Tunka-Rex, and others have shown that radio measurements can compete in precision with other established techniques, in particular for the arrival direction, the energy, and the position of the shower maximum, which is one of the best estimators for the composition of the primary cosmic rays. The scientific potential of the radio technique seems to be maximum in combination with particle detectors, because this combination of complementary detectors can significantly increase the total accuracy for air-shower measurements. This increase in accuracy is crucial for a better separation of different primary particles, like gamma-ray photons, neutrinos, or different types of nuclei, because showers initiated by these particles differ in average depth of the shower maximum and in the ratio between the amplitude of the radio signal and the number of muons. In addition to air-shower measurements, the radio technique can be used to measure particle cascades in dense media, which is a promising technique for detection of ultra-high-energy neutrinos. Several pioneering experiments like ARA, ARIANNA, and ANITA are currently searching for the radio emission by neutrino-induced particle cascades in ice. In the next years

  1. Detecting itinerant single microwave photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyamoorthy, Sankar Raman; Stace, Thomas M.; Johansson, Göran

    2016-08-01

    Single-photon detectors are fundamental tools of investigation in quantum optics and play a central role in measurement theory and quantum informatics. Photodetectors based on different technologies exist at optical frequencies and much effort is currently being spent on pushing their efficiencies to meet the demands coming from the quantum computing and quantum communication proposals. In the microwave regime, however, a single-photon detector has remained elusive, although several theoretical proposals have been put forth. In this article, we review these recent proposals, especially focusing on non-destructive detectors of propagating microwave photons. These detection schemes using superconducting artificial atoms can reach detection efficiencies of 90% with the existing technologies and are ripe for experimental investigations.

  2. Search for Ultra-High Energy Photons with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Kuempel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located in Argentina, provides an unprecedented integrated aperture for the search of photons with energy above 100 PeV. In this contribution recent results are presented including the diffuse search for photons and the directional search for photon point sources. The derived limits are of considerable astrophysical interest: Diffuse limits place severe constraints on top-down models and start to touch the predicted GZK photon flux range while directional limits can exclude the continuation of the electromagnetic flux from measured TeV sources with a significance of more than 5$\\sigma$. Finally, prospects of neutral particle searches for the upcoming detector upgrade AugerPrime are highlighted.

  3. 1979 international symposium on lepton and photon interactions at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, T.B.W.; Abarbanel, H.D.I.

    1979-01-01

    This symposium on Leptons and Photons is ninth in the series of biannual meetings which began at Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1963. Abstracts of individual items from the symposium were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  4. High energy supercontinuum sources using tapered photonic crystal fibers for multispectral photoacoustic microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondu, Magalie; Brooks, Christopher; Jakobsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a record bandwidth high energy supercontinuum source suitable for multispectral photoacoustic microscopy. The source has more than 150  nJ/10  nm150  nJ/10  nm bandwidth over a spectral range of 500 to 1600 nm. This performance is achieved using a carefully designed fiber taper...

  5. A Monte Carlo model for out-of-field dose calculation from high-energy photon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kry, Stephen F; Titt, Uwe; Followill, David; Pönisch, Falk; Vassiliev, Oleg N; White, R Allen; Stovall, Marilyn; Salehpour, Mohammad

    2007-09-01

    As cancer therapy becomes more efficacious and patients survive longer, the potential for late effects increases, including effects induced by radiation dose delivered away from the treatment site. This out-of-field radiation is of particular concern with high-energy radiotherapy, as neutrons are produced in the accelerator head. We recently developed an accurate Monte Carlo model of a Varian 2100 accelerator using MCNPX for calculating the dose away from the treatment field resulting from low-energy therapy. In this study, we expanded and validated our Monte Carlo model for high-energy (18 MV) photon therapy, including both photons and neutrons. Simulated out-of-field photon doses were compared with measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters in an acrylic phantom up to 55 cm from the central axis. Simulated neutron fluences and energy spectra were compared with measurements using moderated gold foil activation in moderators and data from the literature. The average local difference between the calculated and measured photon dose was 17%, including doses as low as 0.01% of the central axis dose. The out-of-field photon dose varied substantially with field size and distance from the edge of the field but varied little with depth in the phantom, except at depths shallower than 3 cm, where the dose sharply increased. On average, the difference between the simulated and measured neutron fluences was 19% and good agreement was observed with the neutron spectra. The neutron dose equivalent varied little with field size or distance from the central axis but decreased with depth in the phantom. Neutrons were the dominant component of the out-of-field dose equivalent for shallow depths and large distances from the edge of the treatment field. This Monte Carlo model is useful to both physicists and clinicians when evaluating out-of-field doses and associated potential risks.

  6. Low-energy photons in high-energy photon fields--Monte Carlo generated spectra and a new descriptive parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rühmann, Antje; Poppe, Björn

    2011-09-01

    The varying low-energy contribution to the photon spectra at points within and around radiotherapy photon fields is associated with variations in the responses of non-water equivalent dosimeters and in the water-to-material dose conversion factors for tissues such as the red bone marrow. In addition, the presence of low-energy photons in the photon spectrum enhances the RBE in general and in particular for the induction of second malignancies. The present study discusses the general rules valid for the low-energy spectral component of radiotherapeutic photon beams at points within and in the periphery of the treatment field, taking as an example the Siemens Primus linear accelerator at 6 MV and 15 MV. The photon spectra at these points and their typical variations due to the target system, attenuation, single and multiple Compton scattering, are described by the Monte Carlo method, using the code BEAMnrc/EGSnrc. A survey of the role of low energy photons in the spectra within and around radiotherapy fields is presented. In addition to the spectra, some data compression has proven useful to support the overview of the behaviour of the low-energy component. A characteristic indicator of the presence of low-energy photons is the dose fraction attributable to photons with energies not exceeding 200 keV, termed P(D)(200 keV). Its values are calculated for different depths and lateral positions within a water phantom. For a pencil beam of 6 or 15 MV primary photons in water, the radial distribution of P(D)(200 keV) is bellshaped, with a wide-ranging exponential tail of half value 6 to 7 cm. The P(D)(200 keV) value obtained on the central axis of a photon field shows an approximately proportional increase with field size. Out-of-field P(D)(200 keV) values are up to an order of magnitude higher than on the central axis for the same irradiation depth. The 2D pattern of P(D)(200 keV) for a radiotherapy field visualizes the regions, e.g. at the field margin, where changes of

  7. Results on the Coherent Interaction of High Energy Electrons and Photons in Oriented Single Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A; Badelek, B; Ballestrero, S; Biino, C; Birol, I; Cenci, P; Connell, S H; Eichblatt, S; Fonseca, T; Freund, A; Gorini, B; Groess, R; Ispirian, K; Ketel, T; Kononets, Y V; López, A; Mangiarotti, A; Van Rens, B; Sellschop, J P Friedel; Shieh, M; Sona, P; Strakhovenko, V M; Uggerhøj, Erik; Uggerhøj, U; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vilakazi, Z Z; Wessely, O; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2005-01-01

    The CERN-NA-59 experiment examined a wide range of electromagnetic processes for multi-GeV electrons and photons interacting with oriented single crystals. The various types of crystals and their orientations were used for producing photon beams and for converting and measuring their polarisation. The radiation emitted by 178 GeV unpolarised electrons incident on a 1.5 cm thick Si crystal oriented in the Coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB) and the String-of-Strings (SOS) modes was used to obtain multi-GeV linearly polarised photon beams. A new crystal polarimetry technique was established for measuring the linear polarisation of the photon beam. The polarimeter is based on the dependence of the Coherent Pair Production (CPP) cross section in oriented single crystals on the direction of the photon polarisation with respect to the crystal plane. Both a 1 mm thick single crystal of Germanium and a 4 mm thick multi-tile set of synthetic Diamond crystals were used as analyzers of the linear polarisation. A birefringence ...

  8. Measurement of pair-production by high energy photons in an aligned tungsten crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Parker, M. A.; Baurichter, A.; Kirsebom, K.; Medenwaldt, R.; Mikkelsen, U.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Doble, N.; Elsener, K.; Ballestrero, S.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V. M.; Biino, C.; Vilakazi, Z. Z.

    1996-10-01

    A new measurement has been made of the rate of pair-production in a 3.2 mm thick tungsten crystal, exposed to photons with energies in the range 10 to 150 GeV, for angles of incidence up to 10 mrad from the crystal axis. A strong enhancement of the pair-production rate is observed when the beam is aligned along the crystal axis, as compared to a random orientation. This effect can be exploited in the NA48 CP-violation experiment by using a thin crystal rather than an amorphous material to convert photons, thus minimising the scattering of kaons in the converter.

  9. Perspective of monochromatic gamma-ray line detection with the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xiaoyuan; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Qiang; Chang, Jin; Dong, Yong-Wei; Hu, Bing-Liang; Lü, Jun-Guang; Wang, Le; Wu, Bo-Bing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    HERD is the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to detect energetic cosmic ray nuclei, leptons and photons with a high energy resolution ($\\sim1\\%$ for electrons and photons and $20\\%$ for nuclei) and a large geometry factor ($>3\\, m^2sr$ for electrons and diffuse photons and $>2\\, m^2sr$ for nuclei). In this work we discuss the capability of HERD to detect monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray lines, based on simulations of the detector performance. It is shown that HERD will be one of the most sensitive instruments for monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray searches at energies between $\\sim10$ to a few hundred GeV. Above hundreds of GeV, Cherenkov telescopes will be more sensitive due to their large effective area. As a specific example, we show that a good portion of the parameter space of a supersymmetric dark matter model can be probed with HERD.

  10. Perspective of monochromatic gamma-ray line detection with the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyuan; Lamperstorfer, Anna S.; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Qiang; Chang, Jin; Dong, Yong-Wei; Hu, Bing-Liang; Lü, Jun-Guang; Wang, Le; Wu, Bo-Bing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-05-01

    HERD is the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to detect energetic cosmic ray nuclei, leptons and photons with a high energy resolution (∼1% for electrons and photons and 20% for nuclei) and a large geometry factor (>3 m2 sr for electrons and diffuse photons and > [2]m2 sr for nuclei). In this work we discuss the capability of HERD to detect monochromatic γ-ray lines, based on simulations of the detector performance. It is shown that HERD will be one of the most sensitive instruments for monochromatic γ-ray searches at energies between ∼ 10 to a few hundred GeV. Above hundreds of GeV, Cherenkov telescopes will be more sensitive due to their large effective area. As a specific example, we show that a good portion of the parameter space of a supersymmetric dark matter model can be probed with HERD.

  11. New detection technologies for ultra-high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böser Sebastian

    2013-06-01

    in dense media provides another promising approachfor the identification of the sources of cosmic rays. The low event rates and large required target volumes limit the experimental methods to far-ranging signatures .from the cascade, such as acoustic emission from the quasi-instantaneous energy deposit or Cherenkov emission from the charged particles in the cascade. Searching for optical Cherenkov photons in a cubic-kilometer of Antarctic ice, the IceCube experiment has recently found an excess of high-energy neutrinos in the TeV-PeV range.Yet its effective volume is too small to detect the GZK flux predicted from interaction of the highest-energy cosmic rays with the ambient cosmic microwave background. Seeking to increase the observed target volume, radio observations of the rim of the moon have energy thresholds well beyond the EeV scale and thus are more likely to find interactions of charged cosmic rays than GZK neutrinos. The currently best sensitivity to this flux is provided from searches for GHz radio emission of neutrino-induced cascades in the antarctic ice from the ANITA ballon experiment. While no high-energy neutrinos have been found, a geomagnetic emission component from air-showers

  12. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray, Neutrino, and Photon Propagation and the Multi-Messenger Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Andrew M; Castillo-Ruiz, Edith

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of UHECR nuclei for A=1 (protons) to A=56 (iron) from cosmological sources through extragalactic space is discussed in the first lecture. This is followed in the second and third lectures by a consideration of the generation and propagation of secondary particles produced via the UHECR loss interactions. In the second lecture we focus on the generation of the diffuse cosmogenic UHE-neutrino flux. In the third lecture we investigate the arriving flux of UHE-photon flux at Earth. In the final lecture the results of the previous lectures are put together in order to provide new insights into UHECR sources. The first of these providing a means with which to investigate the local population of UHECR sources through the measurement of the UHECR spectrum and their photon fraction at Earth. The second of these providing contraints on the UHECR source radiation fields through the possible observation at Earth of UHECR nuclei.

  13. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J. P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; R. J. Holt; C. W. de Jager; M. K. Jones; L. J. Kaufman; E. R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K. D. Paschke; C. F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I. A. Qattan; R. D. Ransome; P. E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E. C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G. M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; and L. Zhu

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  14. A Polarized High-Energy Photon Beam for Production of Exotic Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senderovich, Igor [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This work describes design, prototyping and testing of various components of the Jefferson Lab Hall D photon beamline. These include coherent bremsstrahlung radiators to be used in this facility for generating the photon beam, a fine resolution hodoscope for the facility's tagging spectrometer, and a photon beam position sensor for stabilizing the beam on a collimator. The principal instrumentation project was the hodoscope: its design, implementation and beam testing will be thoroughly described. Studies of the coherent bremsstrahlung radiators involved X-ray characterization of diamond crystals to identify the appropriate line of manufactured radiators and the proper techniques for thinning them to the desired specification of the beamline. The photon beam position sensor project involved completion of a designed detector and its beam test. The results of these shorter studies will also be presented. The second part of this work discusses a Monte Carlo study of a possible photo-production and decay channel in the GlueX experiment that will be housed in the Hall D facility. Specifically, the γ p → Xp → b1 π → ω π+1 π-1 channel was studied including its Amplitude Analysis. This exercise attempted to generate a possible physics signal, complete with internal angular momentum states, and be able to reconstruct the signal in the detector and find the proper set of JPC quantum numbers through an amplitude fit. Derivation of the proper set of amplitudes in the helicity basis is described, followed by a discussion of the implementation, generation of the data sets, reconstruction techniques, the amplitude fit and results of this study.

  15. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  16. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loginov, Andrey Borisovich [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation. Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a search for the anomalous production of events containing a high-transverse momentum charged lepton (ℓ, either e or μ) and photon (γ), accompanied by missing transverse energy (ET), and/or additional leptons and photons, and jets (X). We use the same kinematic selection criteria as in a previous CDF search, but with a substantially larger data set, 305 pb-1, a p$\\bar{p}$ collision energy of 1.96 TeV, and the upgraded CDF II detector. We find 42 ℓγET events versus a standard model expectation of 37.3 ± 5.4 events. The level of excess observed in Run I, 16 events with an expectation of 7.6 ± 0.7 events (corresponding to a 2.7 σ effect), is not supported by the new data. In the signature of ℓℓγ + X we observe 31 events versus an expectation of 23.0 ± 2.7 events. In this sample we find no events with an extra photon or ET and so find no events like the one eeγγ ET event observed in Run I.

  17. Charged Particle, Photon Multiplicity, and Transverse Energy Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Sahoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the charged particle and photon multiplicities and transverse energy production in heavy-ion collisions starting from few GeV to TeV energies. The experimental results of pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles and photons at different collision energies and centralities are discussed. We also discuss the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation and expansion dynamics using the Landau hydrodynamics and the underlying physics. Meanwhile, we present the estimation of initial energy density multiplied with formation time as a function of different collision energies and centralities. In the end, the transverse energy per charged particle in connection with the chemical freeze-out criteria is discussed. We invoke various models and phenomenological arguments to interpret and characterize the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. This review overall provides a scope to understand the heavy-ion collision data and a possible formation of a deconfined phase of partons via the global observables like charged particles, photons, and the transverse energy measurement.

  18. ULTRA-HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAY AND NEUTRINO DETECTION USING THE MOON : FIRST RESULTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Bacelar, J.; Singh, K.; Al Yahyaoui, R.; Buitink, S.; Falcke, H.; Braun, R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Strom, R. G.; Stappers, B.

    2009-01-01

    We show that at wavelengths comparable to the length of the shower produced by an Ultra-High Energy cosmic ray or neutrino, radio signals are an extremely efficient way to detect these particles. First results are presented of an analysis of 20 hours of observation data for NuMoon project using the

  19. Extrapolation chamber mounted on perspex for calibration of high energy photon and electron beams from a clinical linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to establish radiation standards for absorbed doses, for clinical high energy linear accelerator beams. In the nonavailability of a cobalt-60 beam for arriving at Nd, water values for thimble chambers, we investigated the efficacy of perspex mounted extrapolation chamber (EC used earlier for low energy x-rays and beta dosimetry. Extrapolation chamber with facility for achieving variable electrode separations 10.5mm to 0.5mm using micrometer screw was used for calibrations. Photon beams 6 MV and 15 MV and electron beams 6 MeV and 15 MeV from Varian Clinac linacs were calibrated. Absorbed Dose estimates to Perspex were converted into dose to solid water for comparison with FC 65 ionisation chamber measurements in water. Measurements made during the period December 2006 to June 2008 are considered for evaluation. Uncorrected ionization readings of EC for all the radiation beams over the entire period were within 2% showing the consistency of measurements. Absorbed doses estimated by EC were in good agreement with in-water calibrations within 2% for photons and electron beams. The present results suggest that extrapolation chambers can be considered as an independent measuring system for absorbed dose in addition to Farmer type ion chambers. In the absence of standard beam quality (Co-60 radiations as reference Quality for Nd,water the possibility of keeping EC as Primary Standards for absorbed dose calibrations in high energy radiation beams from linacs should be explored. As there are neither Standard Laboratories nor SSDL available in our country, we look forward to keep EC as Local Standard for hospital chamber calibrations. We are also participating in the IAEA mailed TLD intercomparison programme for quality audit of existing status of radiation dosimetry in high energy linac beams. The performance of EC has to be confirmed with cobalt-60 beams by a separate study, as linacs are susceptible for minor

  20. Test study of boron nitride as a new detector material for dosimetry in high-energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, D; Halbur, J; Lemmer, S; Delfs, B; Harder, D; Looe, H K; Poppe, B

    2017-09-05

    The aim of this test study is to check whether boron nitride (BN) might be applied as a detector material in high-energy photon-beam dosimetry. Boron nitride exists in various crystalline forms. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses high mobility of the electrons and holes as well as a high volume resistivity, so that ionizing radiation in the clinical range of the dose rate can be expected to produce a measurable electrical current at low background current. Due to the low atomic numbers of its constituents, its density (2.0 g cm(-3)) similar to silicon and its commercial availability, h-BN appears as possibly suitable for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Five h-BN plates were contacted to triaxial cables, and the detector current was measured in a solid-state ionization chamber circuit at an applied voltage of 50 V. Basic dosimetric properties such as formation by pre-irradiation, sensitivity, reproducibility, linearity and temporal resolution were measured with 6 MV photon irradiation. Depth dose curves at quadratic field sizes of 10 cm and 40 cm were measured and compared to ionization chamber measurements. After a pre-irradiation with 6 Gy, the devices show a stable current signal at a given dose rate. The current-voltage characteristic up to 400 V shows an increase in the collection efficiency with the voltage. The time-resolved detector current behavior during beam interrupts is comparable to diamond material, and the background current is negligible. The measured percentage depth dose curves at 10 cm  ×  10 cm field size agreed with the results of ionization chamber measurements within  ±2%. This is a first study of boron nitride as a detector material for high-energy photon radiation. By current measurements on solid ionization chambers made from boron nitride chips we could demonstrate that boron nitride is in principle suitable as a detector material for high-energy photon-beam dosimetry.

  1. Test study of boron nitride as a new detector material for dosimetry in high-energy photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, D.; Halbur, J.; Lemmer, S.; Delfs, B.; Harder, D.; Looe, H. K.; Poppe, B.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this test study is to check whether boron nitride (BN) might be applied as a detector material in high-energy photon-beam dosimetry. Boron nitride exists in various crystalline forms. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses high mobility of the electrons and holes as well as a high volume resistivity, so that ionizing radiation in the clinical range of the dose rate can be expected to produce a measurable electrical current at low background current. Due to the low atomic numbers of its constituents, its density (2.0 g cm‑3) similar to silicon and its commercial availability, h-BN appears as possibly suitable for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Five h-BN plates were contacted to triaxial cables, and the detector current was measured in a solid-state ionization chamber circuit at an applied voltage of 50 V. Basic dosimetric properties such as formation by pre-irradiation, sensitivity, reproducibility, linearity and temporal resolution were measured with 6 MV photon irradiation. Depth dose curves at quadratic field sizes of 10 cm and 40 cm were measured and compared to ionization chamber measurements. After a pre-irradiation with 6 Gy, the devices show a stable current signal at a given dose rate. The current–voltage characteristic up to 400 V shows an increase in the collection efficiency with the voltage. The time-resolved detector current behavior during beam interrupts is comparable to diamond material, and the background current is negligible. The measured percentage depth dose curves at 10 cm  ×  10 cm field size agreed with the results of ionization chamber measurements within  ±2%. This is a first study of boron nitride as a detector material for high-energy photon radiation. By current measurements on solid ionization chambers made from boron nitride chips we could demonstrate that boron nitride is in principle suitable as a detector material for high-energy photon-beam dosimetry.

  2. Photon emission by ultra-relativistic positrons in crystalline undulators: the high-energy regime

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, W; Solov'yov, A V; Greiner, W

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the undulator radiation emitted by high-energy positrons during planar channeling in periodically bent crystals. We demonstrate that the construction of the undulator for positrons with energies of 10 GeV and above is only possible if one takes into account the radiative energy losses. The frequency of the undulator radiation depends on the energy of the particle. Thus the decrease of the particle's energy during the passage of the crystal should result in the destruction of the undulator radiation regime. However, we demonstrate that it is possible to avoid the destructive influence of the radiative losses on the frequency of the undulator radiation by the appropriate variation of the shape of the crystal channels. We also discuss a method by which, to our mind, it would be possible to prepare the crystal with the desired properties of its channels.

  3. Isotopic quantum effects in water structure measured with high energy photon diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomberli, B.; Benmore, C. J.; Egelstaff, P. A.; Neuefeind, J.; Honkimäki, V.

    2000-03-01

    High energy electromagnetic radiation scattering techniques have been used to measure the structural differences between light and heavy water: we have studied both intra- and intermolecular effects. These methods and our data analysis are described in detail. We have observed a maximum isotopic effect of 1.6% relative to the magnitude of the x-ray structure factor. Our uncertainties are an order of magnitude smaller than those of previous icons/Journals/Common/gamma" ALT="gamma" ALIGN="TOP"/> -ray measurements (Root J H, Egelstaff P A and Hime A 1986 Chem. Phys. 109 5164) and this has permitted us to test accurately the available quantum simulation results on water. The SPC and TIP4P potentials reproduce the measured results in r -space moderately well for intermolecular effects at distances greater than 2.5 Å. These results show that H2 O is a slightly more disordered liquid than D2 O at the same temperature.

  4. The effect of partially used high energy photon on intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Nam Joon; Seok, Jin Yong; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Choi, Ji Hun; Park, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    A selection of proper energy in treatment planning is very important because of having different dose distribution in body as photon energy. In generally, the low energy photon has been used in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H and N) cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of partially used high energy photon at posterior oblique fields on IMRT plan for H and N cancer. The study was carried out on 10 patients (nasopharyngeal cancer 5, tonsilar cancer 5) treated with IMRT in Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. CT images were acquired 3 mm of thickness in the same condition and the treatment plan was performed by Eclipse (Ver.7.1, Varian, Palo Alto, USA). Two plans were generated under same planing objectives, dose volume constraints, and eight fields setting: (1) The low energy plan (LEP) created using 6 MV beam alone, (2) the partially used high energy plan (PHEP) created partially using 15 MV beam at two posterior oblique fields with deeper penetration depths, while 6 MV beam was used at the rest of fields. The plans for LEP and PHEP were compared in terms of coverage, conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for planning target volume (PTV). For organs at risk (OARs), D{sub mean} and D{sub 50%} were analyzed on both parotid glands and D{sub max}, D{sub 1%} for spinal cord were analyzed. Integral dose (ID) and total monitor unit (MU) were compared as addition parameters. For the comparing dose to normal tissue of posterior neck, the posterior-normal tissue volume (P-NTV) was set on the patients respectively. The D{sub mean}, V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 25Gy} for P-NTV were evaluated by using dose volume histogram (DVH). The dose distributions were similar with regard to coverage, CI and HI for PTV between the LEP and PHEP. No evident difference was observed in the spinal cord. However, the D{sub mean}, D{sub 50%} for both parotid gland were slightly reduced by 0.6%, 0.7% in PHEP. The ID was reduced by 1

  5. Detection of High Energy Cosmic Rays at the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    CERN Document Server

    de Jong, Sijbrand

    2016-01-01

    Detection of (ultra-) high-energy cosmic rays with the use of radio frequency emission from extensive air showers has been proven as complimentary to existing ground array detection techniques. Great progress has been made in the understanding of the emission processes and in their Monte Carlo modelling. These have led to experimental results, notably also at the Auger Engineering Radio Array, on energy, angular and mass composition resolution of the primary cosmic rays. Recent results are reported. The measured resolutions turn out to be competitive with existing techniques and they have independent uncertainties. Implications for cross-calibration with existing techniques and for future large-scale applications of radio detection of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays are discussed.

  6. A Study of the use of a Crystal as a `Quarter-Wave Plate' to Produce High Energy Circularly Polarized Photons

    CERN Multimedia

    Kononets, I

    2002-01-01

    %NA59 %title\\\\ \\\\We present a proposal to study the use of a crystal as a `quarter-wave plate' to produce high energy circularly polarized photons, starting from unpolarized electrons. The intention is to generate linearly polarized photons by letting electrons pass a crystalline target, where they interact coherently with the lattice nuclei. The photon polarization is subsequently turned into circular polarization after passing another crystal, which acts as a `quarter-wave plate'.

  7. Radiation-hard Silicon Photonics for Future High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2089774; Troska, Jan

    Collisions of proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN produce very high radiation levels in the innermost parts of the particle detectors and enormous amounts of measurement data. Thousands of radiation-hard optical links based on directly-modulated laser diodes are thus installed in the particle detectors to transmit the measurement data to the processing electronics. The radiation levels in the innermost regions of future particle detectors will be much higher than they are now. Alternative solutions to laser-based radiation-hard optical links have to be found since the performance of laser diodes decreases beyond the operation margin of the system when irradiated to sufficiently high radiation levels. Silicon Photonics (SiPh) is currently being investigated as a promising alternative technology. First tests have indeed shown that SiPh Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZMs) are relatively insensitive to a high neutron fluence. However, they showed a strong degradation when exposed to ionizing radiation. ...

  8. Time-dose relationship of erythema in high energy photon irradiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hidetoshi (Gifu Prefectural Tajimi Hospital (Japan)); Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1992-01-01

    Skin doses of 100 patients who were treated with high energy ionizing irradiation during conventional irradiation therapy were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD). In 87 of the 100 patients, acute hyperemic change of the skin (erythema) of the irradiated region was observed. In the other 13 patients, alopetia of the scalp was observed. The following conclusions were reached. The time-dose relationship was linear when erythema tolerance was used as an index, but not when alopecia was used. The tolerance dose for erythema was lower than previously reported. The slope of the isoeffect curve on the log-log plot of total absorbed skin dose against total number of days after the first irradiation was 0.68 when erythema was used as an index. This number is larger than previously reported results. We considered that erythema is significantly influenced by fraction size and that hyperfractionation is a promising method of irradiation, especially in Japan. Combined use of chemotherapeutic agents, such as 5-FU, accelerated erythema. The slope of combined treatment was 0.86. Observing acute hyperemic change of skin is considered to be a useful method of investigating the combined effects of chemotherapeutic agents on irradiation. (author).

  9. Statistical analysis of the limitation of half integer resonances on the available momentum acceptance of the High Energy Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yi; Duan, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    In a diffraction-limited storage ring, half integer resonances can have strong effects on the beam dynamics, associated with the large detuning terms from the strong focusing and strong sextupoles as required for an ultralow emittance. In this study, the limitation of half integer resonances on the available momentum acceptance (MA) was statistically analyzed based on one design of the High Energy Photon Source (HEPS). It was found that the probability of MA reduction due to crossing of half integer resonances is closely correlated with the level of beta beats at the nominal tunes, but independent of the error sources. The analysis indicated that for the presented HEPS lattice design, the rms amplitude of beta beats should be kept below 1.5% horizontally and 2.5% vertically to reach a small MA reduction probability of about 1%.

  10. Effects of high energy photon emissions in laser generated ultra-relativistic plasmas: Real-time synchrotron simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Erik; Gonoskov, Arkady; Marklund, Mattias

    2015-03-01

    We model the emission of high energy photons due to relativistic charged particle motion in intense laser-plasma interactions. This is done within a particle-in-cell code, for which high frequency radiation normally cannot be resolved due to finite time steps and grid size. A simple expression for the synchrotron radiation spectra is used together with a Monte-Carlo method for the emittance. We extend previous work by allowing for arbitrary fields, considering the particles to be in instantaneous circular motion due to an effective magnetic field. Furthermore, we implement noise reduction techniques and present validity estimates of the method. Finally, we perform a rigorous comparison to the mechanism of radiation reaction, and find the emitted energy to be in excellent agreement with the losses calculated using radiation reaction.

  11. Simple runtime high energy photon emission for ultra relativistic laser-plasma interaction in a PIC-code

    CERN Document Server

    Wallin, Erik; Marklund, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    We model the emission of high energy photons due to relativistic particles in a plasma interacting with a super-intense laser. This is done in a particle-in-cell code where the high frequency radiation normally cannot be resolved, due to the unattainable demands it would place on the time and space resolution. A simple expression for the synchrotron radiation spectra is used together with a Monte-Carlo method for the emittance. We extend to previous work by accounting acceleration due to arbitrary fields, considering the particles to be in instantaneous circular motion due to an effective magnetic field. Furthermore we implement noise reduction techniques and present estimations of the validity of the method. Finally we perform a rigorous comparison to the mechanism of radiation reaction, with the emitted energy very well in agreement with the radiation reaction loss.

  12. Ultra high energy photons as probes of Lorentz symmetry violations in stringy space-time foam models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Liberati, Stefano [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); INFN, Trieste (Italy); Sigl, Guenter [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-03-15

    The time delays between gamma-rays of different energies from extragalactic sources have often been used to probe quantum gravity models in which Lorentz symmetry is violated. It has been claimed that these time delays can be explained by or at least put the strongest available constraints on quantum gravity scenarios that cannot be cast within an effective field theory framework, such as the space-time foam, D-brane model. Here we show that this model would predict too many photons in the ultra-high energy cosmic ray flux to be consistent with observations. The resulting constraints on the space-time foam model are much stronger than limits from time delays and allow for Lorentz violations effects way too small for explaining the observed time delays. (orig.)

  13. Single-photon detection, truth, and misinterpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berloffa, E. H.

    2013-10-01

    Within this investigation it is critically questioned, if we really can detect "single photons", respectively the response of a single quantum transition by use of modern photon detectors. In the course it is shown that avalanche photodiodes (AVDs) especially in the "Geiger" mode by virtue of its geometry (effective area) indeed can detect "single photon" events as proclaimed by the manufacturers, but they tacitly assume the bandwidth of originating visible source being not greater than ~ 2.107 [Hz]. A short excurse to solid state basic physics makes it obvious applying the adequate doping accomplishes "single photon detection". Nevertheless this does not mean there is a 1:1 correspondence between a photon emanated from the source location and that detected within the detector module. Propagation characteristics were simply overlooked during the numerous discussions about "single photon" detection. Practical examples are worked out on hand of a pin- / and a AVDphotodiode.

  14. Nanobolometers for THz Photon Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Karasik, Boris S; Prober, Daniel E; 10.1109/TTHZ.2011.2159560

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the state of rapidly emerging terahertz hot-electron nanobolometers (nano-HEB), which are currently among of the most sensitive radiation power detectors at submillimeter wavelengths. With the achieved noise equivalent power close to 10^{-19} W/Hz^{1/2} and potentially capable of approaching NEP ~ 10^{-20} W/Hz^{1/2}, nano-HEBs are very important for future space astrophysics platforms with ultralow submillimeter radiation background. The ability of these sensors to detect single low-energy photons opens interesting possibilities for quantum calorimetry in the mid-infrared and even in the farinfrared parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. We discuss the competition in the field of ultrasensitive detectors, the physics and technology of nano-HEBs, recent experimental results, and perspectives for future development.

  15. Possible High-Energy Neutrino and Photon Signals from Gravitational Wave Bursts due to Double Neutron Star Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, He; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2013-01-01

    As the technology of gravitational-wave and neutrino detectors becomes increasingly mature, a multi-messenger era of astronomy is ushered in. Advanced gravitational wave detectors are close to making a ground-breaking discovery of gravitational wave bursts (GWBs) associated with mergers of double neutron stars (NS-NS). It is essential to study the possible electromagnetic (EM) and neutrino emission counterparts of these GWBs. Recent observations and numerical simulations suggest that at least a fraction of NS-NS mergers may leave behind a massive millisecond magnetar as the merger product. Here we show that protons accelerated in the forward shock powered by a magnetar wind pushing the ejecta launched during the merger process would interact with photons generated in the dissipating magnetar wind and emit high energy neutrinos and photons. We estimate the typical energy and fluence of the neutrinos from such a scenario. We find that $\\sim$PeV neutrinos could be emitted from the shock front as long as the ejec...

  16. Neutron spectral measurements in an intense photon field associated with a high-energy x-ray radiotherapy machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holeman, G R; Price, K W; Friedman, L F; Nath, R

    1977-01-01

    High-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines in the supermegavoltage region generate complex neutron energy spectra which make an exact evaluation of neutron shielding difficult. Fast neutrons resulting from photonuclear reactions in the x-ray target and collimators undergo successive collisions in the surrounding materials and are moderated by varying amounts. In order to examine the neutron radiation exposures quantitatively, the neutron energy spectra have been measured inside and outside the treatment room of a Sagittaire medical linear accelerator (25-MV x rays) located at Yale-New Haven Hospital. The measurements were made using a Bonner spectrometer consisting of 2-, 3-, 5-, 8-, 10- and 12-in.-diameter polyethylene spheres with 6Li and 7Li thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips at the centers, in addition to bare and cadmium-covered chips. The individual TLD chips were calibrated for neutron and photon response. The spectrometer was calibrated using a known PuBe spectrum Spectrometer measurements were made at Yale Electron Accelerator Laboratory and results compared with a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer and an activation technique. The agreement between the results from these independent methods is found to be good, except for the measurements in the direct photon beam. Quality factors have been inferred for the neutron fields inside and outside the treatment room. Values of the inferred quality factors fall primarily between 4 and 8, depending on location.

  17. Generation of multiple excitons in Ag2S quantum dots: Single high-energy versus multiple-photon excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2014-02-20

    We explored biexciton generation via carrier multiplication (or multiple-exciton generation) by high-energy photons and by multiple-photon absorption in Ag2S quantum dots (QDs) using femtosecond broad-band transient absorption spectroscopy. Irrespective of the size of the QDs and how the multiple excitons are generated in the Ag2S QDs, two distinct characteristic time constants of 9.6-10.2 and 135-175 ps are obtained for the nonradiative Auger recombination of the multiple excitons, indicating the existence of two binding excitons, namely, tightly bound and weakly bound excitons. More importantly, the lifetimes of multiple excitons in Ag 2S QDs were about 1 and 2 orders of magnitude longer than those of comparable size PbS QDs and single-walled carbon nanotubes, respectively. This result is significant because it suggests that by utilizing an appropriate electron acceptor, there is a higher possibility to extract multiple electron-hole pairs in Ag2S QDs, which should improve the performance of QD-based solar cell devices. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  18. Exclusive vector mesons at high energies: from photon-proton to proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäfer Wolfgang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Photoproduction of vector mesons has been studied since the 1960’s and was instrumental in establishing the hadronic structure of the photon and the concept of vectormeson dominance. More recently our knowledge on vector meson photoproduction has been furthered by experiments at the HERA accelerator. Total cross sections ans well as a number of kinematical distributions have been measured from light to heavy vector mesons. These experiments have been a testbed of ideas on the production mechanism, the QCD Pomeron exchange. In particular in varying the mass of the vector meson we can study the Pomeron exchange from the soft to the perturbatively hard regimes. The production mechanism also contains information on the quark-antiquark wave function of the produced meson. High energy protons or ions are the source of a flux of Weizsäcker-Williams photons, which can be utilized to study the photoproduction of vector mesons also at the Tevatron and LHC colliders. We discuss how information on the small-x gluon distribution in protons in nuclei can be obtained. Besides this intrinsic interest in vector meson production, a precise knowledge thereof is also necessary for odderon searches. In this regard, we discuss also transverse momentum distributions including absorption effects.

  19. Overview of lunar detection of ultra-high energy particles and new plans for the SKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Clancy W.

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution, the status of lunar particle detection is reviewed, with particular attention paid to outstanding theoretical questions, and the technical challenges of using a giant radio array to search for nanosecond pulses. The activities of SKA’s High Energy Cosmic Particles Focus Group are described, as is a roadmap by which this group plans to incorporate this detection mode into SKA-low observations. Estimates for the sensitivity of SKA-low phases 1 and 2 to UHE particles are given, along with the achievable science goals with each stage. Prospects for near-future observations with other instruments are also described.

  20. A compact acoustic calibrator for ultra-high energy neutrino detection

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Bou-Cabo, M; Larosa, G; Llorens, C D; Martínez-Mora, J A

    2012-01-01

    With the aim to optimize and test the method of acoustic detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos in underwater telescopes a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed. The acoustic parametric effect is used to reproduce the acoustic signature of an ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction. Different reseach and development studies are presented in order to show the viability of the parametric sources technique to deal with the difficulties of the acoustic signal generation: a very directive transient bipolar signal with pancake directivity. The design, construction and characterization of the prototype are described, including simulation of the propagation of an experimental signal, measured in a pool, over a distance of 1 km. Following these studies, next steps will be testing the device in situ, in underwater neutrino telescope, or from a vessel in a sea campaign.

  1. Radio detection of Cosmic-Ray Air Showers and High-Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, Frank G

    2016-01-01

    This review provides an introduction to the radio emission by particle cascades, an overview on the various experiments, and explains methods for the radio measurement of air-shower properties. Furthermore, potential applications of the radio technique in high-energy astroparticle physics are discussed. Due to the successful operation of digital radio experiments and due to the improved quantitative understanding of the emission, radio detection is back on the list of promising techniques for extensive air showers. With a threshold of about 100 PeV radio detectors are particularly useful to study the highest-energy galactic cosmic rays and ultra-high-energy extragalactic particles of all types. Various antenna arrays like LOPES, CODALEMA, AERA, LOFAR, and Tunka-Rex have shown that radio measurements can compete in precision with other techniques, in particular for the arrival direction, the energy, and the position of the shower maximum. The scientific potential of the radio technique seems to be maximum in c...

  2. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    OpenAIRE

    Duval, A.; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J. B.; Hoiby, P E; Missier, V; Pedersen, L. H.; Hansen, Theis Peter; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Bang, Ole

    2004-01-01

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy and the use of a transversal illumination setup.

  3. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duval, A; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J B

    2004-01-01

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy and ...

  4. Follow-up of high energy neutrinos detected by the ANTARES telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Aurore

    2016-04-01

    The ANTARES telescope is well-suited to detect high energy neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky with a high duty cycle. Potential neutrino sources are gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae and flaring active galactic nuclei. To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a detection method based on follow-up observations from the neutrino direction has been developed. This program, denoted as TAToO, includes a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT, Zadko and MASTER) and the Swift-XRT telescope, which are triggered when an "interesting" neutrino is detected by ANTARES. A follow-up of special events, such as neutrino doublets in time/space coincidence or a single neutrino having a very high energy or in the specific direction of a local galaxy, significantly improves the perspective for the detection of transient sources. The analysis of early and long term follow-up observations to search for fast and slowly varying transient sources, respectively, has been performed and the results covering optical and X-ray data are presented in this contribution.

  5. Follow-up of high energy neutrinos detected by the ANTARES telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ANTARES telescope is well-suited to detect high energy neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky with a high duty cycle. Potential neutrino sources are gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae and flaring active galactic nuclei. To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a detection method based on follow-up observations from the neutrino direction has been developed. This program, denoted as TAToO, includes a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT, Zadko and MASTER and the Swift-XRT telescope, which are triggered when an “interesting” neutrino is detected by ANTARES. A follow-up of special events, such as neutrino doublets in time/space coincidence or a single neutrino having a very high energy or in the specific direction of a local galaxy, significantly improves the perspective for the detection of transient sources. The analysis of early and long term follow-up observations to search for fast and slowly varying transient sources, respectively, has been performed and the results covering optical and X-ray data are presented in this contribution.

  6. Overview of lunar detection of ultra-high energy particles and new plans for the SKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Clancy W.; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Bray, Justin D.; Buitink, Stijn; Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D.; Ekers, Ronald D.; Falcke, Heino; Gayley, Ken; Huege, Tim; Mevius, Maaijke; Mutel, Rob; Scholten, Olaf; Spencer, Ralph; ter Veen, Sander; Winchen, Tobias

    2017-03-01

    The lunar technique is a method for maximising the collection area for ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic ray and neutrino searches. The method uses either ground-based radio telescopes or lunar orbiters to search for Askaryan emission from particles cascading near the lunar surface. While experiments using the technique have made important advances in the detection of nanosecond-scale pulses, only at the very highest energies has the lunar technique achieved competitive limits. This is expected to change with the advent of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the low-frequency component of which (SKA-low) is predicted to be able to detect an unprecedented number of UHE cosmic rays. In this contribution, the status of lunar particle detection is reviewed, with particular attention paid to outstanding theoretical questions, and the technical challenges of using a giant radio array to search for nanosecond pulses. The activities of SKA's High Energy Cosmic Particles Focus Group are described, as is a roadmap by which this group plans to incorporate this detection mode into SKA-low observations. Estimates for the sensitivity of SKA-low phases 1 and 2 to UHE particles are given, along with the achievable science goals with each stage. Prospects for near-future observations with other instruments are also described.

  7. Detection of infrared photons with a superconductor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG LaBao; ZHONG YangYin; KANG Lin; CHEN Jian; JI ZhengMing; XU WeiWei; CAO ChunHai

    2009-01-01

    A superconductor single photon detector based on NbN nanowire was fabricated using electron beam lithography (EBL) and reactive ion etching (RIE) for infrared photon detection. When biased well below its critical current at 4.2 K, NbN nanowire is very sensitive to the incident photons. Typical telecommunication photons with a wavelength of 1550 nm were detected by this detector. Data analysis indicates the repeating rate of the device with 200 nm NbN nanowire may be up to 100 MHz, and the quantum efficiency is about 0.01% when biased at 0.95Ic.

  8. The Role and Detectability of the Charm Contribution to Ultra High Energy Neutrino Fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Gandhi, Raj; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    It is widely believed that charm meson production and decay may play an important role in high energy astrophysical sources of neutrinos, especially those that are baryon-rich, providing an environment conducive to pp interactions. Using slow-jet supernovae (SJS) as an example of such a source, we study the detectability of high-energy neutrinos, paying particular attention to those produced from charmed-mesons. We highlight important distinguishing features in the ultra-high energy neutrino flux which would act as markers for the role of charm in the source. In particular, charm leads to significant event rates at higher energies, after the conventional (pi, K) neutrino fluxes fall off. We calculate event rates both for a nearby single source and for diffuse SJS fluxes for an IceCube-like detector. By comparing muon event rates for the conventional and prompt fluxes in different energy bins, we demonstrate the striking energy dependence in the rates induced by the presence of charm. We also show that it lead...

  9. Discussion on the geometric factor in the detection of high energy electrons in geospace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    High energy electron is a kind of sources to be detected in the geospace environment. Generally, the particle telescope with much thick semiconductor detector is used as the sensor for energetic electrons because they can penetrate deeply into the detector. The more energy of the electrons is, the deeper they can penetrate into, so that the geometric factor varies with energy of the incident electrons. We discuss the geometric factor of particle radiation detector (PRD), which is a payload on ZY-1 (CBERS-1 and CBERS-2) satellites to monitor the high energy particle radiation inside the satellites. According to the NASA's AE8 model, the geometric factors of electrons for the low energy bin (0.5-1.0 MeV) and the high energy bin (> 2.0 MeV) are 2.468 and 1.736 cm2·sr, respectively. These results are much different from the traditional calculation of the geometric factor that is 1.18 cm2·sr. The angle-response function of the telescope is also derived, which can be useful for design of the telescope and analysis of the directional distribution.

  10. Development Toward a Ground-Based Interferometric Phased Array for Radio Detection of High Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Avva, J; Chesebro, T; Cremonisi, L; Deaconu, C; Gupta, A; Ludwig, A; Messino, W; Miki, C; Nichol, R; Oberla, E; Romero-Wolf, A; Saltzberg, D; Schlupf, C; Shipp, N; Varner, G; Vieregg, A G; Wissel, S A

    2016-01-01

    A promising method for further measurements of high energy neutrinos at the PeV scale and above is through an in-ice radio interferometric phased array, designed to look for Askaryan emission from neutrinos interacting in large volumes of glacial ice. Such a detector would be sensitive to two populations of neutrinos: the PeV-scale astrophysical neutrino flux recently detected by IceCube, and the predicted cosmogenic ultra-high energy (UHE) flux ($E>10^{17}$ eV). Characterizing these high energy neutrino populations is an important step toward understanding the most energetic cosmic accelerators, and the discovery of UHE neutrinos would allow us to probe fundamental physics at energy scales that are not achievable on Earth. We report here on studies validating the phased array technique, including measurements and a simulation of thermal noise correlations between nearby antennas, beamforming for impulsive signals, and a measurement of the expected improvement in trigger efficiency through the phased array te...

  11. Discussion on the geometric factor in the detection of high energy electrons in geospace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    High energy electron is a kind of sources to be detected in the geospace environ- ment. Generally, the particle telescope with much thick semiconductor detector is used as the sensor for energetic electrons because they can penetrate deeply into the detector. The more energy of the electrons is, the deeper they can penetrate into, so that the geometric factor varies with energy of the incident electrons. We discuss the geometric factor of particle radiation detector (PRD), which is a payload on ZY-1 (CBERS-1 and CBERS-2) satellites to monitor the high energy particle ra- diation inside the satellites. According to the NASA’s AE8 model, the geometric factors of electrons for the low energy bin (0.5―1.0 MeV) and the high energy bin (> 2.0 MeV) are 2.468 and 1.736 cm2·sr, respectively. These results are much differ- ent from the traditional calculation of the geometric factor that is 1.18 cm2·sr. The angle-response function of the telescope is also derived, which can be useful for design of the telescope and analysis of the directional distribution.

  12. PHOTON09. Proceedings of the international conference on the structure and interactions of the photon including the 18th international workshop on photon-photon collisions and the international workshop on high energy photon linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Olaf; Diehl, Markus; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Steinbrueck, Georg (eds.)

    2010-01-15

    The following topics were dealt with: Electroweak and new physics, photon-collider technology, low-energy photon experiments, prompt photons, photon structure, jets and heavy flavours, vacuum polarization and light-by-light scattering, small-x processes, diffraction, total cross sections, exclusive channels and resonances, photons in astroparticle physics. (HSI)

  13. Photon detection at subwavelength scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We first investigate the microscopic working principle of the nanowire superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs), and we find that the edge of the nanowire is much more sensitive than the central part. The experimental results agree quantitatively with the theory based on a photon-assisted ver

  14. Experimental analysis of general ion recombination in a liquid-filled ionization chamber in high-energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eunah; Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital (L5-113), 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Davis, Stephen [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal General Hospital (L5-112), 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To study experimentally the general ion recombination effect in a liquid-filled ionization chamber (LIC) in high-energy photon beams. Methods: The general ion recombination effect on the response of a micro liquid ion chamber (microLion) was investigated with a 6 MV photon beam in normal and SRS modes produced from a Varian{sup Registered-Sign} Novalis Tx{sup TM} linear accelerator. Dose rates of the linear accelerator were set to 100, 400, and 1000 MU/min, which correspond to pulse repetition frequencies of 60, 240, and 600 Hz, respectively. Polarization voltages applied to the microLion were +800 and +400 V. The relative collection efficiency of the microLion response as a function of dose per pulse was experimentally measured with changing polarization voltage and pulse repetition frequencies and was compared with the theoretically calculated value. Results: For the 60 Hz pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency was not different from the theoretical one for a pulsed beam more than 0.3% for both polarization voltages. For a pulsed radiation beam with a higher pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency converged to the theoretically calculated efficiency for continuous beams. This result indicates that the response of the microLion tends toward the response to a continuous beam with increasing pulse repetition frequency of a pulsed beam because of low ion mobility in the liquid. Conclusions: This work suggests an empirical method to correct for differences in general ion recombination of a LIC between different radiation fields. More work is needed to quantitatively explain the LIC general ion recombination behavior in pulsed beams generated from linear accelerators.

  15. Proposal to detect an emission of unusual super-high energy electrons in electron storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-peng Qian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to an extended Lorentz–Einstein mass formula taken into the uncertainty principle, it is predicted that the electron beams passing accelerating electric field should with a small probability generate abnormal super-high energy electrons which are much higher than the beam energy. Author’s preliminary experiment result at electron storage ring has hinted these signs, so suggests to more strictly detect this unusual phenomenon, and thus to test the extended mass formula as well as a more perfect special relativity.

  16. Theory of high-energy messengers

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the distant high-energy universe comes from photons, ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), high-energy neutrinos, and gravitational waves. The theory of high-energy messengers reviewed here focuses on the extragalactic background light at all wavelengths, cosmic rays and magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and neutrinos of extragalactic origin. Comparisons are drawn between the intensities of photons and UHECRs in intergalactic space, and the high-energy neutrinos recently detected with IceCube at about the Waxman-Bahcall flux. Source candidates for UHECRs and high-energy neutrinos are reviewed, focusing on star-forming and radio-loud active galaxies. HAWC and Advanced LIGO are just underway, with much anticipation.

  17. Theory of high-energy messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the distant high-energy universe comes from photons, ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), high-energy neutrinos, and gravitational waves. The theory of high-energy messengers reviewed here focuses on the extragalactic background light at all wavelengths, cosmic rays and magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and neutrinos of extragalactic origin. Comparisons are drawn between the intensities of photons and UHECRs in intergalactic space, and the high-energy neutrinos recently detected with IceCube at about the Waxman-Bahcall flux. Source candidates for UHECRs and high-energy neutrinos are reviewed, focusing on star-forming and radio-loud active galaxies. HAWC and Advanced LIGO are just underway, with much anticipation.

  18. Measurements of photon induced processes in CMS and forward proton detection at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rouby, Xavier; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    High energy photon induced processes at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) constitutes a unique testing ground for physics within and beyond the Standard Model of Elementary Particles. Colliding protons can interact by the exchange of one or two high energy photons, leading to very clean final state topologies. Several issues related to the study of photon interactions at the LHC are addressed in this Thesis. The detection of forward scattered protons, after the photon exchange, requires near-beam detectors. Developments of edgeless sensor prototypes have been realised as possible solutions for such an application. A proper design of these detectors has required developing a dedicated simulator (Hector) for the transport of charged particles particles in beamlines. Finally, the analyses of detection in the CMS experiment of the photon-induced exclusive production of lepton pairs are presented. In view of application early from the LHC start-up, in particular for the absolute luminosity measurement – the f...

  19. Optimal radio window for the detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos off the Moon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Bacelar, J.; Braun, R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Falcke, H.; Stappers, B.; Strom, R. G.

    2006-01-01

    When high-energy cosmic rays impinge on a dense dielectric medium, radio waves are produced through the Askaryan effect. We show that at wavelengths comparable to the length of the shower produced by an Ultra-High Energy cosmic ray or neutrino, radio signals are ail extremely efficient way to detect

  20. Photon statistics measurement by use of single photon detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Liantuan; JIANG Yuqiang; ZHAO Yanting; YIN Wangbao; ZHAO Jianming; JIA Suotang

    2004-01-01

    The direct measurement of the Mandel para- meter of weak laser pulses, with 10 ns pulse duration time and the mean number of photon per pulsebeing approximately 0.1, is investigated by recording every photocount event. With the Hanbury Brown and Twiss detection scheme, and not more than one photon per pulse being detected during the sample time by single-photon counters, we have found that the single mode diode laser with driving current lower than the threshold yields a sub-Poissonian statistics. In addition, when the diode laser driving current is much higher than the threshold, it is validated that the Mandel parameter QC of the Poissonian coherent state is nearly The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical prediction considering the measurement error.

  1. Detection of ultra-high energy cosmic ray showers with a single-pixel fluorescence telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, T; Bertaina, M; Casolino, M; Dawson, B; Horvath, P; Hrabovsky, M; Jiang, J; Mandat, D; Matalon, A; Matthews, J N; Motloch, P; Palatka, M; Pech, M; Privitera, P; Schovanek, P; Takizawa, Y; Thomas, S B; Travnicek, P; Yamazaki, K

    2015-01-01

    We present a concept for large-area, low-cost detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with a Fluorescence detector Array of Single-pixel Tele- scopes (FAST), addressing the requirements for the next generation of UHECR experiments. In the FAST design, a large field of view is covered by a few pixels at the focal plane of a mirror or Fresnel lens. We report first results of a FAST prototype installed at the Telescope Array site, consisting of a single 200 mm photomultiplier tube at the focal plane of a 1 m2 Fresnel lens system taken from the prototype of the JEM-EUSO experiment. The FAST prototype took data for 19 nights, demonstrating remarkable operational stability. We detected laser shots at distances of several kilometres as well as 16 highly significant UHECR shower candidates.

  2. Photon Statistics of Single-Photon Quantum States in Real Single Photon Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李刚; 李园; 王军民; 彭堃墀; 张天才

    2004-01-01

    @@ Single photon detection (SPD) with high quantum efficiency has been widely used for measurement of different quantum states with different photon distributions.Based on the direct single SPD and double-SPD of HBT configuration, we discuss the effect of a real SPD on the photon statistics measurement and it shows that the measured photon distributions for different quantum states are corrected in different forms.The results are confirmed by experiment with the strongly attenuated coherent light and thermal light.This system can be used to characterize the photon statistics of the fluorescence light from single atom or single molecular.

  3. Absorption of High Energy $\\gamma$ Rays by Interactions With Starlight Photons in Extragalactic Space at High Redshifts and the High Energy $\\gamma$-Ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Salamon, M H

    1998-01-01

    We calculate the absorption of 10-500 GeV gamma-rays at high redshifts. This calculation requires the determination of the high-redshift evolution of the intergalactic starlight photon field, including its IR-UV spectral energy distribution. To estimate this evolution, we have followed a recent analysis of Fall, Charlot and Pei which gives results consistent with recent data. We give our results for the gamma-ray opacity as a function of redshift out to a redshift of 3. We also give predicted gamma-ray spectra for selected blazars and give an extragalactic unresolved blazar background spectrum up to 500 GeV. Our results indicate that this background should steepen significantly above 20 GeV owing to intergalactic absorption. Future observations of this steepening would provide a test for the blazar background origin hypothesis. We have used our results to discuss upper limits on the redshifts of gamma-ray bursts. We note that the 17 Feb. 1994 burst observed by EGRET must have originated at a redshift less tha...

  4. The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) Facility onboard China's Future Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S N

    2014-01-01

    The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility is one of several space astronomy payloads of the cosmic lighthouse program onboard China's Space Station, which is planned for operation starting around 2020 for about 10 years. The main scientific objectives of HERD are indirect dark matter search, precise cosmic ray spectrum and composition measurements up to the knee energy, and high energy gamma-ray monitoring and survey. HERD is composed of a 3-D cubic calorimeter (CALO) surrounded by microstrip silicon trackers (STKs) from five sides except the bottom. CALO is made of about 10$^4$ cubes of LYSO crystals, corresponding to about 55 radiation lengths and 3 nuclear interaction lengths, respectively. The top STK microstrips of seven X-Y layers are sandwiched with tungsten converters to make precise directional measurements of incoming electrons and gamma-rays. In the baseline design, each of the four side SKTs is made of only three layers microstrips. All STKs will also be used for measuring the cha...

  5. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusciac, D.; Bordy, J.-M.; Daures, J.; Blideanu, V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists' demands for high-energy (6 - 9 MeV) photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors) are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes), a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV) has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this "realistic" radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  6. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusciac D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists’ demands for high-energy (6 – 9 MeV photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes, a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this “realistic” radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  7. High energy neutrino acoustic detection activities in Lake Baikal: Status and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aynutdinov, V.; Avrorin, A.; Balkanov, V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belolaptikov, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Bogorodsky, D. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation); Budnev, N. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: nbudnev@api.isu.ru; Danilchenko, I.; Domogatsky, G.; Doroshenko, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dyachok, A. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation); Dzhilkibaev, Zh.-A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fialkovsky, S. [Nizhni Novgorod State Technical University, Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation); Gaponenko, O. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Golubkov, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Gress, O.; Gress, T.; Grishin, O. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation); Klabukov, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Klimov, A. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kochanov, A. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation)] (and others)

    2009-06-01

    We review the status of high-energy acoustic neutrino detection activities in Lake Baikal. The Baikal collaboration constructed a hydro-acoustic device which may be regarded as a prototype subunit for a future underwater acoustic neutrino telescope. The device is capable of common operation with the Baikal neutrino telescope NT200+, and is operating at a depth of about 150 m on the 'NT200+ instrumentation string'. Our measurements show that the integral noise power in the frequency band 20-40 kHz can reach levels as low as about 1 mPa, i.e. one of the lowest noise levels measured at the currently considered acoustic neutrino sites. At the same time, short acoustic pulses with different amplitudes and shapes have been observed. Low sound absorption in Baikal freshwater and absence of strong acoustic noise sources do motivate further activities towards a large-scale acoustic neutrino detector in Lake Baikal.

  8. Detection of very high energy gamma-ray emission from NGC 1275 by the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Asensio, M; Backes, M; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Tridon, D Borla; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Cañellas, A; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Garrido, D; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Häfner, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Jogler, T; Kellermann, H; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Krause, J; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Leonardo, E; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Niedzwiecki, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Paiano, S; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Pardo, S; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Pilia, M; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Gimenez, I Puerto; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vankov, H; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Pfrommer, C; Pinzke, A

    2011-01-01

    We report on the detection of very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission from NGC 1275, the central radio galaxy of the Perseus cluster of galaxies. The source has been detected by the MAGIC telescopes with a statistical significance of 6.6 sigma above 100 GeV in 46 hr of stereo observations carried out between August 2010 and February 2011. The measured differential energy spectrum between 70 GeV and 500 GeV can be described by a power-law with a steep spectral index of Gamma = -4.1 +- 0.7stat +- 0.3syst, and the average flux above 100 GeV is F = (1.3 +- 0.2stat +- 0.3syst) x 10-11 cm-2 s-1. These results, combined with the power-law spectrum measured in the first two years of observations by the Fermi-LAT above 100 MeV, with a spectral index of Gamma ~= -2.1, strongly suggest the presence of a break or a cut-off around tens of GeV in the NGC 1275 spectrum. The light curve of the source above 100 GeV does not show hints of variability on month time-scale. Finally, we report on the non-detection i...

  9. Fast Photon Detection for Particle Identification with COMPASS RICH-1

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, P; Angerer, H; Apollonio, M; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, Franco; Bressan, A; Busso, L; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Costa, S; Dalla Torre, S; Dafni, T; Delagnes, E; Deschamps, H; Díaz, V; Dibiase, N; Duic, V; Eyrich, W; Faso, D; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Fischer, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Hagemann, R; Von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Horikawa, S; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Königsmann, K C; Kolosov, V N; Konorov, I; Kramer, Daniel; Kunne, Fabienne; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Mann, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Mutter, A; Nahle, O; Nerling, F; Neyret, D; Pagano, P; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Paul, S; Pesaro, G; Polak, J; Rebourgeard, P; Robinet, F; Rocco, E; Schiavon, Paolo; Schill, C; Schroder, W; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Steiger, L; Sulc, M; Svec, M; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Wollny, H; COMPASS RICH Upgrade Group

    2007-01-01

    Particle identification at high rates is an important challenge for many current and future high-energy physics experiments. The upgrade of the COMPASS RICH-1 detector requires a new technique for Cherenkov photon detection at count rates of several $10^6$ per channel in the central detector region, and a read-out system allowing for trigger rates of up to 100 kHz. To cope with these requirements, the photon detectors in the central region have been replaced with the detection system described in this paper. In the peripheral regions, the existing multi-wire proportional chambers with CsI photocathode are now read out via a new system employing APV pre-amplifiers and flash ADC chips. The new detection system consists of multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT) and fast read-out electronics based on the MAD4 discriminator and the F1-TDC chip. The RICH-1 is in operation in its upgraded version for the 2006 CERN SPS run. We present the photon detection design, constructive aspects and the first Cherenkov light ...

  10. Fast Photon Detection for COMPASS RICH1

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, P; Angerer, H; Apollonio, M; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Busso, L; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Costa, S; Dibiase, N; Dafni, T; Dalla Torre, S; Diaz, V; Duic, v; Delagnes, E; Deschamps, H; Eyrich, W; Faso, D; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Fischer, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Hagemann, R; Von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Königsmann, K; Kolosov, V N; Konorov, I; Kramer, D; Kunne, F; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Mann, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Mutter, A; Nähle, O; Neyret, D; Nerling, F; Pagano, P; Paul, S; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Pesaro, G; Pizzolotto, C; Polak, J; Rebourgeard, P; Rocco, E; Robinet, F; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schoenmeier, P; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Steiger, L; Sozzi, F; Sulc, M; Svec, M; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Wollny, H

    2006-01-01

    The new photon detection system for COMPASS RICH-1 has been designed to cope with the demanding requests of operation at high beam intensity and at high trigger rates. The detection technique in the central region of RICH-1 has been changed with a system based on multianode photomultipliers coupled to individual fused silica lens telescopes and to a fast, almost dead time free readout system based on the MAD-4 amplifier-discriminator and the F1 TDC-chip. The new photon detection system design and construction are described, as well as its first response in the experiment.

  11. Lunar detection of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bray, J. D.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Buitink, S.; Dagkesamanskii, R. D.; Ekers, R. D.; Falcke, H.; Gayley, K. G.; Huege, T.; James, C. W.; Mevius, M.; Mutel, R. L.; Protheroe, R. J.; Scholten, O.; Spencer, R. E.; ter Veen, S.

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the most energetic particles in nature, the ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays, is still a mystery. Due to their extremely low flux, even the 3,000 km^2 Pierre Auger detector registers only about 30 cosmic rays per year with sufficiently high energy to be used for directional studies.

  12. INTEGRAL detection of high energy emission from XMMSL1 J171900.4-353217

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishibashi, W.; Bozzo, Enrico; Terrier, Mereghetti, Paizis, Ducci, Gotz, Bazzano, Fiocchi, De Rosa, Tarana, Del Santo, Natalucci, Panessa, Capitanio, Sguer, Bianchin, Watanabe, Kuiper, Barragan, -

    2010-01-01

    the IBIS/ISGRI FOV for a total exposure time of 170 ks and was detected at a significance level of 6.5 sigma (20-40 keV energy band). The best fit position obtained from the OSA software is at RA: 259.738 DEC: -35.508 (J2000), with an associated error of 3.9 arcmin. The ISGRI spectrum is best fit...... with a power-law model of photon index Gamma=2.7-0.9+1.3 and the estimated flux is 3.0e-11 ergs/cm^2/s (20-40 keV energy band). The count-rate of the source slightly increased in the latest part of the observation. XMMSL1 J171900.4-353217 was not detected in the ISGRI hard energy band (40-80 ke......V) and the estimated 3 sigma upper limit on the X-ray flux is 4 mCrab. The source was also in the Jem-X FOV (total exposure time 24 ks), but not detected. We estimated a 3 sigma upper limit on the source flux of 6 mCrab (3-10 keV energy band). Further INTEGRAL observations of the region comprising XMMSL1 J171900...

  13. Fast photon detection for COMPASS RICH-1

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, P; Angerer, H; Apollonio, M; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, Franco; Bressan, A; Busso, L; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Costa, S; Dibiase, N; Dafni, T; Dalla Torre, S; Díaz, V; Duic, V; Delagnes, E; Deschamps, H; Eyrich, W; Faso, D; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, J M; Fischer, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Königsmann, K C; Kolosov, V N; Konorov, I; Kramer, Daniel; Kunne, Fabienne; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Mann, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Mutter, A; Nähle, O; Neyret, D; Nerling, F; Pagano, P; Paul, S; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Pesaro, G; Pizzolotto, C; Polak, J; Rebourgeard, P; Rocco, E; Robinet, F; Schiavon, Paolo; Schill, C; Schoenmeier, P; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Steiger, L; Sozzi, F; Sulc, M; Svec, M; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Wollny, H

    2007-01-01

    A fast photon detection system has been built and assembled for the upgrade of COMPASS RICH-1. The system is based on multianode photomultipliers coupled to fused silica lenses to collect the light from a larger surface and to guide it to the photocathode, preserving the position information. The emphasis is on the fast response and high rate capability of the detectors and the associated electronics. The photon detection system is now ready and it will be employed in the 2006 COMPASS data taking. We report about the system design and construction.

  14. Detecting single photons: a supramolecular matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangiano, Lorenzo; Dell'Orco, Daniele

    2013-01-04

    Rod photoreceptors detect single photons through a tradeoff of light collecting ability, amplification and speed. Key roles are played by rhodopsin (Rh) and transducin (G(t)), whose complex supramolecular organization in outer segment disks begs for a functional interpretation. Here we review past and recent evidence of a temperature-dependence of photon detection by mammalian rods, and link this phenomenon with the putative oligomeric organization of Rh and new ideas on the dynamics of Rh-G(t) interaction. Identifying an electrophysiological correlate of the supramolecular organization of Rh and G(t) may shed light on the evolutionary advantage it confers to night vision.

  15. Photon detection with cooled avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. L.; Metscher, B. D.

    1987-01-01

    Commercial avalanche photodiodes have been operated as single-photon detectors at an optimum operating temperature and bias voltage. These detectors were found to be 1.5-3 times more sensitive than presently available photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Both single-photon detection probability and detector noise increase with bias voltage; detection probabilities greater than twice that of a PMT were obtained with detector noise levels below 100 counts per second. Higher probabilities were measured at higher noise levels. The sources of noise and their dependence on temperature and bias voltage are discussed.

  16. Cooled avalanche photodiode used for photon detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Deborah L.; Metscher, Brian D.

    1987-01-01

    Commercial avalanche photodiodes have been operated as single-photon detectors at an optimum operating temperature and bias voltage. These detectors were found to be 1.5 to 3 times more sensitive than presently-available photomultiplier tubes (PPMTs). Both single-photon detection probability and detector noise increase with bias voltage; detection probabilities greater than 25 percent were obtained with detector noise levels comparable to the noise of a PMT; higher probabilities were measured at higher noise levels. The sources of noise and their dependence on temperature and bias voltage are discussed.

  17. Device for Detecting highly energetic photons

    OpenAIRE

    Chemissani Road, Mokhtar; Álvarez Pastor, José; Sánchez Sánchez, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    A device (10) for detecting highly energetic photons, comprising one or more pixelated solid-state detectors (11) for detecting the highly energetic photons; means for providing a high voltage for polarizing said solid-state detectors; one or more pixelated readout elements (30), a readout element being connected to each of said one or more pixelated solid-state detectors (11); an input/output element (12) connected to said readout elements (30) for data input and output; and a base layer (13...

  18. Single-Photon Detection at Telecom Wavelengths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhi-Bin; MA Hai-Qiang; LEI Ming; WANG Di; LIU Zhao-Jie; YANG Han-Dong; WU Ling-An; ZHAI Guang-Jie; FENG Ji

    2007-01-01

    A single-photon detector based on an InGaAs avalanche photodiode has been developed for use at telecom wavelengths. A suitable delay and sampling gate modulation circuit are used to prevent positive and negative transient pulses from influencing the detection of true photon induced avalanches. A monostable trigger circuit eliminates the influence of avalanche peak jitter, and a dead time modulation feedback control circuit decreases the afterpulsing. From performance tests we find that at the optimum operation point, the quantum efficiency is 12% and the dark count rate 1.5 × 10-6 ns-1, with a detection rate of 500 kHz.

  19. Arrays of Ultrathin CdS Nanoflakes with High-Energy Surface for Efficient Gas Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Hua; Yin, Peng-Fei; Kulinich, Sergei A; Zhou, Yu-Zhu; Mao, Jing; Ling, Tao; Du, Xi-Wen

    2017-01-11

    It is fascinating and challenging to endow conventional materials with unprecedented properties. For instance, cadmium sulfide (CdS) is an important semiconductor with excellent light response; however, its potential in gas-sensing was underestimated owing to relatively low chemical activity and poor electrical conductivity. Herein, we demonstrate that an ideal architecture, ultrathin nanoflake arrays (NFAs), can improve significantly gas-sensing properties of CdS material. The CdS NFAs are grown directly on the interdigitated electrode to expose large surface area. Their thickness is reduced below the double Debye length of CdS, permitting to achieve a full depletion of carriers. Particularly, the prepared CdS nanoflakes are enclosed with high-energy {0001} facets exposed, which provides more active sites for gas adsorption. Moreover, the NFAs exhibit the light-trapping effect, which further enhances their gas sensitivity. As a result, the as-prepared CdS NFAs demonstrate excellent gas-sensing and light-response properties, thus being capable of dual gas and light detection.

  20. High-Energy Non-Thermal and Thermal Emission from GRB141207A detected by Fermi

    CERN Document Server

    Arimoto, Makoto; Ohno, Masanori; Veres, Péter; Axelsson, Magnus; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Tachibana, Yutaro; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The bright long gamma-ray burst GRB 141207A was observed by the {\\it Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope} and detected by both instruments onboard. The observations show that the spectrum in the prompt phase is not well described by the canonical empirical Band function alone, and that an additional power-law component is needed. In the early phase of the prompt emission, a modified blackbody with a hard low-energy photon index ($\\alpha$ = +0.2 -- +0.4) is detected, which suggests a photospheric origin. In a finely time-resolved analysis, the spectra are also well fitted by the modified blackbody combined with a power-law function. We discuss the physical parameters of the photosphere such as the bulk Lorentz factor of the relativistic flow and the radius. We also discuss the physical origin of the extra power-law component observed during the prompt phase in the context of different models such as leptonic and hadronic scenarios in the internal shock regime and synchrotron emission in the external forward shock....

  1. Photon-induced positron annihilation for standoff bomb detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.A., E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor Darul Takzim (Malaysia); Hashim, S. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor Darul Takzim (Malaysia); Cabello, J.; Wells, K. [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Dunn, W.L. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, 3002 Rathbone Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2010-07-21

    We describe an approach to detect improvised explosive devices (IEDs) by using photon-induced positron annihilation radiation (PIPAR). This system relies on back-scattered {gamma} photons from the target and surrounding objects following exposure to high energy X-rays from a betatron. In this work we simulate the use of Bremsstrahlung source operating at 3.5 MeV, with a scintillation detector, working in PIPAR mode, in order to reduce noise produced by undesired back-scattering from the surrounding objects. In this paper, we describe the basic imaging method and preliminary results on simulating a suitable betatron source. Two types of X-ray filters copper (Cu) and aluminium (Al), have been used in the simulation to observe their differences in the deposited energy spectrum in the iron target. It was found that the use of iron target in conjunction with 2 mm Al filter is capable of detecting annihilation {gamma} photons. An initiated experiment with an interlaced source also shows promise.

  2. Calculation of Nuclear Particles Production at High-Energy Photon Beams from a Linac Operating at 6, 10 and 15 MV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Renato; Bettega, Daniela; Calzolari, Paola; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2017-05-01

    Production of photonuclear particles in a tissue-equivalent medium has been calculated for linacs at 6, 10 and 15 MV from Varian TrueBeam. Based on the knowledge of bremsstrahlung fluence spectra and linac photon beam parameters, numerical integration was performed on the cross sections for photoparticle production of the constituent elements of tissue (2H,12C,13C,16O,17O,18O,14N,15N). At 15 MV, at the depth of photon maximum dose, the total absorbed dose due to neutrons, protons, alphas and residual nuclei from photon reactions in tissue (5.5E-05 Gy per Gy of photons) is comparable to that due to neutrons from accelerator head. Results reasonably agree with data reported in the literature using Monte Carlo models simulating linac head components. This work suggests a simple method to estimate the dose contributed by the photon-induced nuclear particles for high-energy photon beams produced by linacs in use, as it might be relevant for late stochastic effects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Photon Counting Using Edge-Detection Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Farr, William H.

    2010-01-01

    New applications such as high-datarate, photon-starved, free-space optical communications require photon counting at flux rates into gigaphoton-per-second regimes coupled with subnanosecond timing accuracy. Current single-photon detectors that are capable of handling such operating conditions are designed in an array format and produce output pulses that span multiple sample times. In order to discern one pulse from another and not to overcount the number of incoming photons, a detection algorithm must be applied to the sampled detector output pulses. As flux rates increase, the ability to implement such a detection algorithm becomes difficult within a digital processor that may reside within a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Systems have been developed and implemented to both characterize gigahertz bandwidth single-photon detectors, as well as process photon count signals at rates into gigaphotons per second in order to implement communications links at SCPPM (serial concatenated pulse position modulation) encoded data rates exceeding 100 megabits per second with efficiencies greater than two bits per detected photon. A hardware edge-detection algorithm and corresponding signal combining and deserialization hardware were developed to meet these requirements at sample rates up to 10 GHz. The photon discriminator deserializer hardware board accepts four inputs, which allows for the ability to take inputs from a quadphoton counting detector, to support requirements for optical tracking with a reduced number of hardware components. The four inputs are hardware leading-edge detected independently. After leading-edge detection, the resultant samples are ORed together prior to deserialization. The deserialization is performed to reduce the rate at which data is passed to a digital signal processor, perhaps residing within an FPGA. The hardware implements four separate analog inputs that are connected through RF connectors. Each analog input is fed to a high-speed 1

  4. Picosecond Photon Echoes Detected by Optical Mixing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Wim H.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1978-01-01

    Picosecond photon echoes are shown to be easily detected by optical mixing. The synchronized picosecond excitation and probe pulses are generated by amplifying pulses from two dye lasers, synchronously pumped by a mode-locked argon-ion laser. The technique is used to study optical dephasing in the o

  5. Two-dimensional photonic crystal surfactant detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Smith, Natasha; Asher, Sanford A

    2012-08-07

    We developed a novel two-dimensional (2-D) crystalline colloidal array photonic crystal sensing material for the visual detection of amphiphilic molecules in water. A close-packed polystyrene 2-D array monolayer was embedded in a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogel film. These 2-D photonic crystals placed on a mirror show intense diffraction that enables them to be used for visual determination of analytes. Binding of surfactant molecules attaches ions to the sensor that swells the PNIPAAm-based hydrogel. The resulting increase in particle spacing red shifts the 2-D diffracted light. Incorporation of more hydrophobic monomers increases the sensitivity to surfactants.

  6. A compact BaF sub 2 array for high energy (< or approx. 50 MeV) photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, W.J.; Gan, N.; Caraley, A.L.; Fineman, B.J.; McGrath, R.L.; Vojtech, R.J. (Dept. of Physics, State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States))

    1992-03-15

    A compact array of seven BaF{sub 2} detectors with active plastic shielding has been developed for the measurement of hard photons in the presence of fast neutrons and cosmic ray muon background. (orig.).

  7. Photon detection with CMOS sensors for fast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudot, J. [IPHC, Universite Louis Pasteur, CNRS/IN2P3, BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: baudot@in2p3.fr; Dulinski, W.; Winter, M. [IPHC, Universite Louis Pasteur, CNRS/IN2P3, BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Barbier, R.; Chabanat, E.; Depasse, P.; Estre, N. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Lyon, F-69003 (France); Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne, F-69622 (France)

    2009-06-01

    Pixel detectors employed in high energy physics aim to detect single minimum ionizing particle with micrometric positioning resolution. Monolithic CMOS sensors succeed in this task thanks to a low equivalent noise charge per pixel of around 10 to 15 e{sup -}, and a pixel pitch varying from 10 to a few 10 s of microns. Additionally, due to the possibility for integration of some data treatment in the sensor itself, readout times of 100{mu}s have been reached for 100 kilo-pixels sensors. These aspects of CMOS sensors are attractive for applications in photon imaging. For X-rays of a few keV, the efficiency is limited to a few % due to the thin sensitive volume. For visible photons, the back-thinned version of CMOS sensor is sensitive to low intensity sources, of a few hundred photons. When a back-thinned CMOS sensor is combined with a photo-cathode, a new hybrid detector results (EBCMOS) and operates as a fast single photon imager. The first EBCMOS was produced in 2007 and demonstrated single photon counting with low dark current capability in laboratory conditions. It has been compared, in two different biological laboratories, with existing CCD-based 2D cameras for fluorescence microscopy. The current EBCMOS sensitivity and frame rate is comparable to existing EMCCDs. On-going developments aim at increasing this frame rate by, at least, an order of magnitude. We report in conclusion, the first test of a new CMOS sensor, LUCY, which reaches 1000 frames per second.

  8. Portal verification of high-energy electron beams using their photon contamination by film-cassette systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Peter; Baus, Wolfgang W; Baumann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Though electron beams are widely used in radiotherapy, their verification is not well established in clinical practice. The present study compares the suitability of several sensitive film-cassette systems for electron-portal verification by contaminating photons. The characteristics of the optical density curves of film-cassette combinations were determined by exposing them to the bremsstrahlung contamination of a variety of electron beams. Using a Las-Vegas Phantom the spatial low-contrast resolution of the combinations was investigated. The absorbed dose rates due to the contaminant photons were measured for different geometric conditions. Suitable film-cassette combinations were found for portal verification of all usual electron energies. The best image quality was obtained using the EC film and the EC-L cassettes. For electron energies higher than 6 MeV some film-cassette combinations are suitable to verify abutted electron and photon portals using the same film sheet. The verification of electron portals and of abutted electron-photon portals can be performed by sensitive film-cassette systems with an image quality comparable to photon-beam verification.

  9. Ultra-high-energy cosmic ray and neutrino detection using the Moon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Olaf; Buitink, S.; Falcke, H.; James, C. W.; Mevius, M.; Singh, K.; Stappers, B.; Ter Veen, S.

    2011-01-01

    When Ultra-high-energy (UHE) neutrinos or cosmic rays interact in the lunar surface they will initiate a particle cascade. These cascades have a sizeable negative charge excess and radiate coherent Cherenkov radio emission in a process known as the Askaryan effect. The optimal frequency window for o

  10. Implementation of trigger for detection of ultra high energy cosmic rays with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, K.; Bähren, L.; Falcke, H.; Horneffer, A.; Kooistra, E.; Scholten, O.

    2008-01-01

    Using all stations of LOFAR we are planning to explore the possibility of using Moon as a detector of ultra high energy (>10 21 eV) cosmic rays. The idea is to cover the whole visible lunar surface and to look for short pulses of Cherenkov radiation emitted by showers induced just below the surface

  11. Lunar detection of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos with the Square Kilometre Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bray, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Buitink, S.; Dagkesamanskii, R.; Ekers, R. D.; Falcke, H. D. E.; Gayley, K.; Huege, T.; James, C. W.; Mevius, M.; Mutel, R.; Protheroe, R. J.; Scholten, O.; Schroeder, F.; Spencer, R. E.; ter Veen, S.

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the most energetic particles in nature, the ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays, is still a mystery. Only the most energetic of these have sufficiently small angular deflections to be used for directional studies, and their flux is so low that even the 3,000 km^2 Pierre Auger detector

  12. Implementation of trigger for detection of ultra high energy cosmic rays with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, K.; Bähren, L.; Falcke, H.; Horneffer, A.; Kooistra, E.; Scholten, O.

    2008-01-01

    Using all stations of LOFAR we are planning to explore the possibility of using Moon as a detector of ultra high energy (>10 21 eV) cosmic rays. The idea is to cover the whole visible lunar surface and to look for short pulses of Cherenkov radiation emitted by showers induced just below the surface

  13. Photonic Crystal Fiber Interferometer for Dew Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Jinesh; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for dew detection based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) interferometer that operates in reflection mode is presented in this paper. The fabrication of the sensor head is simple since it only involves cleaving and fusion splicing. The sensor shows good sensitivity to dew formation with a large wavelength peak shift of the interference pattern at the onset of dew formation. The device’s response to ambient humidity and temperature are also studied and reported in this paper. From...

  14. Ultra-High Energy Astrophysical Neutrino Detection, and the Search for Lorentz Invariance Violations

    CERN Document Server

    Hanson, J C

    2016-01-01

    A growing class of ultra-high energy neutrino (UHE-nu) observatories based on the Askaryan effect and Antarctic ice is able to search for Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). The ARA, ARIANNA, ANITA and EVA collaborations have the power to constrain the Standard Model Extension (SME) by measuring the flux and energy distribution of neutrinos created through the GZK process. The future expansion of ARA, at the South Pole, pushes the discovery potential further.

  15. Prospects for the detection of high-energy (E > 25 GeV) Fermi pulsars with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtovoi, A.; Saito, T. Y.; Zampieri, L.; Hassan, T.

    2017-10-01

    Around 160 gamma-ray pulsars were discovered by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) since 2008. The most energetic of them, 12 objects with emission above 25 GeV, are suitable candidates for the detection with the current and future Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes above few tens of GeV. We perform an analysis of the Fermi-LAT data of these high-energy pulsars in order to determine if such objects can be detected with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Our goal is to forecast the significance of their point source detection with CTA. We analyse 5 yr of the Fermi-LAT data fitting the spectra of each pulsar at energies E > 10 GeV with a power-law function. Assuming no spectral cut-off, we extrapolate the resulting spectra to the very high energy range (VHE, E > 0.1 TeV) and simulate CTA observations of all 12 pulsars with the ctools software package. Using different analysis tools, individual CTA sensitivity curves are independently calculated for each pulsar and cross-checked with the ctools results. Our simulations result in significant CTA detections of up to eight pulsars in 50 h. Observations of the most energetic Fermi pulsars with CTA will shed light on the nature of the high-energy emission of pulsars, clarifying whether the VHE emission detected in the Crab pulsar spectrum is present also in other gamma-ray pulsars.

  16. A study of Rhizophora spp wood phantom for dosimetric purposes using high-energy photon and electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banjade, D.P. E-mail: dpbl4007@stud.usm.my; Tajuddin, A.A.; Shukri, A

    2001-09-01

    Previous scattering and depth-dose investigations involving use of the Malaysian hardwood Rhizophora spp have shown this medium to produce good agreement with measurements made in water. Present study extends the comparison, now including measurements of percentage depth-dose made for photons at 6 MV and 5 and 12 MeV electron beams. For the 6 MV photon and 5 MeV electron beams, discrepancies between percentage depth-dose for Rhizophora spp and water, at all depths, are found to be within 2.6 and 2.4% respectively. At 12 MeV electron energies, measured percentage depth-doses in Rhizophora spp beyond 3.5 cm depth are found to be in significant discord with those for water. The absorbed dose in water measured in Rhizophora spp at d{sub max} for all three beams produces discrepancies of no more than 1.1% when compared with measurements made in water.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary radiation exposure from high-energy photon therapy using an anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankl, Matthias; Macián-Juan, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    The development of intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatments delivering large amounts of monitor units (MUs) recently raised concern about higher risks for secondary malignancies. In this study, optimised combinations of several variance reduction techniques (VRTs) have been implemented in order to achieve a high precision in Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport simulations and the calculation of in- and out-of-field photon and neutron dose-equivalent distributions in an anthropomorphic phantom using MCNPX, v.2.7. The computer model included a Varian Clinac 2100C treatment head and a high-resolution head phantom. By means of the applied VRTs, a relative uncertainty for the photon dose-equivalent distribution of 8 MeV, has been calculated. Relative uncertainty, calculated for each voxel, could be kept below 5 % in average over all voxels of the phantom. Thus, a very detailed neutron dose distribution could be obtained. The achieved precision now allows a far better estimation of both photon and especially neutron doses out-of-field, where neutrons can become the predominant component of secondary radiation.

  18. SU-E-T-336: Dosimetric Properties of a New Solid Water High Equivalency Phantom for High-Energy Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, F; Ohno, T; Onitsuka, R [Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Shimohigashi, Y [Kumamoto University Hospital, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric properties in high-energy photon beams for a Solid Water High Equivalency (SWHE, SW557) phantom (Gammex) which was newly developed as water mimicking material. Methods: The mass density of SWHE and SWHE/water electron density ratio are 1.032 g/cm{sup 3} and 1.005 according to the manufacturer information, respectively. SWHE is more water equivalent material in physical characteristics and uniformity than conventional SW457. This study calculated the relative ionization ratio of water and SWHE as a function of depth from the cavity dose in PTW30013 and Exradin A19 Farmer-type ionization chambers using Monte Caro simulations. The simulation was performed with a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field at SAD of 100 cm for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photons. The ionization ratio was also measured with the PTW30013 chamber for 6 and 15 MV photons. In addition, the overall perturbation factor of both chambers was calculated for both phantoms. Results: The relative ionization ratio curves for water and SWHE was in good agreement for all photon energies. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE for both chambers was 0.999–1.002, 0.999–1.002, 1.001–1.004, 1.004–1.007, and 1.006–1.010 at depths of over the buildup region for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photons, respectively. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE increased up to 1% with increasing the photon energy. The measured ionization ratio of water/SWHE for 6 and 15 MV photons agreed well with calculated values. The overall perturbation factor for both chambers was 0.983–0.988 and 0.978–0.983 for water and SWHE, respectively, in a range from 4 MV to 18 MV. Conclusion: The depth scaling factor of water/SWHE was equal to unity for all photon energies. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE at a reference depth was equal to unity for 4 and 6 MV and larger up to 0.7% than unity for 18 MV.

  19. Precision direct photon spectra at high energy and comparison to the 8 TeV ATLAS data

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    The direct photon spectrum is computed to the highest currently available precision and compared to ATLAS data from 8 TeV collisions at the LHC. The prediction includes threshold resummation at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic order through the program PeTeR, matched to next-to-leading fixed order with fragmentation effects using JetPhox and includes the resummation of leading-logarithmic electroweak Sudakov effects. Remarkably, improved agreement with data can be seen when each component of the calculation is added successively. This comparison demonstrates the importance of both threshold logs and electroweak Sudakov effects. Numerical values for the predictions are included.

  20. Detecting Abrupt Changes in the Spectra of High-Energy Astrophysical Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Raymond K W; Lee, Thomas C M; van Dyk, David A

    2015-01-01

    Variable-intensity astronomical sources are the result of complex and often extreme physical processes. Abrupt changes in source intensity are typically accompanied by equally sudden spectral shifts, i.e., sudden changes in the wavelength distribution of the emission. This article develops a method for modeling photon counts collected form observation of such sources. We embed change points into a marked Poisson process, where photon wavelengths are regarded as marks and both the Poisson intensity parameter and the distribution of the marks are allowed to change. We believe this is the first effort to embed change points into a marked Poisson process. Between the change points, the spectrum is modeled non-parametrically using a mixture of a smooth radial basis expansion and a number of local deviations from the smooth term representing spectral emission lines. Because the model is over parameterized we employ an $\\ell_1$ penalty. The tuning parameter in the penalty and the number of change points are determin...

  1. Addendum to the AAPM's TG-51 protocol for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, Malcolm, E-mail: malcolm.mcewen@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); DeWerd, Larry [University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Physics, M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Followill, David [IROC Houston QA Center, Radiological Physics Center, 8060 El Rio Street, Houston, Texas 77054 (United States); Rogers, David W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Seltzer, Stephen [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Québec (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    An addendum to the AAPM's TG-51 protocol for the determination of absorbed dose to water in megavoltage photon beams is presented. This addendum continues the procedure laid out in TG-51 but new k{sub Q} data for photon beams, based on Monte Carlo simulations, are presented and recommendations are given to improve the accuracy and consistency of the protocol's implementation. The components of the uncertainty budget in determining absorbed dose to water at the reference point are introduced and the magnitude of each component discussed. Finally, the consistency of experimental determination of N{sub D,w} coefficients is discussed. It is expected that the implementation of this addendum will be straightforward, assuming that the user is already familiar with TG-51. The changes introduced by this report are generally minor, although new recommendations could result in procedural changes for individual users. It is expected that the effort on the medical physicist's part to implement this addendum will not be significant and could be done as part of the annual linac calibration.

  2. Calibrating the photon detection efficiency in IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Delia

    2015-01-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory is composed of more than five thousand light sensors, Digital Optical Modules (DOMs), installed on the surface and at depths between 1450 and 2450 m in clear ice at the South Pole. Each DOM incorporates a 10-inch diameter photomultiplier tube (PMT) intended to detect light emitted when high energy neutrinos interact with atoms in the ice. Depending on the energy of the neutrino and the distance from secondary particle tracks, PMTs can be hit by up to several thousand photons within a few hundred nanoseconds. The number of photons per PMT and their time distribution is used to reject background events and to determine the energy and direction of each neutrino. The detector energy scale was established from previous lab measurements of DOM optical sensitivity, then refined based on observed light yield from stopping muons and calibration of ice properties. A laboratory setup has now been developed to more precisely measure the DOM optical sensitivity as a function of angle and w...

  3. Photonic crystal microcapsules for label-free multiplex detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Baofen; Ding, Haibo; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Hongcheng; Zhao, Yuanjin; Xie, Zhuoying; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-05-28

    A novel suspension array, which possesses the joint advantages of photonic crystal encoded technology, bioresponsive hydrogels, and photonic crystal sensors with capability of full multiplexing label-free detection is developed.

  4. Using Quasiparticle Poisoning To Detect Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echternach, Pierre; Day, Peter

    2006-01-01

    According to a proposal, a phenomenon associated with excitation of quasiparticles in certain superconducting quantum devices would be exploited as a means of detecting photons with exquisite sensitivity. The phenomenon could also be exploited to perform medium-resolution spectroscopy. The proposal was inspired by the observation that Coulomb blockade devices upon which some quantum logic gates are based are extremely sensitive to quasiparticles excited above the superconducting gaps in their leads. The presence of quasiparticles in the leads can be easily detected via the charge states. If quasiparticles could be generated in the leads by absorption of photons, then the devices could be used as very sensitive detectors of electromagnetic radiation over the spectral range from x-rays to submillimeter waves. The devices in question are single-Cooper-pair boxes (SCBs), which are mesoscopic superconducting devices developed for quantum computing. An SCB consists of a small superconducting island connected to a reservoir via a small tunnel junction and connected to a voltage source through a gate capacitor. An SCB is an artificial two-level quantum system, the Hamiltonian of which can be controlled by the gate voltage. One measures the expected value of the charge of the eigenvectors of this quantum system by use of a radio-frequency single-electron transistor. A plot of this expected value of charge as a function of gate voltage resembles a staircase that, in the ideal case, consists of steps of height 2 e (where e is the charge of one electron). Experiments have shown that depending on the parameters of the device, quasiparticles in the form of "broken" Cooper pairs present in the reservoir can tunnel to the island, giving rise to steps of 1 e. This effect is sometimes called "poisoning." Simulations have shown that an extremely small average number of quasiparticles can generate a 1-e periodic signal. In a device according to the proposal, this poisoning would be

  5. Simulation Study on High Energy Cosmic Electron Detection by Shower Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Many projects have recently been carried out and proposed for observing high energy electrons since it is realized that cosmic ray electrons are very important when study ing the dark matter particles and the acceleration mechanism of cosmic rays. An imaging calorimeter, BETS (Balloon-borne Electron Telescope with Scintillator fiber), has been de veloped for this purpose. Using pattern analysis of the shower development, the electrons can be selected from those primary cosmic ray proton events with flux heights one-tenth that of the electrons. The Monte-Carlo simulation is indispensable for the instrument design, the sig nal trigger and the data analysis. We present different shower simulation codes and compare the simulation results with the beam test and the flight data of BETS. We conclude that the code FLUKA2002 gives the most consistent results with the experimental data.

  6. Analysis of $\\pi^{0},\\eta$ and $\\omega$ mesons in pp collisions with a high energy photon trigger at ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Yano, Satoshi

    High energy heavy ion collision is a powerful and unique tool to achieve the high density and temperature like the early universe. At normal temperature, partons are confined in nucleons and they can not move freely due to the asymp- totic freedom which is a property of the Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). However, at high density and/or high temperature, they can be deconfined from nucleons. This phase is called the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Hadron production measurements in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies can observe new phenomena which must be a frontier in the particle physics and allow validation of the predictive power of the QCD and can provide further constrains on pQCD theory for LHC energies. It is well known that the yield of high transvers momentum particles is suppressed in nucleus-nucleus collisions relative to that in proton-proton collisions. This effect is attributed to energy loss of parent partons or perhaps of hadrons after freeze-out. Since π 0 , η and...

  7. Isotopic quantum effects in the structure of liquid methanol: I. Experiments with high-energy photon diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomberli, B.; Egelstaff, P. A.; Benmore, C. J.; Neuefeind, J.

    2001-12-01

    High-energy electromagnetic radiation scattering techniques have been used to measure the structural differences between four isotopic samples of methanol (CH3OH, CD3OD, CH3OD and CD3OH). The first series of experiments employed room temperature and ambient pressure. The carbon-oxygen intramolecular bond length was measured and found to depend more strongly on the isotopic substitution at the hydroxyl site than at the methyl sites. The oscillations in the isotopic difference of the x-ray structure factor, ΔSX(Q), are shown at room temperature to be about 2% as large as the oscillations in the total structure factor. Our uncertainties are an order of magnitude smaller than those of previous gamma ray measurements (Benmore C J and Egelstaff P A 1996 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 8 9429-32). A second series of experiments was carried out at -80 °C at its vapour pressure in order to study the significant temperature dependence of these effects. The ΔSX(Q) difference at -80 °C is shown to be up to three times larger than the room temperature difference. These studies showed that isotopic structural differences in methanol may be represented as temperature shifts that vary as a function of thermodynamic state and substitution site.

  8. Influence of the atmosphere on the space detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays; Influence de l'atmosphere sur la detection spatiale des rayons cosmiques d'ultra-haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreggia, S

    2007-06-15

    EUSO (Extreme Universe Space Observatory) is a project of ultra-high energy (> 10{sup 20} eV) cosmic rays detection from space. Its concept relies on the observation of fluorescence and Cerenkov photons emitted by extensive air showers from a telescope located on the International Space Station. A simulation software has been developed to study the characteristics of this innovative concept of detection. It deals with the different steps of the detection chain: extensive air shower development, emission of fluorescence and Cerenkov light, and radiative transfer to the telescope. A Monte-Carlo code has been implemented to simulate the propagation of photons through the atmosphere, dealing with multiple scattering in clear sky conditions as well as in presence of aerosols and clouds. With this simulation program, the impact of atmospheric conditions on the performance of a space-located detector has been studied. The precise treatment of photons propagation through the atmosphere has permitted to quantify the scattered light contribution to the detected signal. (author)

  9. Detection of ultra high energy neutrinos by IceCube: Sterile neutrino scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Rajpoot, Subhash; Wang, Hsi Ching

    2013-01-01

    The short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, the excess of radiation from the measurement of the cosmic microwave background radiation, the necessity of the nonbaryonic dark matter candidate and the depletion of the neutrino flux in IceCube all seem to hint at new physics beyond the standard model. An economical way to address these issues is to invoke the existence of sterile neutrinos. We present simple extensions of the standard model with sterile neutrinos and discuss the corresponding PMNS like neutrino flavor mixing matrix. The noteworthy features of the sterile neutrino scenario advocated here is that the lightest one is almost degenerate with one of the active neutrinos, the second sterile has mass of order eV and the heaviest one is in the keV range. Our proposed mixing matrix is also compatible with the observed neutrino oscillation data. We show that the high energy muon and the tau neutrino fluxes from Gamma Ray Bursts can be depleted in IceCube by as much as 38% and 26% respectively. Thes...

  10. Capability of the HAWC gamma-ray observatory for the indirect detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Vargas, Hermes León; Belmont, Ernesto; Alfaro, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    The detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos, with energies in the PeV range or above, is a topic of great interest in modern astroparticle physics. The importance comes from the fact that these neutrinos point back to the most energetic particle accelerators in the Universe, and provide information about their underlying acceleration mechanisms. Atmospheric neutrinos are a background for these challenging measurements, but their rate is expected to be negligible above $\\approx$ 1 PeV. In this work we describe the feasibility to study ultra-high energy neutrinos based on the Earth-skimming technique, by detecting the charged leptons produced in neutrino-nucleon interactions in a high mass target. We propose to detect the charged leptons, or their decay products, with the recently inaugurated High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, and use as a large mass target for the neutrino interactions the Pico de Orizaba volcano, the highest mountain in Mexico. In this work we develop an estimate of the detect...

  11. Detection potential of the KM3NeT detector for high-energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    KM3NeT Collaboration; Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Aguilar, J. A.; Aharonian, F.; Aiello, S.; Albert, A.; Alexandri, M.; Ameli, F.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A.; Aubert, J.-J.; Bakker, R.; Ball, A. E.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Baret, B.; de Bel, M.; Belias, A.; Bellou, N.; Berbee, E.; Berkien, A.; Bersani, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bigourdan, B.; Billault, M.; de Boer, R.; Boer Rookhuizen, H.; Bonori, M.; Borghini, M.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhadef, B.; Bourlis, G.; Bouwhuis, M.; Bradbury, S.; Brown, A.; Bruni, F.; Brunner, J.; Brunoldi, M.; Busto, J.; Cacopardo, G.; Caillat, L.; Calvo Díaz-Aldagalán, D.; Calzas, A.; Canals, M.; Capone, A.; Carr, J.; Castorina, E.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Cereseto, R.; Chaleil, Th.; Chateau, F.; Chiarusi, T.; Choqueuse, D.; Christopoulou, P. E.; Chronis, G.; Ciaffoni, O.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Cohen, F.; Colijn, F.; Coniglione, R.; Cordelli, M.; Cosquer, A.; Costa, M.; Coyle, P.; Craig, J.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; D'Amico, A.; Damy, G.; De Asmundis, R.; De Bonis, G.; Decock, G.; Decowski, P.; Delagnes, E.; De Rosa, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q.; Drogou, J.; Drouhin, D.; Druillole, F.; Drury, L.; Durand, D.; Durand, G. A.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Espinosa, V.; Etiope, G.; Favali, P.; Felea, D.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fotiou, A.; Fritsch, U.; Gajanana, D.; Garaguso, R.; Gasparini, G. P.; Gasparoni, F.; Gautard, V.; Gensolen, F.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Gialas, I.; Giordano, V.; Giraud, J.; Gizani, N.; Gleixner, A.; Gojak, C.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Grasso, D.; Grimaldi, A.; Groenewegen, R.; Guédé, Z.; Guillard, G.; Guilloux, F.; Habel, R.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; van Heerwaarden, J.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hillebrand, T.; van de Hoek, M.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; Imbesi, M.; Jamieson, A.; Jansweijer, P.; de Jong, M.; Jouvenot, F.; Kadler, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Karolak, M.; Katz, U. F.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Keller, P.; Kiskiras, Y.; Klein, R.; Kok, H.; Kontoyiannis, H.; Kooijman, P.; Koopstra, J.; Kopper, C.; Korporaal, A.; Koske, P.; Kouchner, A.; Koutsoukos, S.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Laan, M.; La Fratta, C.; Lagier, P.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Leisos, A.; Lenis, D.; Leonora, E.; Le Provost, H.; Lim, G.; Llorens, C. D.; Lloret, J.; Löhner, H.; Lo Presti, D.; Lotrus, P.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Lykousis, V.; Malyshev, D.; Mangano, S.; Marcoulaki, E. C.; Margiotta, A.; Marinaro, G.; Marinelli, A.; Mariş, O.; Markopoulos, E.; Markou, C.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, A.; Marvaldi, J.; Masullo, R.; Maurin, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Minutoli, S.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C. M.; Mongelli, M.; Monmarthe, E.; Morganti, M.; Mos, S.; Motz, H.; Moudden, Y.; Mul, G.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Naumann, Ch.; Neff, M.; Nicolaou, C.; Orlando, A.; Palioselitis, D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Papaikonomou, A.; Papaleo, R.; Papazoglou, I. A.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Peek, H. Z.; Perkin, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Priede, I. G.; Psallidas, A.; Rabouille, C.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Randazzo, N.; Rapidis, P. A.; Razis, P.; Real, D.; Reed, C.; Reito, S.; Resvanis, L. K.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Rolin, J.; Rose, J.; Roux, J.; Rovelli, A.; Russo, A.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Samtleben, D.; Sapienza, P.; Schmelling, J.-W.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schroeder, K.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schussler, F.; Sciliberto, D.; Sedita, M.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Siotis, I.; Sipala, V.; Sollima, C.; Sparnocchia, S.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Staller, T.; Stavrakakis, S.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steijger, J.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Stransky, D.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, A.; Thompson, L.; Timmer, P.; Tonoiu, D.; Toscano, S.; Touramanis, C.; Trasatti, L.; Traverso, P.; Trovato, A.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urbano, F.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Werneke, P.; White, R. J.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zhukov, V.; Zonca, E.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2013-02-01

    A recent analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope data provided evidence for a high-intensity emission of high-energy gamma rays with a E-2 spectrum from two large areas, spanning 50° above and below the Galactic centre (the "Fermi bubbles"). A hadronic mechanism was proposed for this gamma-ray emission making the Fermi bubbles promising source candidates of high-energy neutrino emission. In this work Monte Carlo simulations regarding the detectability of high-energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles with the future multi-km3 neutrino telescope KM3NeT in the Mediterranean Sea are presented. Under the hypothesis that the gamma-ray emission is completely due to hadronic processes, the results indicate that neutrinos from the bubbles could be discovered in about one year of operation, for a neutrino spectrum with a cutoff at 100 TeV and a detector with about 6 km3 of instrumented volume. The effect of a possible lower cutoff is also considered.

  12. Detection Potential of the KM3NeT Detector for High-Energy Neutrinos from the Fermi Bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    A recent analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope data provided evidence for a high-intensity emission of high-energy gamma rays with a E^-2 spectrum from two large areas, spanning 50{\\deg} above and below the Galactic centre (the "Fermi bubbles"). A hadronic mechanism was proposed for this gamma-ray emission making the Fermi bubbles promising source candidates of high-energy neutrino emission. In this work Monte Carlo simulations regarding the detectability of high-energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles with the future multi-km^3 neutrino telescope KM3NeT in the Mediterranean Sea are presented. Under the hypothesis that the gamma-ray emission is completely due to hadronic processes, the results indicate that neutrinos from the bubbles could be discovered in about one year of operation, for a neutrino spectrum with a cutoff at 100 TeV and a detector with about 6 km^3 of instrumented volume. The effect of a possible lower cutoff is also considered.

  13. FAMOUS – A prototype silicon photomultiplier telescope for the fluorescence detection of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Middendorf Lukas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their high photon detection efficiency, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs promise to increase the sensitivity of today's fluorescence telescopes which use photomultiplier tubes to detect light originating from extensive air showers. On the other hand, drawbacks like a small sensitive area, a strong temperature dependence, a high noise rate and a reduced dynamic range have to be managed. We present plans for FAMOUS, a prototype fluorescence telescope using SiPMs and a special light collecting optical system of Winston cones to increase the sensitive area. The prototype will make use of a Fresnel lens. For several different types of SiPMs we measured their characteristics. Moreover, we will present the R&D in compact modular electronics using photon counting techniques. An evaluation of the performance of the optical telescope design is performed by means of a full detector simulation.

  14. Delivery of high energy Er:YAG pulsed laser light at 2.94 µm through a silica hollow core photonic crystal fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urich, A; Maier, R R J; Mangan, B J; Renshaw, S; Knight, J C; Hand, D P; Shephard, J D

    2012-03-12

    In this paper the delivery of high power Er:YAG laser pulses through a silica hollow core photonic crystal fibre is demonstrated. The Er:YAG wavelength of 2.94 µm is well beyond the normal transmittance of bulk silica but the unique hollow core guidance allows silica to guide in this regime. We have demonstrated for the first time the ability to deliver high energy pulses through an all-silica fibre at 2.94 µm. These silica fibres are mechanically and chemically robust, biocompatible and have low sensitivity to bending. A maximum pulse energy of 14 mJ at 2.94 µm was delivered through the fibre. This, to our knowledge, is the first time a silica hollow core photonic crystal fibre has been shown to transmit 2.94 μm laser light at a fluence exceeding the thresholds required for modification (e.g. cutting and drilling) of hard biological tissue. Consequently, laser delivery systems based on these fibres have the potential for the realization of novel, minimally-invasive surgical procedures.

  15. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying Biomedical Photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy This volume discusses biomedical photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy, the basic physical principles underlying the technology and its applications. The topics discussed in this volume are: Biophotonics; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Medical Photonics; Microscopy; Nonlinear Optics; Ophthalmic Technology; Optical Tomography; Optofluidics; Photodynamic Therapy; Image Processing; Imaging Systems; Sensors; Single Molecule Detection; Futurology in Photonics. Comprehensive and accessible cov

  16. Microscale mapping of SPAD photon detection probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, D. A. B.; Gros-Daillon, E.; Verger, L.

    2017-05-01

    As silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) technology still has potential for further improvements, we describe a method to map the photon detection probability of a single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) at the microscale level, in order to evaluate the behavior of the SPAD triggering capabilities as a function of the position of the incident light and to determine its homogeneity. For this purpose, we performed the analysis of the light response for a single active SPAD, with all its neighbors switched off, using a scanning setup, composed of the digital SiPM SPADnet-I data acquisition system, a microscope, a servo positioning system, a spectrograph and a CCD camera. We varied the wavelength of the incoming light to probe the device volume from the P-well to the N-well, with the ultimate goal of understanding and improving overall sensor performance. The comparison of this study to SPAD design and electric field technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation enables one to estimate how much the P-well drawn area could be increased to optimize fill factor without causing premature edge breakdown through guard ring failure.

  17. Single and few photon avalanche photodiode detection process study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazej, Josef; Prochazka, Ivan

    2009-07-01

    We are presenting the results of the study of the Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) pulse response risetime and its dependence on several key parameters. We were investigating the unique properties of K14 type SPAD with its high delay uniformity of 200 μm active area and the correlation between the avalanche buildup time and the photon number involved in the avalanche trigger. The detection chip was operated in a passive quenching circuit with active gating. This setup enabled us to monitor the diode reverse current using an electrometer, a fast digitizing oscilloscope, and using a custom design comparator circuit. The electrometer reading enabled to estimate the photon number per detection event, independently on avalanche process. The avalanche build up was recorded on the oscilloscope and processed by custom designed waveform analysis package. The correlation of avalanche build up to the photon number, bias above break, photon absorption location, optical pulse length and photon energy was investigated in detail. The experimental results are presented. The existing solid state photon counting detectors have been dedicated for picosecond resolution and timing stability of single photon events. However, the high timing stability is maintained for individual single photons detection, only. If more than one photon is absorbed within the detector time resolution, the detection delay will be significantly affected. This fact is restricting the application of the solid state photon counters to cases where single photons may be guaranteed, only. For laser ranging purposes it is highly desirable to have a detector, which detects both single photon and multi photon signals with picoseconds stability. The SPAD based photon counter works in a purely digital mode: a uniform output signal is generated once the photon is detected. If the input signal consists of several photons, the first absorbed one triggers the avalanche. Obviously, for multiple photon signals, the

  18. Optimal Radio Window for the Detection of Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos off the Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Scholten, O; Braun, R; De Bruyn, A G; Falcke, H; Stappers, B; Strom, R G

    2006-01-01

    We show that at wavelengths comparable to the length of the shower produced by an Ultra-High Energy cosmic ray or neutrino, radio signals are an extremely efficient way to detect these particles. Through an example it is shown that this new approach offers, for the first time, the realistic possibility of measuring UHE neutrino fluxes below the Waxman-Bahcall limit. It is shown that in only one month of observing with the upcoming LOFAR radio telescope, cosmic-ray events can be measured beyond the GZK-limit, at a sensitivity level of two orders of magnitude below the extrapolated values.

  19. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence for early breast cancer biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Brian T; Zangar, Richard C

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces offer a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics. Through the complementary processes of photonic crystal enhanced excitation and enhanced extraction, a periodic dielectric-based nanostructured surface can simultaneously increase the electric field intensity experienced by surface-bound fluorophores and increase the collection efficiency of emitted fluorescent photons. Through the ability to inexpensively fabricate photonic crystal surfaces over substantial surface areas, they are amenable to single-use applications in biological sensing, such as disease biomarker detection in serum. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity, multiplexed biomarker detection in the context of breast cancer diagnosis. We will summarize recent efforts to improve the detection limits of such assays though the use of photonic crystal surfaces. Reduction of detection limits is driven by low autofluorescent substrates for photonic crystal fabrication, and detection instruments that take advantage of their unique features.

  20. High-energy Gamma-Ray Activity from V404 Cygni Detected by AGILE during the 2015 June Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Verrecchia, F.; Tavani, M.; Trushkin, S. A.

    2017-04-01

    The AGILE satellite detected transient high-energy γ-ray emission from the X-ray binary V404 Cygni, during the 2015 June outburst observed in radio, optical, X-ray, and soft γ-ray frequencies. The activity was observed by AGILE in the 50-400 MeV energy band, between 2015 June 24 UT 06:00:00 and 2015 June 26 UT 06:00:00 (MJD 57197.25-57199.25), with a detection significance of ˜4.3σ. The γ-ray detection, consistent with a contemporaneous observation by Fermi-LAT, is correlated with a bright flare observed at radio and hard X-ray frequencies, and with a strong enhancement of the 511 keV line emission, possibly indicating plasmoid ejections in a lepton-dominated transient jet. The AGILE observations of this binary system are compatible with a microquasar scenario in which transient jets are responsible for the high-energy γ-ray emission.

  1. What is the benefit of high energy photons within the frame of a pelvic volumetric modulated arc therapy?; Quel est l'interet des hautes energies de photons dans le cadre d'une arctherapie volumique modulee pelvienne?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenoglietto, P.; Ailleres, N.; Simeon, S.; Santoro, L.; Idri, K.; Moscardo, C.L.; Azria, D.; Dubois, J. [CRLC Val d' Aurelle, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2010-10-15

    As intensity-modulated volumetric arc therapy has known important development, a question still remains: is it still necessary to use machines producing very-high-energy photons to deliver the dose? Ten patients had been treated with a 18 MV photon beam and a new treatment plan has been designed using a 6 MV beam, based on the results obtained with the 18 MV beam. The only modification concerned the decrease of the dose rate. Treatments have been planned using the simulated integrated boost in the Eclipse software. The prostatic treatments appeared to be equivalent with the 18 MV and 6 MV beams, with no dosimetric impact of the dose rate decrease. Short communication

  2. Detection of ultra high energy neutrinos with an underwater very large volume array of acoustic sensors: A simulation study

    CERN Document Server

    Karg, T

    2006-01-01

    This thesis investigates the detection of ultra high energy (E > 1 EeV) cosmic neutrinos using acoustic sensors immersed in water. The method is based on the thermoacoustic model describing the production of microsecond bipolar acoustic pulses by neutrino-induced particle cascades. These cascades locally heat the medium which leads to rapid expansion and a short sonic pulse detectable in water with hydrophones over distances of several kilometres. This makes acoustic detection an approach complementary to todays optical Cerenkov and radio Cerenkov detectors, and could help to reduce the respective systematic uncertainties. In this work a complete simulation / reconstruction chain for a submarine acoustic neutrino telescope is developed, and the sensitivity of such a detector to a diffuse flux of ultra highenergy cosmic neutrinos is estimated.

  3. Enhanced photoacoustic detection using photonic crystal substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Kaiyang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); McClelland, John [Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Lu, Meng, E-mail: menglu@iastate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2014-04-21

    This paper demonstrates the enhanced photoacoustic sensing of surface-bound light absorbing molecules and metal nanoparticles using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) substrate. The PC structure functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength where the analyte absorption is strong. The optical resonance of the PC sensor provides an intensified evanescent field with respect to the excitation light source and results in enhanced optical absorption by surface-immobilized samples. For the analysis of a light absorbing dye deposited on the PC surface, the intensity of photoacoustic signal was enhanced by more than 10-fold in comparison to an un-patterned acrylic substrate. The technique was also applied to detect gold nanorods and exhibited more than 40 times stronger photoacoustic signals. The demonstrated approach represents a potential path towards single molecule absorption spectroscopy with greater performance and inexpensive instrumentation.

  4. Radio detection of high-energy cosmic rays at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, A.M.van den; Collaboration, for the Pierre Auger

    2007-08-01

    The southern Auger Observatory provides an excellent test bed to study the radio detection of extensive air showers as an alternative, cost-effective, and accurate tool for cosmic-ray physics. The data from the radio setup can be correlated with those from the well-calibrated baseline detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory. Furthermore, human-induced radio noise levels at the southern Auger site are relatively low. We have started an R&D program to test various radio-detection concepts. Our studies will reveal Radio Frequency Interferences (RFI) caused by natural effects such as day-night variations, thunderstorms, and by human-made disturbances. These RFI studies are conducted to optimize detection parameters such as antenna design, frequency interval, antenna spacing and signal processing. The data from our initial setups, which presently consist of typically 3 - 4 antennas, will be used to characterize the shower from radio signals and to optimize the initial concepts. Furthermore, the operation of a large detection array requires autonomous detector stations. The current design is aiming at stations with antennas for two polarizations, solar power, wireless communication, and local trigger logic. The results of this initial phase will provide an important stepping stone for the design of a few tens kilometers square engineering array.

  5. Acoustic detection of high energy neutrinos in sea water: status and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahmann Robert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic neutrino detection technique is a promising approach for future large-scale detectors with the aim of measuring the small expected flux of neutrinos at energies in the EeV-range and above. The technique is based on the thermo-acoustic model, which implies that the energy deposition by a particle cascade – resulting from a neutrino interaction in a medium with suitable thermal and acoustic properties – leads to a local heating and a subsequent characteristic pressure pulse that propagates in the surrounding medium. Current or recent test setups for acoustic neutrino detection have either been add-ons to optical neutrino telescopes or have been using acoustic arrays built for other purposes, typically for military use. While these arrays have been too small to derive competitive limits on neutrino fluxes, they allowed for detailed studies of the experimental technique. With the advent of the research infrastructure KM3NeT in the Mediterranean Sea, new possibilities will arise for acoustic neutrino detection. In this article, results from the “first generation” of acoustic arrays will be summarized and implications for the future of acoustic neutrino detection will be discussed.

  6. New method to detect rotation in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Csernai, Laszlo; Svelle, Sindre; Wang, Du-Juan

    2014-01-01

    With increasing beam energies the angular momentum of the fireball in peripheral heavy-ion collisions increases, and the proposed differential Hanbury Brown and Twiss analysis is able to estimate this angular momentum quantitatively. The method detects specific space-time correlation patterns, which are connected to rotation.

  7. Acoustic detection of high energy neutrinos in sea water: status and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmann, Robert

    2017-03-01

    The acoustic neutrino detection technique is a promising approach for future large-scale detectors with the aim of measuring the small expected flux of neutrinos at energies in the EeV-range and above. The technique is based on the thermo-acoustic model, which implies that the energy deposition by a particle cascade - resulting from a neutrino interaction in a medium with suitable thermal and acoustic properties - leads to a local heating and a subsequent characteristic pressure pulse that propagates in the surrounding medium. Current or recent test setups for acoustic neutrino detection have either been add-ons to optical neutrino telescopes or have been using acoustic arrays built for other purposes, typically for military use. While these arrays have been too small to derive competitive limits on neutrino fluxes, they allowed for detailed studies of the experimental technique. With the advent of the research infrastructure KM3NeT in the Mediterranean Sea, new possibilities will arise for acoustic neutrino detection. In this article, results from the "first generation" of acoustic arrays will be summarized and implications for the future of acoustic neutrino detection will be discussed.

  8. High-energy neutrinos in the context of multimessenger physics

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Julia K

    2007-01-01

    The field of astroparticle physics is currently developing rapidly, since new experiments challenge our understanding of the investigated processes. Three messengers can be used to extract information on the properties of astrophysical sources: photons, charged Cosmic Rays and neutrinos. This review focuses on high-energy neutrinos (E>100 GeV) with the main topics as follows. The production mechanism of high-energy neutrinos in astrophysical shocks. The connection between the observed photon spectra and charged Cosmic Rays is described and the source properties as they are known from photon observations and from charged Cosmic Rays are presented. High-energy neutrino detection. Current detection methods are described and the status of the next generation neutrino telescopes are reviewed. In particular, water and ice Cherenkov detectors as well as radio measurements in ice and with balloon experiments are presented. In addition, future perspectives for optical, radio and acoustic detection of neutrinos are rev...

  9. Radio detection of high-energy cosmic rays with the Auger Engineering Radio Array (PISA 2015)

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, Frank G

    2016-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is an enhancement of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. Covering about View the $17\\,$km$^2$, AERA is the world-largest antenna array for cosmic-ray observation. It consists of more than 150 antenna stations detecting the radio signal emitted by air showers, i.e., cascades of secondary particles caused by primary cosmic rays hitting the atmosphere. At the beginning, technical goals had been in focus: first of all, the successful demonstration that a large-scale antenna array consisting of autonomous stations is feasible. Moreover, techniques for calibration of the antennas and time calibration of the array have been developed, as well as special software for the data analysis. Meanwhile physics goals come into focus. At the Pierre Auger Observatory air showers are simultaneously detected by several detector systems, in particular water-Cherenkov detectors at the surface, underground muon detectors, and fluorescence telescopes, which enables cross-calibration of...

  10. INTEGRAL detection of high energy emission from XMMSL1 J171900.4-353217

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishibashi, W.; Bozzo, Enrico; Terrier, Mereghetti, Paizis, Ducci, Gotz, Bazzano, Fiocchi, De Rosa, Tarana, Del Santo, Natalucci, Panessa, Capitanio, Sguer, Bianchin, Watanabe, Kuiper, Barragan, -

    2010-01-01

    the IBIS/ISGRI FOV for a total exposure time of 170 ks and was detected at a significance level of 6.5 sigma (20-40 keV energy band). The best fit position obtained from the OSA software is at RA: 259.738 DEC: -35.508 (J2000), with an associated error of 3.9 arcmin. The ISGRI spectrum is best fit...

  11. Radio detection of high-energy cosmic rays with the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Frank G.

    2016-07-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is an enhancement of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. Covering about 17km2, AERA is the world-largest antenna array for cosmic-ray observation. It consists of more than 150 antenna stations detecting the radio signal emitted by air showers, i.e., cascades of secondary particles caused by primary cosmic rays hitting the atmosphere. At the beginning, technical goals had been in focus: first of all, the successful demonstration that a large-scale antenna array consisting of autonomous stations is feasible. Moreover, techniques for calibration of the antennas and time calibration of the array have been developed, as well as special software for the data analysis. Meanwhile physics goals come into focus. At the Pierre Auger Observatory air showers are simultaneously detected by several detector systems, in particular water-Cherenkov detectors at the surface, underground muon detectors, and fluorescence telescopes, which enables cross-calibration of different detection techniques. For the direction and energy of air showers, the precision achieved by AERA is already competitive; for the type of primary particle, several methods are tested and optimized. By combining AERA with the particle detectors we aim for a better understanding of cosmic rays in the energy range from approximately 0.3 to 10 EeV, i.e., significantly higher energies than preceding radio arrays.

  12. Nondestructive photon detection using a single rare-earth ion coupled to a photonic cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Chris; Zhong, Tian; Faraon, Andrei; Simon, Christoph

    2016-10-01

    We study the possibility of using single rare-earth ions coupled to a photonic cavity with high cooperativity for performing nondestructive measurements of photons, which would be useful for global quantum networks and photonic quantum computing. We calculate the achievable fidelity as a function of the parameters of the rare-earth ion and photonic cavity, which include the ion's optical and spin dephasing rates, the cavity linewidth, the single-photon coupling to the cavity, and the detection efficiency. We suggest a promising experimental realization using current state-of-the-art technology in Nd:YVO4.

  13. Photon detection efficiency of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes

    OpenAIRE

    Gentile, Simonetta; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Meddi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    The photon detection efficiencies of multi-pixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes manufactured by different produ cers are estimated. A new fit method of the response spectra to low-intensity light, taking into ac count after-pulse and cross-talk effects is proposed to yield the initial number of photons. The value of photon detection efficiency is calculated using a calibrated photodetector as a reference.

  14. High-Energy X-Ray Detection of G359.89-0.08 (SGR A-E): Magnetic Flux Tube Emission Powered by Cosmic Rays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Bauer, Franz E.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A; Zhang, Will

    2014-01-01

    We report the first detection of high-energy X-ray (E (is) greater than 10 keV) emission from the Galactic center non-thermal filament G359.89-0.08 (Sgr A-E) using data acquired with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The bright filament was detected up to approximately 50 keV during a NuSTAR Galactic center monitoring campaign. The featureless power-law spectrum with a photon index gamma approximately equals 2.3 confirms a non-thermal emission mechanism. The observed flux in the 3-79 keV band is F(sub X) = (2.0 +/- 0.1) × 10(exp -12)erg cm(-2) s(-1) , corresponding to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity L(sub X) = (2.6+/-0.8)×10(exp 34) erg s(-1) assuming a distance of 8.0 kpc. Based on theoretical predictions and observations, we conclude that Sgr A-E is unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or supernova remnant-molecular cloud (SNR-MC) interaction, as previously hypothesized. Instead, the emission could be due to a magnetic flux tube which traps TeV electrons. We propose two possible TeV electron sources: old PWNe (up to (is) approximately 100 kyr) with low surface brightness and radii up to (is) approximately 30 pc or MCs illuminated by cosmic rays (CRs) from CR accelerators such as SNRs or Sgr A*.

  15. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, H. W., E-mail: herrmann@lanl.gov; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Malone, R. M. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Stoeffl, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shmayda, W. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  16. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experimentsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ˜400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  17. Permafrost - An Alternative Target Material for Ultra High Energy Neutrino Detection?

    CERN Document Server

    Nahnhauer, R; Tosi, D

    2007-01-01

    The detection of cosmic neutrinos with energies above 1017 eV got growing interest during recent years. Possible target materials for in-matter arrays of ~100 km3 size under discussion are water, ice and rock salt. Here we propose to investigate permafrost as an additional alternative, covering ~20% of Earth land surface and reaching down to more than 1000 m depth at certain locations. If sufficiently large attenuation lengths for radio and acoustic signals can be demonstrated by in-situ measurements, the construction of a large hybrid array within this material may be possible in the Northern hemisphere. Properties and problems of a possible location in Siberia are discussed below. Some acoustic data are compared to laboratory measurements using "artificial" permafrost.

  18. Development of sensors for the acoustic detection of ultra high energy neutrinos in the deep sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, C.L.

    2007-09-17

    In addition to the optical detection system used by the ANTARES detector, a proposal was made to include an acoustic system consisting of several modified ANTARES storeys to investigate the feasibility of building and operating an acoustic particle detection system in the deep sea and at the same time perform an extensive study of the acoustic properties of the deep sea environment. The directional characteristics of the sensors and their placement within the ANTARES detector had to be optimised for the study of the correlation properties of the acoustic noise at different length scales - from below a metre to above 100 metres. The so-called 'equivalent circuit diagram (=ECD) model' - was applied to predict the acoustic properties of piezo elements, such as sensitivity and intrinsic noise, and was extended by including effects resulting from the geometrical shape of the sensors. A procedure was devised to gain the relevant ECD parameters from electrical impedance measurements of the piezo elements, both free and coupled to a surrounding medium. Based on the findings of this ECD model, intensive design studies were performed with prototype hydrophones using piezo elements as active sensors. The design best suited for the construction of acoustic sensors for ANTARES was determined, and a total of twelve hydrophones were built with a sensitivity of -145 to -140 dB re 1V/{mu}Pa between 5 and 50 kHz and an intrinsic noise power density around -90 dB re 1 V/{radical}(Hz), giving a total noise rms of 7 mV in this frequency range. The hydrophones were pressure tested and calibrated for integration into the ANTARES acoustic system. In addition, three so-called Acoustic Modules, sensors in pressure resistant glass spheres with a sensitive bandwidth of about 80 kHz, were developed and built. The calibration procedure employed during the sensor design studies as well as for the final sensors to be installed in the ANTARES framework is presented, together with

  19. Detection prospects for high energy neutrino sources from the anisotropic matter distribution in the local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsch, Philipp; Rameez, Mohamed; Tamborra, Irene

    2017-03-01

    Constraints on the number and luminosity of the sources of the cosmic neutrinos detected by IceCube have been set by targeted searches for point sources. We set complementary constraints by using the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) catalogue, which maps the matter distribution of the local Universe. Assuming that the distribution of the neutrino sources follows that of matter, we look for correlations between ``warm'' spots on the IceCube skymap and the 2MRS matter distribution. Through Monte Carlo simulations of the expected number of neutrino multiplets and careful modelling of the detector performance (including that of IceCube-Gen2), we demonstrate that sources with local density exceeding 10‑6 Mpc‑3 and neutrino luminosity Lν lesssim 1042 erg s‑1 (1041 erg s‑1) will be efficiently revealed by our method using IceCube (IceCube-Gen2). At low luminosities such as will be probed by IceCube-Gen2, the sensitivity of this analysis is superior to requiring statistically significant direct observation of a point source.

  20. Measurements of the Suitability of Large Rock Salt Formations for Radio Detection of High Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gorham, P W; Odian, A; Williams, D; Besson, D; Frichter, G; Tantawi, S G; Gorham, Peter; Saltzberg, David; Odian, Allen; Williams, Dawn; Besson, David; Frichter, George; Tantawi, Sami

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility that large rock salt formations might be suitable as target masses for detection of neutrinos of energies about 10 PeV and above. In neutrino interactions at these energies, the secondary electromagnetic cascade produces a coherent radio pulse well above ambient thermal noise via the Askaryan effect. We describe measurements of radio-frequency attenuation lengths and ambient thermal noise in two salt formations. Measurements in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in an evaporite salt bed in Carlsbad, NM yielded short attenuation lengths, 3-7 m over 150-300 MHz. However, measurements at United Salt's Hockley mine, located in a salt dome near Houston, Texas yielded attenuation lengths in excess of 250 m at similar frequencies. We have also analyzed early ground-penetrating radar data at Hockley mine and have found additional evidence for attenuation lengths in excess of several hundred meters at 440 MHz. We conclude that salt domes, which may individually contain...

  1. Dosimetric properties of radiophotoluminescent glass rod detector in high-energy photon beams from a linear accelerator and cyber-knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakia, Fujio; Moribe, Nobuyuki; Shimonobou, Toshiaki; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2004-07-01

    A fully automatic radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (GRD) system has recently become commercially available. This article discusses the dosimetric properties of the GRD including uniformity and reproducibility of signal, dose linearity, and energy and directional dependence in high-energy photon beams. In addition, energy response is measured in electron beams. The uniformity and reproducibility of the signal from 50 GRDs using a 60Co beam are both +/- 1.1% (one standard deviation). Good dose linearity of the GRD is maintained for doses ranging from 0.5 to 30 Gy, the lower and upper limits of this study, respectively. The GRD response is found to show little energy dependence in photon energies of a 60Co beam, 4 MV (TPR20(10)=0.617) and 10 MV (TPR(20)10=0.744) x-ray beams. However, the GRD responses for 9 MeV (mean energy, Ez = 3.6 MeV) and 16 MeV (Ez = 10.4 MeV) electron beams are 4%-5% lower than that for a 60Co beam in the beam quality dependence. The measured angular dependence of GRD, ranging from 0 degrees (along the long axis of GRD) to 120 degrees is within 1.5% for a 4 MV x-ray beam. As applications, a linear accelerator-based radiosurgery system and Cyber-Knife output factors are measured by a GRD and compared with those from various detectors including a p-type silicon diode detector, a diamond detector, and an ion chamber. It is found that the GRD is a very useful detector for small field dosimetry, in particular, below 10 mm circular fields.

  2. Detection of elastic photon-photon scattering through four-wave coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Lundstrom, E

    2005-01-01

    According to the theory of quantum electrodynamics, photon-photon scattering can take place via exchange of virtual electron-positron pairs. Effectively, the interaction can be formulated in terms of non-linear corrections to Maxwell's equations, and hence may be treated by classical non-linear electrodynamics. Due to the strong electromagnetic fields needed to reach any noticeable effect, photon-photon scattering has not yet been observed experimentally, but recent improvements in laser technology have increased the possibility of direct detection. A verification of the phenomena would be of great scientific value as a confirmation of quantum electrodynamics. In this thesis the possibility of direct detection of elastic photon-photon scattering through four-wave coupling is investigated, both for current and future systems. It is shown how three colliding laser pulses satisfying certain matching conditions, can generate scattered radiation in a fourth resonant direction. The interaction is modeled, and the n...

  3. Application of the MST clustering to the high energy gamma-ray sky. IV - Blazar candidates found as possible counterparts of photon clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, R; Bernieri, E

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a cluster search in the Fermi-LAT Pass 8 gamma-ray sky by means of the Minimum Spanning Tree algorithm, at energies higher than 10 GeV and at Galactic latitudes higher than 25 degrees. The selected clusters have a minimum number of photons higher than or equal to 5, a high degree of concentration, and are without a clear corresponding counterpart in blazar catalogues. A sample of 30 possible gamma-ray sources was obtained. These objects were verified by applying the standard Maximum Likelihood analysis on the Fermi-LAT data. A search for possible radio counterparts in a circle having a radius of 6 arcmin was performed, finding several interesting objects, the majority of them without optical spectroscopical data. These can be considered as new blazar candidates. Some of them were already noticed as possible blazars or Active Galactic Nuclei in previous surveys, but never associated with high energy emission. These possible counterparts are reported and their properties are discussed.

  4. Detecting Extended Technicolor Effects via the Process e+e-→tt at High Energy e+e- Linear Collider

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Chong-Xing; WAN Ling-De; SUN Jun-Feng; LU Gong-Ru

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the corrections of extended technicolor (ETC) interactions to the asymmetry parameter ALR and the polarized parameters pLt, PtR of the process e+ e-→tt in topcolor-assisted multiscale technicolor model. Our results show that the ETC effect on PtR is negligibly small which can be safely ignored, and the ETC effect on ALR may be testable at high energy e+e- linear collider (LC). For 0.03 ≤ε≤ 0.1, 500 GeV ≤ s ≤ 800 GeV, the relative correction of PtL is in the range of 15% ≤δPtL/PtL,SM ≤ 39%, which will certainly be detected at the LC experiments (for example TESLA).``

  5. THE MINIMUM WIDTH OF THE ARRIVAL DIRECTION DISTRIBUTION OF ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS DETECTED WITH THE YAKUTSK ARRAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A. A., E-mail: ivanov@ikfia.ysn.ru [Shafer Institute for Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, 31 Lenin Avenue, Yakutsk 677980 (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-10

    This paper presents the results of searches for anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (CRs) detected with the Yakutsk Array during the 1974–2008 observational period as well as searches in available data from other giant extensive air shower arrays working at present. A method of analysis based on a comparison of the minimum width of distributions in equatorial coordinates is used. As a result, a hypothesis of isotropy in arrival directions is rejected at the 99.5% significance level. The observed decrease in the minimum width of the distribution can be explained by the presence of CR sources in energy intervals and sky regions according to recent indications inferred from data of the Yakutsk Array and Telescope Array experiments.

  6. A minimal width of the arrival direction distribution of ultra-high energy cosmic rays detected with the Yakutsk array

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, A A

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of searches for anisotropy in arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays detected with the Yakutsk Array during the 1974--2008 observational period together with available data from other giant extensive air shower arrays working at present. A method of analysis based on a comparison of the minimal width of distributions in equatorial coordinates is applied. As a result, a hypothesis of isotropy in arrival directions is rejected at the $99.5\\%$ significance level. The observed decrease in the minimal width of distribution can be explained by the presence of cosmic ray sources in energy intervals and sky regions according to the recent indications inferred from data of the Yakutsk Array and Telescope Array experiments.

  7. NuSTAR detection of high-energy X-ray emission and rapid variability from Sagittarius A{sup *} flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrière, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Baganoff, Frederick K. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Dexter, Jason [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grefenstette, Brian; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Zhang, Shuo [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William W. [X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Sagittarius A{sup *} harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A{sup *} spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum of Sagittarius A{sup *} X-ray flares extends to high energy, with no evidence for a cutoff. Although the photon index of the absorbed power-law fits are in agreement with past observations, we find a difference between the photon index of two of the flares (significant at the 95% confidence level). The spectra of the two brightest flares (∼55 times quiescence in the 2-10 keV band) are compared to simple physical models in an attempt to identify the main X-ray emission mechanism, but the data do not allow us to significantly discriminate between them. However, we confirm the previous finding that the parameters obtained with synchrotron models are, for the X-ray emission, physically more reasonable than those obtained with inverse Compton models. One flare exhibits large and rapid (<100 s) variability, which, considering the total energy radiated, constrains the location of the flaring region to be within ∼10 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole.

  8. MAGIC detection of very high energy γ-ray emission from the low-luminosity blazar 1ES 1741+196

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Arcaro, C.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Buson, S.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Engelkemeier, M.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schroeder, S.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.; Becerra González, J.; Rani, B.; Krauss, F.; Perri, M.; Verrecchia, F.; Reinthal, R.

    2017-06-01

    We present the first detection of the nearby (z = 0.084) low-luminosity BL Lac object 1ES 1741+196 in the very high energy (E > 100 GeV) band. This object lies in a triplet of interacting galaxies. Early predictions had suggested 1ES 1741+196 to be, along with several other high-frequency BL Lac sources, within the reach of MAGIC detectability. Its detection by MAGIC, later confirmed by VERITAS, helps to expand the small population of known TeV BL Lacs. The source was observed with the MAGIC telescopes between 2010 April and 2011 May, collecting 46 h of good quality data. These observations led to the detection of the source at 6.0 σ confidence level, with a steady flux F(>100 GeV) = (6.4 ± 1.7stat ± 2.6syst) × 10-12 ph cm-2s-1 and a differential spectral photon index Γ = 2.4 ± 0.2stat ± 0.2syst in the range of ˜80 GeV-3 TeV. To study the broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) simultaneous with MAGIC observations, we use KVA, Swift/UVOT and XRT and Fermi/LAT data. One-zone synchrotron-self-Compton (SSC) modelling of the SED of 1ES 1741+196 suggests values for the SSC parameters that are quite common among known TeV BL Lacs except for a relatively low Doppler factor and slope of electron energy distribution. A thermal feature seen in the SED is well matched by a giant elliptical's template. This appears to be the signature of thermal emission from the host galaxy, which is clearly resolved in optical observations.

  9. Prospects for detection of very high energy emission from GRB in the context of the External Shock model

    CERN Document Server

    Galli, A

    2008-01-01

    The detection of the 100 GeV-TeV emission by a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will provide an unprecedented opportunity to enlighten the nature of the central engine and the interaction between the relativistic flow and the environment of the burst progenitor. In this paper we show that there are exciting prospects of detecting by MAGIC high energy (HE) emission from the burst during the "early" X-ray flaring activity and, later, during the "normal" afterglow phase. We also identify the best observational strategy (trigger conditions and time period of observation). We determine the expected HE emission from the flaring and afterglow phases of GRBs in the context of the External Shock scenario and compare them with the MAGIC threshold. We find that a X-ray flare with the average properties of the class, can be detected in the 100 GeV range by MAGIC provided that z a few cm^{-3}. In this case the MAGIC observation shall extend to about 10-20 ksec. We provide recipes to tailor this prediction to the observational proper...

  10. Photon-axion mixing within the jets of active galactic nuclei and prospects for detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J.; Chadwick, P.M., E-mail: j.d.harris@durham.ac.uk, E-mail: p.m.chadwick@durham.ac.uk [Durham University, Department of Physics, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Very high energy γ-ray observations of distant active galactic nuclei (AGN) generally result in higher fluxes and harder spectra than expected, resulting in some tension with the level of the extragalactic background light (EBL). If hypothetical axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) were to exist, this tension could be relieved since the oscillation of photons to ALPs would mitigate the effects of EBL absorption and lead to softer inferred intrinsic AGN spectra. In this paper we consider the effect of photon-ALP mixing on observed spectra, including the photon-ALP mixing that would occur within AGN jets. We then simulate observations of three AGN with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a next generation γ-ray telescope, to determine its prospects for detecting the signatures of photon-ALP mixing on the spectra. We conclude that prospects for CTA detecting these signatures or else setting limits on the ALP parameter space are quite promising. We find that prospects are improved if photon-ALP mixing within the jet is properly considered and that the best target for observations is PKS 2155-304.

  11. Photonic crystal laser sources for chemical detection

    OpenAIRE

    Lončar, Marko; Scherer, Axel; Qiu, Yueming

    2003-01-01

    We have realized photonic crystal lasers that permit the introduction of analyte within the peak of the optical field of the lasing mode. We have explored the design compromises for developing such sensitive low-threshold spectroscopy sources, and demonstrate the operation of photonic crystal lasers in different ambient organic solutions. We show that nanocavity lasers can be used to perform spectroscopic tests on femtoliter volumes of analyte, and propose to use these lasers for high-resolut...

  12. Generation and Detection of Infrared Single Photons and their Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG He-ping; WU Guang; WU E; PAN Hai-feng; ZHOU Chun-yuan; WU E.,F.Treussart; J.-F.Roch

    2006-01-01

    Unbreakable secret communication has been a dream from ancient time.It is quantum physics that gives us hope to turn this wizardly dream into reality.The rapid development of quantum cryptography may put an end to the history of eavesdropping.This will be largely due to the advanced techniques related to single quanta,especially infrared single photons.In this paper,we report on our research works on single-photon control for quantum cryptography,ranging from single-photon generation to single-photon detection and their applications.

  13. A Search for Prompt Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-detected Gamma-ray Bursts using Milagro

    CERN Document Server

    Parkinson, P M Saz

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected up to GeV energies and are predicted by many models to emit in the very high energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) regime too. Detection of such emission would allow us to constrain GRB models. Since its launch, in late 2004, the Swift satellite has been locating GRBs at a rate of approximately 100 per year. The rapid localization and follow-up in many wavelengths has revealed new and unexpected phenomena, such as delayed emission in the form of bright X-ray flares. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory is a wide field of view (2 sr) instrument employing a water Cherenkov detector to continuously ($>$ 90% duty cycle) observe the overhead sky in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. Over 100 GRBs are known to have been in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, including 57 since the launch of Swift (through May 2007). We discuss the results of the searches for prompt emission from these bursts, as well as for delayed emission from the X-ray flares observed in some of the Swift...

  14. Monte Carlo simulation for radio detection of Ultra High Energy air shower cores by ANITA-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Amir

    ANITA is a balloon borne radio interferometer, originally built for detection of Ultra High Energy (UHE) neutrinos through Askaryan pulses induced by neutrinos in the deep ice. Besides searching for neutrinos, ANITA has successfully detected geomagnetic radiation from UHE cosmic ray air showers. The present work checks for the possibility of an additional method of UHE cosmic ray detection by ANITA. Highly vertical showers have shower maximum near the ice surface in Antarctica. The compact cores of these shower produce particle cascades inside the ice and consequently Askaryan radio pulses which may be detected by ANITA. A new Monte Carlo simulation SAM (SADE ANITA Monte Carlo) was developed to study this process. SAM includes a full ANITA instrument and flight model as well as two unique components required for the cosmic ray core simulation. 1) A simple model for radio emission by core initiated cascades in the Antarctic firn, including scaling of the RF emission with the shower and medium properties and a CORSIKA derived parametrization for the energy contained inside the core. 2) Due to the different event geometry, cosmic ray core induced RF signals are reflected from the bedrock and suffer more attenuation than the neutrino induced signals. Accordingly a Pan- Antarctic geo-statistical frequency dependent 3D RF attenuation model was developed based on temperature, chemistry and other physical properties of Antarctic ice. Using the aperture determined from SAM, an Auger UHE cosmic ray flux is expected to produce 7.4×10 -4 < 0.13 < 0.44 events during an ANITA-II flight exposure. There are considerable uncertainties in this estimate.

  15. High-energy X-ray detection of G359.89–0.08 (SGR A–E): Magnetic flux tube emission powered by cosmic rays?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Baganoff, Frederick K. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bauer, Franz E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Tomsick, John A. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Harrison, Fiona A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William W., E-mail: shuo@astro.columbia.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We report the first detection of high-energy X-ray (E > 10 keV) emission from the Galactic center non-thermal filament G359.89–0.08 (Sgr A–E) using data acquired with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The bright filament was detected up to ∼50 keV during a NuSTAR Galactic center monitoring campaign. The featureless power-law spectrum with a photon index Γ ≈ 2.3 confirms a non-thermal emission mechanism. The observed flux in the 3-79 keV band is F{sub X} = (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10{sup –12} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, corresponding to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity L{sub X} = (2.6 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1} assuming a distance of 8.0 kpc. Based on theoretical predictions and observations, we conclude that Sgr A–E is unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or supernova remnant-molecular cloud (SNR-MC) interaction, as previously hypothesized. Instead, the emission could be due to a magnetic flux tube which traps TeV electrons. We propose two possible TeV electron sources: old PWNe (up to ∼100 kyr) with low surface brightness and radii up to ∼30 pc or MCs illuminated by cosmic rays (CRs) from CR accelerators such as SNRs or Sgr A*.

  16. Fast photon-detection for COMPASS RICH-1

    CERN Document Server

    Chiosso, Michela; Alexeev, M; Angerer, H; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Dafni, T; Dalla Torre, S; Delagnes, E; Denisov, O; Deschamps, H; Diaz, V; Dibiase, N; Duic, V; Eyrich, W; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger Jr, M; Fisher, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Hagemann, R; von Harrac, D; Heinsius, F H; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Königsmann, K; Kolosov, V N; Konorov, I; Kramer, D; Kunne, F; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Mann, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Mutter, A; Nähle, O; Neyret, D; Nerling, F; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Paul, S; Pesaro, G; Pizzolotto, C; Polak, J; Rebourgeard, P; Robinet, P; Rocco, E; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schoenmaier, W; Schröder, W; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Steiger, L; Sulc, M; Svec, M; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Wollny, H

    2008-01-01

    A fast photon-detection system for the detector RICH-1 of the COMPASS Experiment at CERN SPS is in operation since the 2006 run. It is based on the use of Multi-Anode Photomultipliers (MAPMTs) coupled to individual fused silica lens telescopes and fast read-out electronics. It has been designed taking into account the high photon flux in the central region of the detector and the high rate requirements of the COMPASS Experiment. We present the photon-detection design and construction, together with its characterization and measured performances based on the data collected in 2006.

  17. Observation of detection-dependent multi-photon coherence times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ra, Young-Sik; Tichy, Malte C.; Lim, Hyang-Tag;

    2013-01-01

    in which the multi-photon coherence time, defined by the width of the interference signal, depends on the number of interfering photons and on the measurement scheme chosen to detect the particles. A theoretical analysis reveals that all multi-photon interferences with more than two particles feature...... this dependence, which can be attributed to higher-order effects in the mutual indistinguishability of the particles. As a striking consequence, a single, well-defined many-particle quantum state can exhibit qualitatively different degrees of interference, depending on the chosen observable. Therefore, optimal...... sensitivity in many-particle quantum interferometry can only be achieved by choosing a suitable detection scheme....

  18. High energy astrophysical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Poggiani, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents ultraviolet and X-ray astronomy, gamma-ray astronomy, cosmic ray astronomy, neutrino astronomy, and gravitational wave astronomy as distinct research areas, focusing on the astrophysics targets and the requirements with respect to instrumentation and observation methods. The purpose of the book is to bridge the gap between the reference books and the specialized literature. For each type of astronomy, the discussion proceeds from the orders of magnitude for observable quantities. The physical principles of photon and particle detectors are then addressed, and the specific telescopes and combinations of detectors, presented. Finally the instruments and their limits are discussed with a view to assisting readers in the planning and execution of observations. Astronomical observations with high-energy photons and particles represent the newest additions to multimessenger astronomy and this book will be of value to all with an interest in the field.

  19. CaloCube: A new-concept calorimeter for the detection of high-energy cosmic rays in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannuccini, E.; Adriani, O.; Agnesi, A.; Albergo, S.; Auditore, L.; Basti, A.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bonechi, L.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Brogi, P.; Carotenuto, G.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; D'Alessandro, R.; Detti, S.; Fasoli, M.; Finetti, N.; Lenzi, P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Miritello, M.; Mori, N.; Orzan, G.; Olmi, M.; Pacini, L.; Papini, P.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Pirzio, F.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Spillantini, P.; Starodubtsev, O.; Stolzi, F.; Suh, J. E.; Sulaj, A.; Tiberio, A.; Tricomi, A.; Trifiro, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Vedda, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Zerbo, B.

    2017-02-01

    The direct observation of high-energy cosmic rays, up to the PeV region, will increasingly rely on highly performing calorimeters, and the physics performance will be primarily determined by their geometrical acceptance and energy resolution. Thus, it is extremely important to optimize their geometrical design, granularity, and absorption depth, with respect to the total mass of the apparatus, which is among the most important constraints for a space mission. Calocube is a homogeneous calorimeter whose basic geometry is cubic and isotropic, so as to detect particles arriving from every direction in space, thus maximizing the acceptance; granularity is obtained by filling the cubic volume with small cubic scintillating crystals. This design forms the basis of a three-year R &D activity which has been approved and financed by INFN. A comparative study of different scintillating materials has been performed. Optimal values for the size of the crystals and spacing among them have been studied. Different geometries, besides the cubic one, and the possibility to implement dual-readout techniques have been investigated. A prototype, instrumented with CsI(Tl) cubic crystals, has been constructed and tested with particle beams. An overview of the obtained results will be presented and the perspectives for future space experiments will be discussed.

  20. The Direct Detection of Boosted Dark Matter at High Energies and PeV events at IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Atri; Gupta, Aritra

    2015-01-01

    If dark matter(DM) dominantly comprises of a massive, non-thermal relic $\\phi$ (mass $m_\\phi$), which decays preferentially (with a very long-lifetime) to another, significantly lighter DM particle $\\chi$, a small non-thermal but highly energetic population of DM may be created around energies $E = m_\\phi/2$. If $\\chi$ interacts with nucleons, it is possible that its cross-section, like the neutrino-nucleus coherent cross-section, may be undetectably small at low energies but may rise sharply with energy leading to deep inelastic scattering not dis-similar to neutral current neutrino-nucleon interactions. Thus, its direct detection may be possible via cascades in very large neutrino detectors. IceCube (IC) has recently reported three ultra-high energy PeV cascade events clustered around $1-2$ PeV. We apply this notion to these events and discuss the features which may help discriminate this scenario from one in which only astrophysical neutrinos constitute the IC event sample.

  1. The ExaVolt Antenna: A Large-Aperture, Balloon-embedded Antenna for Ultra-high Energy Particle Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Gorham, P W; Allison, P; Liewer, K M; Miki, C; Hill, B; Varner, G S

    2011-01-01

    We describe the scientific motivation, experimental basis, design methodology, and simulated performance of the ExaVolt Antenna (EVA) mission, and planned ultra-high energy (UHE) particle observatory under development for NASA's suborbital super-pressure balloon program in Antarctica. EVA will improve over ANITA's integrated totals - the current state-of-the-art in UHE suborbital payloads - by 1-2 orders of magnitude in a single flight. The design is based on a novel application of toroidal reflector optics which utilizes a super-pressure balloon surface, along with a feed-array mounted on an inner membrane, to create an ultra-large radio antenna system with a synoptic view of the Antarctic ice sheet below it. Radio impulses arise via the Askaryan effect when UHE neutrinos interact within the ice, or via geosynchrotron emission when UHE cosmic rays interact in the atmosphere above the continent. EVA's instantaneous antenna aperture is estimated to be several hundred square meters for detection of these events...

  2. Study of the sensibility of the Antares neutrino telescope to very high energy photons: Contribution to the time calibration of the detector; Etude de la sensibilite du telescope a neutrinos Antares aux photons de tres haute energie: Contribution a l'etalonnage en temps du detecteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillard, G.

    2010-10-15

    From the sea-floor, the 900-odd photomultiplier tubes of the Antares neutrino telescope scrutinize the abysses attempting to discern, amid bioluminescence and marine radioactivity, Cerenkov photons emitted by muons from astrophysical neutrinos, and to distinguish these muons from those generated by air showers produced by cosmic rays. Antares has been collecting data since 2006; this feat of engineering has paved the way for submarine neutrino astronomy: Antares is expected to be the forerunner of a larger instrument, KM3NeT. Telescope's performance is characterized in part by its angular resolution. In the case of Antares, the angular resolution is directly related to the time resolution of the detector's elements. This manuscript presents a correction for one of the main sources of deterioration of this time resolution, the walk effect induced by the set up of a fixed threshold for triggering the photomultiplier tubes signal. This correction, implemented in the official software chain of the Antares collaboration, improves in particular the events reconstruction quality estimator. This implementation allows further optimizations. The author also attempts to evaluate, using a complete Monte-Carlo simulation, the possibility of using very high energy photon sources as calibrated muon beams in order to estimate the absolute pointing and the angular resolution of the telescope. Although limited by large uncertainties, it is demonstrated that the possibility to detect such sources is extremely small. In addition, it is shown that the atmospheric neutrino background induced by very high-energy photons is negligible. (author)

  3. Scattering-absorbing method for the detection of 16.7 MeV high-energy pulse gamma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Xinjian; Ouyang Xiaoping; Wang Qunshu

    2009-01-01

    Based on theoretical calculation and Monte Carlo simulation, this paper proposes a new method for the diagno-sing of 16.7 MeV high-energy pulse gamma, named "scattering absorption method". The ratio of the sensitivity of high-energy gamma to that of the low-energy background gamma can reach 106 to 108 by this new method. The sensitivity of 16.7 McV high-energy gamma ranges from 10-21 to 10-16 C·cm2. It's better than the traditional method which is based on the magnetic analyzer and Chcrankov detector on some aspects.

  4. Design and performance simulation of a segmented-absorber based muon detection system for high energy heavy ion collision experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S. [University of Kashmir, Srinagar (India); Bhaduri, P.P. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India); Jahan, H. [Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (India); Senger, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Adak, R.; Samanta, S. [Bose Institute, Kolkata (India); Prakash, A. [Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Dey, K. [Gauhati University, Guwahati (India); Lebedev, A. [Institute für Kernphysik, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Kryshen, E. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI) NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Chattopadhyay, S., E-mail: sub@vecc.gov.in [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India); Senger, P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Bhattacharjee, B. [Gauhati University, Guwahati (India); Ghosh, S.K.; Raha, S. [Bose Institute, Kolkata (India); Irfan, M.; Ahmad, N. [Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (India); Farooq, M. [University of Kashmir, Srinagar (India); Singh, B. [Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India)

    2015-03-01

    A muon detection system (MUCH) based on a novel concept using a segmented and instrumented absorber has been designed for high-energy heavy-ion collision experiments. The system consists of 6 hadron absorber blocks and 6 tracking detector triplets. Behind each absorber block a detector triplet is located which measures the tracks of charged particles traversing the absorber. The performance of such a system has been simulated for the CBM experiment at FAIR (Germany) that is scheduled to start taking data in heavy ion collisions in the beam energy range of 6–45 A GeV from 2019. The muon detection system is mounted downstream to a Silicon Tracking System (STS) that is located in a large aperture dipole magnet which provides momentum information of the charged particle tracks. The reconstructed tracks from the STS are to be matched to the hits measured by the muon detector triplets behind the absorber segments. This method allows the identification of muon tracks over a broad range of momenta including tracks of soft muons which do not pass through all the absorber layers. Pairs of oppositely charged muons identified by MUCH could therefore be combined to measure the invariant masses in a wide range starting from low mass vector mesons (LMVM) up to charmonia. The properties of the absorber (material, thickness, position) and of the tracking chambers (granularity, geometry) have been varied in simulations of heavy-ion collision events generated with the UrQMD generator and propagated through the setup using the GEANT3, the particle transport code. The tracks are reconstructed by a Cellular Automaton algorithm followed by a Kalman Filter. The simulations demonstrate that low mass vector mesons and charmonia can be clearly identified in central Au+Au collisions at beam energies provided by the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)

  5. Detection of very-high energy γ-ray emission from NGC 1275 by the MAGIC telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Caneva, G.; de Cea Del Pozo, E.; de Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Huber, B.; Jogler, T.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Paiano, S.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puerto Gimenez, I.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Pfrommer, C.; Pinzke, A.

    2012-03-01

    We report on the detection of very-high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray emission from NGC 1275, the central radio galaxy of the Perseus cluster of galaxies. The source has been detected by the MAGIC telescopes with a statistical significance of 6.6σ above 100 GeV in 46 h of stereo observations carried out between August 2010 and February 2011. The measured differential energy spectrum between 70 GeV and 500 GeV can be described by a power law with a steep spectral index of Γ = -4.1 ± 0.7stat ± 0.3syst, and the average flux above 100 GeV is Fγ = (1.3 ± 0.2stat ± 0.3syst) × 10-11 cm-2 s-1. These results, combined with the power-law spectrum measured in the first two years of observations by the Fermi-LAT above 100 MeV, with a spectral index of Γ ≃ - 2.1, strongly suggest the presence of a break or cut-off around tens of GeV in the NGC 1275 spectrum. The light curve of the source above 100 GeV does not show hints of variability on a month time scale. Finally, we report on the nondetection in the present data of the radio galaxy IC 310, previously discovered by the Fermi-LAT and MAGIC. The derived flux upper limit FU.L.γ (>300 GeV) = 1.2 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 is a factor ~ 3 lower than the mean flux measured by MAGIC between October 2009 and February 2010, thus confirming the year time-scale variability of the source at VHE.

  6. Mode Invisibility and Single Photon Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Onuma-Kalu, Marvellous; Martin-Martinez, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    We propose a technique to probe the quantum state of light in an optical cavity without significantly altering it. We minimize the interaction of the probe with the field by arranging a setting where the largest contribution to the transition probability is cancelled. We show that we obtain a very good resolution to measure photon population differences between two given Fock states by means of atomic interferometry.

  7. Detection of the high-energy cut-off from the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 5273

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahari, Mayukh; MᶜHardy, I. M.; Mallick, Labani; Dewangan, G. C.; Misra, R.

    2017-09-01

    We perform the NuSTAR and Swift/XRT joint energy spectral fitting of simultaneous observations from the broad-line Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 5273. When fitted with the combination of an exponential cut-off power law and a reflection model, a high-energy cut-off is detected at 143^{+96}_{-40} keV with 2σ significance. Existence of such cut-off is also consistent with the observed Comptonizing electron temperature when fitted with a Comptonization model independently. We observe a moderate hard X-ray variability of the source over the time-scale of ∼12 yr using INTEGRAL/ISGRI observations in the energy range of 20-100 keV. When the hard-band count rate (6-20 keV) is plotted against the soft-band count rate (3-6 keV), a hard offset is observed. Our results indicate that the cut-off energy may not correlate with the coronal X-ray luminosity in a simple manner. Similarities in parameters that describe coronal properties indicate that the coronal structure of NGC 5273 may be similar to that of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 390.3 and another galaxy MCG-5-23-16, where the coronal plasma is dominated by electrons, rather than electron-positron pairs. Therefore, the coronal cooling is equally efficient to the heating mechanism keeping the cut-off energy at low even at the low accretion rate.

  8. Scalable photonic crystal chips for high sensitivity protein detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Feng; Clarke, Nigel; Patel, Parth; Loncar, Marko; Quan, Qimin

    2013-12-30

    Scalable microfabrication technology has enabled semiconductor and microelectronics industries, among other fields. Meanwhile, rapid and sensitive bio-molecule detection is increasingly important for drug discovery and biomedical diagnostics. In this work, we designed and demonstrated that photonic crystal sensor chips have high sensitivity for protein detection and can be mass-produced with scalable deep-UV lithography. We demonstrated label-free detection of carcinoembryonic antigen from pg/mL to μg/mL, with high quality factor photonic crystal nanobeam cavities.

  9. X-ray pulsar signal detection using photon interarrival time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Xie; Luping Xu; Hua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The distribution probability of the photon interarrival time (PIT) without signal initial phases is derived based on the Poisson model of X-ray pulsar signals, and a pulsar signal detec-tion algorithm employing the PIT sequence is put forward. The joint probability of the PIT sequence is regarded as a function of the distribution probability and used to compare a constant radiation intensity model with the nonhomogeneous Poisson model for the signal detection. The relationship between the number of detected photons and the probabilities of false negative and positive is stu-died, and the success rate and mean detection time are estimated based on the number of the given photons. For the spacecraft ve-locity data detection, the changes of time of photon arrival (TOPA) and PIT caused by spacecraft motion are presented first, then the influences on detection are analyzed respectively. By using the analytical pulse profile of PSR B0531+21, the simulation of the X-ray pulsar signal detection is implemented. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, and the contrast tests show that the proposed method is suitable for the spacecraft velocity data detection.

  10. Fast photon detection for the COMPASS RICH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, P; Alekseev, M; Angerer, H; Apollonio, M; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, Franco; Bressan, A; Busso, L; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Costa, S; Dalla Torre, S; Dafni, T; Delagnes, E; Deschamps, H; Díaz, V; Dibiase, N; Duic, V; Eyrich, W; Faso, D; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Fischer, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Hagemann, R; Von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Königsmann, K C; Kolosov, V N; Konorov, I; Kramer, Daniel; Kunne, Fabienne; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Mann, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Mutter, A; Nahle, O; Nerling, F; Neyret, D; Pagano, P; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Paul, S; Pesaro, G; Polak, J; Rebourgeard, P; Robinet, F; Rocco, E; Schiavon, Paolo; Schroder, W; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Steiger, L; Sulc, M; Svec, M; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Wollny, H

    2007-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at the SPS accelerator at CERN uses a large scale Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH) to identify pions, kaons and protons in a wide momentum range. For the data taking in 2006, the COMPASS RICH has been upgraded in the central photon detection area (25% of the surface) with a new technology to detect Cherenkov photons at very high count rates of several 10^6 per second and channel and a new dead-time free read-out system, which allows trigger rates up to 100 kHz. The Cherenkov photons are detected by an array of 576 visible and ultra-violet sensitive multi-anode photomultipliers with 16 channels each. The upgraded detector showed an excellent performance during the 2006 data taking.

  11. Avalanche photodiodes and quenching circuits for single-photon detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cova, S.; Ghioni, M.; Lacaita, A.; Samori, C.; Zappa, F.

    1996-04-01

    Avalanche photodiodes, which operate above the breakdown voltage in Geiger mode connected with avalanche-quenching circuits, can be used to detect single photons and are therefore called single-photon avalanche diodes SPAD's. Circuit configurations suitable for this operation mode are critically analyzed and their relative merits in photon counting and timing applications are assessed. Simple passive-quenching circuits (PQC's), which are useful for SPAD device testing and selection, have fairly limited application. Suitably designed active-quenching circuits (AQC's) make it possible to exploit the best performance of SPAD's. Thick silicon SPAD's that operate at high voltages (250-450 V) have photon detection efficiency higher than 50% from 540-to 850-nm wavelength and still approximately 3% at 1064 nm. Thin silicon SPAD's that operate at low voltages (10-50 V) have 45% efficiency at 500 nm, declining to 10% at 830 nm and to as little as 0.1% at 1064 nm. The time resolution achieved in photon timing is 20 ps FWHM with thin SPAD's; it ranges from 350 to 150 ps FWHM with thick SPAD's. The achieved minimum counting dead time and maximum counting rate are 40 ns and 10 Mcps with thick silicon SPAD's, 10 ns and 40 Mcps with thin SPAD's. Germanium and III-V compound semiconductor SPAD's extend the range of photon-counting techniques in the near-infrared region to at least 1600-nm wavelength.

  12. Photonic crystal hydrogel sensor for detection of nerve agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiayu; Yan, Chunxiao; Liu, Chao; Zhou, Chaohua; Hu, Xiaochun; Qi, Fenglian

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays the photonic crystal hydrogel materials have shown great promise in the detection of different chemical analytes, including creatinine, glucose, metal ions and so on. In this paper, we developed a novel three-dimensional photonic crystal hydrogel, which was hydrolyzed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and immobilized with butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) by 1-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride(EDC). They are demonstrated to be excellent in response to sarin and a limit of detection(LOD) of 1×10-9 mg mL-1 was achieved.

  13. Detection potential of the KM3NeT detector for high-energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ageron, M.; Aguilar, J. A.; Aharonian, F.; Aiello, S.; Albert, A.; Alexandri, M.; Ameli, F.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Jesus, A. Assis; Aubert, J-J; Bakke, R.; Ball, A. E.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Baret, B.; de Bel, M.; Belias, A.; Bellou, N.; Berbee, E.; Berkien, A.; Bersani, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bigourdan, B.; Billault, M.; Rookhuizen, H. Boer; Bonori, M.; Borghini, M.; Bou-Cabo, H. M.; Bouhadef, B.; Bourlis, G.; Bouwhuis, M.; Bradbury, S.; Brown, A.; Bruni, F.; Brunner, J.; Brunoldi, M.; Busto, J.; Cacopardo, G.; Caillat, L.; Diaz-Aldagalan, D. Calvo; Calzas, A.; Canals, M.; Capone, A.; Carr, J.; Castorina, E.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Cereseto, R.; Chaleil, Th.; Chateau, F.; Chiarusi, T.; Choqueuse, D.; Christopoulou, P. E.; Chronis, G.; Ciaffoni, O.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Cohen, F.; Colijn, F.; Coniglione, R.; Cordelli, M.; Cosquer, A.; Costa, M.; Coyle, P.; Craig, J.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; D'Amico, A.; Damy, G.; De Asmundis, R.; De Bonis, G.; Decock, G.; Decowski, P.; Delagnes, E.; De Rosa, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q.; Drogou, J.; Drouhin, D.; Druillole, F.; Drury, L.; Durand, D.; Durand, G. A.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Ernenwein, J-P; Escoffier, S.; Espinosa, V.; Etiope, G.; Favali, P.; Felea, D.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fotiou, A.; Fritsch, U.; Gajanana, D.; Garaguso, R.; Gasparini, G. P.; Gasparoni, F.; Gautard, V.; Gensolen, F.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Gialas, I.; Giordano, V.; Giraud, J.; Gizani, N.; Gleixner, A.; Gojak, C.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. P.; Graf, K.; Grasso, D.; Grimaldi, A.; Groenewegen, R.; Guede, Z.; Guillard, G.; Guilloux, F.; Habel, R.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; van Heerwaarden, J.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hillebrand, T.; van de Hoek, M.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hoessl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; Imbesi, M.; Jamieson, A.; Jansweijer, P.; de Jong, M.; Jouvenot, F.; Kadler, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Karolak, M.; Katz, U. F.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Keller, P.; Kiskiras, Y.; Klein, Remko; Kok, H.; Kontoyiannis, H.; Kooijman, P.; Koopstra, J.; Kopper, C.; Korporaal, A.; Koske, P.; Kouchner, A.; Koutsoukos, S.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Laan, M.; La Fratta, C.; Lagier, P.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Leisos, A.; Lenis, D.; Leonora, E.; Le Provost, H.; Lim, G.; Llorens, C. D.; Lloret, J.; Loehner, H.; Lo Presti, D.; Lotrus, P.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Lykousis, V.; Malyshev, D.; Mangano, S.; Marcoulaki, E. C.; Margiotta, A.; Marinaro, G.; Marinelli, A.; Maris, O.; Markopoulos, E.; Markou, C.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, A.; Marvaldi, J.; Masullo, R.; Maurin, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Minutoli, S.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C. M.; Mongelli, M.; Monmarthe, E.; Morganti, M.; Mos, S.; Motz, H.; Moudden, Y.; Mul, G.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Naumann, Ch; Neff, M.; Nicolaou, C.; Orlando, A.; Palioselitis, D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Papaikonomou, A.; Papaleo, R.; Papazoglou, I. A.; Pavalas, G. E.; Peek, H. Z.; Perkin, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Priede, I. G.; Psallidas, A.; Rabouille, C.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Randazzo, N.; Rapidis, P. A.; Razis, P.; Real, D.; Reed, C.; Reito, S.; Resvanis, L. K.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Rolin, J.; Rose, J.; Roux, J.; Rovelli, A.; Russo, A.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Samtleben, D.; Sapienza, P.; Schmelling, J-W; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schroeder, K.; Schuller, J-P; Schussler, F.; Sciliberto, D.; Sedita, M.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Siotis, I.; Sipala, V.; Sollima, C.; Sparnocchia, S.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Staller, T.; Stavrakakis, S.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steijger, J.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Stransky, D.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, A.; Thompson, L.; Timmer, P.; Tonoiu, D.; Toscano, S.; Touramanis, C.; Trasatti, L.; Traverso, P.; Trovato, A.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urbano, F.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Werneke, P.; White, R. J.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zhukov, V.; Zonca, E.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.; de Boer, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    A recent analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope data provided evidence for a high-intensity emission of high-energy gamma rays with a E-2 spectrum from two large areas, spanning 50 above and below the Galactic centre (the "Fermi bubbles"). A hadronic mechanism was proposed for this gamma-ray emi

  14. Detection Potential of the KM3NeT Detector for High-Energy Neutrinos from the Fermi Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ageron, M.; Kooijman, P.; Zuniga, J.

    2013-01-01

    A recent analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope data provided evidence for a high-intensity emission of high-energy gamma rays with a E 2 spectrum from two large areas, spanning 50 above and below the Galactic centre (the ‘‘Fermi bubbles’’). A hadronic mechanism was proposed for this gamma-ray e

  15. Detection systems for high energy particle producing gaseous ionization; Sistemas de deteccion de particulas de alta energia mediante ionizacion gaseosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, L.; Duran, I.

    1985-07-01

    This report contains a review on the most used detectors based on the collection of the ionization produced by high energy particles: proportional counters, multiwire proportional chambers, Geiger-Muller counters and drift chambers. In six sections, the fundamental principles, the field configuration and useful gas mixtures, are discussed, most relevant devices are reported along 90 pages with 98 references. (Author) 98 refs.

  16. High-energy x-ray detection of G359.89–0.08 (SGR A–E): magnetic flux tube emission powered by cosmic rays?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first detection of high-energy X-ray (E > 10 keV) emission from the Galactic center non-thermal filament G359.89–0.08 (Sgr A–E) using data acquired with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The bright filament was detected up to ∼50 keV during a NuSTAR Galactic center...

  17. Hybrid hydrogel photonic barcodes for multiplex detection of tumor markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yueshuang; Zhang, Xiaoping; Luan, Chengxin; Wang, Huan; Chen, Baoan; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2017-01-15

    Barcodes-based suspension array have for demonstrated values in multiplex assay of tumor markers. Photonic barcodes which are encoded by their characteristic reflection peaks are the important supports for suspension array due to their stable code, low fluorescent background and high surface-volume ratio. Attempts to develop this technology tend to improve the function of the photonic barcodes. Here, we present a new type of hybrid hydrogel photonic barcodes for efficient multiplex assays. This photonic barcodes are hybrid inverse opal hydrogel composed of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) and agarose. The polymerized PEG-DA hydrogel could guarantee the stabilities of the inverse opal structure and its resultant code, while the agarose could offer active chemical groups for the probe immobilization and homogeneous water surrounding for the bioassay. In addition, the interconnected pores inverse opal structure could provide channels for biomolecules diffusing and reaction into the voids of barcodes. These features imparted the hybrid hydrogel photonic barcodes with limits of detection (LOD) of 0.78ng/mL for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and 0.21ng/mL for α-fetoprotein (AFP), respectively. It was also demonstrated that the proposed barcodes showed acceptable accuracy and detection reproducibility, and the results were in acceptable agreement with those from common clinic method for the detections of practical clinical samples. Thus, our technique provides a new platform for simultaneous multiplex immunoassay.

  18. Molecular detection via hybrid peptide-semiconductor photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estephan, E.; Saab, M.-b.; Martin, M.; Cloitre, T.; Larroque, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Gergely, C.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the possibilities to support device functionality that includes strongly confined and localized light emission and detection processes within nano/micro-structured semiconductors for biosensing applications. The interface between biological molecules and semiconductor surfaces, yet still under-explored is a key issue for improving biomolecular recognition in devices. We report on the use of adhesion peptides, elaborated via combinatorial phage-display libraries for controlled placement of biomolecules, leading to user-tailored hybrid photonic systems for molecular detection. An M13 bacteriophage library has been used to screen 1010 different peptides against various semiconductors to finally isolate specific peptides presenting a high binding capacity for the target surfaces. When used to functionalize porous silicon microcavities (PSiM) and GaAs/AlGaAs photonic crystals, we observe the formation of extremely thin (detection was monitored via both linear and nonlinear optical measurements. Our linear reflectance spectra demonstrate an enhanced detection resolution via PSiM devices, when functionalized with the Si-specific peptide. Molecular capture at even lower concentrations (femtomols) is possible via the second harmonic generation of GaAs/AlGaAs photonic crystals when functionalized with GaAs-specific peptides. Our work demonstrates the outstanding value of adhesion peptides as interface linkers between semiconductors and biological molecules. They assure an enhanced molecular detection via both linear and nonlinear answers of photonic crystals.

  19. Flare physics at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaty, R.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy processes, involving a rich variety of accelerated particle phenomena, lie at the core of the solar flare problem. The most direct manifestation of these processes are high-energy radiations, gamma rays, hard X-rays and neutrons, as well as the accelerated particles themselves, which can be detected in interplanetary space. In the study of astrophysics from the moon, the understanding of these processes should have great importance. The inner solar system environment is strongly influenced by activity on the sun; the physics of solar flares is of great intrinsic interest; and much high-energy astrophysics can be learned from investigations of flare physics at high energies.

  20. Barium Qubit State Detection and Ba Ion-Photon Entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnova, Ksenia; Inlek, Ismail Volkan; Crocker, Clayton; Lichtman, Martin; Monroe, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    A modular ion-trap network is a promising framework for scalable quantum-computational devices. In this architecture, different ion-trap modules are connected via photonic buses while within one module ions interact locally via phonons. To eliminate cross-talk between photonic-link qubits and memory qubits, we use different atomic species for quantum information storage (171 Yb+) and intermodular communication (138 Ba+). Conventional deterministic Zeeman-qubit state detection schemes require additional stabilized narrow-linewidth lasers. Instead, we perform fast probabilistic state detection utilizing efficient detectors and high-NA lenses to detect emitted photons from circularly polarized 493 nm laser excitation. Our method is not susceptible to intensity and frequency noise, and we show single-shot detection efficiency of ~ 2%, meaning that we can discriminate between the two qubits states with 99% confidence after as little as 50 ms of averaging. Using this measurement technique, we report entanglement between a single 138 Ba+ ion and its emitted photon with 86% fidelity. This work is supported by the ARO with funding from the IARPA MQCO program, the DARPA Quiness program, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Transduction, and the ARL Center for Distributed Quantum Information.

  1. A cooled avalanche photodiode with high photon detection probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. L.; Metscher, B. D.

    1986-01-01

    An avalanche photodiode has been operated as a photon-counting detector with 2 to 3 times the sensitivity of currently-available photomultiplier tubes. APD (avalanche photodiodes) detection probabilities that exceed 27% and approach 50% have been measured at an optimum operating temperature which minimizes noise. The sources of noise and their dependence on operating temperature and bias voltage are discussed.

  2. Avalanche photodiodes and quenching circuits for single-photon detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cova, S; Ghioni, M; Lacaita, A; Samori, C; Zappa, F

    1996-04-20

    Avalanche photodiodes, which operate above the breakdown voltage in Geiger mode connected with avalanche-quenching circuits, can be used to detect single photons and are therefore called singlephoton avalanche diodes SPAD's. Circuit configurations suitable for this operation mode are critically analyzed and their relative merits in photon counting and timing applications are assessed. Simple passive-quenching circuits (PQC's), which are useful for SPAD device testing and selection, have fairly limited application. Suitably designed active-quenching circuits (AQC's) make it possible to exploit the best performance of SPAD's. Thick silicon SPAD's that operate at high voltages (250-450 V) have photon detection efficiency higher than 50% from 540- to 850-nm wavelength and still ~3% at 1064 nm. Thin silicon SPAD's that operate at low voltages (10-50 V) have 45% efficiency at 500 nm, declining to 10% at 830 nm and to as little as 0.1% at 1064 nm. The time resolution achieved in photon timing is 20 ps FWHM with thin SPAD's; it ranges from 350 to 150 ps FWHM with thick SPAD's. The achieved minimum counting dead time and maximum counting rate are 40 ns and 10 Mcps with thick silicon SPAD's, 10 ns and 40 Mcps with thin SPAD's. Germanium and III-V compound semiconductor SPAD's extend the range of photon-counting techniques in the near-infrared region to at least 1600-nm wavelength.

  3. Single particle detection in CMOS compatible photonic crystal nanobeam cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Qimin; Floyd, Daniel L; Burgess, Ian B; Deotare, Parag B; Frank, Ian W; Tang, Sindy K Y; Ilic, Rob; Loncar, Marko

    2013-12-30

    We report the label-free detection of single particles using photonic crystal nanobeam cavities fabricated in silicon-on-insulator platform, and embedded inside microfluidic channels fabricated in poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Our system operates in the telecommunication wavelength band, thus leveraging the widely available, robust and tunable telecom laser sources. Using this approach, we demonstrated the detection of polystyrene nanoparticles with dimensions down to 12.5nm in radius. Furthermore, binding events of a single streptavidin molecule have been observed.

  4. Feasibility of detecting single atoms using photonic bandgap cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Lev, Benjamin; Srinivasan, Kartik; Barclay, Paul; Painter, Oskar; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    We propose an atom-cavity chip that combines laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms with magnetic microtraps and waveguides to deliver a cold atom to the mode of a fiber taper coupled photonic bandgap (PBG) cavity. The feasibility of this device for detecting single atoms is analyzed using both a semi-classical treatment and an unconditional master equation approach. Single-atom detection seems achievable in an initial experiment involving the non-deterministic delivery of weakly trapped...

  5. On-Chip Detection of Entangled Photons by Scalable Integration of Single-Photon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Najafi, Faraz; Harris, Nicholas; Bellei, Francesco; Dane, Andrew; Lee, Catherine; Kharel, Prashanta; Marsili, Francesco; Assefa, Solomon; Berggren, Karl K; Englund, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) have emerged as a scalable platform for complex quantum technologies using photonic and atomic systems. A central goal has been to integrate photon-resolving detectors to reduce optical losses, latency, and wiring complexity associated with off-chip detectors. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) are particularly attractive because of high detection efficiency, sub-50-ps timing jitter, nanosecond-scale reset time, and sensitivity from the visible to the mid-infrared spectrum. However, while single SNSPDs have been incorporated into individual waveguides, the system efficiency of multiple SNSPDs in one photonic circuit has been limited below 0.2% due to low device yield. Here we introduce a micrometer-scale flip-chip process that enables scalable integration of SNSPDs on a range of PICs. Ten low-jitter detectors were integrated on one PIC with 100% device yield. With an average system efficiency beyond 10% for multiple SNSPDs on one PIC, we demonstrate h...

  6. Detection of endotoxin using a photonic crystal nanolaser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Daichi; Hachuda, Shoji; Watanabe, Takumi; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Baba, Toshihiko, E-mail: baba@ynu.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2015-03-30

    Fast and reliable detection of endotoxin (ET) in medical equipment and pharmaceutical products is an essential precursor to clinical treatment. In this study, we demonstrate the use of shifts in wavelength of photonic crystal nanolasers for sensing the Limulus amebocyte lysate reaction, which is a standard method for detecting ET. From working curves of wavelength shift vs ET concentration, whose correlation factors were as high as 98%, we detected a required concentration of 0.001 EU/ml within 33 min and detected a low concentration of 0.0001 EU/ml.

  7. Detection of endotoxin using a photonic crystal nanolaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daichi; Hachuda, Shoji; Watanabe, Takumi; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Baba, Toshihiko

    2015-03-01

    Fast and reliable detection of endotoxin (ET) in medical equipment and pharmaceutical products is an essential precursor to clinical treatment. In this study, we demonstrate the use of shifts in wavelength of photonic crystal nanolasers for sensing the Limulus amebocyte lysate reaction, which is a standard method for detecting ET. From working curves of wavelength shift vs ET concentration, whose correlation factors were as high as 98%, we detected a required concentration of 0.001 EU/ml within 33 min and detected a low concentration of 0.0001 EU/ml.

  8. A first search for coincident gravitational waves and high energy neutrinos using LIGO, Virgo and ANTARES data from 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Arloganu, C. C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Ernenwein, J-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J-L.; Galata, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hamal, M.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefevre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Pavalas, G. E.; Payet, K.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Riviere, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schoeck, F.; Schuller, J-P.; Schuessler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallee, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Ceron, E. Amador; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H.J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J. -P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Diaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J. -C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endroczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J. -D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M. -K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gaspar, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Gonzalez, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M.T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J. -F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F.Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Langley, A.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lindquist, P. E.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menendez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Mueller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenberg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pihlaja, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Poeld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Racz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Roever, C.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaria, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thuering, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S.E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Wessels, P.; Williams, O.; Bulten, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrinos. Together, these messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, particularly at high energy. Our search uses neutrinos detected by the u

  9. A first search for coincident gravitational waves and high energy neutrinos using LIGO, Virgo and ANTARES data from 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Arloganu, C. C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Ernenwein, J-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J-L.; Galata, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hamal, M.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefevre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Pavalas, G. E.; Payet, K.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Riviere, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schoeck, F.; Schuller, J-P.; Schuessler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallee, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Ceron, E. Amador; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H.J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J. -P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Diaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J. -C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endroczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J. -D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M. -K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gaspar, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Gonzalez, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M.T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J. -F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F.Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Langley, A.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lindquist, P. E.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menendez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Mueller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenberg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pihlaja, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Poeld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Racz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Roever, C.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaria, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thuering, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S.E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Wessels, P.; Williams, O.; Bulten, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrinos. Together, these messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, particularly at high energy. Our search uses neutrinos detected by the u

  10. A first search for coincident gravitational waves and high energy neutrinos using LIGO, Virgo and ANTARES data from 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Arloganu, C. C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Ernenwein, J-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J-L.; Galata, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hamal, M.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefevre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Pavalas, G. E.; Payet, K.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Riviere, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schoeck, F.; Schuller, J-P.; Schuessler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallee, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Ceron, E. Amador; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H.J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J. -P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Diaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J. -C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endroczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J. -D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M. -K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gaspar, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Gonzalez, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M.T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J. -F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F.Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Langley, A.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lindquist, P. E.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menendez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Mueller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenberg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pihlaja, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Poeld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Racz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Roever, C.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaria, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thuering, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S.E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Wessels, P.; Williams, O.; Bulten, H.J.

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrinos. Together, these messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, particularly at high energy. Our search uses neutrinos detected by the

  11. A study of the process $e^+ +e^- \\to e^+ +e^- p \\bar {p}$ by the two-photon mechanism $\\gamma \\gamma \\to p \\bar {p}$ at high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadov, Azad I

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider the exclusive production of proton-antiproton pairs in the interaction between two quasireal photons in $e^+e^-$ collision. The differential and total cross section of the process $\\gamma \\gamma \\to p\\bar {p}$ at a beam energy of photons from 2.1 GeV to 4.5 GeV in the center-of-mass and for different values of $|cos\\theta^{\\ast}|$ is calculated. At energy $$=197 \\,\\,GeV the total cross section process o0f the $e^+ +e^- \\to e^+ +e^- +p +\\bar {p}$ is calculated by the two-photon mechanism. The results are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Detecting Local Deflection Patterns of Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays using the Principal Axes of the Directional Energy Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmann, Martin

    2013-01-01

    From deflections in galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields energy dependent structures in the arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) are expected. We propose to characterize these structures by the strength of collimation of energy along the principal axes in selected regions in the sky. While the strength of collimation are indicators of anisotropy in the arrival distribution of UHECR, the orientation of the principal system holds information about the direction of the deflections of UHECR. We discuss the method and present expected limits on the strength of deflection and density of sources using simulated scenarios of UHECR proton propagation.

  13. Single Microwave Photon Detection with a Trapped Electron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Cridland

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate theoretically the use of an electron in a Penning trap as a detector of single microwave photons. At the University of Sussex we are developing a chip Penning trap technology, designed to be integrated within quantum circuits. Microwave photons are guided into the trap and interact with the electron’s quantum cyclotron motion. This is an electric dipole transition, where the near field of the microwave radiation induces quantum jumps of the cyclotron harmonic oscillator. The quantum jumps can be monitored using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, providing the quantum non demolition signal of the microwave quanta. We calculate the quantum efficiency of photon detection and discuss the main features and technical challenges for the trapped electron as a quantum microwave sensor.

  14. Detection of single photons with THickGEM-based counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, M. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of East Piemonte, Alessandria (Italy); Barbosa, F. [I3N - Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Birsa, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Chiosso, M. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciliberti, P. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Dalla Torre, S. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Denisov, O. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Duic, V. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Ferrero, A. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Finger, M.; Finger, M. [Charles University, Praga (Czech Republic); JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Fischer, H. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Giorgi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Gobbo, B.; Gregori, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Koenigsmann, K. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); and others

    2012-12-11

    Cherenkov imaging counters requiring large photosensitive areas, the capability to stand high rates and to operate in magnetic field environments could benefit from the use of photon detectors based on THick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM) coupled to a solid state CsI photo-cathode. A systematic study of the THGEM detector response as a function of its geometrical parameters and electrodes' applied voltage has been performed. Dedicated electrostatic calculations to optimize the detector design have been accomplished. Data obtained from small photon detector prototypes operating in single photon detection mode are presented and discussed. In particular the key aspect of photo-electron extraction from the photo-cathode surface is investigated via the timing spectrum response of the detector for different electric field conditions at the photo-cathode: a comparison of the measured time distributions and the simulation results is illustrated.

  15. Nanostructured surfaces and detection instrumentation for photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhery, Vikram; George, Sherine; Lu, Meng; Pokhriyal, Anusha; Cunningham, Brian T

    2013-04-26

    Photonic crystal (PC) surfaces have been demonstrated as a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics and life science research. PCs can be engineered to support optical resonances at specific wavelengths at which strong electromagnetic fields are utilized to enhance the intensity of surface-bound fluorophore excitation. Meanwhile, the leaky resonant modes of PCs can be used to direct emitted photons within a narrow range of angles for more efficient collection by a fluorescence detection system. The multiplicative effects of enhanced excitation combined with enhanced photon extraction combine to provide improved signal-to-noise ratios for detection of fluorescent emitters, which in turn can be used to reduce the limits of detection of low concentration analytes, such as disease biomarker proteins. Fabrication of PCs using inexpensive manufacturing methods and materials that include replica molding on plastic, nano-imprint lithography on quartz substrates result in devices that are practical for single-use disposable applications. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity fluorescence detection in the context of molecular diagnosis and gene expression analysis though the use of PC surfaces. Recent efforts to improve the design and fabrication of PCs and their associated detection instrumentation are summarized, including the use of PCs coupled with Fabry-Perot cavities and external cavity lasers.

  16. Nanostructured Surfaces and Detection Instrumentation for Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T. Cunningham

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystal (PC surfaces have been demonstrated as a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics and life science research. PCs can be engineered to support optical resonances at specific wavelengths at which strong electromagnetic fields are utilized to enhance the intensity of surface-bound fluorophore excitation. Meanwhile, the leaky resonant modes of PCs can be used to direct emitted photons within a narrow range of angles for more efficient collection by a fluorescence detection system. The multiplicative effects of enhanced excitation combined with enhanced photon extraction combine to provide improved signal-to-noise ratios for detection of fluorescent emitters, which in turn can be used to reduce the limits of detection of low concentration analytes, such as disease biomarker proteins. Fabrication of PCs using inexpensive manufacturing methods and materials that include replica molding on plastic, nano-imprint lithography on quartz substrates result in devices that are practical for single-use disposable applications. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity fluorescence detection in the context of molecular diagnosis and gene expression analysis though the use of PC surfaces. Recent efforts to improve the design and fabrication of PCs and their associated detection instrumentation are summarized, including the use of PCs coupled with Fabry-Perot cavities and external cavity lasers.

  17. Searching for ultra-high energy cosmic rays with smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteson, Daniel; Mulhearn, Michael; Shimmin, Chase; Cranmer, Kyle; Brodie, Kyle; Burns, Dustin

    2016-06-01

    We propose a novel approach for observing cosmic rays at ultra-high energy (>1018 eV) by repurposing the existing network of smartphones as a ground detector array. Extensive air showers generated by cosmic rays produce muons and high-energy photons, which can be detected by the CMOS sensors of smartphone cameras. The small size and low efficiency of each sensor is compensated by the large number of active phones. We show that if user adoption targets are met, such a network will have significant observing power at the highest energies.

  18. Lead-Tungstate Crystal of the ALICE Photon Spectrometer (PHOS)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The photon spectrometer (PHOS) is designed to measure the temperature of collisions by detecting photons emerging from them. It will be made of lead tungstate crystals like these. When high-energy photons strike lead tungstate, they make it glow, or scintillate, and this glow can be measured. Lead tungstate is extremely dense (denser than iron), stopping most photons that reach it.

  19. Wastewater nitrogen and trace metal uptake by biota on a high-energy rocky shore detected using stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Joanne M; Eyre, Bradley D

    2015-11-15

    On high-energy rocky shores receiving treated wastewater, impacts are difficult to distinguish against a highly variable background and are localised due to rapid dilution. We demonstrate that nitrogen stable isotope values (δ(15)N) of rocky shore biota are highly sensitive to wastewater inputs. For macroalgae (Ulva lactuca and Endarachne binghamiae), grazing snails (Bembicium nanum and Nerita atramentosa), and predatory snails (Morula marginalba), δ(15)N was enriched near a wastewater outfall and declined with distance, returning to background levels within 290m. Any of these species therefore indicates the extent of influence of wastewater, allowing identification of an appropriate scale for studies of ecosystem impacts. For M. marginalba, significant regressions between δ(15)N and tissue copper, manganese, and zinc concentrations indicate a possible wastewater source for these metals. This suggests that δ(15)N is a proxy for exposure to wastewater contaminants, and may help to attribute variations in rocky shore communities to wastewater impacts.

  20. Search for Higgs boson production via weak boson fusion and decaying to bb¯in association with a high-energy photon using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Zhijun; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A search for the bb¯ decay of the Standard Model Higgs boson produced through vector boson fusion in association with a high transverse energy (ET) photon has been conducted with the ATLAS detector. The high-ET photon provides a distinct signature for both triggering and reducing the large QCD jet background present in the inclusive bb¯jj signature. The talk will focus on new trigger strategy implemented in 2016 data taking to target the specific final state as well as the implementation of the multivariate strategy for the signal extraction. This analysis has been combined with a complementary analysis in the more inclusive bb¯jj final state, which results in a significant improvement in the sensitivity. Results with pp collision data collected in 2015 and 2016 at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are presented.

  1. Detection of orbital angular momentum using a photonic integrated circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Guanghao; Gu, Bing; Cui, Yiping; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-06-20

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) state of photons offer an attractive additional degree of freedom that has found a variety of applications. Measurement of OAM state, which is a critical task of these applications, demands photonic integrated devices for improved fidelity, miniaturization, and reconfiguration. Here we report the design of a silicon-integrated OAM receiver that is capable of detecting distinct and variable OAM states. Furthermore, the reconfiguration capability of the detector is achieved by applying voltage to the GeSe film to form gratings with alternate states. The resonant wavelength for arbitrary OAM state is demonstrated to be tunable in a quasi-linear manner through adjusting the duty cycle of the gratings. This work provides a viable approach for the realization of a compact integrated OAM detection device with enhanced functionality that may find important applications in optical communications and information processing with OAM states.

  2. Surface and Buildup Region Dose Measurements with Markus Parallel-Plate Ionization Chamber, GafChromic EBT3 Film, and MOSFET Detector for High-Energy Photon Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Akbas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate surface and buildup region doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams using a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, GafChromic EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector for different field sizes and beam angles. The measurements were made in a water equivalent solid phantom at the surface and in the buildup region of the 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams at 100 cm source-detector distance for 5 × 5, 10 × 10, and 20 × 20 cm2 field sizes and 0°, 30°, 60°, and 80° beam angles. The surface doses using 6 MV photon beams for 10 × 10 cm2 field size were found to be 20.3%, 18.8%, and 25.5% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface doses using 15 MV photon beams for 10 × 10 cm2 field size were found to be 14.9%, 13.4%, and 16.4% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface dose increased with field size for all dosimeters. As the angle of the incident radiation beam became more oblique, the surface dose increased. The effective measurement depths of dosimeters vary; thus, the results of the measurements could be different. This issue can lead to mistakes at surface and buildup dosimetry and must be taken into account.

  3. Structural and dynamical properties of Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 25}Y{sub 10} metallic glasses studied by in situ high energy X-ray diffraction and time resolved X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruta, B., E-mail: ruta@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Giordano, V.M. [ILM, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 and CNRS, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Erra, L. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Liu, C.; Pineda, E. [Departament Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, ESAB, UPC-BarcelonaTech, Castelldefels (Spain)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Study of rapidly quenched Mg-based metallic glasses under different thermal paths. • The atomic dynamics was investigated by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. • The structural changes were followed by in situ high energy X-ray diffraction. • Dynamical and structural properties of Mg-based metallic glasses at the atomic level. • Strengthened idea of a stress-induced atomic motion in metallic glasses. - Abstract: We present a temperature investigation of the structural and dynamical evolution of rapidly quenched metallic glasses of Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 25}Y{sub 10} at the atomic length scale by means of in situ high energy X-ray diffraction and time resolved X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. We find a flattening of the temperature evolution of the position of the first sharp diffraction peak on approaching the glass transition temperature from the glassy state, which reflects into a surprising slowing down of the relaxation dynamics of even one order of magnitude with increasing temperature. The comparison between structural and dynamical properties strengthens the idea of a stress-induced, rather than pure diffusive, atomic motion in metallic glasses.

  4. The joint NASA/Goddard-University of Maryland research program in charged particle and high energy photon detector technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipavich, F.M.

    1990-05-01

    The Univ. of Maryland portion investigated the following areas. The Space Physics Group performed studies of data from the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft CHEM experiment and found that the ratio of solar wind to photospheric abundances decreased rather smoothly with the first ionization potential (FIP) of the ion with the low FIP ion being about a factor of two overabundant. Carbon and hydrogen fit this trend particularly well. Several occurrences were analyzed of field aligned beams observed when CCE was upstream of the Earth's bow shock. Also using CHEM data, ring current intensity and composition changes during the main and recovery phases of the great geomagnetic storm that occurred in February 1986 was examined in detail. Still using CHEM data, ring current characteristics were examined in a survey of 20 magnetic storms ranging in size from -50 nT to -312 nT. A study was done of energetic ion anisotropy characteristics in the Earth's magnetosheath region using data from the UMD/MPE experiment on ISEE-1. The properties were analyzed of approx. 30 to 130 keV/e protons and alpha particles upstream of six quasi-parallel interplanetary shocks that passed by the ISEE-3 spacecraft during 1978 to 1979. Work from NASA-Goddard include studies from the High Energy Cosmic Ray Group, Low Energy Cosmic Ray Group, Low Energy Gamma Ray Group, High Energy Astrophysics Theory Group, and the X ray Astronomy Group.

  5. RPC: from High Energy Physics to Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, G; Vecchi, C De; Giroletti, E; Musitelli, G; Nardo, R; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Sani, G; Torre, P; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica - Universita di Pavia and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Pavia - via A. Bassi, 6 Pavia - (Italy)

    2006-05-15

    A low cost gas-based charged particle detector, the Resistive Plate Counter (RPC) intensively used in fixed target and collider high energy experiments, is proposed as basic detector for Positron Emission Tomography. The performance of RPCs in terms of intrinsic space and time resolution and electronic pulse height response, makes it possible to transform standard RPCs into photon detectors and therefore to compensate for the photon sensitivity of scintillating crystals, when the efficiency of the complex crystal + photomultiplier is turned into standard quantum efficiency (q.e). Prototype multigap glass RPCs were developed which optimize {gamma} detection efficiency and thus might substitute the traditional scintillators setups.

  6. Detection of the gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303 in a low flux state at Very High Energy gamma-rays with the MAGIC Telescopes in 2009

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Asensio, M; Backes, M; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Tridon, D Borla; Bosch-Ramon, V; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Cañellas, A; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Garrido, D; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Hadasch, D; Häfner, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Huber, B; Jogler, T; Kellermann, H; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Krause, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Pardo, S; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Pasanen, M; Pauss, F; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Pilia, M; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vankov, H; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R

    2011-01-01

    We present very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) {\\gamma}-ray observations of the {\\gamma}-ray binary system LS I+61 303 obtained with the MAGIC stereo system between 2009 October and 2010 January. We detect a 6.3{\\sigma} {\\gamma}-ray signal above 400 GeV in the combined data set. The integral flux above an energy of 300 GeV is F(E>300 GeV)=(1.4 +- 0.3stat +- 0.4syst) * 10^{-12} cm^{-2} s^{-1}, which corresponds to about 1.3% of the Crab Nebula flux in the same energy range. The orbit-averaged flux of LS I +61 303 in the orbital phase interval 0.6--0.7, where a maximum of the TeV flux is expected, is lower by almost an order of magnitude compared to our previous measurements between 2005 September and 2008 January. This provides evidence for a new low emission state in LS I +61 303. We find that the change to the low flux state cannot be solely explained by an increase of photon-photon absorption around the compact star.

  7. Detection of the γ-Ray Binary LS I +61°303 in a Low-flux State at Very High Energy γ-Rays with the MAGIC Telescopes in 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Huber, B.; Jogler, T.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, A.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2012-02-01

    We present very high energy (E > 100 GeV) γ-ray observations of the γ-ray binary system LS I +61°303 obtained with the MAGIC stereo system between 2009 October and 2010 January. We detect a 6.3σ γ-ray signal above 400 GeV in the combined data set. The integral flux above an energy of 300 GeV is F(E > 300 GeV) = (1.4 ± 0.3stat ± 0.4syst) × 10-12 cm-2 s-1, which corresponds to about 1.3% of the Crab Nebula flux in the same energy range. The orbit-averaged flux of LS I +61°303 in the orbital phase interval 0.6-0.7, where a maximum of the TeV flux is expected, is lower by almost an order of magnitude compared to our previous measurements between 2005 September and 2008 January. This provides evidence for a new low-flux state in LS I +61°303. We find that the change to the low-flux state cannot be solely explained by an increase of photon-photon absorption around the compact star.

  8. The Lateral Trigger Probability function for the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Showers detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F M; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Antičić, T; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Arqueros, F; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avenier, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Balzer, M; Barber, K B; Barbosa, A F; Bardenet, R; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bäuml, J; Beatty, J J; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanco, F; Blanco, M; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Cheng, S H; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Clay, R W; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cook, H; Cooper, M J; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; del Peral, L; del Río, M; Deligny, O; Dembinski, H; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Castro, M L Díaz; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Tapia, I Fajardo; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fröhlich, U; Fuchs, B; Gaior, R; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; Gámez, D García; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gascon, A; Gemmeke, H; Gesterling, K; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; Gookin, B; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Griffith, N; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Guzman, A; Hague, J D; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Herve, A E; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jarne, C; Jiraskova, S; Josebachuili, M; Kadija, K; Kampert, K H; Karhan, P; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Kotera, K; Krohm, N; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuehn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, J K; Kunka, N; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lu, L; Lucero, A; Ludwig, M; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, J; Marin, V; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martin, L; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Mertsch, P; Meurer, C; Mićanović, S; Micheletti, M I; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Mueller, S; Muller, M A; Müller, G; Münchmeyer, M; Mussa, R; ‡, G Navarra; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nhung, P T; Niemietz, L; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Palmieri, N; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parra, A; Parsons, R D; Pastor, S; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pękala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Phan, N; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rivera, H; Rizi, V; Roberts, J; Robledo, C; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Rodriguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Rühle, C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santo, C E; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F; Schulte, S; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Sigl, G; Lopez, H H Silva; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Stanic, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Šuša, T; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Szuba, M; Tamashiro, A; Tapia, A; Tartare, M; Taşcău, O; Ruiz, C G Tavera; Tcaciuc, R; Tegolo, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tiwari, D K; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; Berg, A M van den; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Will, M; Williams, C; Winchen, T; Winnick, M G; Wommer, M; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Yapici, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zamorano, B; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Silva, M Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of Lateral Trigger Probability (LTP) function, i.e., the probability for an extensive air shower (EAS) to trigger an individual detector of a ground based array as a function of distance to the shower axis, taking into account energy, mass and direction of the primary cosmic ray. We apply this concept to the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consisting of a 1.5 km spaced grid of about 1600 water Cherenkov stations. Using Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-high energy showers the LTP functions are derived for energies in the range between 10^{17} and 10^{19} eV and zenith angles up to 65 degs. A parametrization combining a step function with an exponential is found to reproduce them very well in the considered range of energies and zenith angles. The LTP functions can also be obtained from data using events simultaneously observed by the fluorescence and the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory (hybrid events). We validate the Monte-Carlo results sho...

  9. Fast and high-energy neutron detection with nuclear track detectors: Results of the European joint experiments 1992/93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schraube, H. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Alberts, W.G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Weeks, A.R. [comps.] [Nuclear Electric plc, Berkeley (United Kingdom). Berkeley Technology Centre

    1997-12-31

    Under the auspices of EURADOS, the European radiation dosimetry group, seventeen recognised laboratories engaged in the field of individual neutron dosimetry with passive track detectors participated in an international comparative experiment. A number of twenty-seven detector systems, predominantly etched track detectors with the material PADC (poly allyl diglycol carbonate), were employed by the participating laboratories. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were provided for irradiations free-in-air and on front of a PMMA phantom by the GSF (Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Neuherberg, Germany) and by the PTB (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany). High energy irradiations were conducted by the PSI (Paul-Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland). The results of the on-phantom irradiations were used to derive energy and angular responses of the track detectors, those of the free-in-air irradiations to obtain data for the linearity characteristics of the response with dose. The report contains a short description and the original data of the participating laboratories, displays the irradiation and reference conditions, and provides an over-all evaluation. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative evaluation of the background characteristics and of the non-linearity observed with most of the systems employed which limits their useful dose-range of application. (orig.)

  10. The Lateral Trigger Probability function for the ultra-high energy cosmic ray showers detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST /Lisbon, LIFEP; Aglietta, M.; /INFN, Turin /Turin Observ. /Turin U.; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Balseiro Inst., San Carlos de Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of Lateral Trigger Probability (LTP) function, i.e., the probability for an Extensive Air Shower (EAS) to trigger an individual detector of a ground based array as a function of distance to the shower axis, taking into account energy, mass and direction of the primary cosmic ray. We apply this concept to the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consisting of a 1.5 km spaced grid of about 1600 water Cherenkov stations. Using Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-high energy showers the LTP functions are derived for energies in the range between 10{sup 17} and 10{sup 19} eV and zenith angles up to 65{sup o}. A parametrization combining a step function with an exponential is found to reproduce them very well in the considered range of energies and zenith angles. The LTP functions can also be obtained from data using events simultaneously observed by the fluorescence and the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory (hybrid events). We validate the Monte Carlo results showing how LTP functions from data are in good agreement with simulations.

  11. The Lateral Trigger Probability function for the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray showers detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Nhung, P. T.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Robledo, C.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tamashiro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tavera Ruiz, C. G.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tiwari, D. K.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winders, L.; Winnick, M. G.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of Lateral Trigger Probability (LTP) function, i.e., the probability for an Extensive Air Shower (EAS) to trigger an individual detector of a ground based array as a function of distance to the shower axis, taking into account energy, mass and direction of the primary cosmic ray. We apply this concept to the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consisting of a 1.5 km spaced grid of about 1600 water Cherenkov stations. Using Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-high energy showers the LTP functions are derived for energies in the range between 1017 and 1019 eV and zenith angles up to 65°. A parametrization combining a step function with an exponential is found to reproduce them very well in the considered range of energies and zenith angles. The LTP functions can also be obtained from data using events simultaneously observed by the fluorescence and the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory (hybrid events). We validate the Monte Carlo results showing how LTP functions from data are in good agreement with simulations.

  12. Joint NASA/Goddard-University of Maryland research program in charged particle and high energy photon detector technology. Semiannual progress report, September 1986-March 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    The first measurements of Fe charge states in two coronal hole-association high speed streams, using the sensor on ISEE-3, are presented. Eight event intervals from the January to June 1983 timeframe were chosen for the study of magnetotail dynamics and its relationship to substorm activity and the possible formation of plasmoids. Techniques are being explored for measurement of secondary electrons which are characteristically emitted when ions hit a target material. Efforts are continuing to understand kilometer wavelength shock associated radio events. An all-sky survey of fast x-ray transients of duration of 5 to 10,000 s was completed. Research using high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of celestial sources in the 20 keV to 20 MeV range to search for and study narrow lines in low-energy gamma-ray spectrum continues. Research in high energy radiation from pulsars is being conducted.

  13. Transuranic waste detection by photon interrogation and on-line delayed neutron counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyoussi, A. E-mail: lyoussi@cea.fr; Romeyer-Dherbey, J.; Jallu, F.; Payan, E.; Buisson, A.; Nurdin, G.; Allano, J

    1999-02-01

    A comprehensive program is currently in progress at several laboratories for the development of sensitive, practical, non-destructive assay techniques for the quantification of low-level transuranics (TRUs) in bulk solid wastes. This paper describes the method being developed to assay high density TRU waste packages using photon interrogation. The system uses a pulsed electron beam from an electron linear accelerator to produce high-energy photon bursts from a metallic converter. The photons induce fissions in a TRU waste package which is inside an original neutron separating and counting cavity (NS2C). When fission is induced in trace amounts of TRU contaminants in waste material, it provides 'signatures' from fission products that can be used to assay the material before disposal. We give here the results from counting photofission-induced delayed neutrons from {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U in sample matrices. We counted delayed neutrons emitted after each pulse of the LINAC by using the sequential photon interrogation and neutron counting signatures (SPHINCS) technique which had been developed in the present framework. The SPHINCS method enhances the available counts by a factor of about 20 compared with the counting of delayed neutrons only, after the irradiation period. Furthermore, the use of SPHINCS measurement technique coupled with the NS2C facility improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of about 30. This decreases the detection limit. The electron linear accelerator operates at 15 MeV, 140 mA, and 2.5 {mu}s wide pulse at a 50 and 6.25 Hz rate. The dynamics of photofission and delayed neutron production, NS2C advantages and performances, use of an electron linear accelerator as a particle source, experimental and electronics details, and future experimental works are discussed.

  14. Search for Higgs boson production via weak boson fusion and decaying to $b \\bar b$ in association with a high-energy photon in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search has been conducted for the $b\\bar b$ decay of the Standard Model Higgs boson produced through vector boson fusion in association with a photon and two jets. The search in this $b\\bar b \\gamma jj$ signature benefits from a large reduction of QCD jet background relative to the inclusive $b\\bar b j j$ signature and from the presence of a high-tranverse-momentum photon for triggering. Results are reported from the analysis of 12.6 fb$^{-1}$ of LHC proton-proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV collected with the ATLAS detector. The observed 95\\% confidence level upper limit on the production cross section times branching ratio for a Higgs mass of 125 GeV is $4.0$ times the Standard Model expectation, and the expected upper limit is $6.0^{+2.3}_{-1.7}$. The measured signal strength is $\\mu=-3.9^{+2.8}_{-2.7}$ times the Standard Model value. The analysis methods are also used to search for $Z+\\gamma$ vector boson fusion production in the same $b\\bar b \\gamma j j$ signature. The observed upper limit on...

  15. Surface and buildup region dose measurements with Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, Gafchromic EBT3 film and MOSFET detector for high energy photon beams

    CERN Document Server

    Akbas, Ugur; Koksal, Canan; Bilge, Hatice

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate surface and buildup region doses for 6 MV photon beams using a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, GafChromic EBT3 film and MOSFET detector for different field sizes and beam angles. The measurements were made in a water equivalent solid phantom at the surface and in the buildup region of the 6 MV photon beams at 100 cm source-detector distance (SDD) for 5x5, 10x10 and 20x20 cm2 field sizes and 0, 30, 60, 80 and 90 beam angles. The surface doses for 10x10 cm2 field size were found to be 20.33%, 18.80% and 25.48% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface dose increased with field size for all dosimeters. As the angle of the incident radiation beam became more oblique, the surface dose increased. The effective measurement depths of dosimeters vary, thus the results of the measurements could be different. This issue can lead to mistakes at surface and buildup dosimetry, and must be taken into account.

  16. Authenticated Quantum Key Distribution with Collective Detection using Single Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Bing-Jie; Duan, Ji-Tong; Liu, Bin; Su, Qi; He, Yuan-Hang; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2016-10-01

    We present two authenticated quantum key distribution (AQKD) protocols by utilizing the idea of collective (eavesdropping) detection. One is a two-party AQKD protocol, the other is a multiparty AQKD protocol with star network topology. In these protocols, the classical channels need not be assumed to be authenticated and the single photons are used as the quantum information carriers. To achieve mutual identity authentication and establish a random key in each of the proposed protocols, only one participant should be capable of preparing and measuring single photons, and the main quantum ability that the rest of the participants should have is just performing certain unitary operations. Security analysis shows that these protocols are free from various kinds of attacks, especially the impersonation attack and the man-in-the-middle (MITM) attack.

  17. First results from the microwave air yield beam experiment (MAYBE: Measurement of GHz radiation for ultra-high energy cosmic ray detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzi V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of microwave emission from an electron-beam induced air plasma performed at the 3 MeV electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Results include the emission spectrum between 1 and 15 GHz, the polarization of the microwave radiation and the scaling of the emitted power with respect to beam intensity. MAYBE measurements provide further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

  18. Fermi-LAT, FACT, MAGIC and VERITAS detection of increasing gamma-ray activity from the high-energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buson, S.; Magill, J. D.; Dorner, D.; Biland, A.; Mirzoyan, R.; Mukherjee, R.

    2016-04-01

    The Fermi-LAT, FACT, MAGIC and VERITAS collaborations report the detection of enhanced gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the very-high-energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 (a.k.a 3FGL J2000.0+6509, in the 3rd LAT source catalog, 3FGL, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23) with radio coordinates (J2000) R.A.: 299.999384 deg, Dec.: 65.148514 deg (Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13). This source has a redshift z=0.047 (Schachter et al. 1993, ApJ, 412, 541).

  19. Detection of very high energy gamma-ray emission from the Perseus cluster head-tail galaxy IC 310 by the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Tridon, D Borla; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bose, D; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Camara, M; Cañellas, A; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cossio, L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Errando, M; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Jogler, T; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Kranich, D; Krause, J; La Barbera, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Pasanen, M; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Struebig, J C; Suric, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Torres, D F; Vankov, H; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Neronov, A; Pfrommer, C; Pinzke, A; Semikoz, D V

    2015-01-01

    We report on the detection with the MAGIC telescopes of very high energy gamma-rays from IC 310, a head-tail radio galaxy in the Perseus galaxy cluster, observed during the interval November 2008 to February 2010. The Fermi satellite has also detected this galaxy. The source is detected by MAGIC at a high statistical significance of 7.6sigma in 20.6 hr of stereo data. The observed spectral energy distribution is flat with a differential spectral index of -2.00 \\pm 0.14. The mean flux above 300 GeV, between October 2009 and February 2010, (3.1 \\pm 0.5)x10^{-12} cm^{-2} s^{-1}, corresponds to (2.5 \\pm 0.4)% of Crab Nebula units. Only an upper limit, of 1.9% of Crab Nebula units above 300 GeV, was obtained with the 2008 data. This, together with strong hints (>3sigma) of flares in the middle of October and November 2009, implies that the emission is variable. The MAGIC results favour a scenario with the very high energy emission originating from the inner jet close to the central engine. More complicated models ...

  20. Perspective of detecting very high energy gamma-ray emission from active galactic nuclei with Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Yuan, Qiang; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Zhu, Feng-Rong; Jia, Huan-Yu

    2016-10-01

    The detectability of active galactic nuclei (AGN), a major class of γ-ray emitters in the sky, by the newly planned Chinese project, Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), is investigated. The expectation is primarily based on the AGN catalog of Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT), with an extrapolation to the very high energy (VHE) range taking into account the absorption effect by the extragalactic background light (EBL). It is found that LHAASO may have the potential to detect more than several tens of the Fermi detected AGN, basically BL Lacertaes, with one-year sky survey. The capability of measuring the energy spectrum and light curve are also discussed.

  1. FSU High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosper, Harrison B. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Adams, Todd [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Askew, Andrew [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Berg, Bernd [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Blessing, Susan K. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Okui, Takemichi [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Owens, Joseph F. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Reina, Laura [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Wahl, Horst D. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2014-12-01

    non-zero neutrino masses or the overwhelming astrophysical evidence for an invisible form of matter, called dark matter, that has had a marked effect on the evolution of structure in the universe. The report highlights the main, recent, experimental achievements of the experimental group, which include the investigation of properties of the W and Z bosons; the search for new heavy stable charged particles and the search for a proposed property of nature called supersymmetry in proton-proton collisions that yield high energy photons. In addition, we report a few results from a more general search for supersymmetry at the LHC, initiated by the group. The report also highlights the group's significant contributions, both theoretical and experimental, to the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its properties.

  2. Quantum-dot-tagged photonic crystal beads for multiplex detection of tumor markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Wang, Huan; Dong, Shujun; Zhu, Peizhi; Diao, Guowang; Yang, Zhanjun

    2014-12-04

    Novel quantum-dot-tagged photonic crystal beads were fabricated for multiplex detection of tumor markers via self-assembly of quantum dot-embedded polystyrene nanospheres into photonic crystal beads through a microfluidic device.

  3. Uncooled IR photon detection using MEMS micro-structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datskos, P.G.; Rajic, S.

    1998-08-01

    Generation of free carriers in a semiconductor gives rise to mechanical stress. Photo-induced stress phenomena in MEMS micro-structures can be used in the room temperature detection of infrared photons. Choice of the appropriate semiconductor material for the MEMS micro-structures determines the cutoff wavelength of the uncooled infrared photon detector. The authors have measured the deflection of silicon and indium antimonide micro-structures resulting from a photo-induced stress. The excess charge carriers responsible for the photo-induced stress were produced via photon irradiation from both a diode laser and a black body source. In the case of Si, the photo-induced stress is of opposite direction and about four times larger than the thermal stress. For indium antimonide the direction of stress is the same as due to thermal effects. The photo-induced stress can be distinguished from the thermal stress based on the cut-off wavelength, response speed, and perhaps the direction of the microstructure deflection.

  4. Processes of heavy quark pair (lepton pair) and two gluon (two photon) production in the high energy quark (electron) proton peripheral collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadov, Azad I., E-mail: ahmadov@theor.jinr.ru [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, 141980 (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Kuraev, Eduard A., E-mail: kuraev@theor.jinr.ru [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    We considered the three jet production processes in the region of the incident lepton, photon, quark or gluon fragmentation. The fourth jet is created by the recoil proton. The kinematics of jet production is discussed in jets production in the fragmentation region. The non-trivial relation between the momenta of the recoil proton and the polar angle of its emission was derived. Based on this formalism the differential cross sections of QCD processes gp→(ggg)p; qp→(qQ{sup ¯}Q)p; gp→(gQQ{sup ¯})p were obtained, including the distribution on transverse momentum component of jets fragments. It was shown that the role of the contribution of “non-Abelian” nature may become dominant in a particular kinematics of the final particles. The kinematics, in which the initial particle changes the direction of movement to the opposite one, was considered in the case of heavy quark–antiquark pair production. Different distributions, including spectral, azimuthal and polar angle distribution on the fragments of jets can be arranged using our results. We present besides the behavior of the ratio of non-Abelian contribution to the cross section to the total contribution. We show that it dominates for large values of the transverse momenta of jets component (gluons or quarks). Some historical introduction to the cross-sections of peripheral processes, including 2γ creation mechanism production, including the result Brodsky–Kinoshita–Terazawa, is given.

  5. Use of the high-energy x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source to investigate the interactions between metals and bacteria.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemner, K. M.; Lai, B.; Maser, J.; Schneegurt, M. A.; Cai, Z.; Ilinski, P. P.; Kulpa, C. F.; Legnini, D. G.; Nealson, K. H.; Pratt, S. T.; Rodrigues, W.; Tischler, M. L.; Yun, W.

    1999-09-30

    Understanding the fate of heavy-metal contaminants in the environment is of fundamental importance in the development and evaluation of effective remediation and sequestration strategies. Among the factors influencing the transport of these contaminants are their chemical separation and the chemical and physical attributes of the surrounding medium. Bacteria and the extracellular material associated with them are thought to play a key role in determining a contaminant's speciation and thus its mobility in the environment. In addition, the microenvironment at and adjacent to actively metabolizing cell surfaces can be significantly different from the bulk environment. Thus, the spatial distribution and chemical separation of contaminants and elements that are key to biological processes must be characterized at micron and submicron resolution in order to understand the microscopic physical, geological, chemical, and biological interfaces that determine a contaminant's macroscopic fate. Hard X-ray microimaging is a powerful technique for the element-specific investigation of complex environmental samples at th needed micron and submicron resolution. An important advantage of this technique results from the large penetration depth of hard X-rays in water. This advantage minimizes the requirements for sample preparation and allows the detailed study of hydrated samples. This paper presents results of studies of the spatial distribution of naturally occurring metals and a heavy-metal contaminant (Cr) in and near hydrated bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) in the early stages of biofilm development, performed at the Advanced Photon Source Sector 2 X-ray microscopy beamline.

  6. Use of the high-energy X-ray microprobe at the advanced photon source to investigate the interactions between metals and bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemner, K. M.; Lai, B.; Maser, J.; Schneegurt, M. A.; Cai, Z.; Ilinski, P. P.; Kulpa, C. F.; Legnini, D. G.; Nealson, K. H.; Pratt, S. T.; Rodrigues, W.; Tischler, M. Lee; Yun, W.

    2000-05-01

    Understanding the fate of heavy-metal contaminants in the environment is of fundamental importance in the development and evaluation of effective remediation and sequestration strategies. Among the factors influencing the transport of these contaminants are their chemical speciation and the chemical and physical attributes of the surrounding medium. Bacteria and the extracellular material associated with them are thought to play a key role in determining a contaminant's speciation and thus its mobility in the environment. In addition, the microenvironment at and adjacent to actively metabolizing cell surfaces can be significantly different from the bulk environment. Thus, the spatial distribution and chemical speciation of contaminants and elements that are key to biological processes must be characterized at micron and submicron resolution in order to understand the microscopic physical, geological, chemical, and biological interfaces that determine a contaminant's macroscopic fate. Hard X-ray microimaging is a powerful technique for the element-specific investigation of complex environmental samples at the needed micron and submicron resolution. An important advantage of this technique results from the large penetration depth of hard X-rays in water. This advantage minimizes the requirements for sample preparation and allows the detailed study of hydrated samples. This paper presents results of studies of the spatial distribution of naturally occurring metals and a heavy-metal contaminant (Cr) in and near hydrated bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) in the early stages of biofilm development, performed at the Advanced Photon Source Sector 2 X-ray microscopy beamline.

  7. 64-pixel NbTiN superconducting nanowire single-photon detector array for spatially resolved photon detection

    CERN Document Server

    Miki, Shigehito; Wang, Zhen; Terai, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    We present the characterization of two-dimensionally arranged 64-pixel NbTiN superconducting nanowire single-photon detector array for spatially resolved photon detection. NbTiN films deposited on thermally oxidized Si substrates enabled the high-yield production of high-quality SSPD pixels, and all 64 SSPD pixels showed uniform superconducting characteristics. Furthermore, all of the pixels showed single-photon sensitivity, and 60 of the 64 pixels showed a pulse generation probability higher than 90% after photon absorption. As a result of light irradiation from the single-mode optical fiber at different distances between the fiber tip and the active area, the variations of system detection efficiency in each pixel showed reasonable Gaussian distribution to represent the spatial distributions of photon flux intensity.

  8. Detection of extended very-high-energy gamma-ray emission towards the young stellar cluster Westerlund 2

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brion, E; Brown, A M; Buhler, R; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Ferrero, E; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Funk, S; Fuling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; Moulin, E; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Olive, J P; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Ranchon, S; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schröder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Spanier, F; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; al, et

    2007-01-01

    Results from gamma-ray observations by the H.E.S.S. telescope array in the direction of the young stellar cluster Westerlund 2 are presented. Stereoscopic imaging of Cherenkov light emission of gamma-ray induced showers in the atmosphere is used to study the celestial region around the massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) binary WR 20a. Spectral and positional analysis is performed using standard event reconstruction techniques and parameter cuts. The detection of a new gamma-ray source is reported from H.E.S.S. observations in 2006. HESS J1023-575 is found to be coincident with the young stellar cluster Westerlund 2 in the well-known HII complex RCW 49. The source is detected with a statistical significance of more than 9 sigma, and shows extension beyond a point-like object within the H.E.S.S. point-spread function. The differential gamma-ray spectrum of the emission region is measured over approximately two orders of magnitude in flux. The spatial coincidence between HESS J1023-575 and the young open cluster Westerlund...

  9. Direct detection of delayed high energy electrons from the 181Ta target irradiated by a moderate intensity femtosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel’ev, A.; Chefonov, O.; Ovchinnikov, A.; Agranat, M.; Spohr, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    We depict an experimental study of delayed fast, negatively charged particles from femtosecond laser-plasma interaction at an intensity of I ∼ 1017 W cm‑2. Plates of 2 mm thickness made of 181Ta (∼100% abundance) and natural W were used as targets. We distinguished certain delayed events due to detection of negative H‑, C‑ and O‑ ions. However, most events which were delayed by 0.5–5 μs with respect to the instantaneous plasma formation caused by the laser pulses, were identified as electrons with energies of 3–7 keV. A comparative analysis between the tantalum and tungsten spectra was undertaken. This revealed a close similarity between the measured spectrum for tantalum and the predicted spectrum for electrons arising from to the internal conversion decay of the 6.237 keV nuclear isomeric state in 181Ta.

  10. Detection of single photons by toad and mouse rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reingruber, Jürgen; Pahlberg, Johan; Woodruff, Michael L; Sampath, Alapakkam P; Fain, Gordon L; Holcman, David

    2013-11-26

    Amphibian and mammalian rods can both detect single photons of light even though they differ greatly in physical dimensions, mammalian rods being much smaller in diameter than amphibian rods. To understand the changes in physiology and biochemistry required by such large differences in outer segment geometry, we developed a computational approach, taking into account the spatial organization of the outer segment divided into compartments, together with molecular dynamics simulations of the signaling cascade. We generated simulations of the single-photon response together with intrinsic background fluctuations in toad and mouse rods. Combining this computational approach with electrophysiological data from mouse rods, we determined key biochemical parameters. On average around one phosphodiesterase (PDE) molecule is spontaneously active per mouse compartment, similar to the value for toad, which is unexpected due to the much smaller diameter in mouse. A larger number of spontaneously active PDEs decreases dark noise, thereby improving detection of single photons; it also increases cGMP turnover, which accelerates the decay of the light response. These constraints explain the higher PDE density in mammalian compared with amphibian rods that compensates for the much smaller diameter of mammalian disks. We further find that the rate of cGMP hydrolysis by light-activated PDE is diffusion limited, which is not the case for spontaneously activated PDE. As a consequence, in the small outer segment of a mouse rod only a few activated PDEs are sufficient to generate a signal that overcomes noise, which permits a shorter lifetime of activated rhodopsin and greater temporal resolution.

  11. Study on the effect of the self-attenuation on γ-ray detect or efficiency calculated at low and high energy regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-khatib, Ahmed M; Badawi, Mohamed S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Thabet, Abouzeid A. [Dept. of Medical Equipment Technology, Pharos University, Alexandria (Egypt); Elazher, Mohamd A. [Arab Academy for Science, Technology and Maritime Transport, Alexandria (Egypt); Salem, Bohaysa A. [Basic Science Department, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Pharos University, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2014-04-15

    The present work used the efficiency transfer method used to calculate the full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) curves of the ({sup 2} x {sup 2} and {sup 3} x {sup 3}) NaI (Tl) detectors based on the effective solid angle subtended between the source and the detector. The study covered the effect of the self attenuation coefficient of the source matrix (with a radius greater than the detector's radius) on the detector efficiency. {sup 152}An Eu aqueous radioactive source covering the energy range from 121.78 keV up to 1408.01 keV was used. In this study an empirical formula was deduced to calculate the difference between the measured and the calculated efficiencies [without self attenuation] at low and high energy regions. A proper balance between the measured and calculated efficiencies [with self attenuation] was achieved with discrepancies less than 3%, while reaching 39% for calculating values [without self attenuation] due to working with large sources, or for low photon energies.

  12. Testing the GlaaS algorithm for dose measurements on low- and high-energy photon beams using an amorphous silicon portal imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Giorgia; Fogliata, Antonella; Vanetti, Eugenio; Clivio, Alessandro; Vetterli, Daniel; Cozzi, Luca

    2008-02-01

    The GLAaS algorithm for pretreatment intensity modulation radiation therapy absolute dose verification based on the use of amorphous silicon detectors, as described in Nicolini et al. [G. Nicolini, A. Fogliata, E. Vanetti, A. Clivio, and L. Cozzi, Med. Phys. 33, 2839-2851 (2006)], was tested under a variety of experimental conditions to investigate its robustness, the possibility of using it in different clinics and its performance. GLAaS was therefore tested on a low-energy Varian Clinac (6 MV) equipped with an amorphous silicon Portal Vision PV-aS500 with electronic readout IAS2 and on a high-energy Clinac (6 and 15 MV) equipped with a PV-aS1000 and IAS3 electronics. Tests were performed for three calibration conditions: A: adding buildup on the top of the cassette such that SDD-SSD = d(max) and comparing measurements with corresponding doses computed at d(max), B: without adding any buildup on the top of the cassette and considering only the intrinsic water-equivalent thickness of the electronic portal imaging devices device (0.8 cm), and C: without adding any buildup on the top of the cassette but comparing measurements against doses computed at d(max). This procedure is similar to that usually applied when in vivo dosimetry is performed with solid state diodes without sufficient buildup material. Quantitatively, the gamma index (gamma), as described by Low et al. [D. A. Low, W. B. Harms, S. Mutic, and J. A. Purdy, Med. Phys. 25, 656-660 (1998)], was assessed. The gamma index was computed for a distance to agreement (DTA) of 3 mm. The dose difference deltaD was considered as 2%, 3%, and 4%. As a measure of the quality of results, the fraction of field area with gamma larger than 1 (%FA) was scored. Results over a set of 50 test samples (including fields from head and neck, breast, prostate, anal canal, and brain cases) and from the long-term routine usage, demonstrated the robustness and stability of GLAaS. In general, the mean values of %FA remain below 3% for

  13. Specific and ultrasensitive ciprofloxacin detection by responsive photonic crystal sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rong; Wang, Yong [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yu, Li-Ping, E-mail: lipingyu@tju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Sensor was designed by integrating complexes into responsive photonic crystal. • Ternary tryptophan–zinc(II)–ciprofloxacin complexes were chosen for sensing. • Excellent sensing of ciprofloxacin was achieved in aqueous media. - Abstract: A new approach for specific and ultrasensitive measurement of ciprofloxacin has been developed by integrating ternary complexes into responsive photonic crystal (RPC). Tryptophan was first immobilized within the polyacrylamide hydrogel substrates of RPC. The determination of ciprofloxacin was via the existence of zinc(II) ions that function as a ‘bridge’ to form specific tryptophan–zinc(II)–ciprofloxacin complexes step by step, which resulted in a stepwise red-shift of the diffraction wavelength. A maximum wavelength shift from 798 to 870 nm for ciprofloxacin was observed when the RPC film was immersed in 10{sup −4} M ciprofloxacin. A linear relationship has been obtained between the Δλ of diffraction peak and logarithm of ciprofloxacin concentration at pH 5.0 in the range of 10{sup −10} to 10{sup −4} M. And the least detectable concentration in present work is about 5 × 10{sup −11} M. The results demonstrated that the as-designed ternary complexes-based RPC sensor exhibited high sensitivity, satisfactory specificity and excellent recoverability for sensing of ciprofloxacin in aqueous media and were validated by detecting ciprofloxacin in the eye-drop sample.

  14. Single nanoparticle detection using photonic crystal enhanced microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yue; Hu, Huan; Chen, Weili; Lu, Meng; Tian, Limei; Yu, Hojeong; Long, Kenneth D; Chow, Edmond; King, William P; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-03-07

    We demonstrate a label-free biosensor imaging approach that utilizes a photonic crystal (PC) surface to detect surface attachment of individual dielectric and metal nanoparticles through measurement of localized shifts in the resonant wavelength and resonant reflection magnitude from the PC. Using a microscopy-based approach to scan the PC resonant reflection properties with 0.6 μm spatial resolution, we show that metal nanoparticles attached to the biosensor surface with strong absorption at the resonant wavelength induce a highly localized reduction in reflection efficiency and are able to be detected by modulation of the resonant wavelength. Experimental demonstrations of single-nanoparticle imaging are supported by finite-difference time-domain computer simulations. The ability to image surface-adsorption of individual nanoparticles offers a route to single molecule biosensing, in which the particles can be functionalized with specific recognition molecules and utilized as tags.

  15. Discovery of High-energy and Very High Energy Gamma-ray Emission from the Blazar RBS 0413

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Boettcher, M; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Coppi, P; Cui, W; Decerprit, G; Dickherber, R; Dumm, J; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Hawkins, K; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Lee, K; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Palma, N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pichel, A; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G D; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tesic, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Varlotta, A; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; Fortin, P; Horan, D

    2012-01-01

    We report on the discovery of high-energy (HE; E > 0.1 GeV) and very high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission from the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object RBS 0413. VERITAS, a ground-based gamma-ray observatory, detected VHE gamma rays from RBS 0413 with a statistical significance of 5.5 standard deviations (sigma) and a gamma-ray flux of (1.5 \\pm 0.6stat \\pm 0.7syst) \\times 10^(-8) photons m^(-2) s^(-1) (\\sim 1% of the Crab Nebula flux) above 250 GeV. The observed spectrum can be described by a power law with a photon index of 3.18 \\pm 0.68stat \\pm 0.30syst. Contemporaneous observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected HE gamma rays from RBS 0413 with a statistical significance of more than 9 sigma, a power-law photon index of 1.57 \\pm 0.12stat +0.11sys -0.12sys and a gamma-ray flux between 300 MeV and 300 GeV of (1.64 \\pm 0.43stat +0.31sys -0.22sys) \\times 10^(-5) photons m^(-2) s^(-1). We present the results from Fermi-LAT and VERITAS, including a...

  16. Summary of Lepton Photon 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2012-03-14

    In this lecture, I summarize developments presented at the Lepton Photon 2011 conference and give my perspective on the current situation in high-energy physics. I am grateful to the organizers of Lepton Photon 2011 for providing us a very pleasant and simulating week in Mumbai. This year's Lepton Photon conference has covered the full range of subjects that fall within the scope of high-energy physics, including connections to cosmology, nuclear physics, and atomic physics. The experiments that were discussed detect particles ranging in energy from radio frequencies to EeV.

  17. Detection of high energy muons with sub-20 ps timing resolution using L(Y)SO crystals and SiPM readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaglia, A.; Gundacker, S.; Lecoq, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Para, A.; Pauwels, K.; Auffray, E.

    2016-09-01

    Precise timing capability will be a key aspect of particle detectors at future high energy colliders, as the time information can help in the reconstruction of physics events at the high collision rate expected there. Other than being used in detectors for PET, fast scintillating crystals coupled to compact Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) constitute a versatile system that can be exploited to realize an ad-hoc timing device to be hosted in a larger high energy physics detector. In this paper, we present the timing performance of LYSO:Ce and LSO:Ce codoped 0.4% Ca crystals coupled to SiPMs, as measured with 150 GeV muons at the CERN SPS H2 extraction line. Small crystals, with lengths ranging from 5 mm up to 30 mm and transverse size of 2 × 2mm2 or 3 × 3mm2 , were exposed to a 150 GeV muon beam. SiPMs from two different companies (Hamamatsu and FBK) were used to detect the light produced in the crystals. The best coincidence time resolution value of (14.5 ± 0.5) ps , corresponding to a single-detector time resolution of about 10 ps, is demonstrated for 5 mm long LSO:Ce,Ca crystals coupled to FBK SiPMs, when time walk corrections are applied.

  18. Detectability comparison of simulated objects within a dense breast phantom using high energy x-ray phase sensitive and conventional imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin; Chen, Wei; Fajardo, Laurie L.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the detectability of simulated objects within a dense breast phantom using high energy x-rays for phase sensitive breast imaging in comparison with a conventional imaging system. A 5 cm thick phantom was used which represented a compressed breast consisting of 70% glandular and 30% adipose tissue ratio in non-uniform background. The phantom had a 6 × 6 matrix of holes with milled depths ranging from 1 to 0.1 mm and diameters ranging from 4.25 to 0.25 mm representing simulated tumors. The in-line phase sensitive prototype was equipped with a micro-focus x-ray source and a flat panel detector with a 50 μm pixel pitch, both mounted on an optical rail. Phase contrast image of the phantom was acquired at 120 kVp, 4.5 mAs at source to object distance (SOD) of 68 cm and source to image detector distance (SIDD) of 170 cm with a geometric magnification (M) of 2.5. A 2.5 mm aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The conventional image was acquired using the same porotype with the phantom in contact with the detector at 40 kVp, 12.5 mAs under SID = 68 cm. The mean glandular dose (Dg) for both the acquisitions was 1.3 mGy. The observer study and CNR analyses indicated that the phase contrast image had higher disk detectability as compared to the conventional image. The edge enhancement provided by the phase sensitive images warrants in identifying boundaries of malignant tissues and in providing optimal results in phase retrieval process. The potential demonstrated by this study for imaging a dense breast with a high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging to improve tumor detection in warrants further investigation of this technique.

  19. High-energy astroparticle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Semikoz, A

    2010-01-01

    In these three lectures I discuss the present status of high-energy astroparticle physics including Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR), high-energy gamma rays, and neutrinos. The first lecture is devoted to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. After a brief introduction to UHECR I discuss the acceleration of charged particles to highest energies in the astrophysical objects, their propagation in the intergalactic space, recent observational results by the Auger and HiRes experiments, anisotropies of UHECR arrival directions, and secondary gamma rays produced by UHECR. In the second lecture I review recent results on TeV gamma rays. After a short introduction to detection techniques, I discuss recent exciting results of the H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and Milagro experiments on the point-like and diffuse sources of TeV gamma rays. A special section is devoted to the detection of extragalactic magnetic fields with TeV gammaray measurements. Finally, in the third lecture I discuss Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) neutrinos. I review t...

  20. High-energy atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drukarev, Evgeny G

    2016-01-01

    This self-contained text introduces readers to the field of high-energy atomic physics - a new regime of photon-atom interactions in which the photon energies significantly exceed the atomic or molecular binding energies, and which opened up with the recent advent of new synchrotron sources. From a theoretical point of view, a small-parameter characteristic of the bound system emerged, making it possible to perform analytic perturbative calculations that can in turn serve as benchmarks for more powerful numerical computations. The first part of the book introduces readers to the foundations of this new regime and its theoretical treatment. In particular, the validity of the small-parameter perturbation expansion and of the lowest-order approximation is critically reviewed. The following chapters then apply these insights to various atomic processes, such as photoionization as a many-body problem, dominant mechanisms for the production of ions at higher energies, Compton scattering and ionization accompanied b...

  1. Cosmic absorption of ultra high energy particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, R.; Vereshchagin, G. V.; Xue, S.-S.

    2016-02-01

    This paper summarizes the limits on propagation of ultra high energy particles in the Universe, set up by their interactions with cosmic background of photons and neutrinos. By taking into account cosmic evolution of these backgrounds and considering appropriate interactions we derive the mean free path for ultra high energy photons, protons and neutrinos. For photons the relevant processes are the Breit-Wheeler process as well as the double pair production process. For protons the relevant reactions are the photopion production and the Bethe-Heitler process. We discuss the interplay between the energy loss length and mean free path for the Bethe-Heitler process. Neutrino opacity is determined by its scattering off the cosmic background neutrino. We compute for the first time the high energy neutrino horizon as a function of its energy.

  2. INTERPRETATION OF THE UNPRECEDENTEDLY LONG-LIVED HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION OF GRB 130427A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Ruoyu; Wang Xiangyu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu Xuefeng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-08-20

    High-energy photons (>100 MeV) are detected by the Fermi/Large Area Telescope from GRB 130427A up to almost one day after the burst, with an extra hard spectral component discovered in the high-energy afterglow. We show that this hard spectral component arises from afterglow synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission. This scenario can explain the origin of >10 GeV photons detected up to {approx}30, 000 s after the burst, which would be difficult to explain via synchrotron radiation due to the limited maximum synchrotron photon energy. The lower energy multi-wavelength afterglow data can be fitted simultaneously by the afterglow synchrotron emission. The implication of detecting the SSC emission for the circumburst environment is discussed.

  3. High-temperature superconducting nanowires for photon detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpaia, R. [Quantum Device Physics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Göteborg (Sweden); CNR SPIN Institute – Superconductors, Innovative Materials and Devices, UOS–Napoli, I-80100 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli ‘Federico II’, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Ejrnaes, M. [CNR SPIN Institute – Superconductors, Innovative Materials and Devices, UOS–Napoli, I-80100 Napoli (Italy); Parlato, L. [CNR SPIN Institute – Superconductors, Innovative Materials and Devices, UOS–Napoli, I-80100 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli ‘Federico II’, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Tafuri, F. [CNR SPIN Institute – Superconductors, Innovative Materials and Devices, UOS–Napoli, I-80100 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, I-81031 Aversa, CE (Italy); Cristiano, R. [CNR SPIN Institute – Superconductors, Innovative Materials and Devices, UOS–Napoli, I-80100 Napoli (Italy); Golubev, D. [Low Temperature Laboratory (OVLL), Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Sobolewski, Roman, E-mail: roman.sobolewski@rochester.edu [Institute of Electron Technology, PL-02668 Warszawa (Poland); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY 14627-0231 (United States); Bauch, T.; Lombardi, F. [Quantum Device Physics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Göteborg (Sweden); and others

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Homogeneous YBCO nanowires have been fabricated for photon detection applications. • Serial-parallel nanowire configuration leads to a large detector active area. • The YBCO nanowires exhibit critical current densities up to 106 A/cm{sup 2}. • The devices have been excited using a 1550-nm wavelength, pulsed laser irradiation. • Photoresponse signals have been measured and analyzed from 4 K up to the device T{sub c}. - Abstract: The possible use of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) for realizing superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors is a challenging, but also promising, aim because of their ultrafast electron relaxation times and high operating temperatures. The state-of-the-art HTS nanowires with a 50-nm thickness and widths down to 130 nm have been fabricated and tested under a 1550-nm wavelength laser irradiation. Experimental results presenting both the amplitude and rise times of the photoresponse signals as a function of the normalized detector bias current, measured in a wide temperature range, are discussed. The presence of two distinct regimes in the photoresponse temperature dependence is clearly evidenced, indicating that there are two different response mechanisms responsible for the HTS photoresponse mechanisms.

  4. High-energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi Large Area Telescope Detections and Analysis of Two M-class Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, Q.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Murphy, R.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  5. High-energy astrophysics with neutrino telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarusi, T.; Spurio, M. [Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica, Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    Neutrino astrophysics offers new perspectives on the Universe investigation: high-energy neutrinos, produced by the most energetic phenomena in our Galaxy and in the Universe, carry complementary (if not exclusive) information about the cosmos with respect to photons. While the small interaction cross section of neutrinos allows them to come from the core of astrophysical objects, it is also a drawback, as their detection requires a large target mass. This is why it is convenient to put huge cosmic neutrino detectors in natural locations, like deep underwater or under-ice sites. In order to supply for such extremely hostile environmental conditions, new frontier technologies are under development. The aim of this work is to review the motivations for high-energy neutrino astrophysics, the present status of experimental results and the technologies used in underwater/ice Cherenkov experiments, with a special focus on the efforts for the construction of a km{sup 3}-scale detector in the Mediterranean Sea. (orig.)

  6. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of nitrogen in air. Consequences on the detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays; Mesure precise du rendement absolu de la fluorescence de l'azote dans l'air. Consequences sur la detection des rayons cosmiques d'ultra-haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefeuvre, G

    2006-07-15

    The study of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (E > 10{sup 20} eV) requires to determine the energy with much more precision than what is currently achieved. The shower of particles created in the atmosphere can be detected either by sampling particle on the ground, or by detecting the fluorescence induced by the excitation of nitrogen by shower electrons. At present, the measurement of the fluorescence is the simplest and the most reliable method, since it does not call upon hadronic physics laws at extreme energies, a field still inaccessible to accelerators. The precise knowledge of the conversion factor between deposited energy and the number of fluorescence photons produced (the yield) is thus essential. Up to now, it has been determined with an accuracy of 15 % only. This main goal of this work is to measure this yield to better than 5 per cent. To do this, 1 MeV electrons from a radioactive source excite nitrogen of the air. The accuracy has been reached thanks to the implementation of a new method for the absolute calibration of the photomultipliers detecting the photons, to better than 2 per cent. The fluorescence yield, measured and normalized to 0.85 MeV, 760 mmHg and 15 Celsius degrees, is (4.23 {+-} 0.20) photons per meter, or (20.46 {+-} 0.98) photons per deposited MeV. In addition, and for the first time, the absolute fluorescence spectrum of nitrogen excited by a source has been measured with an optical grating spectrometer. (author)

  7. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying the technology instrumentation of photonics This volume discusses photonics technology and instrumentation. The topics discussed in this volume are: Communication Networks; Data Buffers; Defense and Security Applications; Detectors; Fiber Optics and Amplifiers; Green Photonics; Instrumentation and Metrology; Interferometers; Light-Harvesting Materials; Logic Devices; Optical Communications; Remote Sensing; Solar Energy; Solid-State Lighting; Wavelength Conversion Comprehensive and accessible coverage of the whole of modern photonics Emphas

  8. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern photonics accessibly and discusses the basic physical principles underlying all the applications and technology of photonicsThis volume covers the basic physical principles underlying the technology and all applications of photonics from statistical optics to quantum optics. The topics discussed in this volume are: Photons in perspective; Coherence and Statistical Optics; Complex Light and Singular Optics; Electrodynamics of Dielectric Media; Fast and slow Light; Holography; Multiphoton Processes; Optical Angular Momentum; Optical Forces, Trapping and Manipulation; Pol

  9. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying thescience and technology of nanophotonics, its materials andstructures This volume presents nanophotonic structures and Materials.Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizeslight/matter interactions on the nanoscale where researchers arediscovering new phenomena and developing techniques that go wellbeyond what is possible with conventional photonics andelectronics.The topics discussed in this volume are: CavityPhotonics; Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates; Displays;E-paper; Graphene; Integrated Photonics; Liquid Cry

  10. Sub-wavelength bubble in photon coincidence detection

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ruifeng; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2013-01-01

    Sub-wavelength interference has a potential application in lithography to beat the classical Rayleigh limit of resolution. We carefully study the second-order correlation theory and find there is a bubble of sub-wavelength interference in photon coincidence detection. A Young's double-slit experiment with thermal light is carried out to test the second-order correlation pattern. The result shows that when different scanning ways of two point detectors are chosen, we can get arbitrary-wavelength interference patterns. We then give a theoretical explanation to this surprising result, and find this explanation is also suitable for the result by using entangled light. Furthermore, the question of whether this kind of arbitrary-wavelength interference patterns can be used in quantum lithography is also analyzed.

  11. Photon Detection System Designs for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Whittington, Denver

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the DUNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. To maximize the active area while maintaining a small photocathode coverage, the experiment will utilize a design based on plastic light guides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, along with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. This report presents recent preliminary performance measurements of this baseline design and several alternative designs which promise significant improvements in sensitivity to low-energy interactions.

  12. Photon Detection System Designs for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittington, Denver [Indiana U.

    2015-11-19

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the DUNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. To maximize the active area while maintaining a small photocathode coverage, the experiment will utilize a design based on plastic light guides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, along with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. This report presents recent preliminary performance measurements of this baseline design and several alternative designs which promise significant improvements in sensitivity to low-energy interactions.

  13. Photon detection system designs for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, D.

    2016-05-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the DUNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. To maximize the active area while maintaining a small photocathode coverage, the experiment will utilize a design based on plastic light guides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, along with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. This report presents recent preliminary performance measurements of this baseline design and several alternative designs which promise significant improvements in sensitivity to low-energy interactions.

  14. Measurement of a Phase of a Radio Wave Reflected from Rock Salt and Ice Irradiated by an Electron Beam for Detection of Ultra-High-Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Chiba, Masami; Tanikawa, Takahiro; Yano, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Watanabe, Souichirou; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have found a radio-wave-reflection effect in rock salt for the detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos which are expected to be generated in Greisen, Zatsepin, and Kuzmin (GZK) processes in the universe. When an UHE neutrino interacts with rock salt or ice as a detection medium, a shower is generated. That shower is formed by hadronic and electromagnetic avalanche processes. The energy of the UHE neutrino shower converts to thermal energy through ionization processes. Consequently, the temperature rises along the shower produced by the UHE neutrino. The refractive index of the medium rises with temperature. The irregularity of the refractive index in the medium leads to a reflection of radio waves. This reflection effect combined with the long attenuation length of radio waves in rock salt and ice would yield a new method to detect UHE neutrinos. We measured the phase of the reflected radio wave under irradiation with an electron beam on ice and rock salt powder. The measured phase showed excellent consis...

  15. Detection of Very High Energy γ-ray Emission from the Perseus Cluster Head-Tail Galaxy IC 310 by the MAGIC Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Camara, M.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, M.; De Sabata, F.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Errando, M.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Struebig, J. C.; Suric, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Neronov, A.; Pfrommer, C.; Pinzke, A.; Semikoz, D. V.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    We report on the detection with the MAGIC telescopes of very high energy (VHE) γ-rays from IC 310, a head-tail radio galaxy in the Perseus galaxy cluster, observed during the interval 2008 November to 2010 February. The Fermi satellite has also detected this galaxy. The source is detected by MAGIC at a high statistical significance of 7.6σ in 20.6 hr of stereo data. The observed spectral energy distribution is flat with a differential spectral index of -2.00 ± 0.14. The mean flux above 300 GeV, between 2009 October and 2010 February, (3.1 ± 0.5) × 10-12 cm-2 s-1, corresponds to (2.5 ± 0.4)% of Crab Nebula units. Only an upper limit, of 1.9% of Crab Nebula units above 300 GeV, was obtained with the 2008 data. This, together with strong hints (>3σ) of flares in the middle of 2009 October and November, implies that the emission is variable. The MAGIC results favor a scenario with the VHE emission originating from the inner jet close to the central engine. More complicated models than a simple one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scenario, e.g., multi-zone SSC, external Compton, or hadronic, may be required to explain the very flat spectrum and its extension over more than three orders of magnitude in energy.

  16. Photonic crystal waveguide-based biosensor for detection of diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Harshita; Kaler, Rajinder S.; Painam, Balveer

    2016-07-01

    A biosensor is a device that is used to detect the analytes or molecules of a sample by means of a binding mechanism. A two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide-based biosensor is designed with a diamond-shaped ring resonator and two waveguides: a bus waveguide and a drop waveguide. The sensing mechanism is based on change in refractive index of the analytes, leading to a shift in the peak resonant wavelength. This mechanism can be used in the field of biomedical treatment where different body fluids such as blood, tears, saliva, or urine can be used as the analyte in which different components of the fluid can be detected. It can also be used to differentiate between the cell lines of a normal and an unhealthy human being. Average value of quality factor for this device comes out to be 1082.2063. For different analytes used, the device exhibits enhanced sensitivity and, hence, it is useful for the detection of diseases.

  17. Detection of organophosphorus compounds using a molecularly imprinted photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Huang, Shuyue; Xue, Fei; Wang, Yifei; Meng, Zihui; Xue, Min

    2012-02-15

    A label free molecularly imprinted photonic crystal (MIPC) was developed to detect the degradation product of nerve agents. Mono-dispersed poly-methyl methacrylate colloidal particles with the diameter of 280 nm were used to fabricate a closely packed colloidal crystal array (CCA), and a methyl phosphonic acid (MPA) imprinted hydrogel was prepared within the CCA using 2-hydroxyethyl-methacrylate and N-isopropylacrylamide as monomers, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate and N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linkers, a mixture of n-octanol and acetonitrile as porogen. The diffraction intensity of the MIPC decreased significantly upon the MPA adsorption with a limit of detection (LOD) of 10(-6) molL(-1). Furthermore, the diffraction intensity decreased and blue shifted with the increase of temperature, decreased and red shifted with the increase of ionic strength. At higher pH, the diffraction intensity increased without obvious diffraction shift. The MIPC provides an indirect path to detect nerve agents (Sarin, Soman, VX and R-VX) by monitoring the MPA released from the hydrolysis of nerve agents, with LODs of 3.5 × 10(-6) molL(-1), 2.5 × 10(-5) molL(-1), 7.5 × 10(-5) molL(-1) and 7.5 × 10(-5) molL(-1) for Sarin, Soman, VX and R-VX, respectively.

  18. Development of the radio astronomical method of cosmic particle detection for extremely high-energy cosmic ray physics and neutrino astronomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheleznykh Igor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The proposal to use ground based radio telescopes for detection of Askaryan radio pulses from particle cascades arising when extremely high-energy (EHE > 1020 eV cosmic rays (including neutrinos interact with the lunar regolith of multi gigaton mass was made at the end of 1980s in the framework of the Russian (Soviet DUMAND Program. During more than a quarter of century a number of lunar experiments were carried out mainly in the 1–3 GHz frequency range using the large radio telescopes of Australia, USA, Russia and other countries but these experiments only put upper limits to the EHE cosmic rays fluxes. For this reason, it would be of great interest to search for nanosecond radio pulses from the Moon in a wider interval of frequencies (including lower ones of 100–350 MHz with larger radio detectors – for example the giant radio telescope SKA (Square Kilometer Array which is constructed in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. In this paper possibilities are discussed to use one of the most sensitive meter-wavelength (∼ 110 MHz Large Phased Array (LPA of 187 × 384 m2 and the wide field of view meter-wavelength array of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory as prototypes of low frequency radio detectors for lunar experiments. The new scheme for fast simulation of ultrahigh and extremely high-energy cascades in dense media is also suggested. This scheme will be used later for calculations of radio emission of cascades in the lunar regolith with energies up to 1020 eV and higher in the wide frequency band of 0.1− a few GHz.

  19. Development of the radio astronomical method of cosmic particle detection for extremely high-energy cosmic ray physics and neutrino astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleznykh, Igor; Dagkesamanskii, Rustam; Dedenko, Leonid; Dedenko, Grigorii

    2017-06-01

    The proposal to use ground based radio telescopes for detection of Askaryan radio pulses from particle cascades arising when extremely high-energy (EHE > 1020 eV) cosmic rays (including neutrinos) interact with the lunar regolith of multi gigaton mass was made at the end of 1980s in the framework of the Russian (Soviet) DUMAND Program. During more than a quarter of century a number of lunar experiments were carried out mainly in the 1-3 GHz frequency range using the large radio telescopes of Australia, USA, Russia and other countries but these experiments only put upper limits to the EHE cosmic rays fluxes. For this reason, it would be of great interest to search for nanosecond radio pulses from the Moon in a wider interval of frequencies (including lower ones of 100-350 MHz) with larger radio detectors - for example the giant radio telescope SKA (Square Kilometer Array) which is constructed in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. In this paper possibilities are discussed to use one of the most sensitive meter-wavelength (˜ 110 MHz) Large Phased Array (LPA) of 187 × 384 m2 and the wide field of view meter-wavelength array of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory as prototypes of low frequency radio detectors for lunar experiments. The new scheme for fast simulation of ultrahigh and extremely high-energy cascades in dense media is also suggested. This scheme will be used later for calculations of radio emission of cascades in the lunar regolith with energies up to 1020 eV and higher in the wide frequency band of 0.1- a few GHz.

  20. High energy astrophysical neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Athar, H.

    2002-01-01

    High energy neutrinos with energy typically greater than tens of thousands of GeV may originate from several astrophysical sources. The sources may include, for instance, our galaxy, the active centers of nearby galaxies, as well as possibly the distant sites of gamma ray bursts. I briefly review some aspects of production and propagation as well as prospects for observations of these high energy astrophysical neutrinos.

  1. Detectability comparison between a high energy x-ray phase sensitive and mammography systems in imaging phantoms with varying glandular-adipose ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin; Fajardo, Laurie L.; Yan, Aimin; Fuh, Janis; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential benefits of using high energy x-rays in comparison with the conventional mammography imaging systems for phase sensitive imaging of breast tissues with varying glandular-adipose ratios. This study employed two modular phantoms simulating the glandular (G) and adipose (A) breast tissue composition in 50 G-50 A and 70 G-30 A percentage densities. Each phantom had a thickness of 5 cm with a contrast detail test pattern embedded in the middle. For both phantoms, the phase contrast images were acquired using a micro-focus x-ray source operated at 120 kVp and 4.5 mAs, with a magnification factor (M) of 2.5 and a detector with a 50 µm pixel pitch. The mean glandular dose delivered to the 50 G-50 A and 70 G-30 A phantom sets were 1.33 and 1.3 mGy, respectively. A phase retrieval algorithm based on the phase attenuation duality that required only a single phase contrast image was applied. Conventional low energy mammography images were acquired using GE Senographe DS and Hologic Selenia systems utilizing their automatic exposure control (AEC) settings. In addition, the automatic contrast mode (CNT) was also used for the acquisition with the GE system. The AEC mode applied higher dose settings for the 70 G-30 A phantom set. As compared to the phase contrast images, the dose levels for the AEC mode acquired images were similar while the dose levels for the CNT mode were almost double. The observer study, contrast-to-noise ratio and figure of merit comparisons indicated a large improvement with the phase retrieved images in comparison to the AEC mode images acquired with the clinical systems for both density levels. As the glandular composition increased, the detectability of smaller discs decreased with the clinical systems, particularly with the GE system, even at higher dose settings. As compared to the CNT mode (double dose) images, the observer study also indicated that the phase retrieved images provided

  2. Very-high-energy gamma-rays from the Universe's middle age: detection of the z=0.940 blazar PKS 1441+25 with MAGIC

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biassuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Di Pierro, F; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Fernández-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Guberman, D; Hahn, A; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Moretti, E; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Saito, T; Satalecka, K; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Verguilov, V; Vovk, I; Ward, J E; Will, M; Wu, M H; Zanin, R; :,; Ajello, M; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bonino, R; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cavazzuti, E; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Palma, F; Desiante, R; Di Venere, L; Domínguez, A; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Jogler, T; Kuss, M; Larsson, S; Li, J; Li, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Maldera, S; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mirabal, N; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Nuss, E; Ojha, R; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Troja, E; Wood, K S; Balokovic, M; Berdyugin, A; Carraminana, A; Carrasco, L; Chavushyan, V; Ramazani, V Fallah; Feige, M; Haarto, S; Haeusner, P; Hovatta, T; Kania, J; Klamt, J; Lähteenmäki, A; Leon-Tavares, J; Lorey, C; Pacciani, L; Porras, A; Recillas, E; Reinthal, R; Tornikoski, M; Wolfert, D; Zottmann, N

    2015-01-01

    The flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1441+25 at a redshift of z = 0.940 is detected between 40 and 250 GeV with a significance of 25.5 {\\sigma} using the MAGIC telescopes. Together with the gravitationally lensed blazar QSO B0218+357 (z = 0.944), PKS 1441+25 is the most distant very high energy (VHE) blazar detected to date. The observations were triggered by an outburst in 2015 April seen at GeV energies with the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi. Multi-wavelength observations suggest a subdivision of the high state into two distinct flux states. In the band covered by MAGIC, the variability time scale is estimated to be 6.4 +/- 1.9 days. Modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution with an external Compton model, the location of the emitting region is understood as originating in the jet outside the broad line region (BLR) during the period of high activity, while being partially within the BLR during the period of low (typical) activity. The observed VHE spectrum during the highest activity is used ...

  3. High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission From Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi LAT Detections and Analysis of Two M-Class Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present the detections of 19 solar flares detected in high-energy gamma rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its rst four years of operation. Interestingly, all ares are associated with fairly fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and are not all powerful X-ray ares. We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of the rst two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 are, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive are followed by slowly varying gamma-ray emission over 13 hours, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 are, which was followed by gamma-ray emission lasting for 2 hours. We compare the Fermi-LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that a hadronic origin of the gamma rays is more likely than a leptonic origin and nd that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens after the 2011 March 7 are, favoring a scenario with continuous acceleration at the are site. This work suggests that proton acceleration in solar ares is more common than previously thought, occurring for even modest X-ray ares, and for longer durations.

  4. High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission From Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi LAT Detections and Analysis of Two M-Class Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Thompson, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the detections of 19 solar flares detected in high-energy gamma rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its rst four years of operation. Interestingly, all ares are associated with fairly fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and are not all powerful X-ray ares. We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of the rst two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 are, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive are followed by slowly varying gamma-ray emission over 13 hours, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 are, which was followed by gamma-ray emission lasting for 2 hours. We compare the Fermi-LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that a hadronic origin of the gamma rays is more likely than a leptonic origin and nd that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens after the 2011 March 7 are, favoring a scenario with continuous acceleration at the are site. This work suggests that proton acceleration in solar ares is more common than previously thought, occurring for even modest X-ray ares, and for longer durations.

  5. VERY HIGH ENERGY γ-RAYS FROM THE UNIVERSE’S MIDDLE AGE: DETECTION OF THE z = 0.940 BLAZAR PKS 1441+25 WITH MAGIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Biland, A. [ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Ansoldi, S.; Biasuzzi, B. [Università di Udine, and INFN Trieste, I-33100 Udine (Italy); Antonelli, L. A.; Bonnoli, G.; Carosi, A. [INAF National Institute for Astrophysics, I-00136 Rome (Italy); Antoranz, P. [Università di Siena, and INFN Pisa, I-53100 Siena (Italy); Babic, A. [Croatian MAGIC Consortium, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, University of Rijeka, University of Split and University of Zagreb (Croatia); Banerjee, B. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1\\AF Bidhannagar, Salt Lake, Sector-1, Kolkata 700064 (India); Bangale, P.; Almeida, U. Barres de; Borracci, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, D-80805 München (Germany); Barrio, J. A.; Bonnefoy, S. [Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Bednarek, W. [University of Łódź, PL-90236 Lodz (Poland); Bernardini, E. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Blanch, O. [IFAE, Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Bretz, T. [Universität Würzburg, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Carmona, E., E-mail: fabrizio.tavecchio@brera.inaf.it, E-mail: miguelnievas@ucm.es, E-mail: manganaro@iac.es, E-mail: josefa.becerra@nasa.gov [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Collaboration: MAGIC Collaboration; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; and others

    2015-12-20

    The flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1441+25 at a redshift of z = 0.940 is detected between 40 and 250 GeV with a significance of 25.5σ using the MAGIC telescopes. Together with the gravitationally lensed blazar QSO B0218+357 (z = 0.944), PKS 1441+25 is the most distant very high energy (VHE) blazar detected to date. The observations were triggered by an outburst in 2015 April seen at GeV energies with the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi. Multi-wavelength observations suggest a subdivision of the high state into two distinct flux states. In the band covered by MAGIC, the variability timescale is estimated to be 6.4 ± 1.9 days. Modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution with an external Compton model, the location of the emitting region is understood as originating in the jet outside the broad-line region (BLR) during the period of high activity, while being partially within the BLR during the period of low (typical) activity. The observed VHE spectrum during the highest activity is used to probe the extragalactic background light at an unprecedented distance scale for ground-based gamma-ray astronomy.

  6. Underwater acoustic detection of ultra high energy neutrinos in Antares; Detection acoustique sous-marine de neutrinos de ultra haute energie dans le cadre de l'experience ANTARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niess, V

    2005-09-15

    We investigate the possibility to detect ultra high energy neutrinos (UHE, 1018+ eV) by the mean of underwater acoustic methods. This study is based on experimental measurements and, when none of those are available, on numerical simulations. The sea water acts as a target for neutrinos of cosmic origin. The electroweak interaction of high energy neutrinos with water molecules leads to a cascade of secondary particles resulting in the emission of an ultra-sonic impulse by a thermo-acoustic coupling mechanism. This mechanism is little efficient, however the generated signal has good propagation properties. Ambient sea noise, as well as the self noise of the ceramic transducers used for the detection, restrict the method to UHE. In addition, the strong directivity of the signal implies that location methods, by the detection in coincidence on multiple detectors, are little efficient. At extremely high energies (10{sup 20}+ eV) and for a single detector we estimate the sensitivity limit of this acoustic method to be of the order of E{sup 2}*{phi} 10{sup 6} GeV cm{sup -2} sr{sup -1}*s{sup -1}, for an astrophysical flux 0 falling as 1/E{sup 2}. (author)

  7. Specific and ultrasensitive ciprofloxacin detection by responsive photonic crystal sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Wang, Yong; Yu, Li-Ping

    2014-09-15

    A new approach for specific and ultrasensitive measurement of ciprofloxacin has been developed by integrating ternary complexes into responsive photonic crystal (RPC). Tryptophan was first immobilized within the polyacrylamide hydrogel substrates of RPC. The determination of ciprofloxacin was via the existence of zinc(II) ions that function as a 'bridge' to form specific tryptophan-zinc(II)-ciprofloxacin complexes step by step, which resulted in a stepwise red-shift of the diffraction wavelength. A maximum wavelength shift from 798 to 870 nm for ciprofloxacin was observed when the RPC film was immersed in 10(-4)M ciprofloxacin. A linear relationship has been obtained between the Δλ of diffraction peak and logarithm of ciprofloxacin concentration at pH 5.0 in the range of 10(-10) to 10(-4)M. And the least detectable concentration in present work is about 5 × 10(-11)M. The results demonstrated that the as-designed ternary complexes-based RPC sensor exhibited high sensitivity, satisfactory specificity and excellent recoverability for sensing of ciprofloxacin in aqueous media and were validated by detecting ciprofloxacin in the eye-drop sample.

  8. Two-bit quantum random number generator based on photon-number-resolving detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Yi; Ren, Min; Wu, E.; Wu, Guang; Zeng, Heping

    2011-07-01

    Here we present a new fast two-bit quantum random number generator based on the intrinsic randomness of the quantum physical phenomenon of photon statistics of coherent light source. Two-bit random numbers were generated according to the number of detected photons in each light pulse by a photon-number-resolving detector. Poissonian photon statistics of the coherent light source guaranteed the complete randomness of the bit sequences. Multi-bit true random numbers were generated for the first time based on the multi-photon events from a coherent light source.

  9. SU-E-T-204: Comparison of Absorbed-Dose to Water in High-Energy Photon Beams Based On Addendum AAPM TG-51, IAEA TRS-398, and JSMP 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, N; Kita, A; Yoshioka, C; Sasamoto, K; Nishimoto, Y; Adachi, T [University of Fukui Hospital, Eiheiji, Fukui (Japan); Oguchi, H [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Shioura, H; Kimura, H [University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Several clinical reference dosimetry protocols for absorbed-dose to water have recently been published: The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) published an Addendum to the AAPM’s TG-51 (Addendum TG-51) in April 2014, and the Japan Society of Medical Physics (JSMP) published the Japan Society of Medical Physics 12 (JSMP12), a clinical reference dosimetry protocol, in September 2012. This investigation compared and evaluated the absorbed-dose to water of high-energy photon beams according to Addendum TG-51, International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Report Series No. 398 (TRS-398), and JSMP12. Methods: Differences in the respective beam quality conversion factors with Addendum TG-51, TRS-398, and JSMP12 were analyzed and the absorbed-dose to water using 6- and 10-MV photon beams was measured according to the protocols recommended in Addendum TG-51, TRS-398, and JSMP12. The measurements were conducted using two Farmer-type ionization chambers, Exradin A12 and PTW 30013. Results: The beam quality conversion factors for both the 6- and 10-MV photon beams with Addendum TG-51 were within 0.6%, in agreement with the beam quality conversion factors with TRS-398 and JSMP12. The Exradin A12 provided an absorbed-dose to water ratio from 1.003 to 1.006 with TRS-398 / Addendum TG-51 and from 1.004 to 1.005 with JSMP 12 / Addendum TG-51, whereas the PTW 30013 provided a ratio of 1.001 with TRS-398 / Addendum TG-51 and a range from 0.997 to 0.999 with JSMP 12 / Addendum TG-51. Conclusion: Despite differences in the beam quality conversion factor, no major differences were seen in the absorbed-dose to water with Addendum TG-51, TRS-398, and JSMP12. However, Addendum TG-51 provides the most recent data for beam quality conversion factors based on Monte Carlo simulation and greater detail for the measurement protocol. Therefore, the absorbed-dose to water measured with Addendum TG-51 is an estimate with less uncertainty.

  10. High Energy Sources Observed with OMC

    CERN Document Server

    Risquez, D; Mas-Hesse, J M; Kuulkers, E

    2008-01-01

    The INTEGRAL Optical Monitoring Camera, OMC, has detected many high energy sources. We have obtained V-band fluxes and light curves for their counterparts. In the cases of previously unknown counterparts, we have searched for characteristic variations in optical sources around the high-energy target position. Results about the Galactic Bulge Monitoring, INTEGRAL Gamma-Ray sources (IGR), and other high energy sources are presented.

  11. Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence for Early Breast Cancer Biomarker Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Brian T.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces offer a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics. Through the complementary processes of photonic crystal enhanced excitation and enhanced extraction, a periodic dielectric-based nanostructured surface can simultaneously increase the electric field intensity experienced by surface-bound fluorophores and increase the collection efficiency of emitted fluorescent photons. Through the ability to ine...

  12. Detection of very-high-energy γ-ray emission from the vicinity of PSR B1706-44 and G 343.1-2.3 with H.E.S.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Barnacka, A.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Behera, B.; Bernloehr, K.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Borrel, V.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Buesching, I.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Conrad, J.; Chounet, L.-M.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataie, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'c.; Dubois, F.; Dubus, G.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Foerster, A.; Fontaine, G.; Fuessling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gast, H.; Gerard, L.; Gerbig, D.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glueck, B.; Goret, P.; Goering, D.; Hague, J. D.; Hampf, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holleran, M.; Hoppe, S.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzynski, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Khangulyan, D.; Khelifi, B.; Keogh, D.; Kluzniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Laffont, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, D.; Maxted, N.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Mehault, J.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nguyen, N.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; Olive, J.-F.; de Ona Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Puehlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Ryde, F.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schoeck, F. M.; Schoenwald, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Shalchi, A.; Sushch, I.; Sikora, M.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Szostek, A.; Tam, P. H.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tibolla, O.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vivier, M.; Voelk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; Wierzcholska, A.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; Dubner, G.; Giacani, E.

    2011-04-01

    The γ-ray pulsar PSR B1706-44 and the adjacent supernova remnant (SNR) candidate G 343.1-2.3 were observed by H.E.S.S. during a dedicated observation campaign in 2007. As a result of this observation campaign, a new source of very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ-ray emission, H.E.S.S. J1708-443, was detected with a statistical significance of 7σ, although no significant point-like emission was detected at the position of the energetic pulsar itself. In this paper, the morphological and spectral analyses of the newly-discovered TeV source are presented. The centroid of H.E.S.S. J1708-443 is considerably offset from the pulsar and located near the apparent center of the SNR, at αJ2000 = 17h08m11s ± 17s and δJ2000 = -44°20' ± 4'. The source is found to be significantly more extended than the H.E.S.S. point spread function (~0.1°), with an intrinsic Gaussian width of 0.29° ± 0.04°. Its integral flux between 1 and 10 TeV is ~ 3.8 × 10-12 ph cm-2 s-1, equivalent to 17% of the Crab Nebula flux in the same energy range. The measured energy spectrum is well-fit by a power law with a relatively hard photon index Γ = 2.0 ± 0.1stat ± 0.2sys. Additional multi-wavelength data, including 330 MHz VLA observations, were used to investigate the VHE γ-ray source's possible associations with the pulsar wind nebula of PSR B1706-44 and/or with the complex radio structure of the partial shell-type SNR G 343.1-2.3.

  13. 高能窄谱光子联合药物治疗外阴湿疹的临床研究%Clinical Research of High Energy Narrow Spectrum Photons Combined with Drug Therapy on the treatment of Vulva Eczema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘珉名; 董玲; 邬英

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of High Energy Narrow Spectrum Photons Combined with Drug Therapy on the treatment of Vulva Eczema. Methods 86 patients with Vulva Eczema who came to the dermatological department of our hospital during January 2013 to June 2014 were involved and divided into two groups randomly. In the control group, patients were treated with conventional drugs,while in the experimental group, conventional drugs combined with Carnation Photons therapy. Clinical efficacy and adverse effect between two groups were evaluated after 3 weeks of treatment. Results The total effective rate in the experimental group and control group was 100%and 93.0%, respectively. The treatment effect in the experimental group was significantly better than that in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (P <0.05). The average cure time in the experimental group and the control group were (10.2 ±3.6) days, (13.1 ±5.4) days. The cure time of the experimental group was significantly less than the control group,and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). No obvious adverse effect was observed in both groups. Conclusion The effect of High Energy Narrow Spectrum Photons Combined with Drug Therapy in the treatment of Vulva Eczema is satisfactory. And this treatment method is easy operated with less adverse effect, and worthy to be recommended in the clinical application.%目的:探讨高能窄谱光子联合药物治疗外阴湿疹的临床效果。方法选取2013年1月~2014年6月我院皮肤科门诊治疗的外阴湿疹患者86例,对照组患者采取常规药物治疗,实验组在对照组基础上加用Carnation光子治疗仪进行治疗。治疗三周后对两组患者的疗效和不良反应进行评价。结果实验组患者治疗总有效率为100.0%,对照组患者治疗总有效率为93.0%。实验组患者的治疗效果明显优于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。实

  14. Single-photon detection timing jitter in a visible light photon counter

    CERN Document Server

    Baek, Burm; Stevens, Martin J; Kim, Jungsang; Hogue, Henry H; Nam, Sae Woo

    2009-01-01

    Visible light photon counters (VLPCs) offer many attractive features as photon detectors, such as high quantum efficiency and photon number resolution. We report measurements of the single-photon timing jitter in a VLPC, a critical performance factor in a time-correlated single-photon counting measurement, in a fiber-coupled closed-cycle cryocooler. The measured timing jitter is 240 ps full-width-at-half-maximum at a wavelength of 550 nm, with a dark count rate of 25 000 counts per second. The timing jitter increases modestly at longer wavelengths to 300 ps at 1000 nm, and increases substantially at lower bias voltages as the quantum efficiency is reduced.

  15. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  16. Minimum detection efficiency for a loophole-free atom-photon Bell experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, A; Cabello, Adan; Larsson, Jan-Ake

    2007-01-01

    In Bell experiments, one problem is to achieve high enough photo-detection to ensure that there is no possibility of describing the results via a local hidden-variable model. Using the Clauser-Horne inequality and a two-photon non-maximally entangled state, a photo-detection efficiency higher than 0.67 is necessary. Here we discuss atom-photon Bell experiments. We show that, assuming perfect detection efficiency of the atom, it is possible to perform a loophole-free atom-photon Bell experiment whenever the photo-detection efficiency exceeds 0.50.

  17. Joint multipartite photon statistics by on/off detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brida, G; Genovese, M; Piacentini, F; Paris, Matteo G A

    2006-12-01

    We demonstrate a method to reconstruct the joint photon statistics of two or more modes of radiation by using on/off photodetection performed at different quantum efficiencies. The two-mode case is discussed in detail, and experimental results are presented for the bipartite states obtained after a beam splitter fed by a single photon state or a thermal state.

  18. Super sub-wavelength patterns in photon coincidence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruifeng; Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2014-02-01

    High-precision measurements implemented with light are desired in all fields of science. However, light acts as a wave, and the Rayleigh criterion in classical optics yields a diffraction limit that prevents obtaining a resolution smaller than the wavelength. Sub-wavelength interference has potential application in lithography because it beats the classical Rayleigh resolution limit. Here, we carefully study second-order correlation theory to establish the physics behind sub-wavelength interference in photon coincidence detection. A Young's double slit experiment with pseudo-thermal light is performed to test the second-order correlation pattern. The results show that when two point detectors are scanned in different ways, super sub-wavelength interference patterns can be obtained. We then provide a theoretical explanation for this surprising result, and demonstrate that this explanation is also suitable for the results found for entangled light. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of these types of super sub-wavelength interference patterns in quantum lithography.

  19. Detection of Very High Energy radiation from HESS J1908+063 confirms the Milagro unidentified source MGRO J1908+06

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F

    2009-01-01

    Detection of a gamma-ray source above 300 GeV is reported, confirming the unidentified source MGRO J1908+06, discovered by the Milagro collaboration at a median energy of 20 TeV. The source was observed during 27 h as part of the extension of the H.E.S.S. Galactic plane survey to longitudes >30degr. HESS J1908+063 is detected at a significance level of 10.9 s with an integral flux above 1 TeV of (3.76+-0.29stat+-0.75sys)x10^-12 ph cm^-2 s^-1, and a spectral photon index Gamma = 2.10+-0.07stat+-0.2sys. The positions and fluxes of HESS 1908+063 and MGRO J1908+06 are in good agreement. Possible counterparts at other wavelengths and the origin of the gamma-ray emission are discussed. The nearby unidentified GeV source, GRO J1908+0556 (GeV) which also remains unidentified and the new Fermi pulsar 0FGL J1907.5+0617, may be connected to the TeV source.

  20. Detection and localisation of very high energy particles in underwater acoustic; Detection et localisation de particules de tres hautes energies en acoustique sous-marine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juennard, N

    2007-12-15

    The theme of this thesis is included in the Antares international project whose object is to build a neutrino telescope located in a deep water environment in the Mediterranean sea. In deep water sea, a neutrino can interact with a water molecule. The collision generates a luminous flash and an acoustic wave. The goal of this work is to study this acoustic sound wave and develop a system able to detect the corresponding wave front and to estimate the initial direction of the particle. We first focus on the acoustic sound wave. Two different models are studied, and works made recently have led to a mathematical expression of both signal and wave front. Then, several detection methods are studied, from the most classical to the more recent ones. The experimental comparison in semi-real situation leads to the choice of a detection method: the Extended stochastic matched filter. Position and direction of the neutrino are now estimated with a Gauss-Newton inspired algorithm. This estimator is based on a wave front propagation model and on the time detection information given by the telescope hydro-phones. Performances of the system are then estimated. An antenna structure is then proposed and a global simulation finalizes this thesis. In this simulation, detection and estimation are based on the results found in the previous sections. Underwater sea noise is real and the results of the simulation valid our works. (author)

  1. High-Energy Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutz, Michael

    1983-01-01

    Experimentalists in particle physics have long regarded computers as essential components of their apparatus. Theorists are now finding that significant advances in some areas can be accomplished only in partnership with a machine. Needs of experimentalists, interests of theorists, and specialized computers for high-energy experiments are…

  2. High energy battery. Hochenergiebatterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, H.; Beyermann, G.; Bulling, M.

    1992-03-26

    In a high energy battery with a large number of individual cells in a housing with a cooling medium flowing through it, it is proposed that the cooling medium should be guided so that it only affects one or both sides of the cells thermally.

  3. Duke University high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  4. Efficient and robust quantum random number generation by photon number detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, M. J.; Thomas, O.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Ritchie, D. A.; Shields, A. J.

    2015-08-01

    We present an efficient and robust quantum random number generator based upon high-rate room temperature photon number detection. We employ an electric field-modulated silicon avalanche photodiode, a type of device particularly suited to high-rate photon number detection with excellent photon number resolution to detect, without an applied dead-time, up to 4 photons from the optical pulses emitted by a laser. By both measuring and modeling the response of the detector to the incident photons, we are able to determine the illumination conditions that achieve an optimal bit rate that we show is robust against variation in the photon flux. We extract random bits from the detected photon numbers with an efficiency of 99% corresponding to 1.97 bits per detected photon number yielding a bit rate of 143 Mbit/s, and verify that the extracted bits pass stringent statistical tests for randomness. Our scheme is highly scalable and has the potential of multi-Gbit/s bit rates.

  5. High-energy neutrino astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halzen, Francis

    2017-03-01

    The chargeless, weakly interacting neutrinos are ideal astronomical messengers as they travel through space without scattering, absorption or deflection. But this weak interaction also makes them notoriously di cult to detect, leading to neutrino observatories requiring large-scale detectors. A few years ago, the IceCube experiment discovered neutrinos originating beyond the Sun with energies bracketed by those of the highest energy gamma rays and cosmic rays. I discuss how these high-energy neutrinos can be detected and what they can tell us about the origins of cosmic rays and about dark matter.

  6. Numerical simulations on efficiency and measurement of capabilities of BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray

    CERN Document Server

    Wen Wan Xin

    2002-01-01

    The energy resolution and time resolution of two phi 75 x 100 BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray newly made were measured with sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co resources. The two characteristic gamma rays of high energy emitted from the thermal neutron capture of germanium in BGO crystal were used for the energy calibration of gamma spectra. The intrinsic photopeak efficiency, single escape probability and double escape probabilities of BGO detectors in photon energy range of 4-30 MeV are numerically calculated with GEANT code. The real count response and count ratio of the uniformly distributed incident photons in energy range of 0-30 MeV are also calculated. The distortion of gamma spectra caused by the photon energy loss extension to lower energy in detection medium is discussed

  7. Observation of detection-dependent multi-photon coherence times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ra, Young-Sik; Tichy, Malte C.; Lim, Hyang-Tag

    2013-01-01

    The coherence time constitutes one of the most critical parameters that determines whether or not interference is observed in an experiment. For photons, it is traditionally determined by the effective spectral bandwidth of the photon. Here we report on multi-photon interference experiments...... this dependence, which can be attributed to higher-order effects in the mutual indistinguishability of the particles. As a striking consequence, a single, well-defined many-particle quantum state can exhibit qualitatively different degrees of interference, depending on the chosen observable. Therefore, optimal...

  8. High Energy Gamma-rays from FR I Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, Marek

    2003-07-22

    Thanks to Hubble and Chandra telescopes, some of the large scale jets in extragalactic radio sources are now being observed at optical and X-ray frequencies. For the FR I objects the synchrotron nature of this emission is surely established, although a lot of uncertainties--connected for example with the particle acceleration processes involved--remain. In this paper we study production of high energy {gamma}-rays in FR I kiloparsec-scale jets by inverse-Compton emission of the synchrotron-emitting electrons. We consider different origin of seed photons contributing to the inverse-Compton scattering, including nuclear jet radiation as well as ambient, stellar and circumstellar emission of the host galaxies. We discuss how future detections or non-detections of the evaluated {gamma}-ray fluxes can provide constraints on the unknown large scale jet parameters, i.e. the magnetic field intensity and the jet Doppler factor. For the nearby sources Centaurus A and M 87, we find measurable fluxes of TeV photons resulting from synchrotron self-Compton process and from comptonization of the galactic photon fields, respectively. In the case of Centaurus A, we also find a relatively strong emission component due to comptonization of the nuclear blazar photons, which could be easily observed by GLAST at energy {approx} 10 GeV, providing important test for the unification of FR I sources with BL Lac objects.

  9. No speed limits in medical imaging and high-energy physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Rita Giuffredi & Tom Meyer

    2015-01-01

    Speed, or high time resolution, is becoming increasingly important, if not crucial, in the high-energy physics domain, both for particle acceleration and detection systems. Medical-imaging technology also vitally depends on high time resolution detection techniques, often the offspring of today’s large particle physics experiments. The four-year FP7 Marie Curie Training Project “PicoSEC-MCNet”, which draws to a close at the end of November, was designed to develop ultra-fast photon detectors for applications in both domains. The project has achieved important results that promise to trigger further developments in the years to come.   The PicoSEC-MCNet project participants. “New requirements in high-energy physics force us to push the limits of photon detection speed, as future high-luminosity accelerators will force us to cope with the unprecedentedly short bunch crossing intervals needed to produce sufficient luminosity,” explains Tom M...

  10. Study of photon detection efficiency and position resolution of BESIII electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Vindhyawasini; Ji, Xiaobin; Li, Weidong; Liu, Huaimin; Lou, Xinchou

    2016-01-01

    We study the photon detection efficiency and position resolution of the electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) of the BESIII experiment. The control sample of the initial-state-radiation (ISR) process of $e^+e^-\\rightarrow \\gamma \\mu^+\\mu^-$ is used at $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi(3770)$ resonances for the EMC calibration and photon detection efficiency study. Photon detection efficiency is defined as the predicted photon, obtained by performing a kinematic fit with two muon tracks, matched with real photons in the EMC. The spatial resolution of the EMC is defined as the separation in polar ($\\theta$) and azimuthal ($\\phi$) angles between charged track and associated cluster centroid on the front face of the EMC crystals.

  11. A Radio for Hidden-Photon Dark Matter Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Irwin, Kent; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Zhao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    We propose a resonant electromagnetic detector to search for hidden-photon dark matter over an extensive range of masses. Hidden-photon dark matter can be described as a weakly coupled "hidden electric field," oscillating at a frequency fixed by the mass, and able to penetrate any shielding. At low frequencies (compared to the inverse size of the shielding), we find that observable effect of the hidden photon inside any shielding is a real, oscillating magnetic field. We outline experimental setups designed to search for hidden-photon dark matter, using a tunable, resonant LC circuit designed to couple to this magnetic field. Our "straw man" setups take into consideration resonator design, readout architecture and noise estimates. At high frequencies,there is an upper limit to the useful size of a single resonator set by $1/\

  12. Single photon emission and detection at the nanoscale utilizing semiconductor nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimer, M.E.; van Kouwen, M.P.; Barkelid, M., et al.

    2011-01-01

    We report recent progress toward on-chip single photon emission and detection in the near infrared utilizing semiconductor nanowires. Our single photon emitter is based on a single InAsP quantum dot embedded in a p-n junction defined along the growth axis of an InP nanowire. Under forward bias,

  13. Single photon emission and detection at the nanoscale utilizing semiconductor nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimer, M.E.; van Kouwen, M.P.; Barkelid, M., et al.

    2011-01-01

    We report recent progress toward on-chip single photon emission and detection in the near infrared utilizing semiconductor nanowires. Our single photon emitter is based on a single InAsP quantum dot embedded in a p-n junction defined along the growth axis of an InP nanowire. Under forward bias, ligh

  14. High Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    Audio Productions, Inc, New York

    1960-01-01

    Film about the different particle accelerators in the US. Nuclear research in the US has developed into a broad and well-balanced program.Tour of accelerator installations, accelerator development work now in progress and a number of typical experiments with high energy particles. Brookhaven, Cosmotron. Univ. Calif. Berkeley, Bevatron. Anti-proton experiment. Negative k meson experiment. Bubble chambers. A section on an electron accelerator. Projection of new accelerators. Princeton/Penn. build proton synchrotron. Argonne National Lab. Brookhaven, PS construction. Cambridge Electron Accelerator; Harvard/MIT. SLAC studying a linear accelerator. Other research at Madison, Wisconsin, Fixed Field Alternate Gradient Focusing. (FFAG) Oakridge, Tenn., cyclotron. Two-beam machine. Comments : Interesting overview of high energy particle accelerators installations in the US in these early years. .

  15. High energy beam lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  16. DISCOVERY OF HIGH-ENERGY AND VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION FROM THE BLAZAR RBS 0413

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliu, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Boettcher, M. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Bradbury, S. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Byrum, K.; Decerprit, G. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Coppi, P. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P. O. Box 208101 New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Cui, W., E-mail: gunessenturk@gmail.com, E-mail: fortin@llr.in2p3.fr, E-mail: deirdre@llr.in2p3.fr [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); and others

    2012-05-10

    We report on the discovery of high-energy (HE; E > 0.1 GeV) and very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray emission from the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object RBS 0413. VERITAS, a ground-based {gamma}-ray observatory, detected VHE {gamma} rays from RBS 0413 with a statistical significance of 5.5 standard deviations ({sigma}) and a {gamma}-ray flux of (1.5 {+-} 0.6{sub stat} {+-} 0.7{sub syst}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1} ({approx}1% of the Crab Nebula flux) above 250 GeV. The observed spectrum can be described by a power law with a photon index of 3.18 {+-} 0.68{sub stat} {+-} 0.30{sub syst}. Contemporaneous observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected HE {gamma} rays from RBS 0413 with a statistical significance of more than 9{sigma}, a power-law photon index of 1.57 {+-} 0.12{sub stat}+{sup 0.11}{sub -0.12sys}, and a {gamma}-ray flux between 300 MeV and 300 GeV of (1.64 {+-} 0.43{sub stat}{sup +0.31}{sub -0.22sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We present the results from Fermi-LAT and VERITAS, including a spectral energy distribution modeling of the {gamma}-ray, quasi-simultaneous X-ray (Swift-XRT), ultraviolet (Swift-UVOT), and R-band optical (MDM) data. We find that, if conditions close to equipartition are required, both the combined synchrotron self-Compton/external-Compton and the lepto-hadronic models are preferred over a pure synchrotron self-Compton model.

  17. Femtosecond three-photon excitation and single-photon timing detection of α-NPO fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmer, A.; Hatrick, D. A.; Bai, Y.; Birch, D. J. S.

    1997-04-01

    We demonstrate the application of three-photon excitation to fluorescence probe studies using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC). By exciting with 120 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulses at 800 nm we have observed fluorescence emission from the scintillator 2-(1-napthyl)-5-phenyloxazole (α-NPO) in solutions and small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of L-α-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). In SUVs the time-resolved excimer emission and fluorescence anisotropy are consistent with a heterogeneous distribution of α-NPO molecules between isolated sites and ground state clusters in a similar manner to that which we reported previously for 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO).

  18. High-energy atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

    2010-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known...

  19. Photon Counting and Super Homodyne Detection of Weak QPSK Signals for Quantum Key Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    XU, Q; Agnolini, S; Gallion, P; Mendieta, F J

    2006-01-01

    We compare the principles and experimental results of two different QPSK signal detection configurations, photon counting and super homodyning, for applications in fiber-optic Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) systems operating at telecom wavelength, using the BB84 protocol.

  20. Photonic Crystal Biosensor Chip for Label-Free Detection of Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin; Krüger, Asger Christian; Groothoff, Nathaniel

    Narrow polarization-mixing resonances in planar photonic crystals are studied as candidate components for label-free refractive index sensors for detecting bacteria causing sepsis through the identification of DNA strands....

  1. High energy emission of symbiotic recurrent novae: RS Ophiuchi and V407 Cygni

    CERN Document Server

    Hernanz, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent novae occurring in symbiotic binaries are candidate sources of high energy photons, reaching GeV energies. Such emission is a consequence of particle acceleration leading to pion production. The shock between matter ejected by the white dwarf, undergoing a nova explosion, and the wind from the red giant companion is responsible for such a process, which mimics a supernova remnant but with much smaller energetic output and much shorter time scales. Inverse Compton can also be responsible for high energy emission. Recent examples are V407 Cyg, detected by Fermi, and RS Oph, which unfortunately exploded in 2006, before Fermi was launched.

  2. An aerogel Cherenkov detector for multi-GeV photon detection with low sensitivity to neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, Y; Masuda, T; Morii, H; Naito, D; Nakajima, Y; Nanjo, H; Nomura, T; Sasao, N; Seki, S; Shiomi, K; Sumida, T; Tajima, Y

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel photon detector which operates under an intense flux of neutrons. It is composed of lead-aerogel sandwich counter modules. Its salient features are high photon detection efficiency and blindness to neutrons. As a result of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, the efficiency for photons with the energy larger than 1 GeV is expected to be higher than 99.5% and that for 2 GeV/$c$ neutrons less than 1%. The performance on the photon detection under such a large flux of neutrons was measured for a part of the detector. It was confirmed that the efficiency to photons with the energy $>$1 GeV was consistent with the MC expectation within 8.2% uncertainty.

  3. Coincidence detection of spatially correlated photon pairs with a monolithic time-resolving detector array

    CERN Document Server

    Unternährer, Manuel; Gasparini, Leonardo; Stoppa, David; Stefanov, André

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate coincidence measurements of spatially entangled photons by means of a novel type of multi-pixel based detection array. The adopted sensor is a fully digital 8$\\times$16 silicon photomultiplier array allowing not only photon counting but also per-pixel time stamping of the arrived photons with a resolution of 65 ps. Together with a frame rate of 500 kfps, this property exceeds the capabilities of conventional charge-coupled device cameras which have become of growing interest for the detection of transversely correlated photon pairs. The sensor is used to measure a second-order correlation function for various non-collinear configurations of entangled photons generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The experimental results are compared to theory.

  4. Practical photon number detection with electric field-modulated silicon avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, O; Yuan, Z L; Shields, A J

    2012-01-24

    Low-noise single-photon detection is a prerequisite for quantum information processing using photonic qubits. In particular, detectors that are able to accurately resolve the number of photons in an incident light pulse will find application in functions such as quantum teleportation and linear optics quantum computing. More generally, such a detector will allow the advantages of quantum light detection to be extended to stronger optical signals, permitting optical measurements limited only by fluctuations in the photon number of the source. Here we demonstrate a practical high-speed device, which allows the signals arising from multiple photon-induced avalanches to be precisely discriminated. We use a type of silicon avalanche photodiode in which the lateral electric field profile is strongly modulated in order to realize a spatially multiplexed detector. Clearly discerned multiphoton signals are obtained by applying sub-nanosecond voltage gates in order to restrict the detector current.

  5. Photonic Crystal Biosensor Chip for Label-Free Detection of Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin; Krüger, Asger Christian; Groothoff, Nathaniel

    Narrow polarization-mixing resonances in planar photonic crystals are studied as candidate components for label-free refractive index sensors for detecting bacteria causing sepsis through the identification of DNA strands.......Narrow polarization-mixing resonances in planar photonic crystals are studied as candidate components for label-free refractive index sensors for detecting bacteria causing sepsis through the identification of DNA strands....

  6. Selective detection of labeled DNA using an air-clad photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Bo Damm; Hoiby, P.E.; Pedersen, L.H.

    2004-01-01

    Demonstration of selective detection of fluorophore labeled DNA by hybridization inside the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber A laser exposes the fiber from the side and the emitted fluorescence tunnels into the core.......Demonstration of selective detection of fluorophore labeled DNA by hybridization inside the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber A laser exposes the fiber from the side and the emitted fluorescence tunnels into the core....

  7. Slow-light enhanced optical detection in liquid-infiltrated photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard; Steffensen, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    Slow-light enhanced optical detection in liquid-infiltrated photonic crystals is theoretically studied. Using a scattering-matrix approach and the Wigner–Smith delay time concept, we show that optical absorbance benefits both from slow-light phenomena as well as a high filling factor of the energy...... residing in the liquid. Utilizing strongly dispersive photonic crystal structures, we numerically demonstrate how liquid-infiltrated photonic crystals facilitate enhanced light–matter interactions, by potentially up to an order of magnitude. The proposed concept provides strong opportunities for improving...... existing miniaturized absorbance cells for optical detection in lab-on-a-chip systems....

  8. High energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stanev, Todor

    2010-01-01

    Offers an accessible text and reference (a cosmic-ray manual) for graduate students entering the field and high-energy astrophysicists will find this an accessible cosmic-ray manual Easy to read for the general astronomer, the first part describes the standard model of cosmic rays based on our understanding of modern particle physics. Presents the acceleration scenario in some detail in supernovae explosions as well as in the passage of cosmic rays through the Galaxy. Compares experimental data in the atmosphere as well as underground are compared with theoretical models

  9. High energy electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhomchuk, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  10. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  11. Shielding high energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Graham Roger

    2001-01-01

    After introducing the subject of shielding high energy accelerators, point source, line-of-sight models, and in particular the Moyer model. are discussed. Their use in the shielding of proton and electron accelerators is demonstrated and their limitations noted. especially in relation to shielding in the forward direction provided by large, flat walls. The limitations of reducing problems to those using it cylindrical geometry description are stressed. Finally the use of different estimators for predicting dose is discussed. It is suggested that dose calculated from track-length estimators will generally give the most satisfactory estimate. (9 refs).

  12. Generation and detection of the polarization of multi-GeV photons by use of two diamond crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsebom, K.; Kononets, Yu. V.; Mikkelsen, U.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Elsener, K.; Biino, C.; Ballestrero, S.; Sona, P.; Avakian, R. O.; Ispirian, K. A.; Taroian, S. P.; Connell, S. H.; Sellschop, J. P. F.; Vilakazi, Z. Z.

    1999-07-01

    Presented are experimental results for the difference in pair production probability (the asymmetry) for 5-150 GeV photons polarized parallel and perpendicular to a (110) plane in a 1.5 mm thick diamond crystal. The photons are produced by interaction of 150 GeV electrons with an aligned diamond crystal of 0.5 mm thickness. A significant asymmetry is found over the whole energy range, which corresponds to a high degree of linear polarization of the photons as well as a difference in the refractive index. This proof-of-principle result gives the possibility of producing high energy photons with circular polarization by use of a crystal. This might open for several opportunities in high energy physics like for instance the investigation of the contribution of the gluons to the spin of the nucleon.

  13. Combined enhanced fluorescence and label-free biomolecular detection with a photonic crystal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Chan, Leo L; Cunningham, Brian T

    2007-04-20

    A 2D photonic crystal surface with a different period in each lateral direction is demonstrated to detect biomolecules using two distinct sensing modalities. The sensing mechanisms both rely on the generation of a resonant reflection peak at one of two specific wavelengths, depending on the polarization of light that is incident on the photonic crystal. One polarization results in a resonant reflection peak in the visible spectrum to coincide with the excitation wavelength of a fluorophore, while the orthogonal polarization results in a resonant reflection peak at an infrared wavelength which is used for label-free detection of adsorbed biomolecules. The photonic crystal resonance for fluorescence excitation causes enhanced near fields at the structure surface, resulting in increased signal from fluorophores within 100 nm of the device surface. Label-free detection is performed by illuminating the photonic crystal with white light and monitoring shifts in the peak reflected wavelength of the infrared resonance with a high-resolution imaging detection instrument. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis was used to determine optimal dimensions for the photonic crystal structure, and devices were fabricated using a polymer-based nanoreplica molding approach. Fluorescence-based and label-free detection were demonstrated using arrays of spots of dye-conjugated streptavidin. Quantification of the fluorescent signal showed that the fluorescence output from protein spots on the photonic crystal was increased by up to a factor of 35, and deposited spots were also imaged in the label-free detection mode.

  14. Precision timing calorimeter for high energy physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Duarte, Javier; Peña, Cristián; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Ronzhin, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    Scintillator based calorimeter technology is studied with the aim to achieve particle detection with a time resolution on the order of a few 10 ps for photons and electrons at energies of a few GeV and above. We present results from a prototype of a 1.4×1.4×11.4 cm3 sampling calorimeter cell consisting of tungsten absorber plates and Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal scintillator plates. The LYSO plates are read out with wave lengths shifting fibers which are optically coupled to fast photo detectors on both ends of the fibers. The measurements with electrons were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) and the CERN SPS H2 test beam. In addition to the baseline setup plastic scintillation counter and a MCP-PMT were used as trigger and as a reference for a time of flight measurement (TOF). We also present measurements with a fast laser to further characterize the response of the prototype and the photo sensors. All data were recorded using a DRS4 fast sampling digitizer. These measurements are part of an R&D program whose aim is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a large scale electromagnetic calorimeter with a time resolution on the order of 10 ps, to be used in high energy physics experiments.

  15. Precision timing calorimeter for high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bornheim, Adolf, E-mail: bornheim@hep.caltech.edu [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Duarte, Javier; Peña, Cristián; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, PO Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510-5011 (United States)

    2016-07-11

    Scintillator based calorimeter technology is studied with the aim to achieve particle detection with a time resolution on the order of a few 10 ps for photons and electrons at energies of a few GeV and above. We present results from a prototype of a 1.4×1.4×11.4 cm{sup 3} sampling calorimeter cell consisting of tungsten absorber plates and Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal scintillator plates. The LYSO plates are read out with wave lengths shifting fibers which are optically coupled to fast photo detectors on both ends of the fibers. The measurements with electrons were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) and the CERN SPS H2 test beam. In addition to the baseline setup plastic scintillation counter and a MCP-PMT were used as trigger and as a reference for a time of flight measurement (TOF). We also present measurements with a fast laser to further characterize the response of the prototype and the photo sensors. All data were recorded using a DRS4 fast sampling digitizer. These measurements are part of an R&D program whose aim is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a large scale electromagnetic calorimeter with a time resolution on the order of 10 ps, to be used in high energy physics experiments.

  16. The effect of magnetic field on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting single-photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renema, J. J.; Rengelink, R. J.; Komen, I.; Wang, Q.; Kes, P.; Aarts, J.; Exter, M. P. van; Dood, M. J. A. de [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Lab, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Gaudio, R.; Hoog, K. P. M. op ' t; Zhou, Z.; Fiore, A. [COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Sahin, D. [COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Centre for Quantum Photonics, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Driessen, E. F. C. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPSMS, 38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPSMS, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-03-02

    We experimentally investigate the effect of a magnetic field on photon detection in superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs). At low fields, the effect of a magnetic field is through the direct modification of the quasiparticle density of states of the superconductor, and magnetic field and bias current are interchangeable, as is expected for homogeneous dirty-limit superconductors. At the field where a first vortex enters the detector, the effect of the magnetic field is reduced, up until the point where the critical current of the detector starts to be determined by flux flow. From this field on, increasing the magnetic field does not alter the detection of photons anymore, whereas it does still change the rate of dark counts. This result points at an intrinsic difference in dark and photon counts, and also shows that no enhancement of the intrinsic detection efficiency of a straight SSPD wire is achievable in a magnetic field.

  17. Adaptation of penelope Monte Carlo code system to the absorbed dose metrology: characterization of high energy photon beams and calculations of reference dosimeter correction factors; Adaptation du code Monte Carlo penelope pour la metrologie de la dose absorbee: caracterisation des faisceaux de photons X de haute energie et calcul de facteurs de correction de dosimetres de reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurier, J

    1999-05-28

    This thesis has been performed in the framework of national reference setting-up for absorbed dose in water and high energy photon beam provided with the SATURNE-43 medical accelerator of the BNM-LPRI (acronym for National Bureau of Metrology and Primary standard laboratory of ionising radiation). The aim of this work has been to develop and validate different user codes, based on PENELOPE Monte Carlo code system, to determine the photon beam characteristics and calculate the correction factors of reference dosimeters such as Fricke dosimeters and graphite calorimeter. In the first step, the developed user codes have permitted the influence study of different components constituting the irradiation head. Variance reduction techniques have been used to reduce the calculation time. The phase space has been calculated for 6, 12 and 25 MV at the output surface level of the accelerator head, then used for calculating energy spectra and dose distributions in the reference water phantom. Results obtained have been compared with experimental measurements. The second step has been devoted to develop an user code allowing calculation correction factors associated with both BNM-LPRI's graphite and Fricke dosimeters thanks to a correlated sampling method starting with energy spectra obtained in the first step. Then the calculated correction factors have been compared with experimental and calculated results obtained with the Monte Carlo EGS4 code system. The good agreement, between experimental and calculated results, leads to validate simulations performed with the PENELOPE code system. (author)

  18. Single-strand DNA detection using a planar photonic-crystal-waveguide-based sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toccafondo, V; García-Rupérez, J; Bañuls, M J; Griol, A; Castelló, J G; Peransi-Llopis, S; Maquieira, A

    2010-11-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of single-strand DNA (ssDNA) detection at room temperature using a photonic-crystal-waveguide-based optical sensor. The sensor surface was previously biofunctionalized with ssDNA probes to be used as specific target receptors. Our experiments showed that it is possible to detect these hybridization events using planar photonic-crystal structures, reaching an estimated detection limit as low as 19.8 nM for the detection of the complementary DNA strand.

  19. Very high energy gamma rays from the composite SNR G0.9+0.1

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Aye, K M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borgmeier, C; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Bussons-Gordo, J; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Ergin, T; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Visser, B; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2005-01-01

    Very high energy (> 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission has been detected for the first time from the composite supernova remnant G0.9+0.1 using the H.E.S.S. instrument. The source is detected with a significance of 13 sigma, and a photon flux above 200 GeV of (5.7+/-0.7 stat +/- 1.2 sys) * 10^-12 cm^-2 s^-1, making it one of the weakest sources ever detected at TeV energies. The photon spectrum is compatible with a power law (dN/dE \\propto E^-Gamma) with photon index Gamma = 2.40 +/- 0.11 stat +/- 0.20 sys. The gamma-ray emission appears to originate in the plerionic core of the remnant, rather than the shell, and can be plausibly explained as inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons.

  20. Multigate single-photon detection and timing discrimination with an InGaAs/lnP avalanche photodiode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunyuan; Wu, Guang; Zeng, Heping

    2006-03-10

    Multigate detection of single photons at 1550 nm is achieved by using capacitor-balanced InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes, with which we experimentally demonstrate the efficient discrimination of single-photon timing by counting single-photon clicks and the corresponding afterpulses within the multiple gates. Results show that the technique of multigate detection is a practical method for the single-photon timing information process.

  1. A significant hardening and rising shape detected in the MeV/GeV nuFnu spectrum from the recently-discovered very-high-energy blazar S4 0954+65 during the bright optical flare in 2015 February

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Y T; Itoh, R; Finke, J D; Inoue, Y; Ojha, R; Carpenter, B; Lindfors, E; Krauss, F; Desiante, R; Shiki, K; Fukazawa, Y; Longo, F; McEnery, J; Buson, S; Nilsson, K; Ramazani, V Fallah; Reinthal, R; Takalo, L; Pursimo, T; Boschin, W

    2016-01-01

    We report on Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and multi-wavelength results on the recently-discovered very-high-energy (VHE, $E>$ 100 GeV) blazar S4 0954+65 ($z=0.368$) during an exceptionally bright optical flare in 2015 February. During the time period (2015 February, 13/14, or MJD 57067) when the MAGIC telescope detected VHE $\\gamma$-ray emission from the source, the Fermi-LAT data indicated a significant spectral hardening at GeV energies, with a power-law photon index of $1.8 \\pm 0.1$---compared with the 3FGL value (averaged over four years of observation) of $2.34 \\pm 0.04$. In contrast, Swift/XRT data showed a softening of the X-ray spectrum, with a photon index of $1.72 \\pm 0.08$ (compared with $1.38 \\pm 0.03$ averaged during the flare from MJD 57066 to 57077), possibly indicating a modest contribution of synchrotron photons by the highest-energy electrons superposed on the inverse Compton component. Fitting of the quasi-simultaneous ($$ 100 MeV) and a hard spectral index of $\\Gamma_{\\rm GeV} < 2.0...

  2. Single photon detection with self-quenching multiplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinyu (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A photoelectronic device and an avalanche self-quenching process for a photoelectronic device are described. The photoelectronic device comprises a nanoscale semiconductor multiplication region and a nanoscale doped semiconductor quenching structure including a depletion region and an undepletion region. The photoelectronic device can act as a single photon detector or a single carrier multiplier. The avalanche self-quenching process allows electrical field reduction in the multiplication region by movement of the multiplication carriers, thus quenching the avalanche.

  3. Metrology, applications and methods with high energy CT systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlmann, N.; Voland, V.; Salamon, M.; Hebele, S.; Boehnel, M.; Reims, N.; Schmitt, M.; Kasperl, S. [Fraunhofer IIS/EZRT, Development Center X-Ray Technology, Flugplatzstrasse 75, 90768 Fürth (Germany); Hanke, R. [Chair of X-ray Microscopy, University of Würzburg - Physics and Astronomy (Germany)

    2014-02-18

    The increase of Computed Tomography (CT) as an applicable metrology and Non Destructive Testing (NDT) method raises interest on developing the application fields to larger objects, which were rarely used in the past due to their requirements on the imaging system. Especially the classical X-ray generation techniques based on standard equipment restricted the applications of CT to typical material penetration lengths of only a few cm of steel. Even with accelerator technology that offers a suitable way to overcome these restrictions just the 2D radioscopy technique found a widespread application. Beside the production and detection of photons in the MeV range itself, the achievable image quality is limited using standard detectors due to the dominating absorption effect of Compton Scattering at high energies. Especially for CT reconstruction purposes these effects have to be considered on the development path from 2D to 3D imaging. Most High Energy CT applications are therefore based on line detectors shielding scattered radiation to a maximum with an increase in imaging quality but with time consuming large volume scan capabilities. In this contribution we present the High-Energy X-ray Imaging project at the Fraunhofer Development Centre for X-ray Technology with the characterization and the potential of the CT-system according to metrological and other application capabilities.

  4. Single photon detection in a waveguide-coupled Ge-on-Si lateral avalanche photodiode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Nicholas J D; Gehl, Michael; Derose, Christopher T; Starbuck, Andrew L; Pomerene, Andrew T; Lentine, Anthony L; Trotter, Douglas C; Davids, Paul S

    2017-07-10

    We examine gated-Geiger mode operation of an integrated waveguide-coupled Ge-on-Si lateral avalanche photodiode (APD) and demonstrate single photon detection at low dark count for this mode of operation. Our integrated waveguide-coupled APD is fabricated using a selective epitaxial Ge-on-Si growth process resulting in a separate absorption and charge multiplication (SACM) design compatible with our silicon photonics platform. Single photon detection efficiency and dark count rate is measured as a function of temperature in order to understand and optimize performance characteristics in this device. We report single photon detection of 5.27% at 1310 nm and a dark count rate of 534 kHz at 80 K for a Ge-on-Si single photon avalanche diode. Dark count rate is the lowest for a Ge-on-Si single photon detector in this range of temperatures while maintaining competitive detection efficiency. A jitter of 105 ps was measured for this device.

  5. Probing QCD at high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Voutilainen, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    We review recent experimental work on probing QCD at high $p_{T}$ at the Tevatron and at the LHC. The Tevatron has just finished a long and illustrious career at the forefront of high energy physics, while the LHC now has its physics program in full swing and is producing results at a quick rate in a new energy regime. Many of the LHC measurements extend well into the TeV range, with potential sensitivity to new physics. The experimental systematics at the LHC are also becoming competitive with the Tevatron, making precision measurements of QCD possible. Measurements of inclusive jet, dijet and isolated prompt photon production can be used to test perturbative QCD predictions and to constrain parton distribution functions, as well as to measure the strong coupling constant. More exclusive topologies are used to constrain aspects of parton shower modeling, initial and final state radiation. Interest in boosted heavy resonances has resulted in novel studies of jet mass and subjet structure that also test pertu...

  6. CZT drift strip detectors for high energy astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Caroli, E.

    2010-01-01

    Requirements for X- and gamma ray detectors for future High Energy Astrophysics missions include high detection efficiency and good energy resolution as well as fine position sensitivity even in three dimensions.We report on experimental investigations on the CZT drift detector developed DTU Space....... It is operated in the planar transverse field (PTF) mode, with the purpose of demonstrating that the good energy resolution of the CZT drift detector can be combined with the high efficiency of the PTF configuration. Furthermore, we demonstrated and characterized the 3D sensing capabilities of this detector...... configuration.The CZT drift strip detector (10mm×10mm×2.5mm) was characterized in both standard illumination geometry, Photon Parallel Field (PPF) configuration and in PTF configuration. The detection efficiency and energy resolution are compared for both configurations . The PTF configuration provided a higher...

  7. Photoproduction at High Energy and High Intensity

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photon beam used for this programme is tagged and provides a large flux up to very high energies (150-200 GeV). It is also hadron-free, since it is obtained by a two-step conversion method. A spectrometer is designed to exploit this beam and to perform a programme of photoproduction with a high level of sensitivity (5-50 events/picobarn).\\\\ \\\\ Priority will be given to the study of processes exhibiting the point-like behaviour of the photon, especially deep inelastic Compton scattering. The spectrometer has two magnets. Charged tracks are measured by MWPC's located only in field-free regions. Three calorimeters provide a large coverage for identifying and measuring electrons and photons. An iron filter downstream identifies muons. Most of the equipment is existing and recuperated from previous experiments.

  8. A detection instrument for enhanced-fluorescence and label-free imaging on photonic crystal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Ian D; Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Jones, Sarah I; Dorvel, Brian R; Chaudhery, Vikram; Vodkin, Lila O; Bashir, Rashid; Cunningham, Brian T

    2009-07-20

    We report on the design and demonstration of an optical imaging system capable of exciting surface-bound fluorophores within the resonant evanescent electric field of a photonic crystal surface and gathering fluorescence emission that is directed toward the imaging objective by the photonic crystal. The system also has the ability to quantify shifts in the local resonance angle induced by the adsorption of biomolecules on the photonic crystal surface for label-free biomolecular imaging. With these two capabilities combined within a single detection system, we demonstrate label-free images self-registered to enhanced fluorescence images with 328x more sensitive fluorescence detection relative to a glass surface. This technique is applied to a DNA microarray where label-free quantification of immobilized capture DNA enables improved quality control and subsequent enhanced fluorescence detection of dye-tagged hybridized DNA yields 3x more genes to be detected versus commercially available microarray substrates.

  9. Photon Counting System for High-Sensitivity Detection of Bioluminescence at Optical Fiber End.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iinuma, Masataka; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    The technique of photon counting is widely used for various fields and also applicable to a high-sensitivity detection of luminescence. Thanks to recent development of single photon detectors with avalanche photodiodes (APDs), the photon counting system with an optical fiber has become powerful for a detection of bioluminescence at an optical fiber end, because it allows us to fully use the merits of compactness, simple operation, highly quantum efficiency of the APD detectors. This optical fiber-based system also has a possibility of improving the sensitivity to a local detection of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by high-sensitivity detection of the bioluminescence. In this chapter, we are introducing a basic concept of the optical fiber-based system and explaining how to construct and use this system.

  10. Multi-focus parallel detection of fluorescent molecules at picomolar concentration with photonic nanojets arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghenuche, Petru; Torres, Juan de; Ferrand, Patrick; Wenger, Jérôme, E-mail: jerome.wenger@fresnel.fr [CNRS, Aix Marseille Université, Ecole Centrale Marseille, Institut Fresnel UMR7249, 13013 Marseille (France)

    2014-09-29

    Fluorescence sensing and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are powerful methods to detect and characterize single molecules; yet, their use has been restricted by expensive and complex optical apparatus. Here, we present a simple integrated design using a self-assembled bi-dimensional array of microspheres to realize multi-focus parallel detection scheme for FCS. We simultaneously illuminate and collect the fluorescence from several tens of microspheres, which all generate their own photonic nanojet to efficiently excite the molecules and collect the fluorescence emission. Each photonic nanojet contributes to the global detection volume, reaching FCS detection volumes of several tens of femtoliters while preserving the fluorescence excitation and collection efficiencies. The microspheres photonic nanojets array enables FCS experiments at low picomolar concentrations with a drastic reduction in apparatus cost and alignment constraints, ideal for microfluidic chip integration.

  11. High energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  12. Fermi LAT detection of increasing GeV gamma-ray activity from the high-energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the very-high energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 (also known as TXS 1959+650 and 3FGL J2000.0+6509, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23) with radio coordinates (J2000) R.A.: 299.999384 deg, Dec.: 65.148514 deg (Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13). This source has a redshift z=0.047 (Schachter et al. 1993, ApJ, 412, 541).

  13. Tests of FARICH prototype with precise photon position detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Basok, I. Yu.; Blinov, V. E.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Borodenko, A. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Danilyuk, A. F.; Degenhardt, C.; Dorscheid, R.; Finogeev, D. A.; Frach, T.; Gulevich, V. V.; Karavicheva, T. L.; Kasyanenko, P. V.; Kononov, S. A.; Korda, D. V.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Muelhens, O.; Onuchin, A. P.; Ovtin, I. V.; Podgornov, N. A.; Predein, A. Yu.; Prisekin, V. G.; Protsenko, R. S.; Razin, V. I.; Reshetin, A. I.; Schulze, R.; Shekhtman, L. I.; Talyshev, A. A.; Usenko, E. A.; Zwaans, B.

    2014-12-01

    In June 2012 a FARICH prototype from Philips Digital Photon Counting (PDPC) based on a photon camera with dimensions of 200×200 mm has been tested at CERN. Remarkable particle separation has been achieved with a 4-layer aerogel sample: the π/K separation at a 6 GeV/c momentum is 3.5σ, the μ / π separation is 5.3σ at 1 GeV/c. The analysis of the data has shown that the main contribution to the accuracy of the ring radius measurement comes from aerogel. The development of focusing aerogels is proceeding in two main directions: tuning of production technology of multilayer blocks and development of a new production method with continuous density (refractive index) gradient along the block depth. The beam test was carried out in December 2012-January 2013 at the electron beam test facility at the VEPP-4 M e+e- collider. The goal of this test was to measure different single layer and focusing aerogel samples, both multilayer and gradient. Aerogel samples were tested with a PDPC FARICH prototype. A part of DPC SPADs in each pixel was disabled to form an active area of 1×1 mm2. The collected data proved that gradient aerogel samples focus Cherenkov light.

  14. Construction of a CsI(Tl)-BGO phoswitch detector for the detection of high energy protons at GANIL; Construction d`un detecteur phoswich CsI(Tl)-BGO pour la detection de protons de haute energie au GANIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautridou, P.; Eudes, P.; Germain, M.; Guilbault, F.; Laville, J.L.; Rahmani, A.; Reposeur, T. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees - SUBATECH, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1997-10-01

    An attractive concept of phoswitch detector composed of CsI(Tl) and BGO crystals has been developed in our laboratory. This detector combines the phoswitch technique with the intrinsic capabilities of pulse shape discrimination of CsI(Tl). It can detect particles of Z=3 with energies ranging from a few MeV/nucleon up to several hundred MeV/nucleon. The experimental certification of this new concept has been tested at GANIL where high energy light particles produced in the reaction {sup 58} Ni + Al (74 MeV/A) were detected at an angle of 15 deg.. The identification matrix Q{sub slow} versus Q{sub fast} makes evident two operation principles of the detector. On the diagonal the particles ({gamma},p,d,t,{sup 3,4} He) stopped in CsI form a classical identification picture of this crystal. A very good mass based identification was obtained for Z=1 (A=1,2,3), Z=2 (A=3,4) and Z=3 (A=6,7). In the upper part, the particles (p,d,t) stopped in the BGO after passing through CsI are perfectly identified by the additional contribution of the BGO on the axis Q{sub fast}. The proton energies in the reversal point as well as in the detected peak are determined 5 refs.

  15. Development and data analysis of a radio-detection of ultra high energy cosmic rays experiment; Developpement et analyse des donnees d'une experience de radiodetection des rayons cosmiques d'ultra haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belletoile, A

    2007-10-15

    The radio-detection of cosmic rays was first attempted in the sixties. Unfortunately at that time, the results suffered from poor reproducibility and the technique was abandoned in favour of direct particle and fluorescence detection. Taking advantage of recent technological improvements the radio-detection of ultra high energy cosmic rays is being reinvestigated. In this document, first, we remind the reader of the global problematic of cosmic rays. Then, the several mechanisms involved in the emission of an electric field associated with extensive air showers are discussed. The CODALEMA (cosmic detection array with logarithmic electro magnetic antenna) experiment that aims to demonstrate the feasibility of cosmic ray radio-detection, is extensively described along with the first experimental results. A radio-detection test experiment implanted at the giant detector Pierre Auger is presented. It should provide inputs to design the future detector using this technique at extreme energies. (author)

  16. Hierarchically structured photonic crystals for integrated chemical separation and colorimetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qianqian; Zhu, Biting; Ge, Jianping

    2017-02-16

    A SiO2 colloidal photonic crystal film with a hierarchical porous structure is fabricated to demonstrate an integrated separation and colorimetric detection of chemical species for the first time. This new photonic crystal based thin layer chromatography process requires no dyeing, developing and UV irradiation compared to the traditional TLC. The assembling of mesoporous SiO2 particles via a supersaturation-induced-precipitation process forms uniform and hierarchical photonic crystals with micron-scale cracks and mesopores, which accelerate the diffusion of developers and intensify the adsorption/desorption between the analytes and silica for efficient separation. Meanwhile, the chemical substances infiltrated to the voids of photonic crystals cause an increase of the refractive index and a large contrast of structural colors towards the unloaded part, so that the sample spots can be directly recognized with the naked eye before and after separation.

  17. High-throughput gated photon counter with two detection windows programmable down to 70 ps width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.tosi@polimi.it; Zappa, Franco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Mora, Alberto Dalla [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    We present the design and characterization of a high-throughput gated photon counter able to count electrical pulses occurring within two well-defined and programmable detection windows. We extensively characterized and validated this instrument up to 100 Mcounts/s and with detection window width down to 70 ps. This instrument is suitable for many applications and proves to be a cost-effective and compact alternative to time-correlated single-photon counting equipment, thanks to its easy configurability, user-friendly interface, and fully adjustable settings via a Universal Serial Bus (USB) link to a remote computer.

  18. Modified timing characteristic of a scintillation detection system with photonic crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinliang; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Zhichao; Chen, Liang; Hu, Jing; Xu, Mengxuan; Cheng, Chuanwei; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Zhongbing; Ruan, Jinlu; He, Shiyi; Liu, Linyue; Gu, Mu; Chen, Hong

    2017-03-01

    It is intuitively expected that an enhanced light extraction of a scintillator can be easily achieved by photonic crystal structures. Here, we demonstrate a modified timing characteristic for a detection system induced by enhanced light extraction with photonic crystal structures. Such improvement is due to the enhanced light extraction which can be clearly proven by the independent measurements of the light output and the timing resolution. The present investigation is advantageous to promote the development of a scintillation detection system performance based on the time-of-flight measurement.

  19. Enhanced fluorescence detection of miRNA-16 on a photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascella, F; Ricciardi, S; Pasquardini, L; Potrich, C; Angelini, A; Chiadò, A; Pederzolli, C; De Leo, N; Rivolo, P; Pirri, C F; Descrovi, E

    2015-08-21

    We report a novel sensing method for fluorescence-labelled microRNAs (miRNAs) spotted on an all-dielectric photonic structure. Such a photonic structure provides an enhanced excitation and a directional beaming of the emitted fluorescence, resulting in a significant improvement of the overall signal collected. As a result, the Limit of Detection (LoD) is demonstrated to decrease by a factor of about 50. A compact read-out system allows a wide-field imaging-based detection, with little or no optical alignment issues, which makes this approach particularly interesting for further development for example in microarray-type bioassays.

  20. Active quenching circuit for single-photon detection with Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipcević, Mario

    2009-03-20

    In this paper a novel construction of an active quenching circuit intended for single-photon detection is presented, along with a few original methods for its evaluation. The circuit has been combined with a standard avalanche photodiode C30902S to form a single-photon detector. This detector has a dead time of 39 ns, maximum random counting frequency of 14 MHz, small afterpulsing probability, an estimated peak detection efficiency of over 20%, and a dark count rate of less than 100 Hz. This simple and robust active quenching circuit can be built from off-the-shelf electronic components and is presented with the detailed schematic diagram.

  1. High-throughput gated photon counter with two detection windows programmable down to 70 ps width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2014-01-01

    We present the design and characterization of a high-throughput gated photon counter able to count electrical pulses occurring within two well-defined and programmable detection windows. We extensively characterized and validated this instrument up to 100 Mcounts/s and with detection window width down to 70 ps. This instrument is suitable for many applications and proves to be a cost-effective and compact alternative to time-correlated single-photon counting equipment, thanks to its easy configurability, user-friendly interface, and fully adjustable settings via a Universal Serial Bus (USB) link to a remote computer.

  2. Optical coherent and envelope detection for photonic wireless communication links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prince, Kamau; Zibar, Darko; Yu, Xianbin;

    We present two novel optical detection techniques for radio over fiber (RoF) communication links. Firstly, we present recent results obtained with optical digital coherent detection of optical phase-modulated ROF signals supporting error-free transmission over 25 km standard SMF with BPSK and QPSK...

  3. 32-channel single photon counting module for ultrasensitive detection of DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkov, Georgiy; Dhulla, Vinit; Borodin, Anatoly; Gavrilov, Dmitri; Stepukhovich, Andrey; Tsupryk, Andrey; Gorbovitski, Boris; Gorfinkel, Vera

    2006-10-01

    We continue our work on the design and implementation of multi-channel single photon detection systems for highly sensitive detection of ultra-weak fluorescence signals, for high-performance, multi-lane DNA sequencing instruments. A fiberized, 32-channel single photon detection (SPD) module based on single photon avalanche diode (SPAD), model C30902S-DTC, from Perkin Elmer Optoelectronics (PKI) has been designed and implemented. Unavailability of high performance, large area SPAD arrays and our desire to design high performance photon counting systems drives us to use individual diodes. Slight modifications in our quenching circuit has doubled the linear range of our system from 1MHz to 2MHz, which is the upper limit for these devices and the maximum saturation count rate has increased to 14 MHz. The detector module comprises of a single board computer PC-104 that enables data visualization, recording, processing, and transfer. Very low dark count (300-1000 counts/s), robust, efficient, simple data collection and processing, ease of connectivity to any other application demanding similar requirements and similar performance results to the best commercially available single photon counting module (SPCM from PKI) are some of the features of this system.

  4. Energy reconstruction of hadron-initiated showers of ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Ros, G; Supanitsky, A D; del Peral, L; Rodríguez-Frías, M D

    2015-01-01

    The current methods to determine the primary energy of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are different when dealing with hadron or photon primaries. The current experiments combine two different techniques, an array of surface detectors and fluorescence telescopes. The latter allow an almost calorimetric measurement of the primary energy. Thus, hadron-initiated showers detected by both type of detectors are used to calibrate the energy estimator from the surface array (usually the interpolated signal at a certain distance from the shower core S(r0)) with the primary energy. On the other hand, this calibration is not feasible when searching for photon primaries since no high energy photon has been unambiguously detected so far. Therefore, pure Monte Carlo parametrizations are used instead. In this work, we present a new method to determine the primary energy of hadron-induced showers in a hybrid experiment based on a technique previously developed for photon primaries. It consists on a set of calibration ...

  5. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: the highest energy frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, João R T de Mello

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are the highest energy messengers of the present universe, with energies up to $10^{20}$ eV. Studies of astrophysical particles (nuclei, electrons, neutrinos and photons) at their highest observed energies have implications for fundamental physics as well as astrophysics. The primary particles interact in the atmosphere and generate extensive air showers. Analysis of those showers enables one not only to estimate the energy, direction and most probable mass of the primary cosmic particles, but also to obtain information about the properties of their hadronic interactions at an energy more than one order of magnitude above that accessible with the current highest energy human-made accelerator. In this contribution we will review the state-of-the-art in UHECRs detection. We will present the leading experiments Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array and discuss the cosmic ray energy spectrum, searches for directional anisotropy, studies of mass composition, the determ...

  6. Cosmic Physics: The High Energy Frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic rays have been observed up to energies $10^8$ times larger than those of the best particle accelerators. Studies of astrophysical particles (hadrons, neutrinos and photons) at their highest observed energies have implications for fundamental physics as well as astrophysics. Thus, the cosmic high energy frontier is the nexus to new particle physics. This overview discusses recent advances being made in the physics and astrophysics of cosmic rays and cosmic gamma-rays at the highest observed energies as well as the related physics and astrophysics of very high energy cosmic neutrinos. These topics touch on questions of grand unification, violation of Lorentz invariance, as well as Planck scale physics and quantum gravity.

  7. Semiconductor High-Energy Radiation Scintillation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kastalsky, A; Spivak, B

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation produces electron-hole pairs in a direct-gap semiconductor material that subsequently recombine producing infrared light to be registered by a photo-detector. The key issue is how to make the semiconductor essentially transparent to its own infrared light, so that photons generated deep inside the semiconductor could reach its surface without tangible attenuation. We discuss two ways to accomplish this, one based on doping the semiconductor with shallow impurities of one polarity type, preferably donors, the other by heterostructure bandgap engineering. The proposed semiconductor scintillator combines the best properties of currently existing radiation detectors and can be used for both simple radiation monitoring, like a Geiger counter, and for high-resolution spectrography of the high-energy radiation. The most important advantage of the proposed detector is its fast response time, about 1 ns, essentially limited only by the recombi...

  8. One module of the ALICE photon spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The first module for the ALICE photon spectrometer has been completed. Each of the five modules will contain 3584 lead-tungstate crystals, a material as transparent as ordinary silica glass but with nearly four times the density. When a high-energy particle passes through one of these crystals it will scintillate, allowing the energy of electrons, positrons and photons to be measured through the 17 920 detection channels.

  9. Two-dimensional photonic crystal sensors for visual detection of lectin concanavalin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Cai, Zhongyu; Kwak, Daniel H; Liu, Xinyu; Asher, Sanford A

    2014-09-16

    We fabricated a two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal lectin sensing material that utilizes light diffraction from a 2-D colloidal array attached to the surface of a hydrogel that contains mannose carbohydrate groups. Lectin-carbohydrate interactions create hydrogel cross-links that shrink the hydrogel volume and decrease the 2-D particle spacing. This mannose containing 2-D photonic crystal sensor detects Concanavalin A (Con A) through shifts in the 2-D diffraction wavelength. Con A concentrations can be determined by measuring the diffracted wavelength or visually determined from the change in the sensor diffraction color. The concentrations are easily monitored by measuring the 2-D array Debye ring diameter. Our observed detection limit for Con A is 0.02 mg/mL (0.7 μM). The 2-D photonic crystal sensors are completely reversible and can monitor Con A solution concentration changes.

  10. Protein-protein binding detection with nanoparticle photonic crystal enhanced microscopy (NP-PCEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yue; Tian, Limei; Chen, Weili; Yu, Hojeong; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel microscopy-based biosensing approach that utilizes a photonic crystal (PC) surface to detect protein-protein binding with the functionalized nanoparticles as tags. This imaging approach utilizes the measurement of localized shifts in the resonant wavelength and resonant reflection magnitude from the PC biosensor in the presence of individual nanoparticles. Moreover, it substantially increases the sensitivity of the imaging approach through tunable localized surface plasmon resonant frequency of the nanoparticle matching with the resonance of the PC biosensor. Experimental demonstrations of photonic crystal enhanced microscopy (PCEM) imaging with single nanoparticle resolution are supported by Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) computer simulations. The ability to detect the surface adsorption of individual nanoparticles as tags offers a route to single molecule biosensing with photonic crystal biosensor in the future.

  11. Autonomous absolute calibration of an ICCD camera in single-photon detection regime

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Luo; Leuchs, Gerd; Chekhova, Maria V

    2016-01-01

    Intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) cameras are widely used in various applications such as microscopy, astronomy, spectroscopy. Often they are used as single-photon detectors, with thresholding being an essential part of the readout. In this paper, we measure the quantum efficiency of an ICCD camera in the single-photon detection mode using the Klyshko absolute calibration technique. The quantum efficiency is obtained as a function of the threshold value and of the wavelength of the detected light. In addition, we study the homogeneity of the photon sensitivity over the camera chip area. The experiment is performed in the autonomous regime, without using any additional detectors. We therefore demonstrate the self-calibration of an ICCD camera.

  12. Carving complex many-atom entangled states by single-photon detection

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wenlan; Duan, Yiheng; Braverman, Boris; Zhang, Hao; Vuletic, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    We propose a versatile and efficient method to generate a broad class of complex entangled states of many atoms via the detection of a single photon. For an atomic ensemble contained in a strongly coupled optical cavity illuminated by weak single- or multi-frequency light, the atom-light interaction entangles the frequency spectrum of a transmitted photon with the collective spin of the atomic ensemble. Simple time-resolved detection of the transmitted photon then projects the atomic ensemble into a desired pure entangled state. Complex entangled states such as multicomponent Schroedinger cat states can be generated with high fidelity. This probabilistic but fast heralded state-carving method can be made quasi-deterministic by repeated trial and feedback, yields high success probability per trial, and can be implemented with existing technology.

  13. GEM applications outside high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Pinto, Serge

    2013-01-01

    From its invention in 1997, the Gas Electron Multiplier has been applied in nuclear and high energy physics experiments. Over time however, other applications have also exploited the favorable properties of GEMs. The use of GEMs in these applications will be explained in principle and practice. This paper reviews applications in research, beam instrumentation and homeland security. The detectors described measure neutral radiations such as photons, x-rays, gamma rays and neutrons, as well as all kinds of charged radiation. This paper provides an overview of the still expanding range of possibilities of this versatile detector concept.

  14. Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Optoelectronic materials and devices are examined. Optoelectronic devices, which generate, detect, modulate, or switch electromagnetic radiation are being developed for a variety of space applications. The program includes spatial light modulators, solid state lasers, optoelectronic integrated circuits, nonlinear optical materials and devices, fiber optics, and optical networking photovoltaic technology and optical processing.

  15. Smart detection of microRNAs through fluorescence enhancement on a photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquardini, L; Potrich, C; Vaghi, V; Lunelli, L; Frascella, F; Descrovi, E; Pirri, C F; Pederzolli, C

    2016-04-01

    The detection of low abundant biomarkers, such as circulating microRNAs, demands innovative detection methods with increased resolution, sensitivity and specificity. Here, a biofunctional surface was implemented for the selective capture of microRNAs, which were detected through fluorescence enhancement directly on a photonic crystal. To set up the optimal biofunctional surface, epoxy-coated commercially available microscope slides were spotted with specific anti-microRNA probes. The optimal concentration of probe as well as of passivating agent were selected and employed for titrating the microRNA hybridization. Cross-hybridization of different microRNAs was also tested, resulting negligible. Once optimized, the protocol was adapted to the photonic crystal surface, where fluorescent synthetic miR-16 was hybridized and imaged with a dedicated equipment. The photonic crystal consists of a dielectric multilayer patterned with a grating structure. In this way, it is possible to take advantage from both a resonant excitation of fluorophores and an angularly redirection of the emitted radiation. As a result, a significant fluorescence enhancement due to the resonant structure is collected from the patterned photonic crystal with respect to the outer non-structured surface. The dedicated read-out system is compact and based on a wide-field imaging detection, with little or no optical alignment issues, which makes this approach particularly interesting for further development such as for example in microarray-type bioassays.

  16. Hydrogen-bond dynamics in water explored by heterodyne-detected photon echo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeremenko, S; Pshenichnikov, MS; Wiersma, DA; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2003-01-01

    Results of heterodyne-detected photon echo experiments on the OH stretching mode of water are reported and discussed. Two vibrational dynamical processes with time constants of 130 and 900 fs were identified. The former is attributed to bond breaking dynamics of a single hydrogen bond, the latter to

  17. Structural dynamics in water probed by heterodyne-detected photon echo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeremenko, S; Pshenichnikov, MS; Wiersma, DA; Miller, DR; Murnane, MM; Scherer, NF; Weiner, AM

    2003-01-01

    Results of heterodyne-detected photon echo experiments on the OH stretching mode of HDO molecule in heavy water and acetonitrile are reported and discussed. Two vibrational dynamical processes with time constants of 130 A and 900 fs were identified. The former is attributed to bond breaking dynamics

  18. Radial Photonic Crystal for Detection of Frequency and Position of Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    spiral resonators. Phys. Rev. B 69, 014402 (2004). 12. Carbonell , J., Torrent, D., Diaz-Rubio, A. & Sanchez-Dehesa, J. Multidisciplinary approach to...creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ How to cite this article: Carbonell , J. et al. Radial Photonic Crystal for detection of frequency and position of

  19. Detection of very high energy gamma-ray emission from the gravitationally-lensed blazar QSO B0218+357 with the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Arcaro, C; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Berti, A; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Buson, S; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Di Pierro, F; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Engelkemeier, M; Ramazani, V Fallah; Fernández-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinović, N; Gora, D; Guberman, D; Hadasch, D; Hahn, A; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Moretti, E; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Nogués, L; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Pedaletti, G; Peresano, M; Perri, L; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Garcia, J R; Reichardt, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Saito, T; Satalecka, K; Schroeder, S; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Strzys, M; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Vanzo, G; Verguilov, V; Vovk, I; Ward, J E; Will, M; Wu, M H; Zanin, R; Desiante, R

    2016-01-01

    Context. QSO B0218+357 is a gravitationally lensed blazar located at a redshift of 0.944. The gravitational lensing splits the emitted radiation into two components, spatially indistinguishable by gamma-ray instruments, but separated by a 10-12 day delay. In July 2014, QSO B0218+357 experienced a violent flare observed by the Fermi-LAT and followed by the MAGIC telescopes. Aims. The spectral energy distribution of QSO B0218+357 can give information on the energetics of z ~ 1 very high energy gamma- ray sources. Moreover the gamma-ray emission can also be used as a probe of the extragalactic background light at z ~ 1. Methods. MAGIC performed observations of QSO B0218+357 during the expected arrival time of the delayed component of the emission. The MAGIC and Fermi-LAT observations were accompanied by quasi-simultaneous optical data from the KVA telescope and X-ray observations by Swift-XRT. We construct a multiwavelength spectral energy distribution of QSO B0218+357 and use it to model the source. The GeV and...

  20. Very high energy neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso, Luciano; Spiering, Christian

    2000-03-01

    A sky survey with neutrinos may considerably extend our understanding of cosmic phenomena. Due to the low interaction cross section of neutrinos with matter and due to the high cosmic ray background the detector must be very large (of the order of 1 km 3) and must be shielded. These new devices consist of a network of photo-tubes which are deployed in the depth of the ocean, of a lake or of the ice of South Pole. The detection of the Cherenkov light emitted by muons produced in muon neutrino interactions with the matter surrounding the detector will allow the reconstruction of the neutrino direction with an angular resolution of the order or lower than one degree. Several projects are underway. Their status will be reviewed in this paper.

  1. Label-free virus detection using silicon photonic microring resonators

    OpenAIRE

    McClellan, Melinda S.; Domier, Leslie L; Bailey, Ryan C.

    2011-01-01

    Viruses represent a continual threat to humans through a number of mechanisms, which include disease, bioterrorism, and destruction of both plant and animal food resources. Many contemporary techniques used for the detection of viruses and viral infections suffer from limitations such as the need for extensive sample preparation or the lengthy window between infection and measurable immune response, for serological methods. In order to develop a method that is fast, cost-effective, and featur...

  2. Single photon detection and localization accuracy with an ebCMOS camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajgfinger, T.; Dominjon, A.; Barbier, R.

    2015-07-01

    The CMOS sensor technologies evolve very fast and offer today very promising solutions to existing issues facing by imaging camera systems. CMOS sensors are very attractive for fast and sensitive imaging thanks to their low pixel noise (1e-) and their possibility of backside illumination. The ebCMOS group of IPNL has produced a camera system dedicated to Low Light Level detection and based on a 640 kPixels ebCMOS with its acquisition system. After reminding the principle of detection of an ebCMOS and the characteristics of our prototype, we confront our camera to other imaging systems. We compare the identification efficiency and the localization accuracy of a point source by four different photo-detection devices: the scientific CMOS (sCMOS), the Charge Coupled Device (CDD), the Electron Multiplying CCD (emCCD) and the Electron Bombarded CMOS (ebCMOS). Our ebCMOS camera is able to identify a single photon source in less than 10 ms with a localization accuracy better than 1 μm. We report as well efficiency measurement and the false positive identification of the ebCMOS camera by identifying more than hundreds of single photon sources in parallel. About 700 spots are identified with a detection efficiency higher than 90% and a false positive percentage lower than 5. With these measurements, we show that our target tracking algorithm can be implemented in real time at 500 frames per second under a photon flux of the order of 8000 photons per frame. These results demonstrate that the ebCMOS camera concept with its single photon detection and target tracking algorithm is one of the best devices for low light and fast applications such as bioluminescence imaging, quantum dots tracking or adaptive optics.

  3. Single photon detection and localization accuracy with an ebCMOS camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cajgfinger, T. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Dominjon, A., E-mail: agnes.dominjon@nao.ac.jp [Université de Lyon, Université de Lyon 1, Lyon 69003 France. (France); Barbier, R. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Université de Lyon, Université de Lyon 1, Lyon 69003 France. (France)

    2015-07-01

    The CMOS sensor technologies evolve very fast and offer today very promising solutions to existing issues facing by imaging camera systems. CMOS sensors are very attractive for fast and sensitive imaging thanks to their low pixel noise (1e-) and their possibility of backside illumination. The ebCMOS group of IPNL has produced a camera system dedicated to Low Light Level detection and based on a 640 kPixels ebCMOS with its acquisition system. After reminding the principle of detection of an ebCMOS and the characteristics of our prototype, we confront our camera to other imaging systems. We compare the identification efficiency and the localization accuracy of a point source by four different photo-detection devices: the scientific CMOS (sCMOS), the Charge Coupled Device (CDD), the Electron Multiplying CCD (emCCD) and the Electron Bombarded CMOS (ebCMOS). Our ebCMOS camera is able to identify a single photon source in less than 10 ms with a localization accuracy better than 1 µm. We report as well efficiency measurement and the false positive identification of the ebCMOS camera by identifying more than hundreds of single photon sources in parallel. About 700 spots are identified with a detection efficiency higher than 90% and a false positive percentage lower than 5. With these measurements, we show that our target tracking algorithm can be implemented in real time at 500 frames per second under a photon flux of the order of 8000 photons per frame. These results demonstrate that the ebCMOS camera concept with its single photon detection and target tracking algorithm is one of the best devices for low light and fast applications such as bioluminescence imaging, quantum dots tracking or adaptive optics.

  4. Characterization of a commercially available large area, high detection efficiency single-photon avalanche diode

    CERN Document Server

    Stipčević, Mario; Ursin, Rupert

    2013-01-01

    We characterize a new commercial, back-illuminated reach-through silicon single-photon avalanche photo diode (SPAD) SAP500 (Laser Components. Inc.), operated in Geiger-mode for purpose of photon counting. We show that for this sensor a significant interplay exists between dark counts, detection efficiency, afterpulsing, excess voltage and operating temperature, sometimes requiring a careful optimization tailored for a specific application. We find that a large flat plateau of sensitive area of about 0.5 mm in diameter, a peak quantum efficiency of 73% at 560 nm and timing precision down to 150 ps FWHM are the main distinguishing characteristics of this SPAD.

  5. Polymer-based Photonic Crystal Cavity Sensor for Optical Detection in the Visible Wavelength Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Kenichi; Aki, Shoma; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Hisamoto, Hideaki; Endo, Tatsuro

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a polymer-based two-dimensional photonic crystal (PhC) cavity for visible-light-based optical-sensing applications was designed and fabricated for the first time. The PhC cavity configuration was designed to operate at 650 nm, and fabricated with a polymer (resist) on a silicon substrate using electron-beam lithography. For investigating sensing applications based on shifting of condition exhibiting a photonic bandgap (PBG), the polymer monolayer deposition (layer-by-layer method) was monitored as the light-intensity change at the cavity position. Consequently, the monolayer-level detection of polyions was achieved.

  6. Multiplexed detection of xylene and trichloroethylene in water by photonic crystal absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Cheng; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T

    2013-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate simultaneous selective detection of xylene and trichloroethylene (TCE) using multiplexed photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) by near-infrared optical absorption spectroscopy on a chip. Based on the slow light effect of photonic crystal structure, the sensitivity of our device is enhanced to 1 ppb (v/v) for xylene and 10 ppb (v/v) for TCE in water. Multiplexing is enabled by multimode interference power splitters and Y-combiners that integrate multiple PCWs on a silicon chip in a silicon-on-insulator platform.

  7. Characterisation of the Photon Detection System for the LHCb RICH Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097582; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Easo, Sajan

    The LHCb Experiment will be upgraded during Long Shutdown II of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2019 and 2020. The goal of the upgrade is to efficiently use the increased instantaneous luminosity in LHC Run 3 and to collect data at the proton collision rate of 40 MHz. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) particle identification detectors will be upgraded to perform in the new operating conditions with continuing reliability. The photon detection system will be replaced using multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MaPMTs) and associated read-out electronics. The photon detection chain was studied at CERN using a pulsed laser to test the system under high event rates and high photon intensities. The behaviour of two types of MaPMTs which are foreseen for the upgrade is presented for varying rates and intensities, and different applied bias voltages. A simulation was created to model the photon detection chain using the Geant4 simulation toolkit. The RICH Upgrade test beam using 180 GeV positive hadrons from CERN SP...

  8. High Energy Sources Monitored with OMC

    CERN Document Server

    Risquez, D; Caballero-Garcia, M D; Alfonso-Garzon, J; Mas-Hesse, J M

    2008-01-01

    The Optical Monitoring Camera on-board INTEGRAL (OMC) provides Johnson V band photometry of any potentially variable source within its field of view. Taking advantage of the INTEGRAL capabilities allowing the simultaneous observation of different kind of objects in the optical, X and gamma rays bands, we have performed a study of the optical counterparts of different high-energy sources. Up to now, OMC has detected the optical counterpart for more than 100 sources from the High Energy Catalog (Ebisawa et al., 2003). The photometrically calibrated light curves produced by OMC can be accessed through our web portal at: http://sdc.laeff.inta.es/omc

  9. Current trends in non-accelerator particle physics: 1, Neutrino mass and oscillation. 2, High energy neutrino astrophysics. 3, Detection of dark matter. 4, Search for strange quark matter. 5, Magnetic monopole searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yudong [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    This report is a compilation of papers reflecting current trends in non-accelerator particle physics, corresponding to talks that its author was invited to present at the Workshop on Tibet Cosmic Ray Experiment and Related Physics Topics held in Beijing, China, April 4--13, 1995. The papers are entitled `Neutrino Mass and Oscillation`, `High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics`, `Detection of Dark Matter`, `Search for Strange Quark Matter`, and `Magnetic Monopole Searches`. The report is introduced by a survey of the field and a brief description of each of the author`s papers.

  10. Spatially selective photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence and application to background reduction for biomolecule detection assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Pokhriyal, Anusha; Polans, James; Cunningham, Brian T

    2011-11-07

    By combining photonic crystal label-free biosensor imaging with photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence, it is possible to selectively enhance the fluorescence emission from regions of the PC surface based upon the density of immobilized capture molecules. A label-free image of the capture molecules enables determination of optimal coupling conditions of the laser used for fluorescence imaging of the photonic crystal surface on a pixel-by-pixel basis, allowing maximization of fluorescence enhancement factor from regions incorporating a biomolecule capture spot and minimization of background autofluorescence from areas between capture spots. This capability significantly improves the contrast of enhanced fluorescent images, and when applied to an antibody protein microarray, provides a substantial advantage over conventional fluorescence microscopy. Using the new approach, we demonstrate detection limits as low as 0.97 pg/ml for a representative protein biomarker in buffer.

  11. Collaborative single target detection for depth imaging from sparse single-photon data

    CERN Document Server

    Altmann, Yoann; McCarthy, Aongus; Buller, Gerald S; McLaughlin, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new Bayesian model and associated algorithm for depth and intensity profiling using full waveforms from time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) measurements in the limit of very low photon counts (i.e., typically less than $20$ photons per pixel). The model represents each Lidar waveform as an unknown constant background level, which is combined in the presence of a target, to a known impulse response weighted by the target intensity and finally corrupted by Poisson noise. The joint target detection and depth imaging problem is expressed as a pixel-wise model selection and estimation problem which is solved using Bayesian inference. Prior knowledge about the problem is embedded in a hierarchical model that describes the dependence structure between the model parameters while accounting for their constraints. In particular, Markov random fields (MRFs) are used to model the joint distribution of the background levels and of the target presence labels, which are both expected to exhi...

  12. Fundamental Physics With Cosmic High-Energy Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    High-energy photons (above the MeV) are a powerful probe for astrophysics and for fundamental physics under extreme conditions. During the recent years, our knowledge of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has impressively progressed thanks to the advent of new detectors for cosmic gamma rays, at ground (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS, HAWC) and in space (AGILE, Fermi). This presentation reviews the present status of the studies of fundamental physics problems with high-energy gamma rays, and discusses the expected experimental developments.

  13. Surface spectroscopy using high energy heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, B.L.; Cocke, C.L.; Gray, T.J.; Justiniano, E.; Peercy, P.S.

    1983-04-01

    Surface atoms ionized by high energy heavy ions have been detected by time-of-flight and quadrupole mass spectroscopic techniques. The experimental arrangements are described and potential applications are suggested. Both techniques are demonstrated to produce significant improvements in the detection of atomic hydrogen, with the TOF method producing a nine order of magnitude increase in the sensitivity of atomic hydrogen compared to standard nuclear analysis methods.

  14. Very high energy emission from passive supermassive black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedaletti, Giovanna

    2009-10-22

    The H.E.S.S. experiment, an array of four Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes, widened the horizon of Very High Energy (VHE) astronomy. Its unprecedented sensitivity is well suited for the study of new classes of expected VHE emitters, such as passive galactic nuclei that are the main focus of the work presented in this thesis. Acceleration of particles up to Ultra High Energies is expected in the magnetosphere of supermassive black holes (SMBH). The radiation losses of these accelerated particles are expected to reach the VHE regime in which H.E.S.S. operates. Predicted fluxes exceed the sensitivity of the array. However, strong photon fields in the surrounding of the acceleration region might absorb the produced radiation. Therefore observations focus on those galactic nuclei that are underluminous at lower photon energies. This work presents data collected by the H.E.S.S. telescopes on the test candidate NGC 1399 and their interpretation. While no detection has been achieved, important constraints can be derived from the obtained upper limits on the maximum energy attainable by the accelerated particles and on the magnetic field strength in the acceleration region. A limit on the magnetic field of B < 74 Gauss is given. The limit is model dependent and a scaling of the result with the assumptions is given. This is the tightest empirical constraint to date. Because of the lack of signal from the test candidate, a stacking analysis has been performed on similar sources in three cluster fields. A search for signal from classes of active galactic nuclei has also been made in the same three fields. None of the analyzed samples revealed a significant signal. Also presented are the expectations for the next generation of Cherenkov Telescopes and an outlook on the relativistic effects expected on the VHE emission close to SMBH. (orig.)

  15. Dark Sunshine: Detecting Dark Matter through Dark Photons from the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Jonathan L; Tanedo, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter may interact with the Standard Model through the kinetic mixing of dark photons, $A'$, with Standard Model photons. Such dark matter will accumulate in the Sun and annihilate into dark photons. The dark photons may then leave the Sun and decay into pairs of charged Standard Model particles that can be detected by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. The directionality of this "dark sunshine" is distinct from all astrophysical backgrounds, providing an opportunity for unambiguous dark matter discovery by AMS. We perform a complete analysis of this scenario including Sommerfeld enhancements of dark matter annihilation and the effect of the Sun's magnetic field on the signal, and we define a set of cuts to optimize the signal probability. With the three years of data already collected, AMS may discover dark matter with mass 1 TeV $\\lesssim m_X \\lesssim$ 10 TeV, dark photon masses $m_{A'} \\sim \\mathcal O(100)$ MeV, and kinetic mixing parameters $10^{-11} \\lesssim \\varepsilon \\lesssim 10^{-8}$. The propose...

  16. Large Scale Distribution of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with Zenith Angles up to 80°

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in

  17. LARGE SCALE DISTRIBUTION OF ULTRA HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS DETECTED AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY WITH ZENITH ANGLES UP TO 80 degrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Fernandez, G. Rodriguez; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60 degrees and 80 degrees. We perform two Rayleigh ana

  18. LARGE SCALE DISTRIBUTION OF ULTRA HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS DETECTED AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY WITH ZENITH ANGLES UP TO 80 degrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Fernandez, G. Rodriguez; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60 degrees and 80 degrees. We perform two Rayleigh ana

  19. Large Scale Distribution of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with Zenith Angles up to 80°

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Sua