WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-energy neutron imaging

  1. High energy neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-01-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos

  2. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  3. High energy neutron dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, K.S.F.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields is described. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning. 2 figures

  4. High energy neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjon, R.; Breynat, G.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a generator of fast neutrons only slightly contaminated by neutrons of energy less than 15 MeV, comprising a source of charged particles of energy equal to at least 15 MeV, a target made of lithium deuteride, and means for cooling the target. The target comprises at least two elements placed in series in the path of the charged particles and separated from each other, the thickness of each of the elements being selected as a function of the average energy of the charged particles emitted from the source and the energy of the fast neutrons to be generated such that neutrons of energy equal to at least 15 MeV are emitted in the forward direction in response to the bombardment of the target from behind by the charged particles. The target cooling means comprises means for circulating between and around the elements a gas which does not chemically react with lithium deuteride

  5. High energy positron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shengzu

    2003-01-01

    The technique of High Energy Positron Imaging (HEPI) is the new development and extension of Positron Emission Tomography (PET). It consists of High Energy Collimation Imaging (HECI), Dual Head Coincidence Detection Imaging (DHCDI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). We describe the history of the development and the basic principle of the imaging methods of HEPI in details in this paper. Finally, the new technique of the imaging fusion, which combined the anatomical image and the functional image together are also introduced briefly

  6. Time gating for energy selection and scatter rejection: High-energy pulsed neutron imaging at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Alicia; Schirato, Richard; McKigney, Edward; Hunter, James; Temple, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a linear accelerator in Los Alamos, New Mexico that accelerates a proton beam to 800 MeV, which then produces spallation neutron beams. Flight path FP15R uses a tungsten target to generate neutrons of energy ranging from several hundred keV to ~600 MeV. The beam structure has micropulses of sub-ns width and period of 1.784 ns, and macropulses of 625 μs width and frequency of either 50 Hz or 100 Hz. This corresponds to 347 micropulses per macropulse, or 1.74 x 104 micropulses per second when operating at 50 Hz. Using a very fast, cooled ICCD camera (Princeton Instruments PI-Max 4), gated images of various objects were obtained on FP15R in January 2015. Objects imaged included blocks of lead and borated polyethylene; a tungsten sphere; and a tungsten, polyethylene, and steel cylinder. Images were obtained in 36 min or less, with some in as little as 6 min. This is novel because the gate widths (some as narrow as 10 ns) were selected to reject scatter and other signal not of interest (e.g. the gamma flash that precedes the neutron pulse), which has not been demonstrated at energies above 14 MeV. This proof-of-principle experiment shows that time gating is possible above 14MeV and is useful for selecting neutron energy and reducing scatter, thus forming clearer images. Future work (simulation and experimental) is being undertaken to improve camera shielding and system design and to precisely determine optical properties of the imaging system.

  7. Intercomparison of high energy neutron personnel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.C.; Akabani, G.; Loesch, R.M.

    1993-03-01

    An intercomparison of high-energy neutron personnel dosimeters was performed to evaluate the uniformity of the response characteristics of typical neutron dosimeters presently in use at US Department of Energy (DOE) accelerator facilities. It was necessary to perform an intercomparison because there are no national or international standards for high-energy neutron dosimetry. The testing that is presently under way for the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is limited to the use of neutron sources that range in energy from about 1 keV to 2 MeV. Therefore, the high-energy neutron dosimeters presently in use at DOE accelerator facilities are not being tested effectively. This intercomparison employed neutrons produced by the 9 Be(p,n) 9 B interaction at the University of Washington cyclotron, using 50-MeV protons. The resulting neutron energy spectrum extended to a maximum of approximately 50-MeV, with a mean energy of about 20-MeV. Intercomparison results for currently used dosimeters, including Nuclear Type A (NTA) film, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo, and track-etch dosimeters (TEDs), indicated a wide variation in response to identical doses of high-energy neutrons. Results of this study will be discussed along with a description of plans for future work

  8. High energy radiation from neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruderman, M.

    1985-04-01

    Topics covered include young rapidly spinning pulsars; static gaps in outer magnetospheres; dynamic gaps in pulsar outer magnetospheres; pulse structure of energetic radiation sustained by outer gap pair production; outer gap radiation, Crab pulsar; outer gap radiation, the Vela pulsar; radioemission; and high energy radiation during the accretion spin-up of older neutron stars. 26 refs., 10 figs

  9. Report on high energy neutron dosimetry workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvar, K.R.; Gavron, A.

    1993-01-01

    The workshop was called to assess the performance of neutron dosimetry per the responses from ten DOE accelerator facilities to an Office of Energy Research questionnaire regarding implementation of a personnel dosimetry requirement in DRAFT DOE 5480.ACC, ''Safety of Accelerator Facilities''. The goals of the workshop were to assess the state of dosimetry at high energy accelerators and if such dosimetry requires improvement, to reach consensus on how to proceed with such improvements. There were 22 attendees, from DOE Programs and contract facilities, DOE, Office of Energy Research (ER), Office of Environmental Safety and Health (EH), Office of Fusion Energy, and the DOE high energy accelerator facilities. A list of attendees and the meeting agenda are attached. Copies of the presentations are also attached

  10. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCaslin, J.B.; Thomas, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently

  11. Very High Energy Neutron Scattering from Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, R A; Stock, C; Bennington, S M; Taylor, J; Gidopoulos, N I

    2010-01-01

    The neutron scattering from hydrogen in polythene has been measured with the direct time-of flight spectrometer, MARI, at the ISIS facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with incident neutron energies between 0.5 eV and 600 eV. The results of experiments using the spectrometer, VESUVIO, have given intensities from hydrogen containing materials that were about 60% of the intensity expected from hydrogen. Since VESUVIO is the only instrument in the world that routinely operates with incident neutron energies in the eV range we have chosen to measure the scattering from hydrogen at high incident neutron energies with a different type of instrument. The MARI, direct time-of-flight, instrument was chosen for the experiment and we have studied the scattering for several different incident neutron energies. We have learnt how to subtract the gamma ray background, how to calibrate the incident energy and how to convert the spectra to an energy plot . The intensity of the hydrogen scattering was independent of the scattering angle for scattering angles from about 5 degrees up to 70 degrees for at least 3 different incident neutron energies between 20 eV and 100 eV. When the data was put on an absolute scale, by measuring the scattering from 5 metal foils with known thicknesses under the same conditions we found that the absolute intensity of the scattering from the hydrogen was in agreement with that expected to an accuracy of ± 5.0% over a wide range of wave-vector transfers between 1 and 250 A -1 . These measurements show that it is possible to measure the neutron scattering with incident neutron energies up to at least 100 eV with a direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer and that the results are in agreement with conventional scattering theory.

  12. First observations of power MOSFET burnout with high energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Normand, E.; Majewski, P.P.; Wender, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Single event burnout was seen in power MOSFETs exposed to high energy neutrons. Devices with rated voltage ≥400 volts exhibited burnout at substantially less than the rated voltage. Tests with high energy protons gave similar results. Burnout was also seen in limited tests with lower energy protons and neutrons. Correlations with heavy-ion data are discussed. Accelerator proton data gave favorable comparisons with burnout rates measured on the APEX spacecraft. Implications for burnout at lower altitudes are also discussed

  13. Research activities on dosimetry for high energy neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The external dosimetry research group of JAERI has been calculating dose conversion coefficients for high-energy radiations using particle transport simulation codes. The group has also been developing radiation dose measurement techniques for high-energy neutrons in collaboration with some university groups. (author)

  14. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.A.; Johnson, M.; Navratil, P.

    2007-01-01

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved

  15. High-Energy Neutron Backgrounds for Underground Dark Matter Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Direct dark matter detection experiments usually have excellent capability to distinguish nuclear recoils, expected interactions with Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter, and electronic recoils, so that they can efficiently reject background events such as gamma-rays and charged particles. However, both WIMPs and neutrons can induce nuclear recoils. Neutrons are then the most crucial background for direct dark matter detection. It is important to understand and account for all sources of neutron backgrounds when claiming a discovery of dark matter detection or reporting limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section. One type of neutron background that is not well understood is the cosmogenic neutrons from muons interacting with the underground cavern rock and materials surrounding a dark matter detector. The Neutron Multiplicity Meter (NMM) is a water Cherenkov detector capable of measuring the cosmogenic neutron flux at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, which has an overburden of 2090 meters water equivalent. The NMM consists of two 2.2-tonne gadolinium-doped water tanks situated atop a 20-tonne lead target. It detects a high-energy (>~ 50 MeV) neutron via moderation and capture of the multiple secondary neutrons released when the former interacts in the lead target. The multiplicity of secondary neutrons for the high-energy neutron provides a benchmark for comparison to the current Monte Carlo predictions. Combining with the Monte Carlo simulation, the muon-induced high-energy neutron flux above 50 MeV is measured to be (1.3 ± 0.2) ~ 10-9 cm-2s-1, in reasonable agreement with the model prediction. The measured multiplicity spectrum agrees well with that of Monte Carlo simulation for multiplicity below 10, but shows an excess of approximately a factor of three over Monte Carlo prediction for multiplicities ~ 10 - 20. In an effort to reduce neutron backgrounds for the dark matter experiment SuperCDMS SNO- LAB, an active neutron veto was developed

  16. Bench mark spectra for high-energy neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, R.

    1986-01-01

    To monitor radiation damage experiments, activation detectors are commonly used. The precision of the results obtained by the multiple foil analysis is largely increased by the intercalibration in bench-mark spectra. This technique is already used in dosimetry measurements for fission reactors. To produce neutron spectra similar to fusion reactor and high-energy high-intensity neutron sources (d-Li or spallation), accelerators can be used. Some possible solutions as p-Be and d-D 2 O neutron sources, useful as bench-mark spectra are described. (author)

  17. Calculated intensity of high-energy neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J.A.; Back, B.B.

    2004-01-01

    The flux, energy and angular distributions of high-energy neutrons produced by in-flight spallation and fission of a 400 MeV/A 238 U beam and by the break-up of a 400 MeV/A deuteron beam are calculated. In both cases very intense secondary neutron beams are produced, peaking at zero degrees, with a relatively narrow energy spread. Such secondary neutron beams can be produced with the primary beams from the proposed rare isotope accelerator driver linac. The break-up of a 400 kW deuteron beam on a liquid-lithium target can produce a neutron flux of >10 10 neutrons/cm 2 /s at a distance of 10 m from the target

  18. Fusion materials high energy-neutron studies. A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.; Guinan, M.W.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are (1) to provide background information on the US Magnetic Fusion Reactor Materials Program, (2) to provide a framework for evaluating nuclear data needs associated with high energy neutron irradiations, and (3) to show the current status of relevant high energy neutron studies. Since the last symposium, the greatest strides in cross section development have been taken in those areas providing FMIT design data, e.g., source description, shielding, and activation. In addition, many dosimetry cross sections have been tentatively extrapolated to 40 MeV and integral testing begun. Extensive total helium measurements have been made in a variety of neutron spectra. Additional calculations are needed to assist in determining energy dependent cross sections

  19. Radiographic imaging system for high energy radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A radiographic imaging system for high energy radiation is described utilizing a detector of such radiation and a mask having regions relatively transparent to such radiation and interspersed among regions relatively opaque to such radiation. A relative motion is imparted between the mask and the detector, the detector providing a time varying signal in response to the incident radiation and in response to the relative motion. The time varying signal provides, with the aid of a decoder, an image of a source of such radiation

  20. Radiographic imaging system for high energy radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    A radiographic imaging system for high energy radiation utilizing a detector of such radiation and a mask having regions relatively transparent to such radiation interspersed among regions relatively opaque to such radiation is described. A relative motion is imparted between the mask and the detector, the detector providing a time varying signal in response to the incident radiation and in response to the relative motion. The time varying signal provides, with the aid of a decoder, an image of a source of such radiation

  1. Unique furnace system for high-energy-neutron experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotou, N.F.; Green, D.R.; Price, L.S.

    1982-03-01

    The low flux of high energy neutron sources requires optimum utilization of the available neutron field. A furnace system has been developed in support of the US DOE fusion materials program which meets this challenge. Specimens positioned in two temperature zones just 1 mm away from the outside surface of a neutron window in the furnace enclosure can be irradiated simultaneously at two independent, isothermal (+- 1 0 C) temperatures. The temperature difference between these closely spaced isothermal zones is controllable from 0 to 320 0 C and the maximum temperature is 400 0 C. The design of the system also provides a controlled specimen environment, rapid heating and cooling and easy access to heaters and thermocouples. This furnace system is in use at the Rotating Target Neutron Source-II of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  2. Transport of accelerator produced high energy neutrons though concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar Rao, G.; Sarkar, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    Development of a computational system for estimating the production and transport of high energy neutrons in particle accelerators is reported. The energy-angle distribution of neutrons from accelerated ions bombarding thick targets is calculated by a hybrid nuclear reaction model code, ALICE-91, modified to suit the purpose. Subsequent transmission of these neutrons through concrete slabs is treated using the anisotropic source-flux iteration technique (ASFIT) in the framework of a coupled neutron-gamma transport. Several parameters of both the codes have been optimized to obtain the transmitted dose through concrete. The calculations are found to be accurate and at the same time faster compared to the detailed Monte Carlo calculations. (author). 8 refs., 2 figs

  3. Response function measurement of plastic scintillator for high energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Ban, Syuichi; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Takada, Masashi

    2003-01-01

    The response function and detection efficiency of 2''φ x 2''L plastic (PilotU) and NE213 liquid (2''NE213) scintillators, which were used for the measurement of secondary neutrons from high energy electron induced reactions, were measured at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). High energy neutrons were produced via 400 MeV/n C beam bombardment on a thick graphite target. The detectors were placed at 15 deg with respect to C beam axis, 5 m away from the target. As standard, a 5''φ x 5''L NE213 liquid scintillator (5''NE213) was also placed at same position. Neutron energy was determined by the time-of-flight method with the beam pickup scintillator in front of the target. In front of the detectors, veto scintillators were placed to remove charged particle events. All detector signals were corrected with list mode event by event. We deduce neutron spectrum for each detectors. The efficiency curves for pilotU and 2''NE213 were determined on the bases of 5 N E213 neutron spectrum and its efficiency calculated by CECIL code. (author)

  4. Portable high energy gamma ray imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guru, S.V.; Squillante, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    To satisfy the needs of high energy gamma ray imagers for industrial nuclear imaging applications, three high energy gamma cameras are presented. The RMD-Pinhole camera uses a lead pinhole collimator and a segmented BGO detector viewed by a 3 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). This pinhole gamma camera displayed an energy resolution of 25.0% FWHM at the center of the camera at 662 keV and an angular resolution of 6.2 FWHM at 412 keV. The fixed multiple hole collimated camera (FMCC), used a multiple hole collimator and a continuous slab of NaI(Tl) detector viewed by the same PSPMT. The FMCC displayed an energy resolution of 12.4% FWHM at 662 keV at the center of the camera and an angular resolution of 6.0 FWHM at 412 keV. The rotating multiple hole collimated camera (RMCC) used a 180 antisymmetric rotation modulation collimator and CsI(Tl) detectors coupled to PIN silicon photodiodes. The RMCC displayed an energy resolution of 7.1% FWHM at 662 keV and an angular resolution of 4.0 FWHM at 810 keV. The performance of these imagers is discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  5. High energy neutron source for materials research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odera, M.

    1989-01-01

    Requirements for neutron source for nuclear materials research are reviewed and ESNIT, Energy Selective Neutron Irradiation Test facility proposed by JAERI is discussed. Its principal aims of a wide neutron energy tunability and spectra peaking at each energy to enable characterization of material damage process are demanding but attractive goals which deserve detailed study. It is also to be noted that the requirements make a difference in facility design from those of FMIT, IFMIF and other high energy intense neutron sources built or planned to date. Areas of technologies to be addressed to realize the ESNIT facility are defined and discussed. In order to get neutron source having desired spectral characteristics keeping moderate intensity, projectile and target combinations must be examined including experimentation if necessary. It is also desired to minimize change of flux density and energy spectrum according to location inside irradiation chamber. Extended target or multiple targets configuration might be a solution as well as specimen rotation and choice of combination of projectile and target which has minimum velocity of the center of mass. Though relevant accelerator technology exists, it is to be stressed that considerable efforts must be paid, especially in the area of target and irradiation devices to get ESNIT goal. Design considerations to allow hands-on maintenance and future upgrading possibility are important either, in order to exploit the facility fully for nuclear materials research and development. (author)

  6. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dosemeters used in high-energy neutron environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.W.; Sheu, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy neutrons (>10 MeV) contribute substantially to the dose fraction but result in only a small or negligible response in most conventional moderated-type neutron detectors. Neutron dosemeters used for radiation protection purpose are commonly calibrated with 252 Cf neutron sources and are used in various workplace. A workplace-specific correction factor is suggested. In this study, the effect of the neutron spectrum on the accuracy of dose measurements was investigated. A set of neutron spectra representing various neutron environments was selected to study the dose responses of a series of Bonner spheres, including standard and extended-range spheres. By comparing 252 Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values based on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this paper presents recommendations for neutron field characterisation and appropriate correction factors for responses of conventional neutron dosemeters used in environments with high-energy neutrons. The correction depends on the estimated percentage of high-energy neutrons in the spectrum or the ratio between the measured responses of two Bonner spheres (the 4P6-8 extended-range sphere versus the 6'' standard sphere). (authors)

  7. High-energy neutron irradiation of superconducting compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweedler, A.R.; Snead, C.L.; Newkirk, L.; Valencia, F.; Geballe, T.H.; Schwall, R.H.; Matthias, B.T.; Corenswit, E.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of high-energy neutron irradiation (E greater than 1 MeV) at ambient reactor temperatures on the superconducting properties of a variety of superconducting compounds is reported. The materials studied include the A-15 compounds Nb 3 Sn, Nb 3 Al, Nb 3 Ga, Nb 3 Ge and V 3 Si, the C-15 Laves phase HfV 2 , the ternary molybdenum sulfide Mo 3 Pb 0 . 5 S 4 and the layered dichalcogenide NbSe 2 . The superconducting transition temperature has been measured for all of the above materials for neutron fluences up to 5 x 10 19 n/cm 2 . The critical current for multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn has also been determined for fields up to 16 T and fluences between 3 x 10 17 n/cm 2 and 1.1 x 10 19 n/cm 2

  8. Neutron emission and fragment yield in high-energy fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grudzevich, O. T.; Klinov, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    The KRIS special library of spectra and emission probabilities in the decays of 1500 nuclei excited up to energies between 150 and 250 MeV was developed for correctly taking into account the decay of highly excited nuclei appearing as fission fragments. The emission of neutrons, protons, and photons was taken into account. Neutron emission fromprimary fragments was found to have a substantial effect on the formation of yields of postneutron nuclei. The library was tested by comparing the calculated and measured yields of products originating from the fission of nuclei that was induced by high-energy protons. The method for calculating these yields was tested on the basis of experimental data on the thermal-neutroninduced fission of 235 U nuclei

  9. Neutron scattering investigation of magnetic excitations at high energy transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loong, C.K.

    1984-01-01

    With the advance of pulsed spallation neutron sources, neutron scattering investigation of elementary excitations in magnetic materials can now be extended to energies up to several hundreds of MeV. We have measured, using chopper spectrometers and time-of-flight techniques, the magnetic response functions of a series of d and f transition metals and compounds over a wide range of energy and momentum transfer. In PrO 2 , UO 2 , BaPrO 3 and CeB 6 we observed crystal-field transitions between the magnetic ground state and the excited levels in the energy range from 40 to 260 MeV. In materials exhibiting spin-fluctuation or mixed-valent character such as Ce 74 Th 26 , on the other hand, no sharp crystal-field lines but a broadened quasielastic magnetic peak was observed. The line width of the quasielastic component is thought to be connected to the spin-fluctuation energy of the 4f electrons. The significance of the neutron scattering results in relation to the ground state level structure of the magnetic ions and the spin-dynamics of the f electrons is discussed. Recently, in a study of the spin-wave excitations in itinerant magnetic systems, we have extended the spin-wave measurements in ferromagnetic iron up to about 160 MeV. Neutron scattering data at high energy transfers are of particular interest because they provide direct comparison with recent theories of itinerant magnetism. 26 references, 7 figures

  10. High-energy neutron dosimetry at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, M.W.; Vasilik, D.G.; Littlejohn, G.J.; Cortez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements performed at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility indicated potential areas for high energy neutron exposure to personnel. The low sensitivity of the Los Alamos thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) to high energy neutrons warranted issuing a NTA dosimeter in addition to the TLD badge to employees entering these areas. The dosimeter consists of a plastic holder surrounding NTA film that has been desiccated and sealed in a dry nitrogen environment. A study of the fading of latent images in NTA film demonstrated the success of this packaging method to control the phenomenon. The Los Alamos NTA dosimeter is characterized and the fading study discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Recent research on nuclear reaction using high-energy proton and neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Tokushi [Tokyo Univ., Tanashi (Japan). Inst. for Nuclear Study

    1997-11-01

    The presently available high-energy neutron beam facilities are introduced. Then some interesting research on nuclear reaction using high-energy protons are reported such as the intermediate mass fragments emission and neutron spectrum measurements on various targets. As the important research using high-energy neutron, the (p,n) reactions on Mn, Fe, and Ni, the elastic scattering of neutrons, and the shielding experiments are discussed. (author)

  12. Comparison of neutron and high-energy X-ray dual-beam radiography for air cargo inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Sowerby, B.D.; Tickner, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Dual-beam radiography techniques utilising various combinations of high-energy X-rays and neutrons are attractive for screening bulk cargo for contraband such as narcotics and explosives. Dual-beam radiography is an important enhancement to conventional single-beam X-ray radiography systems in that it provides additional information on the composition of the object being imaged. By comparing the attenuations of transmitted dual high-energy beams, it is possible to build a 2D image, colour coded to indicate material. Only high-energy X-rays, gamma-rays and neutrons have the required penetration to screen cargo containers. This paper reviews recent developments and applications of dual-beam radiography for air cargo inspection. These developments include dual high-energy X-ray techniques as well as fast neutron and gamma-ray (or X-ray) radiography systems. High-energy X-ray systems have the advantage of generally better penetration than neutron systems, depending on the material being interrogated. However, neutron systems have the advantage of much better sensitivity to material composition compared to dual high-energy X-ray techniques. In particular, fast neutron radiography offers the potential to discriminate between various classes of organic material, unlike dual energy X-ray techniques that realistically only offer the ability to discriminate between organic and metal objects

  13. High energy electron multibeam diffraction and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, Alain.

    1980-04-01

    The different theories of dynamical scattering of electrons are firstly reviewed with special reference to their basis and the validity of the different approximations. Then after a short description of the different experimental set ups, structural analysis and the investigation of the optical potential by means of high energy electrons will be surveyed

  14. Development and application of high energy imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shengzu

    1999-01-01

    High Energy Positron Imaging (HEPI) is a new technology. The idea of positron imaging can be traced back to early 1950's. HEPI imaging is formed by positron emitter radionuclide produced by cyclotron, such as 15 O, 13 N, 11 C and 18 F, which are most abundant elements in human body. Clinical applications of HEPI have been witnessed rapidly in recent years. HEPI imaging can be obtained by both PET and SPECT, namely high energy collimation imaging, Mdecular Coincidence Detection (MCD) and positron emission tomography

  15. High energy neutron dosimetry for the fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, D.W.; Norris, A.E.

    1977-01-01

    Neutron dosimetry by the foil activation method offers a flexible technique for characterizing neutron spectra ranging from thermal energies to 30 MeV with the potential for extension to higher neutron energies as investigated by the Los Alamos Radiochemistry Group at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility and in the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. The use of this method for the neutron flux description in thermal, resonance, and fission spectrum assemblies has been demonstrated. An extension of the method to environments involving thermonuclear processes was developed at Los Alamos in the early 1950's to characterize mixed fission-thermonuclear systems

  16. Neutron Imaging Developments at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ron; Hunter, James; Schirato, Richard; Vogel, Sven; Swift, Alicia; Ickes, Tim; Ward, Bill; Losko, Adrian; Tremsin, Anton

    2015-10-01

    Neutron imaging is complementary to x-ray imaging because of its sensitivity to light elements and greater penetration of high-Z materials. Energy-resolved neutron imaging can provide contrast enhancements for elements and isotopes due to the variations with energy in scattering cross sections due to nuclear resonances. These cross section differences exist due to compound nuclear resonances that are characteristic of each element and isotope, as well as broader resonances at higher energies. In addition, multi-probe imaging, such as combined photon and neutron imaging, is a powerful tool for discerning properties and features in materials that cannot be observed with a single probe. Recently, we have demonstrated neutron imaging, both radiography and computed tomography, using the moderated (Lujan Center) and high-energy (WNR facility) neutron sources at LANSCE. Flat panel x-ray detectors with suitable scintillator-converter screens provide good sensitivity for both low and high neutron energies. Micro-Channel-Plate detectors and iCCD scintillator camera systems that provide the fast time gating needed for energy-resolved imaging have been demonstrated as well. Examples of recent work will be shown including fluid flow in plants and imaging through dense thick objects. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, and performed by Los Alamos National Security LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  17. High energy neutron recoil scattering from liquid 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.S.; Needham, L.M.; Paoli, M.P.

    1987-10-01

    The neutron recoil scattering from liquid 4 He at 4.2 K and 1.6 K has been observed for a momentum transfer of 150 A -1 using the Electron Volt Spectrometer on the pulsed neutron source, ISIS. The experiment yielded mean atomic kinetic energy values = 14.8 +- 3 K at 4.2 K and = 14.6 +- 3.2 K at 1.6 K in good agreement with values obtained at lower momentum transfers. (author)

  18. Measurement of high energy neutrons via Lu(n,xn) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, E.A.; Becker, J.A.; Archer, D.E.; Younes, W.; Stoyer, M.A.; Slaughter, D.

    1997-07-01

    High energy neutrons can be assayed by the use of the nuclear diagnostic material lutetium. We are measuring the (n,xn) cross sections for natural lutetium in order to develop it as a detector material. We are applying lutetium to diagnose the high energy neutrons produced in test target/blanket systems appropriate for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. The production of high energy neutrons by secondary reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieschmidt, E.B.; Roney, T.J.; Staples, D.R.; Harmon, J.F.; Burkhart, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    The potential of using binary reactions in targets containing Be is discussed. Data are presented from the use of Be and BeF 2 targets bombarded with 1.5, 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9 MeV protons. Neutron production is enhanced by the presence of the F by factors of ∼4

  20. Neutron-proton elastic scattering at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-e-Aleem (Punjab Univ., Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics)

    1980-09-06

    The most recent measurements of the differential and total cross sections of neutron-proton elastic scattering from 70 to 400 GeV/c have been explained by using rho as a simple pole and pomeron as a dipole. The predictions are also made regarding the energy dependence of dip and bump structure in angular distribution.

  1. High energy spin waves in iron measured by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothroyd, A.T.; Paul, D.M.; Mook, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    We present new results for the spin were dispersion relation measured along the [ζζ0] direction in bcc iron (12% silicon) by time-of-flight, neutron inelastic scattering. The excitations were followed to the zone boundary, where they are spread over a range of energies around 300meV. 6 refs., 2 figs

  2. A very high energy imaging for radioactive wastes processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, V.; Pettier, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    The X imaging occurs at a lot of steps of the radioactive wastes processing: selection for conditioning, physical characterization with a view to radiological characterization, quality control of the product before storage, transport or disposal. Size and volume of the objects considered here necessitate to work with very high energy systems. Here is shown, through some examples, in which conditions this X imaging is carried out as well as the contribution of the obtained images. (O.M.)

  3. Spatial distribution of moderated neutrons along a Pb target irradiated by high-energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragopoulou, M.; Manolopoulou, M.; Stoulos, S.; Brandt, R.; Westmeier, W.; Kulakov, B.A.; Krivopustov, M.I.; Sosnin, A.N.; Debeauvais, M.; Adloff, J.C.; Zamani Valasiadou, M.

    2006-01-01

    High-energy protons in the range of 0.5-7.4 GeV have irradiated an extended Pb target covered with a paraffin moderator. The moderator was used in order to shift the hard Pb spallation neutron spectrum to lower energies and to increase the transmutation efficiency via (n,γ) reactions. Neutron distributions along and inside the paraffin moderator were measured. An analysis of the experimental results was performed based on particle production by high-energy interactions with heavy targets and neutron spectrum shifting by the paraffin. Conclusions about the spallation neutron production in the target and moderation through the paraffin are presented. The study of the total neutron fluence on the moderator surface as a function of the proton beam energy shows that neutron cost is improved up to 1 GeV. For higher proton beam energies it remains constant with a tendency to decline

  4. High-energy X-ray production in a boundary layer of an accreting neutron star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawa, Tomoyuki

    1991-01-01

    It is shown by Monte Carlo simulation that high-energy X-rays are produced through Compton scattering in a boundary layer of an accreting neutron star. The following is the mechanism for the high-energy X-ray production. An accreting neutron star has a boundary layer rotating rapidly on the surface. X-rays radiated from the star's surface are scattered in part in the boundary layer. Since the boundary layer rotates at a semirelativistic speed, the scattered X-ray energy is changed by the Compton effect. Some X-rays are scattered repeatedly between the neutron star and the boundary layer and become high-energy X-rays. This mechanism is a photon analog of the second-order Fermi acceleration of cosmic rays. When the boundary layer is semitransparent, high-energy X-rays are produced efficiently. 17 refs

  5. Relativistic polarized neutrons at the Laboratory of High Energy Physics, JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillov, A.; Komolov, L.; Kovalenko, A.; Matyushevskij, E.; Nomofilov, A.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Sharov, V.; Starikov, A.; Strunov, L.; Svetov, A.

    1996-01-01

    Using slowly extracted polarized deuterons, available at the accelerator facility of the Laboratory of High Energy Physics, JINR, polarized quasi-monochromatic neutrons with momenta from 1.1 to 4.5 GeV/c have been generated. Depending on momentum, from 10 4 to 10 6 polarized neutrons per accelerator cycle were produced. At present, the polarized neutrons are mainly intended for measuring the (n vec, p vec) total cross section differences. 6 refs., 2 figs

  6. Ceramics research in a high-energy neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The studies on the irradiation effect to ceramics have added much to the basic understanding of their behavior, for example, the amorphous state of ceramics related to radiation-induced metamictization, the radiation-induced strengthening and toughening due to ultrafine defect aggregates, the in situ degradation of electrical resistivity, the role of radiation-induced defects on thermal conductivity and so on. Most of the irradiation testing on ceramics in the fields of structural and thermal properties have been carried out by using fast fission neutrons of about 1 MeV, but if this energy could be significantly changed, the size and nature of damage cascade and the quantity of transmutation gases produced would change. The significance of neutron source parameters, the special test requirement for ceramics such as the use of miniature specimens, the control of test environment, the transient reduction of electrical resistivity and so on are discussed. A special case of ceramic studies is that on new oxide superconductors. These materials can be made into amorphous state at about 1 dpa using 1 MeV electrons, and are considered to be fairly damage-sensitive. (K.I.)

  7. Investigation of high-energy inelastic neutron scattering from liquid water confined in silica xerogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perelli-Cippo, E.; Andreani, C.; Casalboni, M.; Dire, S.; Fernandez-Canoto, D.; Gorini, G.; Imberti, S.; Pietropaolo, A.; Prosposito, P.; Schutzmann, S.; Senesi, R.; Tardocchi, M.

    2006-01-01

    High-energy inelastic neutron scattering (HINS) employing epithermal neutrons is a new technique under development at the VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS, aiming to access the high-energy and low wave-vector transfer region in neutron scattering experiments at eV energies. New neutron detectors have been developed for HINS based on the resonant detector (RD). These make use of the detection of prompt gammas after neutron absorption in an analyzer foil. The RD is used in the very low angle detector (VLAD) bank, which will extend the explored kinematical region to momentum transfer -1 , whilst still keeping energy transfer >300 meV. The final VLAD will cover the scattering range 1-5 o and will be installed by the end of 2005. The results obtained with prototype VLAD detectors on polycrystalline ice and liquid water in silica xerogels provide a demonstration of the feasibility of the measurements under realistic conditions

  8. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  9. Field calibration of a TLD albedo dosemeter in the high-energy neutron field of CERF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haninger, T.; Kleinau, P.; Haninger, S.

    2017-01-01

    The new albedo dosemeter-type AWST-TL-GD 04 has been calibrated in the CERF neutron field (CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field). This type of albedo dosemeter is based on thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and used by the individual monitoring service of the Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (AWST) since 2015 for monitoring persons, who are exposed occupationally against photon and neutron radiation. The motivation for this experiment was to gain a field specific neutron correction factor N n for workplaces at high-energy particle accelerators. N n is a dimensionless factor relative to a basic detector calibration with 137 Cs and is used to calculate the personal neutron dose in terms of H p (10) from the neutron albedo signal. The results show that the sensitivity of the albedo dosemeter for this specific neutron field is not significantly lower as for fast neutrons of a radionuclide source like 252 Cf. The neutron correction factor varies between 0.73 and 1.16 with a midrange value of 0.94. The albedo dosemeter is therefore appropriate to monitor persons, which are exposed at high-energy particle accelerators. (authors)

  10. Single event upset and charge collection measurements using high energy protons and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normand, E.; Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Ness, J.D.; Majewski, P.P.; Wender, S.; Gavron, A.

    1994-01-01

    RAMs, microcontrollers and surface barrier detectors were exposed to beams of high energy protons and neutrons to measure the induced number of upsets as well as energy deposition. The WNR facility at Los Alamos provided a neutron spectrum similar to that of the atmospheric neutrons. Its effect on devices was compared to that of protons with energies of 200, 400, 500, and 800 MeV. Measurements indicate that SEU cross sections for 400 MeV protons are similar to those induced by the atmospheric neutron spectrum

  11. Neutron image intensifier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verat, M.; Rougeot, H.; Driard, B.

    1983-01-01

    The most frequently used techniques in neutron radiography employ a neutron converter consisting of either a scintillator or a thin metal sheet. The radiation created by the neutrons exposes a photographic film that is in contact with the converter: in the direct method, the film is exposed during the time that the object is irradiated with neutrons; in the transfer method, the film is exposed after the irradiation of the object with neutrons. In industrial non-destructive testing, when many identical objects have to be checked, these techniques have several disadvantages. Non-destructive testing systems without these disadvantages can be constructed around neutron-image intensifier tubes. A description and the operating characteristics of neutron-image intensifier tubes are given. (Auth.)

  12. Production of charm mesons by high energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipbaugh, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The charmed mesons D/sup /plus minus//, D/sup 0/, and D/sub s//sup /plus minus//, have been observed in neutron-nucleus collisions at the FNAL Tevatron. A sample of 134 /plus minus/ 19 events as investigated in the decay D/sup /plus minus// /yields/ D/sup 0//pi//sup /plus minus// with the subsequent decay mode D/sup 0/ /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup /minus//. The cross section per nucleon for D/sup /plus minus//, at most probable energy /radical/s = 35 GeV, was measured to be 2.11 /plus minus/ .43 (plus minus/.63)/mu/b/nucleon for 0.0 < x/sub f/ < 0.14 (/bar x//sub f/ = .07). The branching ratio (BR) is defined as: BR /identical to/ Br(D /yields/ D/pi/) /times/ BR(D /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup /minus//). The dependence of the cross section per nucleus on number of nucleons in target was fit to a form A /sup /alpha// and it was found that /alpha/ = .96 /plus minus/ .17. A sample of 64 /plus minus/ 16 D/sub s//sup /plus minus// events was investigates for the decay D/sub s//sup /plus minus// /yields/ /phi//pi//sup /plus minus//. The differential cross section for D/sub s//sup /plus minus// production averaged over the particle and antiparticle states is: BR.[1/2](d/sigma/(D/sub s//sup +/)/dx/sub f/ + d/sigma/(D/sub s//sup /minus//) = 2.85 /plus minus/ 0.80 /plus minus/ .86 /mu/b/nucleon at x/sub f/ = 0.175 where the first errors is statistical and the second error is systematic. The branching fraction is defined as BR /equivalent to/ BR(D/sub s/ /yields/ /phi//pi/), and a linear A dependence was assumed. An estimate of relative cross section is: 0.19 /plus minus/ 0.09 at x/sub f/ = 0. 36 refs., 43 figs., 5 tabs

  13. High energy resolution characteristics on 14MeV neutron spectrometer for fusion experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Tetsuo [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.; Takada, Eiji; Nakazawa, Masaharu

    1996-10-01

    A 14MeV neutron spectrometer suitable for an ITER-like fusion experimental reactor is now under development on the basis of a recoil proton counter telescope principle in oblique scattering geometry. To verify its high energy resolution characteristics, preliminary experiments are made for a prototypical detector system. The comparison results show reasonably good agreement and demonstrate the possibility of energy resolution of 2.5% in full width at half maximum for 14MeV neutron spectrometry. (author)

  14. Experimental investigations of the neutron contamination in high-energy photon fields at medical linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunckhorst, Elin

    2009-01-01

    The scope of this thesis was to develop a device for the detection of the photoneutron dose inside the high-energy photon field. The photoneutron contamination of a Siemens PRIMUS linear accelerator was investigated in detail in its 15 MV photon mode. The experimental examinations were performed with three ionisation chambers (a tissue equivalent chamber, a magnesium chamber and a 10 B-coated magnesium chamber) and two types of thermoluminescence detectors (enriched with 6 Li and 7 Li, respectively). The detectors have different sensitivities to photons and neutrons and their combination allows the dose separation in a mixed neutron/photon field. The application of the ionisation chamber system, as well as the present TLD system for photoneutron detection in high-energy photon beams is a new approach. The TLD neutron sensitivity was found to be too low for a measurement inside the open photon field and the further investigation focused on the ionisation chambers. The three ionisation chambers were calibrated at different photon and neutron sources and a the borated magnesium chamber showed a very high response to thermal neutrons. For a cross check of the calibration, the three chambers were also used for dose separation of a boron neutron capture therapy beam where the exact determination of the thermal neutron dose is essential. Very accurate results were achieved for the thermal neutron dose component. At the linear accelerator the chamber system was reduced to a paired chamber system utilising the two magnesium chambers, since the fast neutron component was to small to be separated. The neutron calibration of the three chambers could not be applied, instead a conversion of measured thermal neutron signal by the borated chamber to Monte Carlo simulated total neutron dose was performed. Measurements for open fields in solid water and liquid water were performed with the paired chamber system. In larger depths the neutron dose could be determined with an

  15. Experimental investigations of the neutron contamination in high-energy photon fields at medical linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunckhorst, Elin

    2009-02-26

    The scope of this thesis was to develop a device for the detection of the photoneutron dose inside the high-energy photon field. The photoneutron contamination of a Siemens PRIMUS linear accelerator was investigated in detail in its 15 MV photon mode. The experimental examinations were performed with three ionisation chambers (a tissue equivalent chamber, a magnesium chamber and a {sup 10}B-coated magnesium chamber) and two types of thermoluminescence detectors (enriched with {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li, respectively). The detectors have different sensitivities to photons and neutrons and their combination allows the dose separation in a mixed neutron/photon field. The application of the ionisation chamber system, as well as the present TLD system for photoneutron detection in high-energy photon beams is a new approach. The TLD neutron sensitivity was found to be too low for a measurement inside the open photon field and the further investigation focused on the ionisation chambers. The three ionisation chambers were calibrated at different photon and neutron sources and a the borated magnesium chamber showed a very high response to thermal neutrons. For a cross check of the calibration, the three chambers were also used for dose separation of a boron neutron capture therapy beam where the exact determination of the thermal neutron dose is essential. Very accurate results were achieved for the thermal neutron dose component. At the linear accelerator the chamber system was reduced to a paired chamber system utilising the two magnesium chambers, since the fast neutron component was to small to be separated. The neutron calibration of the three chambers could not be applied, instead a conversion of measured thermal neutron signal by the borated chamber to Monte Carlo simulated total neutron dose was performed. Measurements for open fields in solid water and liquid water were performed with the paired chamber system. In larger depths the neutron dose could be determined

  16. Soil biological shield exposed to high energy neutrons; Zemlja kao bioloski stit od neutrona visokih energija

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simovic, R; Marinkovic, N [Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1993-04-15

    Shielding efficiency of soil biological shield exposed to high energy neutrons was investigated. Dose rate equivalents for neutrons, secondary gamma and gamma radiation were computed on the surface of soil slabs having different thicknesses. Yields of primary and secondary nuclear radiation in the total dose were evaluated. Influence of the incident neutron spectrum, water content and chemical composition of the material on its shielding efficiency was examined. It was found that the soil density and the water content determine the quality of biological shield, the influence of other factors being less important. Comparison of shielding efficiencies for soil with sand, brick and ordinary concrete shields was done.

  17. Dose conversion coefficients for high-energy photons, electrons, neutrons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yukio

    2005-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for photons, electrons and neutrons based on new ICRP recommendations were cited in the ICRP Publication 74, but the energy ranges of these data were limited and there are no data for high energy radiations produced in accelerator facilities. For the purpose of designing the high intensity proton accelerator facilities at JAERI, the dose evaluation code system of high energy radiations based on the HERMES code was developed and the dose conversion coefficients of effective dose were evaluated for photons, neutrons and protons up to 10 GeV, and electrons up to 100 GeV. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalent were also evaluated using quality factors to consider the consistency between radiation weighting factors and Q-L relationship. The effective dose conversion coefficients obtained in this work were in good agreement with those recently evaluated by using FLUKA code for photons and electrons with all energies, and neutrons and protons below 500 MeV. There were some discrepancy between two data owing to the difference of cross sections in the nuclear reaction models. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalents for high energy radiations based on Q-L relation in ICRP Publication 60 were evaluated only in this work. The previous comparison between effective dose and effective dose equivalent made it clear that the radiation weighting factors for high energy neutrons and protons were overestimated and the modification was required. (author)

  18. Characterisation of neutron fields around high-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králík, M.; Turek, Karel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 110, 1-4 (2004), s. 503-507 ISSN 0144-8420 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : radiotherapy machines * neutron fields * high-energy Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 0.617, year: 2003

  19. Resolution of the VESUVIO spectrometer for High-energy Inelastic Neutron Scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imberti, S. [Universita degli Studi di Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.Amaldi' , Rome (Italy) and CNR-INFM, Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: silvia.imberti@roma2.infn.it; Andreani, C. [Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma 60133 (Italy); CNR-INFM, Rome (Italy); Garbuio, V. [Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma 60133 (Italy); CNR-INFM, Rome (Italy); Gorini, G. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica ' G.Occhialini' , Milan (Italy); CNR-INFM, Milan (Italy); Pietropaolo, A. [Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma 60133 (Italy); CNR-INFM, Rome (Italy); Senesi, R. [Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma 60133 (Italy); CNR-INFM, Rome (Italy); Tardocchi, M. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica ' G.Occhialini' , Milan (Italy); CNR-INFM, Milan (Italy)

    2005-11-01

    New perspectives for epithermal neutron spectroscopy have been opened up as a result of the development of the Resonance Detector and its use on inverse geometry time-of-flight spectrometers at spallation sources. A special application of the Resonance Detector is the Very Low Angle Detector Bank (VLAD) for the VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS, operating in the angular range 1 deg. <2{theta}<5 deg. This equipment allows High-energy Inelastic Neutron Scattering (HINS) measurements to be performed in the (q,{omega}) kinematical region at low wavevector (q<10A{sup -1}) and high energy (unlimited) transfer -bar {omega}>500meV, a regime so far inaccessible to experimental studies on condensed matter systems. The HINS measurements complement the Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) measurements performed on VESUVIO in the high wavevector q(20A{sup -1}high energy transfer (-bar {omega}>1eV), where the short-time single-particle dynamics can be sampled. This paper will revise the main components of the resolution for HINS measurements of VESUVIO. Instrument performances and examples of applications for neutron scattering processes at high energy and at low wavevector transfer are discussed.

  20. The neutron dose equivalent around high energy medical electron linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poje Marina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of neutron dose equivalent was made in four dual energy linear accelerator rooms. Two of the rooms were reconstructed after decommissioning of 60Co units, so the main limitation was the space. The measurements were performed by a nuclear track etched detectors LR-115 associated with the converter (radiator that consist of 10B and with the active neutron detector Thermo BIOREM FHT 742. The detectors were set at several locations to evaluate the neutron ambient dose equivalent and/or neutron dose rate to which medical personnel could be exposed. Also, the neutron dose dependence on collimator aperture was analyzed. The obtained neutron dose rates outside the accelerator rooms were several times smaller than the neutron dose rates inside the accelerator rooms. Nevertheless, the measured neutron dose equivalent was not negligible from the aspect of the personal dosimetry with almost 2 mSv a year per person in the areas occupied by staff (conservative estimation. In rooms with 15 MV accelerators, the neutron exposure to the personnel was significantly lower than in the rooms having 18 MV accelerators installed. It was even more pronounced in the room reconstructed after the 60Co decommissioning. This study confirms that shielding from the neutron radiation should be considered when building vaults for high energy linear accelerators, especially when the space constraints exist.

  1. Improving the neutron-to-photon discrimination capability of detectors used for neutron dosimetry in high energy photon beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irazola, L.; Terrón, J.A.; Bedogni, R; Pola, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Sánchez-Nieto, B.; Gómez, F.; Sánchez-Doblado, F.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing interest of the medical community to radioinduced second malignancies due to photoneutrons in patients undergoing high-energy radiotherapy, has stimulated in recent years the study of peripheral doses, including the development of some dedicated active detectors. Although these devices are designed to respond to neutrons only, their parasitic photon response is usually not identically zero and anisotropic. The impact of these facts on measurement accuracy can be important, especially in points close to the photon field-edge. A simple method to estimate the photon contribution to detector readings is to cover it with a thermal neutron absorber with reduced secondary photon emission, such as a borated rubber. This technique was applied to the TNRD (Thermal Neutron Rate Detector), recently validated for thermal neutron measurements in high-energy photon radiotherapy. The positive results, together with the accessibility of the method, encourage its application to other detectors and different clinical scenarios. - Highlights: • Neutron-to-photon discrimination of a thermal neutron detector used in radiotherapy. • Photon and anisotropic response study with distance and beam incidence of thermal neutron detector. • Borated rubber for estimating photon contribution in any thermal neutron detector.

  2. Evaluation of energy response of neutron rem monitor applied to high-energy accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Harada, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    A neutron rem monitor was newly developed for applying to the high-intensity proton accelerator facility (J-PARC) that is under construction as a joint project between the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. To measure the dose rate accurately for wide energy range of neutrons from thermal to high-energy region, the neutron rem monitor was fabricated by adding a lead breeder layer to a conventional neutron rem monitor. The energy response of the monitor was evaluated by using neutron transport calculations for the energy range from thermal to 150 MeV. For verifying the results, the response was measured at neutron fields for the energy range from thermal to 65 MeV. The comparisons between the energy response and dose conversion coefficients show that the newly developed neutron rem monitor has a good performance in energy response up to 150 MeV, suggesting that the present study offered prospects of a practical fabrication of the rem monitor applicable to the high intensity proton accelerator facility. (author)

  3. High energy fast neutrons from the Harwell variable energy cyclotron. II. Biologic studies in mammalian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, R.J.; Bance, D.A.; Barnes, D.W.H.; Cox, R.; Goodhead, D.T.; Sansom, J.M.; Thacker, J.

    1977-01-01

    A high energy fast neutron beam potentially suitable for radiotherapy has been described in a companion paper. Its biologic effects have been studied in the following experimental systems: clonal survival and mutation induction after irradiation in vitro in Chinese hamster cells and human diploid fibroblasts; survival of reproductive capacity in vivo of murine hemopoietic colony-forming cells and murine intestinal crypts after irradiation in vivo; survival of reproductive capacity in vivo after irradiation in vitro or in vivo of murine lymphocytic leukemia cells; acute intestinal death following total body irradiation of mice and guinea pigs; and hemopoietic death following total body irradiation of mice and guinea pigs. The relative biologic effectiveness of these high energy neutrons varied among the different biologic systems, and in several cases varied with the size of the radiation dose. The oxygen enhancement ratio was studied in murine lymphocytic leukemia cells irradiated under aerobic or hypoxic conditions in vitro and assayed for survival of reproductive capacity in vivo. Compared with x-rays, the potential therapeutic gain factor for these neutrons was about 1.5. This work represents a ''radiobiologic calibration'' program which it is suggested should be undertaken before new and unknown fast neutron spectra are used for experimental radiotherapy. The results are compared with biologic studies carried out at high energy fast neutron generators in the United States

  4. Neutron dose to patients treated with high-energy medical accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, P.H.

    2001-01-01

    The neutron dose equivalent received by patients treated with high energy x-ray beams was measured in this research. A total of 13 different medical accelerators were evaluated in terms of the neutron dose equivalent in the patient plane and at the beam center. The neutron dose equivalent at the beam center was found to ranged from 0.02 to 9.4 mSv per Sv of x-ray dose and values from 0.029 to 2.58 mSv per Sv of x-ray were measured in the patient plane. It was concluded that the neutron levels meet the International Electrotechnical Commission standard for the patient plane. It was also concluded that when intensity modulated radiation treatment is conducted the neutron dose equivalent received by the patient will increase by a factor of 2 to 10. (author)

  5. Neutron dose measurements with the GSI ball at high energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehrenbacher, G.; Gutermuth, F.; Radon, T.; Kozlova, E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: At high energy particle accelerators the production of neutron radiation dominates radiation protection. For the radiation survey at accelerators there is a need for reliable detection systems (passive radiation monitors), which can measure the dose for a wide range of neutron energies independently on the beam pulse structure of the produced radiation. In this work a passive neutron dosemeter for the measurement of the ambient dose equivalent is presented. The dosemeter is suitable for measurements of the emerging neutron radiation at accelerators for the whole energy range up to about 10 GeV. The dosemeter consists of a polyethylene sphere, TL elements (pairs of TLD600/700) and an additional lead layer (PE/Pb) in neutron fields at high energy accelerators is investigated in this work. Results of dose measurements which were performed in realistic neutron fields at the high energy accelerator SPS at CERN (CERF facility) and in Cave A at the heavy ion synchrotron SIS at GSI are presented. The results of these measurements are compared with the expected dose values from the neutron spectra determined for the measurement positions at CERF and in Cave A (FLUKA) and with the dosemeter response derived by the calculated response functions (FLUKA) folded with the neutron spectra. The comparisons show that the additional lead layer in the PE/Pb-sphere improves significantly the response of the dosemeter. The response of the PE/Pb-sphere is 40 to 50 % higher at CERF and Cave A in comparison to the bare PE-sphere. At CERF the dose values of the PE/Pb-sphere is about 25 % lower than the expected dose value, whilst for Cave A, a rather good agreement was found (2 % deviation). (author)

  6. Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Don M.; Dudey, Norman D.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

  7. Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, D.M.; Dudey, N.D.

    1976-01-01

    The invention described provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then ''boil off'' or evaporate a neutron

  8. Neutron imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1995-01-01

    Imaging plates have been used in the field of medical diagnosis since long ago, but their usefulness was verified as the two-dimensional detector for analyzing the X-ray crystalline structure of high bio molecules like protein, and they have contributed to the remarkable progress in this field. The great contribution is due to the excellent features, such as the detection efficiency of about 100%, the positional resolution smaller than 0.2 mm, the dynamic range of five digits, and the area of several hundreds mm square. The neutron imaging plates have not yet obtained the sufficient results. It was planned to construct the neutron diffractometer for biological matters, and to put imaging plate neutron detectors (IP-ND) to practical use as the detector. The research on the development of IP-NDs was carried out, and the IPp-NDs having the performance comparable with that for X-ray were able to be produced. Imaging plates are the integral type two-dimensional radiation detector using photostimulated luminescence matters, and their principle is explained. As to neutron imaging plates, the converter, neutron detection efficiency and the flight of secondary particles in photo-stimulated luminescence matters are described. As for the present state of development of neutron imaging plates, the IP-NDs made for trial, the dynamic range, the positional resolution, the detection efficiency and the kinds of converters, and the application of IP-NDs are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Dose determination of Neutron contamination in radiothrapy rooms equiped with high energy linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Anjak, O.

    2014-03-01

    Radiotherapy represents the most widely spread technique to control and treat cancer. To increase the treatment efficiency, high-energy linear accelerators are used. However, applying high energy photon beams leads to a non-negligible dose of neutrons contaminating therapeutic beams. A high-energy (23 MV) linear accelerator (Varian 21EX) was studied. The CR-39 nuclear track detectors (NTDs) were used to study the variation of fast neutron relative intensities around a linear accelerator high energy photon beam and to determined the its variation on the patient plane at 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm from the center of the photon beam was. By increasing the distance from the center of the X-ray beam towards the periphery, the photoneutron dose equivalent decreased rapidly for the fields. Photoneutron intensity and distributions at isocenter level with the field sizes of 40*40 cm'2 at SSD=100cm around 23 MV photon beam using Nuclear Track Detectors were determined. The advantages of CR-39 NTD s over active detectors: 1- there is no pulse pileup problem. 2- no photon interference with neutron measurement. 3- no electronics are required. 4 - less prone to noise and interference. The photoneutron intensities were rapidly decreased as we move away from the isocenter of linear accelerators. As the use of simulation software MCNP match in the results we have obtained through direct measurements and the modeling results using the code MCNP (author).

  10. Verification of the DUCT-III for calculation of high energy neutron streaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masukawa, Fumihiro; Nakano, Hideo; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sasamoto, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tayama, Ryu-ichi; Handa, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Katsumi [Hitachi Engineering Co., Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Hirayama, Hideo [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Shin, Kazuo [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    A large number of radiation streaming calculations under a variety of conditions are required as a part of shielding design for a high energy proton accelerator facility. Since sophisticated methods are very time consuming, simplified methods are employed in many cases. For accuracy evaluation of a simplified code DUCT-III for high energy neutron streaming calculations, two kinds of benchmark problems based on the experiments were analyzed. Through comparison of the DUCT-III calculations with both the measurements and the sophisticated Monte Carlo calculations, DUCT-III was seen reliable enough for applying to the shielding design for the Intense Proton Accelerator Facility. (author)

  11. Verification of the DUCT-III for calculation of high energy neutron streaming

    CERN Document Server

    Masukawa, F; Hayashi, K; Hirayama, H; Nakano, H; Nakashima, H; Sasamoto, N; Shin, K; Tayama, R I

    2003-01-01

    A large number of radiation streaming calculations under a variety of conditions are required as a part of shielding design for a high energy proton accelerator facility. Since sophisticated methods are very time consuming, simplified methods are employed in many cases. For accuracy evaluation of a simplified code DUCT-III for high energy neutron streaming calculations, two kinds of benchmark problems based on the experiments were analyzed. Through comparison of the DUCT-III calculations with both the measurements and the sophisticated Monte Carlo calculations, DUCT-III was seen reliable enough for applying to the shielding design for the Intense Proton Accelerator Facility.

  12. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snigireva, I. [ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  13. The very low angle detector for high-energy inelastic neutron scattering on the VESUVIO spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perelli Cippo, E.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.; Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Very Low Angle Detector (VLAD) bank has been installed on the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. The new device allows for high-energy inelastic neutron scattering measurements, at energies above 1 eV, maintaining the wave vector transfer lower than 10A -1 . This opens a still unexplored region of the kinematical (q,ω) space, enabling new and challenging experimental investigations in condensed matter. This paper describes the main instrumental features of the VLAD device, including instrument design, detector response, and calibration procedure

  14. The very low angle detector for high-energy inelastic neutron scattering on the VESUVIO spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelli Cippo, E.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' G. Occhialini' , Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Pietropaolo, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' G. Occhialini' , CNISM-Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); NAST Center - Nanoscienze-Nanotecnologie-Strumentazione, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@mib.infn.it; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Centro NAST - Nanoscienze-Nanotecnologie-Strumentazione, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire 0QX OX11 (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-01

    The Very Low Angle Detector (VLAD) bank has been installed on the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. The new device allows for high-energy inelastic neutron scattering measurements, at energies above 1 eV, maintaining the wave vector transfer lower than 10A{sup -1}. This opens a still unexplored region of the kinematical (q,{omega}) space, enabling new and challenging experimental investigations in condensed matter. This paper describes the main instrumental features of the VLAD device, including instrument design, detector response, and calibration procedure.

  15. The very low angle detector for high-energy inelastic neutron scattering on the VESUVIO spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelli Cippo, E.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.; Rhodes, N. J.; Schooneveld, E. M.

    2008-05-01

    The Very Low Angle Detector (VLAD) bank has been installed on the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. The new device allows for high-energy inelastic neutron scattering measurements, at energies above 1 eV, maintaining the wave vector transfer lower than 10Å-1. This opens a still unexplored region of the kinematical (q, ω) space, enabling new and challenging experimental investigations in condensed matter. This paper describes the main instrumental features of the VLAD device, including instrument design, detector response, and calibration procedure.

  16. High-energy laser-assisted imaging through vaporizing aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zardecki, A.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1988-02-01

    The degradation of image quality due to multiple scattering in a turbid medium is analyzed various conditions of illumination. The emphasis is on the forward-peaked multiple scattering effects, which can adequately be described by the small-angle approximation. In the case of incoherent illumination, the modulation transfer function (MTF) can be given explicity both in the low- and high-frequency limits. For scattering with smaller degree of anisotropy, the MTF should be imputed numerically by considering numerical by considering solutions to the equation of radiative transfer with a line or point source. As the beam power increases, the turbid medium becomes modified by its interactions with the beam, thus affecting the image resolution. In this nonlinear transport regime (flux levels of the order of 10 6 Wcm 2 and higher) the propagation leads actually to beam narrowing. In the context of the imaging problem, an apparent paradosical situation in which the image of a point source narrows down as the high-energy laser (HEL) beam propagates is discussed. 14 refs., 12 figs

  17. Dose conversion coefficients for high-energy photons, electrons, neutrons and protons

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y; Sato, O; Tanaka, S I; Tsuda, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, N

    2003-01-01

    In the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 Recommendations, radiation weighting factors were introduced in the place of quality factors, the tissue weighting factors were revised, and effective doses and equivalent doses of each tissues and organs were defined as the protection quantities. Dose conversion coefficients for photons, electrons and neutrons based on new ICRP recommendations were cited in the ICRP Publication 74, but the energy ranges of theses data were limited and there are no data for high energy radiations produced in accelerator facilities. For the purpose of designing the high intensity proton accelerator facilities at JAERI, the dose evaluation code system of high energy radiations based on the HERMES code was developed and the dose conversion coefficients of effective dose were evaluated for photons, neutrons and protons up to 10 GeV, and electrons up to 100 GeV. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalent were also evaluated using quality fact...

  18. Simulation of a high energy neutron irradiation facility at beamline 11 of the China Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tairan, Liang [School of Physics and Electronic Information Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Tongliao 028043 (China); Zhiduo, Li [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Wen, Yin, E-mail: wenyin@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Fei, Shen [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Quanzhi, Yu [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Tianjiao, Liang [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-07-11

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) will accommodate 20 neutron beamlines at its first target station. These beamlines serve different purposes, and beamline 11 is designed to analyze the degraded models and damage mechanisms, such as Single Event Effects in electronic components and devices for aerospace electronic systems. This paper gives a preliminary discussion on the scheme of a high energy neutron irradiation experiment at the beamline 11 shutter based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. The neutron source term is generated by calculating the neutrons scattering into beamline 11 with a model that includes the target-moderator-reflector area. Then, the neutron spectrum at the sample position is obtained. The intensity of neutrons with energy of hundreds of MeV is approximately 1E8 neutron/cm{sup 2}/s, which is useful for experiments. The displacement production rate and gas productions are calculated for common materials such as tungsten, tantalum and SS316. The results indicate that the experiment can provide irradiation dose rate ranges from 1E-5 to 1E-4 dpa per operating year. The residual radioactivity is also calculated for regular maintenance work. These results give the basic reference for the experimental design.

  19. Dose levels due to neutrons in the vicinity of high energy medical accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, P.H.; Wood, M.; Sohrabi, M.; Mills, M.; Rodriguez, R.

    1976-01-01

    High energy photons are generated for use in radiation therapy by the decelleration of electrons in metal targets. Fast neutrons are also generated as a result of (γ, n) and (e, e'n) interactions in the target, beam compensator filter, and collimator material. In this work the adsorbed dose to neutrons was measured at the center of a 10 x 10 cm photon beam and 5 cm outside of the beam edge for a number of treatment units. Dose levels due to slow and fast neutrons were also established outside of the treatment rooms and a Bonner sphere neutron spectrometer system was employed to determine the neutron energy spectrum due to stray neutron radiation at each accelerator. For the linac it was found that the neutron dose at the beam center was 0.0039% of the photon dose and values of 0.049% and 0.053% were observed for the Allis Chalmers betatron and the Brown Boveri Betatron. Dose equivalent rates in the range of 0.3 to 22.5 mrem/hr were measured for points outside the treatment rooms when the accelerators were operated at a photon dose rate of 100 rad/min at the treatment position

  20. Neutron radiography using neutron imaging plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chankow, Nares; Wonglee, Sarinrat

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The aims of this research are to study properties of neutron imaging plate, to obtain a suitable condition for neutron radiography and to use the neutron imaging plate for testing of materials nondestructively. The experiments were carried out by using a neutron beam from the Thai Research Reactor TRR-1/M1 at a power of 1.2 MW. A BAS-ND 2040 FUJI neutron imaging plate and a MX125 Kodak X-ray film/Gadolinium neutron converter screen combination were tested for comparison. It was found that the photostimulated light (PSL) read out of the imaging plate was directly proportional to the exposure time. It was also found that radiography with neutron using the imaging plate was approximately 40 times faster than the conventional neutron radiography using x-ray film/Gd converter screen combination. The sensitivity of the imaging plate to gamma-rays was investigated by using gamma-rays from an 192 Ir and a 60 Co radiographic sources. The imaging plate was found to be 5-6 times less sensitive to gamma-rays than a FUJI BAS-MS 2040 gamma-ray imaging plate. Finally, some specimens were selected to be radiographed with neutrons using the imaging plate and the x-ray film/Gd converter screen combination in comparison to x-rays. Parts containing light elements could be clearly observed by the two neutron radiographic techniques. It could be concluded that the image quality from the neutron imaging plate was comparable to the conventional x-ray film/Gd converter screen combination but the exposure time could be approximately reduced by a factor of 40

  1. Resolution of the VESUVIO spectrometer for High-energy Inelastic Neutron Scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imberti, S.; Andreani, C.; Garbuio, V.; Gorini, G.; Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.; Tardocchi, M.

    2005-01-01

    New perspectives for epithermal neutron spectroscopy have been opened up as a result of the development of the Resonance Detector and its use on inverse geometry time-of-flight spectrometers at spallation sources. A special application of the Resonance Detector is the Very Low Angle Detector Bank (VLAD) for the VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS, operating in the angular range 1 deg. -1 ) and high energy (unlimited) transfer -bar ω>500meV, a regime so far inaccessible to experimental studies on condensed matter systems. The HINS measurements complement the Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) measurements performed on VESUVIO in the high wavevector q(20A -1 -1 ) and high energy transfer (-bar ω>1eV), where the short-time single-particle dynamics can be sampled. This paper will revise the main components of the resolution for HINS measurements of VESUVIO. Instrument performances and examples of applications for neutron scattering processes at high energy and at low wavevector transfer are discussed

  2. Characteristics of GaAs MESFET inverters exposed to high energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloss, W.L.; Yamada, W.E.; Young, A.M.; Janousek, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    GaAs MESFET circuits have been exposed to high energy neutrons with fluences ranging from 1x10/sup 14/ n/cm/sup 2/ to 2x10/sup 15/ m/cm/sup 2/. Discrete transistors, inverters, and ring oscillators were characterized at each fluence. While the MESFETs exhibit significant threshold voltage shifts and transconductance and saturation current degradation over this range of neutron fluences, the authors have observed improvement in the DC characteristics of Schottky Diode FET Logic (SDFL) inverters. This unusual result has been successfully simulated using device parameters extracted from FETs damaged by exposure to high energy neutrons. Although the decrease in device transconductance results in an increase in inverter gate delay, as reflected in ring oscillator frequency measurements, the authors conclude that GaAs ICs fabricated from this logic family will remain functional after exposure to extreme neutron fluences. This is a consequence of the observed improvement in inverter noise margin evident in both measured and simulated circuit performance

  3. Neutron-induced electronic failures around a high-energy linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kry, Stephen F.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; White, R. Allen; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Gillin, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: After a new in-vault CT-on-rails system repeatedly malfunctioned following use of a high-energy radiotherapy beam, we investigated the presence and impact of neutron radiation on this electronic system, as well as neutron shielding options. Methods: We first determined the CT scanner's failure rate as a function of the number of 18 MV monitor units (MUs) delivered. We then re-examined the failure rate with both 2.7-cm-thick and 7.6-cm-thick borated polyethylene (BPE) covering the linac head for neutron shielding. To further examine shielding options, as well as to explore which neutrons were relevant to the scanner failure, Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the neutron fluence and spectrum in the bore of the CT scanner. Simulations included BPE covering the CT scanner itself as well as covering the linac head. Results: We found that the CT scanner had a 57% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MUs. While the addition of neutron shielding to the accelerator head reduced this risk of failure, the benefit was minimal and even 7.6 cm of BPE was still associated with a 29% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MU. This shielding benefit was achieved regardless of whether the linac head or CT scanner was shielded. Additionally, it was determined that fast neutrons were primarily responsible for the electronic failures. Conclusions: As illustrated by the CT-on-rails system in the current study, physicists should be aware that electronic systems may be highly sensitive to neutron radiation. Medical physicists should therefore monitor electronic systems that have not been evaluated for potential neutron sensitivity. This is particularly relevant as electronics are increasingly common in the therapy vault and newer electronic systems may exhibit increased sensitivity.

  4. Performance of a MICROMEGAS-based TPC in a high-energy neutron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, L.; Manning, B.; Bowden, N. S.; Bundgaard, J.; Casperson, R. J.; Cebra, D. A.; Classen, T.; Duke, D. L.; Gearhart, J.; Greife, U.; Hagmann, C.; Heffner, M.; Hensle, D.; Higgins, D.; Isenhower, D.; King, J.; Klay, J. L.; Geppert-Kleinrath, V.; Loveland, W.; Magee, J. A.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Sangiorgio, S.; Seilhan, B.; Schmitt, K. T.; Tovesson, F.; Towell, R. S.; Walsh, N.; Watson, S.; Yao, L.; Younes, W.

    2018-02-01

    The MICROMEGAS (MICRO-MEsh GAseous Structure) charge amplification structure has found wide use in many detection applications, especially as a gain stage for the charge readout of Time Projection Chambers (TPCs). Here we report on the behavior of a MICROMEGAS TPC when operated in a high-energy (up to 800 MeV) neutron beam. It is found that neutron-induced reactions can cause discharges in some drift gas mixtures that are stable in the absence of the neutron beam. The discharges result from recoil ions close to the MICROMEGAS that deposit high specific ionization density and have a limited diffusion time. For a binary drift gas, increasing the percentage of the molecular component (quench gas) relative to the noble component and operating at lower pressures generally improves stability.

  5. Tolerance of human spinal cord to high-energy p(66)Be(49) neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, L.; Haken, R.K.T.; Mansell, J.A.; Yalavarthi, D.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Awschalom, M.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 76 patients with cancer of the head and neck have been irradiated at the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility using high-energy neutrons. Dose, time and cord-length factors were determined for each patient from their individual treatment plans. Cord doses ranged from 5 to 16 Gy in 8 to 24 fractions over 6 to 70 days. The treated lengths were between 5 and 15 cm. No myelopathy was seen during follow-up periods ranging from 2 to 6 years. By comparing these observations with published data, the upper and lower limits for spinal cord tolerance to neutrons can be determined. There is no apparent risk of injury with cord doses under 13 Gy

  6. Resolution of the VESUVIO spectrometer for High-energy Inelastic Neutron Scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imberti, S.; Andreani, C.; Garbuio, V.; Gorini, G.; Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.; Tardocchi, M.

    2005-11-01

    New perspectives for epithermal neutron spectroscopy have been opened up as a result of the development of the Resonance Detector and its use on inverse geometry time-of-flight spectrometers at spallation sources. A special application of the Resonance Detector is the Very Low Angle Detector Bank (VLAD) for the VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS, operating in the angular range 1∘500 meV, a regime so far inaccessible to experimental studies on condensed matter systems. The HINS measurements complement the Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) measurements performed on VESUVIO in the high wavevector q(20 Å-11 eV), where the short-time single-particle dynamics can be sampled. This paper will revise the main components of the resolution for HINS measurements of VESUVIO. Instrument performances and examples of applications for neutron scattering processes at high energy and at low wavevector transfer are discussed.

  7. Radiation protection metrology at a high-energy neutron therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnett, D.E.; Sherwin, A.G.; More, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    A radiation protection survey has been carried out at a high-energy neutron therapy facility using a combination of different detectors and counters. Included in the survey were measurements with a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), a rem meter, a large volume ionisation chamber (LVI) and a Geiger counter. Dose equivalent rates, normalised to a proton beam current of 25 μA, of between 1 μSv.h -1 and 0.7 Sv.h -1 were recorded depending on the location. In general the results confirm the tendency of the rem meter to over-read in fields consisting mainly of low energy neutrons and illustrate the advantages of the diagnostic and gamma discriminating properties of the TEPC. The LVI-Geiger system was found to be the least favourable combination of dosemeters, substantially under-reading and being unable to estimate the neutron dose rate at levels below about 32 μGy.h -1 . (author)

  8. The Clatterbridge high-energy neutron therapy facility: specification and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnett, D.E.; Blake, S.W.; Shaw, J.E.; Bewley, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    A high energy neutron therapy facility has been installed at the Douglas Cyclotron Centre, Clatterbridge Hospital Merseyside, to extend M.R.C. clinical trials of fast neutrons. The neutron beam is produced by bombarding a beryllium target with 62 MeV protons. The target is isocentrically mounted with potential for 360 0 rotation, with a fully variable collimator, giving a range of rectilinear field sizes from 5 cm x 5 cm to 30 cm x 30 cm. Basic neutron beam data including output, field flatness, penumbra and depth-dose data have been measured. For a 10 cm x 10 cm field, 50% depth dose occurs at 16.2 cm in water and output is 1.63 cGy μ A -1 min -1 at maximum dose depth. Effectiveness of the target shielding and neutron-induced radioactivity in the treatment head were also measured. It is concluded that the equipment meets design specifications and fully satisfies criticisms of earlier neutron therapy equipment. A full radiation survey showed that radiation levels present no significant staff hazard. (UK)

  9. Neutron yield from thick lead target by the action of high-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noga, V.I.; Ranyuk, Yu.N.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Sorokin, P.V.

    1978-01-01

    The results are presented of studying the complete neutron yield from a lead target bombarded by high-energy electrons. Neutrons were recorded by the method of radio-active indicators. The dependence of the neutron yield on the target thickness varying from 0.2 to 8 cm was obtained at the energies of electrons of 230 and 1200 MeV. The neutron yield for the given energies with the target of 6 cm in thickness is in the range of saturation and is 0.1 +-0.03 and 0.65+-0.22 (neutr./MeV.el.), respectively. The neutron angular distributions were measured for different thicknesses of targets at the 201, 230 and 1200 MeV electrons. Within the error limits the angular distributions are isotropic. The dependence of neutron yield on the electron energy was examined for a 3 cm thick target. In the energy range of 100-1200 MeV these values are related by a linear dependence with the proportionality coefficient C=3x10 -4 (neutr./MeV.el.)

  10. Monitor units are not predictive of neutron dose for high-energy IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hälg Roger A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the substantial increase in beam-on time of high energy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (>10 MV techniques to deliver the same target dose compared to conventional treatment techniques, an increased dose of scatter radiation, including neutrons, is delivered to the patient. As a consequence, an increase in second malignancies may be expected in the future with the application of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. It is commonly assumed that the neutron dose equivalent scales with the number of monitor units. Methods Measurements of neutron dose equivalent were performed for an open and an intensity-modulated field at four positions: inside and outside of the treatment field at 0.2 cm and 15 cm depth, respectively. Results It was shown that the neutron dose equivalent, which a patient receives during an intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment, does not scale with the ratio of applied monitor units relative to an open field irradiation. Outside the treatment volume at larger depth 35% less neutron dose equivalent is delivered than expected. Conclusions The predicted increase of second cancer induction rates from intensity-modulated treatment techniques can be overestimated when the neutron dose is simply scaled with monitor units.

  11. Imaging with cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, E.H.; Kaestner, A.; Josic, L.; Hartmann, S.; Mannes, D.

    2011-01-01

    Neutrons for imaging purposes are provided mainly from thermal beam lines at suitable facilities around the world. The access to cold neutrons is presently limited to very few places only. However, many challenging options for imaging with cold neutrons have been found out, given by the interaction behavior of the observed materials with neutrons in the cold energy range (3-10 A). For absorbing materials, the interaction probability increases proportionally with the wavelength with the consequence of more contrast but less transmission with cold neutrons. Many materials are predominantly scattering neutrons, in particular most of crystalline structural materials. In these cases, cold neutrons play an important role by covering the energy range of the most important Bragg edges given by the lattice planes of the crystallites. This particular behavior can be used for at least two important aspects-choosing the right energy of the initial beam enables to have a material more or less transparent, and a direct macroscopic visualization of the crystalline structure and its change in a manufacturing process. Since 2006, PSI operates its second beam line for neutron imaging, where cold neutrons are provided from a liquid deuterium cold source (operated at 25 K). It has been designed to cover the most current aspects in neutron imaging research with the help of high flexibility. This has been done with changeable inlet apertures, a turbine based velocity selector, two beam positions and variable detector systems, satisfying the demands of the individual investigation. The most important detection system was found to be a micro-tomography system that enables studies in the presently best spatial resolution. In this case, the high contrast from the sample interaction process and the high detection probability for the cold neutrons combines in an ideal combination for the best possible performance. Recently, it was found out that the energy selective studies might become a

  12. Localized Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer Treated with High Energy Neutrons and Chemotherapy at Fermilab - Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saroja, K. R. [Unlisted, US, IL; Cohen, Lionel [Unlisted, US, IL; Hendrickson, Frank R. [Unlisted, US, IL; Mansell, JoAnne [Fermilab

    1990-01-01

    Between January 1985 and July 1989 a total of thirty-eight patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer were treated with high energy neutrons at Fermilab. Twenty-one patients received only neutrons and seventeen were given chemotherapy in addition, either concurrently or subsequently following the completion of neutron irradiation. This is a retrospective study. Data were analyzed for tolerance, complications and survival. Three of the twenty-one (14%) patients who received only neutron beam therapy developed Grade ID or greater complications in the RTOG/EORTC scale. The median survival was 6.4 months. One of these patients is alive 10 months post treatment. Of seventeen patients who also received chemotherapy, five (29%) had severe complications. However, median survival was 13.5 months. Four of these seventeen patients are still alive at the time of this analysis. The preliminary results show that there is improvement in the survival of patients treated with combined neutron irradiation and chemotherapy. A pilot study to further evaluate these results in a larger group of patients is underway. Details of complications and chemotherapy regimen will be preseqted.

  13. Experimental characterization of the neutron spectra generated by a high-energy clinical LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amgarou, K., E-mail: khalil.amgarou@uab.e [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, F-13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lacoste, V.; Martin, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, F-13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2011-02-11

    The production of unwanted neutrons by electron linear accelerators (LINACs) has attracted a special attention since the early 50s. The renewed interest in this topic during the last years is due mainly to the increased use of such machines in radiotherapy. Specially, in most of developing countries where many old teletherapy irradiators, based on {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs radioactive sources, are being replaced with new LINAC units. The main objective of this work is to report the results of an experimental characterization of the neutron spectra generated by a high-energy clinical LINAC. Measurements were carried out, considering four irradiation configurations, by means of our recently developed passive Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS) using pure gold activation foils as central detectors. This system offers the possibility to measure neutrons over a wide energy range (from thermal up to a few MeV) at pulsed, intense and complex mixed n-{gamma} fields. A two-step unfolding method that combines the NUBAY and MAXED codes was applied to derive the final neutron spectra as well as their associated integral quantities (in terms of total neutron fluence and ambient dose equivalent rates) and fluence-averaged energies.

  14. FLUKA simulations of a moderated reduced weight high energy neutron detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biju, K., E-mail: bijusivolli@gmail.com [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tripathy, S.P.; Sunil, C.; Sarkar, P.K. [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2012-08-01

    Neutron response of the systems containing high density polyethylene (HDPE) spheres coupled with different external metallic converters has been studied using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation code. A diameter of 17.8 cm (7 in.) of the moderating sphere is found to be optimum to obtain the maximum response when used with the neutron converter shells like W, Pb and Zr. Enhancement ratios of the neutron response due to the induced (n, xn) reactions in the outer converters made of W, Pb and Zr are analyzed. It is observed that the enhancement in the response by 1 cm thick Zr shell is comparable to that of 1 cm thick Pb in the energy region of 10-50 MeV. An appreciable enhancement is observed in the case of Zr converter for the higher energy neutrons. Thus, by reducing the dimension of the moderating sphere and using a Zr converter shell, the weight of the system reduces to 10 kg which is less compared to the presently available extended high energy neutron rem meters. The normalized energy dependent ambient dose equivalent response of the zirconium based rem counter (ZReC) at high energies is found to be in good agreement with the energy differential H{sup Low-Asterisk }(10) values suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Based on this study, it is proposed that a rem meter made of 17.8 cm diameter HDPE sphere with 1 cm thick Zr can be used effectively and conveniently for routine monitoring in the accelerator environment.

  15. High energy proton simulation of 14-MeV neutron damage in Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.; Bunch, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    High-energy protons are a potentially useful tool for simulating the radiation damage produced by 14-MeV neutrons in CTR materials. A comparison is given of calculations and measurements of the relative damage effectiveness of these two types of radiation in single-crystal Al 2 O 3 . The experiments make use of the prominent absorption band at 206 nm as an index to lattice damage, on the assumption that peak absorption is proportional to the concentration of lattice vacancies. The induced absorption is measured for incident proton energies ranging from 5 to 15 MeV and for 14-MeV neutrons. Recoil-energy spectra are calculated for elastic and inelastic scattering using published angular distributions. Recoil-energy spectra also are calculated for the secondary alpha particles and 12 C nuclei produced by (p,p'α) reactions on 16 O. The recoil spectra are converted to damage-energy spectra and then integrated to yield the damage-energy cross section at each proton energy and for 14 MeV neutrons. A comparison of the calculations with experimental results suggests that damage energy, at least at high energies, is a reasonable criterion for estimating this type of radiation damage. (auth)

  16. High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) Team Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1998-01-01

    This report covers activities on the above grant for the period through the end of September 1997. The work originally proposed to be performed under a three-year award was converted at that time to a two-year award for the remainder of the period, and is now funded under award NAGS-4027 through Goddard Space Flight Center. The P.I. is a co-investigator on the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) team, selected as a Small-Class Explorer (SNMX) mission in 1997. He has also been a participant in the Space Physics Roadmap Planning Group. Our research has been strongly influenced by the NASA mission opportunities related to these activities. The report is subdivided into four sections, each dealing with a different aspect of our research within this guiding theme. Personnel involved in this research at UAH include the P.I. and graduate students Michele Montgomery and Amy Winebarger. Much of the work has been carried out in collaboration with investigators at other institutions, as detailed below. Attachment: Laser wakefield acceleration and astrophysical applications.

  17. Workshop on Non-Imaging Cherenkov at High Energy

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The non-Imaging Cherenkov air shower measurement technique holds great promise in furthering our understanding the Knee-to-Ankle region of the cosmic ray spectrum. In particular, this technique offers a unique way to determine the evolution of the cosmic ray nuclear composition, and an example is given by the recent spectrum results of the Tunka Collaboration. With this in mind, we are organizing a workshop, to be held at the University of Utah, to bring together the various practitioners of this cosmic ray measurement technique to share simulations, analyses, detector designs, and past experimental results amongst the community. The workshop will also be in support of our effort, NICHE, to extend the reach of the TA/TALE detector systems down to the Knee. We anticipate that the workshop will result in a white paper on the scientific importance of these high-energy cosmic ray measurements and on using the Cherenkov technique to accomplish them. Our goal is to have contributions from members of the previous ge...

  18. Imaging with Polarized Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kardjilov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their zero charge, neutrons are able to pass through thick layers of matter (typically several centimeters while being sensitive to magnetic fields due to their intrinsic magnetic moment. Therefore, in addition to the conventional attenuation contrast image, the magnetic field inside and around a sample can be visualized by detecting changes of polarization in a transmitted beam. The method is based on the spatially resolved measurement of the cumulative precession angles of a collimated, polarized, monochromatic neutron beam that traverses a magnetic field or sample.

  19. Development of integrated-type dosimeter responsive to high energy neutrons (2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawamura, Teruko; Murai, Ikuo; Abe, Masashi; Uoyama, Kazuya; Das, Mala [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Tuda, Shuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The response of superheated drop detectors or bubble detectors (BDs) was measured for quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in the 40-75 MeV range. The experiments were performed at the AVF cyclotron facility, TAKASAKI Ion Accelerator for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The measured dose sensitivities showed to be lowered to about a half the nominal sensitivity. A lead-breeder introduced to extend response to the high energy region were investigated and compared with Monte Carlo calculations by MCNPX code. (author)

  20. Contribution to the development of a primary standard for high energy neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancaux, M.

    1983-12-01

    A tissue equivalent calorimeter, made of Shonka A-150 plastic, has been constructed in order to create a primary standard for high energy neutrons and to establish a calibration procedure for ionization chambers used in neutrontherapy. After a detailed description of the calorimeter and the associated measuring system, the preliminary tests are presented, in particular, the evolution of the response as a function of accumulated dose. The measurements of the total absorbed dose (n + γ) by calorimetry in a neutron beam, in order to determine chambers' calibration factors in terms of absorbed dose to A-150 plastic, have been performed at the Neutrontherapy Unit of the Centre Hospitalier Regional d'Orleans. The uncertainty in the determination of the total absorbed dose to the tissu equivalent material using the new procedure is 3% lower than that obtained with the usual procedure, derived from an exposure calibration [fr

  1. High energy nuclear data evaluations for neutron-, proton-, and photon-induced reactions at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Ouk; Chang, Jong Hwa; Kim, Doo Hwan; Lee, Jeong Yeon; Han, Yinlu; Sukhovitski, Efrem Sh.

    2001-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is building high energy neutron-, proton-, and photon-induced nuclear data libraries for energies up to hundreds MeV in response to nuclear data needs from various R and Ds and applications. The librares provide nuclear data needed for the accelerator-driven transmutation of nuclear waste and radiation transport simulations of cancer radiotherapy. The neutron library currently has 10 isotopes such as C-12, N-14, O-16, Al-27, Si-28, Ca-40, Fe-56, Ni-58, Zr-90, Sn-120, and Pb-208 for energies from 20 up to 400 MeV. The proton nuclear data were evaluated in a consistent manner with the neutron case, using the same nuclear model parameters. In addition to the same isotopes included in the neutron library, the proton library has 70 extra isotopes of 24 elements ranging from nitrogen to lead up to 150 MeV for which the evaluations are focused on the medical and activation analyses applications. The photonuclear data library has been built along with international collaboration by participating in the IAEA's Coordinated Research Project (CRP) which ended last year. Currently the KAERI photonuclear library includes 143 isotopes of 39 elements

  2. Monte Carlo simulation for neutron yield produced by bombarding thick targets with high energy heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oranj, Leila Mokhtari; Oh, Joo Hee; Yoon, Moo Hyun; Lee, Hee Seock [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    One of radiation shielding issues at heavy-ion accelerator facilities is to estimate neutron production by primary heavy ions. A few Monte Carlo transport codes such as FLUKA and PHITS can work with primary heavy ions. Recently IBS/RISP((Rare Isotope Science Project) started to design a high-energy, high-power rare isotope accelerator complex for nuclear physics, medical and material science and applications. There is a lack of experimental and simulated data about the interaction of major beam, {sup 238}U with materials. For the shielding design of the end of first accelerating section section, we calculate a differential neutron yield using the FLUKA code for the interaction of 18.5 MeV/u uranium ion beam with thin carbon stripper of 1.3 μm). The benchmarking studies were also done to prove the yield calculation for 400 MeV/n {sup 131}Xe and other heavy ions. In this study, the benchmarking for Xe-C, Xe-Cu, Xe-Al, Xe-Pb and U-C, other interactions were performed using the FLUKA code. All of results show that the FLUKA can evaluate the heavy ion induced reaction with good uncertainty. For the evaluation of neutron source term, the calculated neutron yields are shown in Fig. 2. The energy of Uranium ion beam is only 18.5 MeV/u, but the energy of produced secondary neutrons was extended over 100 MeV. So the neutron shielding and the damage by those neutrons is expected to be serious. Because of thin stripper, the neutron intensity at forward direction was high. But the the intensity of produced secondary photons was relatively low and mostly the angular property was isotropic. For the detail shielding design of stripper section of RISP rare istope accelerator, the benchmarking study and preliminary evaluation of neutron source term from uranium beam have been carried out using the FLUKA code. This study is also compared with the evaluation results using the PHITS code performed coincidently. Both studies shows that two monte carlo codes can give a good results for

  3. Fast neutron radiography using photoluminescent imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rant, J.; Kristof, E.; Balasko, M.; Stade, J.

    1999-01-01

    Fast neutron radiography (FNR) and resonance neutron radiography (RNR) are complementary to the conventional radiography with high energy gamma-rays or brems-strahlung radiation used for the inspection of thick metal objects. In both non-destructive methods, the contrast sensitivity and the penetration power can be improved by using higher energy neutrons. At present direct techniques based either n Solid State Nuclear Track detectors (SSNTDs) or scintillating screens and transfer techniques using activation threshold detectors and radiographic films are applied for the detection of fast neutron images. Rather low detection sensitivity of film and SSNTD based fast neutron imaging methods and also rather poor inherent image contrast of SSNTD pose a problem for FNR in the fast neutron energy region 1-15 MeV interesting for NDT. For more efficient detection of fast neutron images the use of novel highly sensitive photoluminescent imaging plates (IP) in combination with threshold at the KFKI research reactor. The conventional IP produced by FUJI Photo Film Co. for the detection of beta and X-ray radiation were used. The threshold activation detectors were the reactions 115 In(n, n') 115m In, 64 Zn(n,p) 64 Cu, 56 Fe(n, p) 56 Mn, 24 Mg(n, p) 24 Na and 27 Al(n, α) 24 Na. These threshold reactions cover the fast neutron energy region between 0,7 MeV and 12 MeV. Pure, commercially available metals 0,1 mm to 0,25 mm thick made of In, Zn, Fe, Mg and Al were used as converter screens. The very high sensitivity of IP, the linearity of their response over 5 decades of exposure dose and the high dynamic digitalisation latitude enabled fast neutron radiography of image quality comparable to the quality of thermal NR. In our experimental conditions (φ n ∼ 10 8 n/cm 2 s, R Cd ∼ 2) the neutron exposure and IP exposure periods were still practical and comparable to the half life of the corresponding reaction products (half an hour to several hours). Even with the 27 Al(n.α) 24

  4. Inter-comparison of High Energy Files (neutron-induced, from 20 to 150 MeV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Fukahori, Tokio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    Recent new applications using accelerator-driven system require well-tested nuclear data when modeling the interaction of neutrons above 20 MeV. This work is aimed to review evaluation methods applied in currently available neutron high energy files above 20 to 150 MeV, to inter-compare their evaluated cross sections on some important isotopes, and to analyze resulting discrepancies. Through out these, integrities and consistencies of the high energy files are checked, applicability of physics models and evaluation methodologies are assessed, and some directions are derived to improve and expand current JENDL High Energy File. (author)

  5. In vivo transcriptome modulation after low dose of high energy neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendola, R; Fratini, E; Piscitelli, M; Sallustio, D E [ENEA, BAS BIOTEC MED, Roma (Italy); Angelone, M; Pillon, M [ENEA, FUS TEC, Frascati (Italy); Chiani, F; Licursi, V; Negri, R [Universita La Sapienza, Roma (Italy). Dip. Biologia Cellulare e dello Sviluppo

    2007-07-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: This project aims to the identification of an hypothetical transcriptome modulation of mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes and skin after exposure to high energy neutron in vivo. Positive candidate genes isolated from mice in in vivo experiments will be selected and evaluated for both radioprotection issues dealing with cosmic ray exposure, and for biomedical issues mainly for low doses and non-cancer effects. Methods: High energy neutron irradiation is performed at the ENEA Frascati, neutron generator facilities (FNG), specifically dedicated to biological samples. FNG is a linear electrostatic accelerator that produces up to 1.0 x 10{sup 11} n/s 14 MeV neutrons via the D-T nuclear reaction. The dose-rate applied for this study is of 0.7 cGy/min. The functional genomic approach has been performed on six animals for each experimental points: un-irradiated; 20 cGy, 6 hours and 24 hours delayed time after exposure. Preliminarily, a pool of total RNA is evaluated on commercial micro-arrays containing large collections of mus musculus cDNAs. Statistical filtering and functional clustering of the data is carried out using dedicated software packages. Results: Candidate genes are selected on the basis of responsiveness to 20 cGy of exposure, with a defined temporal regulation. We plan to organize a systematic screen focused on genes responding to our selection criteria, in in vivo mouse experiments, and correlate their differential expression to the human counterparts. A specific cross species database will be created with all the functional information available in standardized format (MIAME: minimal information about micro-arrays experiments). Conclusions: A lack of information on in vivo experiments is still evident for low doses exposure, especially for neutron of cosmic interest. Individual susceptibility, extensive number of animals to be processed, lack of standardization methodologies are among problems to be solved

  6. Pilot study for the implantation of a high-energy neutrons field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Jose Julio de O.; Mendes, Adriane C.; Federico, Claudio A.; Passaro, Angelo; Gaspar, Felipe de B.; Pazianotto, Mauricio T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work a theoretical study is presented for the implementation of a high-energy neutron field (14.1 MeV) produced by a neutron generator type DT (deuterium-tritium), to be installed in the premises of the Laboratorio de Radiacoes Ionizantes (LRI) of the Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv). This evaluation was performed by means of computer simulation by Monte Carlo method, using the computer code MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle). The neutron spectra were simulated computationally for pre-selected points of the installation, allowing to estimate the beam quality in the positions provided for use of the direct beam. These simulations also allow assist the basement of a project to install the consistent D-T generator with the guidelines for radiation protection and radiation safety standards determined by the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), by estimating the dose rates provided in accessible points to Individuals Occupationally Exposed (IOE) in the facility. The computational determination of spectra, fluxes and doses produced in different positions previously selected within and outside the laboratory, will serve as guidance from previous studies for the future installation of this generator in the physical facilities of the LRI

  7. Energy dependent neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Hitterman, R.L.; Rhodes, E.

    1990-01-01

    A waste package consisting of a container and high-level nuclear waste is being developed for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being studied as a potential site for the underground high-level nuclear waste repository. A major consideration for choosing Yucca Mountain is the presence of zeolite in tertiary ash-flow tuffs. The presence of zeolites could provide geological barriers to radionuclide migration. The suitability of the tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain for the repository is being investigated since the properties of the environment around a waste site must be well characterized to reliably predict performance. The results of experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to assess the possibility of imaging water in Nevada Test Site welded tuff samples showed that nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is not viable. This leaves neutron tomography and high-frequency electromagnetic geotomography as possibilities for the practical imaging of distribution and flow of fluids in rock, including tuff specimens. Water tracers are needed in electromagnetic tomography techniques since the contrast for detecting water in cracks of tuff is lower than in granite because of the higher porosity in tuff. The results of preliminary testing with geotomography by LLNL indicates relatively low spatial resolution. More sensitive techniques for detecting water is needed. This paper describes preliminary experiments to apply pulsed neutrons to image water in a sample of tuff. 3 refs., 3 figs

  8. Personal dosimetry in a mixed field of high energy muons and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossairt, J.D.; Elwyn, A.J.

    1986-11-01

    High energy accelerators quite often emit muons. These particles behave in matter as would heavy electrons and are thus difficult to attenuate with shielding in many situations. Hence, these muons can be a source of radiation exposure to personnel and suitable methods of measuring the absorbed dose received to these people is obviously required. In practical situations, such muon radiation fields are often mixed with neutrons, well-known to be an even more troublesome particle species with respect to dosimetry. In this paper, we report on fluence measurements made in such a mixed radiation field and a comparison of dosimeter responses. We conclude that commercial self-reading dosimeters and film badges provided an adequate measure of the absorbed dose due to muons

  9. The Biological Effect of Fast Neutrons and High-Energy Protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskalev, Ju.I.; Petrovich, I.K.; Strel'cova, V.N.

    1964-01-01

    The paper gives the results of comparative experiments on the effects of fast neutrons and high-energy protons (500 MeV) on life expectancy, peripheral blood, incidence and rate of appearance of tumours in the rat as a function of administered dose and time of observation. The neutron experiment was performed on 573 and the proton experiment on 490 white rats. The animals irradiated with fast neutrons were given doses between 8.5 and 510 rad, and those irradiated with protons received doses between 28 and 1008 rad. The effective doses for the acute, sub-acute and chronic forms of sickness were established for fast neutrons and for protons. LD 50/30 for neutrons was 408 and for protons 600 rad, and the corresponding LD 50 / 120 values were 380 and 600 rad. The conditions governing rat mortality were analysed both in the early and the later stages of the experiment. It is shown that the average life expectancy of rats irradiated with fast neutrons does not depend on sex. The shape of the dose-effect curve for the various peripheral-blood indexes is strongly dependent not only on the radiosensitivity of the blood cells in question but also on the time of observation. It may change greatly in time for one and the same index. A considerable time after irradiation with either fast neutrons or protons, benign and malignant tumours appear in different tissues of the rats, including the haemopoeitic tissues, mammary glands, pituitary, uterus, ovaries, prostate gland, testicles, liver, kidneys, lungs, gastro-intestinal tract, subcutaneous tissue, lymph nodes, urinary bladder, etc. The over-all incidence of tumours and the number of cases of multi centred neoplasms in females are two to three times higher than in males. The minimum tumour dose for the mammary glands with neutron irradiation is apparently rather less than 42.5 rad. The maximum incidence of tumours of the pituitary is found after irradiation with a dose of 42.5 rad.- At this same dose leucosis and tumour of the

  10. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition Hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multipinhole x-ray imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Dewald, E D; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; MacGowan, B J; Maddox, B R; Milovich, J L; Prasad, R R; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Thomas, C A

    2010-10-01

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside Hohlraums is important to the national ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes with four independent filter combinations to image entire Hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87× during the Hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with Hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 10-40 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser-plasma interactions rather than from Hohlraum hydrodynamics.

  11. High-energy neutron yields in interactions of carbon ions with 114Sn and 124Sn nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, M.B.; Gavrilov, B.P.; Kovalenko, S.S.; Kozulin, Eh.M.; Mozhaev, A.N.; Oganesyan, Yu.Ts.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.Eh.

    1984-01-01

    The measurements of the yields of neutrons (energy more than 5 MeV) emitted in the interactions of carbon-12 ions (9 MeV/nucl.) with nuclei of two tin isotopes are conducted. The results obtained prove the effect of nucleon composition of a nucleus on the process of formation of high-energy neutrons. To clarify the concrete interaction mechanism it is necessary to perform systematic research for a number of isotopes differing in the relation of the number of neutrons and protons and binding energies of the last neutron

  12. A Benchmarking Study of High Energy Carbon Ion Induced Neutron Using Several Monte Carlo Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Oh, J. H.; Jung, N. S.; Lee, H. S. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Y. S.; Kwon, D. Y.; Kim, Y. M. [Catholic Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Oranj, L. Mokhtari [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the benchmarking study was done for the representative particle interaction of the heavy ion accelerator, especially carbon-induced reaction. The secondary neutron is an important particle in the shielding analysis to define the source term and penetration ability of radiation fields. The performance of each Monte Carlo codes were verified for selected codes: MCNPX 2.7, PHITS 2.64 and FLUKA 2011.2b.6. For this benchmarking study, the experimental data of Kurosawa et al. in the SINBAD database of NEA was applied. The calculated results of the differential neutron yield produced from several materials irradiated by high energy carbon beam reproduced the experimental data well in small uncertainty. But the MCNPX results showed large discrepancy with experimental data, especially at the forward angle. The calculated results were lower a little than the experimental and it was clear in the cases of lower incident carbon energy, thinner target and forward angle. As expected, the influence of different model was found clearly at forward direction. In the shielding analysis, these characteristics of each Monte Carlo codes should be considered and utilized to determine the safety margin of a shield thickness.

  13. A Benchmarking Study of High Energy Carbon Ion Induced Neutron Using Several Monte Carlo Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. H.; Oh, J. H.; Jung, N. S.; Lee, H. S.; Shin, Y. S.; Kwon, D. Y.; Kim, Y. M.; Oranj, L. Mokhtari

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the benchmarking study was done for the representative particle interaction of the heavy ion accelerator, especially carbon-induced reaction. The secondary neutron is an important particle in the shielding analysis to define the source term and penetration ability of radiation fields. The performance of each Monte Carlo codes were verified for selected codes: MCNPX 2.7, PHITS 2.64 and FLUKA 2011.2b.6. For this benchmarking study, the experimental data of Kurosawa et al. in the SINBAD database of NEA was applied. The calculated results of the differential neutron yield produced from several materials irradiated by high energy carbon beam reproduced the experimental data well in small uncertainty. But the MCNPX results showed large discrepancy with experimental data, especially at the forward angle. The calculated results were lower a little than the experimental and it was clear in the cases of lower incident carbon energy, thinner target and forward angle. As expected, the influence of different model was found clearly at forward direction. In the shielding analysis, these characteristics of each Monte Carlo codes should be considered and utilized to determine the safety margin of a shield thickness

  14. Neutron Imaging at LANSCE—From Cold to Ultrafast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald O. Nelson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, neutron radiography and tomography have been applied at different beam lines at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE, covering a very wide neutron energy range. The field of energy-resolved neutron imaging with epi-thermal neutrons, utilizing neutron absorption resonances for contrast as well as quantitative density measurements, was pioneered at the Target 1 (Lujan center, Flight Path 5 beam line and continues to be refined. Applications include: imaging of metallic and ceramic nuclear fuels, fission gas measurements, tomography of fossils and studies of dopants in scintillators. The technique provides the ability to characterize materials opaque to thermal neutrons and to utilize neutron resonance analysis codes to quantify isotopes to within 0.1 atom %. The latter also allows measuring fuel enrichment levels or the pressure of fission gas remotely. More recently, the cold neutron spectrum at the ASTERIX beam line, also located at Target 1, was used to demonstrate phase contrast imaging with pulsed neutrons. This extends the capabilities for imaging of thin and transparent materials at LANSCE. In contrast, high-energy neutron imaging at LANSCE, using unmoderated fast spallation neutrons from Target 4 [Weapons Neutron Research (WNR facility] has been developed for applications in imaging of dense, thick objects. Using fast (ns, time-of-flight imaging, enables testing and developing imaging at specific, selected MeV neutron energies. The 4FP-60R beam line has been reconfigured with increased shielding and new, larger collimation dedicated to fast neutron imaging. The exploration of ways in which pulsed neutron beams and the time-of-flight method can provide additional benefits is continuing. We will describe the facilities and instruments, present application examples and recent results of all these efforts at LANSCE.

  15. Imaging Galactic Dark Matter with High-Energy Cosmic Neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos A; Kheirandish, Ali; Vincent, Aaron C

    2017-11-17

    We show that the high-energy cosmic neutrinos seen by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory can be used to probe interactions between neutrinos and the dark sector that cannot be reached by current cosmological methods. The origin of the observed neutrinos is still unknown, and their arrival directions are compatible with an isotropic distribution. This observation, together with dedicated studies of Galactic plane correlations, suggests a predominantly extragalactic origin. Interactions between this isotropic extragalactic flux and the dense dark matter (DM) bulge of the Milky Way would thus lead to an observable imprint on the distribution, which would be seen by IceCube as (i) slightly suppressed fluxes at energies below a PeV and (ii) a deficit of events in the direction of the Galactic center. We perform an extended unbinned likelihood analysis using the four-year high-energy starting event data set to constrain the strength of DM-neutrino interactions for two model classes. We find that, in spite of low statistics, IceCube can probe regions of the parameter space inaccessible to current cosmological methods.

  16. Applicability of the two-angle differential method to response measurement of neutron-sensitive devices at the RCNP high-energy neutron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Akihiko, E-mail: aki-masuda@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tetsuro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Iwamoto, Yosuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hagiwara, Masayuki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Satoh, Daiki; Sato, Tatsuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Iwase, Hiroshi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yashima, Hiroshi [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori, Sennan, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Nakane, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nishiyama, Jun [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Shima, Tatsushi; Tamii, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Harano, Hideki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Nakamura, Takashi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

    2017-03-21

    Quasi-monoenergetic high-energy neutron fields induced by {sup 7}Li(p,n) reactions are used for the response evaluation of neutron-sensitive devices. The quasi-monoenergetic high-energy field consists of high-energy monoenergetic peak neutrons and unwanted continuum neutrons down to the low-energy region. A two-angle differential method has been developed to compensate for the effect of the continuum neutrons in the response measurements. In this study, the two-angle differential method was demonstrated for Bonner sphere detectors, which are typical examples of moderator-based neutron-sensitive detectors, to investigate the method's applicability and its dependence on detector characteristics. Experiments were performed under 96–387 MeV quasi-monoenergetic high-energy neutron fields at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The measurement results for large high-density polyethylene (HDPE) sphere detectors agreed well with Monte Carlo calculations, which verified the adequacy of the two-angle differential method. By contrast, discrepancies were observed in the results for small HDPE sphere detectors and metal-induced sphere detectors. The former indicated that detectors that are particularly sensitive to low-energy neutrons may be affected by penetrating neutrons owing to the geometrical features of the RCNP facility. The latter discrepancy could be consistently explained by a problem in the evaluated cross-section data for the metals used in the calculation. Through those discussions, the adequacy of the two-angle differential method was experimentally verified, and practical suggestions were made pertaining to this method.

  17. CIPHER: coded imager and polarimeter for high-energy radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Caroli, E; Dusi, W; Bertuccio, G; Sampietro, M

    2000-01-01

    The CIPHER instrument is a hard X- and soft gamma-ray spectroscopic and polarimetric coded mask imager based on an array of cadmium telluride micro-spectrometers. The position-sensitive detector (PSD) will be arranged in 4 modules of 32x32 crystals, each of 2x2 mm sup 2 cross section and 10 mm thickness giving a total active area of about 160 cm sup 2. The micro-spectrometer characteristics allow a wide operating range from approx 10 keV to 1 MeV, while the PSD is actively shielded by CsI crystals on the bottom in order to reduce background. The mask, based on a modified uniformly redundant array (MURA) pattern, is four times the area of the PSD and is situated at about 100 cm from the CdTe array top surface. The CIPHER instrument is proposed for a balloon experiment, both in order to assess the performance of such an instrumental concept for a small/medium-size satellite survey mission and to perform an innovative measurement of the Crab polarisation level. The CIPHER's field of view allows the instrument to...

  18. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-28

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  19. Response of CR-39 SSNTD to high energy neutrons using zirconium convertors - a Monte Carlo and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Rupali; Sapra, B.K.; Bakshi, A.K.; Datta, D.; Biju, K.; Suryanarayana, S.V.; Nayak, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron dosimetry in ion accelerators is a challenging field as the neutron spectrum varies from thermal, to fast and high-energy neutrons usually extending beyond 20 MeV. Solid-state Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) have been increasingly used in numerous fields related to nuclear physics. Extensive work has also been carried out on determining the response characteristics of such detectors as nuclear spectrometers. In nuclear reaction studies, identification of reaction products according to their type and energy is frequently required. For normally incident particles, energy-dispersive track-diameter methods have become useful scientific tools using CR-39 SSNTD. CR-39 along with 1 mm polyethylene convertor can cover a neutron energy range from 100 keV to 10 MeV. The neutron interacts with the hydrogen in CR-39 producing recoil protons from elastic collisions. This detectable neutron energy range can be increased by modification in the radiator/convertor used along with CR-39. CR39 detectors placed in conjunction with judiciously chosen thicknesses of a polyethylene radiator and a lead absorber (or degrader) are used to increase energy range upto 19 MeV. A portable neutron counter has been proposed for high-energy neutron measurement with 1 cm thick Zirconium (Zr) as the converter outside a spherical HDPE shell of 7 inch diameter. Zr metal has been found to show (n,2n) cross section for energies above 10 MeV starting from 0.01 barns for 8 MeV upto 1 barns for 22 MeV. Above these energies, the experimental data is scarce. In this paper, Zr was used in conjunction with CR-39 which showed an enhancement of track density on the CR-39. This paper demonstrates the enhancement of neutron response using Zr on CR-39 with both theoretical and experimental studies

  20. Neutron Dark-Field Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, David

    2017-09-01

    Neutron imaging is typically used to image and reconstruct objects that are difficult to image using X-Ray imaging techniques. X-Ray absorption is primarily determined by the electron density of the material. This makes it difficult to image objects within materials that have high densities such as metal. However, the neutron scattering cross section primarily depends on the strong nuclear force, which varies somewhat randomly across the periodic table. In this project, an imaging technique known as dark field imaging using a far-field interferometer has been used to study a sample of granite. With this technique, interferometric phase images are generated. The dispersion of the microstructure of the sample dephases the beam, reducing the visibility. Collecting tomographic projections at different autocorrelation lengths (from 100 nanometers to 1.74 micrometers) essentially creates a 3D small angle scattering pattern, enabling mapping of how the microstructure is distributed throughout the sample.

  1. The High-Energy Polarization-Limiting Radius of Neutron Star Magnetospheres 1, Slowly Rotating Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Heyl, J S; Lloyd, D; CERN. Geneva; Heyl, Jeremy S.; Shaviv, Nir J.; Lloyd, Don

    2003-01-01

    In the presence of strong magnetic fields, the vacuum becomes a birefringent medium. We show that this QED effect decouples the polarization modes of photons leaving the NS surface. Both the total intensity and the intensity in each of the two modes is preserved along a ray's path through the neutron-star magnetosphere. We analyze the consequences that this effect has on aligning the observed polarization vectors across the image of the stellar surface to generate large net polarizations. Counter to previous predictions, we show that the thermal radiation of NSs should be highly polarized even in the optical. When detected, this polarization will be the first demonstration of vacuum birefringence. It could be used as a tool to prove the high magnetic field nature of AXPs and it could also be used to constrain physical NS parameters, such as $R/M$, to which the net polarization is sensitive.

  2. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geslot, B.; Vermeeren, L.; Filliatre, P.; Lopez, A. Legrand; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Bréaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.

    2011-03-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 × 1020 n/cm2. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  3. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, SPEx/LDCI, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vermeeren, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Lopez, A. Legrand [CEA, DEN, Saclay, SIREN/LECSI, F-91400 Saclay (France)

    2011-03-15

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  4. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Vermeeren, L.; Lopez, A. Legrand

    2011-01-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10 20 n/cm 2 . A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  5. The Efficiency of the BC-720 Scintillator in a High-Energy (20--800 MeV) Accelerator Neutron Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, Leslie H. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2005-12-01

    High-energy neutron doses (>20 MeV) are of little importance to most radiation workers. However, space and flight crews, and people working around medical and scientific accelerators receive over half of their radiation dose from high-energy neutrons. Unfortunately, neutrons are difficult to measure, and no suitable dosimetry has yet been developed to measure this radiation. In this paper, basic high-energy neutron interactions, characteristics of high-energy neutron environments, present neutron dosimetry, and quantities used in neutron dosimetry are discussed before looking into the potential of the BC-720 scintillator to improve dosimetry. This research utilized 800 MeV protons impinging upon the WNR Facility spallation neutron source at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Time-of-flight methods and a U-238 Fission Chamber were used to aid evaluation of the efficiency of the BC-720. Results showed that the efficiency is finite over the 20–650 MeV energy region studied, although it decreases by a factor of ten between 40 and 100 MeV. This limits the use of this dosimeter to measure doses at sitespecific locations. It also encourages modifications to use this dosimeter for any unknown neutron field. As such, this dosimeter has the potential for a small, lightweight, real-time dose measurement, which could impact neutron dosimetry in all high-energy neutron environments.

  6. Problems and prospects of neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hisao

    2008-01-01

    Technical problems and future prospects of neutron imaging and neutron radiography are reviewed and discussed for further development. For technical problems, neutron sources together with cold neutron, ultra-cold neutron, epithermal and fast-neutron beams, energy converters, and the intensity of neutron beam, dynamic range associated with imaging procedure, etc, are reviewed. As standardization, such indicators as beam purity, sensitivity, image quality, and beam quality are discussed and limitation of neutron radiography is also presented. As neutron imaging has developed as a nondestructive testing technique in industrial applications, further problems and prospects of quality control and qualification to perform neutron radiography, standardization and international cooperation of neutron imaging are discussed. (S. Ohno)

  7. Study of particle size distribution and formation mechanism of radioactive aerosols generated in high-energy neutron fields

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Noguchi, H; Tanaka, S; Iida, T; Furuichi, S; Kanda, Y; Oki, Y

    2003-01-01

    The size distributions of sup 3 sup 8 Cl, sup 3 sup 9 Cl, sup 8 sup 2 Br and sup 8 sup 4 Br aerosols generated by irradiations of argon and krypton gases containing di-octyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols with 45 MeV and 65 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were measured in order to study the formation mechanism of radioactive particles in high energy radiation fields. The effects of the size distribution of the radioactive aerosols on the size of the added DOP aerosols, the energy of the neutrons and the kinds of nuclides were studied. The observed size distributions of the radioactive particles were explained by attachment of the radioactive atoms generated by the neutron-induced reactions to the DOP aerosols. (author)

  8. A parametric model to describe neutron spectra around high-energy electron accelerators and its application in neutron spectrometry with Bonner Spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, Roberto; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Esposito, Adolfo

    2010-03-01

    Due to the increased interest of the scientific community in the applications of synchrotron light, there is an increasing demand of high-energy electron facilities, testified by the construction of several new facilities worldwide. The radiation protection around such facilities requires accurate experimental methods to determine the dose due to prompt radiation fields. Neutron fields, in particular, are the most complex to measure, because they extend in energy from thermal (10 -8 MeV) up to hundreds MeV and because the responses of dosemeters and survey meters usually have large energy dependence. The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer (BSS) is in practice the only instrument able to respond over the whole energy range of interest, and for this reason it is frequently used to derive neutron spectra and dosimetric quantities in accelerator workplaces. Nevertheless, complex unfolding algorithms are needed to derive the neutron spectra from the experimental BSS data. This paper presents a parametric model specially developed for the unfolding of the experimental data measured with BSS around high-energy electron accelerators. The work consists of the following stages: (1) Generation with the FLUKA code, of a set of neutron spectra representing the radiation environment around accelerators with different electron energies; (2) formulation of a parametric model able to describe these spectra, with particular attention to the high-energy component (>10 MeV), which may be responsible for a large part of the dose in workplaces; and (3) implementation of this model in an existing unfolding code.

  9. A parametric model to describe neutron spectra around high-energy electron accelerators and its application in neutron spectrometry with Bonner Spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedogni, Roberto; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Esposito, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Due to the increased interest of the scientific community in the applications of synchrotron light, there is an increasing demand of high-energy electron facilities, testified by the construction of several new facilities worldwide. The radiation protection around such facilities requires accurate experimental methods to determine the dose due to prompt radiation fields. Neutron fields, in particular, are the most complex to measure, because they extend in energy from thermal (10 -8 MeV) up to hundreds MeV and because the responses of dosemeters and survey meters usually have large energy dependence. The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer (BSS) is in practice the only instrument able to respond over the whole energy range of interest, and for this reason it is frequently used to derive neutron spectra and dosimetric quantities in accelerator workplaces. Nevertheless, complex unfolding algorithms are needed to derive the neutron spectra from the experimental BSS data. This paper presents a parametric model specially developed for the unfolding of the experimental data measured with BSS around high-energy electron accelerators. The work consists of the following stages: (1) Generation with the FLUKA code, of a set of neutron spectra representing the radiation environment around accelerators with different electron energies; (2) formulation of a parametric model able to describe these spectra, with particular attention to the high-energy component (>10 MeV), which may be responsible for a large part of the dose in workplaces; and (3) implementation of this model in an existing unfolding code.

  10. Calculation of efficiency of high-energy neutron detection by plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telegin, Yu.N.

    1977-01-01

    A computer was used to calculate neutron (5-30O MeV) registration effeciencies with plastic scintillators 2,5,10, 20,30,40 and 50 cm thick. The results are shown in the form of tables. The contributions to efficiency of various processes have been analysed. The calculation results may be used in planning experiments with neutron counters

  11. The relative biological effectiveness of a high energy neutron beam for micronuclei induction in T-lymphocytes of different individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slabbert, J.P., E-mail: jps@tlabs.ac.z [NRF iThemba LABS (Laboratory for Accelerated Based Sciences), Somerset West (South Africa); Dept. of Medical Imaging and Clinical Oncology, University of Stellenbosch (South Africa); August, L. [NRF iThemba LABS (Laboratory for Accelerated Based Sciences), Somerset West (South Africa); Vral, A. [Dept. of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University (Belgium); Symons, J. [NRF iThemba LABS (Laboratory for Accelerated Based Sciences), Somerset West (South Africa)

    2010-12-15

    In assessing the radiation risk of personnel exposed to cosmic radiation fields as it pertains to radiological damage during travel in civilian aircrafts, it is particularly important to know the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for high energy neutrons. It has been the subject of numerous investigations in recent years using different neutron energies and cytogenetic examinations. Variations in the radiosensitivity of white blood cells for different individuals are likely to influence the estimate of the relative biological effectiveness for high energy neutrons. This as such observations have been noted in the response of different cancer cell lines with varying inherent sensitivities. In this work the radiosensitivities of T-lymphocytes of different individuals to the p(66)/Be neutron beam at iThemba LABS were measured using micronuclei formations and compared to that noted following exposure to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. The principle objective of this investigation was to establish if a relationship between neutron RBE and variation in biological response to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays for lymphocytes from different individuals could be determined. Peripheral blood samples were collected from four healthy donors and isolated lymphocytes were exposed to different doses of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays (1-5 Gy) and p(66)/Be neutrons (0.5-2.5 Gy). One sample per donor was not exposed to radiation and served as a control. Lymphocytes were stimulated using PHA and cultured to induce micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked cells. Micronuclei yields were numerated using fluorescent microscopy. Radiosensitivities and RBE values were calculated from the fitted parameters describing the micronuclei frequency dose response data. Dissimilar dose response curves for different donors were observed reflecting varying inherent sensitivities to both neutron and gamma radiation. A clear reduction in the dose limiting RBE{sub M} is noted for donors with lymphocytes more sensitive to

  12. Thermal neutron imaging in an active interrogation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanier, P.E.; Forman, L.; Norman, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a thermal-neutron coded-aperture imager that reveals the locations of hydrogenous materials from which thermal neutrons are being emitted. This imaging detector can be combined with an accelerator to form an active interrogation system in which fast neutrons are produced in a heavy metal target by means of excitation by high energy photons. The photo-induced neutrons can be either prompt or delayed, depending on whether neutronemitting fission products are generated. Provided that there are hydrogenous materials close to the target, some of the photo-induced neutrons slow down and emerge from the surface at thermal energies. These neutrons can be used to create images that show the location and shape of the thermalizing materials. Analysis of the temporal response of the neutron flux provides information about delayed neutrons from induced fission if there are fissionable materials in the target. The combination of imaging and time-of-flight discrimination helps to improve the signal-to-background ratio. It is also possible to interrogate the target with neutrons, for example using a D-T generator. In this case, an image can be obtained from hydrogenous material in a target without the presence of heavy metal. In addition, if fissionable material is present in the target, probing with fast neutrons can stimulate delayed neutrons from fission, and the imager can detect and locate the object of interest, using appropriate time gating. Operation of this sensitive detection equipment in the vicinity of an accelerator presents a number of challenges, because the accelerator emits electromagnetic interference as well as stray ionizing radiation, which can mask the signals of interest.

  13. High-energy Neutron-induced Fission Cross Sections of Natural Lead and Bismuth-209

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrio, D; Carrapico, C; Eleftheriadis, C; Leeb, H; Calvino, F; Herrera-Martinez, A; Savvidis, I; Vlachoudis, V; Haas, B; Koehler, P; Vannini, G; Oshima, M; Le Naour, C; Gramegna, F; Wiescher, M; Pigni, M T; Audouin, L; Mengoni, A; Quesada, J; Becvar, F; Plag, R; Cennini, P; Mosconi, M; Rauscher, T; Couture, A; Capote, R; Sarchiapone, L; Vlastou, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dillmann, I; Pavlopoulos, P; Karamanis, D; Krticka, M; Jericha, E; Ferrari, A; Martinez, T; Trubert, D; Oberhummer, H; Karadimos, D; Plompen, A; Isaev, S; Terlizzi, R; Cortes, G; Cox, J; Cano-Ott, D; Pretel, C; Colonna, N; Berthoumieux, E; Vaz, P; Heil, M; Lopes, I; Lampoudis, C; Walter, S; Calviani, M; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Embid-Segura, M; Stephan, C; Igashira, M; Papachristodoulou, C; Aerts, G; Tavora, L; Berthier, B; Rudolf, G; Andrzejewski, J; Villamarin, D; Ferreira-Marques, R; Tain, J L; O'Brien, S; Reifarth, R; Kadi, Y; Neves, F; Poch, A; Kerveno, M; Rubbia, C; Lazano, M; Dahlfors, M; Wisshak, K; Salgado, J; Dridi, W; Ventura, A; Andriamonje, S; Assimakopoulos, P; Santos, C; Voss, F; Ferrant, L; Patronis, N; Chiaveri, E; Guerrero, C; Perrot, L; Vicente, M C; Lindote, A; Praena, J; Baumann, P; Kappeler, F; Rullhusen, P; Furman, W; David, S; Marrone, S; Tassan-Got, L; Gunsig, F; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Pancin, J; Papadopoulos, C; Tagliente, G; Haight, R; Chepel, V; Kossionides, E; Badurek, G; Marganiec, J; Lukic, S; Pavlik, A; Goncalves, I; Duran, I; Alvarez, H; Abbondanno, U; Fujii, K; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n\\_TOF) facility is well suited to measure small neutron-induced fission cross sections, as those of subactinides. The cross section ratios of (nat)Pb and (209)Bi relative to (235)U and (238)U were measured using PPAC detectors. The fragment coincidence method allows to unambiguously identify the fission events. The present experiment provides the first results for neutron-induced fission up to 1 GeV for (nat)Pb and (209)Bi. A good agreement with previous experimental data below 200 MeV is shown. The comparison with proton-induced fission indicates that the limiting regime where neutron-induced and proton-induced fission reach equal cross section is close to 1 GeV.

  14. Direct integration multiple collision integral transport analysis method for high energy fusion neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    A new analysis method specially suited for the inherent difficulties of fusion neutronics was developed to provide detailed studies of the fusion neutron transport physics. These studies should provide a better understanding of the limitations and accuracies of typical fusion neutronics calculations. The new analysis method is based on the direct integration of the integral form of the neutron transport equation and employs a continuous energy formulation with the exact treatment of the energy angle kinematics of the scattering process. In addition, the overall solution is analyzed in terms of uncollided, once-collided, and multi-collided solution components based on a multiple collision treatment. Furthermore, the numerical evaluations of integrals use quadrature schemes that are based on the actual dependencies exhibited in the integrands. The new DITRAN computer code was developed on the Cyber 205 vector supercomputer to implement this direct integration multiple-collision fusion neutronics analysis. Three representative fusion reactor models were devised and the solutions to these problems were studied to provide suitable choices for the numerical quadrature orders as well as the discretized solution grid and to understand the limitations of the new analysis method. As further verification and as a first step in assessing the accuracy of existing fusion-neutronics calculations, solutions obtained using the new analysis method were compared to typical multigroup discrete ordinates calculations

  15. A technique for determining fast and thermal neutron flux densities in intense high-energy (8-30 MeV) photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, K.W.; Holeman, G.R.; Nath, R.

    1978-01-01

    A technique for measuring fast and thermal neutron fluxes in intense high-energy photon fields has been developed. Samples of phorphorous pentoxide are exposed to a mixed photon-neutron field. The irradiated samples are then dissolved in distilled water and their activation products are counted in a liquid scintillation spectrometer at 95-97% efficiency. The radioactive decay characteristics of the samples are then analyzed to determine fast and thermal neutron fluxes. Sensitivity of this neutron detector to high energy photons has been measured and found to be small. (author)

  16. High-altitude cosmic ray neutrons: probable source for the high-energy protons of the earth's radiation belts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajnal, F.; Wilson, J.

    1992-01-01

    'Full Text:' Several High-altitude cosmic-ray neutron measurements were performed by the NASA Ames Laboratory in the mid-to late-1970s using airplanes flying at about 13km altitude along constant geomagnetic latitudes of 20, 44 and 51 degrees north. Bonner spheres and manganese, gold and aluminium foils were used in the measurements. In addition, large moderated BF-3 counters served as normalizing instruments. Data analyses performed at that time did not provide complete and unambiguous spectral information and field intensities. Recently, using our new unfolding methods and codes, and Bonner-sphere response function extensions for higher energies, 'new' neutron spectral intensities were obtained, which show progressive hardening of neutron spectra as a function of increasing geomagnetic latitude, with substantial increases in the energy region iron, 1 0 MeV to 10 GeV. For example, we found that the total neutron fluences at 20 and 51 degrees magnetic north are in the ratio of 1 to 5.2 and the 10 MeV to 10 GeV fluence ratio is 1 to 18. The magnitude of these ratios is quite remarkable. From the new results, the derived absolute neutron energy distribution is of the correct strength and shape for the albedo neutrons to be the main source of the high-energy protons trapped in the Earth's inner radiation belt. In addition, the results, depending on the extrapolation scheme used, indicate that the neutron dose equivalent rate may be as high as 0.1 mSv/h near the geomagnetic north pole and thus a significant contributor to the radiation exposures of pilots, flight attendants and the general public. (author)

  17. The importance of anisotropic scattering in high energy neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prillinger, G.; Mattes, M.

    1984-01-01

    To describe the highly anisotropic scattering of very fast neutrons adequately the transport code ANISN has been improved. Fokker-Planck terms have been introduced into the transport equation which accurately describe the small changes in energy and angle. The new code has been tested for a d(50)-Be neutron source in a deep penetration iron problem. The influence of the forward peaked elastic scattering on the fast neutron spectrum is shown to be significant and can be handled efficiently in the new ANISN version. Since common cross-section libraries are limited by Legendre expansion, or by their upper energy boundary, or exclude elastic scattering above 20 MeV a special library has been created. (Auth.)

  18. Precision measurements of high-energy conversion electron lines and determination of neutron binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braumandl, F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper first discusses the energy accuracy of the BILL conversion electron spectrometer at the Grenoble high flux reactor. With an improved temperature stabilisation of the magnets, an energy accuracy of ΔE/E -5 can be reached. After this, highly exact measurements of high-energy conversion electron lines of the 200 Hg, 114 Cd, 165 Dy, 168 Er, 239 U nuclei and the 13 C, 28 Al 3 H and 92 Zr photoelectron lines were carried out. Energy calibration of the spectrometer was carried out in the 1.5 MeV to 6.5 MeV range with intensive high-energy transitions of the 200 Hg nucleus. Systematic calibration errors could be investigated by means of combinations between the calibration lines. A calibration for absolute energies was obtained by comparing low-energy gamma transitions of 200 Hg with the 411.8 keV gold standard. (orig.) [de

  19. Neutron production in lead targets by high-energy light-mass heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniehl', A.V.; Lyapin, V.S.; Tsvetkov, I.O.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of the time-of-flight spectrometer and the double different distributions of neutrons and secondary charged particles produced by 2 GeV protons and 1 GeVXA d,α, 6 Li and 12 C ions bombarding lead targets are described. Experimental data are compared with the results of calculations by codes SITHA. 17 refs.; 10 figs.; 1 tab

  20. High-energy two-neutron removal from Be{sup 10}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, N.I.; Freer, M.; Ahmed, S.; Clarke, N.M.; Curtis, N.; Soic, N.; Ziman, V.A. [Birmingham Univ., School of Physics and Astronomy, (United Kingdom); Millener, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Orr, N.A.; Carstoiu, F.; Angelique, J.C.; Catford, W.N.; Lecouey, J.L.; Marques, F.M.; Normand, G.; Timis, C. [Caen Univ., Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, ISMRA, IN2P3-CNRS, 14 (France); Carsoiu, F. [Horia Hulubei National institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Bouchat, V.; Hanappe, F.; Kerckx, Y.; Materna, T. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Catford, W.N.; Pain, S.; Timis, C. [Surrey Univ., School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, Guildford (United Kingdom); Horoi, M. [Central Michigan Univ., Physics Dept., Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Unshakova, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2005-09-15

    A kinetically complete measurement of the {sup 12}C({sup 10}Be, {alpha}+{alpha}+n) and ({sup 10}Be, {alpha}+{alpha}) reactions has been performed at a beam energy of 30 MeV/nucleon. The charged beam velocity particles were detected in an array of Si-CsI detectors placed at zero degrees, and the neutrons in an 81-element neutron array. The coincident detection of the final-state particles, produced in the breakup of {sup 10}Be, allowed the reconstruction of the excitation energy in the {sup 8}Be and {sup 9}Be systems. States in {sup 8}Be were identified, in particular the ground and first-excited states; and in {sup 9}Be, states at 1.68, 2.43, and (2.78, 3.05) MeV were observed. The population of these levels, in particular the 2.43 MeV 5/2- level, suggests that collective excitations play an important role in the neutron removal process. Distorted wave Born approximation and Glauber-type calculations have been used to model the direct neutron removal from the {sup 10}Be ground state and the two-step removal via inelastic excitations of the {sup 10}Be(2{sup +}) and {sup 9}Be(5/2{sup -}) excited states. (authors)

  1. Backward emitted high-energy neutrons in hard reactions of p and π+ on carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, A.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averichev, Y.; Barton, D.; Baturin, V.; Bukhtoyarova, N.; Carroll, A.; Heppelmann, S.; Kawabata, T.; Leksanov, A.; Makdisi, Y.; Minina, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Piasetzky, E.; Schetkovsky, A.; Shimanskiy, S.; Tang, A.; Watson, J. W.; Yoshida, H.; Zhalov, D.

    2002-01-01

    Beams of protons and pions of 5.9 GeV/c were incident on a C target. Neutrons emitted into the backward hemisphere, in the laboratory system, were detected in (triple) coincidence with two emerging particles of tranverse momenta pt>0.6 GeV/c. We determined that for (46.5+/-3.7)% of the proton-induced events and for (40.8+/-4.5)% of the pion-induced events with the two high-pt particles, there is also at least one backward emitted neutron with momentum greater than 0.32 GeV/c. This observation is in sharp contrast to a well- established universal pattern from a large variety of earlier inclusive measurements with hadrons, electrons, photons, neutrinos, and antineutrinos where the probability for backward nucleon emission was in the 5 to 10 % range. We present also a measurement of the momentum spectra for the backward going neutrons. The spectra have the same universal shape observed in the inclusive reactions. We speculate that the enhanced backward neutron emission in this semi-inclusive region could be an indication for a strong dependence of the cross section on the squared total center-of-mass energy (s) and for the importance of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations.

  2. Random mask optimization for fast neutron coded aperture imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Marleau, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Brubaker, Erik [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    In coded aperture imaging, one of the most important factors determining the quality of reconstructed images is the choice of mask/aperture pattern. In many applications, uniformly redundant arrays (URAs) are widely accepted as the optimal mask pattern. Under ideal conditions, thin and highly opaque masks, URA patterns are mathematically constructed to provide artifact-free reconstruction however, the number of URAs for a chosen number of mask elements is limited and when highly penetrating particles such as fast neutrons and high-energy gamma-rays are being imaged, the optimum is seldom achieved. In this case more robust mask patterns that provide better reconstructed image quality may exist. Through the use of heuristic optimization methods and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction, we show that for both point and extended neutron sources a random mask pattern can be optimized to provide better image quality than that of a URA.

  3. 90 deg.Neutron emission from high energy protons and lead ions on a thin lead target

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; Foglio-Para, A; Mitaroff, W A; Silari, Marco; Ulrici, L

    2002-01-01

    The neutron emission from a relatively thin lead target bombarded by beams of high energy protons/pions and lead ions was measured at CERN in one of the secondary beam lines of the Super Proton Synchrotron for radiation protection and shielding calculations. Measurements were performed with three different beams: sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb sup 8 sup 2 sup + lead ions at 40 GeV/c per nucleon and 158 GeV/c per nucleon, and 40 GeV/c mixed protons/pions. The neutron yield and spectral fluence per incident ion on target were measured at 90 deg.with respect to beam direction. Monte-Carlo simulations with the FLUKA code were performed for the case of protons and pions and the results found in good agreement with the experimental data. A comparison between simulations and experiment for protons, pions and lead ions have shown that--for such high energy heavy ion beams--a reasonable estimate can be carried out by scaling the result of a Monte-Carlo calculation for protons by the projectile mass number to the power of 0.80-0...

  4. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dose meters used in high-energy neutron environments improved and extended results based on a complete survey of all neutron spectra in IAEA-TRS-403

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oparaji, U.; Tsai, Y. H.; Liu, Y. C.; Lee, K. W.; Patelli, E.; Sheu, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents improved and extended results of our previous study on corrections for conventional neutron dose meters used in environments with high-energy neutrons (E n > 10 MeV). Conventional moderated-type neutron dose meters tend to underestimate the dose contribution of high-energy neutrons because of the opposite trends of dose conversion coefficients and detection efficiencies as the neutron energy increases. A practical correction scheme was proposed based on analysis of hundreds of neutron spectra in the IAEA-TRS-403 report. By comparing 252 Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values derived from fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this study provides recommendations for neutron field characterization and the corresponding dose correction factors. Further sensitivity studies confirm the appropriateness of the proposed scheme and indicate that (1) the spectral correction factors are nearly independent of the selection of three commonly used calibration sources: 252 Cf, 241 Am-Be and 239 Pu-Be; (2) the derived correction factors for Bonner spheres of various sizes (6''-9'') are similar in trend and (3) practical high-energy neutron indexes based on measurements can be established to facilitate the application of these correction factors in workplaces. (authors)

  5. Neutron dosimetry at a high-energy electron-positron collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, Roberto

    Electron-positron colliders with energy of hundreds of MeV per beam have been employed for studies in the domain of nuclear and sub-nuclear physics. The typical structure of such a collider includes an LINAC, able to produce both types of particles, an accumulator ring and a main ring, whose diameter ranges from several tens to hundred meters and allows circulating particle currents of several amperes per beam. As a consequence of the interaction of the primary particles with targets, shutters, structures and barriers, a complex radiation environment is produced. This paper addresses the neutron dosimetry issues associated with the operation of such accelerators, referring in particular to the DAΦ NE complex, operative since 1997 at INFN-Frascati National Laboratory (Italy). Special attention is given to the active and passive techniques used for the spectrometric and dosimetric characterization of the workplace neutron fields, for radiation protection dosimetry purposes.

  6. Production of the $\\Sigma^0_c$ and $\\Sigma^{++}_c$ by High-Energy Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladbury, Raymond, Jr. [Colorado U.

    1988-01-01

    We present the first observation of hadroproduction of the $\\Sigma^{++}_C$ and $\\Sigma^0_c$ , decaying into $\\Lambda_{c\\pi}$. The daughter $\\Lambda_c$ is observed in the decay modes $pK \\pi$ and $pK_s\\pi\\pi$. The Experiment was conducted at a broadband neutron beam in the Proton East area of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. A two - magnet multiparticle spectrometer equipped with proportional wire chambers and a high resolution MWPC vertex detector was used to momentum analyze charged particles produced in the interactions of neutrons on targets of beryllium, silicon and tungsten. Particles were identified using three Cerenkov counters. The beam energy for each event was reconstructed using hadronic and electromagnetic calorimetry....

  7. Damage parameters for non-metals in a high energy neutron environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell, G.F.; Berry, H.C.; Lazareth, O.W.; Goland, A.N.

    1980-01-01

    Simulation of radiation damage induced in monatomic and binary non-metals by FMIT and fusion neutrons is described. Damage produced by elastic scattering of recoil atoms and by ionization-assisted processes has been evaluated using the damage program DON. Displacement damage from gamma rays has been evaluated by using the technique of Oen and Holmes. A comparison of damage for an anticipated FMIT radiation environment generated by a coupled n-γ transport calculations and a fusion spectrum is made. Gamma-induced displacement damage is sufficiently small that it is dominated by neutron-induced recoil processes. Ionization-assisted displacements may be important depending upon the ionization cross section of the particular non-metal under consideration

  8. Response of pancreatic cancer to local irradiation with high-energy neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Lionel; Woodruff, Katherine H.; Hendrickson, Frank R.; Kurup, Parvathy D.; Mansell, Joanne; Awschalom, Miguel; Rosenberg, Ivan; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    1985-09-15

    Seventy-seven patients with locally advanced, nonresectable, biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were treated by palliative bypass surgery followed by intensive neutron beam irradiation of the primary tumor site. Three dose levels, under 20, 21 to 23, and 24 to 25 Gy, were studied with the use of a treatment plan that included all known disease within a limited target volume, generally under 21. Symptomatic palliation was achieved in the majority of patients. The median survival time was 6 months. One patient remained alive and well without evidence of tumor 5 years after irradiation. Two were free of tumor at autopsy (one had died of intercurrent disease and one of radiation-related complications). A common cause of death was metastatic dissemination. Complication rates were dosedependent; life-threatening complications did not exceed 12% with doses of less than 23 Gy. Autopsies from 19 patients were reviewed. In all, the pancreatic tumor site showed extensive reactive fibrosis. Local control was achieved in two patients, but most had both residual tumor in the pancreas and metastases. Six patients had centrolobular veno-occlusive liver disease. These patients had all received the higher (22–24 Gy) neutron doses. Six patients had hemorrhagic radiation gastroenteritis. Mild skin atrophy and bone marrow hypoplasia were seen in the irradiated volumes. The kidneys and spinal cord showed no radiation effects. The authors conclude that neutron irradiation can provide a good local response with marked regression and fibrosis of the tumor. This response, coupled with many deaths due to metastases, suggests that combined treatment with neutrons and chemotherapy would be worth exploring.

  9. Application of the image calorimeter in the high energy gamma astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casolino, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata`, Rome (Italy); Carlson, P. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Fuglesang, C. [ESA-EAC, Cologne (Germany); Ozerov, Yu.V.; Zemskov, V.M.; Zverev, V.G.; Galper, A.M. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The capability of registration of the primary high energy cosmic ray gamma emission by a gamma-telescope made of an image calorimeter is shown in this paper. The problem of triggering and off-line identification of primary particles by the analysis of the electromagnetic showers induced in the calorimeter is under consideration. The estimations of the background flux of delayed secondaries induced by nuclear interactions are presented too.

  10. Electronic imaging applied to neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, D.A.; Bracher, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    A commercially - available image intensifier was used with a scan conversion memory and a mobile 252 Cf based neutron radiography system to obtain neutron radiographs on a television monitor in 0.5 minutes to 10.0 minutes

  11. Neutron imaging integrated circuit and method for detecting neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; More, Mitali J.

    2017-12-05

    The present disclosure provides a neutron imaging detector and a method for detecting neutrons. In one example, a method includes providing a neutron imaging detector including plurality of memory cells and a conversion layer on the memory cells, setting one or more of the memory cells to a first charge state, positioning the neutron imaging detector in a neutron environment for a predetermined time period, and reading a state change at one of the memory cells, and measuring a charge state change at one of the plurality of memory cells from the first charge state to a second charge state less than the first charge state, where the charge state change indicates detection of neutrons at said one of the memory cells.

  12. Evaluation of Neutron Component in Patients under High Energy Radiotherapy By Means of an On Line and In Vivo procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposito, M. R.; Palma, B. A.; Terron, J. A.; Gomez, F.; Domingo, C.; Barquero, R.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.

    2010-01-01

    The use of improved radiotherapy methods has raised the concern about second cancer induction. Epidemiological studies have shown a major incidence of secondary cancer in radiotherapy patients compared to patients subjected to another type of treatment. In this regard, it is important to determine the peripheral dose received by the patient during the treatment. While photon doses have been deeply contemplated, neutron contamination in high energy photon beams is still a subject of research and discussion. In the present work, we introduce a new procedure based on a digital device that allows real time neutron contamination evaluation. Several irradiations of an anthropomorphic phantom have been carried out in a variety of facilities and treatments. The purpose was to correlate the measurements from the digital detector with the neutron doses obtained in the phantom by Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements. A model has been designed to calculate the organ equivalent dose and risk estimates during any therapeutic session. The procedure has been used to monitor more than 1000 patients showing its applicability in clinical routine. It can be used both for inductive and retrospective studies with a reasonable uncertainty. Thus, this could provide the necessary information to complement the dosimetry of patient and estimate the treatment risk.

  13. Novel X-ray imaging diagnostics of high energy nanosecond pulse accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Graham W.; Gallegos, Roque Rosauro; Hohlfelder, Robert James; Beutler, David Eric; Dudley, John; Seymour, Calvin L.G.; Bell, John D.

    2004-01-01

    Pioneering x-ray imaging has been undertaken on a number of AWE's and Sandia National Laboratories radiation effects x-ray simulators. These simulators typically yield a single very short (<50ns) pulse of high-energy (MeV endpoint energy bremsstrahlung) x-ray radiation with doses in the kilorad (krad(Si)) region. X-ray source targets vary in size from 2 to 25cm diameter, dependent upon the particular simulator. Electronic imaging of the source x-ray emission under dynamic conditions yields valuable information upon how the simulator is performing. The resultant images are of interest to the simulator designer who may configure new x-ray source converter targets and diode designs. The images can provide quantitative information about machine performance during radiation effects testing of components under active conditions. The effects testing program is a valuable interface for validation of high performance computer codes and models for the radiation effects community. A novel high-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer is described whereby the spectral energy (0.1 to 2.5MeV) profile may be discerned from the digitally recorded and viewable images via a pinhole/scintillator/CCD imaging system and knowledge of the filtration parameters. Unique images, analysis and a preliminary evaluation of the capability of the spectrometer are presented. Further, a novel time resolved imaging system is described that captures a sequence of high spatial resolution temporal images, with zero interframe time, in the nanosecond timeframe, of our source x-rays.

  14. A polarizing neutron periscope for neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Michael; Boeni, Peter; Calzada, Elbio; Muehlbauer, Martin; Neubauer, Andreas; Schillinger, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    Optical neutron polarizers like guides or benders destroy the collimation of a neutron beam due to multiple reflections or scattering. This makes them unsuitable for their use in polarized neutron radiography, because the beam collimation is essential to obtain high spatial resolution. We have developed a neutron polarizer based on the principle of an optical periscope with a zigzag double reflection on two parallel high-m supermirror polarizers. If the supermirrors are perfectly parallel and flat, the beam collimation is left unchanged by such a device. A first proof of concept version of this type of polarizer was built and tested. We expect to achieve a beam polarization of up to 99% with an improved version yet to be built.

  15. Real-time image parameterization in high energy gamma-ray astronomy using transputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punch, M.; Fegan, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, significant advances in Very-High-Energy gamma-ray astronomy have been made by parameterization of the Cherenkov images arising from gamma-ray initiated showers in the Earth's atmosphere. A prototype system to evaluate the use of Transputers as a parallel-processing elements for real-time analysis of data from a Cherenkov imaging camera is described in this paper. The operation of and benefits resulting from such a system are described, and the viability of an applicaiton of the prototype system is discussed

  16. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs

    CERN Document Server

    Pomp, S; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Rottger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-01-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe.

  17. Neutron cross sections for defect production by high-energy displacement cascades in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Mann, F.M.

    1983-08-01

    Defect production cross sections for copper have been devised, based on computer simulations of displacement cascades. One thousand cascades ranging in energy from 200 eV to 200 keV were generated with the MARLOWE computer code. The cascades were subjected to a semi-empirical cascade quenching procedure and to short-term annealing with the ALSOME computer code. Functions were fitted to the numbers of defects produced as a function of primary knock-on atom (PKA) damage energy for the following defect types: 1) the total number of point defects after quenching and after short-term annealing, 2) the numbers of free interstitials and free vacancies after shortterm annealing, and 3) the numbers and sizes of vacancy and interstitial clusters after shortterm annealing. In addition, a function describing the number of distinct damage regions (lobes) per cascade was fitted to results of a graphical analysis of the cascade configurations. The defect production functions have been folded into PKA spectra using the NJOY nuclear data processing code system with ENDF/B-V nuclear data to yield neutron cross sections for defect production in copper. The free vacancy cross section displays much less variation with neutron energy than the cross sections for damage energy or total point defects

  18. Neutron cross sections for defect production by high energy displacement cascades in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Mann, F.M.

    1984-01-01

    Defect production cross sections for copper have been devised, based on computer simulations of displacement cascades. One thousand cascades ranging in energy from 200 eV to 200 keV were generated with the MARLOWE computer code. The cascades were subjected to a semi-empirical cascade quenching procedure and to short-term annealing with the ALSOME computer code. Functions were fitted to the numbers of defects produced as a function of primary knock-on atom (PKA) damage energy for the following defect types: 1) the total number of point defects after quenching and after short-term annealing, 2) the numbers of free interstitials and free vacancies after short-term annealing, and 3) the numbers and sizes of vacancy and interstitial clusters after short-term annealing. In addition, a function describing the number of distinct damage regions (lobes) per cascade was fitted to results of a graphical analysis of the cascade configurations. The defect production functions have been folded into PKA spectra using the NJOY nuclear data processing code system with ENDF/B-V nuclear data to yield neutron cross sections for defect production in copper. The free vacancy cross section displays much less variation with neutron energy than the cross sections for damage energy or total point defects. (orig.)

  19. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field, Part II: Bonner sphere spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegel, B.; Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Esposito, A.; Fehrenbacher, G.; Ferrarini, M.; Hohmann, E.; Hranitzky, C.; Kasper, A.; Khurana, S.; Mares, V.; Reginatto, M.; Rollet, S.; Ruehm, W.; Schardt, D.; Silari, M.; Simmer, G.; Weitzenegger, E.

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. A major task of the CONRAD Work Package 'complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces' was to organise a benchmark exercise in a workplace field at a high-energy particle accelerator where neutrons are the dominant radiation component. The CONRAD benchmark exercise took place at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in July 2006. In this paper, the results of the spectrometry using four extended -range Bonner sphere spectrometers of four different institutes are reported. Outside Cave A the neutron spectra were measured with three spectrometers at six selected positions and ambient dose equivalent values were derived for use in the intercomparison with other area monitors and dosemeters. At a common position all three spectrometers were used to allow a direct comparison of their results which acts as an internal quality assurance. The comparison of the neutron spectra measured by the different groups shows very good agreement. A detailed analysis presents some differences between the shapes of the spectra and possible sources of these differences are discussed. However, the ability of Bonner sphere spectrometers to provide reliable integral quantities like fluence and ambient dose equivalent is well demonstrated in this exercise. The fluence and dose results derived by the three groups agree very well within the given uncertainties, not only with respect to the total energy region present in this environment but also for selected energy regions which contribute in certain strength to the total values. In addition to the positions outside Cave A one spectrometer was used to measure the neutron spectrum at one position in the entry maze of Cave A. In this case a comparison was possible to earlier measurements.

  20. No speed limits in medical imaging and high-energy physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Rita Giuffredi & Tom Meyer

    2015-01-01

    Speed, or high time resolution, is becoming increasingly important, if not crucial, in the high-energy physics domain, both for particle acceleration and detection systems. Medical-imaging technology also vitally depends on high time resolution detection techniques, often the offspring of today’s large particle physics experiments. The four-year FP7 Marie Curie Training Project “PicoSEC-MCNet”, which draws to a close at the end of November, was designed to develop ultra-fast photon detectors for applications in both domains. The project has achieved important results that promise to trigger further developments in the years to come.   The PicoSEC-MCNet project participants. “New requirements in high-energy physics force us to push the limits of photon detection speed, as future high-luminosity accelerators will force us to cope with the unprecedentedly short bunch crossing intervals needed to produce sufficient luminosity,” explains Tom M...

  1. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part III: Instrument response

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, M; Beck, P; Bedogni, R; Cale, E; Caresana, M; Domingo, C; Donadille, L; Dubourg, N; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernández, F; Ferrarini, M; Fiechtner, A; Fuchs, A; García, M J; Golnik, N; Gutermuth, F; Khurana, S; Klages, Th; Latocha, M; Mares, V; Mayer, S; Radon, T; Reithmeier, H; Rollet, S; Roos, H; Rühm, W; Sandri, S; Schardt, D; Simmer, G; Spurný, F; Trompier, F; Villa-Grasa, C; Weitzenegger, E; Wiegel, B; Wielunski, M; Wissmann, F; Zechner, A; Zielczyński, M

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005–2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organizational framework for this project was provided by the European radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. Work Package 6 of CONRAD dealt with “complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces” and in this context it organised a benchmark exercise, which included both measurements and calculations, in a stray radiation field at a high-energy particle accelerator at GSI, Germany. The aim was to intercompare the response of several types of active detectors and passive dosemeters in a well-characterised workplace field. The Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation field and the experimental determination of the neutron spectra with various Bonner Sphere Spectrometers are discussed in Rollet et al. (2008) and in Wiegel et al. (2008). This paper focuses on the intercomparison of the response of the dosemeters in terms of ambient dose equivalent. Th...

  2. Development and benchmark of high energy continuous-energy neutron cross Section library HENDL-ADS/MC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chong; Wang Minghuang; Zou Jun; Xu Dezheng; Zeng Qin

    2012-01-01

    The ADS (accelerator driven sub-critical system) has great energy spans, complex energy spectrum structures and strong physical effects. Hence, the existing nuclear data libraries can't fully meet the needs of nuclear analysis in ADS. In order to do nuclear analysis for ADS system, a point-wise data library HENDL-ADS/MC (hybrid evaluated nuclear data library) was produced by FDS team. Meanwhile, to test the availability and reliability of the HENDL-ADS/MC data library, a series of shielding and critical safety benchmarks were performed. To validate and qualify the reliability of the high-energy cross section for HENDL-ADS/MC library further, a series of high neutronics integral experiments have been performed. The testing results confirm the accuracy and reliability of HENDL-ADS/MC. (authors)

  3. (3He,α) reaction mechanism at high energy and neutron inner shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiele, J. van de.

    1980-01-01

    The ( 3 He,α) reaction on 12 C, 16 O, 28 Si, 58 Ni, 90 Zr, 118 Sn, 124 Sn and 208 Pb targets has been studied at Esub( 3 He) = 217 MeV (or 205 MeV) in order to investigate the reaction mechanism at high energy and large momentum transfer. The reaction yields large cross sections at very forward angles and strongly enhances the largest orbital momentum transfer. The angular distribution shapes are well reproduced in the frame-work of the Z-R- D.W.B.A. analysis if we use a unique empirical α-potential: Vsub(α)(Esub(α)) = Vsub( 3 He)(3/4 Esub(α)) + Vsub(n)(1/4 Esub(α)). The excitation energy spectra have been measured up to 100 MeV in the residual light and medium nuclei and up to about 16 MeV in heavy nuclei. In addition to the well-known low-lying levels, peaks or broad structures are observed for each nucleus at higher excitation energies. They are attributed to pick up from inner shells: 1s( 11 C and 15 O), 1p( 27 Si), 1d5/2 + 1p( 57 Ni), 1f7/2( 89 Zr) 1g9/2 117 Sn, 123 Sn and 1h11/2( 207 Pb). Selectivity and localization of direct and indirect pick up ( 3 He,α) reactions were studied. Finite range calculations show that this reaction is not very sensitive to the details of the range from function but only to D 0 coefficient and range R. A microscopic α-nucleus optical potential calculated with n-n dependent and independent density forces is able to reproduce both elastic scattering and pick up reaction angular distributions [fr

  4. Design of a compact high-energy setup for x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttler, Markus; Yaroshenko, Andre; Bech, Martin; Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Chabior, Michael; Wolf, Johannes; Tapfer, Arne; Meiser, Jan; Kunka, Danays; Amberger, Maximilian; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-03-01

    The main shortcoming of conventional biomedical x-ray imaging is the weak soft-tissue contrast caused by the small differences in the absorption coefficients between different materials. This issue can be addressed by x-ray phasesensitive imaging approaches, e.g. x-ray Talbot-Lau grating interferometry. The advantage of the three-grating Talbot-Lau approach is that it allows to acquire x-ray phase-contrast and dark-field images with a conventional lab source. However, through the introduction of the grating interferometer some constraints are imposed on the setup geometry. In general, the grating pitch and the mean x-ray energy determine the setup dimensions. The minimal length of the setup increases linearly with energy and is proportional to p2, where p is the grating pitch. Thus, a high-energy (100 keV) compact grating-based setup for x-ray imaging can be realized only if gratings with aspect-ratio of approximately 300 and a pitch of 1-2 μm were available. However, production challenges limit the availability of such gratings. In this study we consider the use of non-binary phase-gratings as means of designing a more compact grating interferometer for phase-contrast imaging. We present simulation and experimental data for both monochromatic and polychromatic case. The results reveal that phase-gratings with triangular-shaped structures yield visibilities that can be used for imaging purposes at significantly shorter distances than binary gratings. This opens the possibility to design a high-energy compact setup for x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Furthermore, we discuss different techniques to achieve triangular-shaped phase-shifting structures.

  5. Fast and high-energy neutron detection with nuclear track detectors: Results of the European joint experiments 1992/93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schraube, H. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Alberts, W.G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Weeks, A.R. [comps.] [Nuclear Electric plc, Berkeley (United Kingdom). Berkeley Technology Centre

    1997-12-31

    Under the auspices of EURADOS, the European radiation dosimetry group, seventeen recognised laboratories engaged in the field of individual neutron dosimetry with passive track detectors participated in an international comparative experiment. A number of twenty-seven detector systems, predominantly etched track detectors with the material PADC (poly allyl diglycol carbonate), were employed by the participating laboratories. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were provided for irradiations free-in-air and on front of a PMMA phantom by the GSF (Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Neuherberg, Germany) and by the PTB (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany). High energy irradiations were conducted by the PSI (Paul-Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland). The results of the on-phantom irradiations were used to derive energy and angular responses of the track detectors, those of the free-in-air irradiations to obtain data for the linearity characteristics of the response with dose. The report contains a short description and the original data of the participating laboratories, displays the irradiation and reference conditions, and provides an over-all evaluation. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative evaluation of the background characteristics and of the non-linearity observed with most of the systems employed which limits their useful dose-range of application. (orig.)

  6. Characterization of neutron-irradiated HT-UPS steel by high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuan, E-mail: xuanzhang@anl.gov [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Li, Meimei [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the first measurement of neutron-irradiated microstructure using far-field high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy (FF-HEDM) in a high-temperature ultrafine-precipitate-strengthened (HT-UPS) austenitic stainless steel. Grain center of mass, grain size distribution, crystallographic orientation (texture), diffraction spot broadening and lattice constant distributions of individual grains were obtained for samples in three different conditions: non-irradiated, neutron-irradiated (3dpa/500 °C), and irradiated + annealed (3dpa/500 °C + 600 °C/1 h). It was found that irradiation caused significant increase in grain-level diffraction spot broadening, modified the texture, reduced the grain-averaged lattice constant, but had nearly no effect on the average grain size and grain size distribution, as well as the grain size-dependent lattice constant variations. Post-irradiation annealing largely reversed the irradiation effects on texture and average lattice constant, but inadequately restored the microstrain.

  7. Determination of workplace neutron spectra at a high energy hadron accelerator using active and passive Bonner sphere spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedogni, R.; Esposito, A.; Chiti, M.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the 2006 experimental benchmark organized at the GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) by the EC CONRAD network, a neutron dosimetry intercomparison was performed in a workplace field around a carbon target hit by 400 MeV/u 12 C ions. The radiation protection group of the INFN-LNF participated to the intercomparison with a Bonner sphere spectrometer equipped with an active 6 LiI(Eu) scintillator and a set of passive detectors, namely MCP-6s (80mgcm -2 )/MCP-7 TLD pairs from TLD Poland. Both active and passive spectrometers, independently tested and calibrated, were used to determine the field and dosimetric quantities in the measurement point. The FRUIT unfolding code, developed at the INFN-LNF radiation protection group, was used to unfold the raw BSS data. This paper compares the results of the active or passive spectrometers, obtaining a satisfactory agreement in terms of both spectrum shape and value of the integral quantities, as the neutron fluence or the ambient dose equivalent. These results allow qualifying the BSS based on TLD pairs as a reliable passive method to be used around high energy particle accelerators even in low dose rate areas. This is particularly useful in those workplaces where the active instruments could be disturbed by the presence of pulsed fields, large photon fluence or electromagnetic noise

  8. Live cell imaging combined with high-energy single-ion microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Na; Du, Guanghua, E-mail: gh-du@impcas.ac.cn; Liu, Wenjing; Wu, Ruqun; Wei, Junzhe [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Guo, Jinlong [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou (China); Chen, Hao [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Lanzhou, Lanzhou (China)

    2016-03-15

    DNA strand breaks can lead to cell carcinogenesis or cell death if not repaired rapidly and efficiently. An online live cell imaging system was established at the high energy microbeam facility at the Institute of Modern Physics to study early and fast cellular response to DNA damage after high linear energy transfer ion radiation. The HT1080 cells expressing XRCC1-RFP were irradiated with single high energy nickel ions, and time-lapse images of the irradiated cells were obtained online. The live cell imaging analysis shows that strand-break repair protein XRCC1 was recruited to the ion hit position within 20 s in the cells and formed bright foci in the cell nucleus. The fast recruitment of XRCC1 at the ion hits reached a maximum at about 200 s post-irradiation and then was followed by a slower release into the nucleoplasm. The measured dual-exponential kinetics of XRCC1 protein are consistent with the proposed consecutive reaction model, and the measurements obtained that the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 recruitment to DNA strand break is 1.2 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1} and the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 release from the break-XRCC1 complex is 1.2 × 10{sup −2} s{sup −1}.

  9. Live cell imaging combined with high-energy single-ion microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Na; Du, Guanghua; Liu, Wenjing; Wu, Ruqun; Wei, Junzhe; Guo, Jinlong; Chen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    DNA strand breaks can lead to cell carcinogenesis or cell death if not repaired rapidly and efficiently. An online live cell imaging system was established at the high energy microbeam facility at the Institute of Modern Physics to study early and fast cellular response to DNA damage after high linear energy transfer ion radiation. The HT1080 cells expressing XRCC1-RFP were irradiated with single high energy nickel ions, and time-lapse images of the irradiated cells were obtained online. The live cell imaging analysis shows that strand-break repair protein XRCC1 was recruited to the ion hit position within 20 s in the cells and formed bright foci in the cell nucleus. The fast recruitment of XRCC1 at the ion hits reached a maximum at about 200 s post-irradiation and then was followed by a slower release into the nucleoplasm. The measured dual-exponential kinetics of XRCC1 protein are consistent with the proposed consecutive reaction model, and the measurements obtained that the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 recruitment to DNA strand break is 1.2 × 10"−"3 s"−"1 and the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 release from the break-XRCC1 complex is 1.2 × 10"−"2 s"−"1.

  10. Live cell imaging combined with high-energy single-ion microbeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Na; Du, Guanghua; Liu, Wenjing; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Chen, Hao; Wei, Junzhe

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand breaks can lead to cell carcinogenesis or cell death if not repaired rapidly and efficiently. An online live cell imaging system was established at the high energy microbeam facility at the Institute of Modern Physics to study early and fast cellular response to DNA damage after high linear energy transfer ion radiation. The HT1080 cells expressing XRCC1-RFP were irradiated with single high energy nickel ions, and time-lapse images of the irradiated cells were obtained online. The live cell imaging analysis shows that strand-break repair protein XRCC1 was recruited to the ion hit position within 20 s in the cells and formed bright foci in the cell nucleus. The fast recruitment of XRCC1 at the ion hits reached a maximum at about 200 s post-irradiation and then was followed by a slower release into the nucleoplasm. The measured dual-exponential kinetics of XRCC1 protein are consistent with the proposed consecutive reaction model, and the measurements obtained that the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 recruitment to DNA strand break is 1.2 × 10-3 s-1 and the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 release from the break-XRCC1 complex is 1.2 × 10-2 s-1.

  11. The neutron imaging diagnostic at NIF (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, F E; Bower, D; Buckles, R; Clark, D D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H; Wilson, D C

    2012-10-01

    A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

  12. The neutron imaging diagnostic at NIF (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, F. E.; Clark, D. D.; Danly, C. R.; Drury, O. B.; Fatherley, V. E.; Gallegos, R.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Loomis, E. N.; Martinson, D. D.; Mares, D.; Morley, D. J.; Morgan, G. L.; Oertel, J. A.; Tregillis, I. L.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Bower, D.; Dzenitis, J. M. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2012-10-15

    A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

  13. Application of imaging plate neutron detector to neutron radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Fujine, S; Kamata, M; Etoh, M

    1999-01-01

    As an imaging plate neutron detector (IP-ND) has been available for thermal neutron radiography (TNR) which has high resolution, high sensitivity and wide range, some basic characteristics of the IP-ND system were measured at the E-2 facility of the KUR. After basic performances of the IP were studied, images with high quality were obtained at a neutron fluence of 2 to 7x10 sup 8 n cm sup - sup 2. It was found that the IP-ND system with Gd sub 2 O sub 3 as a neutron converter material has a higher sensitivity to gamma-ray than that of a conventional film method. As a successful example, clear radiographs of the flat view for the fuel side plates with boron burnable poison were obtained. An application of the IP-ND system to neutron radiography (NR) is presented in this paper.

  14. Definition by modelling, optimization and characterization of a neutron spectrometry system based on Bonner spheres extended to the high-energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serre, S.

    2010-01-01

    This research thesis first describes the problematic of the effects of natural radiation on micro- and nano-electronic components, and the atmospheric-radiative stress of atmospheric neutrons from cosmic origin: issue of 'Single event upsets', present knowledge of the atmospheric radiative environment induced by cosmic rays. The author then presents the neutron-based detection and spectrometry by using the Bonner sphere technique: principle of moderating spheres, definition and mathematical formulation of neutron spectrometry using Bonner spheres, active sensors of thermal neutrons, response of a system to conventional Bonner spheres, extension to the range of high energies. Then, he reports the development of a Bonner sphere system extended to the high-energy range for the spectrometry of atmospheric neutrons: definition of a conventional system, Monte Carlo calculation of response functions, development of the response matrix, representation and semi-empirical verification of fluence response, uncertainty analysis, extension to high energies, and measurement tests of the spectrometer. He reports the use of a Monte Carlo simulation to characterize the spectrometer response in the high-energy range

  15. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y., E-mail: cycjty@sophie.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Fuji, Hino, Tokyo 191-8502 (Japan); Fujiwara, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M. [Nuclear Professional School, the University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Tomita, H. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshihara, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  16. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-01-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  17. Presentation of a semiempirical method for the calculation of doses due to neutrons and capture gamma rays inside high energy accelerators rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcher, A.M.; Bonet Duran, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Medical electron accelerators operating above 10 MeV produce radiation beams that are contaminated with neutrons. Therefore, shielding design for high energy accelerator rooms must consider the neutron component of the radiation field. In this paper a semiempirical method is presented to calculate doses due to neutrons and capture gamma rays inside the room and the maze. The calculation method is based on the knowledge of the neutron yield Q (neutrons/Gy of photons at isocenter) and the average energy of the primary beam of neutrons Eo (MeV). The method constitutes an appropriate tool for shielding facilities evaluation. The accuracy of the method has been contrasted with data obtained from the literature and an excellent correlation among the calculations and the measured values was achieved. In addition, the method has been used in the verification of experimental data corresponding to a 15 MeV linear accelerator installed in the country with similar results. (author) [es

  18. High throughput on-chip analysis of high-energy charged particle tracks using lensfree imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Wei; Shabbir, Faizan; Gong, Chao; Gulec, Cagatay; Pigeon, Jeremy; Shaw, Jessica; Greenbaum, Alon; Tochitsky, Sergei; Joshi, Chandrashekhar [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ozcan, Aydogan, E-mail: ozcan@ucla.edu [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Bioengineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI), University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-04-13

    We demonstrate a high-throughput charged particle analysis platform, which is based on lensfree on-chip microscopy for rapid ion track analysis using allyl diglycol carbonate, i.e., CR-39 plastic polymer as the sensing medium. By adopting a wide-area opto-electronic image sensor together with a source-shifting based pixel super-resolution technique, a large CR-39 sample volume (i.e., 4 cm × 4 cm × 0.1 cm) can be imaged in less than 1 min using a compact lensfree on-chip microscope, which detects partially coherent in-line holograms of the ion tracks recorded within the CR-39 detector. After the image capture, using highly parallelized reconstruction and ion track analysis algorithms running on graphics processing units, we reconstruct and analyze the entire volume of a CR-39 detector within ∼1.5 min. This significant reduction in the entire imaging and ion track analysis time not only increases our throughput but also allows us to perform time-resolved analysis of the etching process to monitor and optimize the growth of ion tracks during etching. This computational lensfree imaging platform can provide a much higher throughput and more cost-effective alternative to traditional lens-based scanning optical microscopes for ion track analysis using CR-39 and other passive high energy particle detectors.

  19. Neutron imaging and applications a reference for the imaging community

    CERN Document Server

    McGreevy, Robert L; Bilheux, Hassina Z

    2009-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the basics of neutron beam production in addition to the wide scope of techniques that enhance imaging application capabilities. This title features a section that describes imaging single grains in polycrystalline materials, neutron imaging of geological materials and other materials science and engineering areas.

  20. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part III: Instrument response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silari, M.; Agosteo, S.; Beck, P.; Bedogni, R.; Cale, E.; Caresana, M.; Domingo, C.; Donadille, L.; Dubourg, N.; Esposito, A.; Fehrenbacher, G.; Fernandez, F.; Ferrarini, M.; Fiechtner, A.; Fuchs, A.; Garcia, M.J.; Golnik, N.; Gutermuth, F.; Khurana, S.; Klages, Th.

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organizational framework for this project was provided by the European radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. Work Package 6 of CONRAD dealt with 'complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces' and in this context it organised a benchmark exercise, which included both measurements and calculations, in a stray radiation field at a high-energy particle accelerator at GSI, Germany. The aim was to intercompare the response of several types of active detectors and passive dosemeters in a well-characterised workplace field. The Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation field and the experimental determination of the neutron spectra with various Bonner Sphere Spectrometers are discussed in Rollet et al. (2008) and in Wiegel et al. (2008). This paper focuses on the intercomparison of the response of the dosemeters in terms of ambient dose equivalent. The paper describes in detail the detectors employed in the experiment, followed by a discussion of the results. A comparison is also made with the H*(10) values predicted by the Monte Carlo simulations and those measured by the BSS systems.

  1. Image of the Crab Nebula Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This is an x-ray image of the Crab Nebula taken with the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory. The image is demonstrated by a pulsar, which appears as a bright point due to its pulsed x-ray emissions. The strongest region of diffused emissions comes from just northwest of the pulsar, and corresponds closely to the region of brightest visible-light emission. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  2. Characterization of the PTW 34031 ionization chamber (PMI) at RCNP with high energy neutrons ranging from 100 - 392 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, C.; Carbonez, P.; Feldbaumer, E.; Forkel-Wirth, D.; Jaegerhofer, L.; Pangallo, M.; Perrin, D.; Urscheler, C.; Roesler, S.; Vincke, H.; Widorski, M.; Iwamoto, Y.; Hagiwara, M.; Satoh, D.; Iwase, H.; Yashima, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Masuda, A.; Nishiyama, J.; Harano, H.; Itoga, T.; Nakamura, T.; Sato, T.; Nakane, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Sakamoto, Y.; Taniguchi, S.; Nakao, N.; Tamii, A.; Shima, T.; Hatanaka, K.

    2017-09-01

    Radiation monitoring at high energy proton accelerators poses a considerable challenge due to the complexity of the encountered stray radiation fields. These environments comprise a wide variety of different particle types and span from fractions of electron-volts up to several terra electron-volts. As a consequence the use of Monte Carlo simulation programs like FLUKA is indispensable to obtain appropriate field-specific calibration factors. At many locations of the LHC a large contribution to the particle fluence is expected to originate from high-energy neutrons and thus, benchmark experiments with mono-energetic neutron beams are of high importance to verify the aforementioned detector response calculations. This paper summarizes the results of a series of benchmark experiments with quasi mono-energetic neutrons of 100, 140, 200, 250 and 392 MeV that have been carried out at RCNP - Osaka University, during several campaigns between 2006 and 2014.

  3. New neutron imaging using pulsed sources. Characteristics of a pulsed neutron source and principle of pulsed neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Neutron beam is one of important tools to obtain the transmission image of an object. Until now, steady state neutron sources such as reactors are mainly used for this imaging purpose. Recently, it has been demonstrated that pulsed neutron imaging based on accelerator neutron sources can provide a real-space distribution of physical information of materials such as crystallographic structure, element, temperature, hydrogen bound state, magnetic field and so on, by analyzing wavelength dependent transmission spectrum, which information cannot be observed or difficult to obtain with a traditional imaging method using steady state neutrons. Here, characteristics of the pulsed neutron source and principle of the pulsed neutron imaging are explained as a basic concept of the new method. (author)

  4. Hard X-Ray Flare Source Sizes Measured with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Pernak, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of 18 double hard X-ray sources seen at energies above 25 keV are analyzed to determine the spatial extent of the most compact structures evident in each case. The following four image reconstruction algorithms were used: Clean, Pixon, and two routines using visibilities maximum entropy and forward fit (VFF). All have been adapted for this study to optimize their ability to provide reliable estimates of the sizes of the more compact sources. The source fluxes, sizes, and morphologies obtained with each method are cross-correlated and the similarities and disagreements are discussed. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the major axes of the sources with assumed elliptical Gaussian shapes are generally well correlated between the four image reconstruction routines and vary between the RHESSI resolution limit of approximately 2" up to approximately 20" with most below 10". The FWHM of the minor axes are generally at or just above the RHESSI limit and hence should be considered as unresolved in most cases. The orientation angles of the elliptical sources are also well correlated. These results suggest that the elongated sources are generally aligned along a flare ribbon with the minor axis perpendicular to the ribbon. This is verified for the one flare in our list with coincident Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) images. There is evidence for significant extra flux in many of the flares in addition to the two identified compact sources, thus rendering the VFF assumption of just two Gaussians inadequate. A more realistic approximation in many cases would be of two line sources with unresolved widths. Recommendations are given for optimizing the RHESSI imaging reconstruction process to ensure that the finest possible details of the source morphology become evident and that reliable estimates can be made of the source dimensions.

  5. Image of the Supernova Cassiopeia Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    This supernova in the constellation Cassiopeia was observed by Tycho Brahe in 1572. In this x-ray image from the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-2/Einstein Observatory produced by nearly a day of exposure time, the center region appears filled with emissions that can be resolved into patches or knots of material. However, no central pulsar or other collapsed object can be seen. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  6. Image of the Quasar 3C 273 Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This image is an observation of Quasar 3C 273 by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory. It reveals the presence of a new source (upper left) with a red shift that indicates that it is about 10 billion light years away. Quasars are mysterious, bright, star-like objects apparently located at the very edge of the visible universe. Although no bigger than our solar system, they radiate as much visible light as a thousand galaxies. Quasars also emit radio signals and were previously recognized as x-ray sources. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2 was designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  7. Image of the Vela Supernova Remnant Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Like the Crab Nebula, the Vela Supernova Remnant has a radio pulsar at its center. In this image taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory, the pulsar appears as a point source surrounded by weak and diffused emissions of x-rays. HEAO-2's computer processing system was able to record and display the total number of x-ray photons (a tiny bundle of radiant energy used as the fundamental unit of electromagnetic radiation) on a scale along the margin of the picture. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  8. Image of the Eta Carinae Nebula Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This image is an x-ray view of Eta Carinae Nebula showing bright stars taken with the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory. The Eta Carinae Nebula is a large and complex cloud of gas, crisscrossed with dark lanes of dust, some 6,500 light years from Earth. Buried deep in this cloud are many bright young stars and a very peculiar variable star. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  9. Optics for Advanced Neutron Imaging and Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncton, David E.; Khaykovich, Boris

    2016-01-01

    During the report period, we continued the work as outlined in the original proposal. We have analyzed potential optical designs of Wolter mirrors for the neutron-imaging instrument VENUS, which is under construction at SNS. In parallel, we have conducted the initial polarized imaging experiment at Helmholtz Zentrum, Berlin, one of very few of currently available polarized-imaging facilities worldwide.

  10. Experimental study on neutronics in bombardment of thick targets by high energy proton beams for accelerator-driven sub-critical system

    CERN Document Server

    Guo Shi Lun; Shi Yong Qian; Shen Qing Biao; Wan Jun Sheng; Brandt, R; Vater, P; Kulakov, B A; Krivopustov, M I; Sosnin, A N

    2002-01-01

    The experimental study on neutronics in the target region of accelerator-driven sub-critical system is carried out by using the high energy accelerator in Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia. The experiments with targets U(Pb), Pb and Hg bombarded by 0.533, 1.0, 3.7 and 7.4 GeV proton beams show that the neutron yield ratio of U(Pb) to Hg and Pb to Hg targets is (2.10 +- 0.10) and (1.76 +- 0.33), respectively. Hg target is disadvantageous to U(Pb) and Pb targets to get more neutrons. Neutron yield drops along 20 cm thick targets as the thickness penetrated by protons increases. The lower the energy of protons, the steeper the neutron yield drops. In order to get more uniform field of neutrons in the targets, the energy of protons from accelerators should not be lower than 1 GeV. The spectra of secondary neutrons produced by different energies of protons are similar, but the proportion of neutrons with higher energy gradually increases as the proton energy increases

  11. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janek, S; Svensson, R; Jonsson, C; Brahme, A

    2006-01-01

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in 11 C and 15 O but also 13 N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of 12 C, 16 O and 14 N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated 12 C, 16 O and 14 N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery verification by means of PET imaging seems to be

  12. Evaluation of the fluence to dose conversion coefficients for high energy neutrons using a voxel phantom coupled with the GEANT4 code

    CERN Document Server

    Paganini, S

    2005-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from Galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the male adult voxels phantom MAX, developed in the Nuclear Energy Department of Pernambuco Federal University in Brazil, has been coupled with the Monte Carlo simulation code GEANT4. This toolkit, distributed and upgraded from the international scientific community of CERN/Switzerland, simulates thermal to ultrahigh energy neutrons transport and interactions in the matter. The high energy neutrons are pointed as the component that contribute about 70% of the neutron effective dose that represent the 35% to 60% total dose at aircraft altitude. In this research calculations of conversion coefficients from fluence to effective dose are performed for neutrons of energies from 100 MeV ...

  13. The National Ignition Facility Neutron Imaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, Mark D.; Batha, Steven H.; Bradley, Paul A.; Day, Robert D.; Clark, David D.; Fatherley, Valerie E.; Finch, Joshua P.; Gallegos, Robert A.; Garcia, Felix P.; Grim, Gary P.; Jaramillo, Steven A.; Montoya, Andrew J.; Morgan, George L.; Oertel, John A.; Ortiz, Thomas A.; Payton, Jeremy R.; Pazuchanics, Peter; Schmidt, Derek W.; Valdez, Adelaida C.; Wilde, Carl H.

    2008-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is scheduled to begin deuterium-tritium (DT) shots possibly in the next several years. One of the important diagnostics in understanding capsule behavior and to guide changes in Hohlraum illumination, capsule design, and geometry will be neutron imaging of both the primary 14 MeV neutrons and the lower-energy downscattered neutrons in the 6-13 MeV range. The neutron imaging system (NIS) described here, which we are currently building for use on NIF, uses a precisely aligned set of apertures near the target to form the neutron images on a segmented scintillator. The images are recorded on a gated, intensified charge coupled device. Although the aperture set may be as close as 20 cm to the target, the imaging camera system will be located at a distance of 28 m from the target. At 28 m the camera system is outside the NIF building. Because of the distance and shielding, the imager will be able to obtain images with little background noise. The imager will be capable of imaging downscattered neutrons from failed capsules with yields Y n >10 14 neutrons. The shielding will also permit the NIS to function at neutron yields >10 18 , which is in contrast to most other diagnostics that may not work at high neutron yields. The following describes the current NIF NIS design and compares the predicted performance with the NIF specifications that must be satisfied to generate images that can be interpreted to understand results of a particular shot. The current design, including the aperture, scintillator, camera system, and reconstruction methods, is briefly described. System modeling of the existing Omega NIS and comparison with the Omega data that guided the NIF design based on our Omega results is described. We will show NIS model calculations of the expected NIF images based on component evaluations at Omega. We will also compare the calculated NIF input images with those unfolded from the NIS images generated from our NIS numerical

  14. Imaging high energy photons with PILATUS II at the tagged photon beam at MAX-lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, V. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: leev@physics.unimelb.edu.au; Peake, D.J.; Sobott, B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Schroeder, B. [MAX-lab, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Broennimann, Ch. [DECTRIS Ltd., Baden (Switzerland); Henrich, B. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Hansen, K. [MAX-lab, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); O' Keefe, G.J. [Centre for PET, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria 3084 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Taylor, G.N. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Boland, M.J. [Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Thompson, M.N.; Rassool, R.P. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia)

    2009-05-21

    In photonuclear experiments precise location of the photon beam relative to the experimental sample is critical. Previously used techniques such as using photographic film to identify the position, intensity and centroid of the beam is time-consuming and a faster method is required. PILATUS is a single-photon-counting pixel detector developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. It is a silicon-based, two-dimensional detector with a large dynamic range and zero readout noise. Designed as an X-ray detector, its optimal quantum efficiency is between 3 and 30 keV. This paper reports measurements carried out at the MAX-lab tagged photon facility in Lund, Sweden. The beam endpoint energy of approximately 200 MeV is far above the designed optimal energy detection range of PILATUS, and provides a critical test of the use of PILATUS under high energy conditions. The detector was placed in the photon beam and images were taken both downstream of other experiments, and in close range of a 19 mm collimator. The successful measurements demonstrate the versatility and robustness of the detector and provide an effective way of quickly and accurately monitoring beam position and profile in real time.

  15. Image of the Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    This x-ray photograph of the Supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, taken with the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 2/Einstein Observatory, shows that the regions with fast moving knots of material in the expanding shell are bright and clear. A faint x-ray halo, just outside the bright shell, is interpreted as a shock wave moving ahead of the expanding debris. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  16. A very high energy imaging for radioactive wastes processing; Une imagerie haute energie pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, V. [CEA Grenoble, Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique (DRT/DSIS/SSBS/LETI), 38 (France); Pettier, J.L. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DTN/SMTM), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    The X imaging occurs at a lot of steps of the radioactive wastes processing: selection for conditioning, physical characterization with a view to radiological characterization, quality control of the product before storage, transport or disposal. Size and volume of the objects considered here necessitate to work with very high energy systems. Here is shown, through some examples, in which conditions this X imaging is carried out as well as the contribution of the obtained images. (O.M.)

  17. Combined neutron imaging techniques for cultural heritage purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materna, T.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the different new neutron techniques developed by the Ancient Charm collaboration to image objects of cultural heritage importance: Prompt-gamma-ray activation imaging (PGAI) coupled to cold/thermal neutron transmission tomography, Neutron Resonance Capture Imaging (NRCI) and Neutron Resonance Tomography.

  18. The impact of ICRP 60 recommendations on the dose equivalent in low- and high energy neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakes, J; Schraube, H [GSF-Forschungszentrum Neuberg, D-85758 Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz

    1996-12-31

    The objectives of this study was to determine the impact of the increased risk factors for neutrons after ICRP 60 on the operational dose equivalent quantities at a few neutron fields selected with the respect to cover the broad variety of neutron spectra: (1) Cadarache calibration assembly, with average neutron energy around 0.6 MeV, designed to simulate realistic neutron spectra at workplaces. This assembly is basically composed of an almost spherical {sup 238}U converter irradiated by 14.6 MeV neutrons from an accelerator target, placed at its center, and a scattering chamber consisting of a cylindrical polyethylene duct and a series of additional shieldings; (2) Neutron spectra at exposed workplaces in nuclear power plants; (3) Moderated spectra of {sup 252}Cf fission source; (4) Neutron spectra behind a shielding made of the iron (the average energy 5.,89 MeV) and concrete (the average energy 46.51 MeV), respectively; (5) Cosmic rays induced neutron spectra measured on the top of the Zugspitze (2968 m) where there is the average neutron energy around 40 MeV. From the derived neutron spectra, the mean quality factors and conversion factors h after ICRP 21 and ICRP 60, respectively, were calculated. The dose equivalent conversion factors were taken for the region below 20 MeV, and the energy region above 20 MeV. The results show that the operational quantities were affected predominately in the low energy fields, where the changes are given by a factor of 1,3 for the neutron fields given above. As has been expected, the impact of the new recommendations depends on the shape of the neutron spectra. Therefore, this factor can be much higher in the fields where the intermediate energy region is dominant, which is the case of moderated and scattered spectra at some places in the nuclear power plant and around containers with the spent fuel elements. (J.K.) 9 refs.

  19. LISe pixel detector for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wiggins, Brenden [Technology Development, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Milburn, Rob [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Burger, Arnold [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Life and Physical Sciences, Fisk University, Nashville, TN (United States); Bilheux, Hassina [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Santodonato, Louis [Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chvala, Ondrej [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Stowe, Ashley [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Technology Development, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Lukosi, Eric, E-mail: elukosi@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-11

    Semiconducting lithium indium diselenide, {sup 6}LiInSe{sub 2} or LISe, has promising characteristics for neutron detection applications. The 95% isotopic enrichment of {sup 6}Li results in a highly efficient thermal neutron-sensitive material. In this study, we report on a proof-of-principle investigation of a semiconducting LISe pixel detector to demonstrate its potential as an efficient neutron imager. The LISe pixel detector had a 4×4 of pixels with a 550 µm pitch on a 5×5×0.56 mm{sup 3} LISe substrate. An experimentally verified spatial resolution of 300 µm was observed utilizing a super-sampling technique.

  20. High-Energy X-Ray Imaging Applied to Nondestructive Characterization of Large Nuclear Waste Drums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estre, Nicolas; Eck, Daniel; Pettier, Jean-Luc; Payan, Emmanuel; Roure, Christophe; Simon, Eric

    2015-12-01

    As part of its R&D programs on non-destructive testing of nuclear waste drums, CEA is commissioning an irradiation cell named CINPHONIE, at Cadarache. This cell allows high-energy imaging (radiography and tomography) on large volumes (up to 5 m3) and heavy weights (up to 5 tons). A demonstrator has been finalized, based on existing components. The X-ray source is a 9 MeV LINAC which produces Bremsstrahlung X-rays (up to 23 Gy/min at 1 meter in the beam axis). The mechanical bench is digitally controlled on three axes (translation, rotation, elevation) and can handle objects up to 2 t. This bench performs trajectories necessary for acquisition of projections (sinograms) according to different geometries: Translation-Rotation, Fan-Beam and Cone-Beam. Two detection systems both developed by CEA-Leti are available. The first one is a large GADOX scintillating screen ( 800 ×600 mm2) coupled to a low-noise pixelated camera. The second one is a multi-CdTe semiconductor detector, offering measurements up to 5 decades of attenuation (equivalent to 25 cm of lead or 180 cm of standard concrete). At the end of the acquisition, a Filtered Back Projection-based algorithm is performed. Then, a density slice (fan-beam tomography) or a density volume (cone-beam tomography or helical tomography) is produced and used to examine the waste. Characterization of LINAC, associated detectors as well as the full acquisition chain, are presented. Experimental performances on phantoms and real drum are discussed and expected limits on defect detectability are evaluated by simulation. The final system, designed to handle objects up to 5 tons is then presented.

  1. Temperature imaging using epithermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, P.H.; Taylor, A.D.

    1987-08-01

    The paper concerns the temperature measurement of suitable targets, both remotely and non-invasively, using epithermal neutrons. The text was presented at the Neutron Resonance Radiography Workshop, Los Alamos, U.S.A., 1987. The technique is demonstrated for tantalum foils at different temperatures, using a pulsed beam of epithermal neutrons, at both Los Alamos and ISIS (United Kingdom). Results on the measured time-of-flight spectra and the tantalum resonances are presented. Beam properties and fluxes at ISIS are discussed. Features of the proposed detectors suitable for the temperature technique are outlined, along with the data analysis, the moving targets, the cyclic temperature variations and transients, and the usefulness of the technique. (U.K.)

  2. Measurement of neutron-production double-differential cross sections for high-energy pion-incident reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Yousuke; Iga, Kiminori; Kitsuki, Hirohiko

    2000-01-01

    Double-differential neutron-production yields for 870-MeV π + , π - and 2.1-GeV π + incident on iron and lead targets were measured with NE213 liquid scintillators by time-of-flight technique. The two-gate integration method was used for the pulse shape discrimination between neutrons and gamma-rays. Neutron detection efficiencies were derived from the calculation results of SCINFUL and CECIL codes. The experimental results were compared with the calculation including the neutron transport in the actual thickness target by the contribution use of both NMTC/JAERI97 and MCNPX. (author)

  3. High energy resolution measurement of the sup 238 U neutron capture yield from 1 to 100 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macklin, R.L. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Perez, R.B. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); De Saussure, G.; Ingle, R.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the precise determination of the {sup 238}U neutron capture yield (i.e. the probability of neutron capture) as a function of neutron energy with the highest available neutron energy resolution. The motivation for this undertaking arises from the central role played by the {sup 238}U neutron capture process in the neutron balance of both thermal reactors and fast breeder reactors. The present measurement was performed using the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) facility. The pulsed beam of neutrons from the ORELA facility is collimated on a sample of {sup 238}U. The neutron capture rate in the sample is measured, as a function of neutron time-of-flight (TOF) by detecting the {gamma}-rays from the {sup 238}U(n, {gamma}){sup 239}U reaction with a large {gamma}-ray detector surrounding the {sup 238}U sample. At each energy, the capture yield is proportional to the observed capture rate divided by the measured intensity of the neutron beam. The constant of proportionality (the normalization constant) is obtained from the ratio of theoretical to experimentally measured areas under small {sup 238}U resonances where the resonance parameters have been determined from high-resolution {sup 238}U transmission measurements. The cross section for the reaction {sup 238}U(n,{gamma}){sup 239}U can be derived from the measured capture yield if one applies appropriate corrections for multiple scattering and resonance self-shielding. Some 200 {sup 238}U neutron resonances in the energy range from 250 eV to 10 keV have been observed which had not been detected in previous measurements. (author).

  4. Imaging optimizations with non-pure and high-energy positron emitters in small animal positron computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harzmann, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    The contribution on imaging optimizations with non-pure and high-energy positron emitters in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) covers the following topics: physical fundamentals of PET, mathematical image reconstruction and data analyses, Monte-Carlo simulations and implemented correction scheme, quantification of cascade gamma coincidences based on simulations and measurements, sinogram based corrections, restoration of the spatial resolution, implementation of full corrections.

  5. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Kang, Misun [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-Lin [ORNL; Horita, Jusuke [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  6. Pulse-shape discrimination of high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in NaI(Tl)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Share, G.H.; Kurfess, J.D.; Theus, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Pulse-shape discrimination can be used to separate neutron and gamma-ray interactions depositing energies up to in excess of 50 MeV in NaI(Tl) crystals. The secondary alpha particles, deuterons and protons produced in the neutron interactions are also resolvable. (Auth.)

  7. Fiber optic neutron imaging system: calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, R.M.; Gow, C.E.; Thayer, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Two neutron imaging experiments using fiber optics have been performed at the Nevada Test Site. In each experiment, an array of scintillator fluor tubes is exposed to neutrons. Light is coupled out through radiation resistant PCS fibers (8-m long) into high-bandwidth, graded index fibers. For image reconstruction to be accurate, common timing differences and transmission variations between fiber optic channels are needed. The calibration system featured a scanning pulsed dye laser, a specially designed fiber optic star coupler, a tektronix 7912AD transient digitizer, and a DEC PDP 11/34 computing system

  8. Digital image processing in neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, S.

    2000-11-01

    Neutron radiography is a method for the visualization of the macroscopic inner-structure and material distributions of various samples. The basic experimental arrangement consists of a neutron source, a collimator functioning as beam formatting assembly and of a plane position sensitive integrating detector. The object is placed between the collimator exit and the detector, which records a two dimensional image. This image contains information about the composition and structure of the sample-interior, as a result of the interaction of neutrons by penetrating matter. Due to rapid developments of detector and computer technology as well as deployments in the field of digital image processing, new technologies are nowadays available which have the potential to improve the performance of neutron radiographic investigations enormously. Therefore, the aim of this work was to develop a state-of-the art digital imaging device, suitable for the two neutron radiography stations located at the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten and furthermore, to identify and develop two and three dimensional digital image processing methods suitable for neutron radiographic and tomographic applications, and to implement and optimize them within data processing strategies. The first step was the development of a new imaging device fulfilling the requirements of a high reproducibility, easy handling, high spatial resolution, a large dynamic range, high efficiency and a good linearity. The detector output should be inherently digitized. The key components of the detector system selected on the basis of these requirements consist of a neutron sensitive scintillator screen, a CCD-camera and a mirror to reflect the light emitted by the scintillator to the CCD-camera. This detector design enables to place the camera out of the direct neutron beam. The whole assembly is placed in a light shielded aluminum box. The camera is controlled by a

  9. Digital image processing in neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, S.

    2000-11-01

    Neutron radiography is a method for the visualization of the macroscopic inner-structure and material distributions of various materials. The basic experimental arrangement consists of a neutron source, a collimator functioning as beam formatting assembly and of a plane position sensitive integrating detector. The object is placed between the collimator exit and the detector, which records a two dimensional image. This image contains information about the composition and structure of the sample-interior, as a result of the interaction of neutrons by penetrating matter. Due to rapid developments of detector and computer technology as well as deployments in the field of digital image processing, new technologies are nowadays available which have the potential to improve the performance of neutron radiographic investigations enormously. Therefore, the aim of this work was to develop a state-of-the art digital imaging device, suitable for the two neutron radiography stations located at the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten and furthermore, to identify and develop two and three dimensional digital image processing methods suitable for neutron radiographic and tomographic applications, and to implement and optimize them within data processing strategies. The first step was the development of a new imaging device fulfilling the requirements of a high reproducibility, easy handling, high spatial resolution, a large dynamic range, high efficiency and a good linearity. The detector output should be inherently digitized. The key components of the detector system selected on the basis of these requirements consist of a neutron sensitive scintillator screen, a CCD-camera and a mirror to reflect the light emitted by the scintillator to the CCD-camera. This detector design enables to place the camera out of the direct neutron beam. The whole assembly is placed in a light shielded aluminum box. The camera is controlled by a

  10. Neutron beam imaging with GEM detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albani, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.; Croci, G.; Muraro, A.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Cavenago, M.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron GEM-based detectors represent a new frontier of devices in neutron physics applications where a very high neutron flux must be measured such as future fusion experiments (e.g. ITER Neutral beam Injector) and spallation sources (e.g. the European Spallation source). This kind of detectors can be properly adapted to be used both as beam monitors but also as neutron diffraction detectors that could represent a valid alternative for the 3 He detectors replacement. Fast neutron GEM detectors (nGEM) feature a cathode composed by one layer of polyethylene and one of aluminium (neutron scattering on hydrogen generates protons that are detected in the gas) while thermal neutron GEM detectors (bGEM) are equipped with a borated aluminium cathode (charged particles are generated through the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction). GEM detectors can be realized in large area (1 m 2 ) and their readout can be pixelated. Three different prototypes of nGEM and one prototype of bGEM detectors of different areas and equipped with different types of readout have been built and tested. All the detectors have been used to measure the fast and thermal neutron 2D beam image at the ISIS-VESUVIO beamline. The different kinds of readout patterns (different areas of the pixels) have been compared in similar conditions. All the detectors measured a width of the beam profile consitent with the expected one. The imaging property of each detector was then tested by inserting samples of different material and shape in the beam. All the samples were correctly reconstructed and the definition of the reconstruction depends on the type of readout anode. The fast neutron beam profile reconstruction was then compared to the one obtained by diamond detectors positioned on the same beamline while the thermal neutron one was compared to the imaged obtained by cadmium-coupled x-rays films. Also efficiency and the gamma background rejection have been determined. These prototypes represent the first step towards

  11. The pin pixel detector--neutron imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Marsh, A S; Rhodes, N J; Schooneveld, E M; Simmons, J E; Stephenson, R

    2002-01-01

    The development and testing of a neutron gas pixel detector intended for application in neutron diffraction studies is reported. Using standard electrical connector pins as point anodes, the detector is based on a commercial 100 pin connector block. A prototype detector of aperture 25.4 mmx25.4 mm has been fabricated, giving a pixel size of 2.54 mm which matches well to the spatial resolution typically required in a neutron diffractometer. A 2-Dimensional resistive divide readout system has been adapted to permit the imaging properties of the detector to be explored in advance of true pixel readout electronics. The timing properties of the device match well to the requirements of the ISIS-pulsed neutron source.

  12. Neutron transmission benchmark problems for iron and concrete shields in low, intermediate and high energy proton accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hayashi, Katsumi [and others

    1996-09-01

    Benchmark problems were prepared for evaluating the calculation codes and the nuclear data for accelerator shielding design by the Accelerator Shielding Working Group of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics in JAERI. Four benchmark problems: transmission of quasi-monoenergetic neutrons generated by 43 MeV and 68 MeV protons through iron and concrete shields at TIARA of JAERI, neutron fluxes in and around an iron beam stop irradiated by 500 MeV protons at KEK, reaction rate distributions inside a thick concrete shield irradiated by 6.2 GeV protons at LBL, and neutron and hadron fluxes inside an iron beam stop irradiated by 24 GeV protons at CERN are compiled in this document. Calculational configurations and neutron reaction cross section data up to 500 MeV are provided. (author)

  13. High energy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhm, W.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Currently, quantification of doses from high-energy radiation fields is a topical issue. This is so because high-energy neutrons play an important role for radiation exposure of air crew members and personnel outside the shielding of ion therapy facilities. In an effort to study air crew exposure from cosmic radiation in detail, two Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSSs) have recently been installed to measure secondary neutrons from cosmic radiation, one at the environmental research station 'Schneefernerhaus' at an altitude of 2650 m on the Zugspitze mountain, Germany, the other at the Koldewey station close to the North Pole on Spitsbergen. Based on the measured neutron fluence distributions and on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, mean ambient dose equivalent rate values of 75.0 ± 2.9 nSv/h and 8.7 ± 0.6 nSv/h were obtained for October 2008, respectively. Neutrons with energies above about 20 MeV contribute about 50% to dose, at 2650 m. Ambient dose equivalent rates measured by means of a standard rem counter and an extended rem counter at the Schneefernerhaus confirm this result. In order to study the response of state-of-the-art radiation instrumentation in such a high-energy radiation field, a benchmark exercise that included both measurements in and simulation of the stray neutron radiation field at the high-energy particle accelerator at GSI, Germany, were performed. This CONRAD (COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry) project was funded by the European Commission, and the organizational framework was provided by the European Radiation Dosimetry Group, EURADOS. The Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation field and the experimental determination of the neutron spectra with various Bonner Sphere Spectrometers suggest the neutron fluence distributions to be very similar to those of secondary neutrons from cosmic radiation. The results of this intercomparison exercise in terms of ambient dose equivalent are also discussed

  14. Computed image analysis of neutron radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinca, M.; Anghel, E.; Preda, M.; Pavelescu, M.

    2008-01-01

    Similar with X-radiography, using neutron like penetrating particle, there is in practice a nondestructive technique named neutron radiology. When the registration of information is done on a film with the help of a conversion foil (with high cross section for neutrons) that emits secondary radiation (β,γ) that creates a latent image, the technique is named neutron radiography. A radiographic industrial film that contains the image of the internal structure of an object, obtained by neutron radiography, must be subsequently analyzed to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about the structural integrity of that object. There is possible to do a computed analysis of a film using a facility with next main components: an illuminator for film, a CCD video camera and a computer (PC) with suitable software. The qualitative analysis intends to put in evidence possibly anomalies of the structure due to manufacturing processes or induced by working processes (for example, the irradiation activity in the case of the nuclear fuel). The quantitative determination is based on measurements of some image parameters: dimensions, optical densities. The illuminator has been built specially to perform this application but can be used for simple visual observation. The illuminated area is 9x40 cm. The frame of the system is a comparer of Abbe Carl Zeiss Jena type, which has been adapted to achieve this application. The video camera assures the capture of image that is stored and processed by computer. A special program SIMAG-NG has been developed at INR Pitesti that beside of the program SMTV II of the special acquisition module SM 5010 can analyze the images of a film. The major application of the system was the quantitative analysis of a film that contains the images of some nuclear fuel pins beside a dimensional standard. The system was used to measure the length of the pellets of the TRIGA nuclear fuel. (authors)

  15. Study of scattering in bi-dimensional neutron radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, K.A.M. de; Crispim, V.R.; Silva, F.C.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of neutron scattering frequently causes distortions in neutron radiographic images and, thus, reduces the quality. In this project, a type of filter, comprised of cadmium (a neutron absorber), was used in the form of a grid to correct this effect. This device generated image data in the discrete shadow bands of the absorber, components relative to neutron scattering on the test object and surroundings. Scattering image data processing, together with the original neutron radiographic image, resulted in a corrected image with improved edge delineation and, thus, greater definition in the neutron radiographic image of the test object. The objective of this study is to propose a theoretical/experimental methodology that is capable of eliminating the components relative to neutron scattering in neutron radiographic images, coming from the material that composes the test object and the materials that compose the surrounding area. (author)

  16. Neutron Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strzelec, Andrea; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Finney, Charles E.A.; Daw, C. Stuart; Foster, Dave; Rutland, Christopher J.; Schillinger, Burkhard; Schulz, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article presents nondestructive neutron computed tomography (nCT) measurements of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) as a method to measure ash and soot loading in the filters. Uncatalyzed and unwashcoated 200cpsi cordierite DPFs exposed to 100% biodiesel (B100) exhaust and conventional ultra low sulfur 2007 certification diesel (ULSD) exhaust at one speed-load point (1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP) are compared to a brand new (never exposed) filter. Precise structural information about the substrate as well as an attempt to quantify soot and ash loading in the channel of the DPF illustrates the potential strength of the neutron imaging technique

  17. Formation of tomographic images with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, A.; Tenreiro, C; Valencia, J; Steinman, G.; Henriquez, C

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of having a non-destructive method of analysis for archaeological and paleontological samples is of interest. A special group of fossil samples has come to our attention, which because of their value should be preserved and, therefore, the availability of an indirect, non-destructive, non contaminating analytical technique is important. The strong absorption of usual kinds of radiation by a fossilized sample restricts the application of conventional methods of analysis. A type of radiation that is not completely attenuated by thick samples, in sizes that are typical in paleontology, is necessary. Neutrons may be considered as an ideal non-invasive probe with the possibility of developing a technique for the formation and analysis of images. A technique has been developed for the spatial reconstruction of the contents of a fossilized sample (tomography) with neutrons, without touching or altering the sample in any way. The neutron beam was extracted from the RECH-1 reactor belonging to the CCHEN, La Reina. The tomographic images of the contents of a fossilized egg are presented for the first time and represent views or cuts of the content as well as a set that permits the three dimensional reconstruction of the inside of the object and its subsequent animation in graphic format. This project developed a technique for taking neutron radiographs of this kind of sample including the numerical algorithms and the treatment and formation of the images (CW)

  18. Statistical analysis for discrimination of prompt gamma ray peak induced by high energy neutron: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do-Kun Yoon; Joo-Young Jung; Tae Suk Suh; Seong-Min Han

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is a statistical analysis for discrimination of prompt gamma ray peak induced by the 14.1 MeV neutron particles from spectra using Monte Carlo simulation. For the simulation, the information of 18 detector materials was used to simulate spectra by the neutron capture reaction. The discrimination of nine prompt gamma ray peaks from the simulation of each detector material was performed. We presented the several comparison indexes of energy resolution performance depending on the detector material using the simulation and statistics for the prompt gamma activation analysis. (author)

  19. Integral test of niobium differential elastic scattering cross-sections of 60 and 120 degrees for high-energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, Saim; Shin, Kazuo; Hyodo, Tomonori

    1984-01-01

    Spectra of scattered neutrons from a niobium disc were measured at the scattering angles of 60 deg and 120 deg by an NE-213 scintillator. Comparison of the experimental data with the point-to-point Monte Carlo calculations, using the evaluated data from the ENDF/B-IV file, showed good agreement at 60 deg, but considerable discrepancy at 120 deg. (author)

  20. Development of an imaging system for patient set-up monitoring during radiotherapeutic treatment with high energy photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herk, M. van.

    1985-01-01

    A prototype image detector has been designed and built for patient moniorting during radiotherapy treatment with high energy photon beams. A matrix of DC operated ionisation chambers was used to detect the transmitted radiation through a patient. The detector was developed in order to replace the current method, in which film radiography is used. Various detector configurations have been tested, and some results will be presented. Image enhancement was achieved by computer processing of the data. Theoretical possibilities of the detector system have been studied. (Auth.)

  1. Calibration of BAS-TR image plate response to high energy (3-300 MeV) carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, D.; Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Fernandez, J.; Cerchez, M.; Gray, R. J.; Hanton, F.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Neely, D.; Romagnani, L.; Ruiz, J. A.; Sarri, G.; Scullion, C.; Streeter, M.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the calibration of Fuji BAS-TR image plate (IP) response to high energy carbon ions of different charge states by employing an intense laser-driven ion source, which allowed access to carbon energies up to 270 MeV. The calibration method consists of employing a Thomson parabola spectrometer to separate and spectrally resolve different ion species, and a slotted CR-39 solid state detector overlayed onto an image plate for an absolute calibration of the IP signal. An empirical response function was obtained which can be reasonably extrapolated to higher ion energies. The experimental data also show that the IP response is independent of ion charge states.

  2. High Energy Resolution Hyperspectral X-Ray Imaging for Low-Dose Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Silvia; Saifuddin, Sarene C; Ferreira, Filipa I M; Henthorn, Nicholas; Seller, Paul; Sellin, Paul J; Stratmann, Philipp; Veale, Matthew C; Wilson, Matthew D; Cernik, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    Contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) is an alternative to conventional X-ray mammography for imaging dense breasts. However, conventional approaches to CEDM require a double exposure of the patient, implying higher dose, and risk of incorrect image registration due to motion artifacts. A novel approach is presented, based on hyperspectral imaging, where a detector combining positional and high-resolution spectral information (in this case based on Cadmium Telluride) is used. This allows simultaneous acquisition of the two images required for CEDM. The approach was tested on a custom breast-equivalent phantom containing iodinated contrast agent (Niopam 150®). Two algorithms were used to obtain images of the contrast agent distribution: K-edge subtraction (KES), providing images of the distribution of the contrast agent with the background structures removed, and a dual-energy (DE) algorithm, providing an iodine-equivalent image and a water-equivalent image. The high energy resolution of the detector allowed the selection of two close-by energies, maximising the signal in KES images, and enhancing the visibility of details with the low surface concentration of contrast agent. DE performed consistently better than KES in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio of the details; moreover, it allowed a correct reconstruction of the surface concentration of the contrast agent in the iodine image. Comparison with CEDM with a conventional detector proved the superior performance of hyperspectral CEDM in terms of the image quality/dose tradeoff.

  3. Fast-neutron, coded-aperture imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a large-scale, coded-aperture imager for fast neutrons, building off a proof-of concept instrument developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The Space Science Division at the NRL has a heritage of developing large-scale, mobile systems, using coded-aperture imaging, for long-range γ-ray detection and localization. The fast-neutron, coded-aperture imaging instrument, designed for a mobile unit (20 ft. ISO container), consists of a 32-element array of 15 cm×15 cm×15 cm liquid scintillation detectors (EJ-309) mounted behind a 12×12 pseudorandom coded aperture. The elements of the aperture are composed of 15 cm×15 cm×10 cm blocks of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The arrangement of the aperture elements produces a shadow pattern on the detector array behind the mask. By measuring of the number of neutron counts per masked and unmasked detector, and with knowledge of the mask pattern, a source image can be deconvolved to obtain a 2-d location. The number of neutrons per detector was obtained by processing the fast signal from each PMT in flash digitizing electronics. Digital pulse shape discrimination (PSD) was performed to filter out the fast-neutron signal from the γ background. The prototype instrument was tested at an indoor facility at the NRL with a 1.8-μCi and 13-μCi 252Cf neutron/γ source at three standoff distances of 9, 15 and 26 m (maximum allowed in the facility) over a 15-min integration time. The imaging and detection capabilities of the instrument were tested by moving the source in half- and one-pixel increments across the image plane. We show a representative sample of the results obtained at one-pixel increments for a standoff distance of 9 m. The 1.8-μCi source was not detected at the 26-m standoff. In order to increase the sensitivity of the instrument, we reduced the fastneutron background by shielding the top, sides and back of the detector array with 10-cm-thick HDPE. This shielding configuration led

  4. A study of television imaging system for fast neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Koji

    1992-01-01

    The neutron radiography with fast neutron beam is a very useful imaging technique for thicker objects, especially those composed of hydrogen-rich materials which are sometimes difficult to image by thermal neutron radiography. The fast neutron radiography has not been studied so much as the thermal neutron radiography. The fast neutron radiography has been studied at the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi' of the University of Tokyo built in Tokai-mura. The average neutron energy of the Yayoi is about 1 MeV, and the peak neutron flux at the core center is 0.8 x 10 12 at the maximum operating power of 2 kW. In the experiment on fast neutron radiography, a CR39 nuclear track detector has been used successfully. But in the Yayoi radiography procedure, about 24 hours were required for obtaining an imaging result. To get a prompt imaging result and a real-time imaging result, it is necessary to develop a fast neutron television system, and in this paper, a new fast neutron TV system is proposed. The main difference is the converter material sensitive to fast neutrons. The study on the fast neutron TV system was carried out by using the Baby Cyclotron of Japan Steel Works, and the good images were realized. (K.I.)

  5. Neutron Ghost Imaging Technology Research on CARR Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Ghost imaging is also known as quantum imaging. Different from the classical imaging, the neutron ghost imaging is based on the quantum mechanics properties of light field and its intrinsic parallel characteristic, and developed by new optical

  6. Fast-neutron, coded-aperture imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    This work discusses a large-scale, coded-aperture imager for fast neutrons, building off a proof-of concept instrument developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The Space Science Division at the NRL has a heritage of developing large-scale, mobile systems, using coded-aperture imaging, for long-range γ-ray detection and localization. The fast-neutron, coded-aperture imaging instrument, designed for a mobile unit (20 ft. ISO container), consists of a 32-element array of 15 cm×15 cm×15 cm liquid scintillation detectors (EJ-309) mounted behind a 12×12 pseudorandom coded aperture. The elements of the aperture are composed of 15 cm×15 cm×10 cm blocks of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The arrangement of the aperture elements produces a shadow pattern on the detector array behind the mask. By measuring of the number of neutron counts per masked and unmasked detector, and with knowledge of the mask pattern, a source image can be deconvolved to obtain a 2-d location. The number of neutrons per detector was obtained by processing the fast signal from each PMT in flash digitizing electronics. Digital pulse shape discrimination (PSD) was performed to filter out the fast-neutron signal from the γ background. The prototype instrument was tested at an indoor facility at the NRL with a 1.8-μCi and 13-μCi 252Cf neutron/γ source at three standoff distances of 9, 15 and 26 m (maximum allowed in the facility) over a 15-min integration time. The imaging and detection capabilities of the instrument were tested by moving the source in half- and one-pixel increments across the image plane. We show a representative sample of the results obtained at one-pixel increments for a standoff distance of 9 m. The 1.8-μCi source was not detected at the 26-m standoff. In order to increase the sensitivity of the instrument, we reduced the fastneutron background by shielding the top, sides and back of the detector array with 10-cm-thick HDPE. This shielding configuration led

  7. Fast-neutron, coded-aperture imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolf, Richard S., E-mail: richard.woolf@nrl.navy.mil; Phlips, Bernard F., E-mail: bernard.phlips@nrl.navy.mil; Hutcheson, Anthony L., E-mail: anthony.hutcheson@nrl.navy.mil; Wulf, Eric A., E-mail: eric.wulf@nrl.navy.mil

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a large-scale, coded-aperture imager for fast neutrons, building off a proof-of concept instrument developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The Space Science Division at the NRL has a heritage of developing large-scale, mobile systems, using coded-aperture imaging, for long-range γ-ray detection and localization. The fast-neutron, coded-aperture imaging instrument, designed for a mobile unit (20 ft. ISO container), consists of a 32-element array of 15 cm×15 cm×15 cm liquid scintillation detectors (EJ-309) mounted behind a 12×12 pseudorandom coded aperture. The elements of the aperture are composed of 15 cm×15 cm×10 cm blocks of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The arrangement of the aperture elements produces a shadow pattern on the detector array behind the mask. By measuring of the number of neutron counts per masked and unmasked detector, and with knowledge of the mask pattern, a source image can be deconvolved to obtain a 2-d location. The number of neutrons per detector was obtained by processing the fast signal from each PMT in flash digitizing electronics. Digital pulse shape discrimination (PSD) was performed to filter out the fast-neutron signal from the γ background. The prototype instrument was tested at an indoor facility at the NRL with a 1.8-μCi and 13-μCi 252Cf neutron/γ source at three standoff distances of 9, 15 and 26 m (maximum allowed in the facility) over a 15-min integration time. The imaging and detection capabilities of the instrument were tested by moving the source in half- and one-pixel increments across the image plane. We show a representative sample of the results obtained at one-pixel increments for a standoff distance of 9 m. The 1.8-μCi source was not detected at the 26-m standoff. In order to increase the sensitivity of the instrument, we reduced the fastneutron background by shielding the top, sides and back of the detector array with 10-cm-thick HDPE. This shielding configuration led

  8. Scintillator Based Coded-Aperture Imaging for Neutron Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Sean-C.; Gamage, Kelum-A-A.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we are going to assess the variations of neutron images using a series of Monte Carlo simulations. We are going to study neutron images of the same neutron source with different source locations, using a scintillator based coded-aperture system. The Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted making use of the EJ-426 neutron scintillator detector. This type of detector has a low sensitivity to gamma rays and is therefore of particular use in a system with a source that emits a mixed radiation field. From the use of different source locations, several neutron images have been produced, compared both qualitatively and quantitatively for each case. This allows conclusions to be drawn on how suited the scintillator based coded-aperture neutron imaging system is to detecting various neutron source locations. This type of neutron imaging system can be easily used to identify and locate nuclear materials precisely. (authors)

  9. The HURRA filter: An easy method to eliminate collimator artifacts in high-energy gamma camera images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, H; Barquero, R

    The correct determination and delineation of tumor/organ size is crucial in 2-D imaging in 131 I therapy. These images are usually obtained using a system composed of a Gamma camera and high-energy collimator, although the system can produce artifacts in the image. This article analyses these artifacts and describes a correction filter that can eliminate those collimator artifacts. Using free software, ImageJ, a central profile in the image is obtained and analyzed. Two components can be seen in the fluctuation of the profile: one associated with the stochastic nature of the radiation, plus electronic noise and the other periodically across the position in space due to the collimator. These frequencies are analytically obtained and compared with the frequencies in the Fourier transform of the profile. A specially developed filter removes the artifacts in the 2D Fourier transform of the DICOM image. This filter is tested using a 15-cm-diameter Petri dish with 131 I radioactive water (big object size) image, a 131 I clinical pill (small object size) image, and an image of the remainder of the lesion of two patients treated with 3.7GBq (100mCi), and 4.44GBq (120mCi) of 131 I, respectively, after thyroidectomy. The artifact is due to the hexagonal periodic structure of the collimator. The use of the filter on large-sized images reduces the fluctuation by 5.8-3.5%. In small-sized images, the FWHM can be determined in the filtered image, while this is impossible in the unfiltered image. The definition of tumor boundary and the visualization of the activity distribution inside patient lesions improve drastically when the filter is applied to the corresponding images obtained with HE gamma camera. The HURRA filter removes the artifact of high-energy collimator artifacts in planar images obtained with a Gamma camera without reducing the image resolution. It can be applied in any study of patient quantification because the number of counts remains invariant. The filter makes

  10. High-energy-neutron damage in Nb3Sn: changes in critical properties, and damage-energy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, C.L. Jr.; Parkin, D.M.; Guinan, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    Filamentary wires of Nb 3 Sn have been irradiated with fission-reactor, 14.8-MeV, and d-Be neutrons and the changes in critical properties measured. The changes observed scale reasonably well with the calculated damage energies for the irradiations. A critical dose for operation of these conductors in fusion-magnet applications is determined to be 0.19 eV/atom damage energy or 0.0019 dpa

  11. Multipolarity analysis for 14C high-energy resonance populated by (18O,16O) two-neutron transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Bondì, M.; Agodi, C.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Khan, E.; Bonaccorso, A.; Fortunato, L.; Foti, A.; Linares, R.; Lubian, J.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Vitturi, A.

    2015-01-01

    The 12 C( 18 O, 16 O) 14 C reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed at 16.9 MeV. A multipolarity analysis of the cross section angular distribution indicates an L = 0 character for such a transition

  12. Image of the Great Nebula in Andromeda, M31 Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Both of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 2/Einstein Observatory imaging devices were used to observe the Great Nebula in Andromeda, M31. This image is a wide field x-ray view of the center region of M31 by the HEAO-2's Imaging Proportional Counter. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  13. HIGH ENERGY NEUTRINOS PRODUCED IN THE ACCRETION DISKS BY NEUTRONS FROM NUCLEI DISINTEGRATED IN THE AGN JETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarek, W., E-mail: bednar@uni.lodz.pl [Department of Astrophysics, The University of Lodz, 90-236 Lodz, ul. Pomorska 149/153 (Poland)

    2016-12-20

    We investigate the consequences of acceleration of nuclei in jets of active galaxies not far from the surface of an accretion disk. The nuclei can be accelerated in the re-connection regions in the jet and/or at the jet boundary, between the relativistic jet and its cocoon. It is shown that the relativistic nuclei can efficiently fragment onto specific nucleons in collisions with the disk radiation. Neutrons, directed toward the accretion disk, take a significant part of energy from the relativistic nuclei. These neutrons develop a cascade in the dense accretion disk. We calculate the neutrino spectra produced in such a hadronic cascade within the accretion disk. We propose that the neutrinos produced in such a scenario, from the whole population of super-massive black holes in active galaxies, can explain the extragalactic neutrino background recently measured by the IceCube neutrino detector, provided that a 5% fraction of galaxies have an active galactic nucleus and a few percent of neutrons reach the accretion disk. We predict that the neutrino signals in the present neutrino detectors, produced in terms of such a model, will not be detectable even from the nearby radio galaxies similar to M87.

  14. SEARCH FOR SOURCES OF HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRONS WITH FOUR YEARS OF DATA FROM THE ICETOP DETECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M. G. [Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, 5005 (Australia); Abraham, K. [Physik-department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ackermann, M. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J. A.; Ansseau, I. [Université Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Ahrens, M. [Oskar Klein Centre and Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Altmann, D.; Anton, G. [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Andeen, K. [Department of Physics, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Anderson, T. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Archinger, M.; Baum, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Argüelles, C.; Axani, S. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Auffenberg, J. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [Physics Department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2016-10-20

    IceTop is an air-shower array located on the Antarctic ice sheet at the geographic South Pole. IceTop can detect an astrophysical flux of neutrons from Galactic sources as an excess of cosmic-ray air showers arriving from the source direction. Neutrons are undeflected by the Galactic magnetic field and can typically travel 10 ( E /PeV) pc before decay. Two searches are performed using 4 yr of the IceTop data set to look for a statistically significant excess of events with energies above 10 PeV (10{sup 16} eV) arriving within a small solid angle. The all-sky search method covers from −90° to approximately −50° in declination. No significant excess is found. A targeted search is also performed, looking for significant correlation with candidate sources in different target sets. This search uses a higher-energy cut (100 PeV) since most target objects lie beyond 1 kpc. The target sets include pulsars with confirmed TeV energy photon fluxes and high-mass X-ray binaries. No significant correlation is found for any target set. Flux upper limits are determined for both searches, which can constrain Galactic neutron sources and production scenarios.

  15. High-energy particle production in solar flares (SEP, gamma-ray and neutron emissions). [solar energetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electrons and ions, over a wide range of energies, are produced in association with solar flares. Solar energetic particles (SEPs), observed in space and near earth, consist of electrons and ions that range in energy from 10 keV to about 100 MeV and from 1 MeV to 20 GeV, respectively. SEPs are directly recorded by charged particle detectors, while X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron detectors indicate the properties of the accelerated particles (electrons and ions) which have interacted in the solar atmosphere. A major problem of solar physics is to understand the relationship between these two groups of charged particles; in particular whether they are accelerated by the same mechanism. The paper reviews the physics of gamma-rays and neutron production in the solar atmosphere and the method by which properties of the primary charged particles produced in the solar flare can be deduced. Recent observations of energetic photons and neutrons in space and at the earth are used to present a current picture of the properties of impulsively flare accelerated electrons and ions. Some important properties discussed are time scale of production, composition, energy spectra, accelerator geometry. Particular attention is given to energetic particle production in the large flare on June 3, 1982.

  16. Fluence-compensated down-scattered neutron imaging using the neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, D. T., E-mail: casey21@llnl.gov; Munro, D. H.; Grim, G. P.; Landen, O. L.; Spears, B. K.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Field, J. E.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Volegov, P. L.; Merrill, F. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility is used to observe the primary ∼14 MeV neutrons from the hotspot and down-scattered neutrons (6-12 MeV) from the assembled shell. Due to the strong spatial dependence of the primary neutron fluence through the dense shell, the down-scattered image is convolved with the primary-neutron fluence much like a backlighter profile. Using a characteristic scattering angle assumption, we estimate the primary neutron fluence and compensate the down-scattered image, which reveals information about asymmetry that is otherwise difficult to extract without invoking complicated models.

  17. Status of the Neutron Imaging and Diffraction Instrument IMAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockelmann, Winfried; Burca, Genoveva; Kelleher, Joe F.; Kabra, Saurabh; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Rhodes, Nigel J.; Schooneveld, Erik M.; Sykora, Jeff; Pooley, Daniel E.; Nightingale, Jim B.; Aliotta, Francesco; Ponterio, Rosa C.; Salvato, Gabriele; Tresoldi, Dario; Vasi, Cirino; McPhate, Jason B.; Tremsin, Anton S.

    A cold neutron imaging and diffraction instrument, IMAT, is currently being constructed at the ISIS second target station. IMAT will capitalize on time-of-flight transmission and diffraction techniques available at a pulsed neutron source. Analytical techniques will include neutron radiography, neutron tomography, energy-selective neutron imaging, and spatially resolved diffraction scans for residual strain and texture determination. Commissioning of the instrument will start in 2015, with time-resolving imaging detectors and two diffraction detector prototype modules. IMAT will be operated as a user facility for material science applications and will be open for developments of time-of-flight imaging methods.

  18. Application of low-cost Gallium Arsenide light-emitting-diodes as kerma dosemeter and fluence monitor for high-energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.; Simrock, S.; Khachan, J.; Rybka, D.; Romaniuk, R.

    2007-01-01

    Displacement damage (DD) caused by fast neutrons in unbiased Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) light emitting diodes (LED) resulted in a reduction of the light output. On the other hand, a similar type of LED irradiated with gamma rays from a 60 Co source up to a dose level in excess of 1.0 kGy (1.0 x 10 5 rad) was found to show no significant drop of the light emission. This phenomenon was used to develop a low cost passive fluence monitor and kinetic energy released per unit mass dosemeter for accelerator-produced neutrons. These LED-dosemeters were used to assess the integrated fluence of photoneutrons, which were contaminated with a strong Bremsstrahlung gamma-background generated by the 730 MeV superconducting electron linac driving the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron. The applications of GaAs LED as a routine neutron fluence monitor and DD precursor for the electronic components located in high-energy accelerator environment are highlighted. (authors)

  19. Cross Sections for High-Energy Gamma Transitions from MeV Neutron Capture in {sup 206}Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergqvist, I; Lundberg, B; Nilsson, L

    1970-03-15

    Gamma-ray spectra from neutron capture in Pb (radiogenic lead) in the energy range 1.5 to 8.5 MeV were recorded using time-of-flight techniques. The spectrometer was a Nal (Tl) crystal, 20.8 cm long and 22.6 cm in diameter. The spectra are dominated by gamma transitions to levels with large single-particle strength, in agreement with predictions of semi-direct capture theories. The theories predict enhancements of the direct capture cross section by a factor of 10 - 15 in the region of the giant dipole resonance. The observed enhancement is about 50.

  20. Neutron Imaging at Compact Accelerator-Driven Neutron Sources in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Kiyanagi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutron imaging has been recognized to be very useful to investigate inside of materials and products that cannot be seen by X-ray. New imaging methods using the pulsed structure of neutron sources based on accelerators has been developed also at compact accelerator-driven neutron sources and opened new application fields in neutron imaging. The world’s first dedicated imaging instrument at pulsed neutron sources was constructed at J-PARC in Japan owing to the development of such new methods. Then, usefulness of the compact accelerator-driven neutron sources in neutron science was recognized and such facilities were newly constructed in Japan. Now, existing and new sources have been used for neutron imaging. Traditional imaging and newly developed pulsed neutron imaging such as Bragg edge transmission have been applied to various fields by using compact and large neutron facilities. Here, compact accelerator-driven neutron sources used for imaging in Japan are introduced and some of their activities are presented.

  1. Laser micromachining of cadmium tungstate scintillator for high energy X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Sion Andreas

    Pulsed laser ablation has been investigated as a method for the creation of thick segmented scintillator arrays for high-energy X-ray radiography. Thick scintillators are needed to improve the X-ray absorption at high energies, while segmentation is required for spatial resolution. Monte-Carlo simulations predicted that reflections at the inter-segment walls were the greatest source of loss of scintillation photons. As a result of this, fine pitched arrays would be inefficient as the number of reflections would be significantly higher than in large pitch arrays. Nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser ablation was investigated as a method to segment cadmium tungstate (CdWO_4). The effect of laser parameters on the ablation mechanisms, laser induced material changes and debris produced were investigated using optical and electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for both types of lasers. It was determined that nanosecond ablation was unsuitable due to the large amount of cracking and a heat affected zone created during the ablation process. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation was found to induce less damage. The optimised laser parameters for a 1028 nm laser was found to be a pulse energy of 54 μJ corresponding to a fluence of 5.3 J cm. -2 a pulse duration of 190 fs, a repetition rate of 78.3 kHz and a laser scan speed of 707 mm s. -1 achieving a normalised pulse overlap of 0.8. A serpentine scan pattern was found to minimise damage caused by anisotropic thermal expansion. Femtosecond pulsed ablation was also found to create a layer of tungsten and cadmium sub-oxides on the surface of the crystals. The CdWO_4 could be cleaned by immersing the CdWO_4 in ammonium hydroxide at 45°C for 15 minutes. However, XPS indicated that the ammonium hydroxide formed a thin layer of CdCO_3 and Cd(OH)_2 on the surface. Prototype arrays were shown to be able to resolve features as small as 0.5 mm using keV energy X-rays. The most

  2. Large-area imaging micro-well detectors for high-energy astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Deines-Jones, P; Hunter, S D; Jahoda, K; Owens, S M

    2002-01-01

    Micro-well detectors are pixelized imaging sensors that can be inexpensively fabricated in very large arrays. Owing to their intrinsic gain and operation at room temperature, they can be instrumented at very low power, per unit area, making them valuable for a variety of space-flight applications where wide-angle X-ray imaging or large-area particle tracking is required. For example, micro-well detectors have been chosen as the focal plane imager for Lobster-ISS, a proposed soft X-ray all-sky monitor. We have fabricated detectors which image X-rays with 200 mu m FWHM resolution at 3 keV. In agreement with other groups using similar geometries, we find nominal proportional counter energy resolution (20% at 6 keV in P-10), and stable operation at gas gains up to 30,000.

  3. Microstructures for high-energy x-ray and particle-imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stone, G.F.; Hawryluk, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    Coded imaging techniques using thick, micro-Fresnel zone plates as coded apertures have been used to image x-ray emissions (2-20 keV) and 3.5 MeV Alpha particle emissions from laser driven micro-implosions. Image resolution in these experiments was 3-8 μm. Extension of this coded imaging capability to higher energy x-rays (approx. 100 keV) and more penetrating charged particles (e.g. approx. 15 MeV protons) requires the fabrication of very thick (50-200 μm), high aspect ratio (10:1), gold Fresnel zone plates with narrow linewidths (5-25 μm) for use as coded aperatures. A reactive ion etch technique in oxygen has been used to produce thick zone plate patterns in polymer films. The polymer patterns serve as electroplating molds for the subsequent fabrication of the free-standing gold zone plate structures

  4. Portal imaging improvement with a low energy un flattened beam in high energy medical accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutman, Y; Faermann, S; Tsechanski, A [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel)

    1996-12-01

    In this work we present a further improvement of the portal film option, for a Clinac 18 accelerator with a 10 MV therapeutic x-ray beam. This is done by lowering the nominal photon energy to 4 MV, therefore increasing the relative contribution of the low energy portion of the x-ray spectrum. Improvement of the image quality is demonstrated with a portal film scale tray, and with an anthropomorphic phantom, a graphical analysis demonstrates the improvement on image (authors).

  5. Fast high-energy X-ray imaging for Severe Accidents experiments on the future PLINIUS-2 platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berge L.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The future PLINIUS-2 platform of CEA Cadarache will be dedicated to the study of corium interactions in severe nuclear accidents, and will host innovative large-scale experiments. The Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache is in charge of real-time high-energy X-ray imaging set-ups, for the study of the corium-water and corium-sodium interaction, and of the corium stratification process. Imaging such large and high-density objects requires a 15 MeV linear electron accelerator coupled to a tungsten target creating a high-energy Bremsstrahlung X-ray flux, with corresponding dose rate about 100 Gy/min at 1 m. The signal is detected by phosphor screens coupled to high-framerate scientific CMOS cameras. The imaging set-up is established using an experimentally-validated home-made simulation software (MODHERATO. The code computes quantitative radiographic signals from the description of the source, object geometry and composition, detector, and geometrical configuration (magnification factor, etc.. It accounts for several noise sources (photonic and electronic noises, swank and readout noise, and for image blur due to the source spot-size and to the detector unsharpness. In a view to PLINIUS-2, the simulation has been improved to account for the scattered flux, which is expected to be significant. The paper presents the scattered flux calculation using the MCNP transport code, and its integration into the MODHERATO simulation. Then the validation of the improved simulation is presented, through confrontation to real measurement images taken on a small-scale equivalent set-up on the PLINIUS platform. Excellent agreement is achieved. This improved simulation is therefore being used to design the PLINIUS-2 imaging set-ups (source, detectors, cameras, etc..

  6. Fast high-energy X-ray imaging for Severe Accidents experiments on the future PLINIUS-2 platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, L.; Estre, N.; Tisseur, D.; Payan, E.; Eck, D.; Bouyer, V.; Cassiaut-Louis, N.; Journeau, C.; Tellier, R. Le; Pluyette, E.

    2018-01-01

    The future PLINIUS-2 platform of CEA Cadarache will be dedicated to the study of corium interactions in severe nuclear accidents, and will host innovative large-scale experiments. The Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache is in charge of real-time high-energy X-ray imaging set-ups, for the study of the corium-water and corium-sodium interaction, and of the corium stratification process. Imaging such large and high-density objects requires a 15 MeV linear electron accelerator coupled to a tungsten target creating a high-energy Bremsstrahlung X-ray flux, with corresponding dose rate about 100 Gy/min at 1 m. The signal is detected by phosphor screens coupled to high-framerate scientific CMOS cameras. The imaging set-up is established using an experimentally-validated home-made simulation software (MODHERATO). The code computes quantitative radiographic signals from the description of the source, object geometry and composition, detector, and geometrical configuration (magnification factor, etc.). It accounts for several noise sources (photonic and electronic noises, swank and readout noise), and for image blur due to the source spot-size and to the detector unsharpness. In a view to PLINIUS-2, the simulation has been improved to account for the scattered flux, which is expected to be significant. The paper presents the scattered flux calculation using the MCNP transport code, and its integration into the MODHERATO simulation. Then the validation of the improved simulation is presented, through confrontation to real measurement images taken on a small-scale equivalent set-up on the PLINIUS platform. Excellent agreement is achieved. This improved simulation is therefore being used to design the PLINIUS-2 imaging set-ups (source, detectors, cameras, etc.).

  7. Neutron radiography of thick hydrogenous materials with use of an imaging plate neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, K.; Matsumoto, G.; Karasawa, Y.; Niimura, N.; Matsubayashi, M.; Tsuruno, A.

    1996-01-01

    The value of the neutron mass attenuation coefficient of hydrogen being very high, it is extremely difficult to image normal size, living animals with neutron radiography. However, the authors suggest the possibility of applying neutron radiography for biomedical specimens. The organs in the breast, bones and cartilages in the extremities, and the tail of mice and rats were clearly imaged by neutron radiography with Gd foils as neutron converters and X-ray films. However, no contours of the organs in the mouse abdomen were visible with neutron radiography with an exposure time of 200 s. By adding Gd or Li compounds as neutron converters to imaging X-ray plates, imaging plates have been developed for neutron detectors. A trial using these imaging plates for neutron radiography of water-filled containers and the abdomen of mice was completed. The roundness of a 100 ml-beaker was imaged with a neutron exposure of 180 s. Obscure contours of the liver and kidneys of the mouse were imaged with a neutron exposure of 100 s. (orig.)

  8. A prototype detector using the neutron image intensifier and multi-anode type photomultiplier tube for pulsed neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hirotaku; Sato, Hirotaka; Hara, Kaoru Y.; Kamiyama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We developed a neutron two-dimensional (2-D) detector for pulsed neutron imaging as a prototype detector, which was composed of a neutron image intensifier and a multi-anode type photomultiplier tube. A neutron transmission spectrum of α-Fe plate was measured by the prototype detector, and compared with the one measured by a typical neutron 2-D detector. The spectrum was in reasonable agreement with the one measured by the typical detector in the neutron wavelength region above 0.15 nm. In addition, a neutron transmission image of a cadmium indicator was obtained by the prototype detector. The usefulness of the prototype detector for pulsed neutron imaging was demonstrated. (author)

  9. One-dimensional neutron imager for the Sandia Z facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittinghoff, David N; Bower, Dan E; Hollaway, James R; Jacoby, Barry A; Weiss, Paul B; Buckles, Robert A; Sammons, Timothy J; McPherson, Leroy A; Ruiz, Carlos L; Chandler, Gordon A; Torres, José A; Leeper, Ramon J; Cooper, Gary W; Nelson, Alan J

    2008-10-01

    A multiinstitution collaboration is developing a neutron imaging system for the Sandia Z facility. The initial system design is for slit aperture imaging system capable of obtaining a one-dimensional image of a 2.45 MeV source producing 5x10(12) neutrons with a resolution of 320 microm along the axial dimension of the plasma, but the design being developed can be modified for two-dimensional imaging and imaging of DT neutrons with other resolutions. This system will allow us to understand the spatial production of neutrons in the plasmas produced at the Z facility.

  10. Results from neutron imaging of ICF experiments at NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, F. E.; Danly, C. R.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    In 2011 a neutron imaging diagnostic was commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system has been used to collect neutron images to measure the size and shape of the burning DT plasma and the surrounding fuel assembly. The imaging technique uses a pinhole neutron aperture placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two-dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic collects two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically one image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons, and the other image measures the distribution of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core. Images have been collected for the majority of the experiments performed as part of the ignition campaign. Results from this data have been used to estimate a burn-averaged fuel assembly as well as providing performance metrics to gauge progress towards ignition. This data set and our interpretation are presented.

  11. The neutron imaging system fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fittinghoff D.N.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have fielded a neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility to collect images of fusion neutrons produced in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion experiments and scattered neutrons from (n, n′ reactions of the source neutrons in the surrounding dense material. A description of the neutron imaging system is presented, including the pinhole array aperture, the line-of-sight collimation, the scintillator-based detection system and the alignment systems and methods. Discussion of the alignment and resolution of the system is presented. We also discuss future improvements to the system hardware.

  12. Characterization of a neutron imaging setup at the INES facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durisi, E. A.; Visca, L.; Albertin, F.; Brancaccio, R.; Corsi, J.; Dughera, G.; Ferrarese, W.; Giovagnoli, A.; Grassi, N.; Grazzi, F.; Lo Giudice, A.; Mila, G.; Nervo, M.; Pastrone, N.; Prino, F.; Ramello, L.; Re, A.; Romero, A.; Sacchi, R.; Salvemini, F.; Scherillo, A.; Staiano, A.

    2013-10-01

    The Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) located at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (Didcot, United Kingdom) provides a thermal neutron beam mainly used for diffraction analysis. A neutron transmission imaging system was also developed for beam monitoring and for aligning the sample under investigation. Although the time-of-flight neutron diffraction is a consolidated technique, the neutron imaging setup is not yet completely characterized and optimized. In this paper the performance for neutron radiography and tomography at INES of two scintillator screens read out by two different commercial CCD cameras is compared in terms of linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution. In addition, the results of neutron radiographies and a tomography of metal alloy test structures are presented to better characterize the INES imaging capabilities of metal artifacts in the cultural heritage field.

  13. Stereoscopic radiographic images with thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvani, M.I.; Almeida, G.L.; Rogers, J.D.; Lopes, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial structure of an object can be perceived by the stereoscopic vision provided by eyes or by the parallax produced by movement of the object with regard to the observer. For an opaque object, a technique to render it transparent should be used, in order to make visible the spatial distribution of its inner structure, for any of the two approaches used. In this work, a beam of thermal neutrons at the main port of the Argonauta research reactor of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear in Rio de Janeiro/Brazil has been used as radiation to render the inspected objects partially transparent. A neutron sensitive Imaging Plate has been employed as a detector and after exposure it has been developed by a reader using a 0.5 μm laser beam, which defines the finest achievable spatial resolution of the acquired digital image. This image, a radiographic attenuation map of the object, does not represent any specific cross-section but a convoluted projection for each specific attitude of the object with regard to the detector. After taking two of these projections at different object attitudes, they are properly processed and the final image is viewed by a red and green eyeglass. For monochromatic images this processing involves transformation of black and white radiographies into red and white and green and white ones, which are afterwards merged to yield a single image. All the processes are carried out with the software ImageJ. Divergence of the neutron beam unfortunately spoils both spatial and contrast resolutions, which become poorer as object-detector distance increases. Therefore, in order to evaluate the range of spatial resolution corresponding to the 3D image being observed, a curve expressing spatial resolution against object-detector gap has been deduced from the Modulation Transfer Functions experimentally. Typical exposure times, under a reactor power of 170 W, were 6 min for both quantitative and qualitative measurements. In spite of its intrinsic constraints

  14. Stereoscopic radiographic images with thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvani, M. I.; Almeida, G. L.; Rogers, J. D.; Lopes, R. T.

    2011-10-01

    Spatial structure of an object can be perceived by the stereoscopic vision provided by eyes or by the parallax produced by movement of the object with regard to the observer. For an opaque object, a technique to render it transparent should be used, in order to make visible the spatial distribution of its inner structure, for any of the two approaches used. In this work, a beam of thermal neutrons at the main port of the Argonauta research reactor of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear in Rio de Janeiro/Brazil has been used as radiation to render the inspected objects partially transparent. A neutron sensitive Imaging Plate has been employed as a detector and after exposure it has been developed by a reader using a 0.5 μm laser beam, which defines the finest achievable spatial resolution of the acquired digital image. This image, a radiographic attenuation map of the object, does not represent any specific cross-section but a convoluted projection for each specific attitude of the object with regard to the detector. After taking two of these projections at different object attitudes, they are properly processed and the final image is viewed by a red and green eyeglass. For monochromatic images this processing involves transformation of black and white radiographies into red and white and green and white ones, which are afterwards merged to yield a single image. All the processes are carried out with the software ImageJ. Divergence of the neutron beam unfortunately spoils both spatial and contrast resolutions, which become poorer as object-detector distance increases. Therefore, in order to evaluate the range of spatial resolution corresponding to the 3D image being observed, a curve expressing spatial resolution against object-detector gap has been deduced from the Modulation Transfer Functions experimentally. Typical exposure times, under a reactor power of 170 W, were 6 min for both quantitative and qualitative measurements. In spite of its intrinsic constraints

  15. Results of Gamma-Ray Imaging with High-Energy Radiation Visualizer HERV at Nuclear Reactor in Russia and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, O.P.; Stepanov, V.E.; Sudarkin, A.N.; Urutskoev, L.I.

    1999-01-01

    HER V-high energy radiation visualizer is a system for imaging in X-and gamma-ray regions developed by RECOM during recent years. Its later version provides the real industrial prototype that has been already tested under the complex gamma-field conditions of highly contaminated nuclear facilities in Russia and Germany. New special options for initial CCD camera frames processing (CCD camera operates in slow repetition mode) allow one to perform imaging without heavy shielding during a long exposure time. Image processing options allowing one to take into account background radiation, noise and drift of electronics are described. The contaminated pipelines and vessels HER V imagery results are presented. Background does rate in rooms with contaminated equipment appeared to be up to 1 R/hour and from 1m R/hour up to 50 m R/hour at detector's head location. The major contaminating nuclides proved to be Co-60 and Cs-137. Imaging time was chosen to be 0.2-1 hour. Data acquisition and processing procedures enabled to avoid the high background dose rate influence at the device measuring head location. Superposition of gamma images over optical images indicates that the major contaminated parts of the pipelines were their bends, places of their connection, and their valves

  16. Results from the Coded Aperture Neutron Imaging System (CANIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brubaker, Erik; Steele, John T.; Brennan, James S.; Hilton, Nathan R.; Marleau, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Because of their penetrating power, energetic neutrons and gamma rays (∼1 MeV) offer the best possibility of detecting highly shielded or distant special nuclear material (SNM). Of these, fast neutrons offer the greatest advantage due to their very low and well understood natural background. We are investigating a new approach to fast-neutron imaging- a coded aperture neutron imaging system (CANIS). Coded aperture neutron imaging should offer a highly efficient solution for improved detection speed, range, and sensitivity. We have demonstrated fast neutron and gamma ray imaging with several different configurations of coded masks patterns and detectors including an 'active' mask that is composed of neutron detectors. Here we describe our prototype detector and present some initial results from laboratory tests and demonstrations.

  17. Results from the coded aperture neutron imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brubaker, Erik; Steele, John T.; Brennan, James S.; Marleau, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Because of their penetrating power, energetic neutrons and gamma rays (∼1 MeV) offer the best possibility of detecting highly shielded or distant special nuclear material (SNM). Of these, fast neutrons offer the greatest advantage due to their very low and well understood natural background. We are investigating a new approach to fast-neutron imaging - a coded aperture neutron imaging system (CANIS). Coded aperture neutron imaging should offer a highly efficient solution for improved detection speed, range, and sensitivity. We have demonstrated fast neutron and gamma ray imaging with several different configurations of coded masks patterns and detectors including an 'active' mask that is composed of neutron detectors. Here we describe our prototype detector and present some initial results from laboratory tests and demonstrations.

  18. MARS Spectral Imaging: From High-Energy Physics to a Biomedical Business

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Abstract MARS spectral scanners provide colour X-Ray images. Current MARS pre-clinical scanners enable researchers and clinicians to measure biochemical and physiological processes in specimens, and animal models of disease. The scanners have developed from a 10 year scientific collaboration between New Zealand and CERN. In parallel a company, MARS Bioimaging Ltd, was founded to commercialise the technology by productising the scanner and selling it to biomedical users around the world. The New Zealand team is now more than 30 people including staff and students from the fields of physics, engineering, computing, maths, radiology, cardiology, biochemistry, oncology, and orthopaedics. Current work with pre-clinical scanners has concluded that the technology will be  useful in heart disease, stroke, arthritis, joint replacements, and cancer. In late 2014, the government announced funding for NZ to build a MARS scanner capable of imaging humans. Bio Professor Anthony Butler is a radiologist wit...

  19. High energy x-ray and neutron studies of disordered energy-related materials at extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parise, John

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental scientific accomplishments are: (1) advances in a general description of the liquid state by employing structural models constrained by measurements to interpret experimental results and extend them to liquids in general, with special emphasis on (2) The structure of the high-temperature crystal and molten UO_2 and 3) water. Specifically, samples of UO_2 and water were probed using high-energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source. The high Z of UO_2, and the 2-3mm diameter droplet shape of the molten sample, means that >100keV X-rays are required to minimize absorption and multiple scattering, which can distort the measured structure factor. A high flux of x-rays is also required to obtain sufficient statistical accuracy in short (a few seconds) measurement times. The scattered x-ray data were analyzed and pair distribution functions, extracted that characterize the local and long-range atomic structure of the material. The measurements of the hot UO_2 solid show a substantial increase in oxygen disorder and, upon melting, the average U-O coordination was found to decrease from 8 to 6.7±0.5. The research incorporated development of diffraction techniques, sample environment optimization and state-of-the-art simulation techniques. The symbiotic nature of the advances in simulation and experiment allowed for a more focused and informed development of future experiments, effective use of expensive beam time and generated new research agendas for the growing number of research groups, within the US and internationally, that focus on the structure of liquids. Molecular dynamics (MD) provided detailed information when combined with high-quality XN data including addressing key issues in liquids; the relationship between cooling path, structure and fictive temperature, and the trade-offs between network over connectedness in liquids containing low-coordination cations.

  20. High energy x-ray and neutron studies of disordered energy-related materials at extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parise, John [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-05-16

    The fundamental scientific accomplishments are: (1) advances in a general description of the liquid state by employing structural models constrained by measurements to interpret experimental results and extend them to liquids in general, with special emphasis on (2) The structure of the high-temperature crystal and molten UO2 and 3) water. Specifically, samples of UO2 and water were probed using high-energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source. The high Z of UO2, and the 2-3mm diameter droplet shape of the molten sample, means that >100keV X-rays are required to minimize absorption and multiple scattering, which can distort the measured structure factor. A high flux of x-rays is also required to obtain sufficient statistical accuracy in short (a few seconds) measurement times. The scattered x-ray data were analyzed and pair distribution functions, extracted that characterize the local and long-range atomic structure of the material. The measurements of the hot UO2 solid show a substantial increase in oxygen disorder and, upon melting, the average U-O coordination was found to decrease from 8 to 6.7±0.5. The research incorporated development of diffraction techniques, sample environment optimization and state-of-the-art simulation techniques. The symbiotic nature of the advances in simulation and experiment allowed for a more focused and informed development of future experiments, effective use of expensive beam time and generated new research agendas for the growing number of research groups, within the US and internationally, that focus on the structure of liquids. Molecular dynamics (MD) provided detailed information when combined with high-quality XN data including addressing key issues in liquids; the relationship between cooling path, structure and fictive temperature, and the trade-offs between network over connectedness in liquids containing low-coordination cations.

  1. Solar Flares Observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Solar flares are impressive examples of explosive energy release in unconfined, magnetized plasma. It is generally believed that the flare energy is derived from the coronal magnetic field. However, we have not been able to establish the specific energy release mechanism(s) or the relative partitioning of the released energy between heating, particle acceleration (electrons and ions), and mass motions. NASA's RHESSI Mission was designed to study the acceleration and evolution of electrons and ions in flares by observing the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions these energetic particles produce. This is accomplished through the combination of high-resolution spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, including the first images of flares in gamma rays. RHESSI has observed over 12,000 solar flares since its launch on February 5, 2002. I will demonstrate how we use the RHESSI spectra to deduce physical properties of accelerated electrons and hot plasma in flares. Using images to estimate volumes, w e typically find that the total energy in accelerated electrons is comparable to that in the thermal plasma. I will also present flare observations that provide strong support for the presence of magnetic reconnection in a large-scale, vertical current sheet in the solar corona. RHESSI observations such as these are allowing us to probe more deeply into the physics of solar flares.

  2. Use of imaging plates at near saturation for high energy density particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Tsuyoshi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Habara, Hideaki; Kodama, Ryousuke; Tanaka, Kazuo A.; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Tampo, Motonobu; Zheng Jian

    2008-01-01

    Since an imaging plate (IP) is sensitive to electron, ion, and x rays, it can be used as a detector for laser plasma experiment using ultraintense laser. Moreover, an IP has the advantageous features such as high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and high spatial resolution. Even though IP itself has a considerable wide dynamic range up to 10 5 , the IP data have appeared often saturated at an IP reading device. We propose a reading technique by inserting optical density filters so that an apparently saturated IP data can be saved.

  3. Imaging of high-energy midfacial trauma: what the surgeon needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnau, Ken F.; Stanley, Robert B.; Hallam, Danial K.; Gross, Joel A.; Mann, F.A. E-mail: famann@u.washington.edu

    2003-10-01

    Treatment goals in severe midfacial trauma are restoration of function and appearance. Restoration of function is directed at multiple organ systems, which support visual acuity, airway patency, mastication, lacrimation, smelling, tasting, hearing, and facial expression. Victims of blunt facial trauma expect to look the same after surgical treatment as before injury. Delicate soft tissues of the midface often make cosmetic reconstructive surgery technically challenging. Generally, clinical evaluation alone does not suffice to fully characterize facial fractures associated with extensive swelling, and the deeper midface is not accessible to physical examination. Properly performed computed tomography (CT) overcomes most limitations of presurgical examination. Thus, operative approaches and sequencing of surgical repair are guided by imaging information displayed by CT. Restoration of function and appearance relies on recreating normal maxillofacial skeletal anatomy, with particular attention to position of the malar eminences, mandibular condyles, vertical dimension and orbital morphology. Due to its pivotal role in surgical planning, CT scans obtained for the evaluation of severe midfacial trauma should be designed to easily depict the imaging information necessary for clinical decision making. Learning objectives: 1. Understand the facial skeletal buttress system; 2. Understand how the pattern of derangement of the buttress system determines the need for and choice of operative approach for repair of fractures in the middle third of the face; 3. Understand the role and importance of CT and CT reformations in the detection and classification of the pattern of buttress system derangement.

  4. The application of two-dimensional imaging to very high energy gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weekes, T.C.

    1992-05-01

    A technique has been developed to distinguish air showers generated by gamma rays from those generated by hadronic cosmic rays. The method involves the registration of the Cherenkov light images by a large aperture multi-phototube telescope at the Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona. The energy threshold is 0.4 TeV. The efficacy of the technique has been demonstrated by the detection of a signal from the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant. The physics of shower development at TeV energies is demonstrated to be what is expected, and no support is found for the detection of anomalous signals from binary sources. The sensitivity of the technique is such that a five sigma gamma-ray signal from the Crab can be detected in just an hour of observation. Further improvements in the technique are under way; in particular, a second large aperture camera is now operated in conjunction with the original camera to give stereoscopic images of showers. When completed, this system will give a flux sensitivity a factor of ten below that now available

  5. Imaging of high-energy midfacial trauma: what the surgeon needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnau, Ken F.; Stanley, Robert B.; Hallam, Danial K.; Gross, Joel A.; Mann, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Treatment goals in severe midfacial trauma are restoration of function and appearance. Restoration of function is directed at multiple organ systems, which support visual acuity, airway patency, mastication, lacrimation, smelling, tasting, hearing, and facial expression. Victims of blunt facial trauma expect to look the same after surgical treatment as before injury. Delicate soft tissues of the midface often make cosmetic reconstructive surgery technically challenging. Generally, clinical evaluation alone does not suffice to fully characterize facial fractures associated with extensive swelling, and the deeper midface is not accessible to physical examination. Properly performed computed tomography (CT) overcomes most limitations of presurgical examination. Thus, operative approaches and sequencing of surgical repair are guided by imaging information displayed by CT. Restoration of function and appearance relies on recreating normal maxillofacial skeletal anatomy, with particular attention to position of the malar eminences, mandibular condyles, vertical dimension and orbital morphology. Due to its pivotal role in surgical planning, CT scans obtained for the evaluation of severe midfacial trauma should be designed to easily depict the imaging information necessary for clinical decision making. Learning objectives: 1. Understand the facial skeletal buttress system; 2. Understand how the pattern of derangement of the buttress system determines the need for and choice of operative approach for repair of fractures in the middle third of the face; 3. Understand the role and importance of CT and CT reformations in the detection and classification of the pattern of buttress system derangement

  6. Cross-sectional imaging of large and dense materials by high energy X-ray CT using linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, Takahiro; Kamata, Shouji; Ito, Shinichi.

    1989-01-01

    A prototype high energy X-ray CT (computed tomography) system has been developed which employs a linear accelerator as the X-ray source (max. photon energy: 12 MeV). One problem encountered in development of this CT system was to reduce the scattered photons from adjacent detectors, i.e. crosstalk, due to high energy X-rays. This crosstalk was reduced to 2% by means of detector shields using tungsten spacers. Spatial resolution was not affected by such small crosstalk as confirmed by numerical simulations. A second problem was to reduce the scattered photons from the test object. This was done using collimators. A third concern was to realize a wide dynamic range data processing which would allow applications to large and dense objects. This problem was solved by using a sample and hold data acquisition method to reduce the dark current of the photo detectors. The dynamic range of this system was experimentally confirmed over 60 dB. It was demonstrated that slits (width: 2 mm) in an iron object (diameter: 25 cm) could be imaged by this prototype CT system. (author)

  7. Imaging the Formation of High-Energy Dispersion Anomalies in the Actinide UCoGa_{5}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmoy Das

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to image the emergence of substantial dispersion and spectral-weight anomalies in the electronic renormalization of the actinide compound UCoGa_{5} that was presumed to belong to a conventional Fermi-liquid family. Kinks or abrupt breaks in the slope of the quasiparticle dispersion are detected both at low (approximately 130 meV and high (approximately 1 eV binding energies below the Fermi energy, ruling out any significant contribution of phonons. We perform numerical calculations to demonstrate that the anomalies are adequately described by coupling between itinerant fermions and spin fluctuations arising from the particle-hole continuum of the spin-orbit-split 5f states of uranium. These anomalies resemble the “waterfall” phenomenon of the high-temperature copper-oxide superconductors, suggesting that spin fluctuations are a generic route toward multiform electronic phases in correlated materials as different as high-temperature superconductors and actinides.

  8. Polarization effect of CdZnTe imaging detector based on high energy γ source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Miao; Xiao Shali; Wang Xi; Shen Min; Zhang Liuqiang; Cao Yulin; Chen Yuxiao

    2011-01-01

    The inner electric potential distribution of CdZnTe detector was derived by applying poisson equation with the first type boundary condition, and the polarization effect of CdZnTe pixellated detector for imaging 137 Cs γ source was investigated. The results of numerical calculation and experiment indicate that electric potential distribution is mainly influenced by applied bias for low charge density in CdZnTe crystal and, in turn, there is linear relationship between electric potential distribution and applied bias that induces uniform electric field under low irradiated flux. However, the electric potential appears polarization phenomenon, and the electric field in CdZnTe crystal is distorted when CdZnTe detector is under high irradiated flux. Consequently, charge carriers in CdZnTe crystal drift towards the edge pixels of irradiated region, and hence, the shut-off central pixels are surrounded by a ring of low counting pixels. The polarization effect indeed deteriorates the performance of CdZnTe detector severely and the event counts of edge pixels for irradiated region reduce about 70%. (authors)

  9. Real time neutron reflectometry using neutron optical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Gregory S.; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2001-01-01

    We will describe recent improvements to the SPEAR reflectometer at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos. One of the changes consists of wider convergent, incident-beam, collimation to take advantage of optical imaging for specular scattering. In addition, the instrument now views a partially coupled liquid hydrogen moderator as opposed to the decoupled moderator that was previous in-place. While the wavelength distribution is poorer, it matches the time (wavelength) resolution of the reflectometer more closely with the angular resolution. Since the integrated intensity of the partially coupled moderator is higher than the decoupled moderator, we show a similar gain in incident beam flux on the sample without loss of the ability to separate fringes. The increases in intensity from the moderator gain and the improved collimation combine to allow us to measure reflectivities with good statistics down to 10 -4 in a matter of minutes and reflectivities of 10 -6 in an hour. Examples of measurements showing the gain in data accumulation rates are presented. (author)

  10. Applications of image plates in neutron radiography and neutron diffraction at BARC, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Neutron radiography techniques based on Gd, Dy and In metallic foils and X-ray film have been used at this centre since early seventies for various NDT and R and D work in nuclear, defence and aerospace industries. In recent years use of photostimulated luminescence based phosphor imaging plate has been introduced in our work. This has enabled to achieve higher sensitivities and dynamic ranges of recording radiographs with acceptable spatial resolution. It also provides digital image information which is more convenient for quantitative evaluations. Neutron image plates have been used in variety of radiography techniques such as conventional neutron radiography (NR), neutron induced beta radiography (NIBR), hydrogen sensitive epithermal neutron radiography (HYSEN) and for neutron powder diffractometry using Apsara, CIRUS and Dhruva reactors as neutron sources. Recently the image plates have also been used for characterization of thermalized neutron beam from a plasma focus neutron source and recording neutron radiographs. Prior to the utilization image plates have been characterised for their performance. Details of the measurements and applications will be presented. (author)

  11. Television imaging system for fast neutron radiography using baby cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Koji; Miya, Kenzo; Katoh, Norihiko.

    1993-01-01

    A television imaging system for fast neutron radiography (FNR-TV) developed using the fast neutron source reactor YAYOI was applied to the baby-cyclotron based fast neutron source to get images of thick objects quickly. In the system the same technique as a current television imaging system of thermal neutron radiography was applied, while the luminescent converter was used to detect fast neutrons. Using the CR39 track etch method it took about 7 h to get an image, while the FNR-TV only 20 s enough for taking the same object. However the FNR-TV imaging result of the simulation model of a large explosive device for the space launch vehicle of H-2 type was not so good as the image taken with the CR39 track etch method. The reason was that the luminescence intensity of the FNR-TV converter was a quarter of that in the YAYOI. (author)

  12. Future prospects of imaging at spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl, M.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of state-of-the-art spallation neutron sources is a major step forward in efficient neutron production for most neutron scattering techniques. Although they provide lower time-averaged neutron flux than high flux reactor sources, advantage for different instrumental techniques can be derived from the pulsed time structure of the available flux, which can be translated into energy, respectively, wavelength resolution. Conventional neutron imaging on the other hand relies on an intense continuous beam flux and hence falls short in profiting from the new development. Nevertheless, some recently developed novel imaging techniques require and some can benefit from energy resolution. The impact of the emerging spallation sources on different imaging techniques has been investigated, ways to benefit will be identified (where possible) and prospects of future imaging instruments and possible options and layouts at a spallation neutron source will be discussed and outlined.

  13. Research on multi-spectrum detector in high-energy dual-energy X-ray imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qinghua; Wang Xuewu; Li Jianmin; Kang Kejun; Li Yuanjing; Zhong Huaqiang

    2008-01-01

    The high-energy dual-energy X-ray imaging system can discriminate the material of the objects inspected, but when the objects are too thin, the discrimination becomes very difficult. This paper proposes the use of multi-spectrum detector to improve the ability to discriminate thin material, and a series of simulation were done with the Monte Carlo method. Firstly the X-ray depositions in the detectors with different thickness were calculated, and then the discrimination effects with different detector structure and parameters were calculated. The simulation results validated that using appropriate multi-spectrum detector can improve the discrimination accuracy of thin material, particularly thin high-Z material. (authors)

  14. Neutron beams. Tracks analysis, imaging and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepy, G.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal neutron beams can supply informations about the arrangement of atoms and molecules and about their movement inside the matter. This article treats of the preparation of thermal neutron beams and of the applications that use their penetration and matter activation properties: 1 - thermal neutrons production; 2 - basic properties of thermal neutrons: neutrons scattering, absorbing materials, activating materials, transparent materials, preparation of a neutron beam; 3 - tracks measurement by activation: activation method, measurement of marine pollution by heavy elements, historical evolution of glass composition; 4 - neutron radiography: neutronography, neutronoscopy: viscosity measurement; 5 - cancer treatment. (J.S.)

  15. Numerical simulation for neutron pinhole imaging in ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Faxin; Yang Jianlun; Wen Shuhuai

    2005-01-01

    Pinhole imaging of the neutron production in laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments can provide important information about performance of various capsule designs. In order to get good results in experiments, it is needed to judge performance of various pinhole designs qualitatively or quantitatively before experiment. Calculation of imaging can be simply separated into pinhole imaging and image spectral analysis. In this paper, pinhole imaging is discussed, codes for neutron pinhole imaging and image showing is programed. The codes can be used to provide theoretical foundation for pinhole designing and simulating data for image analysing. (authors)

  16. Elements and process for recording direct image neutron radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poignant, R.V. Jr.; Przybylowicz, E.P.

    1975-01-01

    An element is provided for recording a direct image neutron radiograph, thus eliminating the need for a transfer step (i.e., the use of a transfer screen). The element is capable of holding an electrostatic charge and comprises a first layer for absorbing neutrons and generating a current by dissipation of said electrostatic charge in proportion to the number of neutrons absorbed, and a second layer for conducting the current generated by the absorbed neutrons, said neutron absorbing layer comprising an insulative layer comprising neutron absorbing agents in a concentration of at least 10 17 atoms per cm 3 . An element for enhancing the effect of the neutron beam by utilizing the secondary emanations of neutron absorbing materials is also disclosed along with a process for using the device. (U.S.)

  17. Development of a new electronic neutron imaging system

    CERN Document Server

    Brenizer, J S; Gibbs, K M; Mengers, P; Stebbings, C T; Polansky, D; Rogerson, D J

    1999-01-01

    An electronic neutron imaging camera system was developed for use with thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons in applications that include nondestructive inspection of explosives, corrosion, turbine blades, electronics, low Z components, etc. The neutron images are expected to provide information to supplement that available from X-ray tests. The primary camera image area was a 30x30 cm field-of-view with a spatial resolution approaching 1.6 line pairs/mm (lp/mm). The camera had a remotely changeable second lens to limit the field-of-view to 7.6x7.6 cm for high spatial resolution (at least 4 lp/mm) thermal neutron imaging, but neutron and light scatter will limit resolution for fast neutrons to about 0.5 lp/mm. Remote focus capability enhanced camera set-up for optimum operation. The 75 dB dynamic range camera system included sup 6 Li-based screens for imaging of thermal and epithermal neutrons and ZnS(Ag)-based screens for fast neutron imaging. The fast optics was input to a Super S-25 Gen II image intensifi...

  18. DUNBID, the Delft University neutron backscattering imaging detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bom, V.R.; Eijk, C.W.E. van; Ali, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    In the search for low-metallic land mines, the neutron backscattering technique may be applied if the soil is sufficiently dry. An advantage of this method is the speed of detection: the scanning speed may be made comparable to that of a metal detector. A two-dimensional position sensitive detector is tested to obtain an image of the back scattered thermal neutron radiation. Results of experiments using a radionuclide neutron source are presented. The on-mine to no-mine signal ratio can be improved by the application of a window on the neutron time-of-flight. Results using a pulsed neutron generator are also presented

  19. High energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, B.E.; Roberts, J.B. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    We report here on the considerable progress that we made for the year beginning November 1, 1989, for DOE Contract No. AS05-76ERO5096. One of our Fermilab experiments, E704 -- polarization studies with 200 GeV protons, was run from February through August of this year. This experiment has been in the planning, construction, and commissioning stages for over ten years. In this report we detail just what measurements we managed to complete during the run. Our other Fermilab experiment, E683 -- photoproduction of jets, has had parasitic test beam during most of the same period. There was also a one week engineering test run in June. The schedule calls for a three month data run beginning in January, 1991. We also had three test runs for our CERN experiment, NA47 (SMC) -- spin dependent structure functions for the proton and neutron. We are in the midst of major apparatus construction for this experiment. More of our plans for the future are included in the accompanying Renewal Proposal. As in recent years, the format we follow in both the Progress Report and the Renewal Proposal is to have a brief writeup on each individual experiment and to include in the appendices copies of published papers which provide much greater detail. For manuscripts that have been submitted for publication and experimental proposals, we provide only the cover and abstract page. The aim is to concentrate on the physics goals, results and their significance in the main body of the report. For our two Fermilab experiments and the SMC experiment, exhaustive reports of the physics goals have been provided in previous years and are not repeated here

  20. Compact Aberration-Free Relay-Imaging Multi-Pass Layouts for High-Energy Laser Amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Körner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results from a theoretical investigation of laser beam propagation in relay imaging multi-pass layouts, which recently found application in high-energy laser amplifiers. Using a method based on the well-known ABCD-matrix formalism and proven by ray tracing, it was possible to derive a categorization of such systems. Furthermore, basic rules for the setup of such systems and the compensation for low order aberrations are derived. Due to the introduced generalization and parametrization, the presented results can immediately be applied to any system of the investigated kinds for a wide range of parameters, such as number of round-trips, focal lengths and optics sizes. It is shown that appropriate setups allow a close-to-perfect compensation of defocus caused by a thermal lens and astigmatism caused by non-normal incidence on the imaging optics, as well. Both are important to avoid intensity spikes leading to damages of optics in multi-pass laser amplifiers.

  1. Image of the Black Hole, Cygnus X-1, Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    This image of the suspected Black Hole, Cygnus X-1, was the first object seen by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory. According to the theories to date, one concept of a black hole is a star, perhaps 10 times more massive than the Sun, that has entered the last stages of stelar evolution. There is an explosion triggered by nuclear reactions after which the star's outer shell of lighter elements and gases is blown away into space and the heavier elements in the stellar core begin to collapse upon themselves. Once this collapse begins, the inexorable force of gravity continues to compact the material until it becomes so dense it is squeezed into a mere point and nothing can escape from its extreme gravitational field, not even light. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy.

  2. Performance of a thermal neutron radiographic system using imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvani, Maria Ines; Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Furieri, Rosanne; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2009-01-01

    A performance evaluation of a neutron radiographic system equipped with a thermal neutron sensitive imaging plate has been undertaken. It includes the assessment of spatial resolution, linearity, dynamic range and the response to exposure time, as well as a comparison of these parameters with the equivalent ones for neutron radiography employing conventional films and a gadolinium foil as converter. The evaluation and comparison between the radiographic systems have been performed at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - CNEN, using the Argonauta Reactor as source of thermal neutrons and a commercially available imaging plate reader. (author)

  3. Modeling the National Ignition Facility neutron imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D C; Grim, G P; Tregillis, I L; Wilke, M D; Patel, M V; Sepke, S M; Morgan, G L; Hatarik, R; Loomis, E N; Wilde, C H; Oertel, J A; Fatherley, V E; Clark, D D; Fittinghoff, D N; Bower, D E; Schmitt, M J; Marinak, M M; Munro, D H; Merrill, F E; Moran, M J; Wang, T-S F; Danly, C R; Hilko, R A; Batha, S H; Frank, M; Buckles, R

    2010-10-01

    Numerical modeling of the neutron imaging system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), forward from calculated target neutron emission to a camera image, will guide both the reduction of data and the future development of the system. Located 28 m from target chamber center, the system can produce two images at different neutron energies by gating on neutron arrival time. The brighter image, using neutrons near 14 MeV, reflects the size and symmetry of the implosion "hot spot." A second image in scattered neutrons, 10-12 MeV, reflects the size and symmetry of colder, denser fuel, but with only ∼1%-7% of the neutrons. A misalignment of the pinhole assembly up to ±175 μm is covered by a set of 37 subapertures with different pointings. The model includes the variability of the pinhole point spread function across the field of view. Omega experiments provided absolute calibration, scintillator spatial broadening, and the level of residual light in the down-scattered image from the primary neutrons. Application of the model to light decay measurements of EJ399, BC422, BCF99-55, Xylene, DPAC-30, and Liquid A suggests that DPAC-30 and Liquid A would be preferred over the BCF99-55 scintillator chosen for the first NIF system, if they could be fabricated into detectors with sufficient resolution.

  4. Neutron imaging for inertial confinement fusion and molecular optic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, O.

    2010-01-01

    Scientific domains that require imaging of micrometric/nano-metric objects are dramatically increasing (Plasma Physics, Astrophysics, Biotechnology, Earth Sciences...). Difficulties encountered in imaging smaller and smaller objects make this research area more and more challenging and in constant evolution. The two scientific domains, through which this study has been led, are the neutron imaging in the context of the inertial confinement fusion and the fluorescence molecular imaging. Work presented in this thesis has two main objectives. The first one is to describe the instrumentation characteristics that require such imagery and, relatively to the scientific domains considered, identify parameters likely to optimize the imaging system accuracy. The second one is to present the developed data analysis and reconstruction methods able to provide spatial resolution adapted to the size of the observed object. Similarities of numerical algorithms used in these two scientific domains, which goals are quiet different, show how micrometric/nano-metric object imaging is a research area at the border of a large number of scientific disciplines. (author)

  5. Zone plate imaging of 14-MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Lane, S.M.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1986-01-01

    At Livermore we are interested in imaging the thermonuclear burn region of fusion targets irradiated at our Nova laser facility. We expect compressed core diameters to be 10's of microns, and would like images with better than 10-μm resolution. Alpha particle images provided the first direct information about the thermonuclear burn geometry in thin walled exploding pusher targets. In future high density target experiments, only highly penetrating radiations like the 14-MeV neutrons will escape the target core to provide information about the burn region. To make the measurement with a neutron ''pinhole'' camera requires a 10μm pinhole through about 10 cm of material and 10 14 to 10 15 source neutrons. Penumbral imaging offers some improvement over a pinhole. Zone plate coded imaging (ZPCI) techniques are particularly well suited for imaging small objects like the compressed core of a laser fusion target. We have been using ZPCI techniques to image nonpenetrating radiations like x rays and alpha particles for about 10 years. The techniques are well developed. Imaging penetrating radiations like 14-MeV neutrons using ZPCI techniques has several possible advantages. The large solid angle subtended by the Zone plate might substantially reduce the required target neutron yield needed to produce a useful image, and a neutron zone plate system with 10-μm resolution might be easier to fabricate and characterize than a pinhole system. This paper explores the use of ZPCI techniques with penetrating radiation

  6. Development of a new electronic neutron imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenizer, J.S. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Thornton Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2442 (United States); Berger, H. [Industrial Quality, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Gibbs, K.M. [Industrial Quality, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Mengers, P. [Paultek Systems, Inc., Nevada City, CA (United States); Stebbings, C.T. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Thornton Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2442 (United States); Polansky, D. [Industrial Quality, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Rogerson, D.J. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1999-11-03

    An electronic neutron imaging camera system was developed for use with thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons in applications that include nondestructive inspection of explosives, corrosion, turbine blades, electronics, low Z components, etc. The neutron images are expected to provide information to supplement that available from X-ray tests. The primary camera image area was a 30x30 cm field-of-view with a spatial resolution approaching 1.6 line pairs/mm (lp/mm). The camera had a remotely changeable second lens to limit the field-of-view to 7.6x7.6 cm for high spatial resolution (at least 4 lp/mm) thermal neutron imaging, but neutron and light scatter will limit resolution for fast neutrons to about 0.5 lp/mm. Remote focus capability enhanced camera set-up for optimum operation. The 75 dB dynamic range camera system included {sup 6}Li-based screens for imaging of thermal and epithermal neutrons and ZnS(Ag)-based screens for fast neutron imaging. The fast optics was input to a Super S-25 Gen II image intensifier, fiber optically coupled to a 1134 (h)x486 (v) frame transfer CCD camera. The camera system was designed to be compatible with a Navy-sponsored accelerator neutron source. The planned neutron source is an RF quadrupole accelerator that will provide a fast neutron flux of 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}-s (at a source distance of 1 m) at an energy of about 2.2 MeV and a thermal neutron flux of 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}-s at a source L/D ratio of 30. The electronic camera produced good quality real-time images at these neutron levels. On-chip integration could be used to improve image quality for low flux situations. The camera and accelerator combination provided a useful non-reactor neutron inspection system.

  7. Development of Neutron Imaging System for Neutron Tomography at Thai Research Reactor TRR-1/M1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonglee, S.; Khaweerat, S.; Channuie, J.; Picha, R.; Liamsuwan, T.; Ratanatongchai, W.

    2017-09-01

    The neutron imaging is a powerful non-destructive technique to investigate the internal structure and provides the information which is different from the conventional X-ray/Gamma radiography. By reconstruction of the obtained 2-dimentional (2D) images from the taken different angle around the specimen, the tomographic image can be obtained and it can provide the information in more detail. The neutron imaging system at Thai Research Reactor TRR-1/M1 of Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (Public Organization) has been developed to conduct the neutron tomography since 2014. The primary goal of this work is to serve the investigation of archeological samples, however, this technique can also be applied to various fields, such as investigation of industrial specimen and others. This research paper presents the performance study of a compact neutron camera manufactured by Neutron Optics such as speed and sensitivity. Furthermore, the 3-dimentional (3D) neutron image was successfully reconstructed at the developed neutron imaging system of TRR-1/M1.

  8. Visualisation of diesel injector with neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.; Jollet, S.; Kaiser, M.; Hansen, H.; Dinkelacker, F.

    2015-12-01

    The injection process of diesel engines influences the pollutant emissions. The spray formation is significantly influenced by the internal flow of the injector. One of the key parameters here is the generation of cavitation caused by the geometry and the needle lift. In modern diesel engines the injection pressure is established up to 3000 bar. The details of the flow and phase change processes inside the injector are of increasing importance for such injectors. With these experimental measurements the validation of multiphase and cavitation models is possible for the high pressure range. Here, for instance, cavitation effects can occur. Cavitation effects in the injection port area destabilize the emergent fuel jet and improve the jet break-up. The design of the injection system in direct-injection diesel engines is an important challenge, as the jet breakup, the atomization and the mixture formation in the combustion chamber are closely linked. These factors have a direct impact on emissions, fuel consumption and performance of an engine. The shape of the spray at the outlet is determined by the internal flow of the nozzle. Here, geometrical parameters, the injection pressure, the injection duration and the cavitation phenomena play a major role. In this work, the flow dependency in the nozzles are analysed with the Neutron-Imaging. The great advantage of this method is the penetrability of the steel structure while a high contrast to the fuel is given due to the interaction of the neutrons with the hydrogen amount. Compared to other methods (optical with glass structures) we can apply real components under highest pressure conditions. During the steady state phase of the injection various cavitation phenomena are visible in the injector, being influenced by the nozzle geometry and the fuel pressure. Different characteristics of cavitation in the sac and spray hole can be detected, and the spray formation in the primary breakup zone is influenced.

  9. Noninvasive measurements of cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolites in dilated cardiomyopathy by using 31P spectroscopic chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansch, A.; Rzanny, R.; Heyne, J.-P.; Reichenbach, J.R.; Kaiser, W.A.; Leder, U.

    2005-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is accompanied by an impaired cardiac energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate metabolic ratios in patients with DCM compared to controls by using spectroscopic two-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D-CSI). Twenty volunteers and 15 patients with severe symptoms (left ventricular ejection fraction, LVEF 30%) of DCM were investigated. Cardiac 31 P MR 2D-CSI measurements (voxel size: 40 x 40 x 100 mm 3 ) were performed with a 1.5 T whole-body scanner. Measurement time ranged from 15 min to 30 min. Peak areas and ratios of different metabolites were evaluated, including high-energy phosphates (PCr, ATP), 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and phosphodiesters (PDE). In addition, we evaluated how PCr/ATP ratios correlate with LVEF as an established prognostic factor of heart failure. The PCr/γ-ATP ratio was significantly decreased in patients with moderate and severe DCM and showed a linear correlation with reduced LVEFs. PDE/ATP ratios were significantly increased only in patients with severe DCM as compared to volunteers. Applying 31 P MRS with commonly-available 2D-CSI sequences is a valuable technique to evaluate DCM by determining PCr/ATP ratios noninvasively. In addition to reduced PCr/ATP ratios observed in patients suffering from DCM, significantly-increased PDE/ATP ratios were found in patients with severe DCM. (orig.)

  10. Comparing neutron and X-ray images from NIF implosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson D.C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Directly laser driven and X-radiation driven DT filled capsules differ in the relationship between neutron and X-ray images. Shot N110217, a directly driven DT-filled glass micro-balloon provided the first neutron images at the National Ignition Facility. As seen in implosions on the Omega laser, the neutron image can be enclosed inside time integrated X-ray images. HYDRA simulations show the X-ray image is dominated by emission from the hot glass shell while the neutron image arises from the DT fuel it encloses. In the absence of mix or jetting, X-ray images of a cryogenically layered THD fuel capsule should be dominated by emission from the hydrogen rather than the cooler plastic shell that is separated from the hot core by cold DT fuel. This cool, dense DT, invisible in X-ray emission, shows itself by scattering hot core neutrons. Germanium X-ray emission spectra and Ross pair filtered X-ray energy resolved images suggest that germanium doped plastic emits in the torus shaped hot spot, probably reducing the neutron yield.

  11. Collimator design for neutron imaging of laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommargren, G.E.; Lerche, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Several pinhole collimator geometries for use in neutron imaging experiments have been modeled and compared. Point spread functions are shown for a cylinder, hyperbola, intersecting cones, and a five-zone approximation to the intersecting cones. Of the geometries studied, the intersecting cones appear the most promising with respect to neutron efficiency, field of view, and isoplanatism

  12. Characterization of a neutron imaging setup at the INES facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durisi, E.A., E-mail: elisabettaalessandra.durisi@unito.it [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Visca, L. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Albertin, F.; Brancaccio, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Corsi, J. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dughera, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Ferrarese, W. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Giovagnoli, A.; Grassi, N. [Fondazione Centro per la Conservazione ed il Restauro dei Beni Culturali “La Venaria Reale”, Piazza della Repubblica, 10078 Venaria Reale, Torino (Italy); Grazzi, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Lo Giudice, A.; Mila, G. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); and others

    2013-10-21

    The Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) located at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (Didcot, United Kingdom) provides a thermal neutron beam mainly used for diffraction analysis. A neutron transmission imaging system was also developed for beam monitoring and for aligning the sample under investigation. Although the time-of-flight neutron diffraction is a consolidated technique, the neutron imaging setup is not yet completely characterized and optimized. In this paper the performance for neutron radiography and tomography at INES of two scintillator screens read out by two different commercial CCD cameras is compared in terms of linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution. In addition, the results of neutron radiographies and a tomography of metal alloy test structures are presented to better characterize the INES imaging capabilities of metal artifacts in the cultural heritage field. -- Highlights: A full characterization of the present INES imaging set-up was carried out. Two CCD cameras and two scintillators (ZnS/{sup 6}LiF) of different thicknesses were tested. Linearity, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution were determined. Radiographies of steep wedges were performed using the highest dynamic range setup. Tomography of a bronze cube was performed using the best spatial resolution setup.

  13. Characterization of a neutron imaging setup at the INES facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durisi, E.A.; Visca, L.; Albertin, F.; Brancaccio, R.; Corsi, J.; Dughera, G.; Ferrarese, W.; Giovagnoli, A.; Grassi, N.; Grazzi, F.; Lo Giudice, A.; Mila, G.

    2013-01-01

    The Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) located at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (Didcot, United Kingdom) provides a thermal neutron beam mainly used for diffraction analysis. A neutron transmission imaging system was also developed for beam monitoring and for aligning the sample under investigation. Although the time-of-flight neutron diffraction is a consolidated technique, the neutron imaging setup is not yet completely characterized and optimized. In this paper the performance for neutron radiography and tomography at INES of two scintillator screens read out by two different commercial CCD cameras is compared in terms of linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution. In addition, the results of neutron radiographies and a tomography of metal alloy test structures are presented to better characterize the INES imaging capabilities of metal artifacts in the cultural heritage field. -- Highlights: A full characterization of the present INES imaging set-up was carried out. Two CCD cameras and two scintillators (ZnS/ 6 LiF) of different thicknesses were tested. Linearity, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution were determined. Radiographies of steep wedges were performed using the highest dynamic range setup. Tomography of a bronze cube was performed using the best spatial resolution setup

  14. A novel dual mode neutron-gamma imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Robert Lee; Gerling, Mark; Brennan, James S.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Mrowka, Stanley; Marleau, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Neutron Scatter Camera (NSC) can image fission sources and determine their energy spectra at distances of tens of meters and through significant thicknesses of intervening materials in relatively short times (1). We recently completed a 32 element scatter camera and will present recent advances made with this instrument. A novel capability for the scatter camera is dual mode imaging. In normal neutron imaging mode we identify and image neutron events using pulse shape discrimination (PSD) and time of flight in liquid scintillator. Similarly gamma rays are identified from Compton scatter in the front and rear planes for our segmented detector. Rather than reject these events, we show it is possible to construct a gamma-ray image by running the analysis in a 'Compton mode'. Instead of calculating the scattering angle by the kinematics of elastic scatters as is appropriate for neutron events, it can be found by the kinematics of Compton scatters. Our scatter camera has not been optimized as a Compton gamma-ray imager but is found to work reasonably. We studied imaging performance using a Cs137 source. We find that we are able to image the gamma source with reasonable fidelity. We are able to determine gamma energy after some reasonable assumptions. We will detail the various algorithms we have developed for gamma image reconstruction. We will outline areas for improvement, include additional results and compare neutron and gamma mode imaging.

  15. Microstructural evolution in modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic steel irradiated with mixed high-energy proton and neutron spectra at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sencer, B.H.; Garner, F.A.; Gelles, D.S.; Bond, G.M.; Maloy, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic steel was exposed at 32-57 deg. C to a mixed proton/neutron particle flux and spectrum at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The microstructure of unirradiated 9Cr-1Mo consists of laths, dislocations and carbides. Examination of electron diffraction patterns obtained from extraction replicas of unirradiated 9Cr-1Mo revealed that the precipitate microstructure was primarily dominated by M 23 C 6 carbides. The post-irradiation microstructure contained black-spot damage in addition to precipitates and dislocations. Examination of electron diffraction patterns revealed diffuse rings from M 23 C 6 carbides, indicating amorphization and/or nanocrystallinity. Crystalline MC carbides were also found. No cavity formation was found although a significant amount of helium and hydrogen generation had been generated. TEM-EDS examination of extraction replicas for carbides from unirradiated and irradiated samples did not show any detectable changes in composition of either M 23 C 6 or MC carbides. There was also no evident change in carbide size. Lattice images of M 23 C 6 carbides revealed an amorphous microstructure following irradiation, but MC carbides were still crystalline

  16. Implementation of neutron phase contrast imaging at FRM-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Klaus

    2008-11-12

    At ANTARES, the beam line for neutron imaging at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) in Garching, the option to do phase contrast imaging besides conventional absorption based neutron imaging was implemented and successfully used for the non-destructive testing of various types of objects. The used propagation-based technique is based on the interference of neutron waves in the detector plane that were differently strong diffracted by the sample. A comparison with other phase-sensitive neutron imaging techniques highlights assets and drawbacks of the different methods. In preliminary measurements at ANTARES and the spallation source SINQ at PSI in Villigen, the influence of the beam geometry, the neutron spectrum and the detector on the quality of the phase contrast measurements were investigated systematically. It was demonstrated that gamma radiation and epithermal neutrons in the beam contribute severely to background noise in measurements, which motivated the installation of a remotely controlled filter wheel for a quick and precise positioning of different crystal filters in the beam. By the installation of a similar aperture wheel, a quick change between eight different beam geometries was made possible. Besides pinhole and slit apertures, coded apertures based on non redundant arrays were investigated. The possibilities, which arise by the exploitation of the real part of the refractive index in neutron imaging, were demonstrated in experiments with especially designed test samples and in measurements with ordinary, industrial components. (orig.)

  17. Implementation of neutron phase contrast imaging at FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    At ANTARES, the beam line for neutron imaging at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) in Garching, the option to do phase contrast imaging besides conventional absorption based neutron imaging was implemented and successfully used for the non-destructive testing of various types of objects. The used propagation-based technique is based on the interference of neutron waves in the detector plane that were differently strong diffracted by the sample. A comparison with other phase-sensitive neutron imaging techniques highlights assets and drawbacks of the different methods. In preliminary measurements at ANTARES and the spallation source SINQ at PSI in Villigen, the influence of the beam geometry, the neutron spectrum and the detector on the quality of the phase contrast measurements were investigated systematically. It was demonstrated that gamma radiation and epithermal neutrons in the beam contribute severely to background noise in measurements, which motivated the installation of a remotely controlled filter wheel for a quick and precise positioning of different crystal filters in the beam. By the installation of a similar aperture wheel, a quick change between eight different beam geometries was made possible. Besides pinhole and slit apertures, coded apertures based on non redundant arrays were investigated. The possibilities, which arise by the exploitation of the real part of the refractive index in neutron imaging, were demonstrated in experiments with especially designed test samples and in measurements with ordinary, industrial components. (orig.)

  18. Neutron penumbral imaging of laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Ress, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Using a new technique, penumbral coded-aperture imaging, the first neutron images of laser-driven, inertial-confinement fusion targets were obtained. With these images the deuterium-tritium burn region within a compressed target can be measured directly. 4 references, 11 figures

  19. Transportable, Low-Dose Active Fast-Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalczo, John T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wright, Michael C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McConchie, Seth M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Archer, Daniel E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Palles, Blake A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This document contains a description of the method of transportable, low-dose active fast-neutron imaging as developed by ORNL. The discussion begins with the technique and instrumentation and continues with the image reconstruction and analysis. The analysis discussion includes an example of how a gap smaller than the neutron production spot size and detector size can be detected and characterized depending upon the measurement time.

  20. Neutron diffractometer for bio-crystallography (BIX) with an imaging plate neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    We have constructed a dedicated diffractometer for neutron crystallography in biology (BIX) on the JRR-3M reactor at JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute). The diffraction intensity from a protein crystal is weaker than that from most inorganic materials. In order to overcome the intensity problem, an elastically bent silicon monochromator and a large area detector system were specially designed. A preliminary result of diffraction experiment using BIX has been reported. An imaging plate neutron detector has been developed and a feasibility experiment was carried out on BIX. Results are reported. An imaging plate neutron detector has been developed and a feasibility test was carried out using BIX.

  1. High-Energy X-ray imaging applied to non destructive characterization of large nuclear waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estre, Nicolas; Eck, Daniel; Pettier, Jean-Luc; Payan, Emmanuel; Roure, Christophe; Simon, Eric

    2013-06-01

    As part of its R and D programs on non-destructive testing of nuclear waste drums, CEA is commissioning an irradiation cell named CINPHONIE, at Cadarache. This cell allows high-energy imaging (radiography and tomography) on large volumes (up to 5 m 3 ) and heavy weights (up to 5 tons). A demonstrator has been finalized, based on existing components. The X-ray source is a 9 MeV LINAC which produces Bremsstrahlung X-rays (up to 23 Gy/min at 1 meter in the beam axis). The mechanical bench is digitally controlled on three axes (translation, rotation, elevation) and can handle objects up to 2 t. This bench performs trajectories necessary for acquisition of projections (sinograms) according to different geometries: Translation-Rotation, Fan-Beam and Cone-Beam. Two detection systems both developed by CEA-Leti are available. The first one is a large GADOX scintillating screen (800*600 mm 2 ) coupled to a low-noise pixelated camera. The second one is a multi- CdTe semiconductor detector, offering measurements up to 5 decades of attenuation (equivalent to 25 cm of lead or 180 cm of standard concrete). At the end of the acquisition, a Filtered Back Projection-based algorithm is performed. Then, a density slice (fan-beam tomography) or a density volume (cone-beam tomography or helical tomography) is produced and used to examine the waste. Characterization of LINAC, associated detectors as well as the full acquisition chain, are presented. Experimental performances on phantoms and real drum are discussed and expected limits on defect detectability are evaluated by simulation. The final system, designed to handle objects up to 5 tons is then presented. (authors)

  2. Moisture imaging of a camphor tree by neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Karakama, Isamu; Sakura, Tsuguo; Matsubayashi, Masashi

    1998-01-01

    Moisture distribution of a camphor tree was presented. A 23 year old camphor tree was downed at university forest and a wood disk, about 1 cm in width, was lumbered out from the breast height of the tree. The wood disk as well as a newly developing branch of the tree were irradiated with thermal neutrons at an atomic reactor installed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The total flux of thermal neutron was 3.0 x 10 9 n/cm 2 . Water specific images of the disk and a branch were presented with high resolution, which was estimated to be about 16 μm. In the case of wood disk, moisture decreasing manner while drying was also shown through neutron image. Neutron images showed that the moisture decreasing rate in sapwood was similar to that of heartwood. (author)

  3. DIANE stationary neutron radiography system image quality and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluzeau, S.; Huet, J.; Tourneur, P. le

    1994-01-01

    The SODERN neutron radiography laboratory has operated since February 1993 using a sealed tube generator (GENIE 46). An experimental programme of characterization (dosimetry, spectroscopy) has confirmed the expected performances concerning: neutron flux intensity, neutron energy range, residual gamma flux. Results are given in a specific report [2]. This paper is devoted to the image performance reporting. ASTM and specific indicators have been used to test the image quality with various converters and films. The corresponding modulation transfer functions are to be determined from image processing. Some industrial applications have demonstrated the capabilities of the system: corrosion detection in aircraft parts, ammunitions filling testing, detection of polymer lacks in sandwich steel sheets, detection of moisture in a probe for geophysics, residual ceramic cores imaging in turbine blades. Various computerized electronic imaging systems will be tested to improve the industrial capabilities. (orig.)

  4. Structural refinement and extraction of hydrogen atomic positions in polyoxymethylene crystal based on the first successful measurements of 2-dimensional high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction and wide-angle neutron diffraction patterns of hydrogenated and deuterated species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Kohji; Hanesaka, Makoto; Ohhara, Takashi; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tamada, Taro; Kuroki, Ryota; Fujiwara, Satoru; Ozeki, Tomoji; Kitano, Toshiaki; Nishu, Takashi; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    2-Dimensional X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns have been successfully measured for deuterated and hydrogenated polyoxymethylene (POM) samples obtained by γ-ray induced solid-state polymerization reaction. More than 700 reflections were collected from the X-ray diffraction data at -150degC by utilizing a high-energy synchrotron X-ray beam at SPring-8, Japan, from which the crystal structure of POM has been refined thoroughly including the extraction of hydrogen atomic positions at clearly seen in the difference Fourier synthesis map. As the first trial the nonuniform (9/5) helical model was analyzed with the reliability factor (R factor) 6.9%. The structural analysis was made also using the X-ray reflections of about 400 observed at room temperature (R 8.8%), and the thermal parameters of constituent atoms were compared between the low and high temperatures to discuss the librational thermal motion of the chains. The 2-dimensional neutron diffraction data, collected for the deuterated and hydrogenated POM samples using an imaging plate system specifically built-up for neutron scattering experiment, have allowed us to pick up the D and H atomic positions clearly in the Fourier synthesis maps. Another possible model, (29/16) helix, which was proposed by several researches, has been also investigated on the basis of the X-ray diffraction data at -150degC. The direct method succeeded in extracting this (29/16) model straightforwardly. The R factor was 8.6%, essentially the same as that of (9/5) helical model. This means that the comparison of the diffraction intensity between the data collected from the full-rotation X-ray diffraction pattern and the intensity calculated for both the (9/5) and (29/16) models cannot be used for the unique determination of the superiority of the model, (9/5) or (29/16) helix. However, we have found the existence of 001 and 002 reflections which give the longer repeating period 55.7 A. Besides there observed a series of meridional

  5. The analysis and correction of neutron scattering effects in neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raine, D.A.; Brenizer, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    A method of correcting for the scattering effects present in neutron radiographic and computed tomographic imaging has been developed. Prior work has shown that beam, object, and imaging system geometry factors, such as the L/D ratio and angular divergence, are the primary sources contributing to the degradation of neutron images. With objects smaller than 20--40 mm in width, a parallel beam approximation can be made where the effects from geometry are negligible. Factors which remain important in the image formation process are the pixel size of the imaging system, neutron scattering, the size of the object, the conversion material, and the beam energy spectrum. The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code, version 4A (MCNP4A), was used to separate and evaluate the effect that each of these parameters has on neutron image data. The simulations were used to develop a correction algorithm which is easy to implement and requires no a priori knowledge of the object. The correction algorithm is based on the determination of the object scatter function (OSF) using available data outside the object to estimate the shape and magnitude of the OSF based on a Gaussian functional form. For objects smaller than 1 mm (0.04 in.) in width, the correction function can be well approximated by a constant function. Errors in the determination and correction of the MCNP simulated neutron scattering component were under 5% and larger errors were only noted in objects which were at the extreme high end of the range of object sizes simulated. The Monte Carlo data also indicated that scattering does not play a significant role in the blurring of neutron radiographic and tomographic images. The effect of neutron scattering on computed tomography is shown to be minimal at best, with the most serious effect resulting when the basic backprojection method is used

  6. High energy (42-66 MeV reactions) fast neutron dose optimization studies in the head and neck, thorax, upper abdomen, pelvis and extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.W.; Laramore, G.E.; Maor, M.H.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Parker, R.G.; Davis, L.W.

    1990-01-01

    550 Patients were entered into a set of dose-searching studies designed to determine normal tissue tolerances to high energy (42-66 MeV reactions) fast neutrons delivered in 12 equal fractions over 4 weeks. Patients were stratified by treatment facility and then randomized to receive 16, 18 or 20 Gy for tumors located in the upper abdomen or pelvis, and 18, 20 or 22 Gy for tumors located in the head and neck, thorax or extremities. Following completion of the randomized protocols, additional patients were studied at the 20.4 Gy level in the head and neck, thorax and pelvis. Normal tissue effect scoring was accomplished using the RTOG-EORTC acute and late normal tissue effect scales. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity rates in the head and neck were 19 per cent for 20/20.4 Gy and 20 per cent for 22 Gy. Time adjusted late toxicity rates in the head and neck at 12 months were 15 per cent for 20/20.4 Gy and 0 per cent for 22 Gy. The 18 Gy treatment arm of the head and neck protocol was dropped early in the study after only two patients were accrued. For cases treated in the thorax, acute Grade 3+ toxicity rates were 6 per cent for 18 Gy, 15 per cent for 20/20.4 Gy and 7 per cent for 22 Gy. Late toxicity rates at 12 months were 0 per cent for 18 Gy, 11 per cent for 20/20.4 Gy and 18 per cent for 22 Gy. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity rates in the upper abdomen were 0 per cent for 16 Gy, 18 per cent for 18 Gy and 12 per cent for 20 Gy. There were no Grade 3+ late toxicities in the upper abdomen. In the pelvis acute Grade 3+ toxicity rates were 0 per cent for 16 Gy, 3 per cent for 18 Gy and 3 per cent for 20/20.4 Gy. Late Grade 3+ toxicities at 24 months were 20 per cent for 16 Gy, 5 per cent for 18 Gy and 24 per cent for 20/20.4 Gy. In the extremities, acute Grade 3+ toxicity rates were 7 per cent for 20 Gy and 21 per cent for 22 Gy, while at 12 months, late Grade 3+ toxicity rates were 14 and 35 per cent respectively. The 18 Gy treatment arm of the extremities protocol was dropped early

  7. MINER - A Mobile Imager of Neutrons for Emergency Responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, John E. M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brennan, James S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gerling, Mark D [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kiff, Scott D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mascarenhas, Nicholas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Van De Vreugde, James L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a mobile fast neutron imaging platform to enhance the capabilities of emergency responders in the localization and characterization of special nuclear material. This mobile imager of neutrons for emergency responders (MINER) is based on the Neutron Scatter Camera, a large segmented imaging system that was optimized for large-area search applications. Due to the reduced size and power requirements of a man-portable system, MINER has been engineered to fit a much smaller form factor, and to be operated from either a battery or AC power. We chose a design that enabled omnidirectional (4π) imaging, with only a ~twofold decrease in sensitivity compared to the much larger neutron scatter cameras. The system was designed to optimize its performance for neutron imaging and spectroscopy, but it does also function as a Compton camera for gamma imaging. This document outlines the project activities, broadly characterized as system development, laboratory measurements, and deployments, and presents sample results in these areas. Additional information can be found in the documents that reside in WebPMIS.

  8. Neutron tomography at IPEN-CNEN/SP: images and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliesi, Reynaldo; Pereira, Marco Antonio Stanojev; Andrade, Marcos Leandro Garcia, E-mail: pugliesi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The neutron tomography is a non destructive testing technique used to inspect the internal structure of a sample by means of tridimensional digital images. Because of the neutron-matter interaction characteristics this technique can be used to inspect hydrogen-rich substances like ceramics, oil, grease, water, rubber, blood and others, even wrapped by thick metal layers. In this way, the information provided by neutrons are complementary to the ones provided by X-rays. The Brazilian Institute for Nuclear Technology IPEN-CNEN/SP has an equipment for neutron tomography which since Nov/2011 is operational and installed at the IEA-R1 Nuclear Research Reactor. This equipment is able to provide high quality tomographs and some important results obtained for Proton Exchange Membranes (PEM) cell, for an archaeological sample and for pottery, will be presented. Furthermore, details of its construction and its versatility, in the sense that by means of small adjustments is possible to obtain images by other neutron imaging techniques, will be also presented. Is very important enhance that the high quality of the obtained images is due to the excellence of the IEA-R1 reactor which is able to furnish neutron beams with adequate intensity for such purpose. (author)

  9. Neutron CSI: Integrated platform for non-destructive composition and stress imaging with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materna, T.; Pirling, T.

    2011-01-01

    We propose to build an interdisciplinary platform for non-destructive analysis and imaging with neutrons. The project regroups an instrument already available at ILL (Laue-Langevin Institute), SALSA, with a new one for Neutron Tomography coupled to Prompt-Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNA) as well as partial usage of another proposed instrument, FIPPS. The focus of the proposition is the versatility of high spatial resolution and energy-selective neutron tomography to provide a rapid and precise 3D morphological map of an object as well as indirect information on its 3D elemental and structural composition through the scan of Bragg-edges in transmission. Coupled to PGNA imaging and the strain analysis power of SALSA, the aim of the platform is to answer key questions occurring in geological, metallurgical, engineering and medical fields, material research and cultural heritage. (authors)

  10. Neutron imaging system based on a video camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinca, M.

    2004-01-01

    The non-destructive testing with cold, thermal, epithermal or fast neutrons is nowadays more and more useful because the world-wide level of industrial development requires considerably higher standards of quality of manufactured products and reliability of technological processes especially where any deviation from standards could result in large-scale catastrophic consequences or human loses. Thanks to their properties, easily obtained and very good discrimination of the materials that penetrate, the thermal neutrons are the most used probe. The methods involved for this technique have advanced from neutron radiography based on converter screens and radiological films to neutron radioscopy based on video cameras, that is, from static images to dynamic images. Many neutron radioscopy systems have been used in the past with various levels of success. The quality of an image depends on the quality of the neutron beam and the type of the neutron imaging system. For real time investigations there are involved tube type cameras, CCD cameras and recently CID cameras that capture the image from an appropriate scintillator through the agency of a mirror. The analog signal of the camera is then converted into digital signal by the signal processing technology included into the camera. The image acquisition card or frame grabber from a PC converts the digital signal into an image. The image is formatted and processed by image analysis software. The scanning position of the object is controlled by the computer that commands the electrical motors that move horizontally, vertically and rotate the table of the object. Based on this system, a lot of static image acquisitions, real time non-destructive investigations of dynamic processes and finally, tomographic investigations of the small objects are done in a short time. A system based on a CID camera is presented. Fundamental differences between CCD and CID cameras lie in their pixel readout structure and technique. CIDs

  11. Imaging of Rabbit VX-2 Hepatic Cancer by Cold and Thermal Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Matsubayashi, Masahito; Takeda, Tohoru; Lwin, Thet Thet; Wu, Jin; Yoneyama, Akio; Matsumura, Akira; Hori, Tomiei; Itai, Yuji

    2003-11-01

    Neutron radiography is based on differences in neutron mass attenuation coefficients among the elements and is a non-destructive imaging method. To investigate biomedical applications of neutron radiography, imaging of rabbit VX-2 liver cancer was performed using thermal and cold neutron radiography with a neutron imaging plate. Hepatic vessels and VX-2 tumor were clearly observed by neutron radiography, especially by cold neutron imaging. The image contrast of this modality was better than that of absorption-contrast X-ray radiography.

  12. Neutron Imaging with Timepix Coupled Lithium Indium Diselenide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elan Herrera

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The material lithium indium diselenide, a single crystal neutron sensitive semiconductor, has demonstrated its capabilities as a high resolution imaging device. The sensor was prepared with a 55 μ m pitch array of gold contacts, designed to couple with the Timepix imaging ASIC. The resulting device was tested at the High Flux Isotope Reactor, demonstrating a response to cold neutrons when enriched in 95% 6 Li. The imaging system performed a series of experiments resulting in a <200 μ m resolution limit with the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI Siemens star mask and a feature resolution of 34 μ m with a knife-edge test. Furthermore, the system was able to resolve the University of Tennessee logo inscribed into a 3D printed 1 cm 3 plastic block. This technology marks the application of high resolution neutron imaging using a direct readout semiconductor.

  13. Neutron Imaging Control Report: FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, D. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-30

    During the 2016 fiscal year, work began on the supervision and control systems for the neutron source currently under construction in the B194 accelerator caves. This source relies on a deuteron beam colliding with a high-speed stream of deuterium gas to create neutrons, which poses significant technical challenges. To help overcome those challenges, an integrated, operator-focused control architecture is required to collect and assimilate disparate data from a variety of measurement points, as well as provide the means to remotely control the system hardware.

  14. Neutron beam applications - A development of real-time imaging processing for neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Whoi Yul; Lee, Sang Yup; Choi, Min Seok; Hwang, Sun Kyu; Han, Il Ho; Jang, Jae Young [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-08-01

    This research is sponsored and supported by KAERI as a part of {sup A}pplication of Neutron Radiography Beam.{sup M}ain theme of the research is to develop a non-destructive inspection system for the task of studying the real-time behaviour of dynamic motion using neutron beam with the aid of a special purpose real-time image processing system that allows to capture an image of internal structure of a specimen. Currently, most off-the-shelf image processing programs designed for visible light or X-ray are not adequate for the applications that require neutron beam generated by the experimental nuclear reactor. In addition, study of dynamic motion of a specimen is severely constrained by such image processing systems. In this research, a special image processing system suited for such application is developed which not only supplements the commercial image processing system but allows to use neutron beam directly in the system for the study. 18 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  15. Feasibility study on using imaging plates to estimate thermal neutron fluence in neutron-gamma mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibuchi, T.; Tanabe, Y.; Sakae, T.; Terunuma, T.; Isobe, T.; Kawamura, H.; Yasuoka, K.; Matsumoto, T.; Harano, H.; Nishiyama, J.; Masuda, A.; Nohtomi, A.

    2011-01-01

    In current radiotherapy, neutrons are produced in a photonuclear reaction when incident photon energy is higher than the threshold. In the present study, a method of discriminating the neutron component was investigated using an imaging plate (IP) in the neutron-gamma-ray mixed field. Two types of IP were used: a conventional IP for beta- and gamma rays, and an IP doped with Gd for detecting neutrons. IPs were irradiated in the mixed field, and the photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) intensity of the thermal neutron component was discriminated using an expression proposed herein. The PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was proportional to thermal neutron fluence. When additional irradiation of photons was added to constant neutron irradiation, the PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was not affected. The uncertainty of PSL intensities was approximately 11.4 %. This method provides a simple and effective means of discriminating the neutron component in a mixed field. (authors)

  16. Improve the efficiency of PEMFC using neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Joo; Shim, Chulmuu

    2010-01-01

    The water management is one of the most critical issues for PEMFC commercialization. In order to make a proper scheme for water management, the information of water distribution and behavior is very important. But the visualization is difficult due to metallic coverage. Recently, neutron imaging has joined the canon of diagnostic methods for fuel cell research and is applied worldwide with qualitative and quantitative results. In this investigation, we prepared 3-parallel serpentine single PEMFC. The active area is 250 mm 2 and channel size is 1 Χ 1 mm, respectively. Distribution and transport of water in an operating PEMFC were observed as functions of flow directions and differential pressures between anode and cathodes. This investigation was performed at BST-2, Nest. The collimation ratio is 600 and neutron fluence of BST-2 is 7.2 Χ 10 6 n/s, respectively. Neutron image was captured by A-Si detector with 1 sec expsosure time. The PEMFC has different performances for each differential pressure and flow directions. When the neutron images are compared with operating conditions, the distribution and behavior of water are different. Total water fraction is increased and then decreases as the current density increases. This situation is similar trend for the flow directions. It is shown that neutron imaging technique is powerful tool to visualize the PEMFC and the water distribution and behavior of an operating PEMFC helps improve the efficiency of PEMFC

  17. New feature of the neutron color image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittoh, Koichi; Konagai, Chikara; Noji, Takashi; Miyabe, Keisuke

    2009-06-01

    We developed prototype neutron color image intensifiers with high-sensitivity, wide dynamic range and long-life characteristics. In the prototype intensifier (Gd-Type 1), a terbium-activated Gd 2O 2S is used as the input-screen phosphor. In the upgraded model (Gd-Type 2), Gd 2O 3 and CsI:Na are vacuum deposited to form the phosphor layer, which improved the sensitivity and the spatial uniformity. A europium-activated Y 2O 2S multi-color scintillator, emitting red, green and blue photons with different intensities, is utilized as the output screen of the intensifier. By combining this image intensifier with a suitably tuned high-sensitive color CCD camera, higher sensitivity and wider dynamic range could be simultaneously attained than that of the conventional P20-phosphor-type image intensifier. The results of experiments at the JRR-3M neutron radiography irradiation port (flux: 1.5×10 8 n/cm 2/s) showed that these neutron color image intensifiers can clearly image dynamic phenomena with a 30 frame/s video picture. It is expected that the color image intensifier will be used as a new two-dimensional neutron sensor in new application fields.

  18. New feature of the neutron color image intensifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nittoh, Koichi; Konagai, Chikara; Noji, Takashi; Miyabe, Keisuke

    2009-01-01

    We developed prototype neutron color image intensifiers with high-sensitivity, wide dynamic range and long-life characteristics. In the prototype intensifier (Gd-Type 1), a terbium-activated Gd 2 O 2 S is used as the input-screen phosphor. In the upgraded model (Gd-Type 2), Gd 2 O 3 and CsI:Na are vacuum deposited to form the phosphor layer, which improved the sensitivity and the spatial uniformity. A europium-activated Y 2 O 2 S multi-color scintillator, emitting red, green and blue photons with different intensities, is utilized as the output screen of the intensifier. By combining this image intensifier with a suitably tuned high-sensitive color CCD camera, higher sensitivity and wider dynamic range could be simultaneously attained than that of the conventional P20-phosphor-type image intensifier. The results of experiments at the JRR-3M neutron radiography irradiation port (flux: 1.5x10 8 n/cm 2 /s) showed that these neutron color image intensifiers can clearly image dynamic phenomena with a 30 frame/s video picture. It is expected that the color image intensifier will be used as a new two-dimensional neutron sensor in new application fields.

  19. Development of a neutron imager based on superconducting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyajima, Shigeyuki, E-mail: miyajima@nict.go.jp [Department of Physics and Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University (Japan); Institute for Nanofabrication Research, Osaka Prefecture University (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Shishido, Hiroaki [Department of Physics and Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University (Japan); Institute for Nanofabrication Research, Osaka Prefecture University (Japan); Fujimaki, Akira [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University (Japan); Hidaka, Mutsuo [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (Japan); Harada, Masahide; Oikawa, Kenichi; Oku, Takayuki; Arai, Masatoshi [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Ishida, Takekazu [Department of Physics and Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University (Japan); Institute for Nanofabrication Research, Osaka Prefecture University (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A neutron detector based on superconducting meander line is demonstrated. • Fast response time of a few tens ns is obtained. • Spatial resolution is 1 μm and can be improved to sub-μm scale. • The proposed neutron detector can operate under the γ-ray fields. - Abstract: We succeeded in demonstrating a neutron detector based on a Nb superconducting meander line with a {sup 10}B conversion layer for a neutron imager based on superconductor devices. We use a current-biased kinetic inductance detector (CB-KID), which is composed of a meander line, for detection of a neutron with high spatial resolution and fast response time. The thickness of Nb meander lines is 40 nm and the line width is narrower than 3 mu m. The area of 8 mm × 8 mm is covered by CB-KIDs, which are assembled at the center of the Si chip of the size 22 mm × 22 mm. The Nb CB-KIDs with a {sup 10}B conversion layer output the voltage by irradiating pulsed neutrons. We have investigated γ/n discrimination of a Nb-based CB-KID with {sup 10}B conversion layer using a Cd plate, which indicates that a CB-KID can operate as a neutron detector under the strong γ-ray fields.

  20. Development of a neutron imager based on superconducting detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyajima, Shigeyuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Shishido, Hiroaki; Fujimaki, Akira; Hidaka, Mutsuo; Harada, Masahide; Oikawa, Kenichi; Oku, Takayuki; Arai, Masatoshi; Ishida, Takekazu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A neutron detector based on superconducting meander line is demonstrated. • Fast response time of a few tens ns is obtained. • Spatial resolution is 1 μm and can be improved to sub-μm scale. • The proposed neutron detector can operate under the γ-ray fields. - Abstract: We succeeded in demonstrating a neutron detector based on a Nb superconducting meander line with a "1"0B conversion layer for a neutron imager based on superconductor devices. We use a current-biased kinetic inductance detector (CB-KID), which is composed of a meander line, for detection of a neutron with high spatial resolution and fast response time. The thickness of Nb meander lines is 40 nm and the line width is narrower than 3 mu m. The area of 8 mm × 8 mm is covered by CB-KIDs, which are assembled at the center of the Si chip of the size 22 mm × 22 mm. The Nb CB-KIDs with a "1"0B conversion layer output the voltage by irradiating pulsed neutrons. We have investigated γ/n discrimination of a Nb-based CB-KID with "1"0B conversion layer using a Cd plate, which indicates that a CB-KID can operate as a neutron detector under the strong γ-ray fields.

  1. Methods and applications in high flux neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballhausen, H.

    2007-01-01

    This treatise develops new methods for high flux neutron radiography and high flux neutron tomography and describes some of their applications in actual experiments. Instead of single images, time series can be acquired with short exposure times due to the available high intensity. To best use the increased amount of information, new estimators are proposed, which extract accurate results from the recorded ensembles, even if the individual piece of data is very noisy and in addition severely affected by systematic errors such as an influence of gamma background radiation. The spatial resolution of neutron radiographies, usually limited by beam divergence and inherent resolution of the scintillator, can be significantly increased by scanning the sample with a pinhole-micro-collimator. This technique circumvents any limitations in present detector design and, due to the available high intensity, could be successfully tested. Imaging with scattered neutrons as opposed to conventional total attenuation based imaging determines separately the absorption and scattering cross sections within the sample. For the first time even coherent angle dependent scattering could be visualized space-resolved. New applications of high flux neutron imaging are presented, such as materials engineering experiments on innovative metal joints, time-resolved tomography on multilayer stacks of fuel cells under operation, and others. A new implementation of an algorithm for the algebraic reconstruction of tomography data executes even in case of missing information, such as limited angle tomography, and returns quantitative reconstructions. The setup of the world-leading high flux radiography and tomography facility at the Institut Laue-Langevin is presented. A comprehensive appendix covers the physical and technical foundations of neutron imaging. (orig.)

  2. Evolution of Neutron Imaging at TRIGA PUSPATI Reactor: A Promising Digital Real-Time Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairiah Yazid; Muhammad Rawi Mohamed Zin; Rafhayudi Jamro; Azraf Azman

    2016-01-01

    Neutron radiography is a powerful tool for non-destructive testing of materials and finds numerous applications in industry and in material research as well. The basic principle is similar to that of X-ray radiography. A beam of neutrons falls on the sample and after passing through the sample, leaves the sample image on a photographic plate or on a detector. The neutrons interact with the nuclei of the atoms that compose the sample and the absorption and scattering properties of the contained elements make it possible to produce images of components containing light elements, like hydrogen beneath a matrix of metallic elements, (lead or bismuth), which cannot be easily done with conventional X ray radiography. Exploiting this property, neutron radiography has been used in applications requiring the identification of (light) materials inside solid samples. This article gives an overview of utilization of the CCD camera system in neutron imaging system for real time radiography/ tomography investigations. (author)

  3. Why high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diddens, A.N.; Van de Walle, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    An argument is presented for high energy physics from the point of view of the practitioners. Three different angles are presented: The cultural consequence and scientific significance of practising high energy physics, the potential application of the results and the discovery of high energy physics, and the technical spin-offs from the techniques and methods used in high energy physics. (C.F.)

  4. Alignment effects on a neutron imaging system using coded apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thfoin, Isabelle; Landoas, Olivier; Caillaud, Tony; Vincent, Maxime; Bourgade, Jean-Luc; Rosse, Bertrand; Disdier, Laurent; Sangster, Thomas C.; Glebov, Vladimir Yu.; Pien, Greg; Armstrong, William

    2010-01-01

    A high resolution neutron imaging system is being developed and tested on the OMEGA laser facility for inertial confinement fusion experiments. This diagnostic uses a coded imaging technique with a penumbral or an annular aperture. The sensitiveness of these techniques to misalignment was pointed out with both experiments and simulations. Results obtained during OMEGA shots are in good agreement with calculations performed with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. Both techniques are sensitive to the relative position of the source in the field of view. The penumbral imaging technique then demonstrates to be less sensitive to misalignment compared to the ring. These results show the necessity to develop a neutron imaging diagnostic for megajoule class lasers taking into account our alignment capabilities on such facilities.

  5. A new compact, high sensitivity neutron imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF,F-91297 Arpajon (France); Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Park, H. S.; Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We have developed a new small neutron imaging system (SNIS) diagnostic for the OMEGA laser facility. The SNIS uses a penumbral coded aperture and has been designed to record images from low yield (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} neutrons) implosions such as those using deuterium as the fuel. This camera was tested at OMEGA in 2009 on a rugby hohlraum energetics experiment where it recorded an image at a yield of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}. The resolution of this image was 54 {mu}m and the camera was located only 4 meters from target chamber centre. We recently improved the instrument by adding a cooled CCD camera. The sensitivity of the new camera has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. The calibration showed that the signal-to-noise ratio could be improved by using raw binning detection.

  6. A new compact, high sensitivity neutron imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Rossé, B.; Thfoin, I.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Park, H. S.; Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new small neutron imaging system (SNIS) diagnostic for the OMEGA laser facility. The SNIS uses a penumbral coded aperture and has been designed to record images from low yield (10 9 –10 10 neutrons) implosions such as those using deuterium as the fuel. This camera was tested at OMEGA in 2009 on a rugby hohlraum energetics experiment where it recorded an image at a yield of 1.4 × 10 10 . The resolution of this image was 54 μm and the camera was located only 4 meters from target chamber centre. We recently improved the instrument by adding a cooled CCD camera. The sensitivity of the new camera has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a 60 Co γ-ray source. The calibration showed that the signal-to-noise ratio could be improved by using raw binning detection.

  7. Dehydration process of fish analyzed by neutron beam imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanoi, K.; Hamada, Y.; Seyama, S.; Saito, T.; Iikura, H.; Nakanishi, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Since regulation of water content of the dried fish is an important factor for the quality of the fish, water-losing process during drying (squid and Japanese horse mackerel) was analyzed through neutron beam imaging. The neutron image showed that around the shoulder of mackerel, there was a part where water content was liable to maintain high during drying. To analyze water-losing process more in detail, spatial image was produced. From the images, it was clearly indicated that the decrease of water content was regulated around the shoulder part. It was suggested that to prevent deterioration around the shoulder part of the dried fish is an important factor to keep quality of the dried fish in the storage.

  8. Neutron radiography activity in the european program cost 524: Neutron imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirco, P.; Bach, P.; Lehmann, E.; Balasko, M.

    2001-01-01

    COST is a framework for scientific and technical cooperation, allowing the coordination of national research on a European level, including 32 member countries. Participation of institutes from non-COST countries is possible. From an initial 7 Actions in 1971, COST has grown to 200 Actions at the beginning of 2000. COST Action 524 is under materials domain, the title of which being 'Neutron Imaging Techniques for the Detection of Defects in Materials', under the Chairmanship of Dr. P. Chirco (I.N.F.N.). The following countries are represented in the Management Committee of Action 524: Italy, France, Austria, Germany, United Kingdom, Hungary, Switzerland, Spain, Czech Republic, Slovenia, and Russia. The six working groups of this Action are working respectively on standardization of neutron radiography techniques, on aerospace application, on civil engineering applications, on comparison and integration of neutron imaging techniques with other NDT, on neutron tomography, and on non radiographic techniques such as neutron scattering techniques. A specific effort is devoted to standardization issues, with respect to other non European standards. Results of work performed in the COST frame are published or will be published in the review INSIGHT, edited by the British Institute of Non Destructive Testing

  9. Fundamentals and applications of neutron imaging. Application part 3. Application of neutron imaging in aircraft, space rocket, car and gunpowder industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    Neutron imaging is applied to nondestructive test. Four neutron imaging facilities are used in Japan. The application examples of industries are listed in the table: space rocket, aircraft, car, liquid metal, and works of art. Neutron imaging of transportation equipments are illustrated as an application to industry. X-ray radiography testing (XRT) image and neutron radiography testing (NRT) image of turbine blade of aircraft engine, honeycomb structure of aircraft, helicopter rotor blade, trigger tube, separation nut of space rocket, carburetor of car, BMW engine, fireworks and ammunitions are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  10. Image reconstruction technique using projection data from neutron tomography system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Abd el Bar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutron tomography is a very powerful technique for nondestructive evaluation of heavy industrial components as well as for soft hydrogenous materials enclosed in heavy metals which are usually difficult to image using X-rays. Due to the properties of the image acquisition system, the projection images are distorted by several artifacts, and these reduce the quality of the reconstruction. In order to eliminate these harmful effects the projection images should be corrected before reconstruction. This paper gives a description of a filter back projection (FBP technique, which is used for reconstruction of projected data obtained from transmission measurements by neutron tomography system We demonstrated the use of spatial Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT and the 2D Inverse DFT in the formulation of the method, and outlined the theory of reconstruction of a 2D neutron image from a sequence of 1D projections taken at different angles between 0 and π in MATLAB environment. Projections are generated by applying the Radon transform to the original image at different angles.

  11. Determination of the fission-neutron averaged cross sections of some high-energy threshold reactions of interest for reactor dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arribere, M.A.; Kestelman, A.J.; Korochinsky, S.; Blostein, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    For three high threshold reactions, we have measured the cross sections averaged over a 235 U fission neutron spectrum. The measured reactions, and corresponding averaged cross sections found, are: 127 I(n,2n) 126 I, (1.36±0.12) mb; 90 Zr(n,2n) 89m Zr, (13.86±0.83) μb; and 58 Ni(n,d+np+pn) 57 Co, (274±15) μb; all referred to the well known standard of (111±3) mb for the 58 Ni(n,p) 58m+g Co averaged cross section. The measured cross sections are of interest in nuclear engineering for the characterization of the fast neutron component in the energy distribution of reactor neutrons. (author)

  12. Performance of the SciBar cosmic ray telescope (SciCRT) toward the detection of high-energy solar neutrons in solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai, Yoshinori; Nagai, Yuya; Itow, Yoshitaka; Matsubara, Yutaka; Sako, Takashi; Lopez, Diego; Itow, Tsukasa; Munakata, Kazuoki; Kato, Chihiro; Kozai, Masayoshi; Miyazaki, Takahiro; Shibata, Shoichi; Oshima, Akitoshi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Harufumi; Watanabe, Kyoko; Koi, Tatsumi; Valdés-Galicia, Jose Francisco; González, Luis Xavier; Ortiz, Ernesto; Musalem, Octavio; Hurtado, Alejandro; Garcia, Rocio; Anzorena, Marcos

    2014-12-01

    We plan to observe solar neutrons at Mt. Sierra Negra (4,600 m above sea level) in Mexico using the SciBar detector. This project is named the SciBar Cosmic Ray Telescope (SciCRT). The main aims of the SciCRT project are to observe solar neutrons to study the mechanism of ion acceleration on the surface of the sun and to monitor the anisotropy of galactic cosmic-ray muons. The SciBar detector, a fully active tracker, is composed of 14,848 scintillator bars, whose dimension is 300 cm × 2.5 cm × 1.3 cm. The structure of the detector enables us to obtain the particle trajectory and its total deposited energy. This information is useful for the energy reconstruction of primary neutrons and particle identification. The total volume of the detector is 3.0 m × 3.0 m × 1.7 m. Since this volume is much larger than the solar neutron telescope (SNT) in Mexico, the detection efficiency of the SciCRT for neutrons is highly enhanced. We performed the calibration of the SciCRT at Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE) located at 2,150 m above sea level in Mexico in 2012. We installed the SciCRT at Mt. Sierra Negra in April 2013 and calibrated this detector in May and August 2013. We started continuous observation in March 2014. In this paper, we report the detector performance as a solar neutron telescope and the current status of the SciCRT.

  13. Characterization of Crystallographic Structures Using Bragg-Edge Neutron Imaging at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Song

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, wavelength-dependent neutron radiography, also known as Bragg-edge imaging, has been employed as a non-destructive bulk characterization method due to its sensitivity to coherent elastic neutron scattering that is associated with crystalline structures. Several analysis approaches have been developed to quantitatively determine crystalline orientation, lattice strain, and phase distribution. In this study, we report a systematic investigation of the crystal structures of metallic materials (such as selected textureless powder samples and additively manufactured (AM Inconel 718 samples, using Bragg-edge imaging at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS. Firstly, we have implemented a phenomenological Gaussian-based fitting in a Python-based computer called iBeatles. Secondly, we have developed a model-based approach to analyze Bragg-edge transmission spectra, which allows quantitative determination of the crystallographic attributes. Moreover, neutron diffraction measurements were carried out to validate the Bragg-edge analytical methods. These results demonstrate that the microstructural complexity (in this case, texture plays a key role in determining the crystallographic parameters (lattice constant or interplanar spacing, which implies that the Bragg-edge image analysis methods must be carefully selected based on the material structures.

  14. An Evaluation of Grazing-Incidence Optics for Neutron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    The refractive index for most materials is slightly less than unity, which opens an opportunity to develop the grazing incidence neutron imaging optics. The ideal material for the optics would be natural nickel and its isotopes. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has active development program on the nickel replicated optics for use in x-ray astronomy. Brief status report on the program is presented. The results of the neutron focusing optic test carried by the MSFC team at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are also presented. Possible applications of the optics are briefly discussed.

  15. High energy neutron cross-sections and kerma values of biomedical interest calculated with a nuclear model applicable to light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    A model has been developed for calculating fast neutron cross sections (E > 14 MeV) for light nuclei of biomedical interest. The model explicitly includes experimental nuclear structure information. Some calculations for 12 C, 14 N, and 16 O are presented

  16. Search for High-energy Neutrinos from Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817 with ANTARES, IceCube, and the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J. -J.; Aublin, J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Basa, S.; Belhorma, B.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bourret, S.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Branzas, H.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; El Moursli, R. Cherkaoui; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Diaz, A. F.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Di Palma, I.; Domi, A.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; El Khayati, N.; Elsaesser, D.; Enzenhofer, A.; Ettahiri, A.; Fassi, F.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Gay, P.; Giordano, V.; Glotin, H.; Gregoire, T.; Ruiz, R. Gracia; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Hoessl, J.; Hofestaedt, J.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kiessling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefevre, D.; Leonora, E.; Lotze, M.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Organokov, M.; Pavalas, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Saldana, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schussler, F.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Turpin, D.; Tonnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Versari, F.; Vivolo, D.; Vizzoca, A.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. 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T.; Raab, C.; Raedel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Saelzer, T.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schoenen, S.; Schoeneberg, S.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stossl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tesic, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turley, C. 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J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia-Quiros, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Goncharov, B.; Gonzalez, G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinderer, T.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hreibi, A.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y. -M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kramer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Linker, S. D.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lueck, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Hernandez, I. Magana; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McNeill, L.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moffa, D.; Moggi, A.; Mogushi, K.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Nevin, L.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dea, G. D.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okada, M. A.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forne, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Wessels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y. -H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo observatories recently discovered gravitational waves from a binary neutron star inspiral. A short gamma-ray burst (GRB) that followed the merger of this binary was also recorded by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (Fermi-GBM), and the Anti-Coincidence Shield

  17. High-resolution breast tomography at high energy: a feasibility study of phase contrast imaging on a whole breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztrókay, A; Schlossbauer, T; Bamberg, F; Reiser, M F; Coan, P; Diemoz, P C; Brun, E; Bravin, A; Mayr, D

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies on phase contrast imaging (PCI) mammography have demonstrated an enhancement of breast morphology and cancerous tissue visualization compared to conventional imaging. We show here the first results of the PCI analyser-based imaging (ABI) in computed tomography (CT) mode on whole and large (>12 cm) tumour-bearing breast tissues. We demonstrate in this work the capability of the technique of working at high x-ray energies and producing high-contrast images of large and complex specimens. One entire breast of an 80-year-old woman with invasive ductal cancer was imaged using ABI-CT with monochromatic 70 keV x-rays and an area detector of 92×92 µm 2 pixel size. Sagittal slices were reconstructed from the acquired data, and compared to corresponding histological sections. Comparison with conventional absorption-based CT was also performed. Five blinded radiologists quantitatively evaluated the visual aspects of the ABI-CT images with respect to sharpness, soft tissue contrast, tissue boundaries and the discrimination of different structures/tissues. ABI-CT excellently depicted the entire 3D architecture of the breast volume by providing high-resolution and high-contrast images of the normal and cancerous breast tissues. These results are an important step in the evolution of PCI-CT towards its clinical implementation. (paper)

  18. High-resolution breast tomography at high energy: a feasibility study of phase contrast imaging on a whole breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztrókay, A.; Diemoz, P. C.; Schlossbauer, T.; Brun, E.; Bamberg, F.; Mayr, D.; Reiser, M. F.; Bravin, A.; Coan, P.

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies on phase contrast imaging (PCI) mammography have demonstrated an enhancement of breast morphology and cancerous tissue visualization compared to conventional imaging. We show here the first results of the PCI analyser-based imaging (ABI) in computed tomography (CT) mode on whole and large (>12 cm) tumour-bearing breast tissues. We demonstrate in this work the capability of the technique of working at high x-ray energies and producing high-contrast images of large and complex specimens. One entire breast of an 80-year-old woman with invasive ductal cancer was imaged using ABI-CT with monochromatic 70 keV x-rays and an area detector of 92×92 µm2 pixel size. Sagittal slices were reconstructed from the acquired data, and compared to corresponding histological sections. Comparison with conventional absorption-based CT was also performed. Five blinded radiologists quantitatively evaluated the visual aspects of the ABI-CT images with respect to sharpness, soft tissue contrast, tissue boundaries and the discrimination of different structures/tissues. ABI-CT excellently depicted the entire 3D architecture of the breast volume by providing high-resolution and high-contrast images of the normal and cancerous breast tissues. These results are an important step in the evolution of PCI-CT towards its clinical implementation.

  19. Study of archaeological objects by neutron imaging, xrd and xrf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinca, M.; Dinu, A. D.; Stanciulescu, M. G.; Mandescu, D.

    2015-01-01

    Archaeological objects were borrowed from Arges County History Museum (ACHM) and investigated at the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR). Metallic objects made in iron, copper alloys and silver discovered in southern part of Romania, mostly Dacian and Roman origin, were investigated. For imaging was used the neutron and gamma imaging facility from tangential channel of the TRIGA ACPR to put in evidence the internal structure of the objects. For elemental and chemical composition, concentration levels in objects were performed investigations by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). These investigations offer valuable information in archaeological research about composition, structure of the bulk, presence of alteration, inclusions, typology of the location of material extraction, manufacturing techniques etc. This work is an example of application of neutron imaging and other radiation-based analytical methods for cultural heritage research that had the aim to involve some of the non-destructive investigation methods available at INR. (authors)

  20. Fertilizer application and root development analyzed by neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nihei, Naoto; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the development of the soybean root system under different application of fertilizer applying neutron imaging technique. When neutron beam was irradiated, the root image as well as fertilizer imbedded in a thin aluminum container was clearly projected, since water amount in roots are higher than that in soil. Through image analysis, the development of root system was studied under different application of the fertilizer. The development of a main root with lateral roots was observed without applying fertilizer. When the fertilizer was homogeneously supplied to the soil, the morphological development of the root showed the similar pattern to that grown without fertilizer, in different to the amount of the fertilizer. In the case of local application of the fertilizer, lateral position or downward to the main root, the inhibition of the root growth was observed, suggesting that the localization of the fertilizer is responsible for reduction of the soybean yield. (author)

  1. Preliminary examination of the applicability of imaging plates to fast neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubayashi, Masahito; Hibiki, Takashi; Mishima, Kaichiro; Yoshii, Koji; Okamoto, Koji

    2001-01-01

    Fast neutron radiography is an attractive non-destructive inspection technique because of the excellent penetration characteristics of fast neutrons in matter. However, the difficulty of detecting fast neutrons reduces this attractive feature. As an experiment to overcome the difficulty, imaging plates were applied to fast neutron radiography. A simple combination of two sheets of imaging plates and a sheet of polyethylene as a proton emitter was examined with the (fast neutron, thermal neutron and gamma ray) FTG discriminator proposed by Yoneda et al. . The experimental results showed that the method could be applicable to fast neutron radiography with effective discrimination of γ-rays

  2. Dual-phase CT for the assessment of acute vascular injuries in high-energy blunt trauma: the imaging findings and management implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobellis, Francesca; Ierardi, Anna M; Mazzei, Maria A; Magenta Biasina, Alberto; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Nicola, Refky; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Acute vascular injuries are the second most common cause of fatalities in patients with multiple traumatic injuries; thus, prompt identification and management is essential for patient survival. Over the past few years, multidetector CT (MDCT) using dual-phase scanning protocol has become the imaging modality of choice in high-energy deceleration traumas. The objective of this article was to review the role of dual-phase MDCT in the identification and management of acute vascular injuries, particularly in the chest and abdomen following multiple traumatic injuries. In addition, this article will provide examples of MDCT features of acute vascular injuries with correlative surgical and interventional findings.

  3. Characterization of two Japanese ancient swords through neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grazzi, Francesco; Zoppi, Marco; Salvemini, Filomena; Kaestner, Anders; Lehmann, Eberhard; Civita, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Japanese blades are culturally interesting objects both from the stylistic point of view and because of their fantastic performances. In this work, we present new results, using a non-invasive approach, concerning these peculiar artefacts. Two integer Japanese swords, pertaining to Kyoto (987-1596) and Shinto (1596-1781) periods have been analysed through neutron-imaging techniques. The experiments have been performed at the ICON beam line, operating at the spallation neutron source SINQ, Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. The reconstruction of projection data into neutron tomographic slices or volumes, allowed us to identify some very peculiar characteristics, related to the forging methods and to the different thermal treatments applied to produce the cutting edge and its unique feature. (author)

  4. 3D parton imaging of the nucleon in high-energy p p and p A collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Frankfurt, L; Weiss, C

    2004-01-01

    We discuss several examples of how the transverse spatial distribution of partons in the nucleon, as well as multiparton correlations, can be probed by observing hard processes (dijets) in high-energy pp(pp) and pA(dA) collisions. Such studies can complement the information gained from measurements of hard exclusive processes in ep scattering. The transverse spatial distribution of partons determines the distribution over pp impact parameters of events with hard dijet production. Correlations in the transverse positions of partons can be studied in multiple dijet production. We find that the correlation cross section measured by the CDF Collaboration, sigma//e //f//f = 14.5 plus or minus 1.7//-//2//.//3**+**1**.**7 mb, can be explained by "constituent quark" type quark-gluon correlations with r //q approximately equals r//N/3, as suggested by the instanton liquid model of the QCD vacuum. Longitudinal and transverse multiparton correlations can be separated in a model-independent way by comparing multiple dije...

  5. Imaging of fast-neutron sources using solid-state track-recorder pinhole radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Kaiser, B.J.; Preston, C.C.

    1983-08-01

    Pinhole imaging methods are being developed and tested for potential future use in imaging the intense neutron source of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Previously reported, extensive calibration measurements of the proton, neutron, and alpha particle response characteristics of CR-39 polymer solid state track recorders (SSTRs) are being used to interpret the results of imaging experiments using both charged particle and neutron pinhole collimators. High resolution, neutron pinhole images of a 252 Cf source have been obtained in the form of neutron induced proton recoil tracks in CR-39 polymer SSTR. These imaging experiments are described as well as their potential future applications to FMIT

  6. Characterization of the new neutron imaging and materials science facility IMAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniti, Triestino; Watanabe, Kenichi; Burca, Genoveva; Pooley, Daniel E.; Kockelmann, Winfried

    2018-04-01

    IMAT is a new cold neutron imaging and diffraction instrument located at the second target station of the pulsed neutron spallation source ISIS, UK. A broad range of materials science and materials testing areas will be covered by IMAT. We present the characterization of the imaging part, including the energy-selective and energy-dispersive imaging options, and provide the basic parameters of the radiography and tomography instrument. In particular, detailed studies on mono and bi-dimensional neutron beam flux profiles, neutron flux as a function of the neutron wavelength, spatial and energy dependent neutron beam uniformities, guide artifacts, divergence and spatial resolution, and neutron pulse widths are provided. An accurate characterization of the neutron beam at the sample position, located 56 m from the source, is required to optimize collection of radiographic and tomographic data sets and for performing energy-dispersive neutron imaging via time-of-flight methods in particular.

  7. High energy electron radiography system design and simulation study of beam angle-position correlation and aperture effect on the images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Quantang; Cao, S.C.; Liu, M.; Sheng, X.K.; Wang, Y.R.; Zong, Y.; Zhang, X.M.; Jing, Y.; Cheng, R.; Zhao, Y.T.; Zhang, Z.M.; Du, Y.C.; Gai, W.

    2016-01-01

    A beam line dedicated to high-energy electron radiography experimental research with linear achromat and imaging lens systems has been designed. The field of view requirement on the target and the beam angle-position correlation correction can be achieved by fine-tuning the fields of the quadrupoles used in the achromat in combination with already existing six quadrupoles before the achromat. The radiography system is designed by fully considering the space limitation of the laboratory and the beam diagnostics devices. Two kinds of imaging lens system, a quadruplet and an octuplet system are integrated into one beam line with the same object plane and image plane but with different magnification factor. The beam angle-position correlation on the target required by the imaging lens system and the aperture effect on the images are studied with particle tracking simulation. It is shown that the aperture position is also correlated to the beam angle-position on the target. With matched beam on the target, corresponding aperture position and suitable aperture radius, clear pictures can be imaged by both lens systems. The aperture is very important for the imaging. The details of the beam optical requirements, optimized parameters and the simulation results are presented.

  8. Control of the neutron detector count rate by optical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roquemore, A.L.; Johnson, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    The signal processing electronics used for the NE451 detectors on the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator are presently showing saturation effects at high counting rates equivalent to neutron yields of ∼10 16 n/s. While nonlinearity due to pulse pileup can be corrected for in most present TFTR experiments, additional steps are required for neutron source strengths above ∼3x10 16 n/s. These pulse pileup effects could be reduced by inserting sleeves in the collimator shielding to reduce the neutron flux in the vicinity of the detectors or by reducing the volume of detector exposed to the flux. We describe a novel method of avoiding saturation by optically controlling the number neutron events processed by the detector electronics. Because of the optical opacity of the ZnS-plastic detectors such as NE451, photons from a proton-recoil scintillation arise from a spatially localized area of the detector. By imaging a selected portion of the detector onto a photomultiplier, we reduce the effective volume of the detector in a controllable, reversible way. A prototype system, consisting of a focusing lens, a field lens, and a variable aperture, has been constructed. Results of laboratory feasibility tests are presented

  9. Probing the potential of neutron imaging for biomedical and biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkin, Kenneth L.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Ankner, John Francis

    2009-01-01

    Neutron imaging of biological specimens began soon after the discovery of the neutron by Chadwick in 1932. The first samples included tumors in tissues, internal organs in rats, and bones. These studies mainly employed thermal neutrons and were often compared with X-ray images of the same or equivalent samples. Although neutron scattering is widely used in biological studies, neutron imaging has yet to be exploited to its full capability in this area. This chapter summarizes past and current research efforts to apply neutron radiography to the study of biological specimens, in the expectation that clinical and medical research, as well as forensic science, may benefit from it.

  10. High energy resolution measurement of the 238U neutron capture yield in the energy region between 1 and 100 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machlin, R.L.; Perez, R.B.; de Saussure, G.; Ingle, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    A measurement of the 238 U neutron capture yield was performed at the 150 meter flight-path of the ORELA facility on two 238 U samples (0.01224 and 0.0031 atomsbarn). The capture yeild data were normalized by Moxon's small resonance method. The energy resolution achieved in this measurement frequently resulted in doublet and triplet splittings of what appeared to be single resonance in previous measurements. This resolution should allow extension of the resolved resonance energy region in 238 U from the present 4-keV limit up to 15 or 20 keV incident neutron energy. Some 200 small resonances of the ( 238 U /plus/ n) compound nucleus have been observed which had not been detected in transmission measurement, in the energy range from 250 eV to 10 keV

  11. Search for High-energy neutrinos from binary neutron star merger GW170817 with ANTARES, iceCube, and the Pierre Auger observatory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Blažek, Jiří; Boháčová, Martina; Chudoba, Jiří; Ebr, Jan; Juryšek, Jakub; Mandát, Dušan; Palatka, Miroslav; Pech, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Řídký, Jan; Martins dos Santos, Eva M.; Schovánek, Petr; Trávníček, Petr; Vícha, Jakub; Yushkov, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 850, č. 2 (2017), s. 1-18, č. článku L35. ISSN 2041-8205 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015038; GA MŠk LG15014; GA MŠk EF16_013/0001402 Grant - others:OP VVV - AUGER-CZ(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/16_013/0001402 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : gamma-ray burst * general * gravitational waves * neutrinos Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 5.522, year: 2016

  12. Bubble masks for time-encoded imaging of fast neutrons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, Erik; Brennan, James S.; Marleau, Peter; Nowack, Aaron B.; Steele, John T.; Sweany, Melinda; Throckmorton, Daniel J.

    2013-09-01

    Time-encoded imaging is an approach to directional radiation detection that is being developed at SNL with a focus on fast neutron directional detection. In this technique, a time modulation of a detected neutron signal is inducedtypically, a moving mask that attenuates neutrons with a time structure that depends on the source position. An important challenge in time-encoded imaging is to develop high-resolution two-dimensional imaging capabilities; building a mechanically moving high-resolution mask presents challenges both theoretical and technical. We have investigated an alternative to mechanical masks that replaces the solid mask with a liquid such as mineral oil. Instead of fixed blocks of solid material that move in pre-defined patterns, the oil is contained in tubing structures, and carefully introduced air gapsbubblespropagate through the tubing, generating moving patterns of oil mask elements and air apertures. Compared to current moving-mask techniques, the bubble mask is simple, since mechanical motion is replaced by gravity-driven bubble propagation; it is flexible, since arbitrary bubble patterns can be generated by a software-controlled valve actuator; and it is potentially high performance, since the tubing and bubble size can be tuned for high-resolution imaging requirements. We have built and tested various single-tube mask elements, and will present results on bubble introduction and propagation as a function of tubing size and cross-sectional shape; real-time bubble position tracking; neutron source imaging tests; and reconstruction techniques demonstrated on simple test data as well as a simulated full detector system.

  13. Device for imaging an object by means of masks of spatially modulable electromagnetic radiation or corpuscular radiation of high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, H.H.

    1979-01-01

    The radiogram of the thyroid is produced by means of a detector device operating similar to a scintillation camera. Between thyroid and detector device there is placed a mask having modulating areas, permeable and impermeable to radiation succeeding each other with decreasing extension. The scanning signal has got the shape of a radar signal with chirp modulation. The filtering unit used for it is a pulse compression filter. The image of the radiation energy distribution on the recording surface of the detector device is thus decoded and compressed to a number of image points giving the picture of the thyroid. (RW) [de

  14. Neutron spin precession in samples of polarised nuclei and neutron spin phase imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piegsa, Florian Michael

    2009-01-01

    The doublet neutron-deuteron (nd) scattering length b 2,d , which is at present only known with an accuracy of 5%, is particularly well suited to fix three-body forces in novel effective field theories at low energies. The understanding of such few-nucleon systems is essential, e.g. for predictions of element abundances in the big-bang and stellar fusion. b 2,d can be obtained via a linear combination of the spin-independent nd scattering length b c,d and the spin-dependent one, b i,d . The aim of this thesis was to perform a high-accuracy measurement of the latter to improve the relative accuracy of b 2,d below 1%. The experiment was performed at the fundamental neutron physics beam line FUNSPIN at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. It utilises the effect that the spin of a neutron passing through a target with polarised nuclei performs a pseudomagnetic precession proportional to the spin-dependent scattering length of the nuclei. An ideal method to measure this precession angle very accurately is Ramsey's atomic beam technique, adapted to neutrons. The most crucial part of the experimental setup is the so-called frozen spin target, which consists of a specially designed dilution refrigerator and contains a sample with dynamically polarised nuclear spins. The polarisation of the sample is determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It turned out that the relaxation of the nuclear spins during the necessary ''cross-calibration'' of the two employed NMR systems is ultimately limiting the achievable accuracy of b i,d . During the extensive use of the Ramsey resonance method in the neutron-deuteron experiment, an idea emerged that the applied technique could be exploited in a completely different context, namely polarised neutron radiography. Hence, the second part of the thesis covers the development of a novel neutron radiography technique, based on the spin-dependent interaction of the neutron with ferromagnetic samples and magnetic fields

  15. Neutron spin precession in samples of polarised nuclei and neutron spin phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piegsa, Florian Michael

    2009-07-09

    neutron with ferromagnetic samples and magnetic fields. For the first time, quantitative imaging of such samples could be performed using a dedicated compact Ramsey apparatus. First results of this spin-off project as well as the principle idea of the imaging technique are presented. (orig.)

  16. Imaging of high-energy x-ray emission from cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Bradley, D K; Bell, P; Cerjan, C J; Dixit, S; Döppner, T; Jones, O; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G; Landen, O L; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Prasad, R R; Ralph, J; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A; Springer, P T; Suter, L; Town, R P J; Weber, S V; Glenzer, S H

    2012-10-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide broadband time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered implosions. This diagnostic measures the temperature- and density-sensitive bremsstrahlung emission and provides estimates of hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure.

  17. High energy muon induced radioactive nuclides in nickel plate and its use for 2-D muon-beam image profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurebayashi, Y.; Sakurai, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Doshita, N.; Kikuchi, S.; Tokanai, F.; Horiuchi, K.; Tajima, Y.; Oe, T.; Sato, T.; Gunji, S.; Inui, E.; Kondo, K.; Iwata, N.; Sasaki, N.; Matsuzaki, H.; Kunieda, S.

    2015-01-01

    Target materials were exposed to a muon beam with an energy of 160 GeV/c at the COMPASS experiment line in CERN-SPS to measure the production cross-sections for muon-induced radionuclides. A muon imager containing four nickel plates, each measuring 100 mm×100 mm, exposed to the IP plate successfully detected the muon beam image during an irradiation period of 33 days. The contrasting density rate of the nickel plate was (5.2±0.7)×10 –9 PSL/muon per one-day exposure to IP. The image measured 122 mm and 174 mm in horizontal and vertical lengths, respectively, in relation to the surface of the base, indicating that 50±6% of the muon beam flux is confined to an area of 18% of the whole muon beam. The number of muons estimated from the PSL value in the total beam image area (0.81±0.1)×10 13 was comparable to the total muon counts of the ion-chamber at the M2 beam line in the CERN-SPS. The production cross-sections of Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-58 in nickel were 0.19±0.08, 0.34±0.06, 0.5±0.05, 3.44±0.07, 0.4±0.03 in the unit of mb, respectively, reducing muon associated particles effects. They are approximately 10 times smaller than that a proceeding study by Heisinger et al

  18. Imaging of high-energy x-ray emission from cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dixit, S.; Doeppner, T.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Prasad, R. R.; Ralph, J.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Springer, P. T.; Suter, L.; Town, R. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2012-10-15

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide broadband time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered implosions. This diagnostic measures the temperature- and density-sensitive bremsstrahlung emission and provides estimates of hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure.

  19. Performance assessment of imaging plates for the JHR transfer Neutron Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, E.; Guimbal, P. AB(; )

    2018-01-01

    The underwater Neutron Imaging System to be installed in the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR-NIS) is based on a transfer method using a neutron activated beta-emitter like Dysprosium. The information stored in the converter is to be offline transferred on a specific imaging system, still to be defined. Solutions are currently under investigation for the JHR-NIS in order to anticipate the disappearance of radiographic films commonly used in these applications. We report here the performance assessment of Computed Radiography imagers (Imaging Plates) performed at LLB/Orphée (CEA Saclay). Several imaging plate types are studied, in one hand in the configuration involving an intimate contact with an activated dysprosium foil converter: Fuji BAS-TR, Fuji UR-1 and Carestream Flex XL Blue imaging plates, and in the other hand by using a prototypal imaging plate doped with dysprosium and thus not needing any contact with a separate converter foil. The results for these imaging plates are compared with those obtained with gadolinium doped imaging plate used in direct neutron imaging (Fuji BAS-ND). The detection performances of the different imagers are compared regarding resolution and noise. The many advantages of using imaging plates over radiographic films (high sensitivity, linear response, high dynamic range) could palliate its lower intrinsic resolution.

  20. A Time of Flight Fast Neutron Imaging System Design Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canion, Bonnie; Glenn, Andrew; Sheets, Steven; Wurtz, Ron; Nakae, Les; Hausladen, Paul; McConchie, Seth; Blackston, Matthew; Fabris, Lorenzo; Newby, Jason

    2017-09-01

    LLNL and ORNL are designing an active/passive fast neutron imaging system that is flexible to non-ideal detector positioning. It is often not possible to move an inspection object in fieldable imager applications such as safeguards, arms control treaty verification, and emergency response. Particularly, we are interested in scenarios which inspectors do not have access to all sides of an inspection object, due to interfering objects or walls. This paper will present the results of a simulation-based design parameter study, that will determine the optimum system design parameters for a fieldable system to perform time-of-flight based imaging analysis. The imaging analysis is based on the use of an associated particle imaging deuterium-tritium (API DT) neutron generator to get the time-of-flight of radiation induced within an inspection object. This design study will investigate the optimum design parameters for such a system (e.g. detector size, ideal placement, etc.), as well as the upper and lower feasible design parameters that the system can expect to provide results within a reasonable amount of time (e.g. minimum/maximum detector efficiency, detector standoff, etc.). Ideally the final prototype from this project will be capable of using full-access techniques, such as transmission imaging, when the measurement circumstances allow, but with the additional capability of producing results at reduced accessibility.

  1. Extracting the cross section angular distributions for 15C high-energy resonance excited via the (18O,16O two-neutron transfer reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbone D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 13C(18O,16O15C reaction has been studied at 84 MeV incident energy. The ejectiles have been momentum analized by the MAGNEX spectrometer and 15C excitation energy spectra have been obtained up to about 20 MeV. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a bump has been observed at 13.7 MeV. The extracted cross section angular distribution for this structure, obtained by using different models for background, displays a clear oscillating pattern, typical of resonant state of the residual nucleus.

  2. Multipolarity analysis for {sup 14}C high-energy resonance populated by ({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O) two-neutron transfer reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbone, D., E-mail: carboned@lns.infn.it; Cavallaro, M.; Bondì, M.; Agodi, C.; Cunsolo, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Cappuzzello, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Khan, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universitè Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Bonaccorso, A. [INFN-Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Fortunato, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Foti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Linares, R.; Lubian, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi (Brazil); Scarpaci, J. A. [Centre de Sciences Nucleaires et de Sciences de Matieres, Universitè Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Vitturi, A. [INFN-Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    The {sup 12}C({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O){sup 14}C reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed at 16.9 MeV. A multipolarity analysis of the cross section angular distribution indicates an L = 0 character for such a transition.

  3. (n,xn cross section measurements for Y-89 foils used as detectors for high energy neutron measurements in the deeply subcritical assembly “QUINTA”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielewicz Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of the deep subcritical systems (QUINTA using relativistic beams is performed within the project “Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Wastes” (E&T – RAW. The experiment assembly was irradiated by deuteron/proton beam (Dubna NUCLOTRON. We calculated the neutron energy spectrum inside the whole assembly by using threshold energy (n,xn reactions in yttrium (Y-89 foils. There are almost no experimental cross section data for those reactions. New Y-89(n,xn cross section measurements were carried out at The Svedberg laboratory (TSL in Uppsala, Sweden in 2015. In this paper we present preliminary results of those experiments.

  4. Dynamics of oxygen ordering in YBa2CU3O6+x studied by neutron and high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffiaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frello, T.; Andersen, N. H.; Madsen, J.; Ka¨ll, M.; von Zimmermann, M.; Schmidt, O.; Poulsen, H. F.; Schneider, J. R.; Wolf, Th.

    1997-08-01

    The dynamics of the ortho-II oxygen structure in a high purity YBa 2Cu 3O 6+ x single crystal with x=0.50 has been studied by neutron and by X-ray diffraction with a photon energy of 100 keV. Our data show that the oxygen order develops on two different time-scales, one of the order of seconds and a much slower of the order of weeks and months. The mechanism dominating the slow time-scale is related to oxygen diffusion, while the fast mechanism may result from a temperature-dependent change in the average oxygen chain length.

  5. Neutron imaging options at the BOA beamline at Paul Scherrer Institut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgano, M.; Peetermans, S.; Lehmann, E.H.; Panzner, T.; Filges, U.

    2014-01-01

    The BOA beamline at the Swiss spallation neutron source SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institut is a flexible instrument used mainly for testing novel techniques and devices for neutron scattering and optics, but, due to the large and relatively homogeneous field of view, it can be successfully used for experiments in the field of neutron imaging. The beamline allows also for the exploitation of advanced imaging concepts such as polarized neutron imaging and diffractive neutron imaging. In this paper we present the characterization of the BOA beamline in the light of its neutron imaging capabilities. We show also the different techniques that can be employed there as user-friendly plugins for non-standard neutron imaging experiments

  6. UF6 Cylinder Imaging by Fast Neutron Transmission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, R.; Hausladen, P.; Blackston, M.; Croft, S.

    2015-01-01

    The common use Non-Destructive Assay techniques for the determination of 235 U enrichment and mass of UF6 cylinders used in the production of nuclear reactor fuel require prior knowledge of the physical distribution of the UF6 within the cylinder. The measurement performance for these techniques is typically evaluated based on assumed bounding case distributions of the material. However, little direct data such as radiographic or tomographic images, regarding the distribution of the UF6 within the cylinder is available against which to judge these assumptions. We have developed and tested a prototype active neutron tomographic imaging system employing an Associated Particle Imaging (API) neutron generator and an array of pixelated neutron scintillation counters. This system has been successfully used to obtain the 3-dimensional map of the distribution of UF6 within a type 12B storage cylinder. Results from these measurements are presented and the potential performance and utility of this technique with larger 30B and 48Y cylinders is discussed. (author)

  7. Comparison of polystyrene scintillator fiber array and monolithic polystyrene for neutron imaging and radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R., E-mail: raspberry@lanl.gov; Cutler, T. E.; Danly, C. R.; Espy, M. A.; Goglio, J. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Madden, A. C.; Mayo, D. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nelson, R. O.; Swift, A. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Zocco, T. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The neutron imaging diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility has been operating since 2011 generating neutron images of deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at peak compression. The current design features a scintillating fiber array, which allows for high imaging resolution to discern small-scale structure within the implosion. In recent years, it has become clear that additional neutron imaging systems need to be constructed in order to provide 3D reconstructions of the DT source and these additional views need to be on a shorter line of sight. As a result, there has been increased effort to identify new image collection techniques that improve upon imaging resolution for these next generation neutron imaging systems, such as monolithic deuterated scintillators. This work details measurements performed at the Weapons Neutron Research Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory that compares the radiographic abilities of the fiber scintillator with a monolithic scintillator, which may be featured in a future short line of sight neutron imaging systems.

  8. Fundamentals and applications of neutron imaging. Application part 9. Application of neutron imaging to biological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    For radiography, the use of neutrons as a complement to X-rays is especially suitable for biological research such as plant, wood, and medical application due to the enhanced sensitivity to light elements such as hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen. The present paper introduces applications of neutron CT to the humidity (water) distribution and its variation in the flowering plant as cut carnation, observation of water movement in refrigerated chrysanthemum leaves using very cold neutron and in cut leaves using deuterium oxide and ordinary water, measurement of water movement in sprouting cone and soy bean and growing ginseng in the soil, and other applications as to archaeological wood immersed in a restoration solution and to medical purposes. (S. Ohno)

  9. Imaging of High-Energy X-Ray Emission from Cryogenic Thermonuclear Fuel Implosions on the NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, T.

    2012-01-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide spectrally resolved time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets. Using bremsstrahlung assumptions, the measured absolute x-ray brightness allows for the inference of electron temperature, electron density, hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure. Current inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) seek to indirectly drive a spherical implosion, compressing and igniting a deuterium-tritium fuel. This DT fuel capsule is cryogenically prepared as a solid ice layer surrounded by a low-Z ablator material. Ignition will occur when the hot spot approaches sufficient temperature (∼3-4 keV) and ρR (∼0.3 g/cm 2 ) such that alpha deposition can further heat the hot spot and generate a self-sustaining burn wave. During the implosion, the fuel mass becomes hot enough to emit large amounts of x-ray radiation, the spectra and spatial variation of which contains key information that can be used to evaluate the implosion performance. The Ross filter diagnostic employs differential filtering to provide spectrally resolved, time-integrated, absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets.

  10. Neutron radiography imaging with 2-dimensional photon counting method and its problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Niwa, T.; Kataoka, T.

    1988-01-01

    A ultra sensitive neutron imaging system has been deviced with a 2-dimensional photon counting camara (ARGUS 100). The imaging system is composed by a 2-dimensional single photon counting tube and a low background vidicon followed with an image processing unit and frame memories. By using the imaging system, electronic neutron radiography (NTV) has been possible under the neutron flux less than 3 x 10 4 n/cm 2 ·s. (author)

  11. Design and realisation of integrated circuits for the readout of pixel sensors in high-energy physics and biomedical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peric, I.

    2004-08-01

    Radiation tolerant pixel-readout chip for the ATLAS pixel detector has been designed, implemented in a deep-submicron CMOS technology and successfully tested. The chip contains readout-channels with complex analog and digital circuits. Chip for steering of the DEPFET active-pixel matrix has been implemented in a high-voltage CMOS technology. The chip contains channels which generate fast sequences of high-voltage signals. Detector containing this chip has been successfully tested. Pixel-readout test chip for an X-ray imaging pixel sensor has been designed, implemented in a CMOS technology and tested. Pixel-readout channels are able to simultaneously count the signals generated by passage of individual photons and to sum the total charge generated during exposure time. (orig.)

  12. R&D on scintillation materials for novel ionizing radiation detectors for High Energy Physics, medical imaging and industrial applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Chipaux, R; Rinaldi, D; Boursier, Y M; Vasilyev, A; Tikhomirov, V; Morel, C; Choi, Y; Tamulaitis, G

    2002-01-01

    The Crystal Clear Collaboration (CCC) was approved by the Detector R&D Committee as RD18 in 1990 with the objective of developing new inorganic scintillators suitable for crystal electromagnetic calorimeters of LHC experiments. From 1990 to 1994, CCC made an intensive investigation for the quest of the most adequate ideal scintillator for the LHC; three main candidates were identified and extensively studied : CeF$_{3}$, PbWO$_{4}$ and heavy scintillating glasses. Lead tungstate was chosen by CMS and ALICE as the most cost effective crystal compliant to LHC conditions. Today 76648 PWO crystals are installed in CMS and 17920 in ALICE. After this success Crystal clear has continued its investigation on new scintillators and the understanding of scintillation mechanisms and light transfer properties in particular : The understanding of cerium ion as activator, The development of LuAP, LuYAP crystals for medical imaging applications, (CERN patent) Investigation of Ytterbium based scintillators for solar ne...

  13. Stereographic images acquired with gamma rays and thermal neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Maria Ines Silvani; Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Furieri, Rosanne C.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The inner structure of an object, which should not be submitted to an invasive assay, can only be perceived by using a suitable technique in order to render it transparent. A widely employed technique for this purpose involves the using of a radiation capable to pass through the object, collecting the transmitted radiation by a proper device, which furnishes a radiographic attenuation map of the object. This map, however, does not display the spatial distribution of the inner components of the object, but a convoluted view for each specific attitude of the object with regard to the set beam-detector. A 3D tomographic approach would show that distribution but it would demand a large number of projections requiring special equipment and software, not always available or affordable. In some circumstances however, a 3D tomography can be replaced by a stereographic view of the object under inspection, as done in this work, where instead of tens of radiographic projections, only two of them taken at suitable object attitudes are employed. Once acquired, these projections are properly processed and observed through a red and green eyeglass. For monochromatic images, this methodology requires the transformation of the black and white radiographs into red and white and green and white ones, which are afterwards merged to yield a single image. All the process is carried out with the software Image J . In this work, the Argonauta reactor at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear in Rio de Janeiro has been used as a source of thermal neutrons to acquire the neutron radiographic images, as well as to produce 198 Au sources employed in the acquisition of gamma-ray radiographic ones. X-ray or neutron-sensitive imaging plates have been used as detector, which after exposure were developed by a reader using a 0.5μm-diameter laser beam. (author)

  14. Noise characteristics of neutron images obtained by cooled CCD device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Ryoichi; Sasaki, Ryoya; Okuda, Shuichi; Okamoto, Ken-Ichi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Tsujimoto, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    The noise characteristics of a cooled CCD device induced by neutron and gamma ray irradiation have been investigated. In the cooled CCD images, characteristic white spot noises (CCD noise) frequently appeared, which have a shape like a pixel in most cases and their brightness is extremely high compared with that of the image pattern. They could be divided into the two groups, fixed pattern noise (FPN) and random noise. The former always appeared in the same position in the image and the latter appeared at any position. In the background image, nearly all of the CCD noises were found to be the FPN, while many of them were the random noise during the irradiation. The random CCD noises increased with irradiation and decreased soon after the irradiation. In the case of large irradiation, a part of the CCD noise remained as the FPN. These facts suggest that the CCD noise is a phenomenon strongly relating to radiation damage of the CCD device.

  15. A study of the sensitivity of an imaging telescope (GRITS) for high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yearian, M.R.

    1990-08-01

    When a gamma-ray telescope is placed in Earth orbit, it is bombarded by a flux of cosmic protons much greater than the flux of interesting gammas. These protons can interact in the telescope's thermal shielding to produce detectable gamma rays, most of which are vetoed. Since the proton flux is so high, the unvetoed gamma rays constitute a significant background relative to some weak sources. This background increases the observing time required to pinpoint some sources and entirely obscures other sources. Although recent telescopes have been designed to minimize this background, its strength and spectral characteristics were not previously calculated in detail. Monte Carlo calculations are presented which characterize the strength, spectrum and other features of the cosmic proton background using FLUKA, a hadronic cascade program. Several gamma-ray telescopes, including SAS-2, EGRET and the Gamma Ray Imaging Telescope System (GRITS), are analyzed, and their proton-induced backgrounds are characterized. In all cases, the backgrounds are either shown to be low relative to interesting signals or suggestions are made which would reduce the background sufficiently to leave the telescope unimpaired. In addition, several limiting cases are examined for comparison to previous estimates and calibration measurements

  16. Characterization of European sword blades through neutron imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvemini, F.; Grazzi, F.; Peetermans, S.; Gener, M.; Lehmann, E. H.; Zoppi, M.

    2014-09-01

    In the present work, we have studied two European rapier blades, dating back to the period ranging from the Late Renaissance to the Early Modern Age (about 17th to 18th century). In order to determine variation in quality and differences in technology, a study was undertaken with the purpose to observe variations in the blade microstructure (and consequently in the construction processes). The samples, which in the present case were expendable, have been investigated, preliminarily, through standard metallography and then by means of white beam and energy-selective neutron imaging. The comparison of the results, using the two techniques, turned out to be satisfactory, with a substantial quantitative agreement of the results obtained with the two techniques, and show the complementarity of the two methods. Metallography has been considered up to now the method of choice for metal material characterization. The correspondence between the two methods, as well as the non-invasive character of the neutron-based techniques and its possibility to obtain 3D reconstruction, candidate neutron imaging as an important and quantitatively reliable technique for metal characterization.

  17. Sparse image representation for jet neutron and gamma tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craciunescu, T. [EURATOM-MEdC Association, Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Kiptily, V. [EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la Fusione, Padova (Italy); Tiseanu, I.; Zoita, V. [EURATOM-MEdC Association, Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •A new tomographic method for the reconstruction of the 2-D neutron and gamma emissivity on JET. •The method is based on the sparse representation of the reconstructed image in an over-complete dictionary. •Several techniques, based on a priori information are used to regularize this highly limited data set tomographic problem. •The proposed method provides good reconstructions in terms of shapes and resolution. -- Abstract: The JET gamma/neutron profile monitor plasma coverage of the emissive region enables tomographic reconstruction. However, due to the availability of only two projection angles and to the coarse sampling, tomography is a highly limited data set problem. A new reconstruction method, based on the sparse representation of the reconstructed image in an over-complete dictionary, has been developed and applied to JET neutron/gamma tomography. The method has been tested on JET experimental data and significant results are presented. The proposed method provides good reconstructions in terms of shapes and resolution.

  18. Neutrons and music: Imaging investigation of ancient wind musical instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Festa, G., E-mail: giulia.festa@roma2.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-IPCF, Messina (Italy); Tardino, G. [BauArt Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Pontecorvo, L. [Conservatorio di Cosenza – Cosenza Conservatory (Italy); Mannes, D.C. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Senesi, R. [Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-IPCF, Messina (Italy); Gorini, G. [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Andreani, C. [Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-IPCF, Messina (Italy)

    2014-10-01

    A set of seven musical instruments and two instruments cares from the ‘Fondo Antico della Biblioteca del Sacro Convento’ in Assisi, Italy, were investigated through neutron and X-ray imaging techniques. Historical and scientific interests around ancient musical instruments motivate an intense research effort for their characterization using non-destructive and non-invasive techniques. X-ray and neutron tomography/radiography were applied to the study of composite material samples containing wood, hide and metals. The study was carried out at the NEUTRA beamline, PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). Results of the measurements provided new information on the composite and multi-scale structure, such as: the internal structure of the samples, position of added materials like metals, wood fiber displays, deformations, presence of adhesives and their spatial distribution and novel insight about construction methods to guide the instruments’ restoration process.

  19. Neutrons and music: Imaging investigation of ancient wind musical instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Festa, G.; Tardino, G.; Pontecorvo, L.; Mannes, D.C.; Senesi, R.; Gorini, G.; Andreani, C.

    2014-01-01

    A set of seven musical instruments and two instruments cares from the ‘Fondo Antico della Biblioteca del Sacro Convento’ in Assisi, Italy, were investigated through neutron and X-ray imaging techniques. Historical and scientific interests around ancient musical instruments motivate an intense research effort for their characterization using non-destructive and non-invasive techniques. X-ray and neutron tomography/radiography were applied to the study of composite material samples containing wood, hide and metals. The study was carried out at the NEUTRA beamline, PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). Results of the measurements provided new information on the composite and multi-scale structure, such as: the internal structure of the samples, position of added materials like metals, wood fiber displays, deformations, presence of adhesives and their spatial distribution and novel insight about construction methods to guide the instruments’ restoration process

  20. Neutrons and music: Imaging investigation of ancient wind musical instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, G.; Tardino, G.; Pontecorvo, L.; Mannes, D. C.; Senesi, R.; Gorini, G.; Andreani, C.

    2014-10-01

    A set of seven musical instruments and two instruments cares from the 'Fondo Antico della Biblioteca del Sacro Convento' in Assisi, Italy, were investigated through neutron and X-ray imaging techniques. Historical and scientific interests around ancient musical instruments motivate an intense research effort for their characterization using non-destructive and non-invasive techniques. X-ray and neutron tomography/radiography were applied to the study of composite material samples containing wood, hide and metals. The study was carried out at the NEUTRA beamline, PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). Results of the measurements provided new information on the composite and multi-scale structure, such as: the internal structure of the samples, position of added materials like metals, wood fiber displays, deformations, presence of adhesives and their spatial distribution and novel insight about construction methods to guide the instruments' restoration process.

  1. Neutron and Gamma Imaging for National Security Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornback, Donald

    2017-09-01

    The Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22) possesses, in part, the mission to develop technologies in support of nuclear security efforts in coordination with other U.S. government entities, such as the Department of Defense and the Department of Homeland Security. DNN R&D has long supported research in nuclear detection at national labs, universities, and through the small business innovation research (SBIR) program. Research topics supported include advanced detector materials and electronics, detection algorithm development, and advanced gamma/neutron detection systems. Neutron and gamma imaging, defined as the directional detection of radiation as opposed to radiography, provides advanced detection capabilities for the NNSA mission in areas of emergency response, international safeguards, and nuclear arms control treaty monitoring and verification. A technical and programmatic overview of efforts in this field of research will be summarized.

  2. Preliminary experiment of fast neutron imaging with direct-film method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Yuyang; Tang Guoyou; Guo Zhiyu; Zhang Guohui

    2005-01-01

    A preliminary experiment is conducted with direct-film method under the condition that fast neutron is generated by the reaction of 9 Be(d, n) on the Beijing University 4.5 MV Van de Graaff, whose energy is lower than 7 MeV. Basic characteristics of direct-film neutron radiography system are investigated with the help of samples in different materials, different thickness and holes of different diameter. The fast neutron converter, which is vital for fast neutron imaging, is produced with the materials made in China. The result indicates that fast neutron converter can meet the requirement of fast neutron imaging; further research of fast neutron imaging can be conducted on the accelerator and neutron-generator in China. (authors)

  3. The role of symmetry in the theory of inelastic high-energy electron scattering and its application to atomic-resolution core-loss imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C

    2015-04-01

    The inelastic scattering of a high-energy electron in a solid constitutes a bipartite quantum system with an intrinsically large number of excitations, posing a considerable challenge for theorists. It is demonstrated how and why the utilization of symmetries, or approximate symmetries, can lead to significant improvements in both the description of the scattering physics and the efficiency of numerical computations. These ideas are explored thoroughly for the case of core-loss excitations, where it is shown that the coupled angular momentum basis leads to dramatic improvements over the bases employed in previous work. The resulting gains in efficiency are demonstrated explicitly for K-, L- and M-shell excitations, including such excitations in the context of atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The utilization of other symmetries is also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lithium indium diselenide: A new scintillator for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukosi, Eric, E-mail: elukosi@utk.edu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; Lee, Kyung-Min [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wiggins, Brenden [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trtik, Pavel [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland); Penumadu, Dayakar; Young, Stephen [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Santodonato, Louis; Bilheux, Hassina [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burger, Arnold; Matei, Liviu [Fisk University, Nashville, TN (United States); Stowe, Ashley C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-11

    Lithium indium diselenide, {sup 6}LiInSe{sub 2} or LISe, is a newly developed neutron detection material that shows both semiconducting and scintillating properties. This paper reports on the performance of scintillating LISe crystals for its potential use as a converter screen for cold neutron imaging. The spatial resolution of LISe, determined using a 10% threshold of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), was found to not scale linearly with thickness. Crystals having a thickness of 450 µm or larger resulted in an average spatial resolution of 67 µm, and the thinner crystals exhibited an increase in spatial resolution down to the Nyquist frequency of the CCD. The highest measured spatial resolution of 198 µm thick LISe (27 µm) outperforms a commercial 50 µm thick ZnS(Cu):{sup 6}LiF scintillation screen by more than a factor of three. For the LISe dimensions considered in this study, it was found that the light yield of LISe did not scale with its thickness. However, absorption measurements indicate that the {sup 6}Li concentration is uniform and the neutron absorption efficiency of LISe as a function of thickness follows general nuclear theory. This suggests that the differences in apparent brightness observed for the LISe samples investigated may be due to a combination of secondary charged particle escape, scintillation light transport in the bulk and across the LISe-air interface, and variations in the activation of the scintillation mechanism. Finally, it was found that the presence of {sup 115}In and its long-lived {sup 116}In activation product did not result in ghosting (memory of past neutron exposure), demonstrating potential of LISe for imaging transient systems.

  5. Clinical application of in vivo treatment delivery verification based on PET/CT imaging of positron activity induced at high energy photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Andreassen, Björn; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Näfstadius, Peder; Näslund, Ingemar; Schoenahl, Frederic; Brahme, Anders

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo verification of radiation treatment with high energy photon beams using PET/CT to image the induced positron activity. The measurements of the positron activation induced in a preoperative rectal cancer patient and a prostate cancer patient following 50 MV photon treatments are presented. A total dose of 5 and 8 Gy, respectively, were delivered to the tumors. Imaging was performed with a 64-slice PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting 7 min after the end of the treatment. The CT volume from the PET/CT and the treatment planning CT were coregistered by matching anatomical reference points in the patient. The treatment delivery was imaged in vivo based on the distribution of the induced positron emitters produced by photonuclear reactions in tissue mapped on to the associated dose distribution of the treatment plan. The results showed that spatial distribution of induced activity in both patients agreed well with the delivered beam portals of the treatment plans in the entrance subcutaneous fat regions but less so in blood and oxygen rich soft tissues. For the preoperative rectal cancer patient however, a 2 ± (0.5) cm misalignment was observed in the cranial-caudal direction of the patient between the induced activity distribution and treatment plan, indicating a beam patient setup error. No misalignment of this kind was seen in the prostate cancer patient. However, due to a fast patient setup error in the PET/CT scanner a slight mis-position of the patient in the PET/CT was observed in all three planes, resulting in a deformed activity distribution compared to the treatment plan. The present study indicates that the induced positron emitters by high energy photon beams can be measured quite accurately using PET imaging of subcutaneous fat to allow portal verification of the delivered treatment beams. Measurement of the induced activity in the patient 7 min after receiving 5 Gy involved count rates which were about

  6. High energy hadron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    High energy and small momentum transfer 2 'yields' 2 hadronic scattering processes are described in the physical framework of particle exchange. Particle production in high energy collisions is considered with emphasis on the features of inclusive reactions though with some remarks on exclusive processes. (U.K.)

  7. The high energy galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarsky, C.J.

    1986-08-01

    The galaxy is host to a wide variety of high energy events. I review here recent results on large scale galactic phenomena: cosmic-ray origin and confinement, the connexion to ultra high energy gamma-ray emission from X-ray binaries, gamma ray and synchrotron emission in interstellar space, galactic soft and hard X-ray emission

  8. Very high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1986-03-01

    The luminosity and energy requirements are considered for both proton colliders and electron-positron colliders. Some of the basic design equations for high energy linear electron colliders are summarized, as well as design constraints. A few examples are given of parameters for very high energy machines. 4 refs., 6 figs

  9. A Review of Significant Advances in Neutron Imaging from Conception to the Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenizer, J. S.

    This review summarizes the history of neutron imaging with a focus on the significant events and technical advancements in neutron imaging methods, from the first radiograph to more recent imaging methods. A timeline is presented to illustrate the key accomplishments that advanced the neutron imaging technique. Only three years after the discovery of the neutron by English physicist James Chadwick in 1932, neutron imaging began with the work of Hartmut Kallmann and Ernst Kuhn in Berlin, Germany, from 1935-1944. Kallmann and Kuhn were awarded a joint US Patent issued in January 1940. Little progress was made until the mid-1950's when Thewlis utilized a neutron beam from the BEPO reactor at Harwell, marking the beginning of the application of neutron imaging to practical applications. As the film method was improved, imaging moved from a qualitative to a quantitative technique, with applications in industry and in nuclear fuels. Standards were developed to aid in the quantification of the neutron images and the facility's capabilities. The introduction of dynamic neutron imaging (initially called real-time neutron radiography and neutron television) in the late 1970's opened the door to new opportunities and new challenges. As the electronic imaging matured, the introduction of the CCD imaging devices and solid-state light intensifiers helped address some of these challenges. Development of improved imaging devices for the medical community has had a major impact on neutron imaging. Additionally, amorphous silicon sensors provided improvements in temporal resolution, while providing a reasonably large imaging area. The development of new neutron imaging sensors and the development of new neutron imaging techniques in the past decade has advanced the technique's ability to provide insight and understanding of problems that other non-destructive techniques could not provide. This rapid increase in capability and application would not have been possible without the

  10. Study of the radiation around a high energy accelerator. Production and scattering of cascade neutrons; Etude du rayonnement autour d'un accelerateur de haute energie. Production et diffusion des neutrons de cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tardy-Joubert, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-03-01

    The cascade induced in protective screens by a 3 GeV proton beam has been studied using activation detectors; the results have been compared with the cosmic neutron spectrum in the atmosphere. A study of the secondary neutron spectrum has made, it possible to obtain the distribution of the dose and to determine the maximum permissible fluxes expressed in terms of the energy, taking into account all the daughter products present. The dose calculated has been checked experimentally. The proportion of cascade neutrons has been studied using the idea of an imaginary source. The parameters which have to be introduced into the general equations to take into account scattering in the the air have been determined. (author) [French] La cascade induite dans les ecrans de protection par un faisceau de protons de 3 GeV a ete etudiee au moyen de detecteurs a activation et la comparaison a ete faite avec le spectre des neutrons cosmiques dans l'atmosphere. L'etude du spectre des neutrons secondaires a permis de preciser la distribution de la dose et de determiner les flux maximaux admissibles qui sont exprimes en fonction de l'energie, en tenant compte de l'ensemble des descendants presents. La dose calculee a ete verifiee experimentalement. La propagation des neutrons de cascade a ete etudiee en introduisant la notion de source fictive. Les parametres a introduire dans les equations generales pour rendre compte de la diffusion dans l'air ont ete determines. (auteur)

  11. High-resolution investigations of edge effects in neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl, M.; Kardjilov, N.; Hilger, A.; Kuehne, G.; Frei, G.; Manke, I.

    2009-01-01

    Edge enhancement is the main effect measured by the so-called inline or propagation-based neutron phase contrast imaging method. The effect has originally been explained by diffraction, and high spatial coherence has been claimed to be a necessary precondition. However, edge enhancement has also been found in conventional imaging with high resolution. In such cases the effects can produce artefacts and hinder quantification. In this letter the edge effects at cylindrical shaped samples and long straight edges have been studied in detail. The enhancement can be explained by refraction and total reflection. Using high-resolution imaging, where spatial resolutions better than 50 μm could be achieved, refraction and total reflection peaks - similar to diffraction patterns - could be separated and distinguished.

  12. Biological effects of high-energy radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, S.B.

    1976-01-01

    The biological effects of high-energy radiation are reviewed, with emphasis on the effects of the hadronic component. Proton and helium ion effects are similar to those of the more conventional and sparsely ionizing x- and γ-radiation. Heavy-ions are known to be more biologically effective, but the long term hazard from accumulated damage has yet to be assessed. Some evidence of widely varying but dramatically increased effectiveness of very high-energy (approximately 70 GeV) hadron beams is reviewed. Finally, the importance of the neutron component in many situations around high-energy accelerators is pointed out

  13. Block-Based Compressed Sensing for Neutron Radiation Image Using WDFB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ideal compression method for neutron radiation image should have high compression ratio while keeping more details of the original image. Compressed sensing (CS, which can break through the restrictions of sampling theorem, is likely to offer an efficient compression scheme for the neutron radiation image. Combining wavelet transform with directional filter banks, a novel nonredundant multiscale geometry analysis transform named Wavelet Directional Filter Banks (WDFB is constructed and applied to represent neutron radiation image sparsely. Then, the block-based CS technique is introduced and a high performance CS scheme for neutron radiation image is proposed. By performing two-step iterative shrinkage algorithm the problem of L1 norm minimization is solved to reconstruct neutron radiation image from random measurements. The experiment results demonstrate that the scheme not only improves the quality of reconstructed image obviously but also retains more details of original image.

  14. Image enhancement using MCNP5 code and MATLAB in neutron radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharwat, Montaser; Mohamed, Nader; Mongy, T

    2014-07-01

    This work presents a method that can be used to enhance the neutron radiography (NR) image for objects with high scattering materials like hydrogen, carbon and other light materials. This method used Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, to simulate the NR process and get the flux distribution for each pixel of the image and determines the scattered neutron distribution that caused image blur, and then uses MATLAB to subtract this scattered neutron distribution from the initial image to improve its quality. This work was performed before the commissioning of digital NR system in Jan. 2013. The MATLAB enhancement method is quite a good technique in the case of static based film neutron radiography, while in neutron imaging (NI) technique, image enhancement and quantitative measurement were efficient by using ImageJ software. The enhanced image quality and quantitative measurements were presented in this work. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-01: Dose and Energy Spectra From Neutron Induced Radioactivity in Medical Linear Accelerators Following High Energy Total Body Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keehan, S; Taylor, M; Franich, R; Smith, R; Dunn, L; Kron, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the risk posed by neutron induced activation of components in medical linear accelerators (linacs) following the delivery of high monitor unit 18 MV photon beams such as used in TBI. Methods: Gamma spectroscopy was used to identify radioisotopes produced in components of a Varian 21EX and an Elekta Synergy following delivery of photon beams. Dose and risk estimates for TBI were assessed using dose deliveries from an actual patient treatment. A 1 litre spherical ion chamber (PTW, Germany) has been used to measure the dose at the beam exit window and at the total body irradiation (TBI) treatment couch following large and small field beams with long beam-on times. Measurements were also made outside of the closed jaws to quantify the benefit of the attenuation provided by the jaws. Results: The radioisotopes produced in the linac head have been identified as 187 W, 56 Mn, 24 Na and 28 Al, which have half-lives from between 2.3 min to 24 hours. The dose at the beam exit window following an 18 MV 2197 MU TBI beam delivery was 12.6 µSv in ten minutes. The dose rate at the TBI treatment couch 4.8 m away is a factor of ten lower. For a typical TBI delivered in six fractions each consisting of four beams and an annual patient load of 24, the annual dose estimate for a staff member at the treatment couch for ten minutes is 750 µSv. This can be further reduced by a factor of about twelve if the jaws are closed before entering the room, resulting in a dose estimate of 65 µSv. Conclusion: The dose resulting from the activation products for a representative TBI workload at our clinic of 24 patients per year is 750 µSv, which can be further reduced to 65 µSv by closing the jaws

  16. Development of a novel neutron detector for imaging and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darambara, D.G.; Beach, A.C.; Spyrou, N.M.

    1993-01-01

    A hardware system employing dynamic Random Access Memory (dRAM) has been designed to make possible the detection of neutrons. One recognised difficulty with dynamic memory devices is the alpha-particle problem. That is alpha-particle 'contamination' present within the dRAM encapsulating material may interact sufficiently as to corrupt stored data. These corruptions, 'known as soft errors', may be induced in dRAMs by the interaction of charged particles with the chip itself as a basis for system function. A preliminary feasibility study has been carried out to use dynamic RAMs as alpha-particle detectors. The initial system tests provide information upon detection efficiency, soft error reading rate, energy dependence of the soft error rate and the soft error reading rate, energy dependence of the soft error rate and the soft error operating bias relationship. These findings highlight the usefulness of such a device in neutron dosimetry, imaging and analysis, by using a neutron converter with a high cross section for the (n, α) capture reaction. (author) 20 refs.; 8 figs

  17. Image enhancement using MCNP5 code and MATLAB in neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tharwat, Montaser; Mohamed, Nader; Mongy, T.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a method that can be used to enhance the neutron radiography (NR) image for objects with high scattering materials like hydrogen, carbon and other light materials. This method used Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, to simulate the NR process and get the flux distribution for each pixel of the image and determines the scattered neutron distribution that caused image blur, and then uses MATLAB to subtract this scattered neutron distribution from the initial image to improve its quality. This work was performed before the commissioning of digital NR system in Jan. 2013. The MATLAB enhancement method is quite a good technique in the case of static based film neutron radiography, while in neutron imaging (NI) technique, image enhancement and quantitative measurement were efficient by using ImageJ software. The enhanced image quality and quantitative measurements were presented in this work. - Highlights: • This work is applicable for static based film neutron radiography and digital neutron imaging. • MATLAB is a useful tool for imaging enhancement in radiographic film. • Advanced imaging processing is available in the ETRR-2 for imaging processing and data extraction. • The digital imaging system is suitable for complex shapes and sizes, while MATLAB technique is suitable for simple shapes and sizes. • Quantitative measurements are available

  18. Assessment of Radiographic Image Quality by Visual Examination of Neutron Radiographs of the Calibration Fuel Pin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Up till now no reliable radiographic image quality standards exist for neutron radiography of nuclear reactor fuel. Under the Euratoro Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG) Test Program neutron radiographs were produced at different neutron radiography facilities within the European Community...... of a calibration fuel pin. The radiographs were made by the direct, transfer and tracketch methods using different film recording materials. These neutron radiographs of the calibration fuel pin were used for the assessement of radiographic image quality. This was done by visual examination of the radiographs...

  19. Monte Carlo modeling of neutron imaging at the SINQ spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebenhaft, J.R.; Lehmann, E.H.; Pitcher, E.J.; McKinney, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    Modeling of the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ) has been used to demonstrate the neutron radiography capability of the newly released MPI-version of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. A detailed MCNPX model was developed of SINQ and its associated neutron transmission radiography (NEUTRA) facility. Preliminary validation of the model was performed by comparing the calculated and measured neutron fluxes in the NEUTRA beam line, and a simulated radiography image was generated for a sample consisting of steel tubes containing different materials. This paper describes the SINQ facility, provides details of the MCNPX model, and presents preliminary results of the neutron imaging. (authors)

  20. A new position-sensitive transmission detector for epithermal neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schooneveld, E M; Kockelmann, W; Rhodes, N; Tardocchi, M; Gorini, G; Perelli Cippo, E; Nakamura, T; Postma, H; Schillebeeckx, P

    2009-01-01

    A new neutron resonant transmission (NRT) detector for epithermal neutron imaging has been designed and built for the ANCIENT CHARM project, which is developing a set of complementary neutron imaging methods for analysis of cultural heritage objects. One of the techniques being exploited is NRT with the aim of performing bulk elemental analysis. The 16-pixel prototype NRT detector consists of independent crystals of 2 x 2 mm pixel size, which allow for 2D position-sensitive transmission measurements with epithermal neutrons. First results obtained at the ISIS pulsed spallation neutron source are presented. (fast track communication)

  1. Tolerance of the High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology ASIC to potentially destructive radiation processes in Earth-orbit-equivalent environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, D. F.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Wilson, M.; Benmoussa, A.; Campola, M.; Christe, S. D.; Gissot, S.; Jones, L.; Newport, J.; Prydderch, M.; Richards, S.; Seller, P.; Shih, A. Y.; Thomas, S.

    2018-02-01

    The High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology (HEXITEC) ASIC is designed on a 0.35 μm CMOS process to read out CdTe or CZT detectors and hence provide fine-pixellated spectroscopic imaging in the range 2-200 keV. In this paper, we examine the tolerance of HEXITEC to both potentially destructive cumulative and single event radiation effects. Bare ASICs are irradiated with X-rays up to a total ionising dose (TID) of 1 Mrad (SiO2) and bombarded with heavy ions with linear energy transfer (LET) up to 88.3 MeV mg-1 cm-2. HEXITEC is shown to operate reliably below a TID of 150 krad, have immunity to fatal single event latchup (SEL) and have high tolerance to non-fatal SEL up to LETs of at least 88.3 MeV mg-1 cm-2. The results are compared to predictions of TID and SELs for various Earth-orbits and aluminium shielding thicknesses. It is found that HEXITEC's radiation tolerance to both potentially destructive cumulative and single event effects is sufficient to reliably operate in these environments with moderate shielding.

  2. High energy astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    High energy astrophysical research carried out at the Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London is reviewed. Work considered includes cosmic ray particle detection, x-ray astronomy, gamma-ray astronomy, gamma and x-ray bursts. (U.K.)

  3. Scintillating-fiber imaging detector for 14-MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ress, D.; Lerche, R.A.; Ellis, R.J.; Heaton, G.W.; Nelson, M.B.; Mant, G.; Lehr, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have created a detector to image the neutrons emitted by imploded inertial-confinement fusion targets. The 14-MeV neutrons, which are produced by deuterium-tritium fusion events in the target, pass through an aperture to create an image on the detector. The neutron radiation is converted to blue light (430 nm) with a 20-cm-square array of plastic scintillating fibers. Each fiber is 10-cm long with a 1-mm-square cross section; approximately 35-thousand fibers make up the array. The resulting blue-light image is reduced and amplified by a sequence of fiber-optic tapers and image intensifiers, then acquired by a CCD camera. The fiber-optic readout system was tested optically for overall throughput the resolution. The authors plan to characterize the scintillator array reusing an ion-beam neutron source as well as DT-fusion neutrons emitted by inertial confinement targets. Characterization experiments will measure the light-production efficiency, spatial resolution, and neutron scattering within the detector. Several neutron images of laser-fusion targets have been obtained with the detector. Several neutron images of laser-fusion targets have been obtained with the detector. They describe the detector and their characterization methods, present characterization results, and give examples of the neutron images

  4. A SrBPO5: Eu2+ phosphor for neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakasai, K.; Katagiri, M.; Toh, K.; Nakamura, T.

    2001-01-01

    A SrBPO 5 : Eu 2+ phosphor material has been investigated for neutron imaging. This phosphor showed photostimulated luminescence (PSL) by illumination of 635 nm laser light after X-ray irradiation. The spectral characteristics of the phosphor were similar to those of BaFBr: Eu 2+ , which is a commonly used phosphor of imaging plates. In addition, we found that this phosphor also showed PSL for neutron irradiation. It comes from the fact that it contains atomic boron in base matrix. Therefore, this phosphor can be used for neutron imaging without adding neutron sensitive materials such as Gd in commercially available neutron imaging plates. The PSL intensity and the neutron detection will be increased by using enriched boron instead of natural boron. (author)

  5. Malaysia: Overview of activities on Neutron Imaging (NI) and Cultural Heritage (CH) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Rawi Mohamed Zin

    2012-01-01

    Inspection of cultural heritage artifact by neutron imaging becoming interesting and important research area since its able to sees internal structure non-destructively. Therefore advanced neutron imaging capability to conduct this kind of inspection is needed. Associated with this needs, TRIGA MARK II PUSPATI reactor has neutron imaging facility, NUR-2 which capable for radiography and tomography usage. Details parameters of current set up is given. Neutron radiography capability at this facility has been relied on direct method technique by the usage of SR-45 KODAK film technology. Current set-up has been used by university student through-out the country to conduct their research in various levels of educations

  6. New neutron imaging techniques to close the gap to scattering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, Eberhard H.; Peetermans, S.; Trtik, P.; Betz, B.; Grünzweig, C.

    2017-01-01

    Neutron scattering and neutron imaging are activities at the strong neutron sources which have been developed rather independently. However, there are similarities and overlaps in the research topics to which both methods can contribute and thus useful synergies can be found. In particular, the spatial resolution of neutron imaging has improved recently, which - together with the enhancement of the efficiency in data acquisition- can be exploited to narrow the energy band and to implement more sophisticated methods like neutron grating interferometry. This paper provides a report about the current options in neutron imaging and describes how the gap to neutron scattering data can be closed in the future, e.g. by diffractive imaging, the use of polarized neutrons and the dark-field imagining of relevant materials. This overview is focused onto the interaction between neutron imaging and neutron scattering with the aim of synergy. It reflects mainly the authors’ experiences at their PSI facilities without ignoring the activities at the different other labs world-wide. (paper)

  7. New neutron imaging techniques to close the gap to scattering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Eberhard H.; Peetermans, S.; Trtik, P.; Betz, B.; Grünzweig, C.

    2017-01-01

    Neutron scattering and neutron imaging are activities at the strong neutron sources which have been developed rather independently. However, there are similarities and overlaps in the research topics to which both methods can contribute and thus useful synergies can be found. In particular, the spatial resolution of neutron imaging has improved recently, which - together with the enhancement of the efficiency in data acquisition- can be exploited to narrow the energy band and to implement more sophisticated methods like neutron grating interferometry. This paper provides a report about the current options in neutron imaging and describes how the gap to neutron scattering data can be closed in the future, e.g. by diffractive imaging, the use of polarized neutrons and the dark-field imagining of relevant materials. This overview is focused onto the interaction between neutron imaging and neutron scattering with the aim of synergy. It reflects mainly the authors’ experiences at their PSI facilities without ignoring the activities at the different other labs world-wide.

  8. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin, E-mail: zouyubin@pku.edu.cn; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator–based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8–2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8–2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  9. High-energy astrophysics and the search for sources of gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, P T; Evans, P

    2018-05-28

    The dawn of the gravitational-wave (GW) era has sparked a greatly renewed interest into possible links between sources of high-energy radiation and GWs. The most luminous high-energy sources-gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)-have long been considered as very likely sources of GWs, particularly from short-duration GRBs, which are thought to originate from the merger of two compact objects such as binary neutron stars and a neutron star-black hole binary. In this paper, we discuss: (i) the high-energy emission from short-duration GRBs; (ii) what other sources of high-energy radiation may be observed from binary mergers; and (iii) how searches for high-energy electromagnetic counterparts to GW events are performed with current space facilities. While current high-energy facilities, such as Swift and Fermi, play a crucial role in the search for electromagnetic counterparts, new space missions will greatly enhance our capabilities for joint observations. We discuss why such facilities, which incorporate new technology that enables very wide-field X-ray imaging, are required if we are to truly exploit the multi-messenger era.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  10. High-energy astrophysics and the search for sources of gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, P. T.; Evans, P.

    2018-05-01

    The dawn of the gravitational-wave (GW) era has sparked a greatly renewed interest into possible links between sources of high-energy radiation and GWs. The most luminous high-energy sources-gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)-have long been considered as very likely sources of GWs, particularly from short-duration GRBs, which are thought to originate from the merger of two compact objects such as binary neutron stars and a neutron star-black hole binary. In this paper, we discuss: (i) the high-energy emission from short-duration GRBs; (ii) what other sources of high-energy radiation may be observed from binary mergers; and (iii) how searches for high-energy electromagnetic counterparts to GW events are performed with current space facilities. While current high-energy facilities, such as Swift and Fermi, play a crucial role in the search for electromagnetic counterparts, new space missions will greatly enhance our capabilities for joint observations. We discuss why such facilities, which incorporate new technology that enables very wide-field X-ray imaging, are required if we are to truly exploit the multi-messenger era. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'.

  11. Digital image processing for real-time neutron radiography and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Shigenori

    1989-01-01

    The present paper describes several digital image processing approaches for the real-time neutron radiography (neutron television-NTV), such as image integration, adaptive smoothing and image enhancement, which have beneficial effects on image improvements, and also describes how to use these techniques for applications. Details invisible in direct images of NTV are able to be revealed by digital image processing, such as reversed image, gray level correction, gray scale transformation, contoured image, subtraction technique, pseudo color display and so on. For real-time application a contouring operation and an averaging approach can also be utilized effectively. (author)

  12. High energy radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vosburgh, K.G.

    1975-01-01

    The high energy radiation detector described comprises a set of closely spaced wedge reflectors. Each wedge reflector is composed of three sides forming identical isoceles triangles with a common apex and an open base forming an equilateral triangle. The length of one side of the base is less than the thickness of the coat of material sensitive to high energy radiation. The wedge reflectors reflect the light photons spreading to the rear of the coat in such a way that each reflected track is parallel to the incident track of the light photon spreading rearwards. The angle of the three isosceles triangles with a common apex is between 85 and 95 deg. The first main surface of the coat of high energy radiation sensitive material is in contact with the projecting edges of the surface of the wedge reflectors of the reflecting element [fr

  13. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  14. X-ray fluorescence in Member States (Italy): Full field X-ray fluorescence imaging with high-energy and high-spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F. P.; Masini, N.; Pappalardo, L., E-mail: romanop@lns.infn.it [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Cosentino, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Rizzo, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    A full field X-ray camera for the X-Ray Fluorescence imaging of materials with high-energy and high-spatial resolution was designed and developed. The system was realized by coupling a pinhole collimator with a positionsensitive CCD detector. X-Ray fluorescence is induced on the samples by irradiation with an external X-ray tube. The characteristic X-ray spectra of the investigated materials are obtained by using a multi-frames acquisition in single-photon counting. The energy resolution measured at the Fe-Kα line was 157 eV. The spatial resolution of the system was determined by the analysis of a sharp-edge at different magnification values; it was estimated to be 90 μm at a magnification value of 3.2x and 190 μm at 0.8x. The present set-up of the system is suited to analyze samples with dimensions up to 5x4 cm{sup 2}. Typical measurement time is in the range between 1h to 4 h. (author)

  15. Applications and characteristics of imaging plates as detector in neutron radiography at SINQ

    CERN Document Server

    Kolbe, H; Gunia, W; Körner, S

    1999-01-01

    Imaging plate technique is a commonly accepted method in many fields as in medicine, biology and physics for detection of the distribution of beta- and gamma-radiation or X-rays on large areas. Recently a new type of imaging plate sensitive to neutrons has been developed. The storage layer is doped with gadolinium, which, after absorption of neutrons, produces radiation detectable by the same sensitive crystals used in conventional imaging plates. At the spallation neutron source, SINQ, at the Paul Scherrer Institut (CH) some of the characteristics of the neutron radiography station in combination with the imaging plate technique were investigated. The intensity distribution of the source was measured to check the accuracy for quantification of the image data. Also, the reproducibility of results obtained by this detection system was stated. For a test object, the high selectivity for different neutron absorption is demonstrated at details with low contrast. The obtainable spatial resolution was determined re...

  16. Visualization and measurement by image processing of thermal hydraulic phenomena by neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Nobuyuki

    1996-01-01

    Neutron Radiography was applied to visualization of thermal hydraulic phenomena and measurement was carried out by image processing the visualized images. Since attenuation of thermal neutron rays is high in ordinary liquids like water and organic fluid while it is low in most of metals, liquid flow behaviors can be visualized through a metallic wall by neutron radiography. Measurement of void fraction and flow vector field which is important to study thermal hydraulic phenomena can be carried out by image processing the images obtained by the visualization. Various two-phase and liquid metal flows were visualized by a JRR-3M thermal neutron radiography system in the present study. Multi-dimensional void fraction distributions in two-phase flows and flow vector fields in liquid metals, which are difficult to measure by the other methods, were successfully measured by image processing. It was shown that neutron radiography was efficiently applicable to study thermal hydraulic phenomena. (author)

  17. Non-Destructive Spent Fuel Characterization with Semiconducting Gallium Arsinde Neutron Imaging Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Gersch, Holly K.; Sanders, Jeffrey D.; Lee, John C.; Hammig, Mark D.; Hartman, Michael R.; Yong Hong Yang; Klann, Raymond T.; Elzen, Brian Van Der; Lindsay, John T.; Simpson, Philip A.

    2002-01-01

    High resistivity bulk grown GaAs has been used to produce thermal neutron imaging devices for use in neutron radiography and characterizing burnup in spent fuel. The basic scheme utilizes a portable Sb/Be source for monoenergetic (24 keV) neutron radiation source coupled to an Fe filter with a radiation hard B-coated pixellated GaAs detector array as the primary neutron detector. The coated neutron detectors have been tested for efficiency and radiation hardness in order to determine their fitness for the harsh environments imposed by spent fuel. Theoretical and experimental results are presented, showing detector radiation hardness, expected detection efficiency and the spatial resolution from such a scheme. A variety of advanced neutron detector designs have been explored, with experimental results achieving 13% thermal neutron detection efficiency while projecting the possibility of over 30% thermal neutron detection efficiency

  18. Theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses theoretical research in high energy physics at Columbia University. Some of the research topics discussed are: quantum chromodynamics with dynamical fermions; lattice gauge theory; scattering of neutrinos by photons; atomic physics constraints on the properties of ultralight-ultraweak gauge bosons; black holes; Chern- Simons physics; S-channel theory of superconductivity; charged boson system; gluon-gluon interactions; high energy scattering in the presence of instantons; anyon physics; causality constraints on primordial magnetic manopoles; charged black holes with scalar hair; properties of Chern-Aimona-Higgs solitons; and extended inflationary universe

  19. High energy magnetic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoh, Yasuo

    1988-01-01

    The report emphasizes that the current development in condensed matter physics opens a research field fit to inelastic neutron scattering experiments in the eV range which is easilly accessed by spallation neutron sources. Several important subjects adopted at thermal reactors are shown. It is desired to extend the implementation of the spectroscopic experiments for investigation of higher energy magnetic excitations. For La 2 CuO 4 , which is the mother crystal of the first high Tc materials found by Bednortz and Muller, it seems to be believed that the magnetism is well characterized by the two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic Hamiltonian, and it is widely accepted that the magnetism is a most probable progenitor of high Tc superconductors. The unusual properties of spin correlations in this crystal have been studied extensively by standard neutron scattering techniques with steady neutrons at BNL. FeSi is not ordered magnetically but shows a very unique feature of temperature induced magnetism, which also has been studied extensively by using the thermal neutron scattering technique at BNL. In these experiments, polarized neutrons are indispensable to extract the clean magnetic components out of other components of non-magnetic scattering. (N.K.)

  20. Detector for imaging and dosimetry of laser-driven epithermal neutrons by alpha conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Alejo, A.; Ahmed, H.; Wilson, L. A.; Ansell, S.; Armstrong, C.; Butler, N. M. H.; Clarke, R. J.; Higginson, A.; Notley, M.; Raspino, D.; Rusby, D. R.; Borghesi, M.; Rhodes, N. J.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.; Brenner, C. M.; Kar, S.

    2016-10-01

    An epithermal neutron imager based on detecting alpha particles created via boron neutron capture mechanism is discussed. The diagnostic mainly consists of a mm thick Boron Nitride (BN) sheet (as an alpha converter) in contact with a non-borated cellulose nitride film (LR115 type-II) detector. While the BN absorbs the neutrons in the thermal and epithermal ranges, the fast neutrons register insignificantly on the detector due to their low neutron capture and recoil cross-sections. The use of solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD), unlike image plates, micro-channel plates and scintillators, provide safeguard from the x-rays, gamma-rays and electrons. The diagnostic was tested on a proof-of-principle basis, in front of a laser driven source of moderated neutrons, which suggests the potential of using this diagnostic (BN+SSNTD) for dosimetry and imaging applications.

  1. A new X-ray pinhole camera for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging with high-energy and high-spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F.P., E-mail: romanop@lns.infn.it [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Altana, C. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cosentino, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Pappalardo, L. [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rizzo, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    A new X-ray pinhole camera for the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) imaging of materials with high-energy and high-spatial resolution, was designed and developed. It consists of a back-illuminated and deep depleted CCD detector (composed of 1024 × 1024 pixels with a lateral size of 13 μm) coupled to a 70 μm laser-drilled pinhole-collimator, positioned between the sample under analysis and the CCD. The X-ray pinhole camera works in a coaxial geometry allowing a wide range of magnification values. The characteristic X-ray fluorescence is induced on the samples by irradiation with an external X-ray tube working at a maximum power of 100 W (50 kV and 2 mA operating conditions). The spectroscopic capabilities of the X-ray pinhole camera were accurately investigated. Energy response and energy calibration of the CCD detector were determined by irradiating pure target-materials emitting characteristic X-rays in the energy working-domain of the system (between 3 keV and 30 keV). Measurements were performed by using a multi-frame acquisition in single-photon counting. The characteristic X-ray spectra were obtained by an automated processing of the acquired images. The energy resolution measured at the Fe–Kα line is 157 eV. The use of the X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D resolved elemental analysis was investigated by using reference-patterns of different materials and geometries. The possibility of the elemental mapping of samples up to an area of 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} was demonstrated. Finally, the spatial resolution of the pinhole camera was measured by analyzing the profile function of a sharp-edge. The spatial resolution determined at the magnification values of 3.2 × and 0.8 × (used as testing values) is about 90 μm and 190 μm respectively. - Highlights: • We developed an X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D X-ray fluorescence imaging. • X-ray spectra are obtained by a multi-frame acquisition in single photon mode. • The energy resolution in the X

  2. Development of neutron imaging beamline for NDT applications at Dhruva reactor, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Mayank; Roy, Tushar; Kashyap, Yogesh; Shukla, Shefali; Singh, Prashant; Ravi, Baribaddala; Patel, Tarun; Gadkari, S. C.

    2018-05-01

    Thermal neutron imaging techniques such as radiography or tomography are very useful tool for various scientific investigations and industrial applications. Neutron radiography is complementary to X-ray radiography, as neutrons interact with nucleus as compared to X-ray interaction with orbital electrons. We present here design and development of a neutron imaging beamline at 100 MW Dhruva research reactor for neutron imaging applications such as radiography, tomography and phase contrast imaging. Combinations of sapphire and bismuth single crystals have been used as thermal neutron filter/gamma absorber at the input of a specially designed collimator to maximize thermal neutron to gamma ratio. The maximum beam size of neutrons has been restricted to ∼120 mm diameter at the sample position. A cadmium ratio of ∼250 with L / D ratio of 160 and thermal neutron flux of ∼ 4 × 107 n/cm2 s at the sample position has been measured. In this paper, different aspects of the beamline design such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system are described. Nondestructive radiography/tomography experiments on hydrogen concentration in Zr-alloy, aluminium foam, ceramic metal seals etc. are also presented.

  3. Microstructured boron foil scintillating G-GEM detector for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Takeshi, E-mail: fujiwara-t@aist.go.jp [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Center for Advanced Photonics, Neutron Beam Technology Team, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Bautista, Unico [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Philippine Nuclear Research Institute-Department of Science and Technology (PNRI-DOST), Commonwealth Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Mitsuya, Yuki [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan); Takahashi, Hiroyuki [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yamada, Norifumi L. [Neutron Science Laboratory, Institute of Material Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) (Japan); Otake, Yoshie; Taketani, Atsushi [Center for Advanced Photonics, Neutron Beam Technology Team, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Uesaka, Mitsuru [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan); Toyokawa, Hiroyuki [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a new simple neutron imaging gaseous detector was successfully developed by combining a micro-structured {sup 10}B foil, a glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), and a mirror–lens–charge-coupled device (CCD)–camera system. The neutron imaging system consists of a chamber filled with Ar/CF{sub 4} scintillating gas mixture. Inside this system, the G-GEM is mounted for gas multiplication. The neutron detection in this system is based on the reaction between {sup 10}B and neutrons. A micro-structured {sup 10}B is developed to overcome the issue of low detection efficiency. Secondary electrons excite Ar/CF{sub 4} gas molecules, and high-yield visible photons are emitted from those excited gas molecules during the gas electron multiplication process in the G-GEM holes. These photons are easily detected by a mirror–lens–CCD–camera system. A neutron radiograph is then simply formed. We obtain the neutron images of different materials with a compact accelerator-driven neutron source. We confirm that the new scintillating G-GEM-based neutron imager works properly with low gamma ray sensitivity and exhibits a good performance as a new simple digital neutron imaging device.

  4. Overview of the Conceptual Design of the Future VENUS Neutron Imaging Beam Line at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilheux, Hassina; Herwig, Ken; Keener, Scott; Davis, Larry

    VENUS (Versatile Neutron Imaging Beam line at the Spallation Neutron Source) will be a world-class neutron-imaging instrument that will uniquely utilize the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) time-of-flight (TOF) capabilities to measure and characterize objects across several length scales (mm to μm). When completed, VENUS will provide academia, industry and government laboratories with the opportunity to advance scientific research in areas such as energy, materials, additive manufacturing, geosciences, transportation, engineering, plant physiology, biology, etc. It is anticipated that a good portion of the VENUS user community will have a strong engineering/industrial research focus. Installed at Beam line 10 (BL10), VENUS will be a 25-m neutron imaging facility with the capability to fully illuminate (i.e., umbra illumination) a 20 cm x 20 cm detector area. The design allows for a 28 cm x 28 cm field of view when using the penumbra to 80% of the full illumination flux. A sample position at 20 m will be implemented for magnification measurements. The optical components are comprised of a series of selected apertures, T0 and bandwidth choppers, beam scrapers, a fast shutter to limit sample activation, and flight tubes filled with Helium. Techniques such as energy selective, Bragg edge and epithermal imaging will be available at VENUS.

  5. Theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report discusses research by Columbia University staff in high energy physics. Some of the topics discussed are as follows: lattice gauge theory; quantum chromodynamics; parity doublets; solitons; baryon number violation; black holes; magnetic monopoles; gluon plasma; Chern-Simons theory; and the inflationary universe

  6. High energy astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shklorsky, I.S.

    1979-01-01

    A selected list of articles of accessible recent review articles and conference reports, wherein up-to-date summaries of various topics in the field of high energy astrophysics can be found, is presented. A special report outlines work done in the Soviet Union in this area. (Auth.)

  7. High energy battery. Hochenergiebatterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, H.; Beyermann, G.; Bulling, M.

    1992-03-26

    In a high energy battery with a large number of individual cells in a housing with a cooling medium flowing through it, it is proposed that the cooling medium should be guided so that it only affects one or both sides of the cells thermally.

  8. High energy beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.; Herr, H.; Linnecar, T.; Millich, A.; Milss, F.; Rubbia, C.; Taylor, C.S.; Meer, S. van der; Zotter, B.

    1980-01-01

    The group concerned itself with the analysis of cooling systems whose purpose is to maintain the quality of the high energy beams in the SPS in spite of gas scattering, RF noise, magnet ripple and beam-beam interactions. Three types of systems were discussed. The status of these activities is discussed below. (orig.)

  9. High energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p anti p), lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed

  10. High Energy Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untitled Document [Argonne Logo] [DOE Logo] High Energy Physics Home Division ES&H Personnel Collider Physics Cosmic Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theory & Computing Detector R&D Electronic Design Mechanical Design Neutrino Physics Theoretical Physics Seminars HEP Division Seminar HEP Lunch Seminar HEP

  11. Passive and Active Fast-Neutron Imaging in Support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Safeguards Campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackston, Matthew A.; Hausladen, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Results from safeguards-related passive and active coded-aperture fast-neutron imaging measurements of plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) material configurations performed at Idaho National Laboratory s Zero Power Physics Reactor facility are presented. The imaging measurements indicate that it is feasible to use fast neutron imaging in a variety of safeguards-related tasks, such as monitoring storage, evaluating holdup deposits in situ, or identifying individual leached hulls still containing fuel. The present work also presents the first demonstration of imaging of differential die away fast neutrons.

  12. Progress toward the development and testing of source reconstruction methods for NIF neutron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, E N; Grim, G P; Wilde, C; Wilson, D C; Morgan, G; Wilke, M; Tregillis, I; Merrill, F; Clark, D; Finch, J; Fittinghoff, D; Bower, D

    2010-10-01

    Development of analysis techniques for neutron imaging at the National Ignition Facility is an important and difficult task for the detailed understanding of high-neutron yield inertial confinement fusion implosions. Once developed, these methods must provide accurate images of the hot and cold fuels so that information about the implosion, such as symmetry and areal density, can be extracted. One method under development involves the numerical inversion of the pinhole image using knowledge of neutron transport through the pinhole aperture from Monte Carlo simulations. In this article we present results of source reconstructions based on simulated images that test the methods effectiveness with regard to pinhole misalignment.

  13. Geant4 Analysis of a Thermal Neutron Real-Time Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Arka; Hawari, Ayman I.

    2017-07-01

    Thermal neutron imaging is a technique for nondestructive testing providing complementary information to X-ray imaging for a wide range of applications in science and engineering. Advancement of electronic imaging systems makes it possible to obtain neutron radiographs in real time. This method requires a scintillator to convert neutrons to optical photons and a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to detect those photons. Alongside, a well collimated beam which reduces geometrical blurriness, the use of a thin scintillator can improve the spatial resolution significantly. A representative scintillator that has been applied widely for thermal neutron imaging is 6LiF:ZnS (Ag). In this paper, a multiphysics simulation approach for designing thermal neutron imaging system is investigated. The Geant4 code is used to investigate the performance of a thermal neutron imaging system starting with a neutron source and including the production of charged particles and optical photons in the scintillator and their transport for image formation in the detector. The simulation geometry includes the neutron beam collimator and sapphire filter. The 6LiF:ZnS (Ag) scintillator is modeled along with a pixelated detector for image recording. The spatial resolution of the system was obtained as the thickness of the scintillator screen was varied between 50 and 400 μm. The results of the simulation were compared to experimental results, including measurements performed using the PULSTAR nuclear reactor imaging beam, showing good agreement. Using the established model, further examination showed that the resolution contribution of the scintillator screen is correlated with its thickness and the range of the neutron absorption reaction products (i.e., the alpha and triton particles). Consequently, thinner screens exhibit improved spatial resolution. However, this will compromise detection efficiency due to the reduced probability of neutron absorption.

  14. Neutron μstiX. Micrometer structure investigation with real space and reciprocal space crossover using neutron imaging detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehlbauer, Martin Johann

    2013-07-19

    This work is concerned with the investigation of inhomogeneities in materials with length scales of the order of micrometers by means of neutrons. In real space this is done by neutron imaging methods measuring the transmitted signal while for Ultra Small Angle Neutron Scattering (USANS) the signal of the scattered neutrons is assigned to a spatial frequency distribution in reciprocal space. The part about neutron imaging is focused on time-resolved neutron radiography on an injection nozzle similar to the ones used for modern diesel truck engines. The associated experiments have been carried out at the neutron imaging facility ANTARES at the Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen in Garching near Munich. Especially the demands on the detector system were high. Therefore different detection methods and detector configurations have been tested. On the one hand the detector should allow for a time resolution high enough to record the injection process lasting about 900 μs. On the other hand it needed to offer a spatial resolution sufficient to resolve the test oil inside the spray hole of a maximum diameter of less than 200 μm. An advanced aim of this work is the visualization of cavitation phenomena which may occur during the injection process inside of the spray hole. In order to operate the injector at conditions as close to reality as possible a high pressure pump supplying the injector with test oil at a pressure of 1600 bar was needed in addition to the specially developed control electronics, the recuperation tank and the exhaust gas equipment for the escaping atomized spray. A second part of the work describes USANS experiments based on the idea of Dr. Roland Gaehler and carried out at the instrument D11 at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. For this purpose a specific multi-beam geometry was applied, where a multi-slit aperture replaced the standard source aperture and the sample aperture was

  15. Neutron μstiX. Micrometer structure investigation with real space and reciprocal space crossover using neutron imaging detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlbauer, Martin Johann

    2013-01-01

    This work is concerned with the investigation of inhomogeneities in materials with length scales of the order of micrometers by means of neutrons. In real space this is done by neutron imaging methods measuring the transmitted signal while for Ultra Small Angle Neutron Scattering (USANS) the signal of the scattered neutrons is assigned to a spatial frequency distribution in reciprocal space. The part about neutron imaging is focused on time-resolved neutron radiography on an injection nozzle similar to the ones used for modern diesel truck engines. The associated experiments have been carried out at the neutron imaging facility ANTARES at the Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen in Garching near Munich. Especially the demands on the detector system were high. Therefore different detection methods and detector configurations have been tested. On the one hand the detector should allow for a time resolution high enough to record the injection process lasting about 900 μs. On the other hand it needed to offer a spatial resolution sufficient to resolve the test oil inside the spray hole of a maximum diameter of less than 200 μm. An advanced aim of this work is the visualization of cavitation phenomena which may occur during the injection process inside of the spray hole. In order to operate the injector at conditions as close to reality as possible a high pressure pump supplying the injector with test oil at a pressure of 1600 bar was needed in addition to the specially developed control electronics, the recuperation tank and the exhaust gas equipment for the escaping atomized spray. A second part of the work describes USANS experiments based on the idea of Dr. Roland Gaehler and carried out at the instrument D11 at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. For this purpose a specific multi-beam geometry was applied, where a multi-slit aperture replaced the standard source aperture and the sample aperture was

  16. A portable neutron spectroscope (NSPECT) for detection, imaging and identification of nuclear material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James M.; Bancroft, Christopher; Bloser, Peter; Bravar, Ulisse; Fourguette, Dominique; Frost, Colin; Larocque, Liane; McConnell, Mark L.; Legere, Jason; Pavlich, Jane; Ritter, Greg; Wassick, Greg; Wood, Joshua; Woolf, Richard

    2010-08-01

    We have developed, fabricated and tested a prototype imaging neutron spectrometer designed for real-time neutron source location and identification. Real-time detection and identification is important for locating materials. These materials, specifically uranium and transuranics, emit neutrons via spontaneous or induced fission. Unlike other forms of radiation (e.g. gamma rays), penetrating neutron emission is very uncommon. The instrument detects these neutrons, constructs images of the emission pattern, and reports the neutron spectrum. The device will be useful for security and proliferation deterrence, as well as for nuclear waste characterization and monitoring. The instrument is optimized for imaging and spectroscopy in the 1-20 MeV range. The detection principle is based upon multiple elastic neutron-proton scatters in organic scintillator. Two detector panel layers are utilized. By measuring the recoil proton and scattered neutron locations and energies, the direction and energy spectrum of the incident neutrons can be determined and discrete and extended sources identified. Event reconstruction yields an image of the source and its location. The hardware is low power, low mass, and rugged. Its modular design allows the user to combine multiple units for increased sensitivity. We will report the results of laboratory testing of the instrument, including exposure to a calibrated Cf-252 source. Instrument parameters include energy and angular resolution, gamma rejection, minimum source identification distances and times, and projected effective area for a fully populated instrument.

  17. Conversion from film to image plates for transfer method neutron radiography of nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, Aaron E.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.

    2017-02-01

    This paper summarizes efforts to characterize and qualify a computed radiography (CR) system for neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). INL has multiple programs that are actively developing, testing, and evaluating new nuclear fuels. Irradiated fuel experiments are subjected to a number of sequential post-irradiation examination techniques that provide insight into the overall behavior and performance of the fuel. One of the first and most important of these exams is neutron radiography, which provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Results from neutron radiography are often the driver for subsequent examinations of the PIE program. Features of interest that can be evaluated using neutron radiography include irradiation-induced swelling, isotopic and fuel-fragment redistribution, plate deformations, and fuel fracturing. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique with film for imaging fuel. INL is pursuing multiple efforts to advance its neutron imaging capabilities for evaluating irradiated fuel and other applications, including conversion from film to CR image plates. Neutron CR is the current state-of-the-art for neutron imaging of highly-radioactive objects. Initial neutron radiographs of various types of nuclear fuel indicate that radiographs can be obtained of comparable image quality currently obtained using film. This paper provides neutron radiographs of representative irradiated fuel pins along with neutron radiographs of standards that informed the qualification of the neutron CR system for routine use. Additionally, this paper includes evaluations of some of the CR scanner parameters and their effects on image quality.

  18. Argentina: Overview of activities on Neutron Imaging (NI) and Cultural Heritage (CH) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    In Argentina there exists a community of researchers of national institutions involved in CH studies and also periodic congresses about the topic since 2007. A new group on neutron imaging is beginning at Bariloche Atomic Center (CNEA). The plan of this group is: - Characterize the facility: flux, doses, collimation, etc;. - Establish contact with CH researchers for offering neutron imaging; - Demonstrate capabilities of the technique with 2D imaging; - In the future, a 3D tomography improvement will be developed

  19. High energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the High Energy Nuclear Physics laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The Laboratory research program is focused on the fundamental physics of interactions, on the new techniques for the acceleration of charged particles and on the nuclei double beta decay. The experiments are performed on the following topics: the measurement of the π 0 inclusive production and the photons production in very high energy nuclei-nuclei interactions and the nucleon stability. Concerning the experiments under construction, a new detector for LEP, the study and simulation of the hadronic showers in a calorimeter and the H1 experiment (HERA), are described. The future research programs and the published papers are listed [fr

  20. High energy medical accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandrillon, P.

    1990-01-01

    The treatment of tumours with charged particles, ranging from protons to 'light ions' (carbon, oxygen, neon), has many advantages, but up to now has been little used because of the absence of facilities. After the successful pioneering work carried out with accelerators built for physics research, machines dedicated to this new radiotherapy are planned or already in construction. These high energy medical accelerators are presented in this paper. (author) 15 refs.; 14 figs.; 8 tabs

  1. Theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.

    1990-05-01

    This report discusses progress on theoretical high energy physics at Columbia University in New York City. Some of the topics covered are: Chern-Simons gauge field theories; dynamical fermion QCD calculations; lattice gauge theory; the standard model of weak and electromagnetic interactions; Boson-fermion model of cuprate superconductors; S-channel theory of superconductivity and axial anomaly and its relation to spin in the parton model

  2. High energy nuclear excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogny, D.; Decharge, J.

    1983-09-01

    The main purpose of this talk is to see whether a simple description of the nuclear excitations permits one to characterize some of the high energy structures recently observed. The discussion is based on the linear response to different external fields calculated using the Random Phase Approximation. For those structure in heavy ion collisions at excitation energies above 50 MeV which cannot be explained with such a simple approach, we discuss a possible mechanism for this heavy ion scattering

  3. Neutron imaging of Zr-1%Nb fuel cladding material containing hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svab, E.; Meszaros, Gy.; Somogyvari, Z.; Balasko, M.; Koeroesi, F.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen distribution and hydride phases were analyzed in reactor fuel cladding pressure tube Zr-1%Nb material up to 13,300 ppm. From neutron diffraction measurements, formation of cubic δ-ZrH 2 and a small amount of tetragonal γ-ZrH was established. Texture effects were analyzed by imaging plate technique. From neutron radiography images a linear model was set up that adequately described the relationship between gray levels and nominal H-concentrations. The H-distribution was unveiled by 3D intensity histograms and fractal analysis of multilevel-segmented neutron radiography images

  4. A tilted fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector for high resolution neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongyul; Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongyul; Hwy, Limchang; Kim, Taejoo; Lee, Kyehong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seungwook [Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    One of these efforts is that a tilted scintillator geometry and lens coupled CCD detector for neutron imaging system were used to improve spatial resolution in one dimension. The increased spatial resolution in one dimension was applied to fuel cell study. However, a lens coupled CCD detector has lower sensitivity than a fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector due to light loss. In this research, a tilted detector using fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector was developed to improve resolution and sensitivity. In addition, a tilted detector can prevent an image sensor from direct radiation damage. Neutron imaging has been used for fuel cell study, lithium ion battery study, and many scientific applications. High quality neutron imaging is demanded for more detailed studies of applications, and spatial resolution should be considered to get high quality neutron imaging. Therefore, there were many efforts to improve spatial resolution.

  5. Current status of high energy nucleon-meson transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Hiroshi; Sasa, Toshinobu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Current status of design code of accelerator (NMTC/JAERI code), outline of physical model and evaluation of accuracy of code were reported. To evaluate the nuclear performance of accelerator and strong spallation neutron origin, the nuclear reaction between high energy proton and target nuclide and behaviors of various produced particles are necessary. The nuclear design of spallation neutron system used a calculation code system connected the high energy nucleon{center_dot}meson transport code and the neutron{center_dot}photon transport code. NMTC/JAERI is described by the particle evaporation process under consideration of competition reaction of intranuclear cascade and fission process. Particle transport calculation was carried out for proton, neutron, {pi}- and {mu}-meson. To verify and improve accuracy of high energy nucleon-meson transport code, data of spallation and spallation neutron fragment by the integral experiment were collected. (S.Y.)

  6. Timing and position response of a block detector for fast neutron time-of-flight imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laubach, M.A., E-mail: mlaubach@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Hayward, J.P., E-mail: jhayward@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zhang, X., E-mail: xzhang39@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Cates, J.W., E-mail: jcates7@vols.utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Our research effort seeks to improve the spatial and timing performance of a block detector made of a pixilated plastic scintillator (EJ-200), first demonstrated as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Advanced Portable Neutron Imaging System. Improvement of the position and time response is necessary to achieve better resolution and contrast in the images of shielded special nuclear material. Time-of-flight is used to differentiate between gamma and different sources of neutrons (e.g., transmission and fission neutrons). Factors limiting the timing and position performance of the neutron detector have been revealed through simulations and measurements. Simulations have suggested that the degradation in the ability to resolve pixels in the neutron detector is due to those interactions occurring near the light guide. The energy deposition within the neutron detector is shown to affect position performance and imaging efficiency. This examination details how energy cuts improve the position performance and degrade the imaging efficiency. Measurements have shown the neutron detector to have a timing resolution of σ=238 ps. The majority of this timing uncertainty is from the depth-of-interaction (DOI) of the neutron which is confirmed by simulations and analytical calculations.

  7. HIGH ENERGY HADRON POLARIMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BUNCE, G.

    2007-01-01

    Proton polarimetry at RHIC uses the interference of electromagnetic (EM) and hadronic scattering amplitudes. The EM spin-flip amplitude for protons is responsible for the proton's anomalous magnetic moment, and is large. This then generates a significant analyzing power for small angle elastic scattering. RHIC polarimetry has reached a 5% uncertainty on the beam polarization, and seem capable of reducing this uncertainty further. Polarized neutron beams ax also interesting for RHIC and for a polarized electron-polarized proton/ion collider in the fume. In this case, deuterons, for example, have a very small anomalous magnetic moment, making the approach used for protons impractical. Although it might be possible to use quasielastic scattering from the protons in the deuteron to monitor the polarization. 3-He beams can provide polarized neutrons, and do have a large anomalous magnetic moment, making a similar approach to proton polarimetry possible

  8. High energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    High energy ion implantation offers the oppertunity for unique structures in semiconductor processing. The unusual physical properties of such implantations are discussed as well as the special problems in masking and damage annealing. A review is made of proposed circuit structures which involve deep implantation. Examples are: deep buried bipolar collectors fabricated without epitaxy, barrier layers to reduce FET memory sensitivity to soft-fails, CMOS isolation well structures, MeV implantation for customization and correction of completed circuits, and graded reach-throughs to deep active device components. (orig.)

  9. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  10. High energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    This progress report presents a review of research done over the past five years by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This research has been centered at Fermilab where we have had a continuing involvement with both the Tevatron collider and fixed-target programs. In 1988 we began extensive detector R ampersand D for the SSC through its Major Subsystem Program. Duke has been an active member of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) since its formation. These last five years has also been used to finish the analysis of data from a series of hybrid bubble chamber experiments which formed the core of Duke's research program in the early 1980's

  11. High energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stanev, Todor

    2010-01-01

    Offers an accessible text and reference (a cosmic-ray manual) for graduate students entering the field and high-energy astrophysicists will find this an accessible cosmic-ray manual Easy to read for the general astronomer, the first part describes the standard model of cosmic rays based on our understanding of modern particle physics. Presents the acceleration scenario in some detail in supernovae explosions as well as in the passage of cosmic rays through the Galaxy. Compares experimental data in the atmosphere as well as underground are compared with theoretical models

  12. Gamma–neutron imaging system utilizing pulse shape discrimination with CLYC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, Chad M.; Soundara-Pandian, Lakshmi; Johnson, Erik B.; Vogel, Sam; Vinci, Bob; Squillante, Michael; Glodo, Jarek; Christian, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, RMD has investigated the use of CLYC (Cs 2 LiYCl 6 :Ce), a new and emerging scintillation material, in a gamma–neutron coded aperture imaging system based on RMD's commercial RadCam TM instrument. CLYC offers efficient thermal neutron detection, fast neutron detection capabilities, excellent pulse shape discrimination (PSD), and gamma-ray energy resolution as good as 4% at 662 keV. PSD improves the isolation of higher energy gammas from thermal neutron interactions (>3 MeV electron equivalent peak), compared to conventional pulse height techniques. The scintillation emission time in CLYC provides the basis for PSD; where neutron interactions result in a slower emission rise and decay components while gamma interactions result in a faster emission components. By creating a population plot based on the ratio of the decay tail compared to the total integral amplitude (PSD ratio), discrimination of gammas, thermal neutrons, and fast neutrons is possible. Previously, we characterized the CLYC-based RadCam system for imaging gammas and neutrons using a layered W-Cd coded aperture mask and employing only pulse height discrimination. In this paper, we present the latest results which investigate gamma-neutron imaging capabilities using PSD. An FPGA system is used to acquire the CLYC–PSPMT last dynode signals, determine a PSD ratio for each event, and compare it to a calibrated PSD cutoff. Each event is assigned either a gamma (low) or neutron (high) flag signal which is then correlated with the imaging information for each event. - Highlights: • The latest results are presented for our CLYC RadCam-2 system which investigate gamma–neutron imaging using pulse shape discrimination. • CLYC RadCam-2 system successfully discriminates gammas, thermal neutrons, and fast neutrons by employing a fully integrated, FPGA-based PSD system. • Imaging of our 252 Cf source was possible using both pulse height and pulse shape discrimination with CLYC. • Imaging

  13. The Biological Effect of Fast Neutrons and High-Energy Protons; Effets Biologiques des Neutrons Rapides et des Protons de Haute Energie; Biologicheskoe dejstvie bystrykh nejtronov i protonov vysokikh ehnergii; Efectos Biologicos de los Neutrones Rapidos y de los Protones de Elevada Energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalev, Ju. I.; Petrovich, I. K.; Strel' cova, V. N.

    1964-03-15

    The paper gives the results of comparative experiments on the effects of fast neutrons and high-energy protons (500 MeV) on life expectancy, peripheral blood, incidence and rate of appearance of tumours in the rat as a function of administered dose and time of observation. The neutron experiment was performed on 573 and the proton experiment on 490 white rats. The animals irradiated with fast neutrons were given doses between 8.5 and 510 rad, and those irradiated with protons received doses between 28 and 1008 rad. The effective doses for the acute, sub-acute and chronic forms of sickness were established for fast neutrons and for protons. LD{sub 50/30} for neutrons was 408 and for protons 600 rad, and the corresponding LD{sub 50}/{sub 120} values were 380 and 600 rad. The conditions governing rat mortality were analysed both in the early and the later stages of the experiment. It is shown that the average life expectancy of rats irradiated with fast neutrons does not depend on sex. The shape of the dose-effect curve for the various peripheral-blood indexes is strongly dependent not only on the radiosensitivity of the blood cells in question but also on the time of observation. It may change greatly in time for one and the same index. A considerable time after irradiation with either fast neutrons or protons, benign and malignant tumours appear in different tissues of the rats, including the haemopoeitic tissues, mammary glands, pituitary, uterus, ovaries, prostate gland, testicles, liver, kidneys, lungs, gastro-intestinal tract, subcutaneous tissue, lymph nodes, urinary bladder, etc. The over-all incidence of tumours and the number of cases of multi centred neoplasms in females are two to three times higher than in males. The minimum tumour dose for the mammary glands with neutron irradiation is apparently rather less than 42.5 rad. The maximum incidence of tumours of the pituitary is found after irradiation with a dose of 42.5 rad.- At this same dose leucosis and

  14. A Detector for 2-D Neutron Imaging for the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, Charles L. Jr.; Bryan, W.L.; Wintenberg, Alan Lee; Clonts, Lloyd G.; Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; McKnight, Timothy E.; Frank, Steven Shane; Cooper, Ronald G.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2006-01-01

    We have designed, built, and tested a 2-D pixellated thermal neutron detector. The detector is modeled after the MicroMegas-type structure previously published for collider-type experiments. The detector consists of a 4X4 square array of 1 cm 2 pixels each of which is connected to an individual preamplifier-shaper-data acquisition system. The neutron converter is a 10B film on an aluminum substrate. We describe the construction of the detector and the test results utilizing 252Cf sources in Lucite to thermalize the neutrons. Drift electrode (Aluminum) Converter (10B) 3 mm Conversion gap neutron (-900 V)

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging at CPHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ran; Chen Zhiqiang; Huang Zhifeng; Xiao Yongshun; Wang Xuewu; Wie Jie; Loong, C.-K.

    2011-01-01

    Since the launching of the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) project of Tsinghua University in 2009, works have begun on the design and engineering of an imaging/radiography instrument for the neutron source provided by CPHS. The instrument will perform basic tasks such as transmission imaging and computerized tomography. Additionally, we include in the design the utilization of coded-aperture and grating-based phase contrast methodology, as well as the options of prompt gamma-ray analysis and neutron-energy selective imaging. Previously, we had implemented the hardware and data-analysis software for grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging. Here, we investigate Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations of neutron refraction phenomena and then model the grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging system according to the classic-optics-based method. The simulated experimental results of the retrieving phase shift gradient information by five-step phase-stepping approach indicate the feasibility of grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging as an option for the cold neutron imaging instrument at the CPHS.

  16. Active neutron and gamma-ray imaging of highly enriched uranium for treaty verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Michael C; Polack, J Kyle; Ruch, Marc L; Marcath, Matthew J; Clarke, Shaun D; Pozzi, Sara A

    2017-08-11

    The detection and characterization of highly enriched uranium (HEU) presents a large challenge in the non-proliferation field. HEU has a low neutron emission rate and most gamma rays are low energy and easily shielded. To address this challenge, an instrument known as the dual-particle imager (DPI) was used with a portable deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator to detect neutrons and gamma rays from induced fission in HEU. We evaluated system response using a 13.7-kg HEU sphere in several configurations with no moderation, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) moderation, and tungsten moderation. A hollow tungsten sphere was interrogated to evaluate the response to a possible hoax item. First, localization capabilities were demonstrated by reconstructing neutron and gamma-ray images. Once localized, additional properties such as fast neutron energy spectra and time-dependent neutron count rates were attributed to the items. For the interrogated configurations containing HEU, the reconstructed neutron spectra resembled Watt spectra, which gave confidence that the interrogated items were undergoing induced fission. The time-dependent neutron count rate was also compared for each configuration and shown to be dependent on the neutron multiplication of the item. This result showed that the DPI is a viable tool for localizing and confirming fissile mass and multiplication.

  17. Bulk magnetic domain structures visualized by neutron dark-field imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenzweig, C.; David, C.; Bunk, O.; Dierolf, M.; Frei, G.; Kuehne, G.; Schaefer, R.; Pofahl, S.; Roennow, H. M. R.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2008-01-01

    We report on how a neutron grating interferometer can yield projection images of the internal domain structure in bulk ferromagnetic samples. The image contrast relies on the ultrasmall angle scattering of unpolarized neutrons at domain wall structures in the specimen. The results show the basic domains of (110)-oriented sheets in an FeSi test sample. The obtained domain structures could be correlated with surface sensitive magneto-optical Kerr effect micrographs

  18. Bulk magnetic domain structures visualized by neutron dark-field imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünzweig, C.; David, C.; Bunk, O.; Dierolf, M.; Frei, G.; Kühne, G.; Schäfer, R.; Pofahl, S.; Rønnow, H. M. R.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2008-09-01

    We report on how a neutron grating interferometer can yield projection images of the internal domain structure in bulk ferromagnetic samples. The image contrast relies on the ultrasmall angle scattering of unpolarized neutrons at domain wall structures in the specimen. The results show the basic domains of (110)-oriented sheets in an FeSi test sample. The obtained domain structures could be correlated with surface sensitive magneto-optical Kerr effect micrographs.

  19. Russia: Overview of activities on Neutron Imaging (NI) and Cultural Heritage (CH) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlenko, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The development of neutron imaging techniques as a tool for non-destructive analysis of the internal structure, defects and processes in industrial products, functional materials, objects of cultural heritage attracts considerable attention at the present time. The dedicated instruments are available at the many neutron sources. The IBR-2M high flux pulsed reactor is one of the most powerful pulsed neutron sources in the world with the average power 2 MW, power per neutron pulse 1850 MW and neutron flux in pulse of 5·10 15 n/cm 2 /s. During the period December 2006 – December 2010 the reactor was on modernization for replacement of the reactor vessel and fuel elements. During 2011, the successful physical and power start-up of IBR-2M were performed. Now reactor is operational and can be used for research and development activities using neutron scattering techniques in next 25 years prospective. However, no instruments dedicated for neutron imaging is installed at IBR-2M so far. Moreover, in Russian Federation there is no dedicated neutron imaging facility for cultural heritage research at the moment

  20. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser Krista

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1 available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  1. A new method by steering kernel-based Richardson–Lucy algorithm for neutron imaging restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Shuang; Wang, Qiao; Sun, Jia-ning; Huang, Ji-peng

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by industrial applications, neutron radiography has become a powerful tool for non-destructive investigation techniques. However, resulted from a combined effect of neutron flux, collimated beam, limited spatial resolution of detector and scattering, etc., the images made with neutrons are degraded severely by blur and noise. For dealing with it, by integrating steering kernel regression into Richardson–Lucy approach, we present a novel restoration method in this paper, which is capable of suppressing noise while restoring details of the blurred imaging result efficiently. Experimental results show that compared with the other methods, the proposed method can improve the restoration quality both visually and quantitatively

  2. Theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.

    1993-01-01

    Brief reports are given on the work of several professors. The following areas are included: quantum chromodynamics calculations using numerical lattice gauge theory and a high-speed parallel computer; the ''spin wave'' description of bosonic particles moving on a lattice with same-site exclusion; a high-temperature expansion to 13th order for the O(4)-symmetric φ 4 model on a four-dimensional F 4 lattice; spin waves and lattice bosons; superconductivity of C 60 ; meson-meson interferometry in heavy-ion collisions; baryon number violation in the Standard Model in high-energy collisions; hard thermal loops in QCD; electromagnetic interactions of anyons; the relation between Bose-Einstein and BCS condensations; Euclidean wormholes with topology S 1 x S 2 x R; vacuum decay and symmetry breaking by radiative corrections; inflationary solutions to the cosmological horizon and flatness problems; and magnetically charged black holes

  3. High energy astrophysical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Poggiani, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents ultraviolet and X-ray astronomy, gamma-ray astronomy, cosmic ray astronomy, neutrino astronomy, and gravitational wave astronomy as distinct research areas, focusing on the astrophysics targets and the requirements with respect to instrumentation and observation methods. The purpose of the book is to bridge the gap between the reference books and the specialized literature. For each type of astronomy, the discussion proceeds from the orders of magnitude for observable quantities. The physical principles of photon and particle detectors are then addressed, and the specific telescopes and combinations of detectors, presented. Finally the instruments and their limits are discussed with a view to assisting readers in the planning and execution of observations. Astronomical observations with high-energy photons and particles represent the newest additions to multimessenger astronomy and this book will be of value to all with an interest in the field.

  4. Prospects at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, C.

    1988-11-01

    I discuss some possibilities for neutrino experiments in the fixed-target environment of the SPS, Tevatron, and UNK, with their primary proton beams of 0.4, 0.9, and 3.0 TeV. The emphasis is on unfinished business: issues that have been recognized for some time, but not yet resolved. Then I turn to prospects for proton-proton colliders to explore the 1-TeV scale. I review the motivation for new physics in the neighborhood of 1 TeV and mention some discovery possibilities for high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders and the implications they would have for neutrino physics. I raise the possibility of the direct study of neutrino interactions in hadron colliders. I close with a report on the status of the SSC project. 38 refs., 17 figs

  5. High energy physics problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzov, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    Described are modern views on the particle structure and particle interactions at high energies. According to the latest data recieved, all particles can be classified in three groups: 1) strong interacting hadrons; 2) leptons, having no strong interactions; 3) photon. The particle structure is described in a quark model, and with the use of gluons. The elementary particle theory is based on the quantum field theory. The energy increase of interacting particles enables to check the main theory principles, such as conventions for causality, relativistic invariance and unitarity. Investigations of weak interactions are of great importance. The progress in this field is connected with unified gauge theories of weak and electromagnetic interactions. For weak interactions promissing are the experiments with colliding electron-proton rings. The new data, especially at higher energies, will lead to a further refinement of the nature of particles and their interactions

  6. Super-resolution processing for pulsed neutron imaging system using a high-speed camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, Ken; Kai, Tetsuya; Shinohara, Takenao; Segawa, Mariko; Mochiki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Super-resolution and center-of-gravity processing improve the resolution of neutron-transmitted images. These processing methods calculate the center-of-gravity pixel or sub-pixel of the neutron point converted into light by a scintillator. The conventional neutron-transmitted image is acquired using a high-speed camera by integrating many frames when a transmitted image with one frame is not provided. It succeeds in acquiring the transmitted image and calculating a spectrum by integrating frames of the same energy. However, because a high frame rate is required for neutron resonance absorption imaging, the number of pixels of the transmitted image decreases, and the resolution decreases to the limit of the camera performance. Therefore, we attempt to improve the resolution by integrating the frames after applying super-resolution or center-of-gravity processing. The processed results indicate that center-of-gravity processing can be effective in pulsed-neutron imaging with a high-speed camera. In addition, the results show that super-resolution processing is effective indirectly. A project to develop a real-time image data processing system has begun, and this system will be used at J-PARC in JAEA. (author)

  7. Cf-252 based neutron radiography using real-time image processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochiki, Koh-ichi; Koiso, Manabu; Yamaji, Akihiro; Iwata, Hideki; Kihara, Yoshitaka; Sano, Shigeru; Murata, Yutaka

    2001-01-01

    For compact Cf-252 based neutron radiography, a real-time image processing system by particle counting technique has been developed. The electronic imaging system consists of a supersensitive imaging camera, a real-time corrector, a real-time binary converter, a real-time calculator for centroid, a display monitor and a computer. Three types of accumulated NR image; ordinary, binary and centroid images, can be observed during a measurement. Accumulated NR images were taken by the centroid mode, the binary mode and ordinary mode using of Cf-252 neutron source and those images were compared. The centroid mode presented the sharpest image and its statistical characteristics followed the Poisson distribution, while the ordinary mode showed the smoothest image as the averaging effect by particle bright spots with distributed brightness was most dominant. (author)

  8. Trends in X-, gamma and neutron radiographic imaging at IGCAR Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatraman, B.; Raghu, N.; Menaka, M.; Anandraj, R.

    2015-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel cycle, right from raw material stage through fabrication and in service inspection upto the retirement of the component, NDE is an indispensable tool. While X- and gamma radiography is quite common, neutron radiography is a very efficient and complementary tool which can enhance investigations in the field of non-destructive testing as well as in many fundamental research applications. The main advantage of neutrons compared to X-rays is its ability to penetrate heavy elements and also image light elements (i.e. with low atomic numbers) such as hydrogen, water, carbon etc. This is because, neutrons interact with the nucleus rather than with the outer electron in the shell. This also makes it possible to distinguish between different isotopes of the same element by neutron radiography. The KAMINI reactor at IGCAR is a versatile and unique facility wherein extensive work has been undertaken on neutron radiography and activation analysis. Apart from conventional neutron radiography using transfer technique, real time neutron imaging of fuel pins and other objects have also been carried out. Using Beam purity indicator and sensitivity indicator, the neutron beam from KAMINI has also been characterized. This paper focuses on the developments and applications of digital imaging NDE using X-, gamma and neutrons at IGCAR. Both 2-dimensional imaging and -D tomography has been undertaken. Case studies undertaken for strategic and core industries including societal applications such as in cultural heritage is also highlighted. Advanced image processing and analysis has also been applied for enhancing the sensitivity and better defect quantification

  9. Displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zujun; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Xiao, Zhigang; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2014-01-01

    The experiments of displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The CMOS APS image sensors are manufactured in the standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The flux of neutron beams was about 1.33 × 10 8 n/cm 2 s. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron equivalent-fluence of 1 × 10 11 , 5 × 10 11 , and 1 × 10 12 n/cm 2 , respectively. The mean dark signal (K D ), dark signal spike, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), noise (V N ), saturation output signal voltage (V S ), and dynamic range (DR) versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors are analyzed. The mean dark signal increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The dark images from CMOS APS image sensors irradiated by neutrons are presented to investigate the generation of dark signal spike

  10. Neutron imaging development for megajoule scale inertial confinement fusion experiments{sup 1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grim, G P; Bradley, P A; Day, R D; Clark, D D; Fatherley, V E; Finch, J P; Garcia, F P; Jaramillo, S A; Montoya, A J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Ortiz, T A; Payton, J R; Pazuchanics, P; Schmidt, D W; Valdez, A C; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: gpgrim@lanl.gov

    2008-05-15

    Neutron imaging of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets is useful for understanding the implosion conditions of deuterium and tritium filled targets at Mega-Joule/Tera-Watt scale laser facilities. The primary task for imaging ICF targets at the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore CA, is to determine the asymmetry of the imploded target. The image data, along with other nuclear information, are to be used to provide insight into target drive conditions. The diagnostic goal at the National Ignition Facility is to provide neutron images with 10 {mu}m resolution and peak signal-to-background values greater than 20 for neutron yields of {approx} 10{sup 15}. To achieve this requires signal multiplexing apertures with good resolution. In this paper we present results from imaging system development efforts aimed at achieving these requirements using neutron pinholes. The data were collected using directly driven ICF targets at the Omega Laser, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY., and include images collected from a 3 x 3 array of 15.5 {mu}m pinholes. Combined images have peak signal-to-background values greater than 30 at neutron yields of {approx} 10{sup 13}.

  11. A novel approach to correct the coded aperture misalignment for fast neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, F. N.; Hu, H. S., E-mail: huasi-hu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, D. M.; Jia, J. [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, T. K. [Laser Fusion Research Center, CAEP, Mianyang, 621900 Sichuan (China); Jia, Q. G. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Aperture alignment is crucial for the diagnosis of neutron imaging because it has significant impact on the coding imaging and the understanding of the neutron source. In our previous studies on the neutron imaging system with coded aperture for large field of view, “residual watermark,” certain extra information that overlies reconstructed image and has nothing to do with the source is discovered if the peak normalization is employed in genetic algorithms (GA) to reconstruct the source image. Some studies on basic properties of residual watermark indicate that the residual watermark can characterize coded aperture and can thus be used to determine the location of coded aperture relative to the system axis. In this paper, we have further analyzed the essential conditions for the existence of residual watermark and the requirements of the reconstruction algorithm for the emergence of residual watermark. A gamma coded imaging experiment has been performed to verify the existence of residual watermark. Based on the residual watermark, a correction method for the aperture misalignment has been studied. A multiple linear regression model of the position of coded aperture axis, the position of residual watermark center, and the gray barycenter of neutron source with twenty training samples has been set up. Using the regression model and verification samples, we have found the position of the coded aperture axis relative to the system axis with an accuracy of approximately 20 μm. Conclusively, a novel approach has been established to correct the coded aperture misalignment for fast neutron coded imaging.

  12. Deriving Quantitative Crystallographic Information from the Wavelength-Resolved Neutron Transmission Analysis Performed in Imaging Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Sato

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Current status of Bragg-edge/dip neutron transmission analysis/imaging methods is presented. The method can visualize real-space distributions of bulk crystallographic information in a crystalline material over a large area (~10 cm with high spatial resolution (~100 μm. Furthermore, by using suitable spectrum analysis methods for wavelength-dependent neutron transmission data, quantitative visualization of the crystallographic information can be achieved. For example, crystallographic texture imaging, crystallite size imaging and crystalline phase imaging with texture/extinction corrections are carried out by the Rietveld-type (wide wavelength bandwidth profile fitting analysis code, RITS (Rietveld Imaging of Transmission Spectra. By using the single Bragg-edge analysis mode of RITS, evaluations of crystal lattice plane spacing (d-spacing relating to macro-strain and d-spacing distribution’s FWHM (full width at half maximum relating to micro-strain can be achieved. Macro-strain tomography is performed by a new conceptual CT (computed tomography image reconstruction algorithm, the tensor CT method. Crystalline grains and their orientations are visualized by a fast determination method of grain orientation for Bragg-dip neutron transmission spectrum. In this paper, these imaging examples with the spectrum analysis methods and the reliabilities evaluated by optical/electron microscope and X-ray/neutron diffraction, are presented. In addition, the status at compact accelerator driven pulsed neutron sources is also presented.

  13. Demonstration of Focusing Wolter Mirrors for Neutron Phase and Magnetic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Hussey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Image-forming focusing mirrors were employed to demonstrate their applicability to two different modalities of neutron imaging, phase imaging with a far-field interferometer, and magnetic-field imaging through the manipulation of the neutron beam polarization. For the magnetic imaging, the rotation of the neutron polarization in the magnetic field was measured by placing a solenoid at the focus of the mirrors. The beam was polarized upstream of the solenoid, while the spin analyzer was situated between the solenoid and the mirrors. Such a polarized neutron microscope provides a path toward considerably improved spatial resolution in neutron imaging of magnetic materials. For the phase imaging, we show that the focusing mirrors preserve the beam coherence and the path-length differences that give rise to the far-field moiré pattern. We demonstrated that the visibility of the moiré pattern is modified by small angle scattering from a highly porous foam. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of using Wolter optics to significantly improve the spatial resolution of the far-field interferometer.

  14. FSU High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosper, Harrison B. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Adams, Todd [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Askew, Andrew [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Berg, Bernd [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Blessing, Susan K. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Okui, Takemichi [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Owens, Joseph F. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Reina, Laura [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Wahl, Horst D. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  15. Computing in high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watase, Yoshiyuki

    1991-09-15

    The increasingly important role played by computing and computers in high energy physics is displayed in the 'Computing in High Energy Physics' series of conferences, bringing together experts in different aspects of computing - physicists, computer scientists, and vendors.

  16. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  17. High energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-01-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb - 1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989

  18. High energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-01-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics Program at the University of California, Riverside. In 1990, we will concentrate on analysis of LEP data from the OPAL detector. We expect to record 10 5 Z's by the end of 1989 and 10 6 in 1990. This data will be used to measure the number of quark-lepton families in the universe. In the second half of 1990 we will also be occupied with the installation of the D-Zero detector in the Tevatron Collider and the preparation of software for the 1991 run. A new initiative made possible by generous university support is a laboratory for detector development at UCR. The focus will be on silicon strip tracking detectors both for the D-Zero upgrade and for SSC physics. The theory program will pursue further various mass-generating radiative mechanisms for understanding small quark and lepton masses as well as some novel phenomenological aspects of supersymmetry

  19. High energy plasma accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.

    1985-05-01

    Colinear intense laser beams ω 0 , kappa 0 and ω 1 , kappa 1 shone on a plasma with frequency separation equal to the electron plasma frequency ω/sub pe/ are capable of creating a coherent large longitudinal electric field E/sub L/ = mc ω/sub pe//e of the order of 1GeV/cm for a plasma density of 10 18 cm -3 through the laser beat excitation of plasma oscillations. Accompanying favorable and deleterious physical effects using this process for a high energy beat-wave accelerator are discussed: the longitudinal dephasing, pump depletion, the transverse laser diffraction, plasma turbulence effects, self-steepening, self-focusing, etc. The basic equation, the driven nonlinear Schroedinger equation, is derived to describe this system. Advanced accelerator concepts to overcome some of these problems are proposed, including the plasma fiber accelerator of various variations. An advanced laser architecture suitable for the beat-wave accelerator is suggested. Accelerator physics issues such as the luminosity are discussed. Applications of the present process to the current drive in a plasma and to the excitation of collective oscillations within nuclei are also discussed

  20. Very high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1985-05-01

    The conclusions are relatively simple, but represent a considerable challenge to the machine builder. High luminosity is essential. We may in the future discover some new kind of high cross section physics, but all we know now indicates that the luminosity has to increase as the square of the center of mass energy. A reasonable luminosity to scale from for electron machines would be 10 33 cm -2 s -1 at a center of mass energy of 3 TeV. The required emittances in very high energy machines are small. It will be a real challenge to produce these small emittances and to maintain them during acceleration. The small emittances probably make acceleration by laser techniques easier, if such techniques will be practical at all. The beam spot sizes are very small indeed. It will be a challenge to design beam transport systems with the necessary freedom from aberration required for these small spot sizes. It would of course help if the beta functions at the collision points could be reduced. Beam power will be large - to paraphrase the old saying, ''power is money'' - and efficient acceleration systems will be required

  1. Thailand: Overview of activities on Neutron Imaging (NI) and Cultural Heritage (CH) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaweerat, Sasiphan

    2012-01-01

    Undoubtedly, neutron imaging is one of the best investigation techniques for cultural heritage researches. Cultural heritage is what we obtain from the past and pass on to future generation. It contains unique and irreplaceable record that is important to fulfill our understanding about the past. Recently, many cultural heritages remain untouched and historical records are ambiguous because scientific method of proof is difficult to make without destruction. Fortunately, the neutron imaging technique allows property of neutron that can penetrate through object providing non-invasive characterization. The intensity of transmitting neutron varies upon neutron flux at exposing position and elemental composition in particular objects. Consequently, the object’s provenance, manufacturing technology, authentication, and hidden structure can be determined. To achieve a high quality image and further service for cultural heritage research, good facility and practice are of significant concerns.This CRP provides great opportunity to develop neutron facility and to standardize methodology in Thailand. After official meeting between Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) and Office of National Museum (ONM), Fine Arts Department on 24th January 2011, we are agreed to collaborate in CRP- F11018. With supporting from IAEA, the neutron imaging technology will be sustainable developed and the strengthen collaboration between TINT and ONM will be established. TINT scientists will work in an appropriate channel to meet the state-of-the-art end user’s requirements. Since the hidden historical records will be revealed, we strongly believe that the adapted neutron imaging technique will help answer questions regarding ancient Thais

  2. Switzerland: Overview of activities on Neutron Imaging (NI) and Cultural Heritage (CH) studies - Paul Scherrer Institut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannes, David

    2012-01-01

    Historical bronze objects play an important rule in cultural heritage research as this material was used for a broad variety of different purposes (tools, weapons, jewellery, cult objects,…) since more than 5000 years in most parts of the world (Africa, Asia, Europe). Furthermore this group of copper alloys shows high durability and has low susceptibility for corrosion, which explains the large number of objects, which have stand the test of time and wait to be studied. For the study of cultural heritage objects non-destructive testing methods are in many cases required and generally preferred. Neutron imaging provides a unique opportunity to thoroughly characterize bronze objects and to provide information on the inner structure also from larger objects while other conventional methods such as X-ray methods are restricted to surface regions of such metal objects. In the scope of this CRP we propose an interdisciplinary platform for non