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Sample records for high-density tiling microarrays

  1. Differential analysis for high density tiling microarray data

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    Kapranov Philipp

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High density oligonucleotide tiling arrays are an effective and powerful platform for conducting unbiased genome-wide studies. The ab initio probe selection method employed in tiling arrays is unbiased, and thus ensures consistent sampling across coding and non-coding regions of the genome. These arrays are being increasingly used to study the associated processes of transcription, transcription factor binding, chromatin structure and their association. Studies of differential expression and/or regulation provide critical insight into the mechanics of transcription and regulation that occurs during the developmental program of a cell. The time-course experiment, which comprises an in-vivo system and the proposed analyses, is used to determine if annotated and un-annotated portions of genome manifest coordinated differential response to the induced developmental program. Results We have proposed a novel approach, based on a piece-wise function – to analyze genome-wide differential response. This enables segmentation of the response based on protein-coding and non-coding regions; for genes the methodology also partitions differential response with a 5' versus 3' versus intra-genic bias. Conclusion The algorithm built upon the framework of Significance Analysis of Microarrays, uses a generalized logic to define regions/patterns of coordinated differential change. By not adhering to the gene-centric paradigm, discordant differential expression patterns between exons and introns have been identified at a FDR of less than 12 percent. A co-localization of differential binding between RNA Polymerase II and tetra-acetylated histone has been quantified at a p-value -13. The prototype R code has been made available as supplementary material [see Additional file 1]. Additional file 1 gsam_prototypercode.zip. File archive comprising of prototype R code for gSAM implementation including readme and examples. Click here for file

  2. Assessing the performance of different high-density tiling microarray strategies for mapping transcribed regions of the human genome.

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    Emanuelsson, Olof; Nagalakshmi, Ugrappa; Zheng, Deyou; Rozowsky, Joel S; Urban, Alexander E; Du, Jiang; Lian, Zheng; Stolc, Viktor; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark B

    2007-06-01

    Genomic tiling microarrays have become a popular tool for interrogating the transcriptional activity of large regions of the genome in an unbiased fashion. There are several key parameters associated with each tiling experiment (e.g., experimental protocols and genomic tiling density). Here, we assess the role of these parameters as they are manifest in different tiling-array platforms used for transcription mapping. First, we analyze how a number of published tiling-array experiments agree with established gene annotation on human chromosome 22. We observe that the transcription detected from high-density arrays correlates substantially better with annotation than that from other array types. Next, we analyze the transcription-mapping performance of the two main high-density oligonucleotide array platforms in the ENCODE regions of the human genome. We hybridize identical biological samples and develop several ways of scoring the arrays and segmenting the genome into transcribed and nontranscribed regions, with the aim of making the platforms most comparable to each other. Finally, we develop a platform comparison approach based on agreement with known annotation. Overall, we find that the performance improves with more data points per locus, coupled with statistical scoring approaches that properly take advantage of this, where this larger number of data points arises from higher genomic tiling density and the use of replicate arrays and mismatches. While we do find significant differences in the performance of the two high-density platforms, we also find that they complement each other to some extent. Finally, our experiments reveal a significant amount of novel transcription outside of known genes, and an appreciable sample of this was validated by independent experiments.

  3. Analysis of DNA strand-specific differential expression with high density tiling microarrays

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    Antequera Francisco

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarray technology allows the analysis of genome structure and dynamics at genome-wide scale. Expression microarrays (EMA contain probes for annotated open reading frames (ORF and are widely used for the analysis of differential gene expression. By contrast, tiling microarrays (TMA have a much higher probe density and provide unbiased genome-wide coverage. The purpose of this study was to develop a protocol to exploit the high resolution of TMAs for quantitative measurement of DNA strand-specific differential expression of annotated and non-annotated transcripts. Results We extensively filtered probes present in Affymetrix Genechip Yeast Genome 2.0 expression and GeneChip S. pombe 1.0FR tiling microarrays to generate custom Chip Description Files (CDF in order to compare their efficiency. We experimentally tested the potential of our approach by measuring the differential expression of 4904 genes in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe growing under conditions of oxidative stress. The results showed a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.943 between both platforms, indicating that TMAs are as reliable as EMAs for quantitative expression analysis. A significant advantage of TMAs over EMAs is the possibility of detecting non-annotated transcripts generated only under specific physiological conditions. To take full advantage of this property, we have used a target-labelling protocol that preserves the original polarity of the transcripts and, therefore, allows the strand-specific differential expression of non-annotated transcripts to be determined. By using a segmentation algorithm prior to generating the corresponding custom CDFs, we identified and quantitatively measured the expression of 510 transcripts longer than 180 nucleotides and not overlapping previously annotated ORFs that were differentially expressed at least 2-fold under oxidative stress. Conclusions We show that the information derived from TMA

  4. Genome-wide transcription analyses in rice using tiling microarrays

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    Li, Lei; Wang, Xiangfeng; Stolc, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    . We report here a full-genome transcription analysis of the indica rice subspecies using high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarrays. Our results provided expression data support for the existence of 35,970 (81.9%) annotated gene models and identified 5,464 unique transcribed intergenic regions...

  5. High-Density Droplet Microarray of Individually Addressable Electrochemical Cells.

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    Zhang, Huijie; Oellers, Tobias; Feng, Wenqian; Abdulazim, Tarik; Saw, En Ning; Ludwig, Alfred; Levkin, Pavel A; Plumeré, Nicolas

    2017-06-06

    Microarray technology has shown great potential for various types of high-throughput screening applications. The main read-out methods of most microarray platforms, however, are based on optical techniques, limiting the scope of potential applications of such powerful screening technology. Electrochemical methods possess numerous complementary advantages over optical detection methods, including its label-free nature, capability of quantitative monitoring of various reporter molecules, and the ability to not only detect but also address compositions of individual compartments. However, application of electrochemical methods for the purpose of high-throughput screening remains very limited. In this work, we develop a high-density individually addressable electrochemical droplet microarray (eDMA). The eDMA allows for the detection of redox-active reporter molecules irrespective of their electrochemical reversibility in individual nanoliter-sized droplets. Orthogonal band microelectrodes are arranged to form at their intersections an array of three-electrode systems for precise control of the applied potential, which enables direct read-out of the current related to analyte detection. The band microelectrode array is covered with a layer of permeable porous polymethacrylate functionalized with a highly hydrophobic-hydrophilic pattern, forming spatially separated nanoliter-sized droplets on top of each electrochemical cell. Electrochemical characterization of single droplets demonstrates that the underlying electrode system is accessible to redox-active molecules through the hydrophilic polymeric pattern and that the nonwettable hydrophobic boundaries can spatially separate neighboring cells effectively. The eDMA technology opens the possibility to combine the high-throughput biochemical or living cell screenings using the droplet microarray platform with the sequential electrochemical read-out of individual droplets.

  6. High-density polymer microarrays: identifying synthetic polymers that control human embryonic stem cell growth.

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    Hansen, Anne; Mjoseng, Heidi K; Zhang, Rong; Kalloudis, Michail; Koutsos, Vasileios; de Sousa, Paul A; Bradley, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The fabrication of high-density polymer microarray is described, allowing the simultaneous and efficient evaluation of more than 7000 different polymers in a single-cellular-based screen. These high-density polymer arrays are applied in the search for synthetic substrates for hESCs culture. Up-scaling of the identified hit polymers enables long-term cellular cultivation and promoted successful stem-cell maintenance. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Wavelet-based detection of transcriptional activity on a novel Staphylococcus aureus tiling microarray

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    Segura Víctor

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-density oligonucleotide microarray is an appropriate technology for genomic analysis, and is particulary useful in the generation of transcriptional maps, ChIP-on-chip studies and re-sequencing of the genome.Transcriptome analysis of tiling microarray data facilitates the discovery of novel transcripts and the assessment of differential expression in diverse experimental conditions. Although new technologies such as next-generation sequencing have appeared, microarrays might still be useful for the study of small genomes or for the analysis of genomic regions with custom microarrays due to their lower price and good accuracy in expression quantification. Results Here, we propose a novel wavelet-based method, named ZCL (zero-crossing lines, for the combined denoising and segmentation of tiling signals. The denoising is performed with the classical SUREshrink method and the detection of transcriptionally active regions is based on the computation of the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT. In particular, the detection of the transitions is implemented as the thresholding of the zero-crossing lines. The algorithm described has been applied to the public Saccharomyces cerevisiae dataset and it has been compared with two well-known algorithms: pseudo-median sliding window (PMSW and the structural change model (SCM. As a proof-of-principle, we applied the ZCL algorithm to the analysis of the custom tiling microarray hybridization results of a S. aureus mutant deficient in the sigma B transcription factor. The challenge was to identify those transcripts whose expression decreases in the absence of sigma B. Conclusions The proposed method archives the best performance in terms of positive predictive value (PPV while its sensitivity is similar to the other algorithms used for the comparison. The computation time needed to process the transcriptional signals is low as compared with model-based methods and in the same range to those

  8. Detection of genome-wide polymorphisms in the AT-rich Plasmodium falciparum genome using a high-density microarray

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    Huyen Yentram

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic mapping is a powerful method to identify mutations that cause drug resistance and other phenotypic changes in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. For efficient mapping of a target gene, it is often necessary to genotype a large number of polymorphic markers. Currently, a community effort is underway to collect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP from the parasite genome. Here we evaluate polymorphism detection accuracy of a high-density 'tiling' microarray with 2.56 million probes by comparing single feature polymorphisms (SFP calls from the microarray with known SNP among parasite isolates. Results We found that probe GC content, SNP position in a probe, probe coverage, and signal ratio cutoff values were important factors for accurate detection of SFP in the parasite genome. We established a set of SFP calling parameters that could predict mSFP (SFP called by multiple overlapping probes with high accuracy (≥ 94% and identified 121,087 mSFP genome-wide from five parasite isolates including 40,354 unique mSFP (excluding those from multi-gene families and ~18,000 new mSFP, producing a genetic map with an average of one unique mSFP per 570 bp. Genomic copy number variation (CNV among the parasites was also cataloged and compared. Conclusion A large number of mSFP were discovered from the P. falciparum genome using a high-density microarray, most of which were in clusters of highly polymorphic genes at chromosome ends. Our method for accurate mSFP detection and the mSFP identified will greatly facilitate large-scale studies of genome variation in the P. falciparum parasite and provide useful resources for mapping important parasite traits.

  9. A cell spot microarray method for production of high density siRNA transfection microarrays

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    Mpindi John-Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput RNAi screening is widely applied in biological research, but remains expensive, infrastructure-intensive and conversion of many assays to HTS applications in microplate format is not feasible. Results Here, we describe the optimization of a miniaturized cell spot microarray (CSMA method, which facilitates utilization of the transfection microarray technique for disparate RNAi analyses. To promote rapid adaptation of the method, the concept has been tested with a panel of 92 adherent cell types, including primary human cells. We demonstrate the method in the systematic screening of 492 GPCR coding genes for impact on growth and survival of cultured human prostate cancer cells. Conclusions The CSMA method facilitates reproducible preparation of highly parallel cell microarrays for large-scale gene knockdown analyses. This will be critical towards expanding the cell based functional genetic screens to include more RNAi constructs, allow combinatorial RNAi analyses, multi-parametric phenotypic readouts or comparative analysis of many different cell types.

  10. CGHScan: finding variable regions using high-density microarray comparative genomic hybridization data

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    Rajashekara Gireesh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomic hybridization can rapidly identify chromosomal regions that vary between organisms and tissues. This technique has been applied to detecting differences between normal and cancerous tissues in eukaryotes as well as genomic variability in microbial strains and species. The density of oligonucleotide probes available on current microarray platforms is particularly well-suited for comparisons of organisms with smaller genomes like bacteria and yeast where an entire genome can be assayed on a single microarray with high resolution. Available methods for analyzing these experiments typically confine analyses to data from pre-defined annotated genome features, such as entire genes. Many of these methods are ill suited for datasets with the number of measurements typical of high-density microarrays. Results We present an algorithm for analyzing microarray hybridization data to aid identification of regions that vary between an unsequenced genome and a sequenced reference genome. The program, CGHScan, uses an iterative random walk approach integrating multi-layered significance testing to detect these regions from comparative genomic hybridization data. The algorithm tolerates a high level of noise in measurements of individual probe intensities and is relatively insensitive to the choice of method for normalizing probe intensity values and identifying probes that differ between samples. When applied to comparative genomic hybridization data from a published experiment, CGHScan identified eight of nine known deletions in a Brucella ovis strain as compared to Brucella melitensis. The same result was obtained using two different normalization methods and two different scores to classify data for individual probes as representing conserved or variable genomic regions. The undetected region is a small (58 base pair deletion that is below the resolution of CGHScan given the array design employed in the study

  11. Fiber optic chemical sensors: The evolution of high- density fiber-optic DNA microarrays

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    Ferguson, Jane A.

    2001-06-01

    Sensors were developed for multianalyte monitoring, fermentation monitoring, lactate analysis, remote oxygen detection for use in bioremediation monitoring and in a fuel spill clean-up project, heavy metal analysis, and high density DNA microarrays. The major focus of this thesis involved creating and improving high-density DNA gene arrays. Fiber optic sensors are created using fluorescent indicators, polymeric supports, and optical fiber substrates. The fluorescent indicator is entrapped in a polymer layer and attached to the tip of the optical fiber. The tip of the fiber bearing the sensing layer (the distal end) is placed in the sample of interest while the other end of the fiber (the proximal end) is connected to an analysis system. Any length of fiber can be used without compromising the integrity or sensitivity of the system. A fiber optic oxygen sensor was designed incorporating an oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye and a gas permeable polymer attached to an optical fiber. The construction simplicity and ruggedness of the sensor enabled its deployment for in situ chemical oxidation and bioremediation studies. Optical fibers were also used as the substrate to detect biomolecules in solution. To monitor bioprocesses, the production of the analyte of interest must be coupled with a species that is optically measurable. For example, oxygen is consumed in many metabolic functions. The fiber optic oxygen sensor is equipped with an additional sensing layer. Upon contact with a specific biochemical in the sample, a reaction occurs in the additional sensing layer that either consumes or produces oxygen. This dual layer system was used to monitor the presence of lactate, an important metabolite for clinical and bioprocess analysis. In many biological and environmental systems, the generation of one species occurs coincidentally with the generation or consumption of another species. A multianalyte sensor was prepared that can monitor the simultaneous activity of pH, CO2

  12. Sample phenotype clusters in high-density oligonucleotide microarray data sets are revealed using Isomap, a nonlinear algorithm

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    Malyj Wasyl

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Life processes are determined by the organism's genetic profile and multiple environmental variables. However the interaction between these factors is inherently non-linear 1. Microarray data is one representation of the nonlinear interactions among genes and genes and environmental factors. Still most microarray studies use linear methods for the interpretation of nonlinear data. In this study, we apply Isomap, a nonlinear method of dimensionality reduction, to analyze three independent large Affymetrix high-density oligonucleotide microarray data sets. Results Isomap discovered low-dimensional structures embedded in the Affymetrix microarray data sets. These structures correspond to and help to interpret biological phenomena present in the data. This analysis provides examples of temporal, spatial, and functional processes revealed by the Isomap algorithm. In a spinal cord injury data set, Isomap discovers the three main modalities of the experiment – location and severity of the injury and the time elapsed after the injury. In a multiple tissue data set, Isomap discovers a low-dimensional structure that corresponds to anatomical locations of the source tissues. This model is capable of describing low- and high-resolution differences in the same model, such as kidney-vs.-brain and differences between the nuclei of the amygdala, respectively. In a high-throughput drug screening data set, Isomap discovers the monocytic and granulocytic differentiation of myeloid cells and maps several chemical compounds on the two-dimensional model. Conclusion Visualization of Isomap models provides useful tools for exploratory analysis of microarray data sets. In most instances, Isomap models explain more of the variance present in the microarray data than PCA or MDS. Finally, Isomap is a promising new algorithm for class discovery and class prediction in high-density oligonucleotide data sets.

  13. A tiling microarray for global analysis of chloroplast genome expression in cucumber and other plants

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    Pląder Wojciech

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plastids are small organelles equipped with their own genomes (plastomes. Although these organelles are involved in numerous plant metabolic pathways, current knowledge about the transcriptional activity of plastomes is limited. To solve this problem, we constructed a plastid tiling microarray (PlasTi-microarray consisting of 1629 oligonucleotide probes. The oligonucleotides were designed based on the cucumber chloroplast genomic sequence and targeted both strands of the plastome in a non-contiguous arrangement. Up to 4 specific probes were designed for each gene/exon, and the intergenic regions were covered regularly, with 70-nt intervals. We also developed a protocol for direct chemical labeling and hybridization of as little as 2 micrograms of chloroplast RNA. We used this protocol for profiling the expression of the cucumber chloroplast plastome on the PlasTi-microarray. Owing to the high sequence similarity of plant plastomes, the newly constructed microarray can be used to study plants other than cucumber. Comparative hybridization of chloroplast transcriptomes from cucumber, Arabidopsis, tomato and spinach showed that the PlasTi-microarray is highly versatile.

  14. Tiling microarray analysis of rice chromosome 10 to identify the transcriptome and relate its expression to chromosomal architecture

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    Li, Lei; Wang, Xiangfeng; Xia, Mian

    2005-01-01

    definition of the heterochromatin and euchromatin domains. The heterochromatin domain appears to associate with distinct chromosome level transcriptional activities under normal and stress conditions. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrated the utility of genome tiling microarray in evaluating annotated rice...... will facilitate rice genome annotation and the application of this knowledge to other more complex cereal genomes. RESULTS: We report here an analysis of the chromosome 10 transcriptome of the two major rice subspecies, japonica and indica, using oligonucleotide tiling microarrays. This analysis detected...... gene model mapping, the tiling microarray analysis identified 549 new models for the japonica chromosome, representing an 18% increase in the annotated protein-coding capacity. Furthermore, an asymmetric distribution of genome elements along the chromosome was found that coincides with the cytological...

  15. DBNorm: normalizing high-density oligonucleotide microarray data based on distributions.

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    Meng, Qinxue; Catchpoole, Daniel; Skillicorn, David; Kennedy, Paul J

    2017-11-29

    Data from patients with rare diseases is often produced using different platforms and probe sets because patients are widely distributed in space and time. Aggregating such data requires a method of normalization that makes patient records comparable. This paper proposed DBNorm, implemented as an R package, is an algorithm that normalizes arbitrarily distributed data to a common, comparable form. Specifically, DBNorm merges data distributions by fitting functions to each of them, and using the probability of each element drawn from the fitted distribution to merge it into a global distribution. DBNorm contains state-of-the-art fitting functions including Polynomial, Fourier and Gaussian distributions, and also allows users to define their own fitting functions if required. The performance of DBNorm is compared with z-score, average difference, quantile normalization and ComBat on a set of datasets, including several that are publically available. The performance of these normalization methods are compared using statistics, visualization, and classification when class labels are known based on a number of self-generated and public microarray datasets. The experimental results show that DBNorm achieves better normalization results than conventional methods. Finally, the approach has the potential to be applicable outside bioinformatics analysis.

  16. High-resolution mapping of DNA copy alterations in human chromosome 22 using high-density tiling oligonucleotide arrays.

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    Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Korbel, Jan O; Selzer, Rebecca; Richmond, Todd; Hacker, April; Popescu, George V; Cubells, Joseph F; Green, Roland; Emanuel, Beverly S; Gerstein, Mark B; Weissman, Sherman M; Snyder, Michael

    2006-03-21

    Deletions and amplifications of the human genomic sequence (copy number polymorphisms) are the cause of numerous diseases and a potential cause of phenotypic variation in the normal population. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has been developed as a useful tool for detecting alterations in DNA copy number that involve blocks of DNA several kilobases or larger in size. We have developed high-resolution CGH (HR-CGH) to detect accurately and with relatively little bias the presence and extent of chromosomal aberrations in human DNA. Maskless array synthesis was used to construct arrays containing 385,000 oligonucleotides with isothermal probes of 45-85 bp in length; arrays tiling the beta-globin locus and chromosome 22q were prepared. Arrays with a 9-bp tiling path were used to map a 622-bp heterozygous deletion in the beta-globin locus. Arrays with an 85-bp tiling path were used to analyze DNA from patients with copy number changes in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 22q. Heterozygous deletions and duplications as well as partial triploidies and partial tetraploidies of portions of chromosome 22q were mapped with high resolution (typically up to 200 bp) in each patient, and the precise breakpoints of two deletions were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Additional peaks potentially corresponding to known and novel additional CNPs were also observed. Our results demonstrate that HR-CGH allows the detection of copy number changes in the human genome at an unprecedented level of resolution.

  17. Testing and validation of high density resequencing microarray for broad range biothreat agents detection.

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    Tomasz A Leski

    Full Text Available Rapid and effective detection and identification of emerging microbiological threats and potential biowarfare agents is very challenging when using traditional culture-based methods. Contemporary molecular techniques, relying upon reverse transcription and/or polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR/PCR provide a rapid and effective alternative, however, such assays are generally designed and optimized to detect only a limited number of targets, and seldom are capable of differentiation among variants of detected targets. To meet these challenges, we have designed a broad-range resequencing pathogen microarray (RPM for detection of tropical and emerging infectious agents (TEI including biothreat agents: RPM-TEI v 1.0 (RPM-TEI. The scope of the RPM-TEI assay enables detection and differential identification of 84 types of pathogens and 13 toxin genes, including most of the class A, B and C select agents as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, Atlanta, GA. Due to the high risks associated with handling these particular target pathogens, the sensitivity validation of the RPM-TEI has been performed using an innovative approach, in which synthetic DNA fragments are used as templates for testing the assay's limit of detection (LOD. Assay specificity and sensitivity was subsequently confirmed by testing with full-length genomic nucleic acids of selected agents. The LOD for a majority of the agents detected by RPM-TEI was determined to be at least 10(4 copies per test. Our results also show that the RPM-TEI assay not only detects and identifies agents, but is also able to differentiate near neighbors of the same agent types, such as closely related strains of filoviruses of the Ebola Zaire group, or the Machupo and Lassa arenaviruses. Furthermore, each RPM-TEI assay results in specimen-specific agent gene sequence information that can be used to assess pathogenicity, mutations, and virulence markers, results that are not generally

  18. High-density rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarray design using early-stage rhesus genome sequence information and human genome annotations

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    Magness Charles L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, few genomic reagents specific for non-human primate research have been available. To address this need, we have constructed a macaque-specific high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using highly fragmented low-pass sequence contigs from the rhesus genome project together with the detailed sequence and exon structure of the human genome. Using this method, we designed oligonucleotide probes to over 17,000 distinct rhesus/human gene orthologs and increased by four-fold the number of available genes relative to our first-generation expressed sequence tag (EST-derived array. Results We constructed a database containing 248,000 exon sequences from 23,000 human RefSeq genes and compared each human exon with its best matching sequence in the January 2005 version of the rhesus genome project list of 486,000 DNA contigs. Best matching rhesus exon sequences for each of the 23,000 human genes were then concatenated in the proper order and orientation to produce a rhesus "virtual transcriptome." Microarray probes were designed, one per gene, to the region closest to the 3' untranslated region (UTR of each rhesus virtual transcript. Each probe was compared to a composite rhesus/human transcript database to test for cross-hybridization potential yielding a final probe set representing 18,296 rhesus/human gene orthologs, including transcript variants, and over 17,000 distinct genes. We hybridized mRNA from rhesus brain and spleen to both the EST- and genome-derived microarrays. Besides four-fold greater gene coverage, the genome-derived array also showed greater mean signal intensities for genes present on both arrays. Genome-derived probes showed 99.4% identity when compared to 4,767 rhesus GenBank sequence tag site (STS sequences indicating that early stage low-pass versions of complex genomes are of sufficient quality to yield valuable functional genomic information when combined with finished genome information from

  19. Triple X syndrome in a patient with partial lipodystrophy discovered using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray: a case report

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    Lanktree Matthew B

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Patients with lipodystrophy experience selective or generalized atrophy of adipose tissue. The disruption of lipid metabolism results in an increased risk for development of metabolic syndrome and coronary artery disease. Currently, the mutations responsible for approximately half of lipodystrophy patients are known, but new techniques and examination of different types of genetic variation may identify new disease-causing mechanisms. Case presentation A 53-year-old woman of African descent was referred to a tertiary care endocrinology clinic for treatment of severe insulin resistance, treatment-resistant hypertension and dyslipidemia. After all known lipodystrophy-causing mutations were excluded by DNA sequencing, the patient was found to have triple X syndrome after an initial investigation into copy number variation using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The patient also had a previously unobserved duplication of 415 kilobases of chromosome 5q33.2. This is the first case report of a patient with lipodystrophy who also had triple X syndrome. Conclusion While we cannot make a direct link between the presence of triple X syndrome and partial lipodystrophy, if unrelated, this is an extremely rare convergence of syndromes. This patient poses an interesting possibility regarding the influence triple X syndrome may have on an individual with other underlying lipodystrophy susceptibility. Finally, impending large-scale case-control and cohort copy number variation investigations will, as a by-product, further document the prevalence of triple X syndrome in various patient groups.

  20. Construction of high-density tissue microarrays at low cost by using self-made manual microarray kits and recipient paraffin blocks.

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    Choi, Chang Hwan; Kim, Kyu Ho; Song, Ju Young; Choi, Suk Jin; Kim, Lucia; Park, In Suh; Han, Jee Young; Kim, Joon Mee; Chu, Young Chae

    2012-12-01

    Advances of tissue microarray (TMA) technology have enabled simultaneous in situ analysis of biomarker expression in a large number of archived pathology specimens. However, the relatively high cost of TMA construction may hamper many researchers from using this essential tool of modern pathology research. We discuss methods for making TMA kits and recipient blocks for manual construction of high-density TMAs at low cost. Ordinary cannula piercing needles, hypodermic needles, bone marrow biopsy needles, metallic ink cartridges of ballpoint pens, and disposable skin biopsy punches were used to construct self-made manual TMA kits. The recipient blocks were manufactured by boring holes in the conventional bare paraffin blocks. A mini electric hand drill and a microcompound table assembled on a drill stand were used to maximize the capacity of the recipient blocks. By using TMA kits made from cannula piercing needles (16- and 18-gauge), it was possible to construct TMAs with 1 mm×140 cores, 0.6 mm×320 cores, 2 mm×70 cores, 3 mm×35 cores, and 5 mm×12 cores. The capacity of the recipient blocks could be dramatically increased by drilling holes. Construction of TMAs using self-made TMA kits is an inexpensive alternative to construction of TMAs using commercial devices.

  1. In-house Manual Construction of High-Density and High-Quality Tissue Microarrays by Using Homemade Recipient Agarose-Paraffin Blocks.

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    Kim, Kyu Ho; Choi, Suk Jin; Choi, Yeon Il; Kim, Lucia; Park, In Suh; Han, Jee Young; Kim, Joon Mee; Chu, Young Chae

    2013-06-01

    Self-made tissue punches can be effectively used to punch holes in blank recipient paraffin blocks and extract tissue cores from the donor paraffin blocks for the low-cost construction of tissue microarrays (TMAs). However, variable degrees of section distortion and loss of the tissue cores can occurs during cutting of the TMAs, posing technical problems for in-house manual construction of high-density TMAs. We aimed to update the method for in-house manual TMA construction to improve the quality of high-density TMAs. Blocks of agarose gel were subjected to the standard tissue processing and embedding procedure to prepare recipient agarose-paraffin blocks. The self-made tissue punches and recipient agarose-paraffin blocks were used to construct TMAs, which were completely melted and re-embedded in paraffin to make finished TMA blocks. The donor tissue cores were completely integrated into the surrounding paraffin of the recipient blocks. This method enabled us to construct high-density TMAs with significantly less section distortion or loss of tissue cores during microtomy. Simple and inexpensive construction of high-density and high-quality TMAs can be warranted by using paraffinized agarose gels as recipient blocks.

  2. Identification of Common Bacterial Antigenic Markers From Bovine Digital Dermatitis Lesions Using Meta-Transcriptomics in Combination With High-Density Peptide-Microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin W.; Marcatili, Paoli; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas

    efficacious immunoprophylactic antigens against DD. It is highly likely that DD-associated treponemes possess considerable antigenic variation, as cows exhibit a variable humoral response against different isolates of Treponema. Hence, combinations of antigens from multiple Treponema species should be used...... animals, and we monitored the host immune response to these target genes using high-density peptide microarrays. By this approach, we identified a small group of antigenic proteins, which were expressed in the majority of the samples, and demonstrated antigenicity when screened against sera from infected...... animal. Future studies will show if these proteins represent candidates for the development of novel biomarkers or vaccines...

  3. Identification of common bacterial antigenic markers from bovine digital dermatitis lesions using meta-transcriptomics in combination with high-density peptide-microarrays

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    Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Marcatili, Paolo; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    efficacious immunoprophylactic antigens against DD. It is highly likely that DD-associated treponemes possess considerable antigenic variation, as cows exhibit a variable humoral response against different isolates of Treponema. Hence, combinations of antigens from multiple Treponema species should be used...... animals, and we monitored the host immune response to these target genes using high-density peptide microarrays. By this approach, we identified a small group of antigenic proteins, which were expressed in the majority of the samples, and demonstrated antigenicity when screened against sera from infected...... animal. Future studies will show if these proteins represent candidates for the development of novel biomarkers or vaccines....

  4. Characterization of the effect of sample quality on high density oligonucleotide microarray data using progressively degraded rat liver RNA

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    Rosenzweig Barry A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interpretability of microarray data can be affected by sample quality. To systematically explore how RNA quality affects microarray assay performance, a set of rat liver RNA samples with a progressive change in RNA integrity was generated by thawing frozen tissue or by ex vivo incubation of fresh tissue over a time course. Results Incubation of tissue at 37°C for several hours had little effect on RNA integrity, but did induce changes in the transcript levels of stress response genes and immune cell markers. In contrast, thawing of tissue led to a rapid loss of RNA integrity. Probe sets identified as most sensitive to RNA degradation tended to be located more than 1000 nucleotides upstream of their transcription termini, similar to the positioning of control probe sets used to assess sample quality on Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays. Samples with RNA integrity numbers less than or equal to 7 showed a significant increase in false positives relative to undegraded liver RNA and a reduction in the detection of true positives among probe sets most sensitive to sample integrity for in silico modeled changes of 1.5-, 2-, and 4-fold. Conclusion Although moderate levels of RNA degradation are tolerated by microarrays with 3'-biased probe selection designs, in this study we identify a threshold beyond which decreased specificity and sensitivity can be observed that closely correlates with average target length. These results highlight the value of annotating microarray data with metrics that capture important aspects of sample quality.

  5. Supplementing High-Density SNP Microarrays for Additional Coverage of Disease-Related Genes: Addiction as a Paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SacconePhD, Scott F [Washington University, St. Louis; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Bierut, Laura J [Washington University, St. Louis; Kalivas, Peter J [Medical College of South Carolina, Charleston; Lerman, Caryn [University of Pennsylvania; Saccone, Nancy L [Washington University, St. Louis; Uhl, George R [Johns Hopkins University; Li, Chuan-Yun [Peking University; Philip, Vivek M [ORNL; Edenberg, Howard [Indiana University; Sherry, Steven [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Feolo, Michael [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Moyzis, Robert K [Johns Hopkins University; Rutter, Joni L [National Institute of Drug Abuse

    2009-01-01

    Commercial SNP microarrays now provide comprehensive and affordable coverage of the human genome. However, some diseases have biologically relevant genomic regions that may require additional coverage. Addiction, for example, is thought to be influenced by complex interactions among many relevant genes and pathways. We have assembled a list of 486 biologically relevant genes nominated by a panel of experts on addiction. We then added 424 genes that showed evidence of association with addiction phenotypes through mouse QTL mappings and gene co-expression analysis. We demonstrate that there are a substantial number of SNPs in these genes that are not well represented by commercial SNP platforms. We address this problem by introducing a publicly available SNP database for addiction. The database is annotated using numeric prioritization scores indicating the extent of biological relevance. The scores incorporate a number of factors such as SNP/gene functional properties (including synonymy and promoter regions), data from mouse systems genetics and measures of human/mouse evolutionary conservation. We then used HapMap genotyping data to determine if a SNP is tagged by a commercial microarray through linkage disequilibrium. This combination of biological prioritization scores and LD tagging annotation will enable addiction researchers to supplement commercial SNP microarrays to ensure comprehensive coverage of biologically relevant regions.

  6. Analysis of dust samples from the Middle East using high-density resequencing micro-array RPM-TEI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leski, T. A.; Gregory, M. J.; Malanoski, A. P.; Smith, J. P.; Glaven, R. H.; Wang, Z.; Stenger, D. A.; Lin, B.

    2010-04-01

    A previously developed resequencing microarray, "Tropical and Emerging Infections (RPM-TEI v.1.0 chip)", designed to identify and discriminate between tropical diseases and other potential biothreat agents, their near-neighbor species, and/or potential confounders, was used to characterize the microbes present in the silt/clay fraction of surface soils and airborne dust collected from the Middle East. Local populations and U.S. military personnel deployed to the Middle East are regularly subjected to high levels of airborne desert dust containing a significant fraction of inhalable particles and some portion require clinical aid. Not all of the clinical symptoms can be directly attributed to the physical action of material in the human respiratory tract. To better understand the potential health effects of the airborne dust, the composition of the microbial communities associated with surface soil and/or airborne dust (air filter) samples from 19 different sites in Iraq and Kuwait was identified using RPM-TEI v.1.0. Results indicated that several microorganisms including a class of rapidly growing Mycobacterium, Bacillus, Brucella, Clostridium and Coxiella burnetti, were present in the samples. The presence of these organisms in the surface soils and the inhalable fraction of airborne dust analyzed may pose a human health risk and warrants further investigation. Better understanding of the factors influencing the composition of these microbial communities is important to address questions related to human health and is critical to achieving Force Health Protection for the Warfighter operating in the Middle East, Afghanistan, North Africa and other arid regions.

  7. Bacillus subtilis RNase Y activity in vivo analysed by tiling microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumaya Laalami

    Full Text Available RNase Y is a key endoribonuclease affecting global mRNA stability in Bacillus subtilis. Its characterization provided the first evidence that endonucleolytic cleavage plays a major role in the mRNA metabolism of this organism. RNase Y shares important functional features with the RNA decay initiating RNase E from Escherichia coli, notably a similar cleavage specificity and a preference for 5' monophosphorylated substrates. We used high-resolution tiling arrays to analyze the effect of RNase Y depletion on RNA abundance covering the entire genome. The data confirm that this endoribonuclease plays a key role in initiating the decay of a large number of mRNAs as well as non coding RNAs. The downstream cleavage products are likely to be degraded by the 5' exonucleolytic activity of RNases J1/J2 as we show for a specific case. Comparison of the data with that of two other recent studies revealed very significant differences. About two thirds of the mRNAs upregulated following RNase Y depletion were different when compared to either one of these studies and only about 10% were in common in all three studies. This highlights that experimental conditions and data analysis play an important role in identifying RNase Y substrates by global transcriptional profiling. Our data confirmed already known RNase Y substrates and due to the precision and reproducibility of the profiles allow an exceptionally detailed view of the turnover of hundreds of new RNA substrates.

  8. Optimizing a custom tiling microarray for low input detection and identification of unamplified virus targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Christine; Wales, Samantha Q; Mammel, Mark K; Hida, Kaoru; Kulka, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Viruses are major pathogens causing foodborne illnesses and are often present at low levels in foods, thus requiring sensitive techniques for their detection in contaminated foods. The lack of efficient culture methods for many foodborne viruses and the potential for multi-species viral contamination have driven investigation toward non-amplification based methods for virus detection and identification. A custom DNA microarray (FDA_EVIR) was assessed for its sensitivity in the detection and identification of low-input virus targets, human hepatitis A virus, norovirus, and coxsackievirus, individually and in combination. Modifications to sample processing were made to accommodate low input levels of unamplified virus targets, which included addition of carrier cDNA, RNase treatment, and optimization of DNase I-mediated target fragmentation. Amplification-free detection and identification of foodborne viruses were achieved in the range of 250-500 copies of virus RNA. Alternative data analysis methods were employed to distinguish the genotypes of the viruses particularly at lower levels of target input and the single probe-based analysis approach made it possible to identify a minority species in a multi-virus complex. The oligonucleotide array is shown to be a promising platform to detect foodborne viruses at low levels close to what are anticipated in food or environmental samples. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. A high-density tissue microarray from patients with clinically localized prostate cancer reveals ERG and TATI exclusivity in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippolis, G; Edsjö, A; Stenman, U-H; Bjartell, A

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is characterized by high tumor heterogeneity. In 2005, the fusion between the androgen-regulated gene TMPRSS2 and members of the ETS family was discovered in prostate cancer. In particular, fusion of TMPRSS2 with ERG was found in approximately 50% of prostate cancers and considered as an early event in the onset of the disease. The prognostic value of this fusion is still contradictory. Bioinformatics showed that overexpression of SPINK1 gene in a subset of fusion-gene-negative prostate cancers was associated with a poor prognosis. In theory, overexpression of the tumor-associated trypsin inhibitor (TATI) protein encoded by SPINK1 in fusion-gene-negative tumor cells opens the way to selected treatments for genotypically different cases. However, their expression has never been assessed at the cellular level in the same tissue samples. As ERG expression has been shown to be a surrogate of fusion gene occurrence in prostate cancer, we have used double immunohistochemical staining to assess expression of ERG and TATI on a large tissue microarray comprising 4177 cases of localized prostate cancer. We did not detect any co-expression of ERG and TATI in the same cancer cells, which confirms previous suggestions from in silico studies. ERG was associated with Gleason score (GS), surgical margins and pathological stage, but had no prognostic value in this cohort. TATI was weakly associated with pathological stage but had no significant association with outcome. We here provide a morphological basis for ERG and TATI exclusivity in prostate cancer cells. Future therapies should be based on a combination of different targets in order to eradicate tumor cells with gene fusions and cells expressing other tumor-associated antigens. Further studies are needed to understand why ERG and TATI are not co-expressed in the same prostatic tumor cells.

  10. Cheek swabs, SNP chips, and CNVs: Assessing the quality of copy number variant calls generated with subject-collected mail-in buccal brush DNA samples on a high-density genotyping microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson Stephen W

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple investigators have established the feasibility of using buccal brush samples to genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with high-density genome-wide microarrays, but there is currently no consensus on the accuracy of copy number variants (CNVs inferred from these data. Regardless of the source of DNA, it is more difficult to detect CNVs than to genotype SNPs using these microarrays, and it therefore remains an open question whether buccal brush samples provide enough high-quality DNA for this purpose. Methods To demonstrate the quality of CNV calls generated from DNA extracted from buccal samples, compared to calls generated from blood samples, we evaluated the concordance of calls from individuals who provided both sample types. The Illumina Human660W-Quad BeadChip was used to determine SNPs and CNVs of 39 Arkansas participants in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS, including 16 mother-infant dyads, who provided both whole blood and buccal brush DNA samples. Results We observed a 99.9% concordance rate of SNP calls in the 39 blood–buccal pairs. From the same dataset, we performed a similar analysis of CNVs. Each of the 78 samples was independently segmented into regions of like copy number using the Optimal Segmentation algorithm of Golden Helix SNP & Variation Suite 7. Across 640,663 loci on 22 autosomal chromosomes, segment-mean log R ratios had an average correlation of 0.899 between blood-buccal pairs of samples from the same individual, while the average correlation between all possible blood-buccal pairs of samples from unrelated individuals was 0.318. An independent analysis using the QuantiSNP algorithm produced average correlations of 0.943 between blood-buccal pairs from the same individual versus 0.332 between samples from unrelated individuals. Segment-mean log R ratios had an average correlation of 0.539 between mother-offspring dyads of buccal samples, which was not

  11. Ratio-based analysis of differential mRNA processing and expression of a polyadenylation factor mutant pcfs4 using arabidopsis tiling microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianti Zheng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative polyadenylation as a mechanism in gene expression regulation has been widely recognized in recent years. Arabidopsis polyadenylation factor PCFS4 was shown to function in leaf development and in flowering time control. The function of PCFS4 in controlling flowering time was correlated with the alternative polyadenylation of FCA, a flowering time regulator. However, genetic evidence suggested additional targets of PCFS4 that may mediate its function in both flowering time and leaf development.To identify further targets, we investigated the whole transcriptome of a PCFS4 mutant using Affymetrix Arabidopsis genomic tiling 1.0R array and developed a data analysis pipeline, termed RADPRE (Ratio-based Analysis of Differential mRNA Processing and Expression. In RADPRE, ratios of normalized probe intensities between wild type Columbia and a pcfs4 mutant were first generated. By doing so, one of the major problems of tiling array data--variations caused by differential probe affinity--was significantly alleviated. With the probe ratios as inputs, a hierarchy of statistical tests was carried out to identify differentially processed genes (DPG and differentially expressed genes (DEG. The false discovery rate (FDR of this analysis was estimated by using the balanced random combinations of Col/pcfs4 and pcfs4/Col ratios as inputs. Gene Ontology (GO analysis of the DPGs and DEGs revealed potential new roles of PCFS4 in stress responses besides flowering time regulation.We identified 68 DPGs and 114 DEGs with FDR at 1% and 2%, respectively. Most of the 68 DPGs were subjected to alternative polyadenylation, splicing or transcription initiation. Quantitative PCR analysis of a set of DPGs confirmed that most of these genes were truly differentially processed in pcfs4 mutant plants. The enriched GO term "regulation of flower development" among PCFS4 targets further indicated the efficacy of the RADPRE pipeline. This simple but effective program is

  12. Optimized design and assessment of whole genome tiling arrays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graf, S.; Nielsen, F.G.G.; Kurtz, S.; Huynen, M.A.; Birney, E.; Stunnenberg, H.G.; Flicek, P.

    2007-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Recent advances in microarray technologies have made it feasible to interrogate whole genomes with tiling arrays and this technique is rapidly becoming one of the most important high-throughput functional genomics assays. For large mammalian genomes, analyzing oligonucleotide tiling

  13. High-density multicore fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takenaga, K.; Matsuo, S.; Saitoh, K.

    2016-01-01

    High-density single-mode multicore fibers were designed and fabricated. A heterogeneous 30-core fiber realized a low crosstalk of −55 dB. A quasi-single-mode homogeneous 31-core fiber attained the highest core count as a single-mode multicore fiber.......High-density single-mode multicore fibers were designed and fabricated. A heterogeneous 30-core fiber realized a low crosstalk of −55 dB. A quasi-single-mode homogeneous 31-core fiber attained the highest core count as a single-mode multicore fiber....

  14. An efficient pseudomedian filter for tiling microrrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerstein Mark B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tiling microarrays are becoming an essential technology in the functional genomics toolbox. They have been applied to the tasks of novel transcript identification, elucidation of transcription factor binding sites, detection of methylated DNA and several other applications in several model organisms. These experiments are being conducted at increasingly finer resolutions as the microarray technology enjoys increasingly greater feature densities. The increased densities naturally lead to increased data analysis requirements. Specifically, the most widely employed algorithm for tiling array analysis involves smoothing observed signals by computing pseudomedians within sliding windows, a O(n2logn calculation in each window. This poor time complexity is an issue for tiling array analysis and could prove to be a real bottleneck as tiling microarray experiments become grander in scope and finer in resolution. Results We therefore implemented Monahan's HLQEST algorithm that reduces the runtime complexity for computing the pseudomedian of n numbers to O(nlogn from O(n2logn. For a representative tiling microarray dataset, this modification reduced the smoothing procedure's runtime by nearly 90%. We then leveraged the fact that elements within sliding windows remain largely unchanged in overlapping windows (as one slides across genomic space to further reduce computation by an additional 43%. This was achieved by the application of skip lists to maintaining a sorted list of values from window to window. This sorted list could be maintained with simple O(log n inserts and deletes. We illustrate the favorable scaling properties of our algorithms with both time complexity analysis and benchmarking on synthetic datasets. Conclusion Tiling microarray analyses that rely upon a sliding window pseudomedian calculation can require many hours of computation. We have eased this requirement significantly by implementing efficient algorithms that

  15. An efficient pseudomedian filter for tiling microrrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce, Thomas E; Carriero, Nicholas J; Gerstein, Mark B

    2007-06-07

    Tiling microarrays are becoming an essential technology in the functional genomics toolbox. They have been applied to the tasks of novel transcript identification, elucidation of transcription factor binding sites, detection of methylated DNA and several other applications in several model organisms. These experiments are being conducted at increasingly finer resolutions as the microarray technology enjoys increasingly greater feature densities. The increased densities naturally lead to increased data analysis requirements. Specifically, the most widely employed algorithm for tiling array analysis involves smoothing observed signals by computing pseudomedians within sliding windows, a O(n2logn) calculation in each window. This poor time complexity is an issue for tiling array analysis and could prove to be a real bottleneck as tiling microarray experiments become grander in scope and finer in resolution. We therefore implemented Monahan's HLQEST algorithm that reduces the runtime complexity for computing the pseudomedian of n numbers to O(nlogn) from O(n2logn). For a representative tiling microarray dataset, this modification reduced the smoothing procedure's runtime by nearly 90%. We then leveraged the fact that elements within sliding windows remain largely unchanged in overlapping windows (as one slides across genomic space) to further reduce computation by an additional 43%. This was achieved by the application of skip lists to maintaining a sorted list of values from window to window. This sorted list could be maintained with simple O(log n) inserts and deletes. We illustrate the favorable scaling properties of our algorithms with both time complexity analysis and benchmarking on synthetic datasets. Tiling microarray analyses that rely upon a sliding window pseudomedian calculation can require many hours of computation. We have eased this requirement significantly by implementing efficient algorithms that scale well with genomic feature density. This result

  16. Handmade Tile Mosaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Rusty

    2007-01-01

    Just like the classroom, children's outdoor environments should be filled with artistic creations that add sparkle and imagination to the space. One of the author's favorite ways to add art to the outdoors is by installing a mosaic mural of child-made tiles. The process of making the tiles is fun for all; each tile is a charming work of art in…

  17. The ATLAS tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Louis Rose-Dulcina, a technician from the ATLAS collaboration, works on the ATLAS tile calorimeter. Special manufacturing techniques were developed to mass produce the thousands of elements in this detector. Tile detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  18. Tilings and Coverings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurer, Walter; Deloudi, Sofia

    Tilings fill space without gaps and overlaps, they can be periodic, quasiperiodic or nonperiodic. If decorated with atoms or larger atomic arrangements, tilings can serve as models for quasiperiodic structures. One-, two-, and three-dimensional examples will be discussed in detail. Beside substitutional sequences such as the Fibonacci and Octonacci sequences, also sequences with almost continuous and singular continuous spectra will be discussed. The tilings underlying really existing quasicrystals with 5-, 8-, 10-, 12-, and 14-fold symmetry or their approximants are treated in detail. Finally, the three-dimensional Penrose tiling is dealt with as example for the quasilattice of icosahedral quasicrystals. Furthermore, coverings will be discussed, which are important for understanding the geometry of cluster structures. Contrary to packings and tilings, coverings fill the space without gaps but with partial overlaps. There is always a one-to-one correspondence between coverings and tilings.

  19. Rewaterproofing Silica Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleger, L. J.; Wade, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Waterproofing agent, vaporized in bubbler transported by gas flowing in system and deposits in pores of tiles. Vapor carried through hole of approximately 1/16 inch (1.6.mm) diameter made in tile coating. Technique used to waterproof buildups (concrete and brick) and possibly fabrics.

  20. Archimedean Voronoi spiral tilings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yoshikazu; Sushida, Takamichi

    2018-01-01

    We study the transition of the number of spirals (called parastichy in the theory of phyllotaxis) within a Voronoi tiling for Archimedean spiral lattices. The transition of local parastichy numbers within a tiling is regarded as a transition at the base site point in a continuous family of tilings. This gives a natural description of the quasiperiodic structure of the grain boundaries. It is proved that the number of tiles in the grain boundaries are denominators of rational approximations of the argument (called the divergence angle) of the generator. The local parastichy numbers are non-decreasing functions of the plastochron parameter. The bifurcation diagram of local parastichy numbers has a Farey tree structure. We also prove Richards’ formula of spiral phyllotaxis in the case of Archimedean Voronoi spiral tilings, and show that, if the divergence angle is a quadratic irrational number, then the shapes of tiles in the grain boundaries are close to rectangles. If the divergence angle is linearly equivalent to the golden section, then the shape of tiles in the grain boundaries is close to square.

  1. Carbohydrate microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sungjin; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Blixt, Klas Ola

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, carbohydrate microarrays have been core technologies for analyzing carbohydrate-mediated recognition events in a high-throughput fashion. A number of methods have been exploited for immobilizing glycans on the solid surface in a microarray format. This microarray-based technol......In the last decade, carbohydrate microarrays have been core technologies for analyzing carbohydrate-mediated recognition events in a high-throughput fashion. A number of methods have been exploited for immobilizing glycans on the solid surface in a microarray format. This microarray......-based technology has been widely employed for rapid analysis of the glycan binding properties of lectins and antibodies, the quantitative measurements of glycan-protein interactions, detection of cells and pathogens, identification of disease-related anti-glycan antibodies for diagnosis, and fast assessment...

  2. High Density Fuel Development for Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Wachs; Dennis Keiser; Mitchell Meyer; Douglas Burkes; Curtis Clark; Glenn Moore; Jan-Fong Jue; Totju Totev; Gerard Hofman; Tom Wiencek; Yeon So Kim; Jim Snelgrove

    2007-09-01

    An international effort to develop, qualify, and license high and very high density fuels has been underway for several years within the framework of multi-national RERTR programs. The current development status is the result of significant contributions from many laboratories, specifically CNEA in Argentina, AECL in Canada, CEA in France, TUM in Germany, KAERI in Korea, VNIIM, RDIPE, IPPE, NCCP and RIARR in Russia, INL, ANL and Y-12 in USA. These programs are mainly engaged with UMo dispersion fuels with densities from 6 to 8 gU/cm3 (high density fuel) and UMo monolithic fuel with density as high as 16 gU/cm3 (very high density fuel). This paper, mainly focused on the French & US programs, gives the status of high density UMo fuel development and perspectives on their qualification.

  3. Carbohydrate microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungjin; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Blixt, Ola; Shin, Injae

    2013-05-21

    In the last decade, carbohydrate microarrays have been core technologies for analyzing carbohydrate-mediated recognition events in a high-throughput fashion. A number of methods have been exploited for immobilizing glycans on the solid surface in a microarray format. This microarray-based technology has been widely employed for rapid analysis of the glycan binding properties of lectins and antibodies, the quantitative measurements of glycan-protein interactions, detection of cells and pathogens, identification of disease-related anti-glycan antibodies for diagnosis, and fast assessment of substrate specificities of glycosyltransferases. This review covers the construction of carbohydrate microarrays, detection methods of carbohydrate microarrays and their applications in biological and biomedical research.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of exosome-compromised human cells using high-density tiling arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Heick

    The extent of RNA degradation in the nucleus has traditionally been underestimated. However, all major RNA species are synthesized, processed and can be degraded in this compartment and consequently an enormous amount of nucleosides are turned over and recycled. The RNA exosome, a multisubunit......-mediated knock down. We have initiated a transcriptome analysis to investigate the global influence of the nuclear exosome on the abundance  of various RNAs (e.g. normal mRNAs, intergenic transcripts, miRNAs, endogenous retroviral RNAs and small non-coding RNAs). We use an ENCODE (ENCyclopedia of DNA Elements...

  5. Extended DNA Tile Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Martin; Kryger, Mille; Zhang, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic linear DNA tile actuator is expanded to three new structures of higher complexity. The original DNA actuator was constructed from a central roller strand which hybridizes with two piston strands by forming two half-crossover junctions. A linear expansion of the actuator is obtained...

  6. Experimental annotation of the human pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum transcribed regions using high-resolution tiling arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sil Anita

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum is thought to be the most common cause of fungal respiratory infections in immunocompetent humans, yet little is known about its biology. Here we provide the first genome-wide studies to experimentally validate its genome annotation. A functional interrogation of the Histoplasma genome provides critical support for continued investigation into the biology and pathogenesis of H. capsulatum and related fungi. Results We employed a three-pronged approach to provide a functional annotation for the H. capsulatum G217B strain. First, we probed high-density tiling arrays with labeled cDNAs from cells grown under diverse conditions. These data defined 6,172 transcriptionally active regions (TARs, providing validation of 6,008 gene predictions. Interestingly, 22% of these predictions showed evidence of anti-sense transcription. Additionally, we detected transcription of 264 novel genes not present in the original gene predictions. To further enrich our analysis, we incorporated expression data from whole-genome oligonucleotide microarrays. These expression data included profiling under growth conditions that were not represented in the tiling experiment, and validated an additional 2,249 gene predictions. Finally, we compared the G217B gene predictions to other available fungal genomes, and observed that an additional 254 gene predictions had an ortholog in a different fungal species, suggesting that they represent genuine coding sequences. Conclusions These analyses yielded a high confidence set of validated gene predictions for H. capsulatum. The transcript sets resulting from this study are a valuable resource for further experimental characterization of this ubiquitous fungal pathogen. The data is available for interactive exploration at http://histo.ucsf.edu.

  7. Experimental annotation of the human pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum transcribed regions using high-resolution tiling arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Mark; Foo, Catherine K; Sil, Anita

    2011-09-29

    The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum is thought to be the most common cause of fungal respiratory infections in immunocompetent humans, yet little is known about its biology. Here we provide the first genome-wide studies to experimentally validate its genome annotation. A functional interrogation of the Histoplasma genome provides critical support for continued investigation into the biology and pathogenesis of H. capsulatum and related fungi. We employed a three-pronged approach to provide a functional annotation for the H. capsulatum G217B strain. First, we probed high-density tiling arrays with labeled cDNAs from cells grown under diverse conditions. These data defined 6,172 transcriptionally active regions (TARs), providing validation of 6,008 gene predictions. Interestingly, 22% of these predictions showed evidence of anti-sense transcription. Additionally, we detected transcription of 264 novel genes not present in the original gene predictions. To further enrich our analysis, we incorporated expression data from whole-genome oligonucleotide microarrays. These expression data included profiling under growth conditions that were not represented in the tiling experiment, and validated an additional 2,249 gene predictions. Finally, we compared the G217B gene predictions to other available fungal genomes, and observed that an additional 254 gene predictions had an ortholog in a different fungal species, suggesting that they represent genuine coding sequences. These analyses yielded a high confidence set of validated gene predictions for H. capsulatum. The transcript sets resulting from this study are a valuable resource for further experimental characterization of this ubiquitous fungal pathogen. The data is available for interactive exploration at http://histo.ucsf.edu.

  8. Irradiation test of high density Si material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Lee, Chul Yong; Yang, Seong Woo; Shim, Kyue Taek; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The feasibility of irradiation test for the high-density Si material entrusted by Guju Inc. was reviewed. The high density Si material is used for a sealing of the penetration holes of piping at the nuclear power plants. The irradiation test was performed and the density changes between before and after irradiation test were measured. The irradiation tests were performed 2 times for 1 day and 20 days at IP 4 hole of HANARO. The 3 Si specimens irradiated were without flaws and the density changes after irradiation were successfully measured. The result satisfies the requirement of the design specification.

  9. Magnetization of High Density Hadronic Fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Providencia, Constanca; da Providencia, João

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper the magnetization of a high density relativistic fluid of elementary particles is studied. At very high densities, such as may be found in the interior of a neutron star, when the external magnetic field is gradually increased, the energy of the normal phase of the fluid...... of the magnetization is derived by first considering and solving the Dirac equation of a fermion in interaction with a magnetic field and with a chiral sigma-pion pair. The solution provides the energies of single-particle states. The energy of the system is found by summing up contributions from all particles...

  10. Efficient oligonucleotide probe selection for pan-genomic tiling arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array comparative genomic hybridization is a fast and cost-effective method for detecting, genotyping, and comparing the genomic sequence of unknown bacterial isolates. This method, as with all microarray applications, requires adequate coverage of probes targeting the regions of interest. An unbiased tiling of probes across the entire length of the genome is the most flexible design approach. However, such a whole-genome tiling requires that the genome sequence is known in advance. For the accurate analysis of uncharacterized bacteria, an array must query a fully representative set of sequences from the species' pan-genome. Prior microarrays have included only a single strain per array or the conserved sequences of gene families. These arrays omit potentially important genes and sequence variants from the pan-genome. Results This paper presents a new probe selection algorithm (PanArray that can tile multiple whole genomes using a minimal number of probes. Unlike arrays built on clustered gene families, PanArray uses an unbiased, probe-centric approach that does not rely on annotations, gene clustering, or multi-alignments. Instead, probes are evenly tiled across all sequences of the pan-genome at a consistent level of coverage. To minimize the required number of probes, probes conserved across multiple strains in the pan-genome are selected first, and additional probes are used only where necessary to span polymorphic regions of the genome. The viability of the algorithm is demonstrated by array designs for seven different bacterial pan-genomes and, in particular, the design of a 385,000 probe array that fully tiles the genomes of 20 different Listeria monocytogenes strains with overlapping probes at greater than twofold coverage. Conclusion PanArray is an oligonucleotide probe selection algorithm for tiling multiple genome sequences using a minimal number of probes. It is capable of fully tiling all genomes of a species on

  11. TileCal ROD Hardware and Software Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Castelo, J; Cuenca, C; Ferrer, A; Fullana, E; Higón, E; Iglesias, C; Munar, A; Poveda, J; Ruiz-Martínez, A; Salvachúa, B; Solans, C; Valls, J A

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present the specific hardware and firmware requirements and modifications to operate the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LiArg) ROD motherboard in the Hadronic Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) environment. Although the use of the board is similar for both calorimeters there are still some differences in the operation of the front-end associated to both detectors which make the use of the same board incompatible. We review the evolution of the design of the ROD from the early prototype stages (ROD based on commercial and Demonstrator boards) to the production phases (ROD final board based on the LiArg design), with emphasis on the different operation modes for the TileCal detector. We start with a short review of the TileCal ROD system functionality and then we detail the different ROD hardware requirements for options, the baseline (ROD Demo board) and the final (ROD final high density board). We also summarize the performance parameters of the ROD motherboard based on the final high density option and s...

  12. Spin polarization in high density quark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Panda, Prafulla K.; Providênci, Constanca

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of a ferromagnetic phase transition in high density hadronic matter (e.g., in the interior of a neutron star). This could be induced by a four-fermion interaction analogous to the one which is responsible for chiral symmetry breaking in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, ...

  13. Supernovae and high density nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahana, S.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) in producing prompt supernova explosions is examined. Results of calculations of Baron, Cooperstein, and Kahana incorporating general relativity and a new high density EOS are presented, and the relevance of these calculations to laboratory experiments with heavy ions considered. 31 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. High Density GEOSAT/GM Altimeter Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The high density Geosat/GM altimeter data south of 30 S have finally arrived. In addition, ERS-1 has completed more than 6 cycles of its 35-day repeat track. These...

  15. Self Cleanable Tile Grout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet CANBAZ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, In this study, self-cleaning tile grout and white cement specimens are produced and the effect of self-cleaning mechanism of TiO2 is tested. Effects of TiO2 amount and TiO2 type are tested and compared. Anatase form and rutile TiO2 additive are used in the study. In addition, effects of silicate additives on the self-cleaning mechanism is determined. Studies are conducted with respect to Italian UNI code. This study presents a method for solving rust between the tiles of ceramic wet floor coverings with photocatalysis method and then removing the dirt with secondary effects such as water, wind etc.

  16. The high density Z-pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCall, G.H.

    1988-01-01

    During the past few years techniques have been developed for producing pinches in solid deuterium. The conditions which exist in these plasmas are quiet different from those produced earlier. The pinch is formed from a fiber of solid deuterium rather than from a low density gas, and the current is driven by a low impedance, high voltage pulse generator. Because of the high initial density, it is not necessary to compress the pinch to reach thermonuclear conditions, and the confinement time required for energy production is much shorter than for a gas. The experimental results, which have been verified by experiments performed at higher current were quite surprising and encouraging. The pinch appeared to be stable for a time much longer than the Alfven radial transit time. In this paper, however, I argue that the pinch is not strictly stable, but it does not appear to disassemble in a catastrophic fashion. It appears that there may be a distinction between stability and confinement in the high density pinch. In the discussion below I will present the status of the high density Z-pinch experiments at laboratories around the world, and I will describe some of the calculational and experimental results. I will confine my remarks to recent work on the high density pinch. 17 refs. 10 figs.

  17. Tile-in-ONE

    CERN Document Server

    Cunha, R; The ATLAS collaboration; Sivolella, A; Ferreira, F; Maidantchik, C

    2013-01-01

    The Tile calorimeter is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS. In order to ensure its proper operation and assess the quality of data, many tasks are to be performed by means of many tools which were developed independently to satisfy different needs. Thus, these systems are commonly implemented without a global perspective of the detector and lack basic software features. Besides, in some cases they overlap in the objectives and resources with another one. It is therefore evident the necessity of an infrastructure to allow the implementation of any functionality without having to duplicate the effort while being possible to integrate with an overall view of the detector status.\

  18. High density scintillating glass proton imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, C. J.; Goranson, K.; Turney, A.; Xie, Q.; Tillman, I. J.; Thune, Z. L.; Dong, A.; Pritchett, D.; McInally, W.; Potter, A.; Wang, D.; Akgun, U.

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, proton therapy has achieved remarkable precision in delivering doses to cancerous cells while avoiding healthy tissue. However, in order to utilize this high precision treatment, greater accuracy in patient positioning is needed. An accepted approximate uncertainty of +/-3% exists in the current practice of proton therapy due to conversions between x-ray and proton stopping power. The use of protons in imaging would eliminate this source of error and lessen the radiation exposure of the patient. To this end, this study focuses on developing a novel proton-imaging detector built with high-density glass scintillator. The model described herein contains a compact homogeneous proton calorimeter composed of scintillating, high density glass as the active medium. The unique geometry of this detector allows for the measurement of both the position and residual energy of protons, eliminating the need for a separate set of position trackers in the system. Average position and energy of a pencil beam of 106 protons is used to reconstruct the image rather than by analyzing individual proton data. Simplicity and efficiency were major objectives in this model in order to present an imaging technique that is compact, cost-effective, and precise, as well as practical for a clinical setting with pencil-beam scanning proton therapy equipment. In this work, the development of novel high-density glass scintillator and the unique conceptual design of the imager are discussed; a proof-of-principle Monte Carlo simulation study is performed; preliminary two-dimensional images reconstructed from the Geant4 simulation are presented.

  19. High density circuit technology, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, T. E.

    The metal (or dielectric) lift-off processes used in the semiconductor industry to fabricate high density very large scale integration (VLSI) systems were reviewed. The lift-off process consists of depositing the light-sensitive material onto the wafer and patterning first in such a manner as to form a stencil for the interconnection material. Then the interconnection layer is deposited and unwanted areas are lifted off by removing the underlying stencil. Several of these lift-off techniques were examined experimentally. The use of an auxiliary layer of polyimide to form a lift-off stencil offers considerable promise.

  20. High density transcriptional mapping of chromosome 21 by hybridization selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassone, F.; Wade, H.; Gardiner, K. [Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A transcriptional map of human chromosome 21 is important for the study of Down syndrome, development processes and genome organization. To construct a high density transcriptional map, the technique of cDNA hybrid selection is being applied to a minimal tiling path of YAC clones that span 21q. The cDNA used for selection represents a complex pool of sequences obtained from a variety of fetal and adult tissues and cell lines. Approximately 70-80 YAC clones are sufficient to span 21q; each is individually processed through the selection procedure to obtain a YAC-specific {open_quotes}selected cDNA library{close_quotes}. Survey analysis of each library includes determination of levels of ribosomal contamination, verification of enrichment of control genes, identification of a preliminary number of novel unique sequences, and verification that novel sequences map to the correct YAC and chromosomal regions. This analysis has been completed for 19 YACs that together comprise approximately 10 Mb of non-overlapping DNA, 25% of the long arm. Ribosomal cDNA contamination is low (<10%) and all known genes of appropriate tissue specificity of expression have been recovered, as well as new genes from each YAC. Libraries of expression have been recovered, as well as new genes from each YAC. Libraries from 8 of these YACs are now being subjected to exhaustive analysis to identify all novel genes contained within them and to obtain complete cDNAs and expression analysis for each. Not all regions of the chromosome, however, are equally amenable to these analyses. Selected cDNA libraries from the centromeric YACs are yielding apparently novel genes, but confirmation of map position is problematic. Also of interest is a region of several megabases within the Giemsa dark band, 21q21. Selected cDNA libraries from these YACs so far have yielded no novel genes and support the idea of a genuinely very gene-poor region.

  1. Some novel phenomena at high density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Evan Scott

    Astrophysical environments probe matter in ways impossible on Earth. In particular, matter in compact objects are extraordinarily dense. In this thesis we discuss two phenomena that may occur at high density. First, we study toroidal topological solitons called vortons, which can occur in the kaon-condensed color-flavor-locked phase of high-density quark matter, a candidate phase for the core of some neutron stars. We show that vortons have a large radius compared to their thickness if their electrical charge is on the order of 104 times the fundamental charge. We show that shielding of electric fields by electrons dramatically reduces the size of a vorton. Second, we study an unusual phase of degenerate electrons and nonrelativistic Bose-condensed helium nuclei that may exist in helium white dwarfs. We show that this phase supports a previously-unknown gapless mode, known as the half-sound, that radically alters the material's specific heat, and can annihilate into neutrinos. We provide evidence that this neutrino radiation is negligible compared to the star's surface photoemission.

  2. Models for Experimental High Density Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradecki, Tomasz; Swoboda, Julia; Nowak, Katarzyna; Dziechciarz, Klaudia

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the effects of research on models of high density housing. The authors present urban projects for experimental high density housing estates. The design was based on research performed on 38 examples of similar housing in Poland that have been built after 2003. Some of the case studies show extreme density and that inspired the researchers to test individual virtual solutions that would answer the question: How far can we push the limits? The experimental housing projects show strengths and weaknesses of design driven only by such indexes as FAR (floor attenuation ratio - housing density) and DPH (dwellings per hectare). Although such projects are implemented, the authors believe that there are reasons for limits since high index values may be in contradiction to the optimum character of housing environment. Virtual models on virtual plots presented by the authors were oriented toward maximising the DPH index and DAI (dwellings area index) which is very often the main driver for developers. The authors also raise the question of sustainability of such solutions. The research was carried out in the URBAN model research group (Gliwice, Poland) that consists of academic researchers and architecture students. The models reflect architectural and urban regulations that are valid in Poland. Conclusions might be helpful for urban planners, urban designers, developers, architects and architecture students.

  3. High density lipoproteins, 1978 -- an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R I

    1978-12-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) have come of age. For years it has been fashionable to study HDL as an approach to understanding lipoprotein structure and lipid binding. Available in abundant amounts from normal human plasma, readily separable into its individual lipid and soluble apolipoprotein components, HDL has provided much information for lipoprotein model building. Suddenly it has been thrust center stage clinically by a host of convincing epidemiologic studies that clearly establishes an inverse relationship between HDL levels and coronary vascular events. Biochemists, clinicians, cardiologists and epidemiologists are simultaneously focusing attention on HDL. Familial High Density Lipoprotein Deficiency (Tangier Disease) has been well described but is poorly understood as a clinical syndrome complex. We have suddenly become aware of how little we understand about HDL's normal ultracentrifugal and apoprotein heterogeneity, about its functional role(s) or the determinant(s) of its concentration in plasma. The relative contributions of the two sites of HDL origin, the liver and intestine, are yet to be determined as are the site(s) of degradation. Awareness of a problem and its importance is the first step toward the solution(s) of the problem.

  4. Microarray blob-defect removal improves array analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun S; Maghsoudi, Kaveh; Li, Wei; Fox, Edward; Quackenbush, John; Shirley Liu, X

    2007-04-15

    New generation Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays often have blob-like image defects that will require investigators to either repeat their hybridization assays or analyze their data with the defects left in place. We investigated the effect of analyzing a spike-in experiment on Affymetrix ENCODE tiling arrays in the presence of simulated blobs covering between 1 and 9% of the array area. Using two different ChIP-chip tiling array analysis programs (Affymetrix tiling array software, TAS, and model-based analysis of tiling arrays, MAT), we found that even the smallest blob defects significantly decreased the sensitivity and increased the false discovery rate (FDR) of the spike-in target prediction. We introduced a new software tool, the microarray blob remover (MBR), which allows rapid visualization, detection and removal of various blob defects from the .CEL files of different types of Affymetrix microarrays. It is shown that using MBR significantly improves the sensitivity and FDR of a tiling array analysis compared to leaving the affected probes in the analysis. The MBR software and the sample array .CEL files used in this article are available at: http://liulab.dfci.harvard.edu/Software/MBR/MBR.htm

  5. Transcriptional landscape estimation from tiling array data using a model of signal shift and drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard; Nicolas, P

    2009-01-01

    MOTIVATION: High-density oligonucleotide tiling array technology holds the promise of a better description of the complexity and the dynamics of transcriptional landscapes. In organisms such as bacteria and yeasts, transcription can be measured on a genome-wide scale with a resolution >25 bp...

  6. A High Density ECRH Plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M.; Rosenthal, G.; Kidd, P.; Wuerker, R.; Wong, A. Y.; Siciliano, E. R.

    1996-11-01

    An ECRH plasma source has been constructed within a 10 kG solenoid, using a 10 kW (max) of CW 10.6 GHz klystron amplifier. Vacuum base pressures are on the order of 10-7 torr. One kW of CW ECRH microwave power is sufficient to create a high density (10^12 cm-3) fully ionized pure calcium metal plasma, the maximum theoretically possible at 10.6 GHz. The electron temperature is around 10 eV. Neutral Ca is evaporated through the ECRH resonance zone from a thermal oven. Only ions (not neutrals) trapped by the field enter the main chamber, resulting in a fully ionized plasma. The source is useful for generating fully ionized pure plasmas from low melting point materinals. Work Supported by NSF PHY-94-21693

  7. High Density Methane Storage in Nanoporous Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Soo, Yuchoong; Maland, Brett; Doynov, Plamen; Lin, Yuyi; Pfeifer, Peter; Mriglobal Collaboration; All-Craft Team

    2014-03-01

    Development of low-pressure, high-capacity adsorbent based storage technology for natural gas (NG) as fuel for advanced transportation (flat-panel tank for NG vehicles) is necessary in order to address the temperature, pressure, weight, and volume constraints present in conventional storage methods (CNG & LNG.) Subcritical nitrogen adsorption experiments show that our nanoporous carbon hosts extended narrow channels which generate a high surface area and strong Van der Waals forces capable of increasing the density of NG into a high-density fluid. This improvement in storage density over compressed natural gas without an adsorbent occurs at ambient temperature and pressures ranging from 0-260 bar (3600 psi.) The temperature, pressure, and storage capacity of a 40 L flat-panel adsorbed NG tank filled with 20 kg of nanoporous carbon will be featured.

  8. Nanotechnology for Synthetic High Density Lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthi, Andrea J.; Patel, Pinal C.; Ko, Caroline H.; Mutharasan, R. Kannan; Mirkin, Chad A.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the disease mechanism responsible for coronary heart disease (CHD), the leading cause of death worldwide. One strategy to combat atherosclerosis is to increase the amount of circulating high density lipoproteins (HDL), which transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The process, known as reverse cholesterol transport, is thought to be one of the main reasons for the significant inverse correlation observed between HDL blood levels and the development of CHD. This article highlights the most common strategies for treating atherosclerosis using HDL. We further detail potential treatment opportunities that utilize nanotechnology to increase the amount of HDL in circulation. The synthesis of biomimetic HDL nanostructures that replicate the chemical and physical properties of natural HDL provides novel materials for investigating the structure-function relationships of HDL and for potential new therapeutics to combat CHD. PMID:21087901

  9. Combinatorial aspects of Escher tilings

    OpenAIRE

    Massé, Alexandre Blondin; Brlek, Srecko; Labbé, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In the late 30's, Maurits Cornelis Escher astonished the artistic world by producing some puzzling drawings. In particular, the tesselations of the plane obtained by using a single tile appear to be a major concern in his work, drawing attention from the mathematical community. Since a tile in the continuous world can be approximated by a path on a sufficiently small square grid - a widely used method in applications using computer displays - the natural combinatorial ...

  10. HIGH DENSITY QCD WITH HEAVY-IONS

    CERN Multimedia

    The Addendum 1 to Volume 2 of the CMS Physics TDR has been published The Heavy-Ion analysis group completed the writing of a TDR summarizing the CMS plans in using heavy ion collisions to study high density QCD. The document was submitted to the LHCC in March and presented in the Open Session of the LHCC on May 9th. The study of heavy-ion physics at the LHC is promising to be very exciting. LHC will open a new energy frontier in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The collision energy of heavy nuclei at sNN = 5.5 TeV will be thirty times larger than what is presently available at RHIC. We will certainly probe quark and gluon matter at unprecedented values of energy density. The prime goal of this research programme is to study the fundamental theory of the strong interaction - Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) - in extreme conditions of temperature, density and parton momentum fraction (low-x). Such studies, with impressive experimental and theoretical advances in recent years thanks to the wealth of high-qua...

  11. Dark High Density Dipolar Liquid of Excitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Kobi; Shilo, Yehiel; West, Ken; Pfeiffer, Loren; Rapaport, Ronen

    2016-06-08

    The possible phases and the nanoscale particle correlations of two-dimensional interacting dipolar particles is a long-sought problem in many-body physics. Here we observe a spontaneous condensation of trapped two-dimensional dipolar excitons with internal spin degrees of freedom from an interacting gas into a high density, closely packed liquid state made mostly of dark dipoles. Another phase transition, into a bright, highly repulsive plasma, is observed at even higher excitation powers. The dark liquid state is formed below a critical temperature Tc ≈ 4.8 K, and it is manifested by a clear spontaneous spatial condensation to a smaller and denser cloud, suggesting an attractive part to the interaction which goes beyond the purely repulsive dipole-dipole forces. Contributions from quantum mechanical fluctuations are expected to be significant in this strongly correlated, long living dark liquid. This is a new example of a two-dimensional atomic-like interacting dipolar liquid, but where the coupling of light to its internal spin degrees of freedom plays a crucial role in the dynamical formation and the nature of resulting condensed dark ground state.

  12. High-density electroencephalography developmental neurophysiological trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Bernard; Pelc, Karine; Cebolla, Ana M; Cheron, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Efforts to document early changes in the developing brain have resulted in the construction of increasingly accurate structural images based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in newborn infants. Tractography diagrams obtained through diffusion tensor imaging have focused on white matter microstructure, with particular emphasis on neuronal connectivity at the level of fibre tract systems. Electroencephalography (EEG) provides a complementary approach with more direct access to brain electrical activity. Its temporal resolution is excellent, and its spatial resolution can be enhanced to physiologically relevant levels, through the combination of high-density recordings (e.g. by using 64 channels in newborn infants) and mathematical models (e.g. inverse modelling computation), to identify generators of different oscillation bands and synchrony patterns. The integration of functional and structural topography of the neonatal brain provides insights into typical brain organization, and the deviations seen in particular contexts, for example the effect of hypoxic-ischaemic insult in terms of damage, eventual reorganization, and functional changes. Endophenotypes can then be used for pathophysiological reasoning, management planning, and outcome measurements, and allow a longitudinal approach to individual developmental trajectories. © The Authors. Journal compilation © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  13. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol: How High

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Rajagopal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C is considered anti-atherogenic good cholesterol. It is involved in reverse transport of lipids. Epidemiological studies have found inverse relationship of HDL-C and coronary heart disease (CHD risk. When grouped according to HDL-C, subjects having HDL-C more than 60 mg/dL had lesser risk of CHD than those having HDL-C of 40-60 mg/dL, who in turn had lesser risk than those who had HDL-C less than 40 mg/dL. No upper limit for beneficial effect of HDL-C on CHD risk has been identified. The goals of treating patients with low HDL-C have not been firmly established. Though many drugs are known to improve HDL-C concentration, statins are proven to improve CHD risk and mortality. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP is involved in metabolism of HDL-C and its inhibitors are actively being screened for clinical utility. However, final answer is still awaited on CETP-inhibitors.

  14. Quality control in tile production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalviainen, Heikki A.; Kukkonen, Saku; Hyvarinen, Timo S.; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1998-10-01

    This work studies visual quality control in ceramics industry. In tile manufacturing, it is important that in each set of tiles, every single tile looks similar. For example, the tiles should have similar color and texture. Our goal is to design a machine vision system that can estimate the sufficient similarity or same appearance to the human eye. Currently, the estimation is usually done by human vision. Differing from other approaches our aim is to use accurate spectral representation of color, and we are comparing spectral features to the RGB color features. A laboratory system for color measurement is built. Experimentations with five classes of brown tiles are presented. We use chromaticity RGB features and several spectral features for classification with the k-NN classifier and with a neural network, called Self-Organizing Map. We can classify many of the tiles but there are several problems that need further investigations: larger training and test sets are needed, illuminations effects must be studied further, and more suitable spectral features are needed with more sophisticated classifiers. It is also interesting to develop further the neural approach.

  15. DNA Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  16. Correlation test to assess low-level processing of high-density oligonucleotide microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergh Jonas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently a number of competing techniques for low-level processing of oligonucleotide array data. The choice of technique has a profound effect on subsequent statistical analyses, but there is no method to assess whether a particular technique is appropriate for a specific data set, without reference to external data. Results We analyzed coregulation between genes in order to detect insufficient normalization between arrays, where coregulation is measured in terms of statistical correlation. In a large collection of genes, a random pair of genes should have on average zero correlation, hence allowing a correlation test. For all data sets that we evaluated, and the three most commonly used low-level processing procedures including MAS5, RMA and MBEI, the housekeeping-gene normalization failed the test. For a real clinical data set, RMA and MBEI showed significant correlation for absent genes. We also found that a second round of normalization on the probe set level improved normalization significantly throughout. Conclusion Previous evaluation of low-level processing in the literature has been limited to artificial spike-in and mixture data sets. In the absence of a known gold-standard, the correlation criterion allows us to assess the appropriateness of low-level processing of a specific data set and the success of normalization for subsets of genes.

  17. Fabrication of Homogeneous High-Density Antibody Microarrays for Cytokine Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeborg Hospach

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytokine proteins are known as biomarker molecules, characteristic of a disease or specific body condition. Monitoring of the cytokine pattern in body fluids can contribute to the diagnosis of diseases. Here we report on the development of an array comprised of different anti-cytokine antibodies on an activated solid support coupled with a fluorescence readout mechanism. Optimization of the array preparation was done in regard of spot homogeneity and spot size. The proinflammatory cytokines Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα and Interleukin 6 (IL-6 were chosen as the first targets of interest. First, the solid support for covalent antibody immobilization and an adequate fluorescent label were selected. Three differently functionalized glass substrates for spotting were compared: amine and epoxy, both having a two-dimensional structure, and the NHS functionalized hydrogel (NHS-3D. The NHS-hydrogel functionalization of the substrate was best suited to antibody immobilization. Then, the optimization of plotting parameters and geometry as well as buffer media were investigated, considering the ambient analyte theory of Roger Ekins. As a first step towards real sample studies, a proof of principle of cytokine detection has been established.

  18. Testing and Validation of High Density Resequencing Microarray for Broad Range Biothreat Agents Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-11

    parvum TU502 Nucleic acid NRL Bacillus anthracis Ames Nucleic acid AFIP Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 Live cells ATCC Bartonella quintana ATCC 51694 Live...Wheeler K, Park C, Kim D, et al. (2005) Rapid genotypic detection of Bacillus anthracis and the Bacillus cereus group by multiplex real- time PCR...assay enables detection and differential identification of 84 types of pathogens and 13 toxin genes, including most of the class A, B and C select agents

  19. Aptamer Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrett, Heather Angel; Collett, James R.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    In vitro selection can yield specific, high-affinity aptamers. We and others have devised methods for the automated selection of aptamers and have begun to use these reagents for the construction of arrays. Arrayed aptamers have proven to be almost as sensitive as their solution-phase counterparts and when ganged together can provide both specific and general diagnostic signals for proteins and other ana-lytes. We describe here technical details regarding the production and processing of aptamer microarrays, including blocking, washing, drying, and scanning. We also discuss the challenges involved in developing standardized and reproducible methods for binding and quantitating protein targets. Although signals from fluorescent analytes or sandwiches are typically captured, it has proven possible for immobilized aptamers to be uniquely coupled to amplification methods not available to protein reagents, thus allowing for protein-binding signals to be greatly amplified. Into the future, many of the biosensor methods described in this book can potentially be adapted to array formats, thus further expanding the their utility and applications for aptamer arrays.

  20. Recycling Roof Tile Waste Material for Wall Cover Tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambar Mulyono

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior research on roof tile waste treatment has attempted to find the appropriate technology to reuse old roof tile waste by  create  wall  cladding  materials  from  it.  Through  exploration  and  experimentation,  a  treatment  method  has  been discovered  to  transform  the  tile  fragments  into  artificial  stone  that  resembles  the  shape  of  coral.  This  baked  clay artificial stone material is then processed as a decorative element for vertical surfaces that are not load-bearing, such as on the interior and exterior walls of a building. Before applying the fragments as wall tiles, several steps must be taken: 1  Blunting,  which  changes  the  look  of  tile  fragments  using  a  machine  created  specifically  to  blunt  the  roof-tile fragment  edges,  2  Closing  the  pores  of  the  blunted  fragments  as  a  finishing  step  that  can  be  done  with  a  transparent coat or a solid color of paint, 3 Planting the transformed roof-tile fragments on a prepared tile body made of concrete. In this study, the second phase is done using the method of ceramics glazing at a temperature of 700 °C. The finishing step is the strength of this product because it produces a rich color artificial pebble.

  1. Snake-Deterministic Tiling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonati, Violetta; Pradella, Matteo

    The concept of determinism, while clear and well assessed for string languages, is still matter of research as far as picture languages are concerned. We introduce here a new kind of determinism, called snake, based on the boustrophedonic scanning strategy, that is a natural scanning strategy used by many algorithms on 2D arrays and pictures. We consider a snake-deterministic variant of tiling systems, which defines the so-called Snake-DREC class of languages. Snake-DREC properly extends the more traditional approach of diagonal-based determinism, used e.g. by deterministic tiling systems, and by online tessellation automata. Our main result is showing that the concept of snake-determinism of tiles coincides with row (or column) unambiguity.

  2. Tiled++: an enhanced tiled hi-res display wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Achim; Thelen, Sebastian; Olech, Peter-Scott; Meyer, Joerg; Hagen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, high-resolution displays have become increasingly important to decision makers and scientists because large screens combined with a high pixel count facilitate content rich, simultaneous display of computer-generated imagery and high-definition video data from multiple sources. Tiled displays are attractive due to their extended screen real estate, scalability, and low cost. LCD panels are usually preferred over projectors because of their superior resolution. One of the drawbacks of LCD-based tiled displays is the fact that users sometimes get distracted by the screens' bezels, which cause discontinuities in rendered images, animations, or videos. Most conventional solutions either ignore the bezels and display all pixels, causing objects to become distorted, or eliminate the pixels that would normally fall under the bezels, causing pixels to be missing in the display of static images. In animations, the missing pixels will eventually reappear when the object moves, providing an experience that is similar to looking through a French window. In this paper, we present a new scalable approach that leads neither to discontinuities nor to significant loss of information. By projecting onto the bezels, we demonstrate that a combination of LCD-based tiled displays and projection significantly reduces the bezel problem. Our technique eliminates ambiguities that commonly occur on tiled displays in the fields of information visualization, visual data analysis, human-computer interaction, and scientific data display. It improves the usability of multimonitor systems by virtually eliminating the bezels. We describe a setup and provide results from an evaluation experiment conducted on a 3 x 3 and on a 10 x 5 tiled display wall.

  3. Truchet Tilings and their Generalisations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyril Stanley Smith was acutely sensitive to this in every aspect of his work. In a diversion he rediscovered the. Truchet tilings of 1704 and added to their richness and variety. 1. Introduction. The range and depth of Cyril Stanley Smith's erudition was astonishing. Apart from being one of the most creative metallur- gists of the ...

  4. Performance of the Tile PreProcessor Demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio Argos, Fernando; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter PreProcessor (TilePPr) demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) Demonstrator Project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the back-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived for receiving and processing the data coming from the front-end electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as for configuring it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the front-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator represents 1/8 of the final TilePPr that will be designed and installed into the detector for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade.

  5. Microarray-based optimization to detect genomic deletion mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Belfield

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH analyses of five Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with genomic deletions ranging in size from 4 bp to >5 kb. We used the Roche NimbleGen Arabidopsis CGH 3 × 720 K whole genome custom tiling array to optimize deletion detection. Details of the microarray design and hybridization data have been deposited at the NCBI GEO repository with accession number GSE55327.

  6. Microarray-based optimization to detect genomic deletion mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Eric J; Brown, Carly; Gan, Xiangchao; Jiang, Caifu; Baban, Dilair; Mithani, Aziz; Mott, Richard; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2014-12-01

    We performed array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) analyses of five Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with genomic deletions ranging in size from 4 bp to > 5 kb. We used the Roche NimbleGen Arabidopsis CGH 3 × 720 K whole genome custom tiling array to optimize deletion detection. Details of the microarray design and hybridization data have been deposited at the NCBI GEO repository with accession number GSE55327.

  7. Linear model for fast background subtraction in oligonucleotide microarrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroll, K.M.; Barkema, G.T.; Carlon, E.

    2009-01-01

    Background One important preprocessing step in the analysis of microarray data is background subtraction. In high-density oligonucleotide arrays this is recognized as a crucial step for the global performance of the data analysis from raw intensities to expression values. Results We propose here an

  8. High regression rate, high density hybrid fuels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR program will investigate high energy density novel nanofuels combined with high density binders for use with an N2O oxidizer. Terves has developed...

  9. 128x128 Ultra-High Density Optical Interconnect Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA programs like Tertiary Planet Finder (TPF) require high-density deformable mirrors with up to 16,000 actuators to enable direct imaging of planets around...

  10. Wake high-density electroencephalographic spatiospectral signatures of Insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colombo, Michele A.; Ramautar, Jennifer R.; Wei, Yishul; Gomez-Herrero, Germán; Stoffers, Diederick; Wassing, Rick; Benjamins, Jeroen S.; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; van der Werf, Ysbrand; Cajochen, Christian; Van Someren, Eus J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Although daytime complaints are a defining characteristic of insomnia, most EEG studies evaluated sleep only. We used high-density electroencephalography to investigate wake resting state oscillations characteristic of insomnia disorder (ID) at a fine-grained spatiospectral

  11. 128x128 Ultra-High Density Optical Interconnect Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA programs like Tertiary Planet Finder (TPF) require high density deformable mirrors with upto 16,000 actuators to enable direct imaging of planets around...

  12. Multilayer Impregnated Fibrous Thermal Insulation Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Szalai, Christine e.; Hsu, Ming-ta; Carroll, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    The term "secondary polymer layered impregnated tile" ("SPLIT") denotes a type of ablative composite-material thermal- insulation tiles having engineered, spatially non-uniform compositions. The term "secondary" refers to the fact that each tile contains at least two polymer layers wherein endothermic reactions absorb considerable amounts of heat, thereby helping to prevent overheating of an underlying structure. These tiles were invented to afford lighter-weight alternatives to the reusable thermal-insulation materials heretofore variously used or considered for use in protecting the space shuttles and other spacecraft from intense atmospheric-entry heating.

  13. Beyond high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels evaluating high-density lipoprotein function as influenced by novel therapeutic approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    deGoma, Emil M; deGoma, Rolando L; Rader, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    A number of therapeutic strategies targeting high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and reverse cholesterol transport are being developed to halt the progression of atherosclerosis or even induce regression...

  14. Folding, Tiling, and Multidimensional Coding

    OpenAIRE

    Etzion, Tuvi

    2009-01-01

    Folding a sequence $S$ into a multidimensional box is a method that is used to construct multidimensional codes. The well known operation of folding is generalized in a way that the sequence $S$ can be folded into various shapes. The new definition of folding is based on lattice tiling and a direction in the $D$-dimensional grid. There are potentially $\\frac{3^D-1}{2}$ different folding operations. Necessary and sufficient conditions that a lattice combined with a direction define a folding a...

  15. Microarrays in Glycoproteomics Research

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Tingting; Haab, Brian B.

    2009-01-01

    Microarrays have been extremely useful for investigating binding interactions among diverse types of molecular species, with the main advantage being the ability to examine many interactions using small amount of samples and reagents. Microarrays are increasingly being used to advance research in the field of glycobiology, which is the study of the nature and function and carbohydrates in health and disease. Several types of microarrays are being used in the study of glycans and proteins in g...

  16. Latest news from the Tiles

    CERN Multimedia

    Costanzo, D

    The Tile hadronic calorimeter will be installed in the central region of ATLAS with an inner radius of 2.28 m, an outer radius of 4.25 m, a total length of about 12 m and a weight of about 2300 tons. The calorimeter is mechanically divided in one central barrel and two extended barrels, with a gap in between for the services of the internal part of ATLAS. The construction of the calorimeter is advanced, and installation in the ATLAS pit is foreseen to start in December 2003. After mechanical assembly the modules are instrumented with all the optical components. Scintillating tiles are inserted into the slots, and the read-out Wave Length Shifting fibers are coupled to scintillators and bundled to achieve the quasi-projective cell geometry of the calorimeter. The final modules are stored in bldg 185, shown in the first photo, and in bldg 175 at CERN. The barrel modules are mechanically assembled in Dubna and then transported to CERN to be optically instrumented, while the extended barrels are constructed in t...

  17. High-density scintillating glasses for a proton imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, I. J.; Dettmann, M. A.; Herrig, V.; Thune, Z. L.; Zieser, A. J.; Michalek, S. F.; Been, M. O.; Martinez-Szewczyk, M. M.; Koster, H. J.; Wilkinson, C. J.; Kielty, M. W.; Jacobsohn, L. G.; Akgun, U.

    2017-06-01

    High-density scintillating glasses are proposed for a novel proton-imaging device that can improve the accuracy of the hadron therapy. High-density scintillating glasses are needed to build a cost effective, compact calorimeter that can be attached to a gantry. This report summarizes the study on Europium, Terbium, and Cerium-doped scintillating glasses that were developed containing heavy elements such as Lanthanum, Gadolinium, and Tungsten. The density of the samples reach up to 5.9 g/cm3, and their 300-600 nm emission overlaps perfectly with the peak cathode sensitivity of the commercial photo detectors. The developed glasses do not require any special quenching and can be poured easily, which makes them a good candidate for production in various geometries. Here, the glass making conditions, preliminary tests on optical and physical properties of these scintillating, high-density, oxide glasses developed for a novel medical imaging application are reported.

  18. Electrochemical desalination of historic Portuguese tiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble salts cause severe decay of historic Portuguese tiles. Treatment options for removal of the salts to stop the decay are few. The present paper deals with development of a method for electrochemical desalination, where an electric DC field is applied to the tiles. Laboratory experiments were...

  19. The Sad Case of the Columbine Tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes free-speech challenge to school district's guidelines for acceptable expressions on ceramic tiles painted by Columbine High School students to express their feelings about the massacre. Tenth Circuit found that tile painting constituted school-sponsored speech and thus district had the constitutional authority under "Hazelwood School…

  20. Tiles CMUT dies with pitch uniformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sudol, W.; Dirksen, P.; Henneken, V.A.; Dekker, R.; Louwerse, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    A large aperture CMUT transducer array is formed of a plurality of adjacently located tiles of CMUT cells. The adjacent edges of the tiles are formed by an anisotropic etch process, preferably a deep reactive ion etching process which is capable of cutting through the die and its substrate while

  1. Fibonacci words, hyperbolic tilings and grossone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margenstern, Maurice

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we study the contribution of the theory of grossone to the study of infinite Fibonacci words, combining this tool with the help of a particular tiling of the hyperbolic plane: the tiling { 7, 3 } , called the heptagrid. With the help of the numeral system based on grossone, we obtain a richer family of infinite Fibonacci words compared with the traditional approach.

  2. Investigating critical success factors in tile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Salmani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to determine critical success factors influencing the success of tile industry in Iran. The study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale, distributes it among some experts in tile industry. Using Pearson correlation test, the study has detected that there was a positive and meaningful relationship between marketing planning and the success of tile industry (r = 0.312 Sig. = 0.001. However, there is not any meaningful relationship between low cost production and success of tile industry (r = 0.13 Sig. = 0.12 and, there is a positive and meaningful relationship between organizational capabilities and success of tile industry (r = 0.635 Sig. = 0.000. Finally, our investigation states that technology and distributing systems also influence on the success of tile industry, positively. The study has also used five regression analyses where the success of tile industry was the dependent variable and marketing planning, low cost production and organizational capabilities are independent variables and the results have confirmed some positive and meaningful relationship between the successes of tile industry with all independent variables.

  3. The Level-1 Tile-Muon Trigger in the Tile Calorimeter Upgrade Program

    CERN Document Server

    Ryzhov, Andrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The TileCal provides highly-segmented energy measurements for incident particles. Information from TileCal's last radial layer can assist in muon tagging using Level-1 muon trigger. It can help in the rejection of fake muon triggers arising from background radiation (slow charged particles - protons) without degrading the efficiency of the trigger. The TileCal main activity for Phase-0 upgrade ATLAS program (2013-2014) was the activation of the TileCal third layer signal for assisting the muon trigger at 1.0<|η|<1.3 (Tile-Muon Trigger). This report describes the Tile-Muon Trigger at TileCal upgrade activities, focusing on the new on-detector electronics such as Tile Muon Digitizer Board (TMDB) to provide (receive and digitize) the signal from eight TileCal modules to three Level-1 muon endcap sector logic blocks.

  4. Performance of the TilePPr demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio Argos, Fernando; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter Pre-processor (TilePPr) demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) Demonstrator Project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the off-detector electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived for receiving and processing the data coming from the on-detector electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as for configuring it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the on-detector electronics.

  5. Electrokinetic desalination of glazed ceramic tiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Ferreira, Celia; Christensen, Iben Vernegren

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic desalination is a method where an applied electric DC field is the driving force for removal of salts from porous building materials. In the present paper, the method is tested in laboratory scale for desalination of single ceramic tiles. In a model system, where a tile...... was contaminated with NaCl during submersion and subsequently desalinated by the method, the desalination was completed in that the high and problematic initial Cl(-) concentration was reduced to an unproblematic concentration. Further conductivity measurements showed a very low conductivity in the tile after...... renovation due to damage of the glazing from the presence of salts. These tiles were severely contaminated with both chlorides and nitrates, and one of the tiles also contained sulphates though at a low concentration. The charge transfer was too low in the experiments to obtain full desalination...

  6. Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00304670; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. Results on the calorimeter operation and performance are presented, including the calibration, stability, absolute energy scale, uniformity and time resolution. These results show that the TileCal performance is within the design requirements and has given essential contribution to reconstructed objects and physics results.

  7. Interfacial stick–slip transition in hydroxyapatite filled high density ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of filler addition and temperature on the stick–slip transition in high density polyethylene melt was studied. Results showed that shear stresses corresponding to stick–slip transition increases with the addition of filler. Increase in temperature also increases the shear stresses for stick–slip transition. The features of the ...

  8. High density lipoproteins (HDLs) and atherosclerosis; the unanswered questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barter, Philip; Kastelein, John; Nunn, Alistair; Hobbs, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The concentration of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) has been found consistently to be a powerful negative predictor of premature coronary heart disease (CHD) in human prospective population studies. There is also circumstantial evidence from human intervention studies and direct

  9. BCS Theory of Hadronic Matter at High Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Panda, Prafulla K.; Providencia, Constanca

    2012-01-01

    The equilibrium between the so-called 2SC and CFL phases of strange quark matter at high densities is investigated in the framework of a simple schematic model of the NJL type. Equal densities are assumed for quarks u, d and s. The 2SC phase is here described by a color-flavor symmetric state, in...

  10. Mendelian Disorders of High-Density Lipoprotein Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldoni, Federico; Sinke, Richard J.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are a highly heterogeneous and dynamic group of the smallest and densest lipoproteins present in the circulation. This review provides the current molecular insight into HDL metabolism led by articles describing mutations in genes that have a large affect on HDL

  11. A Novel Anti-Inflammatory Effect for High Density Lipoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Cameron

    Full Text Available High density lipoprotein has anti-inflammatory effects in addition to mediating reverse cholesterol transport. While many of the chronic anti-inflammatory effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL are attributed to changes in cell adhesion molecules, little is known about acute signal transduction events elicited by HDL in endothelial cells. We now show that high density lipoprotein decreases endothelial cell exocytosis, the first step in leukocyte trafficking. ApoA-I, a major apolipoprotein of HDL, mediates inhibition of endothelial cell exocytosis by interacting with endothelial scavenger receptor-BI which triggers an intracellular protective signaling cascade involving protein kinase C (PKC. Other apolipoproteins within the HDL particle have only modest effects upon endothelial exocytosis. Using a human primary culture of endothelial cells and murine apo-AI knockout mice, we show that apo-AI prevents endothelial cell exocytosis which limits leukocyte recruitment. These data suggest that high density lipoprotein may inhibit diseases associated with vascular inflammation in part by blocking endothelial exocytosis.

  12. The usefulness of total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the usefulness of total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and/or highdensity lipoprotein cholesterol/total cholesterol ratios in the interpretation of lipid profile result in clinical practice. Methods: This is a prospective case-control study involving 109 diabetics, 98 diabetic hypertensives, 102 ...

  13. Sparse deconvolution of high-density super-resolution images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Hugelier (Siewert); J.J. de Rooi (Johan); R. Bernex (Romain); S. Duwé (Sam); O. Devos (Olivier); M. Sliwa (Michel); P. Dedecker (Peter); P.H.C. Eilers (Paul); C. Ruckebusch (Cyril)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIn wide-field super-resolution microscopy, investigating the nanoscale structure of cellular processes, and resolving fast dynamics and morphological changes in cells requires algorithms capable of working with a high-density of emissive fluorophores. Current deconvolution algorithms

  14. High-density QCD phase transitions inside neutron stars: Glitches ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-10-09

    Oct 9, 2017 ... ... of different high-density phases and associated phase transitions. We study effectsof density fluctuations during transitions with and without topological defect production and study the effect on pulsar timings due to changing moment of inertia of the star. We also discuss gravitational wave production due ...

  15. Carbohydrate antigen microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Denong

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes one of my laboratory's working protocols for carbohydrate-based microarrays. Using a standard microarray spotter, we print carbohydrate antigens directly on the nitrocellulose-coated bioarray substrates. Because these substrates support noncovalent immobilization of many spotted antigens, in general no chemical modification of the antigen is needed for microarray production. Thus, this bioarray platform is technically simple and applicable for high-throughput construction of carbohydrate antigen microarrays. A number of nitrocellulose-coated glass slides with different technical characteristics are commercially available. Given the structural diversity of carbohydrate antigens, examining each antigen preparation to determine the efficacy of its immobilization in a given type of substrate and the surface display of the desired glycoepitopes in a microarray assay is essential.

  16. Tile Calorimeter Muon Trigger Signal

    CERN Document Server

    Cerqueira, A S; Usai, G L

    2002-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter contributes to the first level trigger with the fast analog signal coming from the trigger summing boards, so-called analog adder. The adders provide two kinds of output: the total energy sum in a trigger tower and the signal from the respective cell of the last radial calorimeter layer, which can be used for identifying muons, thus making the muon first level trigger more robust. This note reviews the adder specifications and laboratory tests, whereas the main focus is put on the data analysis from the testbeam periods in~2001. Several improvements achieved by tuning the read-out are described. Using the testbeam results, the ability to identify muons in the last radial Tilecal layer is discussed. The experimental results obtained at the testbeams are completed with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. The Level-1 Tile-Muon Trigger in the Tile Calorimeter Upgrade Program

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00414625; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The TileCal provides highly-segmented energy measurements for incident particles. Information from TileCal's outermost radial layer can assist in muon tagging in the Level-1 Muon Trigger by rejecting fake muon triggers arising from background radiation (slow charged particles - protons) without degrading the efficiency of the trigger. The TileCal main activity for the ATLAS Phase-0 upgrade program (2013-2014) was the activation of the TileCal outermost D-layer signal for assisting the Level-1 Muon Trigger at 1.0<|η|<1.3. This report describes the Tile-Muon Trigger within the TileCal upgrade activities, focusing on the new on-detector electronics such as the Tile Muon Digitizer Board (TMDB) providing (receive and digitize) the signal from eight TileCal modules to three Level-1 muon end-cap sector logic blocks.

  18. Materials analysis of TEXTOR limiter tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, R.; Mills, B. E.; Wallura, E.; Walsh, D. S.; Chevalier, G.; Conn, R. W.; Dippel, K. H.; Doyle, B. L.; Esser, H. G.; Finken, K. H.; Gray, D.; Hirooka, Y.; Koizlik, K.; Miyahara, A.; Moyer, R. A.; Watkins, J. G.; Winter, J.

    1990-12-01

    Graphite tiles from both the ALT-II and inner-bumper limiters were removed from TEXTOR and subjected to materials analysis. Scanning-electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were performed at the Institut für Reaktorwerkstoffe, Forschungszentrum Julich. Deuterium profiles and metallic contamination were examined using external ion beam analysis at Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque. The erosion and hydrogen recycling of the tiles, while subjected to plasma bombardment, were studied at University of California, Los Angeles. In-situ analysis of the inner-bumper limiter tiles was performed by Sandia National Laboratory-Livermore using beta backscattering. Results indicate low metallic impurity concentration on the surfaces of both types of tiles. Increased metallic concentration coincides with regions of increased plasma flux to the surface. The ALT-II tiles exhibit a uniformly eroded surface. The inner-bumper limiter tiles show both eroded and redeposited regions, in agreement with power deposition measurements to the tiles in TEXTOR. The redeposited regions show enhanced erosion and recycling when exposed to controlled plasma bombardment.

  19. Fibrous-Ceramic/Aerogel Composite Insulating Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan M.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Fibrous-ceramic/aerogel composite tiles have been invented to afford combinations of thermal-insulation and mechanical properties superior to those attainable by making tiles of fibrous ceramics alone or aerogels alone. These lightweight tiles can be tailored to a variety of applications that range from insulating cryogenic tanks to protecting spacecraft against re-entry heating. The advantages and disadvantages of fibrous ceramics and aerogels can be summarized as follows: Tiles made of ceramic fibers are known for mechanical strength, toughness, and machinability. Fibrous ceramic tiles are highly effective as thermal insulators in a vacuum. However, undesirably, the porosity of these materials makes them permeable by gases, so that in the presence of air or other gases, convection and gas-phase conduction contribute to the effective thermal conductivity of the tiles. Other disadvantages of the porosity and permeability of fibrous ceramic tiles arise because gases (e.g., water vapor or cryogenic gases) can condense in pores. This condensation contributes to weight, and in the case of cryogenic systems, the heat of condensation undesirably adds to the heat flowing to the objects that one seeks to keep cold. Moreover, there is a risk of explosion associated with vaporization of previously condensed gas upon reheating. Aerogels offer low permeability, low density, and low thermal conductivity, but are mechanically fragile. The basic idea of the present invention is to exploit the best features of fibrous ceramic tiles and aerogels. In a composite tile according to the invention, the fibrous ceramic serves as a matrix that mechanically supports the aerogel, while the aerogel serves as a low-conductivity, low-permeability filling that closes what would otherwise be the open pores of the fibrous ceramic. Because the aerogel eliminates or at least suppresses permeation by gas, gas-phase conduction, and convection, the thermal conductivity of such a composite even at

  20. Introductory Tiling Theory for Computer Graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Tiling theory is an elegant branch of mathematics that has applications in several areas of computer science. The most immediate application area is graphics, where tiling theory has been used in the contexts of texture generation, sampling theory, remeshing, and of course the generation of decorative patterns. The combination of a solid theoretical base (complete with tantalizing open problems), practical algorithmic techniques, and exciting applications make tiling theory a worthwhile area of study for practitioners and students in computer science. This synthesis lecture introduces the math

  1. High density plasmas formation in Inertial Confinement Fusion and Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Val, J. M.; Minguez, E.; Velarde, P.; Perlado, J. M.; Velarde, G.; Bravo, E.; Eliezer, S.; Florido, R.; Garcia Rubiano, J.; Garcia-Senz, D.; Gil de la Fe, J. M.; Leon, P. T.; Martel, P.; Ogando, F.; Piera, M.; Relano, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Garcia, C.; Gonzalez, E.; Lachaise, M.; Oliva, E.

    2005-07-01

    In inertially confined fusion (ICF), high densities are required to obtain high gains. In Fast Ignition, a high density, low temperature plasma can be obtained during the compression. If the final temperature reached is low enough, the electrons of the plasma can be degenerate. In degenerate plasmas. Bremsstrahlung emission is strongly suppressed an ignition temperature becomes lower than in classical plasmas, which offers a new design window for ICF. The main difficulty of degenerate plasmas in the compression energy needed for high densities. Besides that, the low specific heat of degenerate electrons (as compared to classical values) is also a problem because of the rapid heating of the plasma. Fluid dynamic evolution of supernovae remnants is a very interesting problem in order to predict the thermodynamical conditions achieved in their collision regions. Those conditions have a strong influence in the emission of light and therefore the detection of such events. A laboratory scale system has been designed reproducing the fluid dynamic field in high energy experiments. The evolution of the laboratory system has been calculated with ARWEN code, 2D Radiation CFD that works with Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Results are compared with simulations on the original system obtained with a 3D SPH astrophysical code. New phenomena at the collision plane and scaling of the laboratory magnitudes will be described. Atomic physics for high density plasmas has been studied with participation in experiments to obtain laser produced high density plasmas under NLTE conditions, carried out at LULI. A code, ATOM3R, has been developed which solves rate equations for optically thin plasmas as well as for homogeneous optically thick plasmas making use of escape factors. New improvements in ATOM3R are been done to calculate level populations and opacities for non homogeneous thick plasmas in NLTE, with emphasis in He and H lines for high density plasma diagnosis. Analytical expression

  2. Tile-Packing Tomography Is NP-hard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrobak, Marek; Dürr, Christoph; Guíñez, Flavio

    2010-01-01

    Discrete tomography deals with reconstructing finite spatial objects from their projections. The objects we study in this paper are called tilings or tile-packings, and they consist of a number of disjoint copies of a fixed tile, where a tile is defined as a connected set of grid points. A row pr...

  3. Modular robotic tiles: experiments for children with autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Dam Pedersen, Martin; Beck, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We developed a modular robotic tile and a system composed of a number of these modular robotic tiles. The system composed of the modular robotic tiles engages the user in physical activities, e.g., physiotherapy, sports, fitness, and entertainment. The modular robotic tiles motivate the user to p...

  4. Beautiful Math, Part 5: Colorful Archimedean Tilings from Dynamical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Peichang; Zhao, Weiguo; Huang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    The art of tiling originated very early in the history of civilization. Almost every known human society has made use of tilings in some form or another. In particular, tilings using only regular polygons have great visual appeal. Decorated regular tilings with continuous and symmetrical patterns were widely used in decoration field, such as mosaics, pavements, and brick walls. In science, these tilings provide inspiration for synthetic organic chemistry. Building on previous CG&A “Beautiful Math” articles, the authors propose an invariant mapping method to create colorful patterns on Archimedean tilings (1-uniform tilings). The resulting patterns simultaneously have global crystallographic symmetry and local cyclic or dihedral symmetry.

  5. High density data storage principle, technology, and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Daoben

    2009-01-01

    The explosive increase in information and the miniaturization of electronic devices demand new recording technologies and materials that combine high density, fast response, long retention time and rewriting capability. As predicted, the current silicon-based computer circuits are reaching their physical limits. Further miniaturization of the electronic components and increase in data storage density are vital for the next generation of IT equipment such as ultra high-speed mobile computing, communication devices and sophisticated sensors. This original book presents a comprehensive introduction to the significant research achievements on high-density data storage from the aspects of recording mechanisms, materials and fabrication technologies, which are promising for overcoming the physical limits of current data storage systems. The book serves as an useful guide for the development of optimized materials, technologies and device structures for future information storage, and will lead readers to the fascin...

  6. The hydrogen equation of state at high densities

    CERN Document Server

    Vorberger, J; Kraeft, W -D

    2011-01-01

    We use a two-fluid model combining the quantum Green's function technique for the electrons and a classical HNC description for the ions to calculate the high-density equation of state of hydrogen. This approach allows us to describe fully ionized plasmas of any electron degeneracy and any ionic coupling strength which are important for the modeling of a variety of astrophysical objects and inertial confinement fusion targets. We have also performed density functional molecular dynamics simulations (DFT-MD) and show that the data obtained agree with our approach in the high density limit. Good agreement is also found between DFT-MD and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The thermodynamic properties of dense hydrogen can thus be obtained for the entire density range using only calculations in the physical picture.

  7. A Coupled Plasma-Sheath Model for High Density Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2000-01-01

    High density, low pressure plasmas are used for etching and deposition in microelectronics fabrication processes. The process characteristics are strongly determined by the ion energy distribution (IED) and the ion flux arriving at the substrate that are responsible for desorption of etch products and neutral dissociation at the surface. The ion flux and energy are determined by a self- consistent modeling of the bulk plasma, where the ions and the neutral radicals are produced, and the sheath, where the ions are accelerated. Due to their widely different time scales, it is a formidable task to self-consistently resolve non-collisional sheath in a high density bulk plasma model. In this work, we first describe a coupled plasma-sheath model that attempts to resolve the non-collisional sheath in a reactor scale model. Second, we propose a semianalytical radio frequency (RF) sheath model to improve ion dynamics.

  8. Noise reduction in muon tomography for detecting high density objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benettoni, M.; Bettella, G.; Bonomi, G.; Calvagno, G.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Cortelazzo, G.; Cossutta, L.; Donzella, A.; Furlan, M.; Gonella, F.; Pegoraro, M.; Rigoni Garola, A.; Ronchese, P.; Squarcia, S.; Subieta, M.; Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zanuttigh, P.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2013-12-01

    The muon tomography technique, based on multiple Coulomb scattering of cosmic ray muons, has been proposed as a tool to detect the presence of high density objects inside closed volumes. In this paper a new and innovative method is presented to handle the density fluctuations (noise) of reconstructed images, a well known problem of this technique. The effectiveness of our method is evaluated using experimental data obtained with a muon tomography prototype located at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The results reported in this paper, obtained with real cosmic ray data, show that with appropriate image filtering and muon momentum classification, the muon tomography technique can detect high density materials, such as lead, albeit surrounded by light or medium density material, in short times. A comparison with algorithms published in literature is also presented.

  9. High-density quantum sensing with dissipative first order transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Raghunandan, Meghana; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Weimer, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    The sensing of external fields using quantum systems is a prime example of an emergent quantum technology. Generically, the sensitivity of a quantum sensor consisting of $N$ independent particles is proportional to $\\sqrt{N}$. However, interactions invariably occuring at high densities lead to a breakdown of the assumption of independence between the particles, posing a severe challenge for quantum sensors operating at the nanoscale. Here, we show that interactions in quantum sensors can be t...

  10. Spontaneous magnetization in high-density quark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providência, João; Providência, Constanca

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that spontaneous magnetization occurs due to the anomalous magnetic moments of quarks in high-density quark matter under the tensor-type four-point interaction. The spin polarized condensate for each flavor of quark appears at high baryon density, which leads to the spontaneous...... magnetization due to the anomalous magnetic moments of quarks. The implications for the strong magnetic field in compact stars is discussed....

  11. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). PMT signals are then digitized at 40 MHz and stored on detector and are only transferred off detector once the first level trigger acceptance has been confirmed. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator b...

  12. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Heelan, Louise; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. It is also useful for identification and reconstruction of muons due to good signal to noise ratio. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 5000 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response and its readout electronics is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance are presented, including the absolute energy scale, timing, noise and associated stabilities. The results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter has performed well within the design ...

  13. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chomont, Arthur Rene; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), located on the outside of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during the data taking, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser and charge injection elements and it allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scin...

  14. 2011 Las Conchas Post Fire Tile Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set consists of an orthophotography tile index based on multi-spectral (red, green, blue, near-infrared) digital aerial imagery, collected and processed by...

  15. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter performance at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cuciuc, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, is a key detector component to detect hadrons, jets and taus and to measure the missing transverse energy. Due to the very good muon signal to noise ratio it assists the spectrometer in the identification and reconstruction of muons. TileCal is built of steel and scintillating tiles coupled to optical fibers and read out by photomultipliers. The calorimeter is equipped with systems that allow to monitor and to calibrate each stage of the readout system exploiting different signal sources: laser light, charge injection and a radioactive source. The calorimeter performance and its stability has been evaluated with the rich sample of collision data in 2011 but also with calibration data, random triggered data, cosmic muons and splash events. Results on the absolute energy scale calibration precision, on the energy and timing uniformity, on the time resolution and on the synchronization precision are presented...

  16. Calibration systems of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lundberg, O; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from the over 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. A multi-faceted calibration system allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. This calibration system is based on signal generation from different sources: a Cs radioactive source, laser light, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. This talk presents a brief description of the different TileCal calibration systems and presents the latest results on their performance in terms of calibration factors...

  17. GIBS Web Map Tile Service (WMTS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The WMTS implementation standard provides a standards-based solution for serviing digital maps using predefined image tiles. Through the constructs of the...

  18. Instrumented module of the ATLAS tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    The ATLAS tile calorimeter consists of steel absorber plates interspersed with plastic scintillator tiles. Interactions of high-energy hadrons in the plates transform the incident energy into a 'hadronic shower'. When shower particles traverse the scintillating tiles, the latter emit an amount of light proportional to the incident energy. This light is transmitted along readout fibres to a photomultiplier, where a detectable electrical signal is produced. These pictures show one of 64 modules or 'wedges' of the barrel part of the tile calorimeter, which are arranged to form a cylinder around the beam axis. The wedge has been instrumented with scintillators and readout fibres. Photos 03, 06: Checking the routing of the readout fibres into the girder that houses the photomultipliers. Photo 04: A view of the fibre bundles inside the girder.

  19. Microfabricated Fountain Pens for High-Density DNA Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Reese, Matthew O.; van Dam, R. Michae; Scherer, Axel; Quake, Stephen R.

    2003-01-01

    We used photolithographic microfabrication techniques to create very small stainless steel fountain pens that were installed in place of conventional pens on a microarray spotter. Because of the small feature size produced by the microfabricated pens, we were able to print arrays with up to 25,000 spots/cm2, significantly higher than can be achieved by other deposition methods. This feature density is sufficiently large that a standard microscope slide can contain multiple replicates of every...

  20. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnat, James G. (Collegeville, PA); Mathur, Akshay (Tampa, FL); Simpson, James C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

  1. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

  2. DNA Microarray Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content DNA Microarray Technology Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding ...

  3. Fingerprinting polymer microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourniaire, Guilhem; Diaz-Mochon, Juan J; Bradley, Mark

    2009-08-01

    The incubation of "polymer microarrays" with labelled proteins and carbohydrates demonstrated polymer selective binding, giving an approach to cellular fingerprinting and offering a possible alternative to current arraying platforms for partitioning and analysis of complex cellular components.

  4. Microarrays in glycoproteomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Tingting; Haab, Brian B

    2009-03-01

    Microarrays have been extremely useful for investigating binding interactions among diverse types of molecular species, with the main advantage being the ability to examine many interactions using small amounts of samples and reagents. Microarrays are increasingly being used to advance research in the field of glycobiology. Several types of microarrays are being used in the study of glycans and proteins in glycobiology, including glycan arrays to study the recognition of carbohydrates, lectin arrays to determine carbohydrate expression on purified proteins or on cells, and antibody arrays to examine the variation in particular glycan structures on specific proteins. This article covers the technology and applications of these types of microarrays, and their use for obtaining complementary information on various aspects of glycobiology.

  5. High-density cervical ureaplasma urealyticum colonization in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranđelović Gordana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/aim: Ureaplasma urealyticum, a common commensal of the female lower genital tract, has been observed as an important opportunistic pathogen during pregnancy. The aims of this study were to determine the degree of cervical colonization with U. urealyticum in pregnant women with risk pregnancy and in pregnant women with normal term delivery and to evaluate the correlation between high-density cervical U. urealyticum colonization and premature rupture of membranes (PROM as well. Methods. This research was conducted on the samples comprising 130 hospitalized pregnant women with threatening preterm delivery and premature rupture of membranes. The control group consisted of 39 pregnant women with term delivery without PROM. In addition to standard bacteriological examination and performing direct immunofluorescence test to detect Chlamydia trachomatis, cervical swabs were also examined for the presence of U. urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis by commercially available Mycofast Evolution 2 test (International Microbio, France. Results. The number of findings with isolated high-density U. urealyticum in the target group was 69 (53.08%, while in the control group was 14 (35.90%. Premature rupture of membranes (PROM occurred in 43 (33.08% examinees: 29 were pPROM, and 14 were PROM. The finding of U.urealyticum ≥104 was determined in 25 (58.14% pregnant women with rupture, 17 were pPROM, and 8 were PROM. There was statistically significant difference in the finding of high-density U. urealyticum between the pregnant women with PROM and the control group (χ² = 4.06, p < 0.05. U. urealyticum was predominant bacterial species found in 62.79% of isolates in the PROM cases, while in 32.56% it was isolated alone. Among the 49 pregnant women with preterm delivery, pPROM occurred in 29 (59.18% examinees, and in 70.83% of pregnant women with findings of high-density U. urealyticum pPROM was observed. Conclusion. Cervical colonization with U

  6. Porcelain tiles by the dry route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchiades, F. G.; Daros, M. T.; Boschi, A. O.

    2010-07-01

    In Brazil, the second largest tile producer of the world, at present, 70% of the tiles are produced by the dry route. One of the main reasons that lead to this development is the fact that the dry route uses approximately 30% less thermal energy them the traditional wet route. The increasing world concern with the environment and the recognition of the central role played by the water also has pointed towards privileging dry processes. In this context the objective of the present work is to study the feasibility of producing high quality porcelain tiles by the dry route. A brief comparison of the dry and wet route, in standard conditions industrially used today to produce tiles that are not porcelain tiles, shows that there are two major differences: the particle sizes obtained by the wet route are usually considerably finer and the capability of mixing the different minerals, the intimacy of the mixture, is also usually better in the wet route. The present work studied the relative importance of these differences and looked for raw materials and operational conditions that would result in better performance and glazed porcelain tiles of good quality. (Author) 7 refs.

  7. Glazed Tiles as Floor Finish in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyin Emmanuel AKINDE

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tile is no doubt rich in antiquity; its primordial  show, came as mosaic with primary prospect in sacred floor finish before its oblivion, courtesy of, later consciousness towards wall finish in banquets, kitchens, toilets, restaurants and even bars. Today, its renaissance as floor finish is apparent in private and public architectural structures with prevalence in residential, recreational, commercial, governmental and other spaces. In Nigeria, the use of glazed tiles as floor finish became apparent, supposedly in mid-twentieth century; and has since, witnessed ever increasing demands from all sundry; a development that is nascent and has necessitated its mass  production locally with pockets of firms in the country. The latter however, is a resultant response to taste cum glazed tiles affordability, whose divergent sophistication in design, colour, size and shape is believed preferred to terrazzo, carpet and floor flex tile. Accessible as glazed tile and production is, in recent times; its dearth of a holistic literature in Nigeria is obvious. In the light of the latter, this paper examine glazed tiles as floor finish in Nigeria, its advent, usage, production, challenge, benefit and prospect with the hope of opening further frontier in discipline specifics.

  8. Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Bartos, Pavol; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analog signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The TileCal frontend electronics reads out the signals produced by about 10000 channels measuring energies ranging from ~30 MeV to ~2 TeV. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. The performance of the calorimeter have been studied in-situ employing cosmic ray muons and a large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the operations o...

  9. Harshlight: a "corrective make-up" program for microarray chips

    OpenAIRE

    Wittkowski Knut M; Pellegrino Maurizio; Suárez-Fariñas Mayte; Magnasco Marcelo O

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Microscopists are familiar with many blemishes that fluorescence images can have due to dust and debris, glass flaws, uneven distribution of fluids or surface coatings, etc. Microarray scans do show similar artifacts, which might affect subsequent analysis. Although all but the starkest blemishes are hard to find by the unaided eye, particularly in high-density oligonucleotide arrays (HDONAs), few tools are available to help with the detection of those defects. Results We ...

  10. Characterization of the high density plasma etching process of CCTO thin films for the fabrication of very high density capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altamore, C; Tringali, C; Sparta' , N; Marco, S Di; Grasso, A; Ravesi, S [STMicroelectronics, Industial and Multi-segment Sector R and D, Catania (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    In this work the feasibility of CCTO (Calcium Copper Titanate) patterning by etching process is demonstrated and fully characterized in a hard to etch materials etcher. CCTO sintered in powder shows a giant relative dielectric constant (10{sup 5}) measured at 1 MHz at room temperature. This feature is furthermore coupled with stability from 10{sup 1} Hz to 10{sup 6} Hz in a wide temperature range (100K - 600K). In principle, this property can allow to fabricate very high capacitance density condenser. Due to its perovskite multi-component structure, CCTO can be considered a hard to etch material. For high density capacitor fabrication, CCTO anisotropic etching is requested by using high density plasma. The behavior of etched CCTO was studied in a HRe- (High Density Reflected electron) plasma etcher using Cl{sub 2}/Ar chemistry. The relationship between the etch rate and the Cl{sub 2}/Ar ratio was also studied. The effects of RF MHz, KHz Power and pressure variation, the impact of HBr addiction to the Cl{sub 2}/Ar chemistry on the CCTO etch rate and on its selectivity to Pt and photo resist was investigated.

  11. Biomimetic High Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles For Nucleic Acid Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kaylin M.; Mutharasan, R. Kannan; Tripathy, Sushant; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bobeica, Mariana; Shumaker, Dale K.; Luthi, Andrea J.; Helfand, Brian T.; Ardehali, Hossein; Mirkin, Chad A.; Volpert, Olga; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2014-01-01

    We report a gold nanoparticle-templated high density lipoprotein (HDL AuNP) platform for gene therapy which combines lipid-based nucleic acid transfection strategies with HDL biomimicry. For proof-of-concept, HDL AuNPs are shown to adsorb antisense cholesterylated DNA. The conjugates are internalized by human cells, can be tracked within cells using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and regulate target gene expression. Overall, the ability to directly image the AuNP core within cells, the chemical tailorability of the HDL AuNP platform, and the potential for cell-specific targeting afforded by HDL biomimicry make this platform appealing for nucleic acid delivery. PMID:21319839

  12. High Density Thermal Energy Storage with Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Wirz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to storing thermal energy with supercritical fluids is being investigated, which if successful, promises to transform the way thermal energy is captured and utilized. The use of supercritical fluids allows cost-affordable high-density storage with a combination of latent heat and sensible heat in the two-phase as well as the supercritical state. This technology will enhance penetration of several thermal power generation applications and high temperature water for commercial use if the overall cost of the technology can be demonstrated to be lower than the current state-of-the-art molten salt using sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic mixtures.

  13. Biofuels Barrier Properties of Polyamide 6 and High Density Polyethylene

    OpenAIRE

    Fillot L.-A.; Ghiringhelli S.; Prebet C.; Rossi S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a comparison of the biofuels barrier properties of PolyAmide 6 (PA6) and High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) is presented. Model fuels were prepared as mixtures of toluene, isooctane and ethanol, the ethanol volume fraction varying between 0% and 100%. Barrier properties were determined at 40°C by gravimetric techniques or gas chromatography measurements, and it was shown that polyamide 6 permeability is lower than that of polyethylene on a wide range of ethanol contents up to 85%...

  14. ATLAS Rewards Russian Supplier for Scintillating Tile Production

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    At a ceremony held at CERN on 30 July, the ATLAS collaboration awarded Russian firm SIA Luch from Podolsk in the Moscow region an ATLAS Suppliers Award. This follows delivery by the company of the final batch of scintillating tiles for the collaboration's Tile Calorimeter some six months ahead of schedule.   Representatives of Russian firm Luch Podolsk received the ATLAS Suppliers Award in the collaboration's Tile Calorimeter instrumentation plant at CERN on 30 July. In front of one Tile Calorimeter module instrumented by scintillating tiles are (left to right) IHEP physicists Evgueni Startchenko and Andrei Karioukhine, Luch Podolsk representatives Igor Karetnikov and Yuri Zaitsev, Tile Calorimeter Project Leader Rupert Leitner, ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni, and CERN Tile Calorimeter group leader Ana Henriques-Correia. Scintillating tiles form the active part of the ATLAS hadronic Tile Calorimeter, which will measure the energy and direction of particles produced in LHC collisions. They are emb...

  15. Cross-recognition of a pit viper (Crotalinae) polyspecific antivenom explored through high-density peptide microarray epitope mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engmark, Mikael; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutiérrez, José María

    2017-01-01

    Snakebite antivenom is a 120 years old invention based on polyclonal mixtures of antibodies purified from the blood of hyper-immunized animals. Knowledge on antibody recognition sites (epitopes) on snake venom proteins is limited, but may be used to provide molecular level explanations for antive...

  16. High-density peptide microarray exploration of the antibody response in a rabbit immunized with a neurotoxic venom fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engmark, Mikael; Jespersen, Martin Closter; Lomonte, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Polyvalent snakebite antivenoms derive their therapeutic success from the ability of their antibodies to neutralize venom toxins across multiple snake species. This ability results from a production process involving immunization of large mammals with a broad suite of toxins present in venoms. As...

  17. Broad spectrum microarray for fingerprint-based bacterial species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Jürg E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are powerful tools for DNA-based molecular diagnostics and identification of pathogens. Most target a limited range of organisms and are based on only one or a very few genes for specific identification. Such microarrays are limited to organisms for which specific probes are available, and often have difficulty discriminating closely related taxa. We have developed an alternative broad-spectrum microarray that employs hybridisation fingerprints generated by high-density anonymous markers distributed over the entire genome for identification based on comparison to a reference database. Results A high-density microarray carrying 95,000 unique 13-mer probes was designed. Optimized methods were developed to deliver reproducible hybridisation patterns that enabled confident discrimination of bacteria at the species, subspecies, and strain levels. High correlation coefficients were achieved between replicates. A sub-selection of 12,071 probes, determined by ANOVA and class prediction analysis, enabled the discrimination of all samples in our panel. Mismatch probe hybridisation was observed but was found to have no effect on the discriminatory capacity of our system. Conclusions These results indicate the potential of our genome chip for reliable identification of a wide range of bacterial taxa at the subspecies level without laborious prior sequencing and probe design. With its high resolution capacity, our proof-of-principle chip demonstrates great potential as a tool for molecular diagnostics of broad taxonomic groups.

  18. Ultra-Stretchable Interconnects for High-Density Stretchable Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Shafqat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The exciting field of stretchable electronics (SE promises numerous novel applications, particularly in-body and medical diagnostics devices. However, future advanced SE miniature devices will require high-density, extremely stretchable interconnects with micron-scale footprints, which calls for proven standardized (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS-type process recipes using bulk integrated circuit (IC microfabrication tools and fine-pitch photolithography patterning. Here, we address this combined challenge of microfabrication with extreme stretchability for high-density SE devices by introducing CMOS-enabled, free-standing, miniaturized interconnect structures that fully exploit their 3D kinematic freedom through an interplay of buckling, torsion, and bending to maximize stretchability. Integration with standard CMOS-type batch processing is assured by utilizing the Flex-to-Rigid (F2R post-processing technology to make the back-end-of-line interconnect structures free-standing, thus enabling the routine microfabrication of highly-stretchable interconnects. The performance and reproducibility of these free-standing structures is promising: an elastic stretch beyond 2000% and ultimate (plastic stretch beyond 3000%, with <0.3% resistance change, and >10 million cycles at 1000% stretch with <1% resistance change. This generic technology provides a new route to exciting highly-stretchable miniature devices.

  19. Multiplexed, high density electrophysiology with nanofabricated neural probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangang Du

    Full Text Available Extracellular electrode arrays can reveal the neuronal network correlates of behavior with single-cell, single-spike, and sub-millisecond resolution. However, implantable electrodes are inherently invasive, and efforts to scale up the number and density of recording sites must compromise on device size in order to connect the electrodes. Here, we report on silicon-based neural probes employing nanofabricated, high-density electrical leads. Furthermore, we address the challenge of reading out multichannel data with an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC performing signal amplification, band-pass filtering, and multiplexing functions. We demonstrate high spatial resolution extracellular measurements with a fully integrated, low noise 64-channel system weighing just 330 mg. The on-chip multiplexers make possible recordings with substantially fewer external wires than the number of input channels. By combining nanofabricated probes with ASICs we have implemented a system for performing large-scale, high-density electrophysiology in small, freely behaving animals that is both minimally invasive and highly scalable.

  20. Multiplexed, high density electrophysiology with nanofabricated neural probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiangang; Blanche, Timothy J; Harrison, Reid R; Lester, Henry A; Masmanidis, Sotiris C

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular electrode arrays can reveal the neuronal network correlates of behavior with single-cell, single-spike, and sub-millisecond resolution. However, implantable electrodes are inherently invasive, and efforts to scale up the number and density of recording sites must compromise on device size in order to connect the electrodes. Here, we report on silicon-based neural probes employing nanofabricated, high-density electrical leads. Furthermore, we address the challenge of reading out multichannel data with an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) performing signal amplification, band-pass filtering, and multiplexing functions. We demonstrate high spatial resolution extracellular measurements with a fully integrated, low noise 64-channel system weighing just 330 mg. The on-chip multiplexers make possible recordings with substantially fewer external wires than the number of input channels. By combining nanofabricated probes with ASICs we have implemented a system for performing large-scale, high-density electrophysiology in small, freely behaving animals that is both minimally invasive and highly scalable.

  1. High-density waveguide superlattices with low crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weiwei; Gatdula, Robert; Abbaslou, Siamak; Lu, Ming; Stein, Aaron; Lai, Warren Y.-C.; Provine, J.; Pease, R. Fabian W.; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Jiang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Silicon photonics holds great promise for low-cost large-scale photonic integration. In its future development, integration density will play an ever-increasing role in a way similar to that witnessed in integrated circuits. Waveguides are perhaps the most ubiquitous component in silicon photonics. As such, the density of waveguide elements is expected to have a crucial influence on the integration density of a silicon photonic chip. A solution to high-density waveguide integration with minimal impact on other performance metrics such as crosstalk remains a vital issue in many applications. Here, we propose a waveguide superlattice and demonstrate advanced superlattice design concepts such as interlacing-recombination that enable high-density waveguide integration at a half-wavelength pitch with low crosstalk. Such waveguide superlattices can potentially lead to significant reduction in on-chip estate for waveguide elements and salient enhancement of performance for important applications, opening up possibilities for half-wavelength-pitch optical-phased arrays and ultra-dense space-division multiplexing.

  2. Effects of High-Density Impacts on Shielding Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana M.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are shielded from micrometeoroids and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts to meet requirements for crew safety and/or mission success. In the past, orbital debris particles have been considered to be composed entirely of aluminum (medium-density material) for the purposes of MMOD shielding design and verification. Meteoroids have been considered to be low-density porous materials, with an average density of 1 g/cu cm. Recently, NASA released a new orbital debris environment model, referred to as ORDEM 3.0, that indicates orbital debris contains a substantial fraction of high-density material for which steel is used in MMOD risk assessments [Ref.1]. Similarly, an update to the meteoroid environment model is also under consideration to include a high-density component of that environment. This paper provides results of hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations on typical spacecraft MMOD shields using steel projectiles. It was found that previous ballistic limit equations (BLEs) that define the protection capability of the MMOD shields did not predict the results from the steel impact tests and hydrocode simulations (typically, the predictions from these equations were too optimistic). The ballistic limit equations required updates to more accurately represent shield protection capability from the range of densities in the orbital debris environment. Ballistic limit equations were derived from the results of the work and are provided in the paper.

  3. A Coupled Plasma and Sheath Model for High Density Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, Bose; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a coupled plasma and collisionless; sheath model for the simulation of high density plasma processing reactors. Due to inefficiencies in numerical schemes and the resulting computational burden, a coupled multidimensional plasma and sheath simulation has not been possible model for gas mixtures and high density reactors of practical interest. In this work we demonstrate that with a fully implicit algorithm and a refined computational mesh, a self-consistent plasma and sheath simulation is feasible. We discuss the details of the model equations, the importance of ion inertia, and the resulting sheath profiles for argon and chlorine plasmas. We find that at low operating pressures (10-30 mTorr), the charge separation occurs only within a 0.5 mm layer near the surface in a 300 mm inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. A unified model eliminates the use of off-line or loosely coupled sheath models with simplifying assumptions which generally lead to uncertainties in ion flux and sheath electrical properties.

  4. Simulating deposition of high density tailings using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaoglu, Yagmur; Simms, Paul H.

    2017-08-01

    Tailings are a slurry of silt-sized residual material derived from the milling of rock. High density (HD) tailings are tailings that have been sufficiently dewatered to a point where they exhibit a yield stress upon deposition. They form gently sloped stacks on the surface when deposited; this eliminates or minimizes the need for dams or embankments for containment. Understanding the flow behaviour of high density tailings is essential for estimating the final stack geometry and overall slope angle. This paper focuses on modelling the flow behaviour of HD tailings using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method incorporating a `bi-viscosity' model to simulate the non-Newtonian behaviour. The model is validated by comparing the numerical results with bench scale experiments simulating single or multi-layer deposits in two-dimensions. The results indicate that the model agreed fairly well with the experimental work, excepting some repulsion of particles away from the bottom boundary closer to the toe of the deposits. Novel aspects of the work, compared to other simulation of Bingham fluids by SPH, are the simulation of multilayer deposits and the use of a stopping criteria to characterize the rest state.

  5. The Mu3e Tile Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, Hans Patrick

    2015-05-06

    The Mu3e experiment is designed to search for the lepton flavour violating decay μ→e{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -} with a sensitivity of one in 10{sup 16} decays. An observation of such a decay would be a clear sign of physics beyond the Standard Model. Achieving the targeted sensitivity requires a high precision detector with excellent momentum, vertex and time resolution. The Mu3e Tile Detector is a highly granular sub-detector system based on scintillator tiles with Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) readout, and aims at measuring the timing of the muon decay products with a resolution of better than 100 ps. This thesis describes the development of the Tile Detector concept and demonstrates the feasibility of the elaborated design. In this context, a comprehensive simulation framework has been developed, in order to study and optimise the detector performance. The central component of this framework is a detailed simulation of the SiPM response. The simulation model has been validated in several measurements and shows good agreement with the data. Furthermore, a 16-channel prototype of a Tile Detector module has been constructed and operated in an electron beam. In the beam tests, a time resolution up to 56 ps has been achieved, which surpasses the design goal. The simulation and measurement results demonstrate the feasibility of the developed Tile Detector design and show that the required detector performance can be achieved.

  6. Tiled WMS/KML Server V2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2012-01-01

    This software is a higher-performance implementation of tiled WMS, with integral support for KML and time-varying data. This software is compliant with the Open Geospatial WMS standard, and supports KML natively as a WMS return type, including support for the time attribute. Regionated KML wrappers are generated that match the existing tiled WMS dataset. Ping and JPG formats are supported, and the software is implemented as an Apache 2.0 module that supports a threading execution model that is capable of supporting very high request rates. The module intercepts and responds to WMS requests that match certain patterns and returns the existing tiles. If a KML format that matches an existing pyramid and tile dataset is requested, regionated KML is generated and returned to the requesting application. In addition, KML requests that do not match the existing tile datasets generate a KML response that includes the corresponding JPG WMS request, effectively adding KML support to a backing WMS server.

  7. Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Mlynarikova, Michaela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analog signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The TileCal frontend electronics reads out the signals produced by about 10000 channels measuring energies ranging from ~30 MeV to ~2 TeV. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. The performance of the calorimeter has been studied in-situ employing cosmic ray muons and a large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the operations of the LHC. Prompt isolated muons of high momentum fro...

  8. Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Mlynarikova, Michaela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analog signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The TileCal frontend electronics reads out the signals produced by about 10000 channels measuring energies ranging from ~30 MeV to ~2 TeV. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. The performance of the calorimeter has been studied in-situ employing cosmic ray muons and a large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the operations of the LHC. Prompt isolated muons of high momentum from elec...

  9. Electro-desalination of glazed tile panels - discussion of possibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias-Ferreira, Célia; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.

    2016-01-01

    of the system. Single tiles, a variety of porous stones and the mortar on the back of a tile have all been electro-desalinated successfully in laboratory scale. Thus individually, all parts of the wall with tile panel can be electro-desalinated. The interface between mortar and tile can be problematic....... In the few experiments conducted on tiles with attached mortar, the mortar was desalinated to a higher degree than the biscuit and successful desalination of the biscuit through the mortar requires further research. In-situ pilot scale tests were performed on highly salt-contaminated walls without tiles...

  10. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures.

  11. Tile vaulting in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. López López

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available New interactive equilibrium methods for the design and analysis of masonry structures have facilitated the construction of masonry structures with a formal language well beyond what is typically associated with compression-only architecture. These developments have also rekindled interest in tile vaulting, and led to a rediscovery of this traditional building technique. To ensure that tile vaults with new, complex shapes can still be built economically, the construction processes involved in the realisation of these structures have adapted. For example, cheaper and simpler falsework systems have been introduced. In addition, a wide variety of materials have been experimented with to be able to build more sustainable vaulted structures with local resources. This paper presents a review of the latest innovations in tile vaulting, based on the most representative works of the past few years with respect to shape, construction method and the use of materials.

  12. Calibration Systems of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lundberg, O

    2013-01-01

    TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. A multi-faceted calibration system allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. This calibration system is based on signal generation from different sources: a Cs radioactive source, laser light, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. A brief description of the different TileCal calibration systems is given and the latest results on their performance in terms of calibration factors, linearity and stability are presented.

  13. Scoping study. High density polyethylene (HDPE) in salstone service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phifer, Mark A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2005-02-18

    An evaluation of the use of high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembranes in Saltstone service has been conducted due to the potential benefits that could be derived from such usage. HDPE is one of the simplest hydrocarbon polymers and one of the most common polymers utilized in the production of geomembranes, which means that its costs are relatively low. Additionally, HDPE geomembranes have an extremely low permeability and an extremely low water vapor diffusional flux, which means that it is a good barrier to contaminant transport. The primary consideration in association with HDPE geomembranes in Saltstone service is the potential impact of Saltstone on the degradation of the HDPE geomembranes. Therefore, the evaluation documented herein has primarily focused upon the potential HDPE degradation in Saltstone service.

  14. The Pulsed High Density Experiment (PHDX) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slough, John P. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Andreason, Samuel [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-04-27

    The purpose of this paper is to present the conclusions that can be drawn from the Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) formation experiments conducted on the Pulsed High Density experiment (PHD) at the University of Washington. The experiment is ongoing. The experimental goal for this first stage of PHD was to generate a stable, high flux (>10 mWb), high energy (>10 KJ) target FRC. Such results would be adequate as a starting point for several later experiments. This work focuses on experimental implementation and the results of the first four month run. Difficulties were encountered due to the initial on-axis plasma ionization source. Flux trapping with this ionization source acting alone was insufficient to accomplish experimental objectives. Additional ionization methods were utilized to overcome this difficulty. A more ideal plasma source layout is suggested and will be explored during a forthcoming work.

  15. Neural network based feed-forward high density associative memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, T.; Moopenn, A.; Lamb, J. L.; Ramesham, R.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel thin film approach to neural-network-based high-density associative memory is described. The information is stored locally in a memory matrix of passive, nonvolatile, binary connection elements with a potential to achieve a storage density of 10 to the 9th bits/sq cm. Microswitches based on memory switching in thin film hydrogenated amorphous silicon, and alternatively in manganese oxide, have been used as programmable read-only memory elements. Low-energy switching has been ascertained in both these materials. Fabrication and testing of memory matrix is described. High-speed associative recall approaching 10 to the 7th bits/sec and high storage capacity in such a connection matrix memory system is also described.

  16. High density thermite mixture for shaped charge ordnance disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Elshenawy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermite mixture based on aluminum and ferric oxides for ammunition neutralization has been studied and tested. Thermochemical calculations have been carried out for different percentage of Al using Chemical Equilibrium Code to expect the highest performance thermite mixture used for shaped charge ordnance disposal. Densities and enthalpy of different formulations have been calculated and demonstrated. The optimized thermite formulation has been prepared experimentally using cold iso-static pressing technique, which exhibited relatively high density and high burning rate thermite mixture. The produced green product compacted powder mixture was tested against small caliber shaped charge bomblet for neutralization. Theoretical and experimental results showed that the prepared thermite mixture containing 33% of aluminum as a fuel with ferric oxide can be successfully used for shaped charge ordnance disposal.

  17. High Density Electroencephalography in Sleep Research: Potential, Problems, Future Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Huber, Reto

    2012-01-01

    High density EEG (hdEEG) during sleep combines the superior temporal resolution of EEG recordings with high spatial resolution. Thus, this method allows a topographical analysis of sleep EEG activity and thereby fosters the shift from a global view of sleep to a local one. HdEEG allowed to investigate sleep rhythms in terms of their characteristic behavior (e.g., the traveling of slow waves) and in terms of their relationship to cortical functioning (e.g., consciousness and cognitive abilities). Moreover, recent studies successfully demonstrated that hdEEG can be used to study brain functioning in neurological and neuro-developmental disorders, and to evaluate therapeutic approaches. This review highlights the potential, the problems, and future perspective of hdEEG in sleep research. PMID:22593753

  18. The alterations in high density polyethylene properties with gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, M. F.; Elshaer, Y. H.; Taha, Doaa. H.

    2017-10-01

    In the present investigation, high density polyethylene (HDPE) polymer has been used to study the alterations in its properties under gamma-irradiation. Physico-chemical properties have been investigated with different spectroscopy techniques, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), biocompatibility properties, as well as, mechanical properties change. The FT-IR analysis shows the formation of new band at 1716 cm-1 that is attributed to the oxidation of irradiated polymer chains, which is due to the formation of carbonyl groups (C˭O). XRD patterns show that a decrease in the crystallite size and increase in the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM). This means that the crystallinity of irradiated samples is decreased with increase in gamma dose. The contact angle measurements show an increase in the surface free energy as the gamma irradiation increases. The measurements of mechanical properties of irradiated HDPE samples were discussed.

  19. Single-Readout High-Density Memristor Crossbar

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, M. A.

    2016-01-07

    High-density memristor-crossbar architecture is a very promising technology for future computing systems. The simplicity of the gateless-crossbar structure is both its principal advantage and the source of undesired sneak-paths of current. This parasitic current could consume an enormous amount of energy and ruin the readout process. We introduce new adaptive-threshold readout techniques that utilize the locality and hierarchy properties of the computer-memory system to address the sneak-paths problem. The proposed methods require a single memory access per pixel for an array readout. Besides, the memristive crossbar consumes an order of magnitude less power than state-of-the-art readout techniques.

  20. Characterization of high density through silicon vias with spectral reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yi-Sha; Huang, Kuo Cheng; Hsu, Weite

    2011-03-28

    Measurement and control is an important step for production-worthy through silicon vias etch. We demonstrate the use and enhancement of an existing wafer metrology tool, spectral reflectometer by implementing novel theoretical model and measurement algorithm for high density through-silicon via (HDTSV) inspection. It is capable of measuring depth and depth variations of array vias by Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) analysis in one shot measurement. Surface roughness of via bottom can also be extracted by scattering model fitting. Our non-destructive solution can measure TSV profile diameters as small as 5 μm and aspect ratios greater than 13:1. The measurement precision is in the range of 0.02 μm. Metrology results from actual 3D interconnect processing wafers are presented.

  1. High-density recording storage system by Collinear holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horimai, Hideyoshi; Tan, Xiaodi; Aoki, Yoshio

    2006-04-01

    Collinear TM Holography, proposed and demonstrated by OPTWARE Corporation, can produce a small, practical holographic versatile disc (HVD TM) drive system more easily than conventional 2-axis holography. With Collinear TM technologies' unique configuration the optical pickup can be designed as small as DVDs, and can be placed on one side of the recording media. As servo technology is being introduced to control the objective lens to be maintained precisely to the disc in the recording and the reconstructing process, a vibration isolator is no longer necessary. Experimental and theoretical studies suggest that the holographic material is very effective in increasing the recording density of the system. A high density data recording of Collinear TM Holography by reducing optical noise is also demonstrated.

  2. High-density percutaneous chronic connector for neural prosthetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Kedar G.; Bennett, William J.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.

    2015-09-22

    A high density percutaneous chronic connector, having first and second connector structures each having an array of magnets surrounding a mounting cavity. A first electrical feedthrough array is seated in the mounting cavity of the first connector structure and a second electrical feedthrough array is seated in the mounting cavity of the second connector structure, with a feedthrough interconnect matrix positioned between a top side of the first electrical feedthrough array and a bottom side of the second electrical feedthrough array to electrically connect the first electrical feedthrough array to the second electrical feedthrough array. The two arrays of magnets are arranged to attract in a first angular position which connects the first and second connector structures together and electrically connects the percutaneously connected device to the external electronics, and to repel in a second angular position to facilitate removal of the second connector structure from the first connector structure.

  3. Methods and systems for rapid prototyping of high density circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jeremy A [Albuquerque, NM; Davis, Donald W [Albuquerque, NM; Chavez, Bart D [Albuquerque, NM; Gallegos, Phillip L [Albuquerque, NM; Wicker, Ryan B [El Paso, TX; Medina, Francisco R [El Paso, TX

    2008-09-02

    A preferred embodiment provides, for example, a system and method of integrating fluid media dispensing technology such as direct-write (DW) technologies with rapid prototyping (RP) technologies such as stereolithography (SL) to provide increased micro-fabrication and micro-stereolithography. A preferred embodiment of the present invention also provides, for example, a system and method for Rapid Prototyping High Density Circuit (RPHDC) manufacturing of solderless connectors and pilot devices with terminal geometries that are compatible with DW mechanisms and reduce contact resistance where the electrical system is encapsulated within structural members and manual electrical connections are eliminated in favor of automated DW traces. A preferred embodiment further provides, for example, a method of rapid prototyping comprising: fabricating a part layer using stereolithography and depositing thermally curable media onto the part layer using a fluid dispensing apparatus.

  4. Environmental determinants, liver function, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuller, L H; Hulley, S B; LaPorte, R E; Neaton, J; Dai, W S

    1983-04-01

    High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-chol) is negatively associated with coronary heart disease. Environmental heart disease risk factors may partially be related to coronary heart disease through alterations in HDL-chol concentrations. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms by which environmental factors are related to HDL-chol. The authors investigated a possible mechanism: changes in liver function as a mediating link between risk factors and HDL-chol concentrations in marathon runners, alcoholics, and participants in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. Liver function, as measured by liver enzymes, was related to both coronary heart disease risk factors and alcohol consumption, suggesting that the increased levels of HDL-chol associated with alcohol were primarily the result of changes in liver function. The relationship of obesity to HDL-chol could not be explained by the alterations in liver function.

  5. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  6. The glass transition in high-density amorphous ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerting, Thomas; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Handle, Philip H; Seidl, Markus; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Gainaru, Catalin; Böhmer, Roland

    2015-01-01

    There has been a long controversy regarding the glass transition in low-density amorphous ice (LDA). The central question is whether or not it transforms to an ultraviscous liquid state above 136 K at ambient pressure prior to crystallization. Currently, the most widespread interpretation of the experimental findings is in terms of a transformation to a superstrong liquid above 136 K. In the last decade some work has also been devoted to the study of the glass transition in high-density amorphous ice (HDA) which is in the focus of the present review. At ambient pressure HDA is metastable against both ice I and LDA, whereas at > 0.2 GPa HDA is no longer metastable against LDA, but merely against high-pressure forms of crystalline ice. The first experimental observation interpreted as the glass transition of HDA was made using in situ methods by Mishima, who reported a glass transition temperature Tg of 160 K at 0.40 GPa. Soon thereafter Andersson and Inaba reported a much lower glass transition temperature of 122 K at 1.0 GPa. Based on the pressure dependence of HDA's Tg measured in Innsbruck, we suggest that they were in fact probing the distinct glass transition of very high-density amorphous ice (VHDA). Very recently the glass transition in HDA was also observed at ambient pressure at 116 K. That is, LDA and HDA show two distinct glass transitions, clearly separated by about 20 K at ambient pressure. In summary, this suggests that three glass transition lines can be defined in the p-T plane for LDA, HDA, and VHDA.

  7. Sequence Folding, Lattice Tiling, and Multidimensional Coding

    OpenAIRE

    Etzion, Tuvi

    2009-01-01

    Folding a sequence $S$ into a multidimensional box is a well-known method which is used as a multidimensional coding technique. The operation of folding is generalized in a way that the sequence $S$ can be folded into various shapes and not just a box. The new definition of folding is based on a lattice tiling for the given shape $\\cS$ and a direction in the $D$-dimensional integer grid. Necessary and sufficient conditions that a lattice tiling for $\\cS$ combined with a direction define a fol...

  8. Developments for a scintillator tile sampling hadron calorimeter with 'longitudinal' tile configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Bosman, M; Teubert, F; Blaj, C; Boldea, V; Dita, S; Ajaltouni, Z; Badaud, F; Bouhemaid, N; Brette, P; Brossard, M; Chadelas, R; Chevaleyre, J C; Crouau, M; Daudon, F; Dugne, J J; Michel, B; Montarou, G; Muanza, G S; Pallin, D; Says, L P; Vazeille, F; Gildemeister, O; Nessi, M; Poggioli, L; Sonderegger, P; Amorin, A; Ferreira, P; Gomes, A; Henriques, A; Maio, A; Peralta, L; Leitner, M; Suk, M; Kostrikov, M; Kulagin, M; Lapin, V; Protopopov, Y; Solodkov, Alexander A; Zaitsev, A; Hakobian, H

    1993-01-01

    In a scintillation tile calorimeter with wavelength shifting fiber readout significant simplifications of the construction and the assembly are possible if the tiles are oriented "longitudinally", i.e. in r-phi plane for a barrel configuration. For a hybrid calorimeter consisting of a scintillator tile hadron compartment and a sufficiently containing LAr EM compartment, as proposed for the ATLAS detector, good jet resolution is predicted by simulations. The aim of the proposal is to construct a test module and to check the simulation results by test beam measurements. Several component tests and further simulations and engineering studies are needed to optimize the design of a large calorimeter structure.

  9. Microfabricated Fountain Pens for High-Density DNA Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Matthew O.; van Dam, R. Michae; Scherer, Axel; Quake, Stephen R.

    2003-01-01

    We used photolithographic microfabrication techniques to create very small stainless steel fountain pens that were installed in place of conventional pens on a microarray spotter. Because of the small feature size produced by the microfabricated pens, we were able to print arrays with up to 25,000 spots/cm2, significantly higher than can be achieved by other deposition methods. This feature density is sufficiently large that a standard microscope slide can contain multiple replicates of every gene in a complex organism such as a mouse or human. We tested carryover during array printing with dye solution, labeled DNA, and hybridized DNA, and we found it to be indistinguishable from background. Hybridization also showed good sequence specificity to printed oligonucleotides. In addition to improved slide capacity, the microfabrication process offers the possibility of low-cost mass-produced pens and the flexibility to include novel pen features that cannot be machined with conventional techniques. PMID:12975313

  10. Microarray challenges in ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammenga, Jan E.; Herman, Michael A.; Ouborg, N. Joop; Johnson, Loretta; Breitling, Rainer

    Microarrays are used to measure simultaneously the amount of mRNAs transcribed from many genes. They were originally designed for gene expression profiling in relatively simple biological systems, such as cell lines and model systems under constant laboratory conditions. This poses a challenge to

  11. Identification of transcribed sequences in Arabidopsis thaliana by using high-resolution genome tiling arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Sethi, Himanshu; Liang, Shoudan; Nelson, David C.; Hegeman, Adrian; Nelson, Clark; Rancour, David; Bednarek, Sebastian; hide

    2005-01-01

    Using a maskless photolithography method, we produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with probe sequences tiled throughout the genome of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. RNA expression was determined for the complete nuclear, mitochondrial, and chloroplast genomes by tiling 5 million 36-mer probes. These probes were hybridized to labeled mRNA isolated from liquid grown T87 cells, an undifferentiated Arabidopsis cell culture line. Transcripts were detected from at least 60% of the nearly 26,330 annotated genes, which included 151 predicted genes that were not identified previously by a similar genome-wide hybridization study on four different cell lines. In comparison with previously published results with 25-mer tiling arrays produced by chromium masking-based photolithography technique, 36-mer oligonucleotide probes were found to be more useful in identifying intron-exon boundaries. Using two-dimensional HPLC tandem mass spectrometry, a small-scale proteomic analysis was performed with the same cells. A large amount of strongly hybridizing RNA was found in regions "antisense" to known genes. Similarity of antisense activities between the 25-mer and 36-mer data sets suggests that it is a reproducible and inherent property of the experiments. Transcription activities were also detected for many of the intergenic regions and the small RNAs, including tRNA, small nuclear RNA, small nucleolar RNA, and microRNA. Expression of tRNAs correlates with genome-wide amino acid usage.

  12. Penetration dynamics of AP8 in thin ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadjieva, E.; Khoe, Y.S.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of thin ceramic tiles with AP8 (WC core, 7,62 mm) at 1000 m/s velocity has been studied experimentally and numerically. “Thin” ceramic tiles refers here to ratio of the tile thickness (t) to the projectile diameter, (d), t/d@ 1, as they are both in the same order. The method applied

  13. Microarray Analysis of Late Response to Boron Toxicity in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oz, M.T.; Yilmaz, R.; Eyidogan, F.; Graaff, de L.H.; Yucel, M.; Oktem, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarrays, being high-density and high-throughput, allow quantitative analyses of thousands of genes and their expression patterns in parallel. In this study, Barley1 GereChip was used to investigate transcriptome changes associated with boron (B) toxicity in a sensitive barley cultivar

  14. Jagged Tiling for Intra-tile Parallelism and Fine-Grain Multithreading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Sunil; Manzano Franco, Joseph B.; Marquez, Andres; Feo, John T.; Gao, Guang R.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we have developed a novel methodology that takes into consideration multithreaded many-core designs to better utilize memory/processing resources and improve memory residence on tileable applications. It takes advantage of polyhedral analysis and transformation in the form of PLUTO, combined with a highly optimized finegrain tile runtime to exploit parallelism at all levels. The main contributions of this paper include the introduction of multi-hierarchical tiling techniques that increases intra tile parallelism; and a data-flow inspired runtime library that allows the expression of parallel tiles with an efficient synchronization registry. Our current implementation shows performance improvements on an Intel Xeon Phi board up to 32.25% against instances produced by state-of-the-art compiler frameworks for selected stencil applications.

  15. Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Robert; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the main hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. TileCal readout consists of about 10000 channels. The bulk of its upgrade will occur for the High Luminosity LHC operation (Phase 2 around 2023) where the peak luminosity will increase 5x compared to the design luminosity (10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}) but with maintained energy (i.e. 7+7 TeV). The TileCal upgrade aims to replace the majority of the on- and off-detector electronics so that all calorimeter signals can be digitized and directly sent to the off-detector electronics in the counting room. This will reduce pile-up problems and allow more complex trigger algorithms. To achieve the required reliability, redundancy has been introduced at different levels. Three different options are presently being investigated for the front-end electronic upgrade. Extensive test beam studies will determine which option will be selected. 10 Gbps optical links are used to read out all digitized data to t...

  16. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter gets into shape!

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The last of the 64 modules for one of the ATLAS Hadron tile calorimeter barrels has just arrived at CERN. This arrival puts an end to two and a half years work assembling and testing all the modules in the Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE), in Barcelona.

  17. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00383643; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central scintillator-steel sampling hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Jointly with other calorimeters it is designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analog signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The TileCal frontend electronics reads out the signals produced by about 10000 channels measuring energies ranging from ~30 MeV to ~2 TeV. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. The performance of the calorimeter has been established with cosmic ray muons and the large sample of the proton-proton collisions. The response of high momentum isolated muons is used to study the energy response at the electromagnetic scale, isolated hadr...

  18. ATLAS: First rehearsal for the tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The dry run assembly of the first barrel of the ATLAS tile hadron calorimeter has been successfully completed. It is now being dismantled again so that it can be lowered into the ATLAS cavern where it will be reassembled in October 2004.

  19. Altered activation of endothelial anti- and proapoptotic pathways by high-density lipoprotein from patients with coronary artery disease: role of high-density lipoprotein-proteome remodeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riwanto, Meliana; Rohrer, Lucia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Besler, Christian; Mocharla, Pavani; Mueller, Maja; Perisa, Damir; Heinrich, Kathrin; Altwegg, Lukas; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Lüscher, Thomas F; Landmesser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    ...). High-density lipoprotein from healthy subjects (HDL(Healthy)) has been proposed to exert endothelial antiapoptotic effects that may represent an important antiatherogenic property of the lipoprotein...

  20. Occupational lead poisoning in workers of traditional tile factories in Mashhad, Northeast of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balali-Mood, M; Shademanfar, S; Rastegar Moghadam, J; Afshari, R; Namaei Ghassemi, M; Allah Nemati, H; Keramati, M R; Neghabian, J; Balali-Mood, B; Zare, G

    2010-01-01

    Occupational lead poisoning is a health problem in Iran. It has not previously been studied in traditional tile makers. To determine the prevalence of lead poisoning and its complications in traditional tile workers in Mashhad, Northwest of Iran. We visited workers in two traditional tile factories and collected data by direct history taking and physical examination. Blood and urine lead concentrations were measured by heated graphite atomization technique. Overall, 108 men with mean±SD age of 37±7.8 years were studied. The mean±SD length of daily lead exposure was 9.8±6 years. The mean±SD blood lead concentration was 520.5±323.2 μg/L. The main objective clinical findings were the presence of lead line (64.8%), peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremities (37%), depressed deep tendon reflexes in the upper extremities (25.7%), tremor (23.3%), peripheral neuropathy of the lower extremities (17%) and abdominal tenderness (15.1%). The subjective findings were mainly attributed to the central nervous system and included loss of memory (57%), moodiness (56.1%), agitation (47.7%), drowsiness (36.4%) and headache (29.9%). There was no statistically significant correlation between the blood lead concentration and glomerular filtration rate. However, there were significant correlations between the blood lead concentration and each of the urine lead concentration (p<0.001), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.04), serum triglyceride level (p = 0.043), high density lipoprotein level (p = 0.012), and basophilic stippling (p = 0.048). Blood lead level, however, did not have any significant correlation with the presence of lead line. In traditional tile workers, lead toxicity is not uncommon and the toxic effects of lead were found more often on the teeth (bone), central and peripheral nervous system, hematological and lipid profiles than on the renal function.

  1. Properties of recycled high density polyethylene and coffee dregs composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibele Piedade Cestari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Composites of recycled high density polyethylene (HDPE-R and coffee dregs (COFD were elaborated. The blends were made at the proportions of 100-0, 90-10, 80-20, 70-30, 60-40, 50-50 and 40-60% polymer-filler ratio. The materials were evaluated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TGA, and compressive resistance test. The compounding was done using a two-stage co-kneader system extruder, and then cylindrical specimens were injection molded. All composites had a fine dispersion of the COFD into the polymeric matrix. The composites degraded in two steps. The first one was in a temperature lower than the neat HDPE, but higher than the average processing temperature of the polymer. The melting temperature and the degree of crystallinity of the composites resulted similar to the neat HDPE ones. The compressive moduli of the composites resulted similar to the neat polymer one. The results show that these composites have interesting properties as a building material.

  2. High-density housing that works for all

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Arif

    2010-03-15

    In an urbanising world, the way people fit into cities is vastly important - socially, economically, environmentally, even psychologically. So density, or the number of people living in a given area, is central to urban design and planning. Both governments and markets tend to get density wrong, leading to overcrowding, urban sprawl or often both. A case in point are the high-rise buildings springing up throughtout urban Asia - perceived as key features of that widely touted concept, the 'world-class city'. While some may offer a viable solution to land pressures and density requirements, many built to house evicted or resettled 'slum' dwellers are a social and economic nightmare - inconveniently sited, overcrowded and costly. New evidence from Karachi, Pakistan, reveals a real alternative. Poor people can create liveable high-density settlements as long as community control, the right technical assistance and flexible designs are in place. A city is surely 'world-class' only when it is cosmopolitan – built to serve all, including the poorest.

  3. High density scalp EEG in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyissa, Anteneh M; Britton, Jeffrey W; Van Gompel, Jamie; Lagerlund, Terrance L; So, Elson; Wong-Kisiel, Lilly C; Cascino, Gregory C; Brinkman, Benjamin H; Nelson, Cindy L; Watson, Robert; Worrell, Gregory A

    2017-01-01

    Localization of seizures in frontal lobe epilepsy using the 10-20 system scalp EEG is often challenging because neocortical seizure can spread rapidly, significant muscle artifact, and the suboptimal spatial resolution for seizure generators involving mesial frontal lobe cortex. Our aim in this study was to determine the value of visual interpretation of 76 channel high density EEG (hdEEG) monitoring (10-10 system) in patients with suspected frontal lobe epilepsy, and to evaluate concordance with MRI, subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM), conventional EEG, and intracranial EEG (iEEG). We performed a retrospective cohort study of 14 consecutive patients who underwent hdEEG monitoring for suspected frontal lobe seizures. The gold standard for localization was considered to be iEEG. Concordance of hdEEG findings with MRI, subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM), conventional 10-20 EEG, and iEEG as well as correlation of hdEEG localization with surgical outcome were examined. hdEEG localization was concordant with iEEG in 12/14 and was superior to conventional EEG 3/14 (pfrontal epilepsy requiring localization of epileptogenic brain. hdEEG may assist in developing a hypothesis for iEEG monitoring and could potentially augment EEG source localization. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Propofol anesthesia and sleep: a high-density EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Riedner, Brady A; Boveroux, Pierre; Noirhomme, Quentin; Landsness, Eric C; Brichant, Jean-Francois; Phillips, Christophe; Massimini, Marcello; Laureys, Steven; Tononi, Giulio; Boly, Mélanie

    2011-03-01

    The electrophysiological correlates of anesthetic sedation remain poorly understood. We used high-density electroencephalography (hd-EEG) and source modeling to investigate the cortical processes underlying propofol anesthesia and compare them to sleep. 256-channel EEG recordings in humans during propofol anesthesia. Hospital operating room. 8 healthy subjects (4 males). N/A. Initially, propofol induced increases in EEG power from 12-25 Hz. Loss of consciousness (LOC) was accompanied by the appearance of EEG slow waves that resembled the slow waves of NREM sleep. We compared slow waves in propofol to slow waves recorded during natural sleep and found that both populations of waves share similar cortical origins and preferentially propagate along the mesial components of the default network. However, propofol slow waves were spatially blurred compared to sleep slow waves and failed to effectively entrain spindle activity. Propofol also caused an increase in gamma (25-40 Hz) power that persisted throughout LOC. Source modeling analysis showed that this increase in gamma power originated from the anterior and posterior cingulate cortices. During LOC, we found increased gamma functional connectivity between these regions compared to the wakefulness. Propofol anesthesia is a sleep-like state and slow waves are associated with diminished consciousness even in the presence of high gamma activity.

  5. High-Density Infrared Surface Treatments of Refractories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiegs, T.N.

    2005-03-31

    Refractory materials play a crucial role in all energy-intensive industries and are truly a crosscutting technology for the Industries of the Future (IOF). One of the major mechanisms for the degradation of refractories and a general decrease in their performance has been the penetration and corrosion by molten metals or glass. Methods and materials that would reduce the penetration, wetting, and corrosive chemistry would significantly improve refractory performance and also maintain the quality of the processed liquid, be it metal or glass. This report presents the results of an R&D project aimed at investigating the use of high-density infrared (HDI) heating to surface treat refractories to improve their performance. The project was a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR). HDI is capable of heating the near-surface region of materials to very high temperatures where sintering, diffusion, and melting can occur. The intended benefits of HDI processing of refractories were to (1) reduce surface porosity (by essentially sealing the surface to prevent liquid penetration), (2) allow surface chemistry changes to be performed by bonding an adherent coating onto the underlying refractory (in order to inhibit wetting and/or improve corrosion resistance), and (3) produce noncontact refractories with high-emissivity surface coatings.

  6. High-density matter: current status and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many fascinating processes in the Universe which we observe in more and more in detail thanks to increasingly sophisticated technology. One of the most interesting phenomena is the life cycle of stars, their birth, evolution and death. If the stars are massive enough, they end their lives in the core-collapse supernova explosion, the one of the most violent events in the Universe. As the result, the densest objects in the Universe, neutron stars and/or black holes are created. Naturally, the physical basis of these events should be understood in line with observation. The current status of our knowledge of processes in the life of stars is far from adequate for their true understanding. We show that although many models have been constructed their detailed ability to describe observations is limited or non-existent. Furthermore the general failure of all models means that we cannot tell which are heading in the right direction. A possible way forward in modeling of high-density matter is outlined, exemplified by the quark-meson-coupling model (QMC. This model has a natural explanation for the saturation of nuclear forces and depends on very few adjustable parameters, strongly constrained by the underlying physics. Latest QMC results for compact objects and finite nuclei are presented.

  7. High-Density Lipoprotein Processing and Premature Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Corina; Gillard, Baiba K.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Pownall, Henry J.

    2015-01-01

    High plasma concentrations of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) are a well-accepted risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and the statin class of hypolipidemic drugs has emerged as an effective means of lowering LDL-C and reducing CVD risk. In contrast, the role of plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in protection against atherosclerotic vascular disease is the subject of considerable controversy. Although the inverse correlation between plasma HDL-C and CVD is widely acknowledged, reduction of CVD risk by interventions that increase HDL-C have not been uniformly successful. Several studies of large populations have shown that the first step in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), the transfer of cholesterol from the subendothelial space of the arterial wall via the plasma compartment to the liver for disposal, is impaired in patients with CVD. Here we review HDL function, the mechanisms by which HDL supports RCT, and the role of RCT in preventing CVD. PMID:26634027

  8. Biodegradation of high density polyethylene using Streptomyces species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Farzi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the biodegradation of high density polyethylene (HDPE by Streptomyces species isolated from the soil of East Azerbaijan, Iran. Methods: Powders of HDPE samples were prepared by grinding in different particle sizes of 212, 300, 420, and 500 microns. Each time 50 mg of a sample was poured to a liquid medium containing species. Samples were incubated for 18 days at 28 °C in a shaker-incubator and their degradation percentage was measured by weighting method. Produced metabolite at 18th day was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Also a film of HDPE was subjected to biodegradation and after one month was analyzed by scanning electron microscope which showed degradation on the surface of the film. Results: The results showed that Streptomyces species degraded 50 mg of HDPE sample with the size of 212 μm about 18.26%, 300 and 420 μm about 14.4%, and 500 μm about 13%. Kinetic modeling of biodegradation process showed that the reaction rate was first order with respect to concentration of HDPE. Based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry results, no high toxic material was produced during biodegradation of HDPE. Conclusions: The research showed that isolated Streptomyces sp. are capable of degradation of HDPE polymer with high degradation efficiency.

  9. Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol in thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agdeppa, D; Macaron, C; Mallik, T; Schnuda, N D

    1979-11-01

    The plasma levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were reduced in 16 hyperthyroid female patients compared to 37 euthyroid women (33.5 +/- 8 vs. 51.5 +/- 13 mg/dl (mean +/- SD); P less than 0.001). When 5 patients were restudied after restoration of the euthyroid state, plasma HDL-C increased from 29 +/- 5 to 43 +/- 11.5 mg/dl (P less than 0.05). In addition, in 22 hypothyroid women, HDL-C levels were also diminished compared to the euthyroid group (43.4 +/- 15.5 vs. 51.5 +/- 13 mg/dl; P less than 0.05). Nine patients were restudied after L-T4 replacement therapy; their levels of HDL-C increased but not to a statistically significant degree. The daily administration of 0.3 mg L-T4 to eight normal male volunteers for 1 month did not significantly affect HDL-C levels.

  10. Low fasting low high-density lipoprotein and postprandial lipemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorodila Konstandina

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol and disturbed postprandial lipemia are associated with coronary heart disease. In the present study, we evaluated the variation of triglyceride (TG postprandially in respect to serum HDL cholesterol levels. Results Fifty two Greek men were divided into 2 main groups: a the low HDL group (HDL p = 0.002. The low HDL group had significantly higher TG at 4, 6 and 8 h postprandially compared to the controls (p = 0.006, p = 0.002, and p p = 0.017 compared to the matched-control group. ROC analysis showed that fasting TG ≥ 121 mg/dl have 100% sensitivity and 81% specificity for an abnormal TG response (auc = 0.962, p Conclusions The delayed TG clearance postprandially seems to result in low HDL cholesterol even in subjects with low fasting TG. The fasting TG > 121 mg/dl are predictable for abnormal response to fatty meal.

  11. Crystallographic alignment of high-density gallium nitride nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Zhang, Yanfeng; Goldberger, Joshua; Sirbuly, Donald; Denlinger, Jonathan; Yang, Peidong

    2004-08-01

    Single-crystalline, one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are considered to be one of the critical building blocks for nanoscale optoelectronics. Elucidation of the vapour-liquid-solid growth mechanism has already enabled precise control over nanowire position and size, yet to date, no reports have demonstrated the ability to choose from different crystallographic growth directions of a nanowire array. Control over the nanowire growth direction is extremely desirable, in that anisotropic parameters such as thermal and electrical conductivity, index of refraction, piezoelectric polarization, and bandgap may be used to tune the physical properties of nanowires made from a given material. Here we demonstrate the use of metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) and appropriate substrate selection to control the crystallographic growth directions of high-density arrays of gallium nitride nanowires with distinct geometric and physical properties. Epitaxial growth of wurtzite gallium nitride on (100) gamma-LiAlO(2) and (111) MgO single-crystal substrates resulted in the selective growth of nanowires in the orthogonal [1\\[Evec]0] and [001] directions, exhibiting triangular and hexagonal cross-sections and drastically different optical emission. The MOCVD process is entirely compatible with the current GaN thin-film technology, which would lead to easy scale-up and device integration.

  12. High-Density Carbon (HDC) Ablator for NIC Ignition Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, D.; Haan, S.; Salmonson, J.; Milovich, J.; Callahan, D.

    2012-10-01

    HDC ablators show high performance based on simulations, despite the fact that the shorter pulses for HDC capsules result in higher M-band radiation compared to that for plastic capsules. HDC capsules have good 1-D performance because HDC has relatively high density (3.5 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator that absorbs more radiation. HDC ablators have good 2-D performance because the ablator surface is more than an order-of-magnitude smoother than Be or plastic ablators. Refreeze of the ablator near the fuel region can be avoided by appropriate dopant placement. Here we present two HDC ignition designs doped with W and Si. For the design with maximum W concentration of 1.0 at% (and respectively with maximum Si concentration of 2.0 at%): peak velocity = 0.395 (0.397) mm/ns, mass weighted fuel entropy = 0.463 (0.469) kJ/mg/eV, peak core hydrodynamic stagnation pressure = 690 (780) Gbar, and yield = 17.3 (20.2) MJ. 2-D simulations show that yield is close to 80% YoC even with 2.5x of nominal surface roughness on all surfaces. The clean fuel fraction is about 75% at peak velocity. Doping HDC with the required concentration of W and Si is in progress. A first undoped HDC Symcap is scheduled to be fielded later this year.

  13. High-Density Superconducting Cables for Advanced ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, C. G.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Duff, S. M.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Henderson, S. W.; Ho, S. P.; Koopman, B. J.; Li, D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is an upcoming Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) receiver upgrade, scheduled to deploy in 2016, that will allow measure- ment of the cosmic microwave background polarization and temperature to the highest precision yet with ACT. The AdvACT increase in sensitivity is partly provided by an increase in the number of transition-edge sensors (TESes) per array by up to a factor of two over the current ACTPol receiver detector arrays. The high-density AdvACT TES arrays require 70 µ m pitch superconducting flexible cables (flex) to connect the detec- tor wafer to the first-stage readout electronics. Here, we present the flex fabrication process and test results. For the flex wiring layer, we use a 400-nm-thick sputtered alu- minum film. In the center of the cable, the wiring is supported by a polyimide substrate, which smoothly transitions to a bare (uncoated with polyimide) silicon substrate at the ends of the cable for a robust wedge wire-bonding interface. Tests on the first batch of flex made for the first AdvACT array show that the flex will meet the requirements for AdvACT, with a superconducting critical current above 1 mA at 500 mK, resilience to mechanical and cryogenic stress, and a room temperature yield of 97%.

  14. High Density Lipoprotein: A Therapeutic Target in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Barter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available High density lipoproteins (HDLs have a number of properties that have the potential to inhibit the development of atherosclerosis and thus reduce the risk of having a cardiovascular event. These protective effects of HDLs may be reduced in patients with type 2 diabetes, a condition in which the concentration of HDL cholesterol is frequently low. In addition to their potential cardioprotective properties, HDLs also increase the uptake of glucose by skeletal muscle and stimulate the synthesis and secretion of insulin from pancreatic β cells and may thus have a beneficial effect on glycemic control. This raises the possibility that a low HDL concentration in type 2 diabetes may contribute to a worsening of diabetic control. Thus, there is a double case for targeting HDLs in patients with type 2 diabetes: to reduce cardiovascular risk and also to improve glycemic control. Approaches to raising HDL levels include lifestyle factors such as weight reduction, increased physical activity and stopping smoking. There is an ongoing search for HDL-raising drugs as agents to use in patients with type 2 diabetes in whom the HDL level remains low despite lifestyle interventions.

  15. [Residual risk: The roles of triglycerides and high density lipoproteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, Tanja; Kleber, Marcus; Silbernagel, Günther; Scharnagl, Hubert; März, Winfried

    2016-06-01

    In clinical trials, the reduction of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) with statins reduces the incidence rate of cardiovascular events by approximately one third. This means, that a sizeable "residual risk" remains. Besides high lipoprotein (a), disorders in the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and high density liproteins have been implicated as effectors of the residual risk. Both lipoprotein parameters correlate inversely with each other. Therefore, the etiological contributions of triglycerides and / or of HDL for developing cardiovascular disease can hardly be estimated from either observational studies or from intervention studies. The largely disappointing results of intervention studies with inhibitors of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein and in particular the available set of genetically-epidemiological studies suggest that in the last decade, the importance of HDL cholesterol has been overvalued, while the importance of triglycerides has been underestimated. High triglycerides not always atherogenic, but only if they are associated with the accumulation relatively cholesterol-enriched, incompletely catabolized remnants of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins (familial type III hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus). The normalization of the concentration of triglycerides and remnants by inhibiting the expression of apolipoprotein C3 is hence a new, promising therapeutic target. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Towards High-throughput Immunomics for Infectious Diseases: Use of Next-generation Peptide Microarrays for Rapid Discovery and Mapping of Antigenic Determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J. Carmona, Santiago; Nielsen, Morten; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    , we developed a highly-multiplexed platform based on next-generation high-density peptide microarrays to map these specificities in Chagas Disease, an exemplar of a human infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. We designed a high-density peptide microarray containing more than...... 175,000 overlapping 15mer peptides derived from T. cruzi proteins. Peptides were synthesized in situ on microarray slides, spanning the complete length of 457 parasite proteins with fully overlapped 15mers (1 residue shift). Screening of these slides with antibodies purified from infected patients...

  17. ATLAS tile hadronic calorimeter signal reconstruction and performance.

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We present the signal reconstruction and performance of ATLAS tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) using proton-proton collision data. The signal reconstruction algorithms, optimal filter and match filter, are discussed together with their signal reconstruction performances. We demonstrate the effects of increasing LHC pile-up conditions on noise description and signal reconstruction. Furthermore, the average energy deposited in a TileCal cell and the TileCal response to single isolated charged particles are presented. Finally, we discuss the TileCal upgrade plans during LHC shutdowns.

  18. Tile-based Level of Detail for the Parallel Age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niski, K; Cohen, J D

    2007-08-15

    Today's PCs incorporate multiple CPUs and GPUs and are easily arranged in clusters for high-performance, interactive graphics. We present an approach based on hierarchical, screen-space tiles to parallelizing rendering with level of detail. Adapt tiles, render tiles, and machine tiles are associated with CPUs, GPUs, and PCs, respectively, to efficiently parallelize the workload with good resource utilization. Adaptive tile sizes provide load balancing while our level of detail system allows total and independent management of the load on CPUs and GPUs. We demonstrate our approach on parallel configurations consisting of both single PCs and a cluster of PCs.

  19. Experimental study of high density foods for the Space Operations Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental study of high density foods for the Space Operations Center is described. A sensory evaluation of the high density foods was conducted first to test the acceptability of the products. A shelf-life study of the high density foods was also conducted for three different time lengths at three different temperatures. The nutritional analysis of the high density foods is at present incomplete.

  20. ATLAS rewards Russian supplier for scintillating tile production

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has awarded Russian firm SIA Luch from Podolsk in the Moscow region an ATLAS Supplier Award. This follows delivery by the company of the final batch of scintillating tiles for the collaboration's tile calorimeter some six months ahead of schedule. Representatives of the firm are seen here receiving the award at a ceremony held in the collaboration's tile calorimeter instrumentation plant at CERN on 30 July. In front of one tile calorimeter module instrumented by scintillating tiles are (left to right) IHEP physicists Evgueni Startchenko and Andrei Karioukhine, Luch Podolsk representatives Igor Karetnikov and Yuri Zaitsev, tile calorimeter project leader Rupert Leitner, ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni, and CERN tile calorimeter group leader Ana Henriques-Correia.

  1. WANG TILE SIZE IN TERMS OF CIRCULAR PARTICLE DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Šedlbauer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main advantage of the Wang tiling concept for material engineering is ability to create large material domains with a relatively small set of tiles. Such idea allows both a reduction of computational demands and preserving heterogeneity of a reconstructed media in comparison with traditional cell concepts. This work is dealing with a random heterogeneous material composed of monodisperse circular hard particles within a matrix. The Wang tile sets are generated via algorithm with molecular dynamics and adaptive boundaries approach. Even though previous works proved usefulness of the Wang tiling for material reconstruction, still plenty of questions remain unanswered. In here we would like to provide simulations with emphasis on the overall particle distribution and the ratio of hard disc number to tile size. The results and discussion should followers help with settings of both tile generations and the tiling algorithms when creating samples of various degree of heterogeneity.

  2. Solving Vertex Cover Problem Using DNA Tile Assembly Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA tile assembly models are a class of mathematically distributed and parallel biocomputing models in DNA tiles. In previous works, tile assembly models have been proved be Turing-universal; that is, the system can do what Turing machine can do. In this paper, we use tile systems to solve computational hard problem. Mathematically, we construct three tile subsystems, which can be combined together to solve vertex cover problem. As a result, each of the proposed tile subsystems consists of Θ(1 types of tiles, and the assembly process is executed in a parallel way (like DNA’s biological function in cells; thus the systems can generate the solution of the problem in linear time with respect to the size of the graph.

  3. Biomimetic High-Density Lipoproteins from a Gold Nanoparticle Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthi, Andrea Jane

    For hundreds of years the field of chemistry has looked to nature for inspiration and insight to develop novel solutions for the treatment of human diseases. The ability of chemists to identify, mimic, and modifiy small molecules found in nature has led to the discovery and development of many important therapeutics. Chemistry on the nanoscale has made it possible to mimic natural, macromolecular structures that may also be useful for understanding and treating diseases. One example of such a structure is high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The goal of this work is to use a gold nanoparticle (Au NP) as a template to synthesize functional mimics of HDL and characterize their structure and function. Chapter 1 details the structure and function of natural HDL and how chemistry on the nanoscale provides new strategies for mimicking HDL. This Chapter also describes the first examples of using nanoparticles to mimic HDL. Chapter 2 reports the synthesis and characterization of biomimetic HDL using different sizes of Au NPs and different surface chemistries and how these variables can be used to tailor the properties of biomimetic HDL. From these studies the optimal strategy for synthesizing biomimetic HDL was determined. In Chapter 3, the optimization of the synthesis of biomimetic HDL is discussed as well as a full characterization of its structure. In addition, the work in this chapter shows that biomimetic HDL can be synthesized on a large scale without alterations to its structure or function. Chapter 4 focuses on understanding the pathways by which biomimetic HDL accepts cholesterol from macrophage cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that biomimetic HDL is able to accept cholesterol by both active and passive pathways of cholesterol efflux. In Chapter 5 the preliminary results of in vivo studies to characterize the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of biomimetic HDL are presented. These studies suggest that biomimetic HDL traffics through tissues prone to

  4. Surface interactions involved in flashover with high density electronegative gases.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Keith Conquest; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wallace, Zachariah Red; Lehr, Jane Marie

    2010-01-01

    This report examines the interactions involved with flashover along a surface in high density electronegative gases. The focus is on fast ionization processes rather than the later time ionic drift or thermalization of the discharge. A kinetic simulation of the gas and surface is used to examine electron multiplication and includes gas collision, excitation and ionization, and attachment processes, gas photoionization and surface photoemission processes, as well as surface attachment. These rates are then used in a 1.5D fluid ionization wave (streamer) model to study streamer propagation with and without the surface in air and in SF6. The 1.5D model therefore includes rates for all these processes. To get a better estimate for the behavior of the radius we have studied radial expansion of the streamer in air and in SF6. The focus of the modeling is on voltage and field level changes (with and without a surface) rather than secondary effects, such as, velocities or changes in discharge path. An experiment has been set up to carry out measurements of threshold voltages, streamer velocities, and other discharge characteristics. This setup includes both electrical and photographic diagnostics (streak and framing cameras). We have observed little change in critical field levels (where avalanche multiplication sets in) in the gas alone versus with the surface. Comparisons between model calculations and experimental measurements are in agreement with this. We have examined streamer sustaining fields (field which maintains ionization wave propagation) in the gas and on the surface. Agreement of the gas levels with available literature is good and agreement between experiment and calculation is good also. Model calculations do not indicate much difference between the gas alone versus the surface levels. Experiments have identified differences in velocity between streamers on the surface and in the gas alone (the surface values being larger).

  5. Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein modulates activation of human leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Spirig

    Full Text Available An anti-inflammatory effect of reconstituted High Density Lipoprotein (rHDL has been demonstrated in atherosclerosis and in sepsis models. An increase of adhesion molecules as well as tissue factor expression on endothelial cells in response to inflammatory or danger signals are attenuated by the treatment with rHDL. Here we show the inhibitory effect of rHDL on the activation of human leukocytes in a whole blood assay as well as on monocyte-derived human dendritic cells (DC. Multiplex analysis of human whole blood showed that phytohaemagglutinin (PHA-induced secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2R, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12(p40, IL-15 and IFN-α was inhibited. Furthermore, an inhibitory effect on the production of the chemokines CCL-2, CCL-4, CCL-5, CXCL-9 and CXCL-10 was observed. Activation of granulocytes and CD14+ monocytes by PHA is inhibited dose-dependently by rHDL shown as decreased up-regulation of ICAM-1 surface expression. In addition, we found a strong inhibitory effect of rHDL on toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2- and TLR4-mediated maturation of DC. Treatment of DC with rHDL prevented the up-regulation of cell surface molecules CD80, CD83 and CD86 and it inhibited the TLR-driven activation of inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. These findings suggest that rHDL prevents activation of crucial cellular players of cellular immunity and could therefore be a useful reagent to impede inflammation as well as the link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  6. Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein modulates activation of human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirig, Rolf; Schaub, Alexander; Kropf, Alain; Miescher, Sylvia; Spycher, Martin O; Rieben, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An anti-inflammatory effect of reconstituted High Density Lipoprotein (rHDL) has been demonstrated in atherosclerosis and in sepsis models. An increase of adhesion molecules as well as tissue factor expression on endothelial cells in response to inflammatory or danger signals are attenuated by the treatment with rHDL. Here we show the inhibitory effect of rHDL on the activation of human leukocytes in a whole blood assay as well as on monocyte-derived human dendritic cells (DC). Multiplex analysis of human whole blood showed that phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2R, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12(p40), IL-15 and IFN-α was inhibited. Furthermore, an inhibitory effect on the production of the chemokines CCL-2, CCL-4, CCL-5, CXCL-9 and CXCL-10 was observed. Activation of granulocytes and CD14+ monocytes by PHA is inhibited dose-dependently by rHDL shown as decreased up-regulation of ICAM-1 surface expression. In addition, we found a strong inhibitory effect of rHDL on toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)- and TLR4-mediated maturation of DC. Treatment of DC with rHDL prevented the up-regulation of cell surface molecules CD80, CD83 and CD86 and it inhibited the TLR-driven activation of inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. These findings suggest that rHDL prevents activation of crucial cellular players of cellular immunity and could therefore be a useful reagent to impede inflammation as well as the link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  7. Porcelain tiles by the dry route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boschi, A. O.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, the second largest tile producer of the world, at present, 70% of the tiles are produced by the dry route. One of the main reasons that lead to this development is the fact that the dry route uses approximately 30% less thermal energy them the traditional wet route. The increasing world concern with the environment and the recognition of the central role played by the water also has pointed towards privileging dry processes. In this context the objective of the present work is to study the feasibility of producing high quality porcelain tiles by the dry route. A brief comparison of the dry and wet route, in standard conditions industrially used today to produce tiles that are not porcelain tiles, shows that there are two major differences: the particle sizes obtained by the wet route are usually considerably finer and the capability of mixing the different minerals, the intimacy of the mixture, is also usually better in the wet route. The present work studied the relative importance of these differences and looked for raw materials and operational conditions that would result in better performance and glazed porcelain tiles of good quality.

    En Brasil, en este momento segundo productor mundial, el 70% de los pavimentos cerámicos se obtiene por vía seca. Una de las razones fundamentales se debe a que esta vía supone un consumo energético inferior, en un 30%, a la via húmeda tradicional. La creciente preocupación mundial sobre los problemas medioambientales y el reconocimiento del papel central que juega el agua en este proceso han favorecido el desarrollo de la vía seca. En este contexto, el objetivo del presente trabajo es estudiar la viabilidad de la producción de pavimentos porcelánicos de alta calidad por vía seca. Una breve comparación entre ambas vías, en las condiciones standard de producción vigentes para producciones que no son de porcelánico, indican que existen dos diferencias substanciales; el tamaño de

  8. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes, located in the outer part of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two photomultiplier in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during the data taking, a set of calibration systems is used. The calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator based readout system. Combined information from all systems allows to monitor and equalise the calorimeter r...

  9. Laser calibration of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Di Gregorio, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    High performance stability of the ATLAS Tile calorimeter is achieved with a set of calibration procedures. One step of the calibrtion procedure is based on measurements of the response stability to laser excitation of the photomultipliers (PMTs) that are used to readout the calorimeter cells. A facility to study in lab the PMT stability response is operating in the PISA-INFN laboratories since 2015. Goals of the test in lab are to study the time evolution of the PMT response to reproduce and to understand the origin of the resonse drifts seen with the PMT mounted on the Tile calorimeter in its normal operation during LHC run I and run II. A new statistical approach was developed to measure the drift of the absolute gain. This approach was applied to both the ATLAS laser calibration data and to the data collected in the Pisa local laboratory. The preliminary results from these two studies are shown.

  10. Laser Calibration of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Di Gregorio, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    High performance stability of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is achieved with a set of calibration procedures. One step of the calibration procedure is based on measurements of the response stability to laser excitation of the PMTs that are used to readout the calorimeter cells. A facility to study in lab the PMT stability response is operating in the PISA-INFN laboratories since 2015. Goals of the tests in lab are to study the time evolution of the PMT response to reproduce and to understand the origin of the response drifts seen with the PMT mounted on the Tile calorimeter in its normal operating during LHC run I and run II. A new statistical approach was developed to measure drift of the absolute gain. This approach was applied to both the ATLAS laser calibration data and to data collected in the Pisa local laboratory. The preliminary results from these two studies are shown.

  11. Tiling by rectangles and alternating current

    KAUST Repository

    Prasolov, M. V.

    2011-04-01

    This paper is on tilings of polygons by rectangles. A celebrated physical interpretation of such tilings by R.L. Brooks, C.A.B. Smith, A.H. Stone and W.T. Tutte uses direct-current circuits. The new approach of this paper is an application of alternating-current circuits. The following results are obtained: •a necessary condition for a rectangle to be tilable by rectangles of given shapes;•a criterion for a rectangle to be tilable by rectangles similar to it but not all homothetic to it;•a criterion for a "generic" polygon to be tilable by squares. These results generalize those of C. Freiling, R. Kenyon, M. Laczkovich, D. Rinne, and G. Szekeres. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  12. Tile-in-ONE.cern.ch

    CERN Document Server

    Sivolella Gomes, Andressa; The ATLAS collaboration; Ferreira, Fernando; Solans, Carlos; Solodkov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter assesses the quality of data in order to ensure its proper operation. A number of tasks are then performed by running several tools and systems, which were independently developed to meet distinct collaboration’s requirements and do not necessarily builds an effective connection among them. Thus, a program is usually implemented without a global perspective of the detector, requiring basic software features. In addition, functionalities may overlap in their objectives and frequently replicate resources retrieval mechanisms. Tile-in-ONE is a unique platform that assembles various web systems used by the calorimeter community through a single framework and a standard technology. It provides an infrastructure to support the code implementation, avoiding duplication of work while integrating with an overall view of the detector status. Database connectors smooth the process of information access since developers do not need to be aware of where records are placed and how to extract th...

  13. Tilings colourful - only even more so

    CERN Document Server

    Baake, M; Scheffer, M

    2003-01-01

    We consider colour symmetries for planar tilings of certain n-fold rotational symmetry. The colourings are such that one colour occupies a submodule of n-fold symmetry, while the other colours encode the cosets. We determine the possible number of colours and count inequivalent colouring solutions with those numbers. The corresponding Dirichlet series generating functions are zeta functions of cyclotomic fields. The cases with phi(n)8 are discussed here.

  14. Wideband Monolithic Tile for Reconfigurable Phased Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    element enables reconfiguration of the antenna performance. The Quad Switch uses series PHEMT switching devices with integral junctions and bias control ...circuits. The Tile incorporates 36 such Quad Switches , having 288 PHEMT devices controlled by 144 control lines and 300 bias resistors. To the...Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) implementation of the Quad Switch with integral junctions, bias, and control . This paper will discuss the MMIC

  15. Human endothelial progenitor cells internalize high-density lipoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaemisa Srisen

    Full Text Available Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs originate either directly from hematopoietic stem cells or from a subpopulation of monocytes. Controversial views about intracellular lipid traffic prompted us to analyze the uptake of human high density lipoprotein (HDL, and HDL-cholesterol in human monocytic EPCs. Fluorescence and electron microscopy were used to investigate distribution and intracellular trafficking of HDL and its associated cholesterol using fluorescent surrogates (bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, cytochemical labels and fluorochromes including horseradish peroxidase and Alexa Fluor® 568. Uptake and intracellular transport of HDL were demonstrated after internalization periods from 0.5 to 4 hours. In case of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568, bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, a photooxidation method was carried out. HDL-specific reaction products were present in invaginations of the plasma membrane at each time of treatment within endocytic vesicles, in multivesicular bodies and at longer periods of uptake, also in lysosomes. Some HDL-positive endosomes were arranged in form of "strings of pearl"- like structures. HDL-positive multivesicular bodies exhibited intensive staining of limiting and vesicular membranes. Multivesicular bodies of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568-treated EPCs showed multilamellar intra-vacuolar membranes. At all periods of treatment, labeled endocytic vesicles and organelles were apparent close to the cell surface and in perinuclear areas around the Golgi apparatus. No HDL-related particles could be demonstrated close to its cisterns. Electron tomographic reconstructions showed an accumulation of HDL-containing endosomes close to the trans-Golgi-network. HDL-derived bodipy-cholesterol was localized in endosomal vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes and in many of the stacked Golgi cisternae and the trans-Golgi-network Internalized HDL-derived bodipy-cholesteryl oleate was channeled into the lysosomal

  16. Biofuels Barrier Properties of Polyamide 6 and High Density Polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fillot L.-A.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a comparison of the biofuels barrier properties of PolyAmide 6 (PA6 and High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE is presented. Model fuels were prepared as mixtures of toluene, isooctane and ethanol, the ethanol volume fraction varying between 0% and 100%. Barrier properties were determined at 40°C by gravimetric techniques or gas chromatography measurements, and it was shown that polyamide 6 permeability is lower than that of polyethylene on a wide range of ethanol contents up to 85% of ethanol (E85 in the biofuel, permeability of PA6 being 100 times lower than that of HDPE for low ethanol content fuels (E5, E0. The time-lags were also compared, and on the whole range of ethanol contents, HDPE permeation kinetics appears to be much faster than that of PA6, the time lag for a 1 mm thick specimens in presence of E10 being 50 days for PA6 and 0.5 days for HDPE. The compositions of the solvent fluxes were analyzed by FID gas chromatography, and it turned out that the solvent flux was mainly made up of ethanol (minimum 95% in the case of PA6, whereas in the case of HDPE, solvent flux was mainly made up of hydrocarbons. The implication of this difference in the solvent flux composition is discussed in the present article, and a side effect called the “fuel exhaustion process” is presented. The influence of the sample thickness was then studied, and for the different biofuels compositions, the pervaporation kinetics of polyamide 6 appeared to evolve with the square of the thickness, a long transitory regime being highlighted in the case of PA6. This result implies that the time needed to characterize the steady state permeability of thick PA6 parts such as fuel tanks can be very long (one year or more, this duration being far superior to the Euros 5 or Euro 6 standard emission measurements time scale. The influence of temperature on the permeability was finally assessed, and the activation energy that is the signature of the temperature

  17. Fuel-rich catalytic combustion of a high density fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.; Merritt, Sylvia A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel-rich catalytic combustion (ER is greater than 4) of the high density fuel exo-tetrahydrocyclopentadiene (JP-10) was studied over the equivalence ratio range 5.0 to 7.6, which yielded combustion temperatures of 1220 to 1120 K. The process produced soot-free gaseous products similar to those obtained with iso-octane and jet-A in previous studies. The measured combustion temperature agreed well with that calculated assuming soot was not a combustion product. The process raised the effective hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio from 1.6 to over 2.0, thus significantly improving the combustion properties of the fuel. At an equivalence ratio near 5.0, about 80 percent of the initial fuel carbon was in light gaseous products and about 20 percent in larger condensable molecules. Fuel-rich catalytic combustion has now been studied for three fuels with H/C ratios of 2.25 (iso-octane), 1.92 (jet-A), and 1.6 (JP-10). A comparison of the product distribution of these fuels shows that, in general, the measured concentrations of the combustion products were monotonic functions of the H/C ratio with the exception of hydrogen and ethylene. In these cases, data for JP-10 fell between iso-octane and jet-A rather than beyond jet-A. It is suggested that the ring cross-linking structure of JP-10 may be responsible for this behavior. All the fuels studied showed that the largest amounts of small hydrocarbon molecules and the smallest amounts of large condensable molecules occurred at the lower equivalence ratios. This corresponds to the highest combustion temperatures used in these studies. Although higher temperatures may improve this mix, the temperature is limited. First, the life of the present catalyst would be greatly shortened when operated at temperatures of 1300 K or greater. Second, fuel-rich catalytic combustion does not produce soot because the combustion temperatures used in the experiments were well below the threshold temperature (1350 K) for the formation of soot. Increasing

  18. A pilot study of transcription unit analysis in rice using oligonucleotide tiling-path microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolc, Viktor; Li, Lei; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2005-01-01

    transcription of the japonica rice genome. In a pilot experiment to test this approach, one array representing the reverse strand of the last 11.2 Mb sequence of chromosome 10 was analyzed in detail based on a mathematical model developed in this study. Analysis of the array data detected 77% of the reference...

  19. Effects of acute exercise on high density lipoprotein cholesterol and high density lipoprotein subfractions in moderately trained females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, P M; Fowler, S; Warty, V; Danduran, M; Visich, P; Keteyian, S

    1998-03-01

    Increases in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels have previously been reported after moderate exercise bouts lasting less than two hours in men. Little information exists, however, on HDL-C responses after moderate duration exercise in women. Post-exercise HDL-C modifications may appear differently in women because of higher baseline HDL-C concentrations and differences in lipolytic activity. To determine the influence of exercise on acute HDL-C responses in women, 12 trained premenopausal women (22 (4) years old; mean (SD)) who ran 24-48 km a week exercised on a motor driven treadmill at 75% VO2MAX until 3.34 MJ (800 kcal) were expended (72 (9) min). Subjects were all tested during the early follicular phase of their menstrual cycle. Fasting blood samples were obtained before exercise (baseline), immediately after (IPE), one hour after (1 h PE), 24 hours after (24 h PE), and 48 hours after (48 h PE) exercise. Plasma was analysed for HDL-C, HDL2-C, and HDL3-C. A significant increase in HDL-C was observed 48 h PE (p<0.05). HDL3-C increased IPE (p<0.01) but returned to baseline at 1 h PE. In contrast, HDL2-C was not significantly different from baseline at any time point. The rise in HDL-C, however, was attributed to an increase in both HDL2 and HDL3. Moreover, at 48 h PE, the increase in HDL-C correlated highly with changes in HDL2-C (r = 0.92). Thus it appears that exercise of moderate duration can elicit similar post-exercise increases in HDL-C in women to those previously reported in men. However, the changes in HDL subfractions leading to the rise in HDL-C may be different in women.

  20. Upgrading the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Souza, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. The TileCal readout consists of about 10000 channels. Its main upgrade will occur for the High Luminosity LHC phase (phase 2) where the peak luminosity will increase 5-fold compared to the design luminosity (10exp34 cm−2s−1) but with maintained energy (i.e. 7+7 TeV). An additional increase of the average luminosity with a factor of 2 can be achieved by luminosity leveling. This upgrade will probably happen around 2023. The upgrade aims at replacing the majority of the on- and off-detector electronics so that all calorimeter signals are directly digitized and sent to the off-detector electronics in the counting room. To achieve the required reliability, redundancy has been introduced at different levels. The smallest independent on-detector electronics module has been reduced from 45 channels to 6, greatly reducing the consequences of a failure in the on-detector electronics. The size of t...

  1. Foam-on-Tile Damage Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koharchik, Michael; Murphy, Lindsay; Parker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    An impact model was developed to predict how three specific foam types would damage the Space Shuttle Orbiter insulating tiles. The inputs needed for the model are the foam type, the foam mass, the foam impact velocity, the foam impact incident angle, the type being impacted, and whether the tile is new or aged (has flown at least one mission). The model will determine if the foam impact will cause damage to the tile. If it can cause damage, the model will output the damage cavity dimensions (length, depth, entry angle, exit angle, and sidewall angles). It makes the calculations as soon as the inputs are entered (less than 1 second). The model allows for the rapid calculation of numerous scenarios in a short time. The model was developed from engineering principles coupled with significant impact testing (over 800 foam impact tests). This model is applicable to masses ranging from 0.0002 up to 0.4 pound (0.09 up to 181 g). A prior tool performed a similar function, but was limited to the assessment of a small range of masses and did not have the large test database for verification. In addition, the prior model did not provide outputs of the cavity damage length, entry angle, exit angle, or sidewall angles.

  2. Upgrading the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. The TileCal readout consists of about 10000 channels. Its main upgrade will occur for the High Luminosity LHC phase (phase 2) where the luminosity will have increased 5-fold compared to the design luminosity (1034 cm−2s−1) but with maintained energy (i.e. 7+7 TeV). An additional luminosity increase by a factor of 2 can be achieved by luminosity leveling. This upgrade will probably happen around 2022. The upgrade aims at replacing the majority of the on- and off- detector electronics so that all calorimeter signals are directly digitized and sent to the off-detector electronics in the counting room. To achieve the required reliability, redundancy has been introduced at different levels. An ambitious upgrade development program is pursued studying different electronics options. Three different options are presently being investigated for the front-end electronic upgrade. Which one to u...

  3. Chemical Composition of Ceramic Tile Glazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anufrik, S. S.; Kurian, N. N.; Zhukova, I. I.; Znosko, K. F.; Belkov, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out laser emission and x-ray fluorescence spectral analysis of glaze before and after its application to ceramic tile produced by Keramin JSC (Belarus). We have studied the internal microstructure of the ceramic samples. It was established that on the surface and within the bulk interior of all the samples, there are micropores of sizes ranging from a few micrometers to tens of micrometers and microcracks as long as several hundred micrometers. The presence of micropores on the surface of the ceramic tile leads to an increase in the water absorption level and a decrease in frost resistance. It was found that a decrease in the surface tension of ceramic tile coatings is promoted by substitution of sodium by potassium, silica by boric anhydride, magnesium and barium by calcium, CaO by sodium oxide, and SiO2 by chromium oxide. We carried out a comparative analysis of the chemical composition of glaze samples using S4 Pioneer and ElvaX x-ray fluorescence spectrometers and also an LIBS laser emission analyzer.

  4. Evaluation of tile layer productivity in construction project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Hassan, Siti Hafizan; Rosly, Noorsyalili; Ul-Saufie, Ahmad Zia

    2017-10-01

    Construction is a key sector of the national economy for countries all over the world. Until today, construction industries are still facing lots of problems concerning the low productivity, poor safety and insufficient quality. Labour productivity is one of the factors that will give impact to the quality of projects. This study is focusing on evaluating the tile layer productivity in the area of Seberang Perai, Penang. The objective of this study is to determine the relationship of age and experience of tile layers with their productivity and to evaluate the effect of nationality to tile layers productivity. Interview and site observation of tile layers has been conducted to obtain the data of age, experience and nationality of tile layers. Site observation is made to obtain the number of tiles installed for every tile layer for the duration of 1 hour, and the data were analysed by using Statistical Package for Social Science (IBM SPSS Statistic 23) software. As a result, there is a moderate linear relationship between age and experience of tile layers with their productivity. The age of 30 and the experience of 4 years give the highest productivity. It also can be concluded that the tile layers from Indonesia tend to have higher productivity compared to tile layers from Myanmar.

  5. Tiling arbitrarily nested loops by means of the transitive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielecki Włodzimierz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach to generation of tiled code for arbitrarily nested loops is presented. It is derived via a combination of the polyhedral and iteration space slicing frameworks. Instead of program transformations represented by a set of affine functions, one for each statement, it uses the transitive closure of a loop nest dependence graph to carry out corrections of original rectangular tiles so that all dependences of the original loop nest are preserved under the lexicographic order of target tiles. Parallel tiled code can be generated on the basis of valid serial tiled code by means of applying affine transformations or transitive closure using on input an inter-tile dependence graph whose vertices are represented by target tiles while edges connect dependent target tiles. We demonstrate how a relation describing such a graph can be formed. The main merit of the presented approach in comparison with the well-known ones is that it does not require full permutability of loops to generate both serial and parallel tiled codes; this increases the scope of loop nests to be tiled.

  6. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Mona A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed.

  7. Mining Top-K Largest Tiles in a Data Stream

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Hoang Thanh; Pei, Wenjie; Prado, Adriana; Jeudy, Baptiste; Fromont, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Large tiles in a database are itemsets with the largest area which is defined as the itemset frequency in the database multiplied by its size. Mining these large tiles is an important pattern mining problem since tiles with a large area describe a large part of the database. In this paper, we introduce the problem of mining top-k largest tiles in a data stream under the sliding window model. We propose a candidate-based approach which summarizes the data stream and pro...

  8. Tiling as a Durable Abstraction for Parallelism and Data Locality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unat, Didem [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chan, Cy P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhang, Weiqun [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bell, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shalf, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-11-18

    Tiling is a useful loop transformation for expressing parallelism and data locality. Automated tiling transformations that preserve data-locality are increasingly important due to hardware trends towards massive parallelism and the increasing costs of data movement relative to the cost of computing. We propose TiDA as a durable tiling abstraction that centralizes parameterized tiling information within array data types with minimal changes to the source code. The data layout information can be used by the compiler and runtime to automatically manage parallelism, optimize data locality, and schedule tasks intelligently. In this study, we present the design features and early interface of TiDA along with some preliminary results.

  9. Geopolymers as potential repair material in tiles conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldes, Catarina F. M.; Lima, Augusta M.; Delgado-Rodrigues, José; Mimoso, João Manuel; Pereira, Sílvia R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The restoration materials currently used to fill gaps in historical architectural tiles (e.g. lime or organic resin pastes) usually show serious drawbacks in terms of compatibility, effectiveness or durability. The existing solutions do not fully protect Portuguese faïence tiles ( azulejos) in outdoor conditions and frequently result in further deterioration. Geopolymers can be a potential solution for tile lacunae infill, given the chemical-mineralogical similitude to the ceramic body, and also the durability and versatile range of physical properties that can be obtained through the manipulation of their formulation and curing conditions. This work presents and discusses the viability of the use of geopolymeric pastes to fill lacunae in tiles or to act as "cold" cast ceramic tile surrogates reproducing missing tile fragments. The formulation of geopolymers, namely the type of activators, the alumino-silicate source, the quantity of water required for adequate workability and curing conditions, was studied. The need for post-curing desalination was also considered envisaging their application in the restoration of outdoor historical architectural tiles frequently exposed to adverse environmental conditions. The possible advantages and disadvantages of the use of geopolymers in the conservation of tiles are also discussed. The results obtained reveal that geopolymers pastes are a promising material for the restoration of tiles, when compared to other solutions currently in use.

  10. Compensated readout for high-density MOS-gated memristor crossbar array

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2015-01-01

    Leakage current is one of the main challenges facing high-density MOS-gated memristor arrays. In this study, we show that leakage current ruins the memory readout process for high-density arrays, and analyze the tradeoff between the array density and its power consumption. We propose a novel readout technique and its underlying circuitry, which is able to compensate for the transistor leakage-current effect in the high-density gated memristor array.

  11. Design and evaluation of tile selection algorithms for tiled HTTP adaptive streaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devloo, J.; Lamot, N.; Campen, J. van; Weymaere, E.; Latré, S.; Famaey, J.; Brandenburg, R. van; Turck, F. de

    2013-01-01

    The future of digital video is envisioned to have an increase in both resolution and interactivity. New resolutions like 8k UHDTV are up to 16 times as big in number of pixels compared to current HD video. Interactivity includes the possibility to zoom and pan around in video. We examine Tiled HTTP

  12. Tiling a Pyramidal Polycube with Dominoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Bodini

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The notion of pyramidal polycubes, namely the piling-up of bricks of a non-increasing size, generalizes in ℝ n the concept of trapezoidal polyominoes. In the present paper, we prove that n-dimensional dominoes can tile a pyramidal polycube if and only if the latter is balanced, that is, if the number of white cubes is equal to the number of black ones for a chessboard-like coloration, generalizing the result of [BC92] when n=2

  13. The Production and Qualification of Scintillator Tiles for the ATLAS Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Alexa, C; Alves, R; Amaral, P; Ananiev, A; Anderson, K; Andresen, X; Antonaki, A; Batusov, V; Bednar, P; Bergeaas, E; Biscarat, C; Blanch, O; Blanchot, G; Bohm, C; Boldea, V; Bosi, F; Bosman, M; Bromberg, C; Budagov, Yu; Calvet, D; Cardeira, C; Carli, T; Carvalho, J; Cascella, M; Castillo, M V; Costello, J; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Cerqueira, A S; Clément, C; Cobal, M; Cogswell, F; Constantinescu, S; Costanzo, D; Da Silva, P; David, M; Davidek, T; Dawson, J; De, K; Del Prete, T; Diakov, E; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Dotti, A; Downing, R; Drake, G; Efthymiopoulos, I; Errede, D; Errede, S; Farbin, A; Fassouliotis, D; Feng, E; Fenyuk, A; Ferdi, C; Ferreira, B C; Ferrer, A; Flaminio, V; Flix, J; Francavilla, P; Fullana, E; Garde, V; Gellerstedt, K; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giangiobbe, V; Gildemeister, O; Gilewsky, V; Giokaris, N; Gollub, N; Gomes, A; González, V; Gouveia, J; Grenier, P; Gris, P; Guarino, V; Guicheney, C; Sen-Gupta, A; Hakobyan, H; Haney, M; Hellman, S; Henriques, A; Higón, E; Hill, N; Holmgren, S; Hruska, I; Hurwitz, M; Huston, J; Jen-La Plante, I; Jon-And, K; Junk, T; Karyukhin, A; Khubua, J; Klereborn, J; Konsnantinov, V; Kopikov, S; Korolkov, I; Krivkova, P; Kulchitskii, Yu A; Kurochkin, Yu; Kuzhir, P; Lapin, V; LeCompte, T; Lefèvre, R; Leitner, R; Li, J; Liablin, M; Lokajícek, M; Lomakin, Y; Lourtie, P; Lovas, L; Lupi, A; Maidantchik, C; Maio, A; Maliukov, S; Manousakis, A; Marques, C; Marroquim, F; Martin, F; Mazzoni, E; Merritt, F S; Myagkov, A; Miller, R; Minashvili, I; Miralles, L; Montarou, G; Némécek, S; Nessi, M; Nikitine, I; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Onofre, A; Oreglia, M; Palan, B; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Pereira, A; Pilcher, J E; Pina, J; Pinhão, J; Pod, E; Podlyski, F; Portell, X; Poveda, J; Pribyl, a L; Price, L E; Proudfoot, J; Ramalho, M; Ramstedt, M; Raposeiro, L; Reis, J; Richards, R; Roda, C; Romanov, V; Rosnet, P; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Rumiantsau, V; Rusakovich, N; Sada Costa, J; Salto, O; Salvachúa, B; Sanchis, E; Sanders, H; Santoni, C; Santos, J; Saraiva, J G; Sarri, F; Says, L P; Schlager, G; Schlereth, J L; Seixas, J M; Selldén, B; Shalanda, N; Shevtsov, P; Shochet, M; Silva, J; Simaitis, V; Simonyan, M; Sisakian, A; Sjölin, J; Solans, C; Solodkov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sosebee, M; Spanó, F; Speckmeyer, P; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E; Starovoitov, P; Suk, M; Sykora, I; Tang, F; Tas, P; Teuscher, R; Tischenko, M; Tokar, S; Topilin, N; Torres, J; Underwood, D; Usai, G; Valero, A; Valkár, S; Valls, J A; Vartapetian, A; Vazeille, F; Vellidis, C; Ventura, F; Vichou, I; Vivarelli, I; Volpi, M; White, A; Zaitsev, A; Zaytsev, Yu; Zenin, A; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zilka, B

    2007-01-01

    The production of the scintillator tiles for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is presented. In addition to the manufacture and production, the properties of the tiles will be presented including light yield, uniformity and stability.

  14. Evaluating the microbial diversity of an in vitro model of the human large intestine by phylogenetic microarray analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajilić-Stojanović, M.; Maathuis, A.; Heilig, H.G.H.J.; Venema, K.; Vos, W.M.de; Smidt, H.

    2010-01-01

    A high-density phylogenetic microarray targeting small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) sequences of over 1000 microbial phylotypes of the human gastrointestinal tract, the HITChip, was used to assess the impact of faecal inoculum preparation and operation conditions on an in vitro model of the human large

  15. The TileCal Barrel Test Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Leitner, R

    On 30th October, the mechanics test assembly of the central barrel of the ATLAS tile hadronic calorimeter was completed in building 185. It started on 23rd June and is the second wheel for the Tilecal completely assembled this year. The ATLAS engineers and technicians are quick: instead of the 27 weeks initially foreseen for assembling the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter (Tilecal) in building 185, they inserted the last of the 64 modules on 30th October after only 19 weeks. In part, this was due to the experience gained in the dry run assembly of the first extended barrel, produced in Spain, in spring this year (see Bulletin 23/2003); however, the central barrel is twice as long - and twice as heavy. With a length of 6.4 metres, an outer diameter of 8.5 metres and an inner diameter of 4.5 metres, the object weight is 1300 tonnes. The whole barrel cylinder is supported by the stainless steel support structure weighing only 27 tons. The barrel also has to have the right shape: over the whole 8...

  16. Terminating DNA Tile Assembly with Nanostructured Caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Jiang, Ruoyu; Reinhart, Seth; Mohammed, Abdul M; Jorgenson, Tyler D; Schulman, Rebecca

    2017-10-24

    Precise control over the nucleation, growth, and termination of self-assembly processes is a fundamental tool for controlling product yield and assembly dynamics. Mechanisms for altering these processes programmatically could allow the use of simple components to self-assemble complex final products or to design processes allowing for dynamic assembly or reconfiguration. Here we use DNA tile self-assembly to develop general design principles for building complexes that can bind to a growing biomolecular assembly and terminate its growth by systematically characterizing how different DNA origami nanostructures interact with the growing ends of DNA tile nanotubes. We find that nanostructures that present binding interfaces for all of the binding sites on a growing facet can bind selectively to growing ends and stop growth when these interfaces are presented on either a rigid or floppy scaffold. In contrast, nucleation of nanotubes requires the presentation of binding sites in an arrangement that matches the shape of the structure's facet. As a result, it is possible to build nanostructures that can terminate the growth of existing nanotubes but cannot nucleate a new structure. The resulting design principles for constructing structures that direct nucleation and termination of the growth of one-dimensional nanostructures can also serve as a starting point for programmatically directing two- and three-dimensional crystallization processes using nanostructure design.

  17. Ultrasonic characterization of defective porcelain tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren, E.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is the optimization of ultrasonic methods in the non-destructive testing of sintered porcelain tiles containing defects. For this reason, a silicon nitride ball, carbon black and PMMA (Polymethylmethacrylate were imbedded in porcelain tile granules before pressing to make special defects in tiles. After sintering at 1220ºC, the time of flight of the ultrasonic waves and ultrasonic signal amplitudes through the sintered porcelain tiles were measured by a contact ultrasonic transducer operating on pulse-echo mode. This method can allow for defect detection using the A-scan. The results of the test showed that the amplitude of the received peak for a defective part is smaller than for a part which has no defects. Depending on the size, shape and position of the defect, its peak can be detected. Additionally, an immersion pulse-echo C-scan method was also used to differentiate between defects in porcelain tiles. By using this technique, it is possible to determine the place and shape of defects. To support the results of the ultrasonic investigation, a SEM characterization was also made.

    El fin principal de este trabajo es la optimización de métodos ultrasónicos en la prueba no destructiva de azulejos sinterizados de porcelana que contienen defectos. Por lo tanto, bolas del nitruro de silicio, negros de carbón y PMMA (polimetilmetacrilato fueron encajados en gránulos del azulejo de porcelana antes de presionar para hacer defectos especiales en azulejos. Después de sinterizado en 1220ºC, el tiempo de vuelo de las ondas ultrasónicas fue medido a través del azulejo sinterizado de la porcelana. El tiempo del vuelo de ondas ultrasónicas fue medido por un transductor de contacto ultrasónico operando en modo eco-pulso. Este método puede permitir la detección de defectos usando escaneo-A. Los resultados de la prueba demostraron que la amplitud del pico recibido por partes defectuosas es más pequeño que la parte

  18. Low-Density, Aerogel-Filled Thermal-Insulation Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maryann; Heng, Vann; Barney, Andrea; Oka, Kris; Droege, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel fillings have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop low-density thermal-insulation tiles that, relative to prior such tiles, have greater dimensional stability (especially less shrinkage), equal or lower thermal conductivity, and greater strength and durability. In preparation for laboratory tests of dimensional and thermal stability, prototypes of aerogel-filled versions of recently developed low-density tiles have been fabricated by impregnating such tiles to various depths with aerogel formations ranging in density from 1.5 to 5.6 lb/ft3 (about 53 to 200 kg/cu m). Results available at the time of reporting the information for this article showed that the thermal-insulation properties of the partially or fully aerogel- impregnated tiles were equivalent or superior to those of the corresponding non-impregnated tiles and that the partially impregnated tiles exhibited minimal (<1.5 percent) shrinkage after multiple exposures at a temperature of 2,300 F (1,260 C). Latest developments have shown that tiles containing aerogels at the higher end of the density range are stable after multiple exposures at the said temperature.

  19. METHOD FOR EVALUATING MOLD GROWTH ON CEILING TILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A method to extract mold spores from porous ceiling tiles was developed using a masticator blender. Ceiling tiles were inoculated and analyzed using four species of mold. Statistical analysis comparing results obtained by masticator extraction and the swab method was performed. T...

  20. Drainage water management effects on tile discharge and water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) fluxes from tile drained watersheds have been implicated in water quality studies of the Mississippi River Basin, but the contribution of tile drains to N export in headwater watersheds is not well understood. The objective of this study was to ascertain seasonal and annual contribution...

  1. New SWAT tile drain equations: Modifications, Calibration, Validation, and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subsurface tile drainage is a commonly used agricultural practice to enhance crop yield in poorly drained but highly productive soils in many other regions of the world. However, the presence of subsurface tile drainage systems also expedites the transport of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) and other chemi...

  2. Computerized Machine for Cutting Space Shuttle Thermal Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Luis E.; Reuter, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    A report presents the concept of a machine aboard the space shuttle that would cut oversized thermal-tile blanks to precise sizes and shapes needed to replace tiles that were damaged or lost during ascent to orbit. The machine would include a computer-controlled jigsaw enclosed in a clear acrylic shell that would prevent escape of cutting debris. A vacuum motor would collect the debris into a reservoir and would hold a tile blank securely in place. A database stored in the computer would contain the unique shape and dimensions of every tile. Once a broken or missing tile was identified, its identification number would be entered into the computer, wherein the cutting pattern associated with that number would be retrieved from the database. A tile blank would be locked into a crib in the machine, the shell would be closed (proximity sensors would prevent activation of the machine while the shell was open), and a "cut" command would be sent from the computer. A blade would be moved around the crib like a plotter, cutting the tile to the required size and shape. Once the tile was cut, an astronaut would take a space walk for installation.

  3. NMR studies of artificial double-crossover DNA tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerapandian, Murugan; Kim, Byeonghoon; Amin, Rashid; Lee, Junwye; Yun, Kyusik; Park, Sung Ha

    2012-03-01

    This report documents the design and characterization of DNA molecular nanoarchitectures consisting of artificial double crossover DNA tiles with different geometry and chemistry. The Structural characterization of the unit tiles, including normal, biotinylated and hairpin loop structures, are morphologically studied by atomic force microscopy. The specific proton resonance of the individual tiles and their intra/inter nucleotide relationships are verified by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 2-dimensional correlation spectral studies, respectively. Significant up-field and down-field shifts in the resonance signals of the individual residues at various temperatures are discussed. The results suggest that with artificially designed DNA tiles it is feasible to obtain structural information of the relative base sequences. These tiles were later fabricated into 2D DNA lattice structures for specific applications such as protein arrangement by biotinylated bulged loops or pattern generation using a hairpin structure.

  4. Development of anti-slip sustainable tiles from agricultural waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkefli, Zainordin Firdaus; Zainol, Mohd Remy Rozainy Mohd Arif; Osman, Norhayati

    2017-04-01

    In general of 80% the human activities is located in the building. Buildings constructed should be in line with full functions and optimum safety features. Aspects to be emphasized is the slip on the floor of the building. The selection of tiles must have anti-slip characteristics and achieve standard strength stress. This study is conducted to develop anti-slip tiles modification using agricultural waste. The material used is agricultural waste such rice husks, palm fibre and saw dusk mixed into the clay and then baked at a temperature of 900-1185 C °. Agricultural waste mixture ratio is 5%, 10% and 15%. The samples of tiles are produced for experiments. The results of agricultural waste tiles show that the strength is higher than standard strength, the water absorption less than standard tiles and pendulum value test is exceeds 36.

  5. Optical design and studies of a tiled single grating pulse compressor for enhanced parametric space and compensation of tiling errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiya, D.; Patidar, R. K.; Sharma, J.; Joshi, A. S.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-04-01

    A new optical design of tiled single grating pulse compressor has been proposed, set-up and studied. The parametric space, i.e. the laser beam diameters that can be accommodated in the pulse compressor for the given range of compression lengths, has been calculated and shown to have up to two fold enhancement in comparison to our earlier proposed optical designs. The new optical design of the tiled single grating pulse compressor has an additional advantage of self compensation of various tiling errors like longitudinal and lateral piston, tip and groove density mismatch, compared to the earlier designs. Experiments have been carried out for temporal compression of 650 ps positively chirped laser pulses, at central wavelength 1054 nm, down to 235 fs in the tiled grating pulse compressor set up with the proposed design. Further, far field studies have been performed to show the desired compensation of the tiling errors takes place in the new compressor.

  6. Tile-in-ONE: A web platform which integrates Tile Calorimeter data quality and calibration assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivolella, A.; Ferreira, F.; Maidantchik, C.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Burghgrave, B.; Smirnov, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter collaboration assesses the quality of calibration data in order to ensure its proper operation. A number of tasks is then performed by executing several tools and accessing web systems, which were independently developed to meet distinct collaboration's requirements and do not necessarily are connected with each other. Thus, to attend the collaboration needs, several programs are usually implemented without a global perspective of the detector, requiring basic software features. In addition, functionalities may overlap in their objectives and frequently replicate resources retrieval mechanisms. Tile-in-ONE is a designed and implemented platform that assembles various web systems used by the calorimeter community through a single framework and a standard technology. It provides an infrastructure to support the code implementation, avoiding duplication of work while integrating with an overall view of the detector status. Database connectors smooth the process of information access since developers do not need to be aware of where records are placed and how to extract them. Within the environment, a dashboard stands for a particular Tile operation aspect and gets together plug-ins, i.e. software components that add specific features to an existing application. A server contains the platform core, which represents the basic environment to deal with the configuration, manage user settings and load plug-ins at runtime. A web middleware assists users to develop their own plug-ins, perform tests and integrate them into the platform as a whole. Backends are employed to allow that any type of application is interpreted and displayed in a uniform way. This paper describes Tile-in-ONE web platform.

  7. Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the status of the on-detector and off-detector electronics developments for the Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at the LHC scheduled around 2024. A demonstrator prototype for a slice of the calorimeter including most of the new electronics is planned to be installed in ATLAS in middle 2014 during the Long Shutdown. For the on-detector readout, three different front-end boards (FEB) alternatives are being studied: a new version of the 3-in-1 card, the QIE chip and a dedicated ASIC called FATALIC. The MainBoard will provide communication and control to the FEBs and the DaughterBoard will transmit the digitized data to the off-detector electronics in the counting room, where the sROD will perform processing tasks on them.

  8. Upgrading the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio, F

    2013-01-01

    This work summarizes the status of the on-detector and off-detector electronics developments for the Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at the LHC scheduled around 2022. A demonstrator prototype for a slice of the calorimeter including most of the new electronics is planned to be installed in ATLAS in middle 2014 during the Long Shutdown. For the on-detector readout, three different front-end boards (FEB) alternatives are being studied: a new version of the 3-in-1 card, the QIE chip and a dedicated ASIC called FATALIC. The MainBoard will provide communication and control to the FEBs and the DaughterBoard will transmit the digitized data to the off-detector electronics in the counting room, where the sROD will perform processing tasks on them.

  9. Upgrading the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrió Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work summarizes the status of the on-detector and off-detector electronics developments for the Phase 2 Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at the LHC scheduled around 2022. A demonstrator prototype for a slice of the calorimeter including most of the new electronics is planned to be installed in ATLAS in the middle of 2014 during the first Long Shutdown. For the on-detector readout, three different front-end boards (FEB alternatives are being studied: a new version of the 3-in-1 card, the QIE chip and a dedicated ASIC called FATALIC. The Main Board will provide communication and control to the FEBs and the Daughter Board will transmit the digitized data to the off-detector electronics in the counting room, where the super Read-Out Driver (sROD will perform processing tasks on them and will be the interface to the trigger levels 0, 1 and 2.

  10. High quality protein microarray using in situ protein purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenomic era, high throughput protein expression and protein microarray technologies have progressed markedly permitting screening of therapeutic reagents and discovery of novel protein functions. Hexa-histidine is one of the most commonly used fusion tags for protein expression due to its small size and convenient purification via immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. This purification process has been adapted to the protein microarray format, but the quality of in situ His-tagged protein purification on slides has not been systematically evaluated. We established methods to determine the level of purification of such proteins on metal chelate-modified slide surfaces. Optimized in situ purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins has the potential to become the new gold standard for cost-effective generation of high-quality and high-density protein microarrays. Results Two slide surfaces were examined, chelated Cu2+ slides suspended on a polyethylene glycol (PEG coating and chelated Ni2+ slides immobilized on a support without PEG coating. Using PEG-coated chelated Cu2+ slides, consistently higher purities of recombinant proteins were measured. An optimized wash buffer (PBST composed of 10 mM phosphate buffer, 2.7 mM KCl, 140 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween 20, pH 7.4, further improved protein purity levels. Using Escherichia coli cell lysates expressing 90 recombinant Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, 73 proteins were successfully immobilized, and 66 proteins were in situ purified with greater than 90% purity. We identified several antigens among the in situ-purified proteins via assays with anti-S. pneumoniae rabbit antibodies and a human patient antiserum, as a demonstration project of large scale microarray-based immunoproteomics profiling. The methodology is compatible with higher throughput formats of in vivo protein expression, eliminates the need for resin-based purification and circumvents

  11. Peptide based diagnostics: are random-sequence peptides more useful than tiling proteome sequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalkar, Krupa Arun; Johnston, Stephan Albert; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-02-01

    Diagnostics using peptide ligands have been available for decades. However, their adoption in diagnostics has been limited, not because of poor sensitivity but in many cases due to diminished specificity. Numerous reports suggest that protein-based rather than peptide-based disease detection is more specific. We examined two different approaches to peptide-based diagnostics using Coccidioides (aka Valley Fever) as the disease model. Although the pathogen was discovered more than a century ago, a highly sensitive diagnostic remains unavailable. We present a case study where two different approaches to diagnosing Valley Fever were used: first, overlapping Valley Fever epitopes representing immunodominant Coccidioides antigens were tiled using a microarray format of presynthesized peptides. Second, a set of random sequence peptides identified using a 10,000 peptide immunosignaturing microarray was compared for sensitivity and specificity. The scientific hypothesis tested was that actual epitope peptides from Coccidioides would provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity as a diagnostic. Results demonstrated that random sequence peptides exhibited higher accuracy when classifying different stages of Valley Fever infection vs. epitope peptides. The epitope peptide array did provide better performance than the existing immunodiffusion array, but when directly compared to the random sequence peptides, reported lower overall accuracy. This study suggests that there are competing aspects of antibody recognition that involve conservation of pathogen sequence and aspects of mimotope recognition and amino acid substitutions. These factors may prove critical when developing the next generation of high-performance immunodiagnostics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modular Interactive Tiles for Rehabilitation – Evidence and Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2010-01-01

    We developed modular interactive tiles to be used for playful physiotherapy, which is supposed to motivate patients to engage in and perform physical rehabilitation exercises. We report on evidence for elderly training. We tested the modular interactive tiles for an extensive period of time (4...... years) in daily use in a hospital rehabilitation unit e.g. for cardiac patients. Also, the tiles were tested for performing physical rehabilitation of stroke patients both in hospital, rehabilitation centre and in their private home. In all test cases qualitative feedback indicate that the patients find...

  13. Laser cutting speeds for ceramic tile: a theoretical empirical comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, I.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents a comparison of theoretically-predicted optimum cutting speeds for decorative ceramic tile with experimentally-derived data. Four well-established theoretical analyses are considered and applied to the laser cutting of ceramic tile, i.e. Rosenthal's moving point heat-source model and the heat balance approaches of Powell, Steen and Chryssolouris. The theoretical results are subsequently compared and contrasted with actual cutting data taken from an existing laser machining database. Empirical models developed by the author are described which have been successfully used to predict cutting speeds for various thicknesses of ceramic tile.

  14. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter: simulation and validation of the response

    CERN Document Server

    Faltova, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is readout by wavelength shifting fibers and transmitted to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being further transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. Detailed simulations are described in this contribution, ranging from the implementation of the geometrical elements to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, including specific noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. Special attention is given to the improved optical signal propagation and the validation with the real particle data.

  15. High Density Lipoproteins and Arteriosclerosis: Role of Cholesterol Efflux and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    von Eckardstein, Arnold; Nofer, Jerzy Roch; Assmann, Gerd

    2001-01-01

    Abstract—High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is an important risk factor for coronary heart disease, and HDL exerts various potentially antiatherogenic properties, including the mediation of reverse transport of cholesterol...

  16. Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein increases the antiatherogenic potential of high density lipoproteins in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Haperen (Rien); A. van Tol (Arie); P. Vermeulen; M. Jauhiainen; T. van Gent (Teus); P.M. van den Berg (Paul); S. Ehnholm (Sonja); A.W.M. van der Kamp (Arthur); M.P.G. de Crom (Rini); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractPlasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) transfers phospholipids between lipoprotein particles and alters high density lipoprotein (HDL) subfraction patterns in vitro, but its physiological function is poorly understood. Transgenic mice that overexpress

  17. A Decentralized Control Strategy for High Density Material Flow Systems with Automated Guided Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a universal decentralized control strategy for grid-based high-density material flow systems with automated guided vehicles and gives insights into the system behavior as well as the solution quality.

  18. Moderate doses of alcoholic beverages with dinner and postprandial high density lipoprotein composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, H.F.J.; Veenstra, J.; Tol, A. van; Groener, J.E.M.; Schaafsma, G.

    1998-01-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. In this study, postprandial changes in plasma lipids, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) composition and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity levels

  19. The Influence of Opacity on Hydrogen Line Emission and Ionisation Balance in High Density Divertor Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Behringer, K.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of opacity on hydrogen line emission and ionisation balance in high density divertor plasmas. - Garching bei München : Max-Planck-Inst. für Plasmaphysik, 1997. - 21 S. - (IPP-Report ; 10/5)

  20. Test of high density UC targets development at Gatchina for neutron rich radioactive beam facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Lhersonneau, G; Lanchais, A; Rizzi, V; Tecchio, L.B; Bajeat, O; Essabaa, S; Lau, C; Cheikh Mhamed, M; Roussière, B; Barzakh, A.E; Fedorov, D.V; lonan, A.M; lvanov, V.S; Mezilev, K.A; Moroz, F.V; Orlov, S.YU; Panteleevc, V.N; Volkovc, YU.M; Dubois, M; Eléon, C; Gaubert, G; Jardin, P; Leroy, R; Saint Laurent, M.G; Villari, A.C.C; Stroe, L; 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.05.033

    2008-01-01

    Production of on-line mass separator neutron rich isotopes using fission induced by 1 GeV protons on high density uranium carbide has been investigate and results compared with the low density targets yields.

  1. High-density lipoproteins and adrenal steroidogenesis : A population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenwerf, Edward; Kerstens, Michiel N.; Links, Thera P.; Kema, Ido P.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    BACKGROUND: Cholesterol trafficked within plasma lipoproteins, in particular high-density lipoproteins (HDL), may represent an important source of cholesterol that is required for adrenal steroidogenesis. Based on a urinary gas chromatography method, compromised adrenal function has been suggested

  2. Traffic Signal Synchronization in the Saturated High-Density Grid Road Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hu, Xiaojian; Lu, Jian; Wang, Wei; Zhirui, Ye

    2015-01-01

    ... has inspired several urban road network development trends, including increased use of the high-density grid road network (HGRN). The structure of the HGRN is the orthogonal checkerboard pattern,...

  3. Lessons learned from building and calibrating the ICWall, a stereo tiled display: Research Articles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaaf, T.; Germans, D.M.; Bal, H.E.; Koutek, M.

    2007-01-01

    Implementation of stereo tiled displays is a rather demanding task. In this article we want to share the lessons we have learned during the design and construction of the ICWall tiled display. This large display, used in a classroom setting, is a high-resolution stereo tiled display (2×8 tiles),

  4. Fundamental Study of Interactions Between Pulsed High-Density Plasmas and Materials for Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-23

    interaction phenomena. The high density thermal plasma source was also used to produce surface tracking high density non-thermal plasma discharges...state. A set of high speed image sequences were used to determine the dielectric tracking path and propagation velocity of the non- thermal streamer...represented by a slab of atoms supported by a frozen layer held in the position of the bulk. A thermostat above this frozen layer is used to remove

  5. High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver>4kW/cm2 of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources.

  6. Expansion of Endothelial Progenitor Cells in High Density Dot Culture of Rat Bone Marrow Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Kretlow, James D.; Zhou, Guangdong; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2014-01-01

    In vitro expansion of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) remains a challenge in stem cell research and its application. We hypothesize that high density culture is able to expand EPCs from bone marrow by mimicking cell-cell interactions of the bone marrow niche. To test the hypothesis, rat bone marrow cells were either cultured in high density (2×105 cells/cm2) by seeding total 9×105 cells into six high density dots or cultured in regular density (1.6×104 cells/cm2) with the same total number of cells. Flow cytometric analyses of the cells cultured for 15 days showed that high density cells exhibited smaller cell size and higher levels of marker expression related to EPCs when compared to regular density cultured cells. Functionally, these cells exhibited strong angiogenic potentials with better tubal formation in vitro and potent rescue of mouse ischemic limbs in vivo with their integration into neo-capillary structure. Global gene chip and ELISA analyses revealed up-regulated gene expression of adhesion molecules and enhanced protein release of pro-angiogenic growth factors in high density cultured cells. In summary, high density cell culture promotes expansion of bone marrow contained EPCs that are able to enhance tissue angiogenesis via paracrine growth factors and direct differentiation into endothelial cells. PMID:25254487

  7. Evaluating Approaches to Rendering Braille Text on a High-Density Pin Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morash, Valerie S; Russomanno, Alexander; Gillespie, R Brent; OModhrain, Sile

    2017-10-13

    Refreshable displays for tactile graphics are typically composed of pins that have smaller diameters and spacing than standard braille dots. We investigated configurations of high-density pins to form braille text on such displays using non-refreshable stimuli produced with a 3D printer. Normal dot braille (diameter 1.5 mm) was compared to high-density dot braille (diameter 0.75 mm) wherein each normal dot was rendered by high-density simulated pins alone or in a cluster of pins configured in a diamond, X, or square; and to "blobs" that could result from covering normal braille and high-density multi-pin configurations with a thin membrane. Twelve blind participants read MNREAD sentences displayed in these conditions. For high-density simulated pins, single pins were as quickly and easily read as normal braille, but diamond, X, and square multi-pin configurations were slower and/or harder to read than normal braille. We therefore conclude that as long as center-to-center dot spacing and dot placement is maintained, the dot diameter may be open to variability for rendering braille on a high density tactile display.

  8. Fluorous-based carbohydrate microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang-Seuk; Jaipuri, Firoz A; Pohl, Nicola L

    2005-09-28

    The success of microarrays, such as DNA chips, for biosample screening with minimal sample usage has led to a variety of technologies for assays on glass slides. Unfortunately, for small molecules, such as carbohydrates, these methods usually rely on covalent bond formation, which requires unique functional handles and multiple chemical steps. A new simpler concept in microarray formation is based on noncovalent fluorous-based interactions. A fluorous tail is designed not only to aid in saccharide purification but also to allow direct formation of carbohydrate microarrays on fluorous-derivatized glass slides for biological screening with lectins, such as concanavalin A. The noncovalent interactions in the fluorous-based array are even strong enough to withstand the detergents used in assays with the Erythrina crystagalli lectin. Additionally, the utility of benzyl carbonate protecting groups on fucose building blocks for the formation of alpha-linkages is demonstrated.

  9. Carbohydrate microarrays in plant science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangel, Jonatan U; Pedersen, Henriette L; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Ahl, Louise I; Salmean, Armando Asuncion; Egelund, Jack; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Clausen, Mads H; Willats, William G T

    2012-01-01

    Almost all plant cells are surrounded by glycan-rich cell walls, which form much of the plant body and collectively are the largest source of biomass on earth. Plants use polysaccharides for support, defense, signaling, cell adhesion, and as energy storage, and many plant glycans are also important industrially and nutritionally. Understanding the biological roles of plant glycans and the effective exploitation of their useful properties requires a detailed understanding of their structures, occurrence, and molecular interactions. Microarray technology has revolutionized the massively high-throughput analysis of nucleotides, proteins, and increasingly carbohydrates. Using microarrays, the abundance of and interactions between hundreds and thousands of molecules can be assessed simultaneously using very small amounts of analytes. Here we show that carbohydrate microarrays are multifunctional tools for plant research and can be used to map glycan populations across large numbers of samples to screen antibodies, carbohydrate binding proteins, and carbohydrate binding modules and to investigate enzyme activities.

  10. Calibration and monitoring of the ATLAS Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). PMT signals are then digitized at 40~MHz and stored on detector and are only transferred off detector once the first level trigger acceptance has been confirmed. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator b...

  11. A Receiver System for the TileCal Muon Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Ciodaro, T

    2009-01-01

    The muon signals of the hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS (TileCal) have successfully been used to trigger on cosmic rays. These muon signals provided by the trigger tower adder system is currently not used by ATLAS level-one muon trigger, as it has been foreseen for a near-future upgrade. Studies showed that the signal-to-noise ratio is increased if muon signals from the same cell of the last TileCal segmentation layer are summed up together. This work presents a receiver system design for the TileCal muon signals, which is based on the analog sum of both readout signals of the last TileCal detection layer. The receiver system interfaces to ATLAS level-one trigger system aiming at improving overall muon detection.

  12. Tile/hadronic Calorimeter design viewed from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Santoni, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the barrel hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It is a sampling calorimeter using plastic scintillator as the active material and iron as the absorber. In the barrel part of ATLAS, together with the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter, TileCal provides precise measurements of hadrons, jets, taus and the missing transverse energy. To understand the detail of the response of the detector, 11% of the 192 calorimeter modules were exposed to test beams of electrons, muons, and hadrons. Results were also obtained in the experimental hall using random triggers, calibration data and data from muons, isolated pions, and inclusive p-p events. This talk gives an overview of the TileCal performance.

  13. Run 1 Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Heelan, Louise; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. It is also useful for identification and reconstruction of muons due to good signal to noise ratio. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 5000 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response and its readout electronics is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance are presented, including the absolute energy scale, timing, noise and associated stabilities. The results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter has performed well within the design ...

  14. CFD analysis and experimental comparison of novel roof tile shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Bottarelli

    2017-06-01

    Using an experimental rig, the air pressure difference and the volumetric flow rate between tiles have been measured for an existing Portoghese tile design over a range of pressures. Then, in order to understand the air flows under different conditions, a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD model has been implemented to recreate the full geometry of the rig. The model was calibrated against the aforementioned experimental results, and run with boundary conditions simulating different wind directions. Even in the low velocities typical of average local wind patterns, the fluid dynamic problem remains complex because of the geometry of the gaps between the tiles. However, it has been possible to assess the coefficient of local head loss and then apply it in an analytical relationship between pressure drop and flow rate, taking into account the open area. The results have shown how the wind direction affects the air permeability and, therefore, important insights have been gathered for the design of novel tiles.

  15. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter performance at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, is a key detector component to detect hadrons, jets and taus and to measure the missing transverse energy. Due to the very good muon signal to noise ratio it assists the spectrometer in the identification and reconstruction of muons. TileCal is built of steel and scintillating tiles coupled to optical fibers and read out by photo-multipliers. The calorimeter is equipped with systems that allow to monitor and to calibrate each stage of the readout system exploiting different signal sources: laser light, charge injection and a radioactive source. The performance of the calorimeter has been measured and monitored using calibration data, random triggered data, cosmic muons, splash events and more importantly LHC collision events. The results presented here assess the absolute energy scale calibration precision, the energy and timing uniformity and the synchronization precision. The ensemble of the results demo...

  16. Simulation and validation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Artamonov, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    --Simulation and validation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at LHC TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from the approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized every 25 ns before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. This contribution describes the detailed simulation of this large scale calorimeter from the implementation of the geometrical elements down to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, the special noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. Detector non-uniformities and imperfections are also represented. Detailed validation has shown that the simulated detector response characteristics have been successfully integrated and...

  17. No inherent glassiness in a Penrose tiling quasicrystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandburg, K.J.; Dressel, P.R.

    1988-11-01

    Consideration of the structure of the Penrose pattern has led to speculation that a system with a Penrose tiling ground state might be subject to inherent glassy behavior. Monte Carol simulations show, using a simple model of the energetics, that there is no inherent glassiness in the Penrose tiling. Thermodynamic quantities measured are completely reversible, displaying no observable hysterisis, and the system may be easily cooled from a highly disordered configuration into its lowest energy state. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Modeling Subsurface Storm and Tile Drain Systems in GSSHA with SUPERLINK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    discharge to overland flow. ERDC/CHL TR-14-11 12 3 Tile Drains As described in Chapter 2, pipes in SUPERLINK represent both storm drains and tile...stream network. Storm drains may also function as tile drains as long as saturated groundwater is being simulated in the GSSHA model. The input...requirements for storm drains and tile drains are the same; only the value of hydraulic conductivity for the pipe differs between storm and tile drains

  19. High-density marker imputation accuracy in sixteen French cattle breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozé, Chris; Fouilloux, Marie-Noëlle; Venot, Eric; Guillaume, François; Dassonneville, Romain; Fritz, Sébastien; Ducrocq, Vincent; Phocas, Florence; Boichard, Didier; Croiseau, Pascal

    2013-09-03

    Genotyping with the medium-density Bovine SNP50 BeadChip® (50K) is now standard in cattle. The high-density BovineHD BeadChip®, which contains 777,609 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), was developed in 2010. Increasing marker density increases the level of linkage disequilibrium between quantitative trait loci (QTL) and SNPs and the accuracy of QTL localization and genomic selection. However, re-genotyping all animals with the high-density chip is not economically feasible. An alternative strategy is to genotype part of the animals with the high-density chip and to impute high-density genotypes for animals already genotyped with the 50K chip. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the error rate when imputing from the 50K to the high-density chip. Five thousand one hundred and fifty three animals from 16 breeds (89 to 788 per breed) were genotyped with the high-density chip. Imputation error rates from the 50K to the high-density chip were computed for each breed with a validation set that included the 20% youngest animals. Marker genotypes were masked for animals in the validation population in order to mimic 50K genotypes. Imputation was carried out using the Beagle 3.3.0 software. Mean allele imputation error rates ranged from 0.31% to 2.41% depending on the breed. In total, 1980 SNPs had high imputation error rates in several breeds, which is probably due to genome assembly errors, and we recommend to discard these in future studies. Differences in imputation accuracy between breeds were related to the high-density-genotyped sample size and to the genetic relationship between reference and validation populations, whereas differences in effective population size and level of linkage disequilibrium showed limited effects. Accordingly, imputation accuracy was higher in breeds with large populations and in dairy breeds than in beef breeds. More than 99% of the alleles were correctly imputed if more than 300 animals were genotyped at high-density. No

  20. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter DCS for Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Pedro Martins, Filipe Manuel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    TileCal is one of the ATLAS sub-detectors operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is taking data since 2010. The Detector Control System (DCS) was developed to ensure the coherent and safe operation of the whole ATLAS detector. Seventy thousand (70000) parameters are used for control and monitoring purposes of TileCal, requiring an automated system. The TileCal DCS is mainly responsible for the control and monitoring of the high and low voltage systems but it also supervises the detector infrastructure (cooling and racks), calibration systems, data acquisition and safety. During the first period of data taking (Run 1, 2010-12) the TileCal DCS allowed a smooth detector operation and should continue to do so for the second period (Run 2) that started in 2015. The TileCal DCS was updated in order to cope with the hardware and software requirements for Run 2 operation. These updates followed the general ATLAS guidelines on the software and hardware upgrade but also the new requirements from the TileCa...

  1. Implementation of Trigger Tiles for ALFA Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rehaag, Thomas Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS (ALFA) experiment was designed to accurately measure the luminosity of the intersecting proton beams at the ATLAS interaction point [1]. However, the ALFA experiment has shifted its primary purpose from luminosity measurement to elastic and inelastic proton collisions. This change was the result of difficulty in fitting parameters in the region governed by Coulomb scattering. The operational principle for luminosity measurement with ALFA relied on detecting elastic proton collisions, so the detector is suited to its role in proton collision measurements. The ALFA detector consists of several sensitive components, including the main detector (MD), overlap detectors (ODs) and trigger tiles. A diagram of the ALFA detector is shown in Figure 1. The main detector is composed of layers of 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 cross section scintillating fibres with an active area of 0.48 × 0.48 mm2, which are directed diagonally across the detector with 64 fibres in each layer. The 20 total layers ar...

  2. Programmable disorder in random DNA tilings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, Grigory; Petersen, Philip; Qian, Lulu

    2017-03-01

    Scaling up the complexity and diversity of synthetic molecular structures will require strategies that exploit the inherent stochasticity of molecular systems in a controlled fashion. Here we demonstrate a framework for programming random DNA tilings and show how to control the properties of global patterns through simple, local rules. We constructed three general forms of planar network—random loops, mazes and trees—on the surface of self-assembled DNA origami arrays on the micrometre scale with nanometre resolution. Using simple molecular building blocks and robust experimental conditions, we demonstrate control of a wide range of properties of the random networks, including the branching rules, the growth directions, the proximity between adjacent networks and the size distribution. Much as combinatorial approaches for generating random one-dimensional chains of polymers have been used to revolutionize chemical synthesis and the selection of functional nucleic acids, our strategy extends these principles to random two-dimensional networks of molecules and creates new opportunities for fabricating more complex molecular devices that are organized by DNA nanostructures.

  3. Microarray Developed on Plastic Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuls, María-José; Morais, Sergi B; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    There is a huge potential interest to use synthetic polymers as versatile solid supports for analytical microarraying. Chemical modification of polycarbonate (PC) for covalent immobilization of probes, micro-printing of protein or nucleic acid probes, development of indirect immunoassay, and development of hybridization protocols are described and discussed.

  4. The Scripture on Tiles: Dutch Tiles as an Example of the Biblical Culture of Everyday in the Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oczko Piotr

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The history of Dutch tiles started in the sixteenth century Antwerp in the workshops of the Italian potters who had settled in the city upon the Scheldt. Due to the political and social factors (i.e. huge wave of refugees during the Dutch Revolt, tile production was moved to the Northern Netherlands, where it was fully developed and the offer of the Republic’s tile works began to enjoy greatest fame and a huge commercial success all over Europe. The given article deals mostly with Dutch tiles representing the biblical scenes (bijbeltegels and discusses their numerous contexts, such as confessional and social background, iconographical origin of their designs (engravings, illustrated Bibles, stencils, the taste and status of the potential buyers. Moreover, the artistic and cultural phenomenon of Dutch biblical tiles has been interpreted in terms of a much wider tradition, namely the ‘biblicisation’ of everyday life in the Dutch Republic and its interiors. Finally, the issue of Dutch tiles, being the symbols of the national cultural tradition, has been brought up.

  5. The effect of water stress on super-high- density 'Koroneiki' olive oil quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dag, Arnon; Naor, Amos; Ben-Gal, Alon; Harlev, Guy; Zipori, Isaac; Schneider, Doron; Birger, Reuven; Peres, Moti; Gal, Yoni; Kerem, Zohar

    2015-08-15

    Over the last two decades, the area of cultivated super-high-density olive orchards has increased rapidly. Water stress is an important tool in super-high-density orchards to reduce tree growth and promote suitability for overhead mechanical harvesters. Little is known regarding the effect of water stress in super-high-density orchards on oil quality parameters. In this study the effect of irrigation rate on oil quality parameters was evaluated in a six-year-old super-high-density 'Koreneiki' olive orchard for five consecutive seasons. Five water status levels, determined by irrigating in order to maintain various midday stem water potential threshold values (-1.5, -2, -2.5, -3 and -4 MPa), were applied during the oil accumulation stage. The MUFA/PUFA ratio and free fatty acid content generally decreased as a function of increasing tree water stress. In most seasons a reduction in polyphenols was found with decreasing irrigation level. Peroxide value was not affected by the water stress level. The present study demonstrates that limiting irrigation and exposure of olive trees to water stress in a super-high-density orchard lowers free fatty acid content and therefore benefits oil quality. However, the decreased MUFA/PUFA ratio and the reduction in polyphenol content that were also found under increased water stress negatively influence oil quality. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. The Microarray Revolution: Perspectives from Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Jay L.; Beason, K. Beth; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Evans, Irene M.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, microarray analysis has become a key experimental tool, enabling the analysis of genome-wide patterns of gene expression. This review approaches the microarray revolution with a focus upon four topics: 1) the early development of this technology and its application to cancer diagnostics; 2) a primer of microarray research,…

  7. Current Knowledge on Microarray Technology - An Overview

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    situ photolithographic synthesis method used by Affymetrix gene chip ... The solution for this is to analyze proteins rather than make inferences based on RNA levels directly which can be done through protein microarrays. Protein microarrays also known as .... is reverse phase protein microarray (RPA). Unlike functional and ...

  8. Direct calibration of PICKY-designed microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Pamela C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few microarrays have been quantitatively calibrated to identify optimal hybridization conditions because it is difficult to precisely determine the hybridization characteristics of a microarray using biologically variable cDNA samples. Results Using synthesized samples with known concentrations of specific oligonucleotides, a series of microarray experiments was conducted to evaluate microarrays designed by PICKY, an oligo microarray design software tool, and to test a direct microarray calibration method based on the PICKY-predicted, thermodynamically closest nontarget information. The complete set of microarray experiment results is archived in the GEO database with series accession number GSE14717. Additional data files and Perl programs described in this paper can be obtained from the website http://www.complex.iastate.edu under the PICKY Download area. Conclusion PICKY-designed microarray probes are highly reliable over a wide range of hybridization temperatures and sample concentrations. The microarray calibration method reported here allows researchers to experimentally optimize their hybridization conditions. Because this method is straightforward, uses existing microarrays and relatively inexpensive synthesized samples, it can be used by any lab that uses microarrays designed by PICKY. In addition, other microarrays can be reanalyzed by PICKY to obtain the thermodynamically closest nontarget information for calibration.

  9. High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly E.; Piceno, Y. M.; Anderson, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N' Guessan, A. L.; Peacock, Aaron; Bargar, John R.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-06-13

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional diversity of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Understanding the response of communities to stimulation, including flanking taxa, presents important opportunities for optimizing remediation approaches. We used high-density PhyloChip microarray analysis to comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns amongst a suite of samples from U(VI) bioremediation experiments. Samples were unstimulated or collected during Fe(III) and sulfate reduction from an acetate-augmented aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Results showed the greatest diversity in abundant SRB lineages was present in naturally-reduced sediment. Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales were consistently identified as the dominant Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (IRB and SRB) throughout acetate amendment experiments. Stimulated communities also exhibited a high degree of functional redundancy amongst enriched flanking members. Not surprisingly, competition for both sulfate and iron was evident amongst abundant taxa, but the distribution and abundance of these ancillary SRB (Peptococcaceae, Desulfovibrionales and Syntrophobacterales), and lineages containing IRB (excluding Desulfobacteraceae) was heterogeneous amongst sample types. Interesting, amongst the most abundant taxa, particularly during sulfate reduction, were Epsilonproteobacteria that perform microaerobic or nitrate-dependant sulfur oxidation, and a number of bacteria other than Geobacteraceae that may enzymatically reduce U(VI). Finally, in depth community probing with PhyloChip determined the efficacy of experimental approaches, notably revealing striking similarity amongst stimulated sediment (from drill cores and in-situ columns) and groundwater communities, and demonstrating that sediment-packed in-situ (down-well) columns served

  10. Leveraging two-way probe-level block design for identifying differential gene expression with high-density oligonucleotide arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Leah; Benner, Chris; Tao, Yong-Chuan; Winzeler, Elizabeth; Zhou, Yingyao

    2004-04-20

    To identify differentially expressed genes across experimental conditions in oligonucleotide microarray experiments, existing statistical methods commonly use a summary of probe-level expression data for each probe set and compare replicates of these values across conditions using a form of the t-test or rank sum test. Here we propose the use of a statistical method that takes advantage of the built-in redundancy architecture of high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We employ parametric and nonparametric variants of two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on probe-level data to account for probe-level variation, and use the false-discovery rate (FDR) to account for simultaneous testing on thousands of genes (multiple testing problem). Using publicly available data sets, we systematically compared the performance of parametric two-way ANOVA and the nonparametric Mack-Skillings test to the t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for detecting differentially expressed genes at varying levels of fold change, concentration, and sample size. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve comparisons, we observed that two-way methods with FDR control on sample sizes with 2-3 replicates exhibits the same high sensitivity and specificity as a t-test with FDR control on sample sizes with 6-9 replicates in detecting at least two-fold change. Our results suggest that the two-way ANOVA methods using probe-level data are substantially more powerful tests for detecting differential gene expression than corresponding methods for probe-set level data.

  11. Leveraging two-way probe-level block design for identifying differential gene expression with high-density oligonucleotide arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yong-Chuan

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify differentially expressed genes across experimental conditions in oligonucleotide microarray experiments, existing statistical methods commonly use a summary of probe-level expression data for each probe set and compare replicates of these values across conditions using a form of the t-test or rank sum test. Here we propose the use of a statistical method that takes advantage of the built-in redundancy architecture of high-density oligonucleotide arrays. Results We employ parametric and nonparametric variants of two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA on probe-level data to account for probe-level variation, and use the false-discovery rate (FDR to account for simultaneous testing on thousands of genes (multiple testing problem. Using publicly available data sets, we systematically compared the performance of parametric two-way ANOVA and the nonparametric Mack-Skillings test to the t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for detecting differentially expressed genes at varying levels of fold change, concentration, and sample size. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve comparisons, we observed that two-way methods with FDR control on sample sizes with 2–3 replicates exhibits the same high sensitivity and specificity as a t-test with FDR control on sample sizes with 6–9 replicates in detecting at least two-fold change. Conclusions Our results suggest that the two-way ANOVA methods using probe-level data are substantially more powerful tests for detecting differential gene expression than corresponding methods for probe-set level data.

  12. FALCON: fast and unbiased reconstruction of high-density super-resolution microscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Junhong; Vonesch, Cédric; Kirshner, Hagai; Carlini, Lina; Olivier, Nicolas; Holden, Seamus; Manley, Suliana; Ye, Jong Chul; Unser, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Super resolution microscopy such as STORM and (F)PALM is now a well known method for biological studies at the nanometer scale. However, conventional imaging schemes based on sparse activation of photo-switchable fluorescent probes have inherently slow temporal resolution which is a serious limitation when investigating live-cell dynamics. Here, we present an algorithm for high-density super-resolution microscopy which combines a sparsity-promoting formulation with a Taylor series approximation of the PSF. Our algorithm is designed to provide unbiased localization on continuous space and high recall rates for high-density imaging, and to have orders-of-magnitude shorter run times compared to previous high-density algorithms. We validated our algorithm on both simulated and experimental data, and demonstrated live-cell imaging with temporal resolution of 2.5 seconds by recovering fast ER dynamics.

  13. Triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are associated with insulinemia in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez-López Guadalupe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between lipids and insulin concentration in adolescents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 350 adolescents aged 14-19 years old from a public high school in Guadalajara, in the state of Jalisco, Mexico, was conducted. Fasting insulin concentration was determined using microparticle enzyme immunoassay; total cholesterol and triglycerides were detected by standard enzymatic procedures; and low- and high-density lipoproteins were found using standard precipitation methods. Statistical analysis included linear multivariate regression. RESULTS: Serum triglycerides were associated positively with insulin fasting (beta= 0.003, p= 0.0001 and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was negatively associated with insulin fasting in male adolescents 18-19 years old (beta= -0.03, p= 0.012. CONCLUSIONS: The relationships between triglycerides and insulin and between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and insulin are already present in adolescence.

  14. The final stage of gravitational collapse for high density fluid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, R. G. [Physics Department , Roraima Federal University, 69304-000 Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); De Campos, M. [Physics Department, Roraima Federal University, 69304-000 Boa Vista, RR (Brazil) and Astronomy Department, Sao Paulo University, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    The High density high density fluids can be represented by a stiff matter state equation P={rho} and also by the Hagedorn state equation. The first is constructed using a lagrangian that allows bare nucleons to interact attractively via scalar meson exchange, and repulsively by a more massive vector meson exchange; the second consider that for large mass the spectrum of hadrons grows exponentially, namely {rho}(m) {approx}exp(m/T{sub H}), where T{sub H} is the Hagedorn temperature, resulting the state equation P = P{sub 0}+{rho}{sub 0}ln({rho}/{rho}{sub 0}). We study the gravitational collapse for a high density fluid, considering a Hagedorn state equation in a presence of a vacuum component.

  15. High-Density Chemical Intercalation of Zero-Valent Copper into Bi 2 Se 3 Nanoribbons

    KAUST Repository

    Koski, Kristie J.

    2012-05-09

    A major goal of intercalation chemistry is to intercalate high densities of guest species without disrupting the host lattice. Many intercalant concentrations, however, are limited by the charge of the guest species. Here we have developed a general solution-based chemical method for intercalating extraordinarily high densities of zero-valent copper metal into layered Bi 2Se 3 nanoribbons. Up to 60 atom % copper (Cu 7.5Bi 2Se 3) can be intercalated with no disruption to the host lattice using a solution disproportionation redox reaction. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. LTE Micro-cell Deployment for High-Density Railway Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sniady, Aleksander; Kassab, Mohamed; Soler, José

    2014-01-01

    Long Term Evolution (LTE) is a serious candidate for the future releases of the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS). LTE offers more capacity and supports new communication-based applications and services for railways. Nevertheless, even with this technology, the classical macro......-cell radio deployments reach overload, especially in high-density areas, such as major train stations. In this paper, an LTE micro-cell deployment is investigated in high-density railway areas. Copenhagen Main Station is considered as a realistic deployment study case, with a set of relevant railway...

  17. Research on and Application to BH-HTC High Density Cementing Slurry System on Tarim Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuanhong, Song; Fei, Gao; Jianyong, He; Qixiang, Yang; Jiang, Yang; Xia, Liu

    2017-08-01

    A large section of salt bed is contented in Tarim region Piedmont which constructs complex geological conditions. For high-pressure gas well cementing difficulties from the region, high density cement slurry system has been researched through reasonable level of particle size distribution and second weighting up. The results of laboratory tests and field applications show that the high density cementing slurry system is available to Tarim region cementing because this system has a well performance in slurry stability, gas breakthrough control, fluidity, water loss, and strength.

  18. Interplay between spin polarization and color superconductivity in high density quark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providência, João; Providência, Constança

    2013-01-01

    Here, it is suggested that a four-point interaction of the tensor type may lead to spin polarization in quark matter at high density. It is found that the two-flavor superconducting phase and the spin polarized phase correspond to distinct local minima of a certain generalized thermodynamical...... potential. It follows that a transition from one to the other phase occurs, passing through true minima with both a spin polarization and a color superconducting gap. It is shown that the quark spin polarized phase is realized at rather high density, while the two-flavor color superconducting phase...

  19. Improving the circular economy via hydrothermal processing of high-density waste plastics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Helmer; Conti, Federica

    2017-01-01

    Rising environmental concerns on climate changes are causing an increasing attention on circular economies. The plastic economy, in particular, is in focus due to the accelerating consumption of plastics, mainly derived from virgin feedstock, combined with the lack of plastic recycling strategies....... This work presents a novel outlook on the potential of using supercritical hydrothermal processing of waste plastic fractions for tertiary recycling. The study investigates hydrothermal processing of nine different, high-density types of plastics into original resin monomers and other value-added chemical...... processing of high-density plastics is a prospective technology for increasing the circularity of the plastic economy....

  20. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter DCS for Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Pedro Martins, Filipe Manuel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    TileCal is one of the ATLAS subdetectors operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is taking data since 2010. Seventy thousand (70000) parameters are used for control and monitoring purposes, requiring an automated system. The Detector Control System (DCS) was developed to ensure the coherent and safe operation of the whole ATLAS detector. The TileCal DCS is mainly responsible for the control and monitoring of the high and low voltage systems but it also supervises the detector infrastructure (cooling and racks), calibration systems, data acquisition and safety. During the first period of data taking (Run 1, 2010-12) the TileCal DCS allowed a smooth detector operation and should continue to do so for the second period (Run 2) that started in 2015. The TileCal DCS was updated in order to cope with the hardware and software requirements for Run 2 operation. These updates followed the general ATLAS guidelines on the software and hardware upgrade but also the new requirements from the TileCal detector. ...

  1. Valorization of rice straw waste: production of porcelain tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Guzmán A

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The rice industry generates huge amounts of rice straw ashes (RSA. This paper presents the results of an experimental research work about the incorporation of RSA waste as a new alternative raw material for production of porcelain tiles. The RSA replaces, partially or completely, the non-plastic raw materials (quartz (feldspathic sand in this research and feldspar, that together with the clays, constitute the major constituents of formulations of porcelain tiles. A standard industrial composition (0% RSA and two more compositions in which feldspar and feldspathic sand were replaced with two percentages of RSA (12.5% RSA and 60% RSA were formulated, keeping the clay content constant. The mixtures were processed, reproducing industrial porcelain tile manufacturing conditions by the dry route and fired at peak temperatures varying from 1140-1260 ºC. The results showed that additions of 12.5% RSA in replacement of feldspar and feldspathic sand allowed producing porcelain tiles that did not display marked changes in processing behaviour, in addition to obtain a microstructure and the typical mineralogical phases of porcelain tile. Thus, an alternative use of an agricultural waste material is proposed, which can be translated into economic and environmental benefits.

  2. Analysis of Thick Sandwich Shells with Embedded Ceramic Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Smith, C.; Lumban-Tobing, F.

    1996-01-01

    The Composite Armored Vehicle (CAV) is an advanced technology demonstrator of an all-composite ground combat vehicle. The CAV upper hull is made of a tough light-weight S2-glass/epoxy laminate with embedded ceramic tiles that serve as armor. The tiles are bonded to a rubber mat with a carefully selected, highly viscoelastic adhesive. The integration of armor and structure offers an efficient combination of ballistic protection and structural performance. The analysis of this anisotropic construction, with its inherent discontinuous and periodic nature, however, poses several challenges. The present paper describes a shell-based 'element-layering' technique that properly accounts for these effects and for the concentrated transverse shear flexibility in the rubber mat. One of the most important advantages of the element-layering technique over advanced higher-order elements is that it is based on conventional elements. This advantage allows the models to be portable to other structural analysis codes, a prerequisite in a program that involves the computational facilities of several manufacturers and government laboratories. The element-layering technique was implemented into an auto-layering program that automatically transforms a conventional shell model into a multi-layered model. The effects of tile layer homogenization, tile placement patterns, and tile gap size on the analysis results are described.

  3. Preparation of porcelain tile granulates by more environmentally sustainable processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, C.; Silvestre, D.; Piquer, J.; Garcia-Ten, J.; Quereda, E.; Vicente, M. J.

    2012-07-01

    This study examines the feasibility of manufacturing glazed porcelain tiles with a more environmentally friendly manufacturing process, by reducing water and thermal energy consumption. The process studied in this paper is dry milling in a pendulum mill, with subsequent granulation (in order to obtain a press powder with similar flow ability to that of spray dried powders). The different morphology of the new granulate with respect to the standard spray-dried granulate modifies the microstructure of the green compacts and thus, their behaviour and fired tile properties. In order to obtain porcelain tiles with the required properties (water absorption, mechanical strength,) changes have been made in the raw materials mixture and in the processing variables. Finally, porcelain tiles measuring 50x50 cm have been manufactured at industrial scale with the new granulate using a conventional firing cycle, obtaining quality levels identical to those provided by the spray-dried granulate. These results open the possibility of preparing porcelain tile body compositions through a manufacturing process alternative to the standard one, more environmentally friendly and with lower costs. (Author)

  4. Color features for quality control in ceramic tile industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkonen, Saku; Kaelviaeinen, Heikki; Parkkinen, Jussi P.

    2001-02-01

    We study visual quality control in the ceramics industry. In the manufacturing, it is important that in each set of tiles, every single tile looks similar. Currently, the estimation is usually done by human vision. Our goal is to design a machine vision system that can estimate the sufficient similarity, or same appearance, to the human eye. Our main approach is to use accurate spectral representation of color, and compare spectral features to the RGB color features. A laboratory system for color measurements is built. Experimentations with five classes of brown tiles are presented and discussed. In addition to the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classifier, a neural network called the self-organizing map (SOM) is used to provide understanding of the spectral features. Every single spectrum in each tile of a training set is used as input to a 2D SOM. The SOM is analyzed to understand how spectra are clustered. As a result, tiles are classified using a trained 2D SOM. It is also of interest to know whether the order of spectral colors can be determined. In our approach, all spectra are clustered in a 1D SOM, and each pixel spectrum) is presented by pseudocolors according to the trained nodes. Finally, the results are compared to experiments with human vision.

  5. The ATLAS tile calorimeter ROD injector and multiplexer board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valero, A., E-mail: alberto.valero@cern.c [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Paterna, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Castillo, V.; Ferrer, A. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Paterna, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Gonzalez, V. [Departamento de Ingenieria electronica, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot, 46100 Valencia (Spain); Hernandez, Y.; Higon, E. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Paterna, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Sanchis, E. [Departamento de Ingenieria electronica, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot, 46100 Valencia (Spain); Solans, C. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Paterna, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Torres, J. [Departamento de Ingenieria electronica, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot, 46100 Valencia (Spain); Valls, J.A. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Paterna, 46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-02-11

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is a sampling detector composed by cells made of iron-scintillator tiles. The calorimeter cell signals are digitized in the front-end electronics and transmitted to the Read-Out Drivers (RODs) at the first level trigger rate. The ROD receives triggered data from up to 9856 channels and provides the energy, phase and quality factor of the signals to the second level trigger. The back-end electronics is divided into four partitions containing eight RODs each. Therefore, a total of 32 RODs are used to process and transmit the data of the TileCal detector. In order to emulate the detector signals in the production and commissioning of ROD modules a board called ROD Injector and Multiplexer Board (RIMBO) was designed. In this paper, the RIMBO main functional blocks, PCB design and the different operation modes are described. It is described the crucial role of the board within the TileCal ROD test-bench in order to emulate the front-end electronics during the validation of ROD boards as well as during the evaluation of the ROD signal reconstruction algorithms. Finally, qualification and performance results for the injection operation mode obtained during the Tile Calorimeter ROD production tests are presented.

  6. Harshlight: a "corrective make-up" program for microarray chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittkowski Knut M

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microscopists are familiar with many blemishes that fluorescence images can have due to dust and debris, glass flaws, uneven distribution of fluids or surface coatings, etc. Microarray scans do show similar artifacts, which might affect subsequent analysis. Although all but the starkest blemishes are hard to find by the unaided eye, particularly in high-density oligonucleotide arrays (HDONAs, few tools are available to help with the detection of those defects. Results We develop a novel tool, Harshlight, for the automatic detection and masking of blemishes in HDONA microarray chips. Harshlight uses a combination of statistic and image processing methods to identify three different types of defects: localized blemishes affecting a few probes, diffuse defects affecting larger areas, and extended defects which may invalidate an entire chip. Conclusion We demonstrate the use of Harshlight can materially improve analysis of HDONA chips, especially for experiments with subtle changes between samples. For the widely used MAS5 algorithm, we show that compact blemishes cause an average of 8 gene expression values per chip to change by more than 50%, two of them by more than twofold; our masking algorithm restores about two thirds of this damage. Large-scale artifacts are successfully detected and eliminated.

  7. A microarray for assessing transcription from pelagic marine microbial taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, Irina N; Robidart, Julie C; James Tripp, H; Turk-Kubo, Kendra; Wawrik, Boris; Post, Anton F; Thompson, Anne W; Ward, Bess; Hollibaugh, James T; Millard, Andy; Ostrowski, Martin; Scanlan, David J; Paerl, Ryan W; Stuart, Rhona; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2014-07-01

    Metagenomic approaches have revealed unprecedented genetic diversity within microbial communities across vast expanses of the world's oceans. Linking this genetic diversity with key metabolic and cellular activities of microbial assemblages is a fundamental challenge. Here we report on a collaborative effort to design MicroTOOLs (Microbiological Targets for Ocean Observing Laboratories), a high-density oligonucleotide microarray that targets functional genes of diverse taxa in pelagic and coastal marine microbial communities. MicroTOOLs integrates nucleotide sequence information from disparate data types: genomes, PCR-amplicons, metagenomes, and metatranscriptomes. It targets 19 400 unique sequences over 145 different genes that are relevant to stress responses and microbial metabolism across the three domains of life and viruses. MicroTOOLs was used in a proof-of-concept experiment that compared the functional responses of microbial communities following Fe and P enrichments of surface water samples from the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. We detected transcription of 68% of the gene targets across major taxonomic groups, and the pattern of transcription indicated relief from Fe limitation and transition to N limitation in some taxa. Prochlorococcus (eHLI), Synechococcus (sub-cluster 5.3) and Alphaproteobacteria SAR11 clade (HIMB59) showed the strongest responses to the Fe enrichment. In addition, members of uncharacterized lineages also responded. The MicroTOOLs microarray provides a robust tool for comprehensive characterization of major functional groups of microbes in the open ocean, and the design can be easily amended for specific environments and research questions.

  8. Self-Assembling Protein Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Eisenstein, Samuel; Rosen, Benjamin; Lau, Albert Y.; C. Walter, Johannes; LaBaer, Joshua

    2004-07-01

    Protein microarrays provide a powerful tool for the study of protein function. However, they are not widely used, in part because of the challenges in producing proteins to spot on the arrays. We generated protein microarrays by printing complementary DNAs onto glass slides and then translating target proteins with mammalian reticulocyte lysate. Epitope tags fused to the proteins allowed them to be immobilized in situ. This obviated the need to purify proteins, avoided protein stability problems during storage, and captured sufficient protein for functional studies. We used the technology to map pairwise interactions among 29 human DNA replication initiation proteins, recapitulate the regulation of Cdt1 binding to select replication proteins, and map its geminin-binding domain.

  9. The Current Status of DNA Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger G.; Tong, Weida

    DNA microarray technology that allows simultaneous assay of thousands of genes in a single experiment has steadily advanced to become a mainstream method used in research, and has reached a stage that envisions its use in medical applications and personalized medicine. Many different strategies have been developed for manufacturing DNA microarrays. In this chapter, we discuss the manufacturing characteristics of seven microarray platforms that were used in a recently completed large study by the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium, which evaluated the concordance of results across these platforms. The platforms can be grouped into three categories: (1) in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays based on photolithography synthesis and Agilent's arrays based on inkjet synthesis); (2) spotting of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (GE Healthcare's CodeLink system, Applied Biosystems' Genome Survey Microarrays, and the custom microarrays printed with Operon's oligonucleotide set); and (3) deposition of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on bead-based microarrays (Illumina's BeadChip microarrays). We conclude this chapter with our views on the challenges and opportunities toward acceptance of DNA microarray data in clinical and regulatory settings.

  10. DNA-directed assembly of protein microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yew Chung; Wan, Guoqiang; Ng, Jin Kiat; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran; Too, Heng-Phon

    2008-05-01

    Microarray technology has made it possible to simultaneously study the abundance, interactions, and functions of potentially tens of thousands of biological molecules. From its earliest use in DNA microarrays, where only nucleic acids were captured and detected on the arrays, applications of microarrays now extend to those involving biomolecules such as antibodies, proteins, peptides, and carbohydrates. In contrast to the relative robustness of DNA microarrays, the use of such chemically diverse biomolecules on microarray formats presents many challenges in their fabrication as well as application. Among the many methods that have been proposed to overcome these challenges, DNA-directed assembly (DDA) has emerged as a promising strategy for the high sensitivity and multiplexed capture and detection of various analytes. In this review, we explore the challenges faced during the design, fabrication, and utilization of protein microarrays and highlight how DDA strategies, together with other recent advances in the field, are accelerating the development of platforms available for protein microarray applications.

  11. Microarray results: how accurate are they?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mane Shrikant

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarray technology is a powerful technique that was recently developed in order to analyze thousands of genes in a short time. Presently, microarrays, or chips, of the cDNA type and oligonucleotide type are available from several sources. The number of publications in this area is increasing exponentially. Results In this study, microarray data obtained from two different commercially available systems were critically evaluated. Our analysis revealed several inconsistencies in the data obtained from the two different microarrays. Problems encountered included inconsistent sequence fidelity of the spotted microarrays, variability of differential expression, low specificity of cDNA microarray probes, discrepancy in fold-change calculation and lack of probe specificity for different isoforms of a gene. Conclusions In view of these pitfalls, data from microarray analysis need to be interpreted cautiously.

  12. Analysis of the weld strength of the High Density Polyethylene (HDPE)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analysis was carried out to determine the strength of welded joints in High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) dam liners. Samples were collected of welded joints and subjected to tensile tests and creep test. It was observed that the welded joints from field welded samples were much weaker and had a very low straining ...

  13. Amorphous silicon rich silicon nitride optical waveguides for high density integrated optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Andersen, Karin Nordström; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2004-01-01

    Amorphous silicon rich silicon nitride optical waveguides clad in silica are presented as a high-index contrast platform for high density integrated optics. Performance of different cross-sectional geometries have been measured and are presented with regards to bending loss and insertion loss...

  14. Revealing structural and dynamical properties of high density lipoproteins through molecular simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivuniemi, A.; Vattulainen, I.

    2012-01-01

    The structure and function of high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles have intrigued the scientific community for decades because of their crucial preventive role in coronary heart disease. However, it has been a taunting task to reveal the precise molecular structure and dynamics of HDL. Further...

  15. Assessing the feasibility of high-density subsurface heat extraction in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abesser, Corinna; Busby, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    The subsurface is increasingly utilized as a heat source (sink) for use in heating (and cooling) applications. This is driven by the need to increase the amount of heat generated from renewable sources to meet the EU renewable energy target of 12% by 2020. This study explores the feasibility, performance and long-term sustainability of high density, closed-loop GSHP installations in urban areas. Specifically, it employs a 2D, finite element, heat transport model to assess the impact of high density heat extraction in a residential area in Reading. A block of semi-detached houses is modelled, assuming that separate GSHP systems are installed in every property. The model considers conductive and advective heat transport. Uncertainties are explored through varying thermal properties and groundwater gradients across the site. Different heat demand scenarios are evaluated and the impact on the subsurface temperature distribution and on heat pump efficiency is assessed. The scenarios are selected to represent variations in inter-annual weather pattern, heating pattern and building insulation standards. Results indicate that high density heat extraction for domestic heating can be sustainable over the lifespan expected for GSHP systems (of around 20 years), in particular where heat demand is reduced by home improvement measures. Based on the results, recommendations are being presented for the sustainable deployment of high density GSHP installation in urban areas.

  16. High-density surface electromyography improves the identification of oscillatory synaptic inputs to motor neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Steeg, C.; Daffertshofer, A.; Stegeman, D.F.; Boonstra, T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have addressed corticomuscular coherence (CMC), but broad applications are limited by low coherence values and the variability across subjects and recordings. Here, we investigated how the use of high-density surface electromyography (HDsEMG) can improve the detection of CMC. Sixteen

  17. High-density surface electromyography improves the identification of oscillatory synaptic inputs to motoneurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, C.V.; Daffertshofer, A.; Stegeman, D.F.; Boonstra, T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have addressed corticomuscular coherence (CMC), but broad applications are limited by low coherence values and the variability across subjects and recordings. Here, we investigated how the use of high-density surface electromyography (HDsEMG) can improve the detection of CMC. Sixteen

  18. Fluidisation and dispersion behaviour of small high density pellicular expanded bed adsorbents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theodossiou, Irini; Elsner, H.D.; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2002-01-01

    The fluidisation and dispersion properties of various agarose-based expanded bed matrices-small high density stainless steel cored prototypes and standard commercial types-were studied in I-cm diameter expanded bed contactors in which fluid entering the column base is locally stirred. In all cases...

  19. Magnetic force microscopy of thin film media for high density magnetic recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porthun, Steffen; Porthun, S.; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses various aspect of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) for use in the field of high density magnetic recording. After an introduction of the most important magnetic imaging techniques, an overview is given of the operation and theory of MFM. The developments in instrumentation, MFM

  20. The Effects of Interspersal Training versus High-Density Reinforcement on Spelling Acquisition and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, Nancy A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of interspersing known items during spelling instruction on new words for three moderately to severely mentally retarded male students (ages 19 to 24). Results showed that high density reinforcement did facilitate performance over baseline; however, interspersal training was superior to the other conditions in…

  1. The HDL hypothesis : does high-density lipoprotein protect from atherosclerosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, Menno; Holleboom, Adriaan G; Kastelein, John J P; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    There is unequivocal evidence of an inverse association between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations and the risk of cardiovascular disease, a finding that has led to the hypothesis that HDL protects from atherosclerosis. This review details the experimental evidence for

  2. The HDL hypothesis: does high-density lipoprotein protect from atherosclerosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, Menno; Holleboom, Adriaan G.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2010-01-01

    There is unequivocal evidence of an inverse association between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations and the risk of cardiovascular disease, a finding that has led to the hypothesis that HDL protects from atherosclerosis. This review details the experimental evidence for

  3. Mutations in ABC1 in Tangier disease and familial high-density lipoprotein deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooks-Wilson, A.; Marcil, M.; Clee, S. M.; Zhang, L. H.; Roomp, K.; van Dam, M.; Yu, L.; Brewer, C.; Collins, J. A.; Molhuizen, H. O.; Loubser, O.; Ouelette, B. F.; Fichter, K.; Ashbourne-Excoffon, K. J.; Sensen, C. W.; Scherer, S.; Mott, S.; Denis, M.; Martindale, D.; Frohlich, J.; Morgan, K.; Koop, B.; Pimstone, S.; Kastelein, J. J.; Genest, J.; Hayden, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    Genes have a major role in the control of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Here we have identified two Tangier disease (TD) families, confirmed 9q31 linkage and refined the disease locus to a limited genomic region containing the gene encoding the ATP-binding cassette

  4. Measurement of neutrino oscillations by means of a high density detector on the atmospheric neutrino beam

    CERN Document Server

    Aglietta, M; Aprile, E; Bologna, G; Bonesini, M; Bencivenni, G; Calvi, M; Castellina, A; Curioni, A; Fulgione, W; Ghia, P L; Gustavino, C; Kokoulin, R P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Periale, L; Petrukhin, A A; Picchi, P; Pullia, Antonio; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N G; Satta, L; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Terranova, F; Tonazzo, A; Trinchero, G C; Vallania, P; Villone, B

    1999-01-01

    A high-density calorimeter, consisting of magnetized iron planes interleaved by RPCs, as tracking and timing devices, is a good candidate for a next generation experiment on atmospheric neutrinos. With 34 kt of mass and in four years of data taking, this experiment will be sensitive to $\

  5. Effect of resin variables on the creep behavior of high density hardwood composite panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.C. Tang; Jianhua Pu; C.Y Hse

    1993-01-01

    The flexural creep behavior of oriented strandboards (OSB) fabricated with mixed high, density hardwood flakes was investigated. Three types of adhesives, liquid phenolic-formaldehyde (LPF), melamine modified urea-formaldehyde (MUF), and LPF (face)/MUF (core) were chosen in this investigation. The resin contents (RC) used were 3.5 percent and 5.0 percent. The flakes...

  6. A High-Density Map for Navigating the Human Polycomb Complexome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauri, Simon; Comoglio, Federico; Seimiya, Makiko

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are major determinants of gene silencing and epigenetic memory in higher eukaryotes. Here, we systematically mapped the human PcG complexome using a robust affinity purification mass spectrometry approach. Our high-density protein interaction network uncovered...

  7. Plasma modification of sisal and high-density polyethylene composites : effect on mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.R. Martin; S. Manolache; L.H.C. Mattoso; R.M. Rowell; F. Denes

    2000-01-01

    Sisal fibers and finely powdered high-density polyethylene were surface functionalized using dichlorosilane (DS) under R-F plasma conditions to improve interfacial adhesion between the two dissimilar substrates. The functionalized polyethylene (70%) and sisal (30%) were compounded on four different ways using thermokinetic mixer and injected molded into composites...

  8. Increased Antioxidant Quality Versus Lower Quantity Of High Density Lipoprotein In Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydin Ozgur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of every human disease. To understand its possible role in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, we measured the overall oxidative status of patients with BPH and the serum activity of the high density lipoprotein (HDL-related antioxidant enzymes paraoxonase 1 (PON1 and arylesterase (ARE.

  9. Residual gas entering high density hydrogen plasma: rarefaction due to rapid heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. den Harder,; D.C. Schram,; W. J. Goedheer,; de Blank, H. J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; van Rooij, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of background molecular hydrogen with magnetized (0.4 T) high density (1–5 × 10 20  m −3 ) low temperature (∼3 eV) hydrogen plasma was inferred from the Fulcher band emission in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI. In the plasma center,

  10. Deep anisotropic dry etching of silicon microstructures by high-density plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blauw, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis deals with the dry etching of deep anisotropic microstructures in monocrystalline silicon by high-density plasmas. High aspect ratio trenches are necessary in the fabrication of sensitive inertial devices such as accellerometers and gyroscopes. The etching of silicon in fluorine-based

  11. Behavior and Preparedness to Fire Hazard in High Density Settlements in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saut Sagala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fire is one of the hazards that may affect urban areas with high density settlements. Thus, research on fire mitigation is important to be conducted. This paper examines the behavior and preparedness of occupants in high density settlements towards fire risks in urban area. The case study is located at Kelurahan Sukahaji, Kecamatan Babakan Ciparay, Bandung that has very high density settlement as well as prone to fire hazards. This study assess 232 respondents in the study areas on information related to demography, understanding about fire, behavior and preparedness. The respondents understanding on the types of fire sources are still low. Similarly, the behavior related to the activites using fire are still dangerous because some activities are conducted with other activities which make people less aware of the fire hazards. Nevertheless, their knowledge on how to extinguish fires are quite good. This paper recommends more trainings on knowledge of fire source and behavior to be conducted to occupants living in high density settlements in order to reduce fire disaster risk.

  12. The Pain in Storage: Work Safety in a High-Density Shelving Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Stephanie A.

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of academic and research libraries have built high-density shelving facilities to address overcrowding conditions in their regular stacks. However, the work performed in these facilities is physically strenuous and highly repetitive in nature and may require the use of potentially dangerous equipment. This article will examine…

  13. The constraints of high density production of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa Dana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu, Minh T. T.; Hansen, Benni W.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Copepods are excellent live feed for marine fish larvae in aquaculture. Culturing copepods at high density is important to increase the total egg yield, but this is still a main challenge. To address this, we conducted experiments to test factors affecting the egg harvest potential of the well...

  14. Radiation Tests of Highly Scaled, High-Density, Commercial, Nonvolatile NAND Flash Memories - Update 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irom, Farokh; Nguyen, Duc N.

    2010-01-01

    High-density, commercial, nonvolatile flash memories with NAND architecture are now available from several manufacturers. This report examines SEE effects and TID response in single-level cell (SLC) and multi-level cell (MLC) NAND flash memories manufactured by Micron Technology.

  15. Radiation Tests of Highly scaled, High-Density, Commercial, Nonvolatile NAND Flash Memories--Update 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irom, Farokh; Nguyen, Duc N.

    2011-01-01

    High-density, commercial, nonvolatile flash memories with NAND architecture are now available from several manufacturers. This report examines SEE effects and TID response in single-level cell (SLC) 32Gb and multi-level cell (MLC) 64Gb NAND flash memories manufactured by Micron Technology.

  16. Properties of high density polyethylene – Paulownia wood flour composites via injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulownia wood (PW) flour is evaluated as a bio-based fiber reinforcement. Composites of high density polyethylene (HDPE), 25% by weight of PW, and either 0% or 5% by weight of maleated polyethylene (MAPE) were produced by twin screw compounding followed by injection molding. Molded test composite...

  17. Functional mapping of the pelvic floor and sphincter muscles from high-density surface EMG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; He, Jinbao; Khavari, Rose; Boone, Timothy B; Zhang, Yingchun

    2016-11-01

    Knowledge of the innervation of pelvic floor and sphincter muscles is of great importance to understanding the pathophysiology of female pelvic floor dysfunctions. This report presents our high-density intravaginal and intrarectal electromyography (EMG) probes and a comprehensive innervation zone (IZ) imaging technique based on high-density EMG readings to characterize the IZ distribution. Both intravaginal and intrarectal probes are covered with a high-density surface electromyography electrode grid (8 × 8). Surface EMG signals were acquired in ten healthy women performing maximum voluntary contractions of their pelvic floor. EMG decomposition was performed to separate motor-unit action potentials (MUAPs) and then localize their IZs. High-density surface EMG signals were successfully acquired over the vaginal and rectal surfaces. The propagation patterns of muscle activity were clearly visualized for multiple muscle groups of the pelvic floor and anal sphincter. During each contraction, up to 218 and 456 repetitions of motor units were detected by the vaginal and rectal probes, respectively. MUAPs were separated with their IZs identified at various orientations and depths. The proposed probes are capable of providing a comprehensive mapping of IZs of the pelvic floor and sphincter muscles. They can be employed as diagnostic and preventative tools in clinical practices.

  18. Plasma detachment study of high density helium plasmas in the Pilot-PSI device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, Y.; Jesko, K.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Vernimmen, J. W. M.; Morgan, T. W.; Ohno, N.; Kajita, S.; Yoshikawa, M.; Masuzaki, S.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated plasma detachment phenomena of high-density helium plasmas in the linear plasma device Pilot-PSI, which can realize a relevant ITER SOL/Divertor plasma condition. The experiment clearly indicated plasma detachment features such as drops in the plasma pressure and particle flux

  19. Properties Of 10 Ghanaian High Density Lesser-Used-Species Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty trees of ten high density Lesser Used Species (LUS) of potential importance to bridge construction were extracted from four forest reserves - Bobiri, Pra-Anum, Nueng, and Subri River (in four different ecological zones). Logs from the trees were converted on a horizontal bandmill to 27 and 53 mm thick boards.

  20. How Well Does BODIPY-Cholesteryl Ester Mimic Unlabeled Cholesteryl Esters in High Density Lipoprotein Particles?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karilainen, Topi; Vuorela, Timo; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2015-01-01

    We compare the behavior of unlabeled and BODIPY-labeled cholesteryl ester (CE) in high density lipoprotein by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We find through replica exchange umbrella sampling and unbiased molecular dynamics simulations that BODIPY labeling has no significant effect...

  1. Co-isolation of extracellular vesicles and high-density lipoproteins using density gradient ultracentrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuana, Yuana; Levels, Johannes; Grootemaat, Anita; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) facilitate intercellular communication by carrying bioactive molecules such as proteins, messenger RNA, and micro (mi)RNAs. Recently, high-density lipoproteins (HDL) isolated from human plasma were also reported to transport miRNA to other cells. HDL, when isolated from

  2. Clinical applications of high-density surface EMG: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, G.; Stegeman, D.F.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Zwarts, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    High density-surface EMG (HD-sEMG) is a non-invasive technique to measure electrical muscle activity with multiple (more than two) closely spaced electrodes overlying a restricted area of the skin. Besides temporal activity HD-sEMG also allows spatial EMG activity to be recorded, thus expanding the

  3. Clinical applications of high-density surface EMG: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, G; Stegeman, D.F.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Rodenburg, J.A.; Hol, F.A.

    2006-01-01

    High density-surface EMG (HD-sEMG) is a non-invasive technique to measure electrical muscle activity with multiple (more than two) closely spaced electrodes overlying a restricted area of the skin. Besides temporal activity HD-sEMG also allows spatial EMG activity to be recorded, thus expanding the

  4. Does high-density stocking affect perennial forbs in mesic grassland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Livestock production is an appropriate land use for mainstreaming biodiversity conservation, but little is known about the impact of grazing strategies on forbs that contribute most species, in grasslands. This study compared the effects of high-density, short-duration stocking (HDG) with no grazing (control) on vegetation ...

  5. Image microarrays (IMA: Digital pathology′s missing tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Hipp

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increasing availability of whole slide imaging (WSI data sets (digital slides from glass slides offers new opportunities for the development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD algorithms. With the all-digital pathology workflow that these data sets will enable in the near future, literally millions of digital slides will be generated and stored. Consequently, the field in general and pathologists, specifically, will need tools to help extract actionable information from this new and vast collective repository. Methods: To address this limitation, we designed and implemented a tool (dCORE to enable the systematic capture of image tiles with constrained size and resolution that contain desired histopathologic features. Results: In this communication, we describe a user-friendly tool that will enable pathologists to mine digital slides archives to create image microarrays (IMAs. IMAs are to digital slides as tissue microarrays (TMAs are to cell blocks. Thus, a single digital slide could be transformed into an array of hundreds to thousands of high quality digital images, with each containing key diagnostic morphologies and appropriate controls. Current manual digital image cut-and-paste methods that allow for the creation of a grid of images (such as an IMA of matching resolutions are tedious. Conclusion: The ability to create IMAs representing hundreds to thousands of vetted morphologic features has numerous applications in education, proficiency testing, consensus case review, and research. Lastly, in a manner analogous to the way conventional TMA technology has significantly accelerated in situ studies of tissue specimens use of IMAs has similar potential to significantly accelerate CAD algorithm development.

  6. Identification of novel non-coding small RNAs from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 using high-resolution genome tiling arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ranjit; Shah, Pratik; Swiatlo, Edwin; Burgess, Shane C; Lawrence, Mark L; Nanduri, Bindu

    2010-06-03

    The identification of non-coding transcripts in human, mouse, and Escherichia coli has revealed their widespread occurrence and functional importance in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic life. In prokaryotes, studies have shown that non-coding transcripts participate in a broad range of cellular functions like gene regulation, stress and virulence. However, very little is known about non-coding transcripts in Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), an obligate human respiratory pathogen responsible for significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. Tiling microarrays enable genome wide mRNA profiling as well as identification of novel transcripts at a high-resolution. Here, we describe a high-resolution transcription map of the S. pneumoniae clinical isolate TIGR4 using genomic tiling arrays. Our results indicate that approximately 66% of the genome is expressed under our experimental conditions. We identified a total of 50 non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) from the intergenic regions, of which 36 had no predicted function. Half of the identified sRNA sequences were found to be unique to S. pneumoniae genome. We identified eight overrepresented sequence motifs among sRNA sequences that correspond to sRNAs in different functional categories. Tiling arrays also identified approximately 202 operon structures in the genome. In summary, the pneumococcal operon structures and novel sRNAs identified in this study enhance our understanding of the complexity and extent of the pneumococcal 'expressed' genome. Furthermore, the results of this study open up new avenues of research for understanding the complex RNA regulatory network governing S. pneumoniae physiology and virulence.

  7. 29 CFR 570.64 - Occupations involved in the manufacture of brick, tile, and kindred products (Order 13).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... by any other hazardous occupations order issued by the Secretary of Labor. (b) Definitions. (1) The..., glazed structural tile, roofing tile, stove lining, chimney pipes and tops, wall coping, and drain tile...

  8. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Brewster Angle Reflection Imaging of Acoustic Tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Kilcullen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A Brewster angle reflection imaging apparatus is demonstrated which is capable of detecting hidden water-filled voids in a rubber tile sample. This imaging application simulates a real-world hull inspection problem for Royal Canadian Navy Victoria-class submarines. The tile samples represent a challenging imaging application due to their large refractive index and absorption coefficient. With a rubber transmission window at approximately 80 GHz, terahertz (THz sensing methods have shown promise for probing these structures in the laboratory. Operating at Brewster’s angle allows for the typically strong front surface reflection to be minimized while also conveniently making the method insensitive to air-filled voids. Using a broadband THz time-domain waveform imaging system (THz-TDS, we demonstrate satisfactory imaging and detection of water-filled voids without complicated signal processing. Optical properties of the tile samples at low THz frequencies are also reported.

  9. Calibration of the Tile Hadronic Calorimeter of ATLAS at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, D

    2015-01-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated to the calorimeter, there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of their formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, Laser, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. Recent performances of these systems as well TileCal calibration stability are presented.

  10. Performance and Calibration of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Starovoitov, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. This detector is instrumental for the measurements of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. After an initial setting of the absolute energy scale in test beams with particles of well-defined momentum, the calibrated scale is transferred to the rest of the detector via the response to radioactive sources. The calibrated scale is validated in situ with muons and single hadrons whereas the timing performance is checked with muons and jets. A brief description of the individual calibration systems (Cs radioactive source, laser, charge injection, minimum bias) is provided. Their combination allows to calibr...

  11. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter time calibration, monitoring and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Davidek, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling device is made of plastic scintillating tiles alternated with iron plates and its response is calibrated to electromagnetic scale by means of several dedicated calibration systems. The accurate time calibration is important for the energy reconstruction, non-collision background removal as well as for specific physics analyses. The initial time calibration with so-called splash events and subsequent fine-tuning with collision data are presented. The monitoring of the time calibration with laser system and physics collision data is discussed as well as the corrections for sudden changes performed still before the recorded data are processed for physics analyses. Finally, the time resolution as measured with jets and isolated muons particles is presented.

  12. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter time calibration, monitoring and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidek, T.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling device is made of plastic scintillating tiles alternated with iron plates and its response is calibrated to electromagnetic scale by means of several dedicated calibration systems. The accurate time calibration is important for the energy reconstruction, non-collision background removal as well as for specific physics analyses. The initial time calibration with so-called splash events and subsequent fine-tuning with collision data are presented. The monitoring of the time calibration with laser system and physics collision data is discussed as well as the corrections for sudden changes performed still before the recorded data are processed for physics analyses. Finally, the time resolution as measured with jets and isolated muons is presented.

  13. Consolidation and upgrades of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Cerda Alberich, Leonor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This is a presentation of the status of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter during the EYETS and before starting 2017 data-taking. Updates on the upgrade of the readout system such as doubling the RODs output links and the number of processing units (PUs) are being worked on at the moment as well as items concerning the maintenance of the detector which involves issues such as cooling leaks and consolidation of the Low Voltage Power Supplies, which are being replaced if necessary. Other updates include works on the Tile calibration, in particular on the Cesium system. In addition, the whole Tile readout electronics is being replaced for Phase-II and it is being tested in Test Beam area.

  14. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter: simulation and validation of the response

    CERN Document Server

    Davidek, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central secti1 on of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is readout by wavelength shifting fibers and transmitted to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being further transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. Detailed simulations are described in this contribution, ranging from the implementation of the geometrical elements to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, including specific noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. Special attention is given to the improved optical signal propagation and the validation with the real particle data.

  15. Genome-wide copy number profiling on high-density bacterial artificial chromosomes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and oligonucleotide microarrays: a platform comparison based on statistical power analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Egmont-Peterson, M.; Janssen, I.M.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Veltman, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, comparative genomic hybridization onto bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) has proved to be successful for the detection of submicroscopic DNA copy-number variations in health and disease. Technological improvements to achieve a

  16. Prevention of hyperglycemia in Zucker diabetic fatty rats by exercise training: effects on gene expression in insulin-sensitive tissues determined by high-density oligonucleotide microarray analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Michele; Gregersen, Soeren; Kruhoeffer, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    , blood samples, soleus muscle, liver, visceral fat (epididymal fat pads), and islet tissue were collected. Gene expression was quantified with Affymetrix RG-U34A array (16 chips). Exercise training ameliorates the development of hyperglycemia and reduces plasma free fatty acid and the level of glucagon...

  17. High-throughput immuno-profiling of mamba (Dendroaspis) venom toxin epitopes using high-density peptide microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engmark, Mikael; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    Snakebite envenoming is a serious condition requiring medical attention and administration of antivenom. Current antivenoms are antibody preparations obtained from the plasma of animals immunised with whole venom(s) and contain antibodies against snake venom toxins, but also against other antigen...

  18. Rare copy number alterations and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity revealed in ameloblastomas by high-density whole-genome microarray analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Duarte, Alessandra Pires; Villacis, Rolando A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ameloblastoma (unicystic, UA, or multicystic, MA) is a rare tumor associated with bone destruction and facial deformity. Its malignant counterpart is the ameloblastic carcinoma (AC). The BRAFV600E mutation is highly prevalent in all these tumors subtypes and cannot account for their d......BACKGROUND: Ameloblastoma (unicystic, UA, or multicystic, MA) is a rare tumor associated with bone destruction and facial deformity. Its malignant counterpart is the ameloblastic carcinoma (AC). The BRAFV600E mutation is highly prevalent in all these tumors subtypes and cannot account......: Ameloblastomas show rare CNAs and cnLOH, presenting a specific genomic profile with no overlapping of the rare alterations among UA, MA, and AC. These genomic changes might play a role in tumor evolution and in BRAFV600E-negative tumors....

  19. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  20. Combination of an unbiased amplification method and a resequencing microarray for detecting and genotyping equine arteritis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Aymeric; Gaudaire, Delphine; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Leon, Albertine; Gessain, Antoine; Laugier, Claire; Berthet, Nicolas; Zientara, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    This study shows that an unbiased amplification method applied to equine arteritis virus RNA significantly improves the sensitivity of the real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) recommended by the World Organization for Animal Health. Twelve viral RNAs amplified using this method were hybridized on a high-density resequencing microarray for effective viral characterization. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Development of a DNA Microarray to Detect Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Identified in the National Center for Biotechnology Information Database

    OpenAIRE

    Frye, Jonathan G.; Lindsey, Rebecca L.; Rondeau, Gaelle; Porwollik, Steffen; Long, Fred; McClelland, Michael; Jackson, Charlene R.; Englen, Mark D.; Meinersmann, Richard J.; Berrang, Mark E.; Davis, Johnnie A.; Barrett, John B.; Turpin, Jennifer B.; Thitaram, Sutawee N.; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.

    2010-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms and epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance (AR), the genetic elements responsible must be identified. Due to the myriad of possible genes, a high-density genotyping technique is needed for initial screening. To achieve this, AR genes in the National Center for Biotechnology Information GenBank database were identified by their annotations and compiled into a nonredundant list of 775 genes. A DNA microarray was constructed of 70mer oligonucelotide probes designed...

  2. ArrayPitope: Automated Analysis of Amino Acid Substitutions for Peptide Microarray-Based Antibody Epitope Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skjødt; Østerbye, Thomas; Marcatili, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    -reactivity. B cell epitopes are typically classified as either linear epitopes, i.e. short consecutive segments from the protein sequence or conformational epitopes adapted through native protein folding. Recent advances in high-density peptide microarrays enable high-throughput, high-resolution identification......-HSA (and mouse anti-rabbit-Cy3). The application is made available at: www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/ArrayPitope....

  3. High-Performance Tiled WMS and KML Web Server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2007-01-01

    This software is an Apache 2.0 module implementing a high-performance map server to support interactive map viewers and virtual planet client software. It can be used in applications that require access to very-high-resolution geolocated images, such as GIS, virtual planet applications, and flight simulators. It serves Web Map Service (WMS) requests that comply with a given request grid from an existing tile dataset. It also generates the KML super-overlay configuration files required to access the WMS image tiles.

  4. Nonlinear Multiscale Changes of Peak Flows on Tiled Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Ricardo; Basu, Nandita; Sloan, Brandon; Fonley, Morgan

    2017-04-01

    We perform a multiscale analysis of the effect of tile drainage on peak flows. Our analysis suggests that a complex interaction of network topology and tile organization in space takes place even in the presence of a homogeneous runoff field. Subsurface drainage systems are common in agricultural landscapes all over the world, and yet there is a lack of understanding on how they modify the hydrologic flow regime, from the field to the watershed and the regional scale. In this study, we conduct a systematic assessment of the effect of agricultural subsurface drainage (tiling) on the hydrologic response as a function of the watershed scale. We used the field scale model DRAINMOD in conjunction with a linearized routing equation for our analysis, and use a watershed in south central Iowa as a case study. Tile drainage was observed to increase low flows, decrease intermediate flows, and have no effect on the largest floods. The reduction in peakflows was observed to be dependent on the event size and the spatial scale, such that the greatest flow reductions were apparent at the intermediate scale (100 to 1,000 km2), with lower reduction at the largest scale (> 10,000 km2). The scale dependence can be attributed to the fact that peakflows at larger scales are typically not caused by a single rainfall event, but by the accumulation of flows over a temporal window that is equal to the time of concentration of the catchments. Our linearized routing equation allows the use of hydrograph superposition to show how the impact of tiled fields on watershed peakflows is determined by the topological structure of the river network. We demonstrate that the percentage of tiled fields in a basin is not a definitive indicator of changes in peakflow regimes, but rather the spatial organization of these fields within the watershed is the determinant. We connect our results to the Width Function, a well-known geomorphological descriptor of river network topology, and demonstrate how tile

  5. Simulation and validation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter response

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, S N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data acquisition systems. This contribution describes the detailed simulation of this large scale calorimeter from the implementation of the geometrical elements down to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, the special noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. The improved description of the optical and electronic signal propagation is highlighted and the validation with the real particle data is presented.

  6. Research into Practice: Spatial Sense and the Construction of Abstract Units in Tiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Grayson H., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses a variation on tiling that offers opportunities for the construction of the fundamental mathematical concept of constructing abstract units called "unitizing." Tiling integrates geometric and numerical settings to develop spatial sense and present mathematics as constructing patterns. (MDH)

  7. An automated data management/analysis system for space shuttle orbiter tiles. [stress analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, G. L.; Ballas, M.

    1982-01-01

    An engineering data management system was combined with a nonlinear stress analysis program to provide a capability for analyzing a large number of tiles on the space shuttle orbiter. Tile geometry data and all data necessary of define the tile loads environment accessed automatically as needed for the analysis of a particular tile or a set of tiles. User documentation provided includes: (1) description of computer programs and data files contained in the system; (2) definitions of all engineering data stored in the data base; (3) characteristics of the tile anaytical model; (4) instructions for preparation of user input; and (5) a sample problem to illustrate use of the system. Description of data, computer programs, and analytical models of the tile are sufficiently detailed to guide extension of the system to include additional zones of tiles and/or additional types of analyses

  8. Tritium profiles in tiles from the first wall of fusion machines and techniques for their detritiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzhorn, R.-D.; Bekris, N.; Hellriegel, W.; Noppel, H.-E.; Naegele, W.; Ziegler, H.; Rolli, R.; Werle, H.; Haigh, A.; Peacock, A

    2000-06-01

    Tritium profiles on a TFTR graphite tile exposed to D-D plasmas and a JET graphite tile from the first tritium campaigns were examined by full combustion, thermogravimetry and thermal desorption. Combustion measurements revealed that >98.9% of the tritium is trapped in a layer <50 {mu}m thick, the remainder being spread throughout the tile. The tritium distribution on the tile surface is not homogeneous. A significant fraction resides in the gaps between tiles. Graphite disks from the plasma-exposed side of JET tiles heated up to 1100 deg. C under a helium stream containing 0.1% hydrogen showed the highest tritium release rate at {approx}850 deg. C. The agreement between tritium measurements by full combustion and thermal release was reasonably good. Tritium on graphite tiles was released to >95% under a stream of moist air at about 400 deg. C. A large fraction of tritium can be removed from the tile surface with adhesive tape.

  9. Comparison of performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT 2009 and 2012 in an extensively tile-drained watershed in the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tian; Gitau, Margaret; Merwade, Venkatesh; Arnold, Jeffrey; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Hirschi, Michael; Engel, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Subsurface tile drainage systems are widely used in agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern US and enable the Midwest area to become highly productive agricultural lands, but can also create environmental problems, for example nitrate-N contamination associated with drainage waters. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has been used to model watersheds with tile drainage. SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 provide new tile drainage routines. However, few studies have used these revisions to study tile drainage impacts at both field and watershed scales. Moreover, SWAT2012 revision 645 improved the soil moisture based curve number calculation method, which has not been fully tested. This study used long-term (1991-2003) field site and river station data from the Little Vermilion River (LVR) watershed to evaluate performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT2009 revision 528 (the old routine) and SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 (the new routine). Both the old and new routines provided reasonable but unsatisfactory (NSE sediment and annual corn and soybean yield results from SWAT with the old and new tile drainage routines were compared with observed values. Generally, the new routine provided acceptable simulated tile flow (NSE = 0.48-0.65) and nitrate in tile flow (NSE = 0.48-0.68) for field sites with random pattern tile and constant tile spacing, while the old routine simulated tile flow and nitrate in tile flow results for the field site with constant tile spacing were unacceptable (NSE = 0.00-0.32 and -0.29-0.06, respectively). The new modified curve number calculation method in revision 645 (NSE = 0.50-0.81) better simulated surface runoff than revision 615 (NSE = -0.11-0.49). The calibration provided reasonable parameter sets for the old and new routines in the LVR watershed, and the validation results showed that the new routine has the potential to accurately simulate hydrologic processes in mildly sloped watersheds.

  10. Bulk universality for random lozenge tilings near straight boundaries and for tensor products

    OpenAIRE

    Gorin, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    We prove that the asymptotic of the bulk local statistics in models of random lozenge tilings is universal in the vicinity of straight boundaries of the tiled domains. The result applies to uniformly random lozenge tilings of large polygonal domains on triangular lattice and to the probability measures describing the decomposition in Gelfand-Tsetlin bases of tensor products of representations of unitary groups. In a weaker form our theorem also applies to random domino tilings.

  11. Rapid high-resolution mapping of balanced chromosomal rearrangements on tiling CGH arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greisman, Harvey A; Hoffman, Noah G; Yi, Hye Son

    2011-11-01

    The diagnosis and classification of many cancers depends in part on the identification of large-scale genomic aberrations such as chromosomal deletions, duplications, and balanced translocations. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) can detect chromosomal imbalances on a genome-wide scale but cannot reliably identify balanced chromosomal rearrangements. We describe a simple modification of array CGH that enables simultaneous identification of recurrent balanced rearrangements and genomic imbalances on the same microarray. Using custom tiling oligonucleotide arrays and gene-specific linear amplification primers, translocation CGH (tCGH) maps balanced rearrangements to ∼100-base resolution and facilitates the rapid cloning and sequencing of novel rearrangement breakpoints. As proof of principle, we used tCGH to characterize nine of the most common gene fusions in mature B-cell neoplasms and myeloid leukemias. Because tCGH can be performed in any CGH-capable laboratory and can screen for multiple recurrent translocations and genome-wide imbalances, it should be of broad utility in the diagnosis and classification of various types of lymphomas, leukemias, and solid tumors. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Surface characterization of carbohydrate microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurr, David J; Horlacher, Tim; Oberli, Matthias A; Werz, Daniel B; Kroeck, Lenz; Bufali, Simone; Seeberger, Peter H; Shard, Alexander G; Alexander, Morgan R

    2010-11-16

    Carbohydrate microarrays are essential tools to determine the biological function of glycans. Here, we analyze a glycan array by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to gain a better understanding of the physicochemical properties of the individual spots and to improve carbohydrate microarray quality. The carbohydrate microarray is prepared by piezo printing of thiol-terminated sugars onto a maleimide functionalized glass slide. The hyperspectral ToF-SIMS imaging data are analyzed by multivariate curve resolution (MCR) to discern secondary ions from regions of the array containing saccharide, linker, salts from the printing buffer, and the background linker chemistry. Analysis of secondary ions from the linker common to all of the sugar molecules employed reveals a relatively uniform distribution of the sugars within the spots formed from solutions with saccharide concentration of 0.4 mM and less, whereas a doughnut shape is often formed at higher-concentration solutions. A detailed analysis of individual spots reveals that in the larger spots the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) salts are heterogeneously distributed, apparently resulting in saccharide concentrated at the rim of the spots. A model of spot formation from the evaporating sessile drop is proposed to explain these observations. Saccharide spot diameters increase with saccharide concentration due to a reduction in surface tension of the saccharide solution compared to PBS. The multivariate analytical partial least squares (PLS) technique identifies ions from the sugars that in the complex ToF-SIMS spectra correlate with the binding of galectin proteins.

  13. GROWTH EVALUATION OF FUNGI (PENICILLIUM AND ASPERGILLUS SPP.) ON CEILING TILES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of the potential for fungal growth on four different ceiling tiles in static chambers. It was found that even new ceiling tiles supported fungal growth under favorable conditions. Used ceiling tiles appeared to be more susceptible to funga...

  14. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2005-11-01

    Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

  15. High-density QCD phase transitions inside neutron stars: Glitches and gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A. M.; Bagchi, P.; Das, A.; Layek, B.

    2017-10-01

    We discuss physics of exotic high baryon density QCD phases which are believed to exist in the core of a neutron star. This can provide a laboratory for exploring exotic physics such as axion emission, KK graviton production etc. Much of the physics of these high-density phases is model-dependent and not very well understood, especially the densities expected to occur inside neutron stars. We follow a different approach and use primarily universal aspects of the physics of different high-density phases and associated phase transitions. We study effects of density fluctuations during transitions with and without topological defect production and study the effect on pulsar timings due to changing moment of inertia of the star. We also discuss gravitational wave production due to rapidly changing quadrupole moment of the star due to these fluctuations.

  16. Development of ultra-high-density screening tools for microbial "omics".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon J Bean

    Full Text Available High-throughput genetic screens in model microbial organisms are a primary means of interrogating biological systems. In numerous cases, such screens have identified the genes that underlie a particular phenotype or a set of gene-gene, gene-environment or protein-protein interactions, which are then used to construct highly informative network maps for biological research. However, the potential test space of genes, proteins, or interactions is typically much larger than current screening systems can address. To push the limits of screening technology, we developed an ultra-high-density, 6144-colony arraying system and analysis toolbox. Using budding yeast as a benchmark, we find that these tools boost genetic screening throughput 4-fold and yield significant cost and time reductions at quality levels equal to or better than current methods. Thus, the new ultra-high-density screening tools enable researchers to significantly increase the size and scope of their genetic screens.

  17. High-density ferroelectric recording using a hard disk drive-type data storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Tomonori; Hiranaga, Yoshiomi; Cho, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric probe data storage has been proposed as a novel data storage method in which bits are recorded based on the polarization directions of individual domains. These bits are subsequently read by scanning nonlinear dielectric microscopy. The domain walls of typical ferroelectric materials are quite thin: often only several times the lattice constant, which is advantageous for high-density data storage. In this work, high-density read/write (R/W) demonstrations were conducted using a hard disk drive-type test system, and the writing of bit arrays with a recording density of 3.4 Tbit/in.2 was achieved. Additionally, a series of writing and reading operations was successfully demonstrated at a density of 1 Tbit/in.2. Favorable characteristics of ferroelectric recording media for use with the proposed method are discussed in the latter part of this paper.

  18. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  19. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-01

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  20. High-Density Liquid-Crystalline Polymer Brushes Formed by Surface Segregation and Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Koji; Hara, Mitsuo; Nagano, Shusaku; Seki, Takahiro

    2016-11-02

    High-density polymer brushes on substrates exhibit unique properties and functions stemming from the extended conformations due to the surface constraint. To date, such chain organizations have been mostly attained by synthetic strategies of surface-initiated living polymerization. We show herein a new method to prepare a high-density polymer brush architecture using surface segregation and self-assembly of diblock copolymers containing a side-chain liquid-crystalline polymer (SCLCP). The surface segregation is attained from a film of an amorphous base polymer (polystyrene, PS) containing a minor amount of a SCLCP-PS diblock copolymer upon annealing above the glass-transition temperature. The polystyrene portion of the diblock copolymer can work as a laterally mobile anchor for the favorable self-assembly on the polystyrene base film. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. High density lipoproteins as indicators of endothelial dysfunction in children with diadetes type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobanova S.M.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to study the level of blood high density lipoproteins (HDL in the groups of children with different course of diadetes type I in order to find out the dependence of course and complications of diabetes on that level. Materials and methods: Blood high density lipoprotein (HDL levels were investigated in children and adolescents with diadetes type I, depending on the duration of diadetes type I, age, stage of sexual development, the stage of diabetic nephropathy and levels of plasma endothelin-1 (E-1. Results: Decrease in HDL level with increasing duration of diadetes type I in prepubertate patients, higher indices of HDL cholesterol were determined in girls, especially with impaired puberty. HDL cholesterol was higher in diabetic nephropathy at the stage of proteinuria and high level of blood endothelin-1. Conclusion: The revealed changes were considered to cause deregulation of vascular endothelium as a manifestation of the initial stages of endothelial dysfunction

  2. ChemicalVia: a CERN-patented technology for use in high-density circuits

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    High-density multilayer printed circuits such as those pictured here are found in miniaturized modern equipment from video cameras to mobile phones. Adjacent layers in these circuits are electrically connected by microvias, consisting of a small-diameter hole (usually 50 µm) with a thin metal-deposited surface covering their cylindrical walls to ensure local conductivity between the two layers. ChemicalVia is a new method, patented by CERN, to make microvias on high-density multilayer printed circuits using chemicals rather than complex laser, plasma or photoimaging technology. The process is compatible with all standard printed-circuit assembly lines, and has the advantages of low initial investment and reduced manufacturing costs. http://www.cern.ch/ttdatabase

  3. OSCAR experiment high-density network data report: Event 3 - April 16-17, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dana, M.T.; Easter, R.C.; Thorp, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    The OSCAR (Oxidation and Scavenging Characteristics of April Rains) experiment, conducted during April 1981, was a cooperative field investigation of wet removal in cyclonic storm systems. The high-density component of OSCAR was located in northeast Indiana and included sequential precipitation chemistry measurements on a 100 by 100 km network, as well as airborne air chemistry and cloud chemistry measurements, surface air chemistry measurements, and supporting meteorological measurements. Four separate storm events were studied during the experiment. This report summarizes data taken by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) during the third storm event, April 16-17. The report contains the high-density network precipitation chemistry data, air chemistry and cloud chemistry data from the PNL aircraft, and meteorological data for the event, including standard National Weather Service products and radar and rawindsonde data from the network. 4 references, 76 figures, 6 tables.

  4. High-density 3D graphene-based monolith and related materials, methods, and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Biener, Juergen; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Kucheyev, Sergei; Montalvo, Elizabeth; Shin, Swanee; Tylski, Elijah

    2017-03-21

    A composition comprising at least one high-density graphene-based monolith, said monolith comprising a three-dimensional structure of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds and having a density of at least 0.1 g/cm.sup.3. Also provided is a method comprising: preparing a reaction mixture comprising a suspension and at least one catalyst, said suspension selected from a graphene oxide (GO) suspension and a carbon nanotube suspension; curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, said drying step is substantially free of supercritical drying and freeze drying; and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a high-density graphene-based monolith. Exceptional combinations of properties are achieved including high conductive and mechanical properties.

  5. Thermal Experimental Analysis for Dielectric Characterization of High Density Polyethylene Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Thabet Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of nanoparticles in controlling physical properties of polymeric nanocomposite materials leads us to study effects of these nanoparticles on electric and dielectric properties of polymers in industry In this research, the dielectric behaviour of High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE nanocomposites materials that filled with nanoparticles of clay or fumed silica has been investigated at various frequencies (10 Hz-1 kHz and temperatures (20-60°C. Dielectric spectroscopy has been used to characterize ionic conduction, then, the effects of nanoparticles concentration on the dielectric losses and capacitive charge of the new nanocomposites can be stated. Capacitive charge and loss tangent in high density polyethylene nanocomposites are measured by dielectric spectroscopy. Different dielectric behaviour has been observed depending on type and concentration of nanoparticles under variant thermal conditions.

  6. A complete life cycle assessment of high density polyethylene plastic bottle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treenate, P.; Limphitakphong, N.; Chavalparit, O.

    2017-07-01

    This study was aimed to determine environmental performances of a lubricant oil bottle made from high density polyethylene and to develop potential measures for reducing its impacts. A complete life cycle assessment was carried out to understand a whole effect on the environment from acquiring, processing, using, and disposing the product. Two scenarios of disposal phase; recycle and incineration: were examined to quantify a lesser degree on environmental impact. The results illustrated that major impacts of the two scenarios were at the same categories with the highest contributor of raw material acquisition and pre-processing. However, all impacts in case of recycling provided a lower point than that in case of incineration, except mineral extraction. Finally, feasible measures for reducing the environmental impact of high density polyethylene plastic bottle were proposed in accordance with 3Rs concept.

  7. Fragment and particle size distribution of impacted ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Weerheijm, J.; Ditzhuijzen, C.; Tuinman, I.

    2014-01-01

    The fragmentation of ceramic tiles under ballistic impact has been studied. Fragments and aerosol (respirable) particles were collected and analyzed to determine the total surface area generated by fracturing (macro-cracking and comminution) of armor grade ceramics. The larger fragments were

  8. Remote parallel rendering for high-resolution tiled display walls

    KAUST Repository

    Nachbaur, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    © 2014 IEEE. We present a complete, robust and simple to use hardware and software stack delivering remote parallel rendering of complex geometrical and volumetric models to high resolution tiled display walls in a production environment. We describe the setup and configuration, present preliminary benchmarks showing interactive framerates, and describe our contributions for a seamless integration of all the software components.

  9. EVALUATION OF FUNGAL GROWTH (PENICILLIUM GLABRUM) ON A CEILING TILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of a study employing static chambers to study the impact of different equilibrium relative humidities (RHs) and moisture conditions on the ability of a new ceiling tile to support fungal growth. Amplification of the mold, Penicillium glabrum, occurred at R...

  10. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  11. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  12. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter central barrel assembly and installation.

    CERN Multimedia

    nikolai topilin

    2009-01-01

    These photos belong to the self-published book by Nikolai Topilin "ATLAS Hadron Calorimeter Assembly". The book is a collection of souvenirs from the years of assembly and installation of the Tile Hadron Calorimeter, which extended from November 2002 until May 2006.

  13. Cyclic loading of sacroiliac screws in Tile C pelvic fractures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwienen, C.M. van; Bosch, E.W. van den; Hoek van Dijke, G.A.; Snijders, C.J.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate the stiffness and strength of completely unstable pelvic fractures fixated both anteriorly and posteriorly under cyclic loading conditions, the authors conducted a randomized, comparative, cadaveric study. METHODS: In 12 specimens, a Tile C1 pelvic fracture was created.

  14. The ATLAS Tile Hadronic Calorimeter performance at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Francavilla, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, is a key detector component to detect hadrons, jets and taus and to measure the missing transverse energy. Due to the very good muon signal to noise ratio it assists the spectrometer in the identi cation and reconstruction of muons. TileCal is built of steel and scintillating tiles coupled to optical bers and read out by photomultipliers. The calorimeter is equipped with systems that allow to monitor and to calibrate each stage of the read-out system exploiting di erent signal sources: laser light, charge injection, a radioactive source and the signal produced by minimum bias events. The performance of the calorimeter has been measured and monitored using calibration data, random triggered data, cosmic muons, splash events and most importantly the large sample of pp collision events. Results are discussed that demonstrate how the calorimeter is operated, how is monitored and what performance has been obtai...

  15. The ATLAS Tile Hadronic Calorimeter performance at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Francavilla, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, is a key detector component to detect hadrons, jets and taus and to measure the missing transverse energy. Due to the very good muon signal to noise ratio it assists the spectrometer in the identification and reconstruction of muons. TileCal is built of steel and scintillating tiles coupled to optical fibers and read out by photomultipliers. The calorimeter is equipped with systems that allow to monitor and to calibrate each stage of the read-out system exploiting different signal sources: laser light, charge injection, a radioactive source and the signal produced by minimum bias events. The performance of the calorimeter has been measured and monitored using calibration data, random triggered data, cosmic muons, splash events and most importantly the large sample of pp collision events. Results are discussed that demostrate how the calorimeter is operated, how is monitored and what performance has been ob...

  16. Carbohydrate microarrays for assaying galactosyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungjin; Shin, Injae

    2007-04-26

    [reaction: see text] Carbohydrate microarrays have been used recently for the rapid analysis of glycan-protein or glycan-cell interactions and for the detection of pathogens. As a demonstration of its significance and versatility, the microarray technology has been applied in this effort to assay glycosyltransferase activities. In addition, carbohydrate microarray based methods have been employed to quantitatively determine binding affinities between lectins and carbohydrates.

  17. High-density surface electromyography improves the identification of oscillatory synaptic inputs to motor neurons

    OpenAIRE

    van de Steeg, C.; Daffertshofer, A.; Stegeman, D.F.; Boonstra, T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have addressed corticomuscular coherence (CMC), but broad applications are limited by low coherence values and the variability across subjects and recordings. Here, we investigated how the use of high-density surface electromyography (HDsEMG) can improve the detection of CMC. Sixteen healthy subjects performed isometric contractions at six low-force levels using a pinch-grip, while HDsEMG of the adductor pollicis transversus and flexor and abductor pollicis brevis and whole-head ...

  18. The HDL hypothesis: does high-density lipoprotein protect from atherosclerosis?

    OpenAIRE

    Vergeer, Menno; Holleboom, Adriaan G.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2010-01-01

    There is unequivocal evidence of an inverse association between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations and the risk of cardiovascular disease, a finding that has led to the hypothesis that HDL protects from atherosclerosis. This review details the experimental evidence for this “HDL hypothesis”. In vitro studies suggest that HDL has a wide range of anti-atherogenic properties but validation of these functions in humans is absent to date. A significant number of anima...

  19. Preparation and Compatibility Evaluation of Polypropylene/High Density Polyethylene Polyblends

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jia-Horng; Pan, Yi-Jun; Liu, Chi-Fan; Huang, Chien-Lin; Hsieh, Chien-Teng; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Lin, Zheng-Ian; Lou, Ching-Wen

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes melt-blending polypropylene (PP) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) that have a similar melt flow index (MFI) to form PP/HDPE polyblends. The influence of the content of HDPE on the properties and compatibility of polyblends is examined by using a tensile test, flexural test, Izod impact test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and X-ray diffraction...

  20. Mechanical and thermal properties of high density polyethylene - dried distillers grains with solubles composites

    OpenAIRE

    Brent Tisserat; Louis Reifschneider; Rogers Harry O’Kuru; Victoria L. Finkenstadt

    2013-01-01

    Dried Distillers Grain with Solubles (DDGS) was evaluated as a bio-based fiber reinforcement. Composites of high density polyethylene (HDPE) composed of 25% by weight DDGS and either 0% or 5% by weight of maleated polyethylene (MAPE) were produced by twin screw compounding and injection molding. An improved DDGS bio-filler was produced by solvent treating DDGS (STDDGS). Injection-molded test specimens were evaluated for their tensile, flexural, impact, and thermal properties. Composite blends...

  1. Output Enhancement Effect of Magnetic Underlayer in High-Density Magnetic Recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Katsumi; Yoshida, Osamu; Sasaki, Kenji; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Maki, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yoshihisa

    1999-10-01

    A double-layered tape with a metal particulate (MP) upper layer and a metal-evaporated (ME) underlayer is fabricated. Output properties were enhanced over the single-layered MP tape in high-density recording. This effect cannot be explained by conventional magnetic recording mechanisms, and a new model of magneto-static interaction is proposed. This model is supported by a preliminary computer simulation.

  2. Small high-density lipoprotein is associated with monocyte subsets in stable coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Kastl, Stefan P.; Pfaffenberger, Stefan; Pongratz, Thomas; Hofbauer, Sebastian L.; Wonnerth, Anna; Katsaros, Katharina M.; Goliasch, Georg; Gaspar, Ludovit; Huber, Kurt; Maurer, Gerald; Dostal, Elisabeth; Oravec, Stanislav; Wojta, Johann; Speidl, Walter S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: High-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles are heterogeneous in structure and function and the role of HDL subfractions in atherogenesis is not well understood. It has been suggested that small HDL may be dysfunctional in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Monocytes are considered to play a key role in atherosclerotic diseases. Circulating monocytes can be divided into three subtypes according to their surface expression of CD14 and CD16. Our aim was to examine whether mono...

  3. Preparation of High-Density Fibrillar Collagen Matrices that Mimic Desmoplastic Tumor Stroma

    OpenAIRE

    Artym, Vira V.

    2016-01-01

    The stroma of invasive tumors becomes enriched in dense fibrillar collagen as a result of the desmoplastic reaction. This desmoplastic collagen exerts profound effects on tumor and normal cells. In view of these findings, it is important to develop novel in vitro cell systems that mimic this desmoplastic extracellular matrix in order to permit cell studies under in vivo-like conditions. This Unit provides a protocol and troubleshooting guide for the preparation of high density fibrillar colla...

  4. Sorption Isotherm of Southern Yellow Pine—High Density Polyethylene Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Feihong Liu; Guangping Han; Wanli Cheng,; Qinglin Wu

    2015-01-01

    Temperature and relative humidity (RH) are two major external factors, which affect equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood-plastic composites (WPCs). In this study, the effect of different durability treatments on sorption and desorption isotherms of southern yellow pine (SYP)-high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites was investigated. All samples were equilibriumed at 20 °C and various RHs including 16%, 33%, 45%, 66%, 75%, 85%, 93%, and100%. EMCs obtained from desorption and absorpt...

  5. Quasiperiodic canonical-cell tiling with pseudo icosahedral symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Nobuhisa

    2017-10-01

    Icosahedral quasicrystals and their approximants are generally described as packing of icosahedral clusters. Experimental studies show that clusters in various approximants are orderly arranged, such that their centers are located at the nodes (or vertices) of a periodic tiling composed of four basic polyhedra called the canonical cells. This so called canonical-cell geometry is likely to serve as a common framework for modeling how clusters are arranged in approximants, while its applicability seems to extend naturally to icosahedral quasicrystals. To date, however, it has not been proved yet if the canonical cells can tile the space quasiperiodically, though we usually believe that clusters in icosahedral quasicrystals are arranged such that quasiperiodic long-range order as well as icosahedral point symmetry is maintained. In this paper, we report for the first time an iterative geometrical transformation of the canonical cells defining a so-called substitution rule, which we can use to generate a class of quasiperiodic canonical-cell tilings. Every single step of the transformation proceeds as follows: each cell is first enlarged by a magnification ratio of τ3 (τ = golden mean) and then subdivided into cells of the original size. Here, cells with an identical shape can be subdivided in several distinct manners depending on how their adjacent neighbors are arranged, and sixteen types of cells are identified in terms of unique subdivision. This class of quasiperiodic canonical-cell tilings presents the first realization of three-dimensional quasiperiodic tilings with fractal atomic surfaces. There are four distinct atomic surfaces associated with four sub-modules of the primitive icosahedral module, where a representative of the four submodules corresponds to the Σ = 4 coincidence site module of the icosahedral module. It follows that the present quasiperiodic tilings involve a kind of superlattice ordering that manifests itself in satellite peaks in the

  6. Low-enriched uranium high-density target project. Compendium report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, George; Brown, M. Alex; Jerden, James L.; Gelis, Artem V.; Stepinski, Dominique C.; Wiedmeyer, Stanley; Youker, Amanda; Hebden, Andrew; Solbrekken, G; Allen, C; Robertson., D; El-Gizawy, Sherif; Govindarajan, Srisharan; Hoyer, Annemarie; Makarewicz, Philip; Harris, Jacob; Graybill, Brian; Gunn, Andy; Berlin, James; Bryan, Chris; Sherman, Steven; Hobbs, Randy; Griffin, F. P.; Chandler, David; Hurt, C. J.; Williams, Paul; Creasy, John; Tjader, Barak; McFall, Danielle; Longmire, Hollie

    2016-09-01

    At present, most 99Mo is produced in research, test, or isotope production reactors by irradiation of highly enriched uranium targets. To achieve the denser form of uranium needed for switching from high to low enriched uranium (LEU), targets in the form of a metal foil (~125-150 µm thick) are being developed. The LEU High Density Target Project successfully demonstrated several iterations of an LEU-fission-based Mo-99 technology that has the potential to provide the world’s supply of Mo-99, should major producers choose to utilize the technology. Over 50 annular high density targets have been successfully tested, and the assembly and disassembly of targets have been improved and optimized. Two target front-end processes (acidic and electrochemical) have been scaled up and demonstrated to allow for the high-density target technology to mate up to the existing producer technology for target processing. In the event that a new target processing line is started, the chemical processing of the targets is greatly simplified. Extensive modeling and safety analysis has been conducted, and the target has been qualified to be inserted into the High Flux Isotope Reactor, which is considered above and beyond the requirements for the typical use of this target due to high fluence and irradiation duration.

  7. Motor unit number estimation based on high-density surface electromyography decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; He, Jinbao; Yao, Bo; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Yingchun

    2016-09-01

    To advance the motor unit number estimation (MUNE) technique using high density surface electromyography (EMG) decomposition. The K-means clustering convolution kernel compensation algorithm was employed to detect the single motor unit potentials (SMUPs) from high-density surface EMG recordings of the biceps brachii muscles in eight healthy subjects. Contraction forces were controlled at 10%, 20% and 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Achieved MUNE results and the representativeness of the SMUP pools were evaluated using a high-density weighted-average method. Mean numbers of motor units were estimated as 288±132, 155±87, 107±99 and 132±61 by using the developed new MUNE at 10%, 20%, 30% and 10-30% MVCs, respectively. Over 20 SMUPs were obtained at each contraction level, and the mean residual variances were lower than 10%. The new MUNE method allows a convenient and non-invasive collection of a large size of SMUP pool with great representativeness. It provides a useful tool for estimating the motor unit number of proximal muscles. The present new MUNE method successfully avoids the use of intramuscular electrodes or multiple electrical stimuli which is required in currently available MUNE techniques; as such the new MUNE method can minimize patient discomfort for MUNE tests. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. PERUBAHAN KADAR KOLESTEROL HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN SETELAH SENAM POCO-POCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. M. Rattu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The acute and chronic effects of endurance exercise on parameters pertinent to blood lipid profiles have been extensively studied and reviewed. The preponderance of evidence available would suggest that endurance exercise transiently increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with concomitant alteration in total cholesterol and triglycerides. The major aim of the present study was to determine the effect of Poco-Poco Dance On High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Level. Subjects were divided into 2 groups : A Poco-Poco Dance Group; B Control group which received no exercise training. Venous blood samples were obtained at rest and immediately after Poco-Poco Dance. Data showed that high-density lipoprotein cholesterol rose significantly in the Poco-Poco Dance Group (from 39.3 ±0.4 to 40.7 ± 4.0 mg%; P<0.05 in response to Poco-Poco Dance. It is therefore concluded that The Poco-Poco Dance induces alterations in blood lipid profiles.

  9. Construction and analysis of high-density linkage map using high-throughput sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyuan Liu

    Full Text Available Linkage maps enable the study of important biological questions. The construction of high-density linkage maps appears more feasible since the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS, which eases SNP discovery and high-throughput genotyping of large population. However, the marker number explosion and genotyping errors from NGS data challenge the computational efficiency and linkage map quality of linkage study methods. Here we report the HighMap method for constructing high-density linkage maps from NGS data. HighMap employs an iterative ordering and error correction strategy based on a k-nearest neighbor algorithm and a Monte Carlo multipoint maximum likelihood algorithm. Simulation study shows HighMap can create a linkage map with three times as many markers as ordering-only methods while offering more accurate marker orders and stable genetic distances. Using HighMap, we constructed a common carp linkage map with 10,004 markers. The singleton rate was less than one-ninth of that generated by JoinMap4.1. Its total map distance was 5,908 cM, consistent with reports on low-density maps. HighMap is an efficient method for constructing high-density, high-quality linkage maps from high-throughput population NGS data. It will facilitate genome assembling, comparative genomic analysis, and QTL studies. HighMap is available at http://highmap.biomarker.com.cn/.

  10. A high-density SNP genotyping array for rice biology and molecular breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haodong; Xie, Weibo; He, Hang; Yu, Huihui; Chen, Wei; Li, Jing; Yu, Renbo; Yao, Yue; Zhang, Wenhui; He, Yuqing; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Fasong; Deng, Xing Wang; Zhang, Qifa

    2014-03-01

    A high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array is critically important for geneticists and molecular breeders. With the accumulation of huge amounts of genomic re-sequencing data and available technologies for accurate SNP detection, it is possible to design high-density and high-quality rice SNP arrays. Here we report the development of a high-density rice SNP array and its utility. SNP probes were designed by screening more than 10 000 000 SNP loci extracted from the re-sequencing data of 801 rice varieties and an array named RiceSNP50 was produced on the Illumina Infinium platform. The array contained 51 478 evenly distributed markers, 68% of which were within genic regions. Several hundred rice plants with parent/F1 relationships were used to generate a high-quality cluster file for accurate SNP calling. Application tests showed that this array had high genotyping accuracy, and could be used for different objectives. For example, a core collection of elite rice varieties was clustered with fine resolution. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) analysis correctly identified a characterized QTL. Further, this array was successfully used for variety verification and trait introgression. As an accurate high-throughput genotyping tool, RiceSNP50 will play an important role in both functional genomics studies and molecular breeding.

  11. Novel LLM series high density energy materials: Synthesis, characterization, and thermal stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoria, Philip; Zhang, Maoxi; Tsyshevskiy, Roman; Kuklja, Maija

    Novel high density energy materials must satisfy specific requirements, such as an increased performance, reliably high stability to external stimuli, cost-efficiency and ease of synthesis, be environmentally benign, and be safe for handling and transportation. During the last decade, the attention of researchers has drifted from widely used nitroester-, nitramine-, and nitroaromatic-based explosives to nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compounds. Good thermal stability, the low melting point, high density, and moderate sensitivity make heterocycle materials attractive candidates for use as oxidizers in rocket propellants and fuels, secondary explosives, and possibly as melt-castable ingredients of high explosive formulations. In this report, the synthesis, characterization, and results of quantum-chemical DFT study of thermal stability of LLM-191, LLM-192 and LLM-200 high density energy materials are presented. Work performed under the auspices of the DOE by the LLNL (Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344). This research is supported in part by ONR (Grant N00014-12-1-0529) and NSF. We used NSF XSEDE (Grant DMR-130077) and DOE NERSC (Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231) resources.

  12. X-ray CT high-density artefact suppression in the presence of bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Jikun [School of Health Sciences, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2051 (United States); Chen Laigao [BioImaging Center of Emphasis, Pfizer Global Research and Development, 2800 Plymouth RD, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States); Sandison, George A [School of Health Sciences, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2051 (United States); Liang Yun [Department of Radiology, Indiana University Medical School, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Xu, Lisa X [School of Mechanical Engineering, 585 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2040 (United States)

    2004-12-21

    This paper presents a novel method of reducing x-ray CT high-density artefacts generated by metal objects when abundant bone structures are present in the region of interest. This method has an advantage over previously proposed methods since it heavily suppresses the metal artefacts without introducing extra bone artefacts. The method of suppression requires that bone pixels are isolated and segmented by thresholding. Then artificial CT numbers are assigned to the bone pixels so that their projection profiles are smooth and thus can be properly simulated by a polynomial interpolation. The projection profile of the metal object is then removed to fully suppress the artefacts. The resulting processed profile is fed to a reconstruction routine and the previously preserved bone pixels added back. The new method utilizes two important features of the CT image with metal artefacts: (a) metal and bone pixels are not severely affected by the high-density artefacts and (b) the high-density artefacts can be located in specific projection channels in the profile domain, although they are spread out in the image domain. This suppression method solves the problem of CT image artefacts arising from metal objects in the body. It has the potential to greatly improve diagnostic CT imaging in the presence of these objects and treatment planning that utilizes CT for patients with metal applicators (e.g., brachytherapy for cervix cancer and prostate cryotherapy)

  13. Nucleation of ordered solid phases of proteins via a disordered high-density state: Phenomenological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weichun; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2005-05-01

    Nucleation of ordered solid phases of proteins triggers numerous phenomena in laboratory, industry, and in healthy and sick organisms. Recent simulations and experiments with protein crystals suggest that the formation of an ordered crystalline nucleus is preceded by a disordered high-density cluster, akin to a droplet of high-density liquid that has been observed with some proteins; this mechanism allowed a qualitative explanation of recorded complex nucleation kinetics curves. Here, we present a simple phenomenological theory that takes into account intermediate high-density metastable states in the nucleation process. Nucleation rate data at varying temperature and protein concentration are reproduced with high fidelity using literature values of the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the system. Our calculations show that the growth rate of the near-critical and supercritical ordered clusters within the dense intermediate is a major factor for the overall nucleation rate. This highlights the role of viscosity within the dense intermediate for the formation of the ordered nucleus. The model provides an understanding of the action of additives that delay or accelerate nucleation and presents a framework within which the nucleation of other ordered protein solid phases, e.g., the sickle cell hemoglobin polymers, can be analyzed.

  14. Experimental evidence that ecological effects of an invasive fish are reduced at high densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornis, Matthew S; Carlson, Jedchada; Lehrer-Brey, Gabrielle; Vander Zanden, M Jake

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the relationship between invasive species density and ecological impact is a pressing topic in ecology, with implications for environmental management and policy. Although it is widely assumed that invasive species impact will increase with density, theory suggests interspecific competition may diminish at high densities due to increased intraspecific interactions. To test this theory, we experimentally examined intra- and interspecific interactions between a globally invasive fish, round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), and three native species at different round goby densities in a tributary of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Eighteen 2.25 m(2) enclosures were stocked with native fish species at natural abundances, while round gobies were stocked at three different densities: 0 m(-2), 2.7 m(-2), and 10.7 m(-2). After 52 days, native fish growth rate was significantly reduced in the low density goby treatment, while growth in the high density goby treatment mirrored the goby-free treatment for two of three native species. Invertebrate density and gut content weight of native fishes did not differ among treatments. Conversely, gut content weight and growth of round gobies were lower in the high goby density treatment, suggesting interactions between round gobies and native fishes are mediated by interference competition amongst gobies. Our experiment provides evidence that invasive species effects may diminish at high densities, possibly due to increased intraspecific interactions. This is consistent with some ecological theory, and cautions against the assumption that invasive species at moderate densities have low impact.

  15. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Jonczyk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays.

  16. Assessment of a direct hybridization microarray strategy for comprehensive monitoring of genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkec, Aydin; Lucas, Stuart J; Karacanli, Burçin; Baykut, Aykut; Yuksel, Hakki

    2016-03-01

    Detection of GMO material in crop and food samples is the primary step in GMO monitoring and regulation, with the increasing number of GM events in the world market requiring detection solutions with high multiplexing capacity. In this study, we test the suitability of a high-density oligonucleotide microarray platform for direct, quantitative detection of GMOs found in the Turkish feed market. We tested 1830 different 60nt probes designed to cover the GM cassettes from 12 different GM cultivars (3 soya, 9 maize), as well as plant species-specific and contamination controls, and developed a data analysis method aiming to provide maximum throughput and sensitivity. The system was able specifically to identify each cultivar, and in 10/12 cases was sensitive enough to detect GMO DNA at concentrations of ⩽1%. These GMOs could also be quantified using the microarray, as their fluorescence signals increased linearly with GMO concentration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Gene expression profile analysis in human hepatocellular carcinoma by cDNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Jung; Sung, Young Kwan; Farooq, Mohammad; Kim, Younghee; Im, Sanguk; Tak, Won Young; Hwang, Yoon Jin; Kim, Yang Il; Han, Hyung Soo; Kim, Jung-Chul; Kim, Moon Kyu

    2002-12-31

    We performed gene expression profiling of normal and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) liver tissues using a high-density microarray that contained 3,063 human cDNA. The results of a microarray hybridization experiment from eight different HCC tissues were analyzed and classified by the Cluster program. Among these differentially-expressed genes, the galectin-3, serine/threonine kinase SGK, translation factor eIF-4A, -4B, -3, fibroblast growth factor receptor, and ribosomal protein L35A were up-regulated; the mRNAs of Nip3, decorin, and the insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 were down-regulated in HCC. The differential expression of these genes was further confirmed by an RT-PCR analysis. In addition, our data suggest that the gene expression profile of HCC varies according to the histological types.

  18. Pairwise Kinship Analysis by the Index of Chromosome Sharing Using High-Density Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Morimoto, Chie; Manabe, Sho; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Kawai, Chihiro; Fujimoto, Shuntaro; Hamano, Yuya; Yamada, Ryo; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new approach for pairwise kinship analysis in forensic genetics based on chromosomal sharing between two individuals. Here, we defined "index of chromosome sharing" (ICS) calculated using 174, 254 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci typed by SNP microarray and genetic length of the shared segments from the genotypes of two individuals. To investigate the expected ICS distributions from first- to fifth-degree relatives and unrelated pairs, we used computationally generated...

  19. Design, construction and validation of a Plasmodium vivax microarray for the transcriptome profiling of clinical isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Boopathi, Pon Arunachalam

    2016-10-09

    High density oligonucleotide microarrays have been used on Plasmodium vivax field isolates to estimate whole genome expression. However, no microarray platform has been experimentally optimized for studying the transcriptome of field isolates. In the present study, we adopted both bioinformatics and experimental testing approaches to select best optimized probes suitable for detecting parasite transcripts from field samples and included them in designing a custom 15K P. vivax microarray. This microarray has long oligonucleotide probes (60 mer) that were in-situ synthesized onto glass slides using Agilent SurePrint technology and has been developed into an 8X15K format (8 identical arrays on a single slide). Probes in this array were experimentally validated and represents 4180 P. vivax genes in sense orientation, of which 1219 genes have also probes in antisense orientation. Validation of the 15K array by using field samples (n =14) has shown 99% of parasite transcript detection from any of the samples. Correlation analysis between duplicate probes (n = 85) present in the arrays showed perfect correlation (r(2) = 0.98) indicating the reproducibility. Multiple probes representing the same gene exhibited similar kind of expression pattern across the samples (positive correlation, r >= 0.6). Comparison of hybridization data with the previous studies and quantitative real-time PCR experiments were performed to highlight the microarray validation procedure. This array is unique in its design, and results indicate that the array is sensitive and reproducible. Hence, this microarray could be a valuable functional genomics tool to generate reliable expression data from P. vivax field isolates. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Carbohydrate microarrays by microcontact printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendeln, Christian; Heile, Andreas; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2010-04-06

    This Article describes the preparation of carbohydrate microarrays by the immobilization of carbohydrates via microcontact printing (microCP) on glass and silicon substrates. To this end, diene-modified carbohydrates (galactose, glucose, mannose, lactose, and maltose) were printed on maleimide-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). A Diels-Alder reaction occurred exclusively in the contact area between stamp and substrate and resulted in a carbohydrate pattern on the substrate. It was found that cyclopentadiene-functionalized carbohydrates could be printed within minutes at room temperature, whereas furan-functionalized carbohydrates required long printing times and high temperatures. By successive printing, microstructured arrays of up to three different carbohydrates could be produced. Immobilization and patterning of the carbohydrates on the surfaces was investigated with contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the lectins concanavalin A (ConA) and peanut agglutinin (PNA) bind to the microarrays, and the printed carbohydrates retain their characteristic selectivity toward these proteins.

  1. Relation of black race between high density lipoprotein cholesterol content, high density lipoprotein particles and coronary events (from the Dallas Heart Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Alvin; Neeland, Ian J; Das, Sandeep R; Khera, Amit; Turer, Aslan T; Ayers, Colby R; McGuire, Darren K; Rohatgi, Anand

    2015-04-01

    Therapies targeting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol content (HDL-C) have not improved coronary heart disease (CHD) outcomes. High-density lipoprotein particle concentration (HDL-P) may better predict CHD. However, the impact of race/ethnicity on the relations between HDL-P and subclinical atherosclerosis and incident CHD events has not been described. Participants from the Dallas Heart Study (DHS), a multiethnic, probability-based, population cohort of Dallas County adults, underwent the following baseline measurements: HDL-C, HDL-P by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, and coronary artery calcium by electron-beam computed tomography. Participants were followed for a median of 9.3 years for incident CHD events (composite of first myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, or cardiovascular death). The study comprised 1,977 participants free of CHD (51% women, 46% black). In adjusted models, HDL-C was not associated with prevalent coronary artery calcium (p = 0.13) or incident CHD overall (hazard ratio [HR] per 1 SD 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76 to 1.05). However, HDL-C was inversely associated with incident CHD among nonblack (adjusted HR per 1 SD 0.67, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.97) but not black participants (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.13, pinteraction = 0.05). Conversely, HDL-P, adjusted for risk factors and HDL-C, was inversely associated with prevalent coronary artery calcium (p = 0.009) and with incident CHD overall (adjusted HR per 1 SD 0.73, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.86), with no interaction by black race/ethnicity (pinteraction = 0.57). In conclusion, in contrast to HDL-C, the inverse relation between HDL-P and incident CHD events is consistent across ethnicities. These findings suggest that HDL-P is superior to HDL-C in predicting prevalent atherosclerosis as well as incident CHD events across a diverse population and should be considered as a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Giardia Colonizes and Encysts in High-Density Foci in the Murine Small Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barash, N. R.; Nosala, C.; Pham, J. K.; McInally, S. G.; Gourguechon, S.; McCarthy-Sinclair, B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Giardia lamblia is a highly prevalent yet understudied protistan parasite causing significant diarrheal disease worldwide. Hosts ingest Giardia cysts from contaminated sources. In the gastrointestinal tract, cysts excyst to become motile trophozoites, colonizing and attaching to the gut epithelium. Trophozoites later differentiate into infectious cysts that are excreted and contaminate the environment. Due to the limited accessibility of the gut, the temporospatial dynamics of giardiasis in the host are largely inferred from laboratory culture and thus may not mirror Giardia physiology in the host. Here, we have developed bioluminescent imaging (BLI) to directly interrogate and quantify the in vivo temporospatial dynamics of Giardia infection, thereby providing an improved murine model to evaluate anti-Giardia drugs. Using BLI, we determined that parasites primarily colonize the proximal small intestine nonuniformly in high-density foci. By imaging encystation-specific bioreporters, we show that encystation initiates shortly after inoculation and continues throughout the duration of infection. Encystation also initiates in high-density foci in the proximal small intestine, and high density contributes to the initiation of encystation in laboratory culture. We suggest that these high-density in vivo foci of colonizing and encysting Giardia likely result in localized disruption to the epithelium. This more accurate visualization of giardiasis redefines the dynamics of the in vivo Giardia life cycle, paving the way for future mechanistic studies of density-dependent parasitic processes in the host. IMPORTANCE Giardia is a single-celled parasite causing significant diarrheal disease in several hundred million people worldwide. Due to limited access to the site of infection in the gastrointestinal tract, our understanding of the dynamics of Giardia infections in the host has remained limited and largely inferred from laboratory culture. To better understand

  3. Chromosomal microarrays testing in children with developmental disabilities and congenital anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Lay-Son

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Clinical use of microarray-based techniques for the analysis of many developmental disorders has emerged during the last decade. Thus, chromosomal microarray has been positioned as a first-tier test. This study reports the first experience in a Chilean cohort. METHODS: Chilean patients with developmental disabilities and congenital anomalies were studied with a high-density microarray (CytoScan(tm HD Array, Affymetrix, Inc., Santa Clara, CA, USA. Patients had previous cytogenetic studies with either a normal result or a poorly characterized anomaly. RESULTS: This study tested 40 patients selected by two or more criteria, including: major congenital anomalies, facial dysmorphism, developmental delay, and intellectual disability. Copy number variants (CNVs were found in 72.5% of patients, while a pathogenic CNV was found in 25% of patients and a CNV of uncertain clinical significance was found in 2.5% of patients. CONCLUSION: Chromosomal microarray analysis is a useful and powerful tool for diagnosis of developmental diseases, by allowing accurate diagnosis, improving the diagnosis rate, and discovering new etiologies. The higher cost is a limitation for widespread use in this setting.

  4. Life considerations of the shuttle orbiter densified-tile thermal protection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P. A.; Sawyer, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Shuttle orbiter themal protection system (TPS) incorporates ceramic reusable surface insulation tiles bonded to the orbiter substructure through a strain isolation pad. Densification of the bonding surface of the tiles increases the static strength of the tiles. The densification proces does not, however, necessarily lead to an equivalent increase in fatigue strength. Investigation of the expected lifetime of densified tile TPS under both sinusoidal loading and random loading simulating flight conditions indicates that the strain isolation pads are the weakest components of the TPS under fatigue loading. The felt pads loosen under repetitive loading and, in highly loaded regions, could possibly cause excessive step heights between tiles causing burning of the protective insulation between tiles. A method of improving the operational lifetime of the TPS by using a strain isolation pad with increased stiffness is presented as is the consequence of the effect of increased stiffness on the tile inplane strains and transverse stresses.

  5. The EADGENE Microarray Data Analysis Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Koning, Dirk-Jan; Jaffrézic, Florence; Lund, Mogens Sandø

    2007-01-01

    Microarray analyses have become an important tool in animal genomics. While their use is becoming widespread, there is still a lot of ongoing research regarding the analysis of microarray data. In the context of a European Network of Excellence, 31 researchers representing 14 research groups from...

  6. Carbohydrate Microarrays in Plant Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Pedersen, H.L.; Vidal-Melgosa, S.

    2012-01-01

    industrially and nutritionally. Understanding the biological roles of plant glycans and the effective exploitation of their useful properties requires a detailed understanding of their structures, occurrence, and molecular interactions. Microarray technology has revolutionized the massively high......Almost all plant cells are surrounded by glycan-rich cell walls, which form much of the plant body and collectively are the largest source of biomass on earth. Plants use polysaccharides for support, defense, signaling, cell adhesion, and as energy storage, and many plant glycans are also important...... for plant research and can be used to map glycan populations across large numbers of samples to screen antibodies, carbohydrate binding proteins, and carbohydrate binding modules and to investigate enzyme activities....

  7. Carbohydrate microarrays as tools in HIV glycobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Daniel M; Seeberger, Peter H

    2007-01-01

    Progress in carbohydrate microarray technology has positioned the glycochip among the expanding set of biophysical tools available to researchers. Synthetically-derived glycochips unite established microarray techniques with the versatility and structural precision of synthetic carbohydrate chemistry. A comprehensive demonstration of carbohydrate microarrays is illustrated by the chip-based study of protein/carbohydrate and protein/glycoprotein interactions as they relate to HIV glycobiology. Composed of a series of high-mannose oligosaccharides, carbohydrate microarrays were prepared utilizing a covalent linking strategy to immobilize synthetically-defined glycans in a uniform orientation. In concert with a simple glycoprotein array, these microarrays were used to establish the individual and competitive binding profiles of five gp120 binding proteins--DC-SIGN, CD4, 2G12 cyanovirin-N, and scytovirin--and established the carbohydrate structural requirements for these interactions.

  8. Diagnostic and analytical applications of protein microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dufva, Hans Martin; Christensen, C.B.V.

    2005-01-01

    -linked immunosorbent assay, mass spectrometry or high-performance liquid chromatography-based assays. However, for protein and antibody arrays to be successfully introduced into diagnostics, the biochemistry of immunomicroarrays must be better characterized and simplified, they must be validated in a clinical setting......DNA microarrays have changed the field of biomedical sciences over the past 10 years. For several reasons, antibody and other protein microarrays have not developed at the same rate. However, protein and antibody arrays have emerged as a powerful tool to complement DNA microarrays during the post 5...... years. A genome-scale protein microarray has been demonstrated for identifying protein-protein interactions as well as for rapid identification of protein binding to a particular drug. Furthermore, protein microarrays have been shown as an efficient tool in cancer profiling, detection of bacteria...

  9. Comparison of performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT 2009 and 2012 in an extensively tile-drained watershed in the Midwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface tile drainage systems are widely used in agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern US and enable the Midwest area to become highly productive agricultural lands, but can also create environmental problems, for example nitrate-N contamination associated with drainage waters. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT has been used to model watersheds with tile drainage. SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 provide new tile drainage routines. However, few studies have used these revisions to study tile drainage impacts at both field and watershed scales. Moreover, SWAT2012 revision 645 improved the soil moisture based curve number calculation method, which has not been fully tested. This study used long-term (1991–2003 field site and river station data from the Little Vermilion River (LVR watershed to evaluate performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT2009 revision 528 (the old routine and SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 (the new routine. Both the old and new routines provided reasonable but unsatisfactory (NSE  <  0.5 uncalibrated flow and nitrate loss results for a mildly sloped watershed with low runoff. The calibrated monthly tile flow, surface flow, nitrate-N in tile and surface flow, sediment and annual corn and soybean yield results from SWAT with the old and new tile drainage routines were compared with observed values. Generally, the new routine provided acceptable simulated tile flow (NSE  =  0.48–0.65 and nitrate in tile flow (NSE  =  0.48–0.68 for field sites with random pattern tile and constant tile spacing, while the old routine simulated tile flow and nitrate in tile flow results for the field site with constant tile spacing were unacceptable (NSE  =  0.00–0.32 and −0.29–0.06, respectively. The new modified curve number calculation method in revision 645 (NSE  =  0.50–0.81 better simulated surface runoff than revision 615 (NSE  =  −0.11–0.49. The calibration

  10. Pruning for crop regulation in high density guava (Psidium guajava L.) plantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakre, M.; Lal, S.; Uniyal, S.; Goswami, A.K. Prakash. P.

    2016-11-01

    High density management and crop regulation are two important aspects in guava (Psidium guajava L.) production. Therefore, to find out the economic way of managing high density planting and crop regulation, the present work was carried out on 6-year-old guava trees of cv. Pant Prabhat under double-hedge row system of planting during 2009-10 and 2010-11. Seven different forms of pruning [FBT: flower bud thinning by hand, FBTT: flower bud thinning by hand followed by removal of terminal one leaf pair, RLFO: removal of leaves and flower buds by hand, retaining one leaf pair at the top, RLF: removal of all leaves and flowers by hand, OLPS: one leaf pair shoot pruning, FSP: full shoot pruning, OLPF: one leaf pair pruning of fruited shoots only] were studied along with control (C).Minimum annual increase in tree volume (6.764 m3) was recorded with the treatment OLPF, which was 2.31 times less than the control (15.682 m3). Highest yield during winter season (55.30 kg/tree) and total yield (59.87 kg/tree) was obtained from treatment OLPF. One leaf pair pruning of fruited shoots only (OLPF) was also found profitable among other treatments by recording cost:benefit ratio of 1:2.96. This treatment also recorded the highest return distributed in rainy as well as in winter season. On the basis of findings it can be concluded that one leaf pair pruning of fruited shoots only is suitable for profitable high density management as well as crop regulation of guava in farmer friendly manner. (Author)

  11. BioMEA: a versatile high-density 3D microelectrode array system using integrated electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvet, Guillaume; Rousseau, Lionel; Billoint, Olivier; Gharbi, Sadok; Rostaing, Jean-Pierre; Joucla, Sébastien; Trevisiol, Michel; Bourgerette, Alain; Chauvet, Philippe; Moulin, Céline; Goy, François; Mercier, Bruno; Colin, Mikael; Spirkovitch, Serge; Fanet, Hervé; Meyrand, Pierre; Guillemaud, Régis; Yvert, Blaise

    2010-04-15

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) offer a powerful tool to both record activity and deliver electrical microstimulations to neural networks either in vitro or in vivo. Microelectronics microfabrication technologies now allow building high-density MEAs containing several hundreds of microelectrodes. However, dense arrays of 3D micro-needle electrodes, providing closer contact with the neural tissue than planar electrodes, are not achievable using conventional isotropic etching processes. Moreover, increasing the number of electrodes using conventional electronics is difficult to achieve into compact devices addressing all channels independently for simultaneous recording and stimulation. Here, we present a full modular and versatile 256-channel MEA system based on integrated electronics. First, transparent high-density arrays of 3D-shaped microelectrodes were realized by deep reactive ion etching techniques of a silicon substrate reported on glass. This approach allowed achieving high electrode aspect ratios, and different shapes of tip electrodes. Next, we developed a dedicated analog 64-channel Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) including one amplification stage and one current generator per channel, and analog output multiplexing. A full modular system, called BIOMEA, has been designed, allowing connecting different types of MEAs (64, 128, or 256 electrodes) to different numbers of ASICs for simultaneous recording and/or stimulation on all channels. Finally, this system has been validated experimentally by recording and electrically eliciting low-amplitude spontaneous rhythmic activity (both LFPs and spikes) in the developing mouse CNS. The availability of high-density MEA systems with integrated electronics will offer new possibilities for both in vitro and in vivo studies of large neural networks. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An approach to conifer stem localization and modeling in high density airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikumar, A.; Bovolo, F.; Bruzzone, L.

    2017-10-01

    Individual tree level inventory performed using high density multi-return airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) systems provides both internal and external geometric details on individual tree crowns. Among them, the parameters such as, the stem location, and Diameter at Breast Height of the stem (DBH) are very relevant for accurate biomass, and forest growth estimation. However, methods that can accurately estimate these parameters along the vertical canopy are lacking in the state of the art. Thus, we propose a method to locate and model the stem by analyzing the empty volume that appears within the 3D high density LiDAR point cloud of a conifer, due to the stem. In a high LiDAR density data, the points most proximal to the stem location in the upper half of the crown are very likely due to laser reflections from the stem and/or the branch-stem junctions. By locating accurately these points, we can define the lattice of points representing branch-stem junctions and use it to model the empty volume associated to the stem location. We identify these points by using a state-of-the-art internal crown structure modelling technique that models individual conifer branches in a high density LiDAR data. Under the assumption that conifer stem can be closely modelled using a cone shape, we regression fit a geometric shape onto the lattice of branch-stem junction points. The parameters of the geometric shape are used to accurately estimate the diameter at breast height, and height of the tree. The experiments were performed on a set of hundred conifers consisting of trees from six dominant European conifer species, for which the height and the DBH were known. The results prove the method to be accurate.

  13. Two-laser, large-field hyperspectral microarray scanner for the analysis of multicolor microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfurth, Florian; Tretyakov, Alexander; Nyuyki, Berla; Mrotzek, Grit; Schmidt, Wolf-Dieter; Fassler, Dieter; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2008-10-15

    We describe the development and operation of a two-laser, large-field hyperspectral scanner for analysis of multicolor genotyping microarrays. In contrast to confocal microarray scanners, in which wavelength selectivity is obtained by positioning band-pass filters in front of a photomultiplier detector, hyperspectral microarray scanners collect the complete visible emission spectrum from the labeled microarrays. Hyperspectral scanning permits discrimination of multiple spectrally overlapping fluorescent labels with minimal use of optical filters, thus offering important advantages over standard filter-based multicolor microarray scanners. The scanner uses two-sided oblique line illumination of microarrays. Two lasers are used for the excitation of dyes in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The hyperspectral scanner was evaluated with commercially available two-color calibration slides and with in-house-printed four-color microarrays containing dyes with spectral properties similar to their commercial genotyping array counterparts.

  14. Banks-Casher-type relation for the BCS gap at high density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanazawa, Takuya [The University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Wettig, Tilo [University of Regensburg, Department of Physics, Regensburg (Germany); Yamamoto, Naoki [Kyoto University, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto (Japan); University of Maryland, Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States)

    2013-07-15

    We derive a new Banks-Casher-type relation which relates the density of complex Dirac eigenvalues at the origin to the BCS gap of quarks at high density and zero temperature. Our relation is applicable to QCD and QCD-like theories without a sign problem, such as two-color QCD and adjoint QCD with baryon chemical potential, and QCD with isospin chemical potential. It provides us with a method to measure the BCS gap through the Dirac spectrum on the lattice. (orig.)

  15. High-density EMG e-textile systems for the control of active prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farina, Dario; Lorrain, Thomas; Negro, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Myoelectric control of active prostheses requires electrode systems that are easy to apply for daily repositioning of the electrodes by the user. In this study we propose the use of Smart Fabric and Interactive Textile (SFIT) systems as an alternative solution for recording high-density EMG signals...... for myoelectric control. A sleeve covering the upper and lower arm, which contains 100 electrodes arranged in four grids of 5 * 5 electrodes, was used to record EMG signals in 3 subjects during the execution of 9 tasks of the wrist and hand. The signals were analyzed by extracting wavelet coefficients which were...

  16. Generation of a neutral, high-density electron-positron plasma in the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Sarri, G; Cole, J; Schumaker, W; Di Piazza, A; Reville, B; Doria, D; Dromey, B; Gizzi, L; Green, A; Grittani, G; Kar, S; Keitel, C H; Krushelnick, K; Kushel, S; Mangles, S; Najmudin, Z; Thomas, A G R; Vargas, M; Zepf, M

    2013-01-01

    We report on the laser-driven generation of purely neutral, relativistic electron-positron pair plasmas. The overall charge neutrality, high average Lorentz factor ($\\gamma_{e/p} \\approx 15$), small divergence ($\\theta_{e/p} \\approx 10 - 20$ mrad), and high density ($n_{e/p}\\simeq 10^{15}$cm$^{-3}$) of these plasmas open the pathway for the experimental study of the dynamics of this exotic state of matter, in regimes that are of relevance to electron-positron astrophysical plasmas.

  17. Reliability of High I/O High Density CCGA Interconnect Electronic Packages under Extreme Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the experimental test results of advanced CCGA packages tested in extreme temperature thermal environments. Standard optical inspection and x-ray non-destructive inspection tools were used to assess the reliability of high density CCGA packages for deep space extreme temperature missions. Ceramic column grid array (CCGA) packages have been increasing in use based on their advantages such as high interconnect density, very good thermal and electrical performances, compatibility with standard surface-mount packaging assembly processes, and so on. CCGA packages are used in space applications such as in logic and microprocessor functions, telecommunications, payload electronics, and flight avionics. As these packages tend to have less solder joint strain relief than leaded packages or more strain relief over lead-less chip carrier packages, the reliability of CCGA packages is very important for short-term and long-term deep space missions. We have employed high density CCGA 1152 and 1272 daisy chained electronic packages in this preliminary reliability study. Each package is divided into several daisy-chained sections. The physical dimensions of CCGA1152 package is 35 mm x 35 mm with a 34 x 34 array of columns with a 1 mm pitch. The dimension of the CCGA1272 package is 37.5 mm x 37.5 mm with a 36 x 36 array with a 1 mm pitch. The columns are made up of 80% Pb/20%Sn material. CCGA interconnect electronic package printed wiring polyimide boards have been assembled and inspected using non-destructive x-ray imaging techniques. The assembled CCGA boards were subjected to extreme temperature thermal atmospheric cycling to assess their reliability for future deep space missions. The resistance of daisy-chained interconnect sections were monitored continuously during thermal cycling. This paper provides the experimental test results of advanced CCGA packages tested in extreme temperature thermal environments. Standard optical inspection and x-ray non

  18. On The Use Of High-Density Rock In Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgason, Einar; Burcharth, H. F.

    2005-01-01

    Natural rock with high density is widely used in the Scandinavian countries. However, the use of natural rock with density higher than 2:9t=m3 is ordinarily associated with some kind of problem solving, e.g. where normal density stones have to be replaced with heavier stones without increasing...... the construction volume or layer thickness. Most common design formulae do not give a clear conclusion on the in°uence of the rock density on the stability. The present paper presents results of small and large scale model tests in which is used rock with different densities. It is shown that the positive effect...

  19. In situ determination of pore sizes of high density polyester woven fabrics under biaxial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkay Kocaman, Recep; Malik, Samander Ali; Aibibu, Dilbar; Cherif, Chokri

    2017-10-01

    In this study an in situ pore size measurement method was developed to determine the pore size changes of high density polyester woven fabrics under biaxial loading. This unique method allows the non-destructive testing of the pore sizes under biaxial loading. Changes in the pore size distributions of samples were in situ determined with the newly developed method. The results show that the developed measurement method is very promising to define the pore size changes of barrier textiles in situ under loading.

  20. PRODUCTION OF HIGH DENSITY PARTICLEBOARD USING MELAMINE-UREA-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuo Iwakiri

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was developed aiming to evaluate the effects of board density and melamine-urea-formaldehyde resin onthe properties of particleboard for semi-structural applications. The boards were manufactured with nominal density of 0.65 g/cm³and 0.90 g/cm³ using urea-formaldehyde resin as control and melamine-urea-formaldehyde. The results showed a better dimensionallystability and mechanical properties of the boards manufactured with higher density and MUF resin content. The fine furnish usedfor external layer of particleboard in the industrial process, could be used for high density homogeneous board to semi-strucuturaluses, such as flooring applications.

  1. Self-digitization of samples into a high-density microfluidic bottom-well array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Thomas; Yen, Gloria S; Thompson, Alison M; Burnham, Daniel R; Chiu, Daniel T

    2013-11-05

    This paper describes a sample digitization method that generates tens of thousands of nanoliter-sized droplets in a high-density array in a matter of minutes. We show that the sample digitization depends on both the geometric design of the microfluidic device and the viscoelastic forces between the aqueous sample and a continuous oil phase. Our design avoids sample loss: Samples are split into tens of thousands of discrete volumes with close to 100% efficiency without the need for any expensive valving or pumping systems. We envision this technology will have broad applications that require simple sample digitization within minutes, such as digital polymerase chain reactions and single-cell studies.

  2. Health benefits of high-density lipoproteins in preventing cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrougui, Hicham; Momo, Claudia N; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2012-01-01

    Plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) are strongly and inversely correlated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, it is becoming clear that a functional HDL is a more desirable target than simply increasing HDL-cholesterol levels. The best known antiatherogenic function of HDL particles relates to their ability to promote reverse cholesterol transport from peripheral cells. However, HDL also possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic effects. This review focuses on the state of knowledge regarding assays of HDL heterogeneity and function and their relationship to cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2012 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of thermal properties and morphology of eucalyptus wood residue filled high density polyethylene composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengeloglu, Fatih; Kabakci, Ayse

    2008-02-01

    Thermal behaviors of eucalyptus wood residue (EWR) filled recycled high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites have been measured applying the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Morphology of the materials was also studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Addition of the EWR into the recycled HDPE matrix reduced the starting of degradation temperature. EWR filled recycled HDPE had two main decomposition peaks, one for EWR around 350 degrees C and one for recycled HDPE around 460 degrees C. Addition of EWR did not affect the melting temperature of the recycled HDPE. Morphological study showed that addition of coupling agent improved the compatibility between wood residue and recycled HDPE.

  4. Hepatic lipase, genetically elevated high-density lipoprotein, and risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Trine Holm; Kamstrup, Pia R; Andersen, Rolf V

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Hepatic lipase influences metabolism of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), a risk factor for ischemic cardiovascular disease (ICD: ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease). OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in the hepatic lipase genetic variants V......73M, N193S, S267F, L334F, T383M, and -480c>t influence levels of lipids, lipoproteins, and apolipoproteins and risk of ICD. DESIGN: For the cross-sectional study, we genotyped 9003 individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study; hereof were 8971 individuals included in the prospective study, 1747...

  5. Solving a product safety problem using a recycled high density polyethylene container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Waskom, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives are to introduce basic problem-solving techniques for product safety including problem identification, definition, solution criteria, test process and design, and data analysis. The students are given a recycled milk jug made of high density polyethylene (HDPE) by blow molding. The objectives are to design and perform proper material test(s) so they can evaluate the product safety if the milk jug is used in a certain way which is specified in the description of the procedure for this investigation.

  6. Laser drilling of vias in dielectric for high density multilayer LSHI thick film circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocca, T.; Dakesian, S.

    1977-01-01

    A design analysis of a high density multilevel thick film digital microcircuit used for large scale integration is presented. The circuit employs 4 mil lines, 4 mil spaces and requires 4 mil diameter vias. Present screened and fired thick film technology is limited on a production basis to 16 mil square vias. A process whereby 4 mil diameter vias can be fabricated in production using laser technology was described along with a process to produce 4 mil diameter vias for conductor patterns which have 4 mil lines and 4 mil spacings.

  7. Multilevel SOT-MRAM Cell with a Novel Sensing Scheme for High-Density Memory Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeinali, Behzad; Madsen, Jens Kargaard; Moradi, Farshad

    in high-density memory application. To deal with this obstacle, we propose a multilevel cell which stores two bits per memory cell. In addition, we propose a novel sensing scheme to read out the stored data in the multilevel SOT-MRAM cell. Our simulation results show that the proposed cell can achieve 3X......This paper presents a multilevel spin-orbit torque magnetic random access memory (SOT-MRAM). The conventional SOT-MRAMs enables a reliable and energy efficient write operation. However, these cells require two access transistors per cell, hence the efficiency of the SOTMRAMs can be questioned...

  8. Polyethylene Terephthalate (Pete) And High Density Polyethylene (Hdpe) Mixture To Fuel Production

    OpenAIRE

    Moinuddin Sarker

    2013-01-01

    High density polyethylene (HDPE) and polyethylene terephthalate (PETE) mixture to fuel production process was performed with Ferric Oxide (Fe2O3) and activated carbon. HDPE waste plastic was use 75 gm, PETE was use 25 gm, activated carbon was use 5 gm as a 5% and Ferric Oxide was use 2 gm as a 1%. PETE and HDPE waste plastics mixture to fuel production process temperature was use 420 ºC and reactor was use Pyrex glass reactor. Total waste plastics sample was 100 gm and 100 gm of waste plastic...

  9. A high density genetic map of maritime pine based on AFLPs

    OpenAIRE

    Chagné, David; Lalanne, Céline; Madur, Delphine; Kumar, Satish; Frigério, Jean-Marc; Krier, Catherine; Decroocq, Stéphane; Savouré, Arnould; Magida Bou-Dagher-Kharrat,; Bertocchi, Evangelista; Brach, Jean; Plomion, Christophe

    2002-01-01

    International audience; We constructed a high-density linkage map of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) based on AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) markers using a three-generation outbred pedigree. In a first step, male and female maps were established independently with test-cross markers segregating 1:1 (presence:absence of the amplified fragment in the full-sib progeny). In a second step, both maps were merged using intercross markers segregating 3:1 in the progeny. A combinat...

  10. Reduced scattering-matrix algorithm for high-density plasmonic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchon, Patrick; Pardo, Fabrice; Haïdar, Riad; Vincent, Grégory; Pelouard, Jean-Luc

    2010-10-01

    We describe a method to compute S-matrix interface terms using a selection of eigenmodes. When solving the modal equation, the computation of left and right eigenvectors leads to rectangular eigenmodes matrices. Expressions of S-matrix interface terms are then expressed so as to allow for a significant reduction of the computation cost. The reduction is even further decreased in the case of the B-spline modal method, which deals with sparse matrices. Its convergence is illustrated on a high-density plasmonic structure and compared to a full modal method.

  11. Rapid inactivation of Penicillium digitatum spores using high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Sachiko; Ohta, Takayuki; Aomatsu, Akiyoshi; Ito, Masafumi; Kano, Hiroyuki; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2010-04-01

    A promising, environmentally safe method for inactivating fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum, a difficult-to-inactivate food spoilage microorganism, was developed using a high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). The NEAPP employing Ar gas had a high electron density on the order of 1015 cm-3. The spores were successfully and rapidly inactivated using the NEAPP, with a decimal reduction time in spores (D value) of 1.7 min. The contributions of ozone and UV radiation on the inactivation of the spores were evaluated and concluded to be not dominant, which was fundamentally different from the conventional sterilizations.

  12. High-Density Near-Field Readout Using Diamond Solid Immersion Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masataka; Saito, Kimihiro; Kondo, Takao; Nakaoki, Ariyoshi; Furuki, Motohiro; Takeda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Schaich, Thomas J.; van Oerle, Bart M.; Godfried, Herman P.; Kriele, Paul A. C.; Houwman, Evert P.; Nelissen, Wim H. M.; Pels, Gert J.; Spaaij, Paul G. M.

    2006-02-01

    We investigated high-density near-field readout using a diamond solid immersion lens (SIL). A synthetic single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond provides a high refractive index and a high transmission for a wide wavelength range. Since the refractive index at a wavelength of 405 nm is 2.458, we could design a solid immersion lens with an effective numerical aperture of 2.34. Using the diamond SIL, we observed the eye pattern of a 150-GB-capacity (104.3 Gbit/in.2) disk with a track pitch of 130 nm and a bit length of 47.6 nm.

  13. High-density lipoprotein subfractions and influence of endothelial lipase in a healthy Turkish population: a study in a land of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Harun; Atalar, Enver; Lay, Incilay; Yazihan, Nuray; Buyukcam, Fatih; Saygisunar, Ugur; Aksoy, Murat; Gunduz, Huseyin; Akdemir, Ramazan

    2014-06-01

    Low concentration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is prevalent in Turkey. Endothelial lipase (EL) regulates lipoprotein metabolism. Small, lipid-poor HDL particles represent more-efficient cholesterol acceptors than their large, lipid-rich counterparts. The aim of this study was to investigate HDL subfractions and the effect of EL on HDL concentrations in healthy Turkish population. 102 healthy subjects were included in the study (mean age 33.6 ± 10.3 years, 42 female). HDL subfractions were assayed by single precipitation method and EL concentrations were measured by competitive enzyme immunoassay. Mean HDL concentrations were 1.45 ± 0.37 mmol/L in women, 1.10 ± 0.30 mmol/L in men. Small HDL subfraction levels did not differ statistically between density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), triglyceride (TG) and age but positively correlated with total cholesterol and HDL (r = 0.2, p = 0.017; r = 0.2, p = 0.028, respectively). Large HDL was not correlated with age, EL and total cholesterol, and negatively correlated with HDL, LDL, TG (r = - 0.7, p 1.6 mmol/L, mean EL concentrations were 475.83 ± 521.77 nmol/L and 529.71 ± 276.92 nmol/L, respectively (p = 0.086). There were no differences between small HDL concentrations in the HDL low and high groups. Our data did not support EL to be the reason for low HDL in a healthy Turkish population. Our results in a healthy population may serve as a reference for clinical studies on HDL subfractions.

  14. Weight Loss and Exercise Alter the High-Density Lipoprotein Lipidome and Improve High-Density Lipoprotein Functionality in Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anmar A; Mundra, Piyushkumar A; Straznicky, Nora E; Nestel, Paul J; Wong, Gerard; Tan, Ricardo; Huynh, Kevin; Ng, Theodore W; Mellett, Natalie A; Weir, Jacquelyn M; Barlow, Christopher K; Alshehry, Zahir H; Lambert, Gavin W; Kingwell, Bronwyn A; Meikle, Peter J

    2018-02-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) lipid composition and function may better reflect cardiovascular risk than HDL cholesterol concentration. This study characterized the relationships between HDL composition, metabolism, and function in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients and how changes in composition after weight loss (WL) and exercise treatments are related to function. Plasma samples from MetS patients (n=95) and healthy individuals (n=40) were used in this study. Subsets of the MetS group underwent 12 weeks of no treatment (n=17), WL (n=19), or WL plus exercise (WLEX; n=17). HDL was isolated using density-gradient ultracentrifugation. The HDL lipidome was analyzed by mass spectrometry, and particle size determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity and ex vivo HDL cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) were assessed. The HDL lipidome in the MetS patients was substantially different from that in healthy individuals, mean particle size was smaller, and CEC was lower. Several HDL phospholipid and sphingolipid species were associated with HDL diameter and CEC. The HDL lipidome and particle size were modified toward the healthy individuals after WL and WLEX treatments, with greater effects observed in the latter group. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity was reduced after WL and WLEX, and CEC was improved after WLEX. WLEX treatment in MetS patients normalizes the HDL lipidome and particle size profile and enhances CEC. HDL lipids associated with diminished CEC may represent novel biomarkers for early prediction of HDL dysfunction and disease risk and may represent potential therapeutic targets for future HDL therapies. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00163943. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Photo- and biophysical studies of lectin-conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles: reduced sensitivity in high density assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaqi; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Basu, Amit; Zimmt, Matthew B

    2010-11-18

    Lectin-conjugated, fluorescent silica nanoparticles (fNP) have been developed for carbohydrate-based histopathology evaluations of epithelial tissue biopsies. The fNP platform was selected for its enhanced emissive brightness compared to direct dye labeling. Carbohydrate microarray studies were performed to compare the carbohydrate selectivity of the mannose-recognizing lectin Concanavalin A (ConA) before and after conjugation to fluorescent silica nanoparticles (ConA-fNP). These studies revealed surprisingly low emission intensities upon staining with ConA-fNP compared to those with biotin-ConA/Cy3-streptavidin staining. A series of photophysical and biophysical characterizations of the fNP and ConA-fNP conjugates were performed to probe the low sensitivity from fNP in the microarray assays. Up to 1200 fluorescein (FL) and 80 tetramethylrhodamine (TR) dye molecules were incorporated into 46 nm diameter fNP, yielding emissive brightness values 400 and 35 times larger than the individual dye molecules, respectively. ConA lectin conjugated to carboxylic acid surface-modified nanoparticles covers 15-30% of the fNP surface. The CD spectra and mannose substrate selectivity of ConA conjugated to the fNP differed slightly compared to that of soluble ConA. Although, the high emissive brightness of fNP enhances detection sensitivity for samples with low analyte densities, large fNP diameters limit fNP recruitment and binding to samples with high analyte densities. The high analyte density and nearly two-dimensional target format of carbohydrate microarrays make probe size a critical parameter. In this application, fNP labels afford minimal sensitivity advantage compared to direct dye labeling.

  16. Readiness of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter for LHC collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B; 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Macek, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Mackeprang, R.; Madaras, R.J.; Mader, W.F.; Maenner, R.; Maeno, T.; Mattig, P.; Mattig, S.; Magalhaes Martins, P.J.; Magradze, E.; Mahalalel, Y.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahmood, A.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makouski, M.; Makovec, N.; Malecki, Pa.; Malecki, P.; Maleev, V.P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V.; Malyukov, S.; Mambelli, M.; Mameghani, R.; Mamuzic, J.; Mandelli, L.; Mandic, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Mangeard, P.S.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjavidze, I.D.; Manning, P.M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mapelli, A.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchand, J.F.; Marchese, F.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C.P.; Marroquim, F.; Marshall, Z.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, B.; Martin, B.; Martin, F.F.; Martin, J.P.; Martin, T.A.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V.; Martyniuk, A.C.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; 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Nderitu, S.K.; Neal, H.A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T.K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A.A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M.S.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R.M.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F.M.; Nickerson, R.B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicolas, L.; Nicoletti, G.; Nicquevert, B.; Niedercorn, F.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, P.; Nisati, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nordberg, M.; Nordkvist, B.; Notz, D.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nozicka, M.; Nugent, I.M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'Neil, D.C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F.G.; Oberlack, H.; Ochi, A.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S.H.; Ohm, C.C.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Ohsugi, T.; Okada, S.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olchevski, A.G.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P.U.E.; Oram, C.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R.S.; Ortega, E.O.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Ottersbach, J.P; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Oyarzun, A; Ozcan, V.E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J.D.; Pan, Y.B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Park, S.J.; Park, W.; Parker, M.A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J.A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pasztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J.R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Peak, L.S.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M.I.; Peleganchuk, S.V.; Peng, H.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Codina, E.; Perez Garcia-Estan, M.T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Persembe, S.; Perus, P.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Petersen, B.A.; Petersen, T.C.; Petit, E.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A.W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pilkington, A.D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J.L.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Pleier, M.A.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommes, K.; Ponsot, P.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B.G.; Popeneciu, G.A.; Popovic, D.S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G.E.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I.N.; Potter, C.J.; Potter, C.T.; Potter, K.P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L.E.; Prichard, P.M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qin, Z.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D.R.; Quayle, W.B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A.M.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A.L.; Rebuzzi, D.M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z.L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Ribeiro, N.; Richards, A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R.R.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robertson, S.H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, JEM; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J.G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V.M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G.A.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L.P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C.R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V.I.; Rudolph, G.; Ruhr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N.A.; Rutherfoord, J.P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y.F.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A.F.; Sadrozinski, H.F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.S.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B.H.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H.G.; Sanders, M.P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandhu, P.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A.Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D.H.; Says, L.P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D.A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schafer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A.C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schamov, A.G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M.I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schonig, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, J.W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B.A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W.G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S.C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J.M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Sellden, B.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M.E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L.Y.; Shank, J.T.; Shao, Q.T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P.B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M.J.; Shupe, M.A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S.B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N.B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T.B.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S.Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B.C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R.D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S.N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.A.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D.A.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.H.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P.K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y.D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Therhaag, J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F.J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torro Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J.M.; Tunnell, C.D.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; 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Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-01-01

    The Tile hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS detector has undergone extensive testing in the experimental hall since its installation in late 2005. The readout, control and calibration systems have been fully operational since 2007 and the detector successfully collected data from the LHC single beams in 2008 and first collisions in 2009. This paper gives an overview of the Tile Calorimeter performance as measured using random triggers, calibration data, data from cosmic ray muons and single beam data. The detector operation status, noise characteristics and performance of the calibration systems are presented, as well as the validation of the timing and energy calibration carried out with minimum ionising cosmic ray muons data. The calibration systems' precision is well below the design of 1%. The determination of the global energy scale was performed with an uncertainty of 4%.

  17. Decagonal and quasi-crystalline tilings in medieval Islamic architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peter J; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2007-02-23

    The conventional view holds that girih (geometric star-and-polygon, or strapwork) patterns in medieval Islamic architecture were conceived by their designers as a network of zigzagging lines, where the lines were drafted directly with a straightedge and a compass. We show that by 1200 C.E. a conceptual breakthrough occurred in which girih patterns were reconceived as tessellations of a special set of equilateral polygons ("girih tiles") decorated with lines. These tiles enabled the creation of increasingly complex periodic girih patterns, and by the 15th century, the tessellation approach was combined with self-similar transformations to construct nearly perfect quasi-crystalline Penrose patterns, five centuries before their discovery in the West.

  18. Thermal Characterization of Clay Roof Tile Using Photothermal Deflection Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittidach, T.; Kijamnajsuk, P.; Tipmonta, P.; Chotikaprakhan, S.

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a non-destructive, simple and rapid method, photothermal deflection technique or the so-called “mirage effect”, is setup. A flat and smooth sample is heated by a modulated 532 nm 14 mW pump beam on the surface. The heat flow induced by the surface layer is detected by the 632 nm 0.14 mW probe beam. The frequency-dependent signal in the range of 1 - 800 Hz is measured by lock-in amplifier in term of amplitude and phase. The clay roof tile with and without the waterproof glaze layer on top are the measured samples. The results give the thermal diffusivities of the clay roof tile and the waterproof glaze layer of 0.67 mm2s-1 and 2.32 mm2s-1, respectively.

  19. Índices bursátiles en Europa

    OpenAIRE

    Martín González, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    La realización de este Trabajo Fin de Grado: "Índices bursátiles en Europa", tiene como objeto realizar un estudio descriptivo sobre 18 índices bursátiles de Europa, de los cuales 17 son índices de referencia del mercado de valores de sus respectivos países y un último índice -el Eurostoxx50- que engloba las principales compañías europeas. El periodo de análisis se extiende entre los años 2007 y 2013, periodo caracterizado por la reciente crisis económica y financiera. En él, se analizarán lo...

  20. Calibration and Monitoring systems of the ATLAS Tile Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    BOUMEDIENE, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated to the calorimeter, there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of their formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, LASER, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. Recent performances of these systems are presented.

  1. Calibration and Monitoring systems of the ATLAS Tile Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    BOUMEDIENE, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated on the calorimeter there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of its formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, LASER and charge injection and minimum bias events produces in proton-proton collisions. In this contribution is given a brief description of the different systems hardware and presented the latest results on their performance, like the determination of the conversion factors, linearity and stability.

  2. Calibration of the Tile Hadronic Calorimeter of ATLAS at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated on the calorimeter there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of its formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, LASER and charge injection and minimum bias events produces in proton-proton collisions. In this contribution is given a brief description of the different systems hardware and presented the latest results on their performance, like the determination of the conversion factors, linearity and stability.

  3. Inspection of magnetic tile internal cracks based on impact acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Luofeng; Huang, Qinyuan; Zhao, Yue; Yin, Guofu

    2015-04-01

    An automatic system is developed for internal cracks detection in magnetic tiles based on the impact acoustics, using wavelet packet transform (WPT), principal component analysis (PCA) and hidden Markov model (HMM). In this system, the detecting device is considered as core part to collect and analyse the impact sounds. The original impact sounds are first decomposed up to six levels based on WPT to extract the features. PCA is then performed for dimension reduction and clustering analysis. By adopting the features extracted based on WPT and optimised by PCA as inputs, an HHM classifier is developed for automatic inspection. The results of classification show that the accuracy rate is 100%, demonstrating that the system has significant potential in detecting magnetic tile internal cracks.

  4. Calibration and signal reconstruction in the ATLAS Tile Hadronic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Febbraro, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Tilecal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS detector which is one of the four experiment installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collider at CERN. In order to calibrate the full read-out path in the TileCal are present different calibration systems. As the final digital signal is the result of successive conversions the signal needs to be calibrated at each stage. The full calibration process relies on three subsystems: the Charge Injection System (CIS), the Laser System, and the Cesium. Once the digital signal is calibrated, it needs to reconstructed in order to determine the amplitude and the time of the deposited energy. In TileCal the Optimal Filter (OF) algorithm is used for this purpose; in particular the signal is reconstructed in the Read-Out Drivers (ROD) using the Digital Signal processor (DSP).

  5. Classification of microarray data with factor mixture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, Francesca

    2006-01-15

    The classification of few tissue samples on a very large number of genes represents a non-standard problem in statistics but a usual one in microarray expression data analysis. In fact, the dimension of the feature space (the number of genes) is typically much greater than the number of tissues. We consider high-density oligonucleotide microarray data, where the expression level is associated to an 'absolute call', which represents a qualitative indication of whether or not a transcript is detected within a sample. The 'absolute call' is generally not taken in consideration in analyses. In contrast to frequently used cluster analysis methods to analyze gene expression data, we consider a problem of classification of tissues and of the variables selection. We adopted methodologies formulated by Ghahramani and Hinton and Rocci and Vichi for simultaneous dimensional reduction of genes and classification of tissues; trying to identify genes (denominated 'markers') that are able to distinguish between two known different classes of tissue samples. In this respect, we propose a generalization of the approach proposed by McLachlan et al. by advising to estimate the distribution of log LR statistic for testing one versus two component hypothesis in the mixture model for each gene considered individually, using a parametric bootstrap approach. We compare conditional (on 'absolute call') and unconditional analyses performed on dataset described in Golub et al. We show that the proposed techniques improve the results of classification of tissue samples with respect to known results on the same benchmark dataset. The software of Ghahramani and Hinton is written in Matlab and available in 'Mixture of Factor Analyzers' on http://www.gatsby.ucl.ac.uk/~zoubin/software.html while the software of Rocci and Vichi is available upon request from the authors.

  6. Synthesis of aerogel tiles with high light scattering length

    CERN Document Server

    Danilyuk, A F; Okunev, A G; Onuchin, A P; Shaurman, S A

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of aerogel tiles production for RICH detectors is described. Monolithic blocks of silica aerogel were synthesized by two-step sol-gel processing of tetraethoxysilane Si(OEt) sub 4 followed by high temperature supercritical drying with organic solvent. The important characteristic of aerogel is the light scattering length. In the wide range of refraction indexes the light scattering length exceeds 4 cm at 400 nm.

  7. Enabling Airspace Integration for High-Density On-Demand Mobility Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Eric; Kopardekar, Parimal; Goodrich, Kenneth H.

    2017-01-01

    Aviation technologies and concepts have reached a level of maturity that may soon enable an era of on-demand mobility (ODM) fueled by quiet, efficient, and largely automated air taxis. However, successfully bringing such a system to fruition will require introducing orders of magnitude more aircraft to a given airspace volume than can be accommodated by the traditional air traffic control system, among other important technical challenges. The airspace integration problem is further compounded by requirements to set aside appropriate ground infrastructure for take-off and landing areas and ensuring these new aircraft types and their operations do not burden traditional airspace users and air traffic control. This airspace integration challenge may be significantly reduced by extending the concepts and technologies developed to manage small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) at low altitudethe UAS traffic management (UTM) systemto higher altitudes and new aircraft types, or by equipping ODM aircraft with advanced sensors, algorithms, and interfaces. The precedent of operational freedom inherent in visual flight rules and the technologies developed for large UAS and commercial aircraft automation will contribute to the evolution of an ODM system enabled by UTM. This paper describes the set of air traffic services, normally provided by the traditional air traffic system, that an ODM system would implement to achieve the high densities needed for ODMs economic viability. Finally, the paper proposes a framework for integrating, evaluating, and deploying low-, medium-, and high-density ODM concepts that build on each other to ensure operational and economic feasibility at every step.

  8. High-density biosynthetic fuels: the intersection of heterogeneous catalysis and metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Benjamin G; Meylemans, Heather A; Gough, Raina V; Quintana, Roxanne L; Garrison, Michael D; Bruno, Thomas J

    2014-05-28

    Biosynthetic valencene, premnaspirodiene, and natural caryophyllene were hydrogenated and evaluated as high performance fuels. The parent sesquiterpenes were then isomerized to complex mixtures of hydrocarbons with the heterogeneous acid catalyst Nafion SAC-13. High density fuels with net heats of combustion ranging from 133-141 000 Btu gal(-1), or up to 13% higher than commercial jet fuel could be generated by this approach. The products of caryophyllene isomerization were primarily tricyclic hydrocarbons which after hydrogenation increased the fuel density by 6%. The isomerization of valencene and premnaspirodiene also generated a variety of sesquiterpenes, but in both cases the dominant product was δ-selinene. Ab initio calculations were conducted to determine the total electronic energies for the reactants and products. In all cases the results were in excellent agreement with the experimental distribution of isomers. The cetane numbers for the sesquiterpane fuels ranged from 20-32 and were highly dependent on the isomer distribution. Specific distillation cuts may have the potential to act as high density diesel fuels, while use of these hydrocarbons as additives to jet fuel will increase the range and/or time of flight of aircraft. In addition to the ability to generate high performance renewable fuels, the powerful combination of metabolic engineering and heterogeneous catalysis will allow for the preparation of a variety of sesquiterpenes with potential for pharmaceutical, flavor, and fragrance applications.

  9. Holographic memory for high-density data storage and high-speed pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Claire

    2002-09-01

    As computers and the internet become faster and faster, more and more information is transmitted, received, and stored everyday. The demand for high density and fast access time data storage is pushing scientists and engineers to explore all possible approaches including magnetic, mechanical, optical, etc. Optical data storage has already demonstrated its potential in the competition against other storage technologies. CD and DVD are showing their advantages in the computer and entertainment market. What motivated the use of optical waves to store and access information is the same as the motivation for optical communication. Light or an optical wave has an enormous capacity (or bandwidth) to carry information because of its short wavelength and parallel nature. In optical storage, there are two types of mechanism, namely localized and holographic memories. What gives the holographic data storage an advantage over localized bit storage is the natural ability to read the stored information in parallel, therefore, meeting the demand for fast access. Another unique feature that makes the holographic data storage attractive is that it is capable of performing associative recall at an incomparable speed. Therefore, volume holographic memory is particularly suitable for high-density data storage and high-speed pattern recognition. In this paper, we review previous works on volume holographic memories and discuss the challenges for this technology to become a reality.

  10. Localized Electrochemiluminescence from Nanoneedle Electrodes for Very-high-density Electrochemical Sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jingjing

    2017-09-28

    In this paper, localized electrochemiluminescence (ECL) was visualized from nanoneedle electrodes that achieved very-high-density electrochemical sensing. The localized luminescence at the nanometer-sized tip observed was ascribed to enhanced mass transfer of the luminescence probe at the tip than on the planar surface surrounding the tip, which provided higher luminescence at the tip. The size of the luminescence spots was restricted to 15 μm permitting the electrochemical analysis with a density over 4 × 103 spots/mm2. The positive correlation between the luminescence intensity at the tips and the concentration of hydrogen peroxide supported the quantitative ECL analysis using nanoneedle electrodes. The further modification of glucose oxidase at the electrode surface conceptually demonstrated that the concentration of glucose ranging from 0.5 to 5 mM could be quantified using the luminescence at the tips, which could be further applied for the detection of multiple molecules in the complex biosystem. This successful localized ECL offers a specific strategy for the development of very-high-density electrochemical arrays without the complicated chip design.

  11. Evolutionary Agroecology: the potential for cooperative, high density, weed-suppressing cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Jacob; Andersen, Sven B; Wille, Wibke K-M; Griepentrog, Hans W; Olsen, Jannie M

    2010-09-01

    Evolutionary theory can be applied to improve agricultural yields and/or sustainability, an approach we call Evolutionary Agroecology. The basic idea is that plant breeding is unlikely to improve attributes already favored by millions of years of natural selection, whereas there may be unutilized potential in selecting for attributes that increase total crop yield but reduce plants' individual fitness. In other words, plant breeding should be based on group selection. We explore this approach in relation to crop-weed competition, and argue that it should be possible to develop high density cereals that can utilize their initial size advantage over weeds to suppress them much better than under current practices, thus reducing or eliminating the need for chemical or mechanical weed control. We emphasize the role of density in applying group selection to crops: it is competition among individuals that generates the 'Tragedy of the Commons', providing opportunities to improve plant production by selecting for attributes that natural selection would not favor. When there is competition for light, natural selection of individuals favors a defensive strategy of 'shade avoidance', but a collective, offensive 'shading' strategy could increase weed suppression and yield in the high density, high uniformity cropping systems we envision.

  12. Detecting genetic association of common human facial morphological variation using high density 3D image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shouneng; Tan, Jingze; Hu, Sile; Zhou, Hang; Guo, Jing; Jin, Li; Tang, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Human facial morphology is a combination of many complex traits. Little is known about the genetic basis of common facial morphological variation. Existing association studies have largely used simple landmark-distances as surrogates for the complex morphological phenotypes of the face. However, this can result in decreased statistical power and unclear inference of shape changes. In this study, we applied a new image registration approach that automatically identified the salient landmarks and aligned the sample faces using high density pixel points. Based on this high density registration, three different phenotype data schemes were used to test the association between the common facial morphological variation and 10 candidate SNPs, and their performances were compared. The first scheme used traditional landmark-distances; the second relied on the geometric analysis of 15 landmarks and the third used geometric analysis of a dense registration of ∼30,000 3D points. We found that the two geometric approaches were highly consistent in their detection of morphological changes. The geometric method using dense registration further demonstrated superiority in the fine inference of shape changes and 3D face modeling. Several candidate SNPs showed potential associations with different facial features. In particular, one SNP, a known risk factor of non-syndromic cleft lips/palates, rs642961 in the IRF6 gene, was validated to strongly predict normal lip shape variation in female Han Chinese. This study further demonstrated that dense face registration may substantially improve the detection and characterization of genetic association in common facial variation.

  13. Optimization of Cold Spray Deposition of High-Density Polyethylene Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Trenton B.; Khalkhali, Zahra; Champagne, Victor; Schmidt, David P.; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2017-10-01

    When a solid, ductile particle impacts a substrate at sufficient velocity, the resulting heat, pressure and plastic deformation can produce bonding between the particle and the substrate. The use of a cool supersonic gas flow to accelerate these solid particles is known as cold spray deposition. The cold spray process has been commercialized for some metallic materials, but further research is required to unlock the exciting potential material properties possible with polymeric particles. In this work, a combined computational and experimental study was employed to study the cold spray deposition of high-density polyethylene powders over a wide range of particle temperatures and impact velocities. Cold spray deposition of polyethylene powders was demonstrated across a range broad range of substrate materials including several different polymer substrates with different moduli, glass and aluminum. A material-dependent window of successful deposition was determined for each substrate as a function of particle temperature and impact velocity. Additionally, a study of deposition efficiency revealed the optimal process parameters for high-density polyethylene powder deposition which yielded a deposition efficiency close to 10% and provided insights into the physical mechanics responsible for bonding while highlighting paths toward future process improvements.

  14. High density plasma calculation of J-PARC RF negative ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, T.; Asano, H.; Ikegami, K.; Naito, F.; Nanmo, K.; Oguri, H.; Ohkoshi, K.; Shinto, K.; Takagi, A.; Ueno, A.

    2017-08-01

    Ignition and steady state phases of Radio Frequency (RF) plasma in J-PARC ion source has been investigated by numerical modeling. The model takes into account the transport of plasma particles (electrons, protons, hydrogen molecular ions and cesium ions) in electromagnetic (EM) field with collision processes. Inductively coupled and capacitive EM fields are simultaneously solved in the model with plasma transport. Applying KEK parallel computation system A (64 cores, 56 nodes with 256 GB memory per node), behavior of high density plasma up to 1019 - 1020 m-3 in the steady state is calculated. In the simulation, it has been clarified that inductively coupled electric field in azimuthal direction and magnetic field in axial direction play a key role to maintain high density plasma which oscillates with frequency up to doubled value of applied RF frequency. The spatial distribution plot of plasma density and EM field at each phase may lead to understandings on how RF plasma is kept stable inside the source chamber.

  15. High density event-related potential data acquisition in cognitive neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotnick, Scott D

    2010-04-16

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently the standard method of evaluating brain function in the field of Cognitive Neuroscience, in part because fMRI data acquisition and analysis techniques are readily available. Because fMRI has excellent spatial resolution but poor temporal resolution, this method can only be used to identify the spatial location of brain activity associated with a given cognitive process (and reveals virtually nothing about the time course of brain activity). By contrast, event-related potential (ERP) recording, a method that is used much less frequently than fMRI, has excellent temporal resolution and thus can track rapid temporal modulations in neural activity. Unfortunately, ERPs are under utilized in Cognitive Neuroscience because data acquisition techniques are not readily available and low density ERP recording has poor spatial resolution. In an effort to foster the increased use of ERPs in Cognitive Neuroscience, the present article details key techniques involved in high density ERP data acquisition. Critically, high density ERPs offer the promise of excellent temporal resolution and good spatial resolution (or excellent spatial resolution if coupled with fMRI), which is necessary to capture the spatial-temporal dynamics of human brain function.

  16. StreamMap: Smooth Dynamic Visualization of High-Density Streaming Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenhui; Baciu, George; Yu, Han

    2017-02-13

    Interactive visualization of streaming points for real-time scatterplots and linear blending of correlation patterns is increasingly becoming the dominant mode of visual analytics for both big data and streaming data from active sensors and broadcasting media. To better visualize and interact with inter-stream patterns, it is generally necessary to smooth out gaps or distortions in the streaming data. Previous approaches either animate the points directly or present a sampled static heatmap. We propose a new approach, called StreamMap, to smoothly blend high-density streaming points and create a visual flow that emphasizes the density pattern distributions. In essence, we present three new contributions for the visualization of high-density streaming points. The first contribution is a density-based method called super kernel density estimation that aggregates streaming points using an adaptive kernel to solve the overlapping problem. The second contribution is a robust density morphing algorithm that generates several smooth intermediate frames for a given pair of frames. The third contribution is a trend representation design that can help convey the flow directions of the streaming points. The experimental results on three datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of StreamMap when dynamic visualization and visual analysis of trend patterns on streaming points are required.

  17. Nasal measurements in Asians and high-density porous polyethylene implants in rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dongwoo; Yu, Li; Wang, Yimin; Cao, Dejun; Yu, Zheyuan; Mu, Xiongzheng

    2012-01-01

    To understand Asian noses, set goals for rhinoplasty, and find the best alternative columellar strut. Six values were used to evaluate the morphology of the nose: tip projection, alar-tip-columellar base angle, alar-columellar base-philtrum angle, nasolabial angle, nasofacial angle, and tip angle. One hundred average Chinese people (50 males and 50 females) were compared with 36 preoperative Chinese patients (13 males and 23 females). We presented an application of high-density porous polyethylene (Medpor) implant as a columellar strut for use in lengthening. We performed 3 surgical techniques: a single-plate strut, a double-plate strut, and a butterfly-shaped strut. Open rhinoplasty (transcolumella incision) was performed on 21 patients; closed rhinoplasty (marginal incision) was performed on 15 patients. Prominent changes in the 6 values were found in both male and female patients after rhinoplasty. An analysis of the Asian nose will help surgeons achieve better results. High-density porous polyethylene columellar strut grafts provide adequate support for refined tip definition and the shaping of the columellar-lobular angle.

  18. Estimation of genomic inbreeding coefficients based on high-density SNP markers in Chinese Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhan-cheng; Huang, He-tian; Yan, Qing-xia; Wang, Ya-chun; Yu, Ying; Chen, Shao-hu; Sun, Dong-xiao; Zhang, Sheng-li; Zhang, Yi

    2017-01-20

    In livestock, inbreeding coefficient based on pedigree information is usually used to evaluate the level of inbreeding. Recently, with cost reduction of high-density SNP genotyping, it's possible to analyze real genomic inbreeding degree using genomic information. In this study, utilizing high-density SNP chip data, we analyzed the frequency and distribution of runs of homozygosity (ROH) in 2107 Chinese Holstein cattle in Beijing area, and calculated 2 genomic inbreeding coefficients, i.e., 1) the proportion of ROH length in the total length of autosomal genome (Froh), and 2) the percentage of homozygous SNPs (Fhom). Then we analyzed the correlation between 2 genomic inbreeding coefficients and the correlation between genomic and pedigree inbreeding coefficients. We totally detected 44 676 ROHs that mainly ranged from 1 to 10 Mb. Various lengths of ROHs existed in the genome. There were more short ROHs than long ROHs. ROHs aren't evenly distributed in chromosomes. The area with most ROHs is in the middle part of chromosome 10. Strong correlation (r > 0.90) existed between 2 kinds of genomic inbreeding coefficients, but the correlation between pedigree and genomic inbreeding coefficients were much lower (r inbreeding. Genomic inbreeding measures may reflect individuals' real inbreeding, which could be a useful tool to evaluate population inbreeding.

  19. Study on the Weaving Behavior of High Density Bidirectional Pedestrian Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishan Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Weaving area may be the critical risk place in the subway transfer station. When improving service level of the weaving area, the characteristic of pedestrian weaving behavior should be systemically discussed. This paper described the mechanism of weaving behavior on high density pedestrian which was analyzed by the collection data of controlled experiment. Different weaving behaviors were contrasted due to different volumes in the bidirectional passageway. Video analysis was conducted to extract pedestrian moving behavior and calibrate the movement data with SIMI Motion. Influence of the high density weaving pedestrian was studied based on the statistical results (e.g., velocity, walking distance, and journey time. Furthermore, the quantitative method by speed analysis was announced to discriminate the conflict point. The scopes of weaving area and impact area at different pedestrian volumes were revealed to analyze the pedestrian turning angle. The paper concluded that walking pedestrians are significantly influenced by the weaving conflict and trend to turn the moving direction to avoid the conflict in weaving area; the ratio of stable weaving area and impact area is 2 to 3. The conclusions do provide a method to evaluate the transfer station safety and a facility layout guidance to improve the capacity.

  20. Catalyst design by cyclic deposition: Nanoparticle formation and growth of high-density nanotube forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esconjauregui, Santiago; Fouquet, Martin; Xie, Rongsie; Cartwright, Richard; Robertson, John [Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, CB2 1PZ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Newcomb, Simon B. [Glebe Scientific Ltd., Newport, County Tipperary (Ireland)

    2012-12-15

    The areal density of carbon nanotube forests can be increased up to the order of 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} using cycles of deposition and annealing of ultra-thin metal films, followed by nanoparticle immobilization. Herein, we show how the density of the catalyst nanoparticles increases after each cycle by using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The layers of metal catalyst - subsequently deposited after previous annealing - sit on the uncovered areas of the support and, after annealing, restructure into nanoparticles cumulatively increasing the catalyst density. These nanoparticles lead to close-packed, high-density nanotube forests with nanotube areal densities of {proportional_to}10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. The height of these high-density forests shortens as the density of the catalyst nanoparticle increases, which is observed using several synthesis conditions. This high nanotube density is required for using carbon nanotubes as interconnects in integrated circuits and in thermal interface materials. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)