WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-copper weld materials

  1. The effect of non-metallic inclusions on the fracture toughness master curve in high copper reactor pressure vessel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yong-Jun; Lee, Bong-Sang; Hong, Jun-Hwa

    2002-03-01

    The fracture toughness of two high copper reactor pressure vessel welds having low upper shelf energy was evaluated in accordance with the master curve method of ASTM E1921. The resultant data were correlated to the metallurgical factors involved in the brittle fracture initiation to provide a metallurgical-based understanding of the master curve. The tests were performed using pre-cracked Charpy V-notched specimens and the master curve was made with an average of T0 values determined at different temperatures. In all specimens, the cleavage fracture initiated at non-metallic inclusion ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 μm in diameter showing a scatter with the specimens and testing temperatures. Temperature dependency of the triggering particle size was not found. The fracture toughness ( KJC) was inversely proportional to the square root of the triggering inclusion diameter ( di) at respective temperatures. From this relationship, we determined median KJC values which correspond to the average value of triggering inclusion diameter of all tested specimens and defined them as a modified median KJC ( K'JC(med) ). The obtained K'JC(med) values showed quite smaller deviation from the master curve at different temperatures than the experimental median KJC values. This suggests that the master curve is on the premise of a constant dimension of key microstructural factor in a material regardless of the testing temperature. But the inclusion size at trigger point played an important role in the absolute position of the master curve with temperature and the consequent T0 value.

  2. The effect of non-metallic inclusions on the fracture toughness master curve in high copper reactor pressure vessel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Yong-Jun E-mail: yjoh@kaeri.re.kr; Lee, Bong-Sang; Hong, Jun-Hwa

    2002-03-01

    The fracture toughness of two high copper reactor pressure vessel welds having low upper shelf energy was evaluated in accordance with the master curve method of ASTM E1921. The resultant data were correlated to the metallurgical factors involved in the brittle fracture initiation to provide a metallurgical-based understanding of the master curve. The tests were performed using pre-cracked Charpy V-notched specimens and the master curve was made with an average of T{sub 0} values determined at different temperatures. In all specimens, the cleavage fracture initiated at non-metallic inclusion ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 {mu}m in diameter showing a scatter with the specimens and testing temperatures. Temperature dependency of the triggering particle size was not found. The fracture toughness (K{sub J{sub C}}) was inversely proportional to the square root of the triggering inclusion diameter (d{sub i}) at respective temperatures. From this relationship, we determined median K{sub J{sub C}} values which correspond to the average value of triggering inclusion diameter of all tested specimens and defined them as a modified median K{sub J{sub C}} (K{sup '}{sub J{sub C}}{sub (med)}). The obtained K{sup '}{sub J{sub C}}{sub (med)} values showed quite smaller deviation from the master curve at different temperatures than the experimental median K{sub J{sub C}} values. This suggests that the master curve is on the premise of a constant dimension of key microstructural factor in a material regardless of the testing temperature. But the inclusion size at trigger point played an important role in the absolute position of the master curve with temperature and the consequent T{sub 0} value.

  3. Effects of annealing time on the recovery of Charpy V-notch properties of irradiated high-copper weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1994-12-31

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. An important issue to be resolved is the effect on the toughness properties of reirradiating a vessel that has been annealed. This paper describes the annealing response of irradiated high-copper submerged-arc weld HSSI 73W. For this study, the weld has been annealed at 454 C (850 F) for lengths of time varying between 1 and 14 days. The Charpy V-notch 41-J (30-ft-lb) transition temperature (TT{sub 41J}) almost fully recovered for the longest period studied, but recovered to a lesser degree for the shorter periods. No significant recovery of the TT{sub 41J} was observed for a 7-day anneal at 343 C (650 F). At 454 C for the durations studied, the values of the upper-shelf impact energy of irradiated and annealed weld metal exceeded the values in the unirradiated condition. Similar behavior was observed after aging the unirradiated weld metal at 460 and 490 C for 1 week.

  4. Results of crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstead, R.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288{degree}C to an average fluence of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). Evaluation of the results shows that the neutron-irradiation-induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower-bound curves (for the range of test temperatures covered) did not seem to have been altered by irradiation compared to those of the ASME K{sub Ia} curve. 9 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. PVRC/MPC Round Robin Tests for the Low Toughness High-Copper 72W Weld Using Master Curve Methodology of PCVN Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bong-Sang; Hong, Jun Hwa; Yang, Won Jon

    2000-06-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained from the Korean contribution the PVRC/MPC cooperative program on {sup R}ound Robin Tests for Low Toughness High-Copper 72W Weld Using Master Curve Methodology of PCVN Specimens. The mandatory part of this program is to perform fracture toughness (K{sub jc}) tests on the low toughness 72W weld at three different temperatures using pre-cracked Charpy specimens. The purpose of the tests is to verify the specimen size requirements in the ASTM E 1921, 'Standard test method for determination of reference temperature, T{sub o}, for ferritic steels in the transition range'.

  6. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  7. Materials participation in welded joints manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2016-08-01

    Management of materials dilution to form a joint with higher features asked by complex metallic structures is a problem that took attention and efforts of welding processes researchers and this communication will give a little contribution presenting some scientific and experimental results of dilution processes studied by Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department. Liquid state welding processes have a strong dependence related to dilution of base and filler materials, the most important are for automatic joining using welding. The paper presents a review of some scientific works already published and their contributions, results of dilution coefficient evaluation using weighing, graphics and software applied for shielded metal arc welding process. Paper results could be used for welders’ qualification, welding procedure specification and other welding processes researchers’ activities. The results of Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department, show dilution coefficient values between 20-30 % of base material and 70-80 % of filler material for studied welding process.

  8. Irradiation effects on fracture toughness of two high-copper submerged-arc welds, HSSI Series 5. Volume 1, Main report and Appendices A, B, C, and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Haggag, F.M.; McCabe, D.E.; Iskander, S.K.; Bowman, K.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Menke, B.H. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1992-10-01

    The Fifth Irradiation Series in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program obtained a statistically significant fracture toughness data base on two high-copper (0.23 and 0.31 wt %) submerged-arc welds to determine the shift and shape of the K{sub Ic} curve as a consequence of irradiation. Compact specimens with thicknesses to 101.6 mm (4 in) in the irradiated condition and 203.2 mm (8 in) in the unirradiated condition were tested, in addition to Charpy impact, tensile, and drop-weight specimens. Irradiations were conducted at a nominal temperature of 288{degree}C and an average fluence of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>l MeV). The Charpy 41-J temperature shifts are about the same as the corresponding drop-weight NDT temperature shifts. The irradiated welds exhibited substantial numbers of cleavage pop-ins. Mean curve fits using two-parameter (with fixed intercept) nonlinear and linearized exponential regression analysis revealed that the fracture toughness 100 MPa{lg_bullet}{radical}m shifts exceeded the Charpy 41-J shifts for both welds. Analyses of curve shape changes indicated decreases in the slopes of the fracture toughness curves, especially for the higher copper weld. Weibull analyses were performed to investigate development of lower bound curves to the data, including the use of a variable K{sub min} parameter which affects the curve shape.

  9. Welding of Materials for Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPont, John N.; Babu, Suresh; Liu, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Materials will play a critical role in power generation from both new and existing plants that rely on coal, nuclear, and oil/gas as energy supplies. High efficiency power plants are currently being designed that will require materials with improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance under conditions of elevated temperature, stress, and aggressive gaseous environments. Most of these materials will require welding during initial fabrication and plant maintenance. The severe thermal and strain cycles associated with welding can produce large gradients in microstructure and composition within the heat-affected and fusion zones of the weld, and these gradients are commonly accompanied by deleterious changes to properties. Thus, successful use of materials in energy applications hinges on the ability to understand, predict, and control the processing-microstructure-property relations during welding. This article highlights some of the current challenges associated with fusion welding of materials for energy applications.

  10. New materials for welding and surfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Galevsky, G. V.; Kryukov, R. E.; Titova, D. A.; Shurupov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The paper provides description of research into the influence of new materials and technologies on quality parameters of welds and deposited metal carried out in the research and production centre “Welding processes and technologies”. New welding technologies of tanks for northern conditions are considered, as well as technologies of submerged arc welding involving fluxing agents AN - 348, AN - 60, AN - 67, OK.10.71 and carbon-fluorine containing additives; new flux cored wires and surfacing technologies, teaching programs and a trainer for welders are designed.

  11. Materials and welding engineering in advanced coal utilization plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhmacher, D.; Schulze-Frielinghaus, W.; Puetz, J.; Eichhorn, F.; Gaever, E. van

    1983-08-01

    The authors present the findings of studies on welding methods for high-temperature alloys used in advanced coal gasification plants. They discuss weld preparation, automatic TIG welding, MIG welding (also with pulsed arc) and plasma arc welding. The mechanical properties of welded joints before and after age hardening are investigated, and the results of fatigue and corrosion tests are presented. The welding methods are compared with a view to their suitability for high-temperature materials.

  12. Review on electromagnetic welding of dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanthala, K.; Sreenivasa, T. N.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic welding (EMW) is a highspeed joining technique that is used to join similar or dissimilar metals, as well as metals to non-metals. This technique uses electromagnetic force to mainly join conductive materials. Unlike conventional joining processes, the weld interface does not melt, thus keeping the material properties intact. Extremely high velocity and strain rate involved in the process facilitate extending the EMW technique for joining several materials. In this paper, the research and progress in electromagnetic welding are reviewed from various perspectives to provide a basis for further research.

  13. Application and prospect of computer technology in welding materials field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the application status of computer technology in welding materials field from three aspects: the CAD of welding materials, the date base system for welding materials and the expert system for welding materials .Besides, this paper explores and discusses the existing problems and the developing trend in the future.

  14. Simulation of the welding of irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hua Tay

    1989-07-01

    Helium was uniformly implanted using the ''tritium trick'' technique to levels of 0.18, 2.5, 27, 105 and 256 atomic part per million (appm) for type 316 stainless steel, and 0.3 and 1 appm for Sandvik HT-9 (12 Cr-1MoVW). Both full penetration as well as partial penetration welds were then produced on control and helium-containing materials using the autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process under full constraint conditions. For full penetration welds, both materials were successfully welded when they contained less than 0.3 appm helium. However, welds of both materials, when containing greater than 1 appm helium, were found to develop cracks during cooling of the weld. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the HAZ cracking was caused by the growth and coalescence of grain boundary (GB) helium bubbles. This cracking occurred as a result of the combination of high temperatures and high shrinkage tensile stresses. The cracking in the fusion zone was found to result from the precipitation of helium along dendrite interfaces. A model based on the kinetics of diffusive cavity growth is presented to explain the observed results. The model proposes a helium bubble growth mechanism which leads to final intergranular rupture in the heat-affected zone. Results of the present study demonstrate that the use of conventional fusion welding techniques to repair materials degraded by exposure to irradiation environments may be difficult if the irradiation results in the generation of helium equal to or greater than 1 appm.

  15. Electron Beam Welding of Thick Copper Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broemssen, Bernt von [IVF Industriforskning och utveckling AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the two variants of the Electron Beam Welding (EBW) processes developed (or used) by 1- SKB, Sweden with assistance from TWI, England and 2 - POSIVA, Finland with assistance from Outokumpu, Finland. The aim was also to explain the principle properties of the EBW method: how it works, the parameters controlling the welding result but also giving rise to benefits, and differences between the EBW variants. The main conclusions are that both SKB and POSIVA will within a few years succeed to qualify their respective EBW method for welding of copper canisters. The Reduced Pressure EBW that SKB use today seems to be very promising in order to avoid root defects. If POSIVA does not succeed to avoid root defects with the high vacuum method and the beam oscillation technique it should be possible for POSIVA to incorporate the Reduced Pressure technique albeit with significant changes to the EBW equipment. POSIVA has possibly an advantage over SKB with the beam oscillation technique used, which gives an extra degree of freedom to affect the weld quality. The beam oscillation could be of importance for closing of the keyhole. Before EBW of lids, the material certification showing the alloy content (specifying min and max impurity percentages) and the mechanical properties should be checked. The welded material needs also to be tested for mechanical properties. If possible the weld should have a toughness level equal to that of the unwelded parent material. Specifically some conclusions are reported regarding the SKB equipment. Suggestions for further development are also given in the conclusion chapter.

  16. Welded joints integrity analysis and optimization for fiber laser welding of dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yuewei; Shao, Xinyu; Jiang, Ping; Li, Peigen; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Dissimilar materials welded joints provide many advantages in power, automotive, chemical, and spacecraft industries. The weld bead integrity which is determined by process parameters plays a significant role in the welding quality during the fiber laser welding (FLW) of dissimilar materials. In this paper, an optimization method by taking the integrity of the weld bead and weld area into consideration is proposed for FLW of dissimilar materials, the low carbon steel and stainless steel. The relationships between the weld bead integrity and process parameters are developed by the genetic algorithm optimized back propagation neural network (GA-BPNN). The particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is taken for optimizing the predicted outputs from GA-BPNN for the objective. Through the optimization process, the desired weld bead with good integrity and minimum weld area are obtained and the corresponding microstructure and microhardness are excellent. The mechanical properties of the optimized joints are greatly improved compared with that of the un-optimized welded joints. Moreover, the effects of significant factors are analyzed based on the statistical approach and the laser power (LP) is identified as the most significant factor on the weld bead integrity and weld area. The results indicate that the proposed method is effective for improving the reliability and stability of welded joints in the practical production.

  17. Effect of weld line shape on material flow during friction stir welding of aluminum and steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Toshiaki; Ando, Naoyuki; Morinaka, Shinpei; Mizushima, Hiroki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    The effect of weld line shape on material flow during the friction stir welding of aluminum and steel was investigated. The material flow velocity was evaluated with simulated experiments using plasticine as the simulant material. The validity of the simulated experiments was verified by the marker material experiments on aluminum. The circumferential velocity of material around the probe increased with the depth from the weld surface. The effect is significant in cases where the advancing side is located on the outside of curve and those with higher curvature. Thus, there is an influence of weld line shape on material flow.

  18. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  19. Weld formation during material extrusion additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppala, Jonathan E; Hoon Han, Seung; Hillgartner, Kaitlyn E; Davis, Chelsea S; Migler, Kalman B

    2017-08-18

    Material extrusion (ME) is a layer-by-layer additive manufacturing process that is now used in personal and commercial production where prototyping and customization are required. However, parts produced from ME frequently exhibit poor mechanical performance relative to those from traditional means; moreover, fundamental knowledge of the factors leading to development of inter-layer strength in this highly non-isothermal process is limited. In this work, we seek to understand the development of inter-layer weld strength from the perspective of polymer interdiffusion under conditions of rapidly changing mobility. Our framework centers around three interrelated components: in situ thermal measurements (via infrared imaging), temperature dependent molecular processes (via rheology), and mechanical testing (via mode III fracture). We develop the concept of an equivalent isothermal weld time and test its relationship to fracture energy. For the printing conditions studied the equivalent isothermal weld time for Tref = 230 °C ranged from 0.1 ms to 100 ms. The results of these analysis provide a basis for optimizing inter-layer strength, the limitations of the ME process, and guide development of new materials.

  20. The electron beam welding of dissimilar materials - case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, A.

    2016-11-01

    The modalities to realize the welding workpieces are multiple. The electron beam welding is one of them. One can weld two different types of materials that give the possibility to reduce the cost of workpiece, if the active part is realised of rich materials welded on components with inferior phisico-mecanical characteristics. The procedure provides great flexibility to the product designs through efficient use of each type of material. So this aspects lead to the necessity to join dissimilar metals. Different tables are given in the specific literature regarding the possible combination. Conflicts may arise by the compromises required for to the optimum heat control of the two dissimilar materials used. But nowadays, more and more frequently are meet the welding of dissimilar metals, thus, the objective of this article is to provide information regarding the particular case of welding between stainless steel and copper without the filler material use.

  1. Study of issues in difficult-to-weld thick materials by hybrid laser arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazar Atabaki, Mehdi

    There is a high interest for the high strength-to-weight ratio with good ductility for the welds of advanced alloys. The concern about the welding of thick materials (Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and 5xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys) has stimulated the development of manufacturing processes to overcome the associated issues. The need to weld the dissimilar materials (AHSS and aluminum alloys) is also required for some specific applications in different industries. Hence, the requirement in the development of a state-of-the-art welding procedure can be helpful to fulfill the constraints. Among the welding methods hybrid laser/arc welding (HLAW) has shown to be an effective method to join thick and difficult-to-weld materials. This process benefits from both advantages of the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and laser welding processes. The interaction of the arc and laser can help to have enough penetration of weld in thick plates. However, as the welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys and steels is very difficult because of the formation of brittle intermetallics the present work proposed a procedure to effectively join the alloys. The reports showed that the explosively welded aluminum alloys to steels have the highest toughness, and that could be used as an "insert" (TRICLAD) for welding the thick plates of AHSS to aluminum alloys. Therefore, the HLAW of the TRICLAD-Flange side (Aluminum alloy (AA 5456)) to the Web side (Aluminum alloys (AA 6061 and AA 5456)) and the TRICLAD-Flange side (ASTM A516) to the Web side (AHSS) was studied in the present work. However, there are many issues related to HLAW of the dissimilar steels as well as dissimilar aluminum alloys that have to be resolved in order to obtain sound welds. To address the challenges, the most recent welding methods for joining aluminum alloys to steels were studied and the microstructural development, mechanical properties, and on-line monitoring of the welding processes were discussed as well

  2. Weld nugget formation in resistance spot welding of new lightweight sandwich material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sagüés Tanco, J.; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Chergui, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    Weldability of a new lightweight sandwich material, LITECOR®, by resistance spot welding is analyzed by experiments and numerical simulations. The spot welding process is accommodated by a first pulse squeezing out the non-conductive polymer core of the sandwich material locally to allow metal–me...

  3. Picosecond laser welding of similar and dissimilar materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard M; Chen, Jianyong; Shephard, Jonathan D; Thomson, Robert R; Hand, Duncan P

    2014-07-01

    We report picosecond laser welding of similar and dissimilar materials based on plasma formation induced by a tightly focused beam from a 1030 nm, 10 ps, 400 kHz laser system. Specifically, we demonstrate the welding of fused silica, borosilicate, and sapphire to a range of materials including borosilicate, fused silica, silicon, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Dissimilar material welding of glass to aluminum and stainless steel has not been previously reported. Analysis of the borosilicate-to-borosilicate weld strength compares well to those obtained using similar welding systems based on femtosecond lasers. There is, however, a strong requirement to prepare surfaces to a high (10-60 nm Ra) flatness to ensure a successful weld.

  4. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  5. Fine tuning of dwelling time in friction stir welding for preventing material overheating, weld tensile strength increase and weld nugget size decrease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After successful welding, destructive testing into test samples from Al 2024-T351 friction stir butt welds showed that tensile strength of the weld improve along the joint line, while dimensions of the weld nugget decrease. For those welds, both the base material and the welding tool constantly cool down during the welding phase. Obviously, the base material became overheated during the long dwelling phase what made conditions for creation of joints with the reduced mechanical properties. Preserving all process parameters but varying the dwelling time from 5-27 seconds a new set of welding is done to reach maximal achievable tensile strength. An analytical-numerical-experimental model is used for optimising the duration of the dwelling time while searching for the maximal tensile strength of the welds

  6. Effect of Thermal and Diffusion Processes on Formation of the Structure of Weld Metal in Laser Welding of Dissimilar Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, G. A.; Klimova, O. G.; Babkin, K. D.; Pevzner, Ya. B.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal and diffusion processes in laser welding of dissimilar materials are simulated. The active LaserCAD model for welding of dissimilar materials is amended. The developed model is verified for the Fe - Cu system. The microstructure of a weld of tin bronze and low-carbon steel is studied and the elements in the diffusion zone are analyzed. The computed and experimental data for laser and electron-beam welding are shown to agree well.

  7. Process Simulation of Resistance Weld Bonding and Automotive Light-weight Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenqi; Chergui, Azeddine; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    and predicting welding process window, for weld planning with optimal welding parameter settings, and for modeling microstructures and hardness distribution after welding. Latest developments have been made on simulation of resistance welding with nonconductive materials for applications in weld bonding......This paper presents the latest developments in numerical simulation of resistance welding especially with the new functions for simulation of microstructures, weld bonding and spot welding of new light-weight materials. The fundamental functions in SORPAS® are built on coupled modeling...... of mechanical, electrical, thermal and metallurgical processes, which are essential for simulation of resistance welding process to predict the welding results and evaluate the weldability of materials. These functions have been further extended with new functions for optimization of welding process parameters...

  8. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  9. Effect of welding speed on the material flow patterns in friction stir welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; Wu Huiqiang; Huang Jihua; LIN Sanbao; WU Lin

    2007-01-01

    The clear zigzag-line pattern on transverse cross sections can be used to explain the formation mechanism of the weld nugget when friction stir welded AZ31 magnesium alloy without any other insert material is used as mark. It provides a simple and useful method to research the joining mechanism of friction stir welding. The rotation speed is kept at 1000 r/min and the welding speed changes from 120 mm/min to 600 mm/min. The macrostructure on the transverse cross section was divided into several parts by faying surface. The results show that the shape and formation procedure of the weld nugget change with the welding speed. There are two main material flows in the weld nugget: one is from the advancing side and the other is from the retreating side. A simple model on the weld nugget formation of FSW is presented in this article.

  10. Virtual Welded-Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Liu, S.; Babu, S.; Olson, G.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-04-15

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the fatigue life of a welded-joint by 10 times and to reduce energy use by 25% through product performance and productivity improvements using an integrated modeling approach. The fatigue strength of a welded-joint is currently the bottleneck to design high performance and lightweight welded structures using advanced materials such as high strength steels. In order to achieve high fatigue strength in a welded-joint it is necessary to manage the weld bead shape for lower stress concentration, produce preferable residual stress distribution, and obtain the desired microstructure for improved material toughness and strength. This is a systems challenge that requires the optimization of the welding process, the welding consumable, the base material, as well as the structure design. The concept of virtual welded-joint design has been proposed and established in this project. The goal of virtual welded-joint design is to develop a thorough procedure to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, property, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatigue strength by a systematic modeling approach. The systematic approach combines five sub-models: weld thermal-fluid model, weld microstructure model, weld material property model, weld residual stress model, and weld fatigue model. The systematic approach is thus based on interdisciplinary applied sciences including heat transfer, computational fluid dynamics, materials science, engineering mechanics, and material fracture mechanics. The sub-models are based on existing models with further development. The results from modeling have been validated with critical experiments. The systematic modeling approach has been used to design high fatigue resistant welds considering the combined effects of weld bead geometry, residual stress, microstructure, and material property. In particular, a special welding wire has been developed in this project to introduce

  11. High Copper Amalgam Alloys in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam Restoration is an example of the material giving its name to the process. Amalgam fillings are made up of mercury, powdered silver and tin. They are mixed and packed into cavities in teeth where it hardens slowly and replaces the missing tooth substance. The high copper have become material of choice as compared to low copper alloys nowadays because of their improved mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, better marginal integrity and improved performance in clinical trial. The high copper amalgam was used as a restorative material. The application of high copper amalgam was found to be much more useful than low copper amalgam. High copper had much more strength, corrosion resistance, durability and resistance to tarnish as compared to low copper amalgams. No marked expansion or condensation was noted in the amalgam restoration after its setting after 24 hrs. By using the high copper alloy, the chances of creep were also minimized in the restored tooth. No discomfort or any kind of odd sensation in the tooth was noted after few days of amalgam restoration in the tooth.

  12. Effect of the hardness of welded materials on the position of the lower limit of explosive welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharenko, I.D.; Zlobin, B.S.

    1984-03-01

    In order to clarify the question of the effect of the hardness of materials on the position of the lower limit in explosive welding, the authors carried out experiments with materials of essentially different hardnesses. (The investigation of the processes that take place near the lower limit of the region of welding is important in helping us to understand the mechanism of the formation of the welded joint. The experiments permit these conclusions: The process of self-purification in the explosive welding of materials of different hardness can take place as a result of the formation of a flow of material from the softer plate alone; and, in calculating the lower limit of the welding region, the H /SUB V/ of the softer material should be substituted in the expression for calculating the critical angle..gamma.. *.

  13. Modeling of material flow in friction stir welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D numerical model to study the material flow in the friction stir welding process. Results indicate that the material in front of the pin moves upwards due to the extrusion of the pin, and then the upward material rotates with the pin. Behind the rotating tool, the material starts to move downwards and to deposit in the wake. This process is the real cause to make friction stir welding process continuing successfully. The tangent movement of the material takes the main contribution to the flow of the material in friction stir welding process. There exists a swirl on the advancing side and with the increase of the translational velocity the inverse flow of the material on the advancing side becomes faster. The shoulder can increase the velocity of material flow in both radial direction and tangent direction near the top surface. The variations of process parameters do have an effect on the velocity field near the pin, especially in the region in which the material flow is faster.

  14. Measurement of outgassing rate for GTAW welded SS304 materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Mohsin; Mukherjee, Samiran; Panchal, Paresh; Gangradey, Ranjana; Shukla, Ajit Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Outgassing plays an important role to achieve Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) and to maintaining the required vacuum level of the vessel. For a large size machines like Tokamak, accelerators, space simulation chambers, outgassing from the structural materials and their welding sections need to be checked during the design. Hence studies were carried out for the measurement of outgassing rate for the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) welded SS304 materials at OutGassing Measurement System (OGMS) at IPR Extension Lab. The system consists of two chambers, pumping chamber and sample chamber, made up of 304 grades Stainless Steel pre-air baked at 400 °C. The pumping chamber connected to a turbo molecular pump having pumping speed 240 l/s, backed by a rotary vacuum pump having pumping speed 5m3/hour. Pumping chamber and sample chamber connected through a 100 CF flange having a circular aperture of 5.2 mm diameter. The conductance of aperture is 2.47 l/s. Bare SS304 sample & GTAW welded SS304 samples are prepared with 100mmX50mmX5mm and 95mmX55mmX5mm dimensions respectively. The base outgassing rate of the blank system is 2.34×10-11 mbar l/s-cm2. The calculated outgassing rate is 3.66×10-10 & 4.37×10-10 mbar l/s-cm2 for bare sample & welded sample. From the partial pressure analysis it has been found that hydrogen and nitrogen are in the partial level of 3.35×10-9 & 2.36×10-9 for bare sample and 3.14×10-9 mbar & 2.33×10-9 mbar for welded sample. It has been observed that, the GTAW doesn't have major effect on outgassing rate and one can use welded joint for designing a large vessel welding sections.

  15. Material test data of SUS304 welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asayama, Tai [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Kawakami, Tomohiro [Nuclear Energy System Incorporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    This report summarizes the material test data of SUS304 welded joints. Numbers of the data are as follows: Tensile tests 71 (Post-irradiation: 39, Others: 32), Creep tests 77 (Post-irradiation: 20, Others: 57), Fatigue tests 50 (Post-irradiation: 0), Creep-fatigue tests 14 (Post-irradiation: 0). This report consists of the printouts from 'the structural material data processing system'. (author)

  16. Friction Stir Lap Welding: material flow, joint structure and strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.W. Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding has been studied intensively in recent years due to its importance in industrial applications. The majority of these studies have been based on butt joint configuration and friction stir lap welding (FSLW has received considerably less attention. Joining with lap joint configuration is also widely used in automotive and aerospace industries and thus FSLW has increasingly been the focus of FS research effort recently. number of thermomechancal and metallurgical aspects of FSLW have been studied in our laboratory. In this paper, features of hooking formed during FSLW of Al-to-Al and Mg-to-Mg will first be quantified. Not only the size measured in the vertical direction but hook continuity and hooking direction have been found highly FS condition dependent. These features will be explained taking into account the effects of the two material flows which are speed dependent and alloy deformation behaviour dependent. Strength values of the welds will be presented and how strength is affected by hook features and by alloy dependent local deformation behaviours will be explained. In the last part of the paper, experimental results of FSLW of Al-to-steel will be presented to briefly explain how joint interface microstructures affect the fracturing process during mechanical testing and thus the strength. From the results, tool positioning as a mean for achieving maximum weld strength can be suggested.

  17. A Strategy for Modeling Microstructure in Macroscopic Simulations of Welded Material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiessen, R.G.; Richardson, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    With the increased precision in laser-welded structures, smaller and thinner parts can be joined. This magnifies the effect that microstructural changes due to the welding process have on the mechanical properties of the material. Although conventional welding processes are generally applied to work

  18. Student Material for Competency-Based Education Curriculum for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Associated Educational Consultants, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA.

    This student welding competency-based education curriculum consists of six units dealing with general areas related to trade occupations and nine units covering specific aspects of working with welding equipment and performing welding operations. Topics covered in the first six units are welding opportunities, human relations, safety, basic…

  19. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Airframe. A204. Aircraft Welding. Instructor Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide is designed to aid teachers in leading students through a module on aircraft welding on airframes. The module contains four units that cover the following topics: (1) gas welding and cutting; (2) brazing and soldering; (3) shielded metal arc welding; and (4) gas tungsten arc welding. Each unit follows a standardized format…

  20. Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2005-06-30

    Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

  1. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Ultrasonic Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Roberts, Scott N. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using ultrasonic welding. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: ultrasonically welding at least one ribbon to a surface; where at least one ribbon that is ultrasonically welded to a surface has a thickness of less than approximately 150.mu.m; and where at least one ribbon that is ultrasonically welded to a surface includes a metallic glass-based material.

  2. Study on laser welding of stainless steel/copper dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnea, D.; Dontu, O.; Avram, M.; Spânu, A.; Rizescu, C.; Pascu, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper stainless steel/copper laser welding was investigated by controlling the processing parameters like welding speed and laser power. Welding the dissimilar materials of stainless steel and copper presents a series of problems. Differences in the physical properties of the two metals, including the melting point, thermal conductivity and thermal dilatation are the main reasons for obtaining an inappropriate laser welding bead. Particularly, the laser welding process of copper is complex because of the very high reflectivity of cooper and in almost situations it requires a specific surface pre-treatment. The main objective of the study conducted in this work was to laser weld a structure used in pressure measuring and control equipments. In order to satisfy the conditions imposed by the sensor manufacturer, the difficulty of obtaining flawless joints was represented by the very small dimensions of the parts to be welded especially of the elastic spiral thickness made of steel.

  3. Synthetic Reference Materials Based on Polymer Films for the Control of Welding Fumes Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, O. V.; Kuznetsova, A. N.; Begunova, L. A.

    2017-04-01

    Analysis of the current hygienic situation in the welding production showed that the intensification of welding processes involves the deterioration of air quality, which negatively affects the welders health. Welders are exposed to a variety of metal fumes, including manganese that may elevate the risk for neurological diseases. The control of metals concentration in the air of the working area is difficult due to the lack of reference materials. The creation of reference materials of welding fumes composition is a challenge due to chemical characteristics of their physical properties. Synthetic samples in a form of the polymer film containing powder particles of welding fumes were create. Studies on the selection of the polymer were done. Experiments proved that the qualitative materials of synthetic welding fumes are obtained by using polyvinyl alcohol. The metals concentration in the samples was determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis. The obtained data demonstrates indirectly the uniform distribution of welding fumes powder particles on the polymer film.

  4. Influence of the Tool Shoulder Contact Conditions on the Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doude, Haley R.; Schneider, Judy A.; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2014-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSWing) is a solid-state joining process of special interest in joining alloys that are traditionally difficult to fusion weld. In order to optimize the process, various numeric modeling approaches have been pursued. Of importance to furthering modeling efforts is a better understanding of the contact conditions between the workpiece and the weld tool. Both theoretical and experimental studies indicate the contact conditions between the workpiece and weld tool are unknown, possibly varying during the FSW process. To provide insight into the contact conditions, this study characterizes the material flow in the FSW nugget by embedding a lead (Pb) wire that melted at the FSWing temperature of aluminum alloy 2195. The Pb trace provided evidence of changes in material flow characteristics which were attributed to changes in the contact conditions between the weld tool and workpiece, as driven by temperature, as the tool travels the length of a weld seam.

  5. FE analysis of cruciform welded joints considering different mechanical properties for base material, heat affected zone and weld metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualino Corigliano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this scientific work was to investigate the behaviour of cruciform welded joints under static loading using a full-field technique: Digital Image Correlation. The material curves, relative to different zones (base material, heat affected zone, weld, were obtained by hardness measurements, which were done by means of a fully automated hardness scanner with high resolution. This innovative technique, based on the UCI method, allowed to identify the different zones and to assess their different mechanical properties, which were considered in the finite element model. Finally the finite element model was validated experimentally, comparing the results with the measurements obtained using the Digital Image Correlation technique.

  6. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S., E-mail: ivkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Konovalenko, Igor S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru; Kolubaev, Evgeniy A., E-mail: eak@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, Andrey I., E-mail: dmitr@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G., E-mail: sp@ms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  7. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Konovalenko, Igor S.; Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Kolubaev, Evgeniy A.

    2015-10-01

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  8. Dissimilar material welding of rapidly solidified foil and stainless steel plate using underwater explosive welding technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokamoto, Kazuyuki [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: hokamoto@mech.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Nakata, Kazuhiro [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Mori, Akihisa [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Tsuda, Shota [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University (Japan); Tsumura, Takuya [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Inoue, Akihisa [Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-03-20

    Rapidly solidified amorphous and metallic glass thin foils clad on a stainless steel base plate is attempted by employing underwater shock wave assembly. The conditions of the explosive welding are numerically analyzed and discussed based on the earlier welding limits. The thin foils successfully welded along the length of 50 mm show clear waves typically found in explosively welded interface. The interfacial microstructure characterized through optical and scanning electron microscopes shows evidence of excessive melting generated due to the trapping of metal jet in limited area.

  9. 3D visualization of the material flow in friction stir welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Yanhua; Lin Sanbao; Shen Jiajie; Wu Lin

    2005-01-01

    The material flow in friction stir welded 2014 Al alloy has been investigated using a marker insert technique (MIT). Results of the flow visualization show that the material flow is asymmetrical during the friction stir welding(FSW)process and there are also significant differences in the flow patterns observed on advancing side and retreating side. On advancing side, some material transport forward and some move backward, but on retreating side, material only transport backward. At the top surface of the weld, significant material traasport forward due to the action of the rotating tool shoulder.Combining the data from all the markers, a three-dimensional flow visualization, similar to the 3D image reconstruction technique, was obtained. The three-dimensional plot gives the tendency chart of material flow in friction stir welding process and from the plot it can be seen that there is a vertical, circular motion around the longitudinal axis of the weld. On the advancing side of the weld, the material is pushed downward but on the retreating side, the material is pushed toward the crown of the weld. The net result of the two relative motions in both side of the advancing and the retreating is that a circular motion comes into being. Comparatively, the material flow around the longitudinal axis is a secondary motion.

  10. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05) and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05). In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N). Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (pfracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N). Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (pfracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  11. Experimental tests of irradiation-anneal-reirradiation effects on mechanical properties of RPV plate and weld materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, J.R. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C{sub V}) notch ductility and tension test properties of three reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel materials were determined for the 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) irradiated (I), 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) irradiated + 454{degree}C (850{degree}F)-168 h postirradiation annealed (IA), and 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) reirradiated (IAR) conditions. Total fluences of the I condition and the IAR condition were, respectively, 3.33 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} and 4.18 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV. The irradiation portion of the IAR condition represents an incremental fluence increase of 1. 05 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV, over the I-condition fluence. The materials (specimens) were supplied by the Yankee Atomic Electric Company and represented high and low nickel content plates and a high nickel, high copper content weld deposit prototypical of the Yankee-Rowe reactor vessel. The promise of the IAR method for extending the fluence tolerance of radiation-sensitive steels and welds is clearly shown by the results. The annealing treatment produced full C{sub V} upper shelf recovery and full or nearly full recovery in the C{sub V} 41 J (30 ft-lb) transition temperature. The C{sub V} transition temperature increases produced by the reirradiation exposure were 22% to 43% of the increase produced by the first cycle irradiation exposure. A somewhat greater radiation embrittlement sensitivity and a somewhat greater reirradiation embrittlement sensitivity was exhibited by the low nickel content plate than the high nickel content plate. Its high phosphorus content is believed to be responsible. The IAR-condition properties of the surface vs. interior regions of the low nickel content plate are also compared.

  12. 3D construction and repair from welding and material science perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marya, Surendar; Hascoet, Jean-Yves

    2016-10-01

    Additive manufacturing, based on layer-by-layer deposition of a feedstock material from a 3D data, can be mechanistically associated to welding. With feedstock fusion based processes, both additive manufacturing and welding implement similar heat sources, feedstock materials and translation mechanisms. From material science perspectives, additive manufacturing can take clue from lessons learned by millennium old welding technology to rapidly advance in its quest to generate fit for service metallic parts. This paper illustrates material science highlights extracted from the fabrication of a 316 L air vent and the functional repair of a Monel K500 (UNS N0500) with Inconel 625.

  13. Weld repair of helium degraded reactor vessel material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Lohmeier, D.A.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Rankin, D.T.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Bruck, G.J.; Madeyski, A.; Shogan, R.P.; Lessmann, G.G. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center)

    1990-01-01

    Welding methods for modification or repair of irradiated nuclear reactor vessels are being evaluated at the Savannah River Site. A low-penetration weld overlay technique has been developed to minimize the adverse effects of irradiation induced helium on the weldability of metals and alloys. This technique was successfully applied to Type 304 stainless steel test plates that contained 3 to 220 appm helium from tritium decay. Conventional welding practices caused significant cracking and degradation in the test plates. Optical microscopy of weld surfaces and cross sections showed that large surface toe cracks formed around conventional welds in the test plates but did not form around overlay welds. Scattered incipient underbead cracks (grain boundary separations) were associated with both conventional and overlay test welds. Tensile and bend tests were used to assess the effect of base metal helium content on the mechanical integrity of the low-penetration overlay welds. The axis of tensile specimens was perpendicular to the weld-base metal interface. Tensile specimens were machined after studs were resistance welded to overlay surfaces.

  14. Weld repair of helium degraded reactor vessel material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Lohmeier, D.A.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Rankin, D.T.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Bruck, G.J.; Madeyski, A.; Shogan, R.P.; Lessmann, G.G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

    1990-12-31

    Welding methods for modification or repair of irradiated nuclear reactor vessels are being evaluated at the Savannah River Site. A low-penetration weld overlay technique has been developed to minimize the adverse effects of irradiation induced helium on the weldability of metals and alloys. This technique was successfully applied to Type 304 stainless steel test plates that contained 3 to 220 appm helium from tritium decay. Conventional welding practices caused significant cracking and degradation in the test plates. Optical microscopy of weld surfaces and cross sections showed that large surface toe cracks formed around conventional welds in the test plates but did not form around overlay welds. Scattered incipient underbead cracks (grain boundary separations) were associated with both conventional and overlay test welds. Tensile and bend tests were used to assess the effect of base metal helium content on the mechanical integrity of the low-penetration overlay welds. The axis of tensile specimens was perpendicular to the weld-base metal interface. Tensile specimens were machined after studs were resistance welded to overlay surfaces.

  15. Material Flow and Oxide Particle Distributions in Friction-Stir Welded F/M-ODS Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Noh, Sanghoon; Jin, Hyun Ju; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    It is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion in ODS(Oxide dispersion strengthened) steel. However, these advantages will disappear while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. There is only limited literature available on the joining of ODS steels. Friction stir welding (FSW) is considered to be the best welding technique for welding ODS steels as the technique helps in retaining the homogeneous nano-oxide particles distributions in matrix. FSW is a solid.state, hot.shear joining process in which a rotating tool with a shoulder and terminating in a threaded pin, moves along the butting surfaces of two rigidly clamped plates placed on a backing plate. Heat generated by friction at the shoulder and to a lesser extent at the pin surface, softens the material being welded. Severe plastic deformation and flow of this plasticised metal occurs as the tool is translated along the welding direction. Material is transported from the front of the tool to the trailing edge where it is forged into a joint. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels. This study found that, during FSW, the forward movement of the tool pin results in loose contact between the tool pin and the receding material on the advancing side.

  16. Plasma ARC Welding of High-Performance-Ship Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    the work piece dur- ing welding. During the course of development by industry of the plasma arc process as a welding tool, v&rious orifice...point for the intended keyhole weld although, of course , minor modification to the travel speed may have to be made. The curves may be used to estimate...8217 : ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. TABLE 2 - TENSILE TEST RESULTS SpOC imun Ytlld Strounth T’n mil• StrIe lngth I|loniinttirol Lwait IL’ ,i ifr pin

  17. Composite Aluminum-Copper Sheet Material by Friction Stir Welding and Cold Rolling

    OpenAIRE

    Kahl, S; Osikowicz, W

    2013-01-01

    An aluminum alloy and a pure copper material were butt-joined by friction stir welding and subsequently cold rolled. The cold-rolling operation proved to be very advantageous because small voids present after friction stir welding were closed, the interface area per material thickness was enlarged, a thin intermetallic layer was partitioned, and the joint was strengthened by strain hardening. Tensile test specimens fractured in the heat-affected zone in the aluminum material; tensile strength...

  18. Thick SS316 materials TIG welding development activities towards advanced fusion reactor vacuum vessel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. Ramesh; Gangradey, R.

    2012-11-01

    Advanced fusion reactors like ITER and up coming Indian DEMO devices are having challenges in terms of their materials design and fabrication procedures. The operation of these devices is having various loads like structural, thermo-mechanical and neutron irradiation effects on major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, magnets and blanket modules. The concept of double wall vacuum vessel (VV) is proposed in view of protecting of major reactor subsystems like super conducting magnets, diagnostic systems and other critical components from high energy 14 MeV neutrons generated from fusion plasma produced by D-T reactions. The double walled vacuum vessel is used in combination with pressurized water circulation and some special grade borated steel blocks to shield these high energy neutrons effectively. The fabrication of sub components in VV are mainly used with high thickness SS materials in range of 20 mm- 60 mm of various grades based on the required protocols. The structural components of double wall vacuum vessel uses various parts like shields, ribs, shells and diagnostic vacuum ports. These components are to be developed with various welding techniques like TIG welding, Narrow gap TIG welding, Laser welding, Hybrid TIG laser welding, Electron beam welding based on requirement. In the present paper the samples of 20 mm and 40 mm thick SS 316 materials are developed with TIG welding process and their mechanical properties characterization with Tensile, Bend tests and Impact tests are carried out. In addition Vickers hardness tests and microstructural properties of Base metal, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and Weld Zone are done. TIG welding application with high thick SS materials in connection with vacuum vessel requirements and involved criticalities towards welding process are highlighted.

  19. Material Properties of Laser-Welded Thin Silicon Foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Hessmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended monocrystalline silicon base foil offers a great opportunity to combine low-cost production with high efficiency silicon solar cells on a large scale. By overcoming the area restriction of ingot-based monocrystalline silicon wafer production, costs could be decreased to thin film solar cell range. The extended monocrystalline silicon base foil consists of several individual thin silicon wafers which are welded together. A comparison of three different approaches to weld 50 μm thin silicon foils is investigated here: (1 laser spot welding with low constant feed speed, (2 laser line welding, and (3 keyhole welding. Cross-sections are prepared and analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD to reveal changes in the crystal structure at the welding side after laser irradiation. The treatment leads to the appearance of new grains and boundaries. The induced internal stress, using the three different laser welding processes, was investigated by micro-Raman analysis. We conclude that the keyhole welding process is the most favorable to produce thin silicon foils.

  20. Solidification paths in modified Inconel 625 weld overlay material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandrasekaran, Karthik; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hald, John

    2009-01-01

    Inconel 625 is commonly used for overlay welding to protect the base metal against high temperature corrosion. The efficiency of corrosion protection depends on effective mixing of the overlay weld with the base metal and the subsequent segregation of alloy elements during solidification...

  1. Optimisation of laser welding parameters for welding of P92 material using Taguchi based grey relational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugarajan B.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF steels are used in advanced power plant systems for high temperature applications. P92 (Cr–W–Mo–V steel, classified under CSEF steels, is a candidate material for piping, tubing, etc., in ultra-super critical and advanced ultra-super critical boiler applications. In the present work, laser welding process has been optimised for P92 material by using Taguchi based grey relational analysis (GRA. Bead on plate (BOP trials were carried out using a 3.5 kW diffusion cooled slab CO2 laser by varying laser power, welding speed and focal position. The optimum parameters have been derived by considering the responses such as depth of penetration, weld width and heat affected zone (HAZ width. Analysis of variance (ANOVA has been used to analyse the effect of different parameters on the responses. Based on ANOVA, laser power of 3 kW, welding speed of 1 m/min and focal plane at −4 mm have evolved as optimised set of parameters. The responses of the optimised parameters obtained using the GRA have been verified experimentally and found to closely correlate with the predicted value.

  2. Resistance Welding of Advanced Materials and Micro Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Kasper Storgaard

    presented problems. Simulation of two- and three sheet spot welding of advanced high strength steels DP600 and TRIP700 did generally agree well with experimental observations. Microstructure characterisation revealed that martensite was the main constituent in the final weld. By using empirical formulae......, thermal, electrical and metallurgical effects all signifcantly in uencing the process. Modelling is further complicated when down-scaling the process for welding micro components or when welding new advanced high strength steels in the automotive industry. The current project deals with three main themes...... resistance is addressed both theoretically and experimentally. Secondly the consequences of downscaling the process is investigated experimentally and discussed in relation to simulation of the process. Finally resistance welding of advanced high strength steels is addressed aimed at improving the simulation...

  3. Ultrasound influence on materials structure in parts reconditioned by welding with ultrasonic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dobrotă

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research presented in the paper refers to the structural analysis of materials that are thermally influenced for loading by welding of pieces in the classical variant of manual coated electric arc welding and the version that in which the welding bath is activated by ultrasounds. The structural analysis made refer to: the size of the grains of the structure obtained under certain loading conditions through welding, grain size variation on the submission of a single layer in the ultrasonic field, the mode of solidification and fragmentation of grains when loaded in welding in a ultrasonic field, acceleration of the diffusion process for ultrasonic activation, the appearance of hard carbides between grains.

  4. Melt pool vorticity in deep penetration laser material welding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Kumar; S Dash; A K Tyagi; Baldev Raj

    2011-04-01

    In the present study, the vorticity of melt motion in the keyhole and weld pool has been evaluated in case of high power CO2 laser beam welding. The circulation of vorticity is obtained as a function of Reynolds number for a given keyhole volume which is linked to Mach number variation. The shear stress and thermal fluxes present in the turbulent pool are linked to diffusivity and Prandtl number variation. It was shown that below a critical value of Rayleigh number, the conduction mode of melt transfer signifying beam absorption becomes dominant. Above this value, convective heat transfer indicates melting and evaporation occurring in the weld pool during laser welding. The evaporative recoil pressure expels the liquid while surface tension and hydrostatic pressure help to retain the melt in the keyhole cavity in this high power laser beam welding. The understanding of several hydrodynamic phenomena occuring in the weld pool is valuable not only for understanding basic mechanistic aspects but also for process optimization involved in laser beam welding.

  5. production of manual arc welding electrodes with local raw materials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHUKSSUCCESS 4 LOVE

    effectively with titanium dioxide based electrode (a foreign electrode) with tensile strength of. 606.7N/mm . ... composition and mechanical properties as ... bead from oxidation during welding. ... Manganese (Mn), Slag, Silicon (Si) and Iron. 2. 3.

  6. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  7. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Johannes Bock

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005. Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05 and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05. In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N. Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test were found in each joint configuration. The highest fracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N. Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test. In conclusion, the fracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  8. Effect of Traverse/Rotational Speed on Material Deformations and Temperature Distributions in Friction Stir Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao ZHANG; Jun BIE; Yali LIU; Hongwu ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    A fully coupled thermo-mechanical model was developed to study the temperature fields and the plastic deformations of alloy AL6061-T6 under different process parameters during the friction stir welding (FSW) process.Three-dimensional results under different process parameters were presented.Results indicate that the maximum temperature is lower than the melting point of the welding material.The higher temperature gradient occurs in the leading side of the workpiece.The calculated temperature field can be fitted well with the one from the experimental test.A lower plastic strain region can be found near the welding tool in the trailing side on the bottom surface,which is formed by the specific material flow patterns in FSW.The maximum temperature can be increased with increasing the welding speed and the angular velocity in the current numerical modelling.

  9. Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding Computational Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    REPORT Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding Computational Analyses 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...TERMS AA5083, friction stir welding , Johnson-Cook material model M. Grujicic, B. Pandurangan, C.-F. Yen, B. A. Cheeseman Clemson University Office of...Use in Friction Stir Welding Computational Analyses Report Title ABSTRACT Johnson-Cook strength material model is frequently used in finite-element

  10. Multiple pass and multiple layer friction stir welding and material enhancement processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhili [Knoxville, TN; David, Stan A [Knoxville, TN; Frederick, David Alan [Harriman, TN

    2010-07-27

    Processes for friction stir welding, typically for comparatively thick plate materials using multiple passes and multiple layers of a friction stir welding tool. In some embodiments a first portion of a fabrication preform and a second portion of the fabrication preform are placed adjacent to each other to form a joint, and there may be a groove adjacent the joint. The joint is welded and then, where a groove exists, a filler may be disposed in the groove, and the seams between the filler and the first and second portions of the fabrication preform may be friction stir welded. In some embodiments two portions of a fabrication preform are abutted to form a joint, where the joint may, for example, be a lap joint, a bevel joint or a butt joint. In some embodiments a plurality of passes of a friction stir welding tool may be used, with some passes welding from one side of a fabrication preform and other passes welding from the other side of the fabrication preform.

  11. Research into the Reliability of the Overlap Joint of Bituminous Heat Welded Roofing Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius Balčiūnas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The conducted analysis has revealed that the most common reason of leaks in bituminous roofs is caused by a lack of adhesion between two nearby sheets of roof cover. Regarding the above mentioned problems, reliability, testing methods and data analysis methods of the overlap joint is observed more closely. The research conducted by different scientists worldwide has showed difficulties in evaluating the obtained data due to a lack of information on how these samples were produced. Therefore, it is proposed to evaluate the influence of welding time analyzing the mechanical properties of the joints of bituminous heat welded roofing materials. The influence of welding time, when the samples are produced, and mechanical properties of overlap joints are practically proved according to LST standards. The test results have showed that welding time does not have a significant influence on the shear resistance of overlap joints but is important regarding its limited deformation.

  12. Influence of deformation on structural-phase state of weld material in St3 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Alexander, E-mail: galvas.kem@gmail.ru; Ababkov, Nicolay, E-mail: n.ababkov@rambler.ru; Ozhiganov, Yevgeniy, E-mail: zhigan84@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); LLC “Kuzbass Center of Welding and Control”, 33/2, Lenin Str., 650055, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Kozlov, Eduard, E-mail: kozlov@tsuab.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Popova, Natalya, E-mail: natalya-popova-44@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nikonenko, Elena, E-mail: vilatomsk@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Zboykova, Nadezhda, E-mail: tezaurusn@gmail.com; Koneva, Nina, E-mail: koneva@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The structural-phase condition of the weld material subjected to the plastic deformation was investigated using the translucent diffraction electron microscopy method. The investigations were carried out near the joint of the weld and the base metal. The seam was done by the method of manual arc welding without artificial defects. The St3 steel was taken as the welded material. Influence of the plastic deformation on morphology, phase composition, defect structure and its parameters of weld metal was revealed. All investigations were done at the distance of 0.5 mm from the joint of the weld and the base metal at the deformation degrees from 0 to 5% and after destruction of a sample. It was established that deformation of the sample did not lead to qualitative changes in the structure (the structure is still presented by ferrite-pearlite mixture) but changed the quantitative parameters of the structure, namely, with the increase of plastic deformation a part of the pearlite component becomes more and more imperfect. In the beginning it turns into the destroyed pearlite then into ferrite, the volume fraction of pearlite is decreased. The polarization of dislocation structure takes place but it doesn’t lead to the internal stresses that can destroy the sample.

  13. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Dissimilar Material Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziewiec A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the mechanical testing and the microstructure analysis of dissimilar welded joint of the R350HT steel and the high-manganese (Hadfield cast steel using Cr-Ni cast steel spacer. The simulation tests of the welded joint surface deformation were carried out. The macroscopic and microscopic investigation were made using light microscopy (LM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Content of the magnetic phase was measured using magnetoscope. The quantitative metallographic investigation was used for assessment of ferrite and martensite contents and X-ray diffraction phase analysis was carried out. The results showed that during cooling of the spacer after welding, the transformation of metastable austenite into martensite proceeded. In addition to work hardening, the phase transformation of austenite into martensite occurs during the process of the superficial deformation of the spacer while simulated exploitation. This leads to a substantial increase of hardness, and at the same time, causes the increase of wear resistance of the welded joints of crossovers.

  14. Material property evaluations of bimetallic welds, stainless steel saw fusion lines, and materials affected by dynamic strain aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudland, D.; Scott, P.; Marschall, C.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Pipe fracture analyses can often reasonably predict the behavior of flawed piping. However, there are material applications with uncertainties in fracture behavior. This paper summarizes work on three such cases. First, the fracture behavior of bimetallic welds are discussed. The purpose of the study was to determine if current fracture analyses can predict the response of pipe with flaws in bimetallic welds. The weld joined sections of A516 Grade 70 carbon steel to F316 stainless steel. The crack was along the carbon steel base metal to Inconel 182 weld metal fusion line. Material properties from tensile and C(T) specimens were used to predict large pipe response. The major conclusion from the work is that fracture behavior of the weld could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using properties of the carbon steel pipe and conventional J-estimation analyses. However, results may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds. Second, the toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines is discussed. During large-scale pipe tests with flaws in the center of the SAW, the crack tended to grow into the fusion line. The fracture toughness of the base metal, the SAW, and the fusion line were determined and compared. The major conclusion reached is that although the fusion line had a higher initiation toughness than the weld metal, the fusion-line J-R curve reached a steady-state value while the SAW J-R curve increased. Last, carbon steel fracture experiments containing circumferential flaws with periods of unstable crack jumps during steady ductile tearing are discussed. These instabilities are believed to be due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). The paper discusses DSA, a screening criteria developed to predict DSA, and the ability of the current J-based methodologies to assess the effect of these crack instabilities. The effect of loading rate on the strength and toughness of several different carbon steel pipes at LWR temperatures is also discussed.

  15. The effects of microstructural changes caused by welding on microbiologically influenced corrosion: Material and process implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, D.W.; Willis, E.R.; Van Diepen, T. [California Polytechnic State Univ., San Luis Obispo, CA (United States). Materials Engineering Dept.

    1995-10-01

    The microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) susceptibility of a material is inextricably linked to its microstructure. The thermomechanical cycle associated with welding produces extensive microstructural change in the vicinity of the weld. This work tested the hypothesis that fabrication procedure would alter MIC susceptibility. This study examined the effect of systematic variation in the amounts of cerium, sulfur and silicon on the corrosion susceptibility of welded AISI 8630 material in aqueous, anaerobic solutions. Samples were exposed to both sterile and biologically solutions. Biologically active solutions were invariably more aggressive. The changes in corrosion susceptibility were correlated to the changes in the microstructure of the weld fusion zone, the partially melted zone (PMZ) and the base material, as affected by minor element content. Significant correlations between total numbers of pits/maximum pit depth and minor element content/location of attack were found in this study. The creation of extensive subgrain boundary coupled with solute redistribution in the fusion zone as well as extensive continuous grain boundary films in the partially melted zone foster MIC in these locations. Mitigation strategies treating material selection and weld process/procedure selection are discussed.

  16. Evaluation on defect in the weld of stainless steel materials using nondestructive technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Kyung, E-mail: leejink@deu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dongeui University, Eomgwangno 176, Busanjingu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Dong Su [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dongeui University, Eomgwangno 176, Busanjingu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Pill [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dongeui University, Eomgwangno 176, Busanjingu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon Hyun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busandaehakro 63beongil, Geumjeonggu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the elastic wave's characteristic on the crack in the weld of stainless steel materials using guided wave and acoustic emission, nondestructive tests. The stainless steel is expected as candidate of structural piping material under high temperature condition in nuclear fusion instrument, and a tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld technique was applied for making its jointing. The defect size of 20 mm was induced in the weld material. The guided wave, one of elastic waves, can propagate through very long pipe, and easily change to lots of modes by the defects in the structure. By analyzing the relationship between the mode conversion and the defects we can evaluate existing of the defects in weld material. In present study Nd-YAG laser was used to excite the guided wave by non-contact method, and AE technique was also used to clarify the mode conversion of guided wave by defect because lots of AE parameters of energy, count and amplitude can give more chances for analysis of mode conversion. The optimal AE parameters for the evaluation of the defects in weld zone using laser guided wave were derived.

  17. The Importance of Materials Data and Modelling Parameters in an FE Simulation of Linear Friction Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Turner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear friction welding has become a key technology in the aeroengine industry due to its capability to produce blisk components. Finite element (FE simulation of linear friction welding applications has been studied in recent years by a number of institutions, using a variety of software codes. Several codes have been demonstrated to be capable of predicting with reasonable accuracy some or all of the critical outputs of friction welding, namely, the thermal loading, plastic deformation, and residual stresses generated. The importance of reliable material data in performing these calculations is paramount. Available material data in the published literature is often restricted to lower temperatures and strain rate regimes. Extrapolation methods used on this data to estimate high temperature properties can lead to uncertainties in the modelled predictions. This paper reviews the approach to materials modelling, including material datasets and material constitutive laws, for FE simulation work in the literature regarding linear friction welding. Best-practice methods for materials constitutive laws, materials data-sets, and the associated experimental temperatures and strain rates used to gather data are suggested. Finally, successfully validated modelled outcomes—when a robust, reliable, and accurate material database has been selected—are demonstrated for a number of the FE methods considered.

  18. Laser Beam Welding with High-Frequency Beam Oscillation: Welding of Dissimilar Materials with Brilliant Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraetzsch, Mathias; Standfuss, Jens; Klotzbach, Annett; Kaspar, Joerg; Brenner, Berndt; Beyer, Eckhard

    Brilliant laser beam sources in connection with a high frequent beam oscillation make it now possible to join metallic material combinations, which have been conventionally non-laser weldable up to now. It concerns especially such combinations like Al- Cu, where brittle intermetallic phases occur. Extreme small weld seam with high aspect ratio leads to very short meld pool life time. These allow an extensive reduction of the heat input. On the other side the melting behavior at metallic mixed joint, seam geometry, meld pool turbulence and solidification behavior can be influenced by a high frequent time-, position- and powercontrolled laser beam oscillation.

  19. Application of Hard Metal Weld Deposit in the Area of Mixing Organic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Any machine part is subject to degradation processes. Intensive wear occurs either when two bearing surfaces come into contact or when loose particles rub the function surface of a machine part. Soil processing machines are a good example. A similar process of abrasive wear occurs also in mixing machines or lines for material transport, such as worm-conveyors. The experiment part of this paper analyses hard metal weld deposit dedicated for renovation of abrasive stressed surfaces. In order to prolong the service life of a blade disc in a mixing machine Kreis-Biogas-Dissolver, the technology of hard surfacing by an electric arc was used. Tested hard metal electrodes were applied on a steel tape class 11 373. To eliminate mixing with the base material, weld beads were applied in two layers. Firstly, the weld bead was visually analyzed on a binocular microscope. Further, weld bead as well as the base material was analyzed from the metallographic point of view, whose aim was to identify the structure of weld metal and the origin of microcracks in weld bead. Moreover, there was also measured microhardness of weld metal. Abrasive resistance was tested according to the norm ČSN 01 5084, which is an abrasive cloth test. As in the mixing process also erosion wear occurs, there was also processed a test on a Bond device simulating stress of test samples by loose abrasive particles. The abrading agents were formed by broken stones of 8–16 mm in size. Based on the results of the individual tests, the recommendation of usage hard metal electrodes for prolonging service life of machine parts will be made.

  20. Laser welding of dissimilar materials for lightweight construction and special applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimek, Mitja; Springer, André; Pfeifer, Ronny; Kaierle, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    Against the background of climate objectives and the desired reduction of CO2-emissions, optimization of existing industrial products is needed. To counter rising raw material costs, currently used materials are substituted. This will places new requirements on joining technologies for dissimilar material classes. The main difficulty lies in joining these materials cohesively without changing the properties of the base materials. Current research work at the LZH on joining dissimilar materials is being carried out for the automotive sector and for solar absorbers. For the automotive industry, a laser welding process for joining steel and aluminum without using additives is being investigated, equipped with a spectroscopic welding depth control to increase tensile strength. With a specially constructed laser processing head, it is possible to regulate welding penetration depth in the aluminum sheet, reducing the formation of intermetallic phases. Flat plate solar collectors are favorable devices for generating heat from solar energy. The solar absorber is the central part of a collector, consisting of an aluminum sheet and a copper tube which is attached to the aluminum sheet. Research on new laser welding processes aims at reducing the amount of energy required for production of these solar absorbers. In the field of joining dissimilar materials, laser joining processes, especially for special applications, will complement established joining techniques.

  1. Three-Dimensional Thermomechanical Simulation and Experimental Validation on Failure of Dissimilar Material Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, R.; Das, S. K.; Das, G.; Korody, J.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2016-07-01

    Dissimilar material weld joints, consisting of low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel (SS), have critical application in boiling water reactors in the nuclear industry. It was predicted that phase transformation adjacent to the fusion boundary and stress distribution across the transition joint play a key role in the structural degeneration of these welds. Quantitatively, to evaluate their contribution, two different joints were considered. One was fabricated with buttering material 309L SS (M/S Mishra Dhatu Nigam Limited, Hyderabad, India), and the other was produced with buttering material IN182 (M/S Mishra Dhatu Nigam Limited, Hyderabad, India). Base materials remained the same for both. Thermomechanical simulation on dissimilar material welds was performed using finite-element modeling to predict the thermal effect and stress prone area. Temperature-dependent thermal and structural properties were considered for simulation. Simulation results were compared with microstructural characteristics, and data were obtained from the in-situ tensile test. Simulation results exhibited that stress was at maximum in the buttering material and made the zone weaker with respect to adjacent areas. During the validation of results, it was observed that failure occurred through buttering material and endorsed the inference. The variation in mechanical properties of the two welds was explained considering the effect of thermal state and stress distribution.

  2. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  3. Geometry and Material Constraint Effects on Creep Crack Growth Behavior in Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Wang, G. Z.; Xuan, F. Z.; Tu, S. T.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the geometry and material constraint effects on creep crack growth (CCG) and behavior in welded joints were investigated. The CCG paths and rates of two kinds of specimen geometry (C(T) and M(T)) with initial cracks located at soft HAZ (heat-affected zone with lower creep strength) and different material mismatches were simulated. The effect of constraint on creep crack initiation (CCI) time was discussed. The results show that there exists interaction between geometry and material constraints in terms of their effects on CCG rate and CCI time of welded joints. Under the condition of low geometry constraint, the effect of material constraint on CCG rate and CCI time becomes more obvious. Higher material constraint can promote CCG due to the formation of higher stress triaxiality around crack tip. Higher geometry constraint can increase CCG rate and reduce CCI time of welded joints. Both geometry and material constraints should be considered in creep life assessment and design for high-temperature welded components.

  4. PENGARUH VARIASI SUHU POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT ANNEALING TERHADAP SIFAT MEKANIS MATERIAL BAJA EMS-45 DENGAN METODE PENGELASAN SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusiyanto Rusiyanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan Untuk mengetahui nilai kekerasan Vickers material Baja EMS-45 sebelum proses pengelasan dan setelah dilakukan proses pengelasan tanpa post weld heat treatment annealing, Untuk mengetahui berapakah suhu optimal post weld heat treatment annealing untuk material baja EMS-45 dengan variasi suhu yang digunakan 350 o C, 550 o C, dan 750 C. Untuk mengetahui struktur mikro dari material baja EMS-45 akibat variasi suhu post weld heat treatment annealing pada proses pengelasan dengan menggunakan metode pengelasan shielded metal arc welding. Bahan atau material dasar yang digunakan pada penelitian ini adalah Baja EMS-45 dengan ketebalan pelat 10 mm, lebar pelat 20 mm dan panjang 100 mm. Berdasarkan hasil pengujian nilai kekerasan tertinggi setelah proses pengelasan terletak pada daerah Logam Las. Pengelasan non PWHT memiliki nilai kekerasan paling tinggi setelah proses pengelasan yaitu sebesar 183,2 VHN. Suhu optimal Post Weld Heat Treatment Annealing untuk material baja EMS-45 adalah pada suhu 750 C. Karena pada PWHT pada suhu tersebut mengalami penurunan kekerasan yang besar yaitu sebesar 127,2 VHN, sehingga material baja EMS-45 dapat memperbaiki sifat mampu mesinnya. Struktur mikro dari material baja EMS-45 sebelum proses pengelasan berupa grafit serpih, perlit dan ferit, setelah dilakukan proses pengelasan mempunyai struktur mikro berupa matrik ferit dan grafit pada daerah logam las, matrik perlit kasar dan grafit serpih pada daerah HAZ dan struktur perlit, grafit serpih dan ferit pada daerah logam induk o o

  5. Simulation of 3D material flow in friction stir welding of AA6061-T6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhao; Zhang Hongwu

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the numerical simulation of the 3D material flow in friction stir welding process by using finite element methods based on solid mechanics. It is found that the material flow behind the pin is much faster than that in front of the pin. The material in front of the pin moves upwards and then rotates with the pin due to the effect of the rotating tool. Behind of the pin, the material moves downwards. This process of material movement is the real cause to make the friction stir welding process continuing successfully. With the increase of the translational velocity or the rotational velocity of the pin, the material flow becomes faster.

  6. Fracture toughness of welded joints materials for main pipelines at Ignalina NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daunys, Mykolas [Kaunas University of Technology, 27 Kestucio, LT-44025 Kaunas (Lithuania)]. E-mail: mykolas.daunys@ktu.lt; Krasauskas, Povilas [Kaunas University of Technology, 27 Kestucio, LT-44025 Kaunas (Lithuania); Dundulis, Romualdas [Kaunas University of Technology, 27 Kestucio, LT-44025 Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2005-03-01

    This paper deals with an investigation of mechanical and fracture toughness characteristics of welded joint materials used in Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor main circulating circuit (MCC) and steam pipelines. Basic metal of MCC group distributing header (GDH) steel 08Ch18N10T (Du-300), its weld metal welded by manual and automatic arc method using the wire SV-04Ch19N11M3 and electrodes EA-100/10U or EA-100/10T, this joint heat-affected zone metal and base metal of the main steam system-steel 16GS (DU-630) and its weld metal welded by manual arc method using the wire SV-08GS2 and electrodes UONI-13/55 were tested. Mechanical properties of welded joints materials-proportional limit ({sigma}{sub pl}), yield ({sigma}{sub y}) and ultimate ({sigma}{sub u}) strength, fracture stress ({sigma}{sub f}) and ductility (Z) (percent reduction of area) of the specimens were determined. Investigation of relative critical stress intensity factor for fixed thickness of the specimen K{sub C}* and critical J-integral, J{sub IC}, was performed. The probabilistic investigation of influence of the mechanical properties ({sigma}{sub pl}, {sigma}{sub y}, {sigma}{sub u}) onto fracture toughness characteristics K{sub C}* and J{sub IC} for tested materials by using linear regression model with three independent variables was performed. Research enabled to conclude that proposed multivariable regression model with 80% probability (confidence coefficient {alpha}=0.05) has explained reasonably well the dependence of K{sub C}* with {sigma}{sub pl}, {sigma}{sub y}, {sigma}{sub u} and it has shown the non-acceptability of probabilistic evaluation of the model with respect to J{sub IC}.

  7. Narrow gap HST welding process and its application to candidate pipe material for 700 C USC boiler component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Gang; Sato, Takashi; Fukuda, Yuji [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., Hiroshima (Japan). Kure Research Lab.; Mitsuhata, Koichi [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., Hiroshima (Japan). Kure Div.

    2008-07-01

    Increasing steam temperature and pressure conditions of 700 C USC (Ultra Super Critical) power plants under consideration require the adoption of Ni-based alloys. One of the most crucial issues for the application of 700 C USC power plants is the establishment of welding technology for the thick-walled components. This paper reports the research results on the practicability of candidate material for the thickwalled components. The weld test was conducted on Ni-based Alloy617 (52Ni-22Cr- 13Co-9Mo-Ti-Al) by using the narrow gap HST (Hot wire Switching TIG) welding process developed by Babcock-Hitachi K.K with the matching filler wire of Alloy617. The weldability and strength properties of weld joint were examined. The sound weld joint was achieved. The advantages of narrow gap HST welding process for the thick-walled components of Ni-based alloy were discussed from the viewpoints of weld metal chemical composition and creep rupture strength. Due to the good shielding effect, the melting loss of alloy elements in the weld consumable during the narrow gap HST welding procedure was suppressed successfully. The narrow gap HST weld joint showed comparable strength with the parent metal. (orig.)

  8. The fatigue strength of base material and butt welds made of S690 and S1100

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, R.J.M.; Kolstein, M.H.; Romeijn, A.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2007-01-01

    Modern steel manufacturing techniques make it possible to produce steel with nominal strengths up to 1100 MPa (very high strength steels, VHSS). For the design of cyclic loaded slender VHSS structures, the fatigue strength of both base material and welded components should be known. In a VHSS

  9. The fatigue strength of base material and butt welds made of S690 and S1100

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, R.J.M.; Kolstein, M.H.; Romeijn, A.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2007-01-01

    Modern steel manufacturing techniques make it possible to produce steel with nominal strengths up to 1100 MPa (very high strength steels, VHSS). For the design of cyclic loaded slender VHSS structures, the fatigue strength of both base material and welded components should be known. In a VHSS fatigu

  10. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding of Al Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2003-01-01

    The innovative process of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has generated tremendous interest since its inception about a decade or so ago since the first patent in 1991 by TWI of Cambridge, England. This interest has been seen in many recent international conferences and publications on the subject and relevant published literature. Still the process needs both intensive basic study of deformation mechanisms during this FSW process and analysis and feasibility study to evaluate production methods that will yield high quality strong welds from the stirring action of the appropriate pin tool into the weld plate materials. Development of production processes is a complex task that involves effects of material thickness, materials weldability, pin tool design, pin height, and pin shoulder diameter and related control conditions. The frictional heating with rotational speeds of the pin tool as it plunges into the material and the ensuing plastic flow arising during the traverse of the welding faying surfaces provide the known special advantages of the FSW process in the area of this new advanced joining technology.

  11. Management of heat in laser tissue welding using NIR cover window material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Savage, Howard; Katz, Alvin; Muthukattil, Ronex; Alfano, Robert R

    2011-12-01

    Laser tissue welding (LTW) is a novel method of surgical wound closure by the use of laser radiation to induce fusion of the biological tissues. Molecular dynamics associated with LTW is a result of thermal and non-thermal mechanisms. This research focuses exclusively on better heat management to reduce thermal damage of tissues in LTW using a near infrared laser radiation. An infrared continuous-wave (CW) laser radiation at 1,450 nm wavelength corresponding to the absorption band from combination vibrational modes of water is used to weld together ex vivo porcine aorta. In these studies we measured the optimal laser power and scan speed, for better tensile strength of the weld and lesser tissue dehydration. Significant amount of water loss from the welded tissue results in cellular death and tissue buckling. Various thermally conductive optical cover windows were used as heat sinks to reduce thermal effects during LTW for the dissipation of the heat. The optimal use of the method prevents tissue buckling and minimizes the water loss. Diamond, sapphire, BK7, fused silica, and IR quartz transparent optical cover windows were tested. The data from this study suggests that IR-quartz as the material with optimal thermal conductivity is ideal for laser welding of the porcine aorta. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Welding of a corrosion-resistant composite material based on VT14 titanium alloy obtained using an electron beam emitted into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkovski, M. G.; Samoylenko, V. V.; Polyakov, I. A.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Chakin, I. K.; Komarov, P. N.; Ruktuev, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigates the possibility of inert gas arc welding of a double layer composite material on a titanium base with an anti-corrosive layer obtained by fused deposition of a powder mix containing tantalum and niobium over a titanium base using an electron beam emitted into the atmosphere. Butt welding and fillet welding options were tested with two types of edge preparation. Welds were subjected to a metallographic examination including a structural study and an analysis of the chemical and phase composition of the welds. A conclusion was made regarding the possibility of using welding for manufacturing of items from the investigated composite material.

  13. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  14. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling......Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  15. Material properties of a dissimilar metal weld Inconel 600/ Inconel 82 weld filler/ Carbon Steel (Gr.106 B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, S. [Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Duan, X. [CANDU Energy Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Weck, A., E-mail: aweck@uottawa.ca [Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Inconel 600 pipes welded to Carbon-Steel are used in CANDU nuclear reactors. Fracture of these welded pipes has important consequences in term of safety, and therefore their mechanical properties need to be better understood. In this study, the weld region was analyzed at various length-scales using optical microscopy, micro hardness testing, small and large scale tensile testing, and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). Micro-hardness profiles showed variations across the weld and through thickness and were justified in terms of residual stresses. Local stress-strain curves were built using DIC and showed good agreement with stress-strain curves obtained from miniature tensile samples. (author)

  16. Modeling the Material Flow and Heat Transfer in Reverse Dual-Rotation Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L.; Wu, C. S.; Liu, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    Reverse dual-rotation friction stir welding (RDR-FSW) is a novel modification of conventional friction stir welding (FSW) process. During the RDR-FSW process, the tool pin and the assisted shoulder are separated and rotate with opposite direction independently, so that there are two material flows with reverse direction. The material flow and heat transfer in RDR-FSW have significant effects on the microstructure and properties of the weld joint. A 3D model is developed to quantitatively analyze the effects of the separated tool pin and the assisted shoulder which rotate in reverse direction on the material flow and heat transfer during RDR-FSW process. Numerical simulation is conducted to predict the temperature profile, material flow field, streamlines, strain rate, and viscosity distributions near the tool. The calculated results show that as the rotation speed of the tool pin increases, the temperature near the tool gets higher, the zone with higher temperature expands, and approximately symmetric temperature distribution is obtained near the tool. Along the workpiece thickness direction, the calculated material flow velocity and its layer thickness near the tool get lowered because the effect of the shoulder is weakened as the distance away from the top surface increases. The model is validated by comparing the predicted values of peak temperature at some typical locations with the experimentally measured ones.

  17. Laser-driven flyer application in thin film dissimilar materials welding and spalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huimin; Wang, Yuliang

    2017-10-01

    This paper applied a low cost method to pack and drive laser-driven flyer in the applications of welding and spalling. The laser system has the maximum energy of 3.1 J, which is much lower than that used in the previous study. The chemical release energy from the ablative layer was estimated as 3.7 J. The flying characteristic of laser-driven flyer was studied by measuring the flyer velocity at different locations with photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV). The application of laser-driven flyer in welding Al and Cu was investigated at different laser spot size. Weld strength was measured with the peel test. Weld interface was characterized with optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study of application of laser-driven flyer in spalling was carried out for both brittle and ductile materials. The impact pressure was calculated based on the Hugoniot data. The amount of spalling was not only related to the impact pressure but also related to the duration of impact pressure. The fractography of spalled fracture surface was studied and revealed that the fracture mode was related to the strain rate. The spall strength of Cu 110, Al 1100 and Ni 201was measured and was consistent with the literature data.

  18. Composite Aluminum-Copper Sheet Material by Friction Stir Welding and Cold Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, S.; Osikowicz, W.

    2013-08-01

    An aluminum alloy and a pure copper material were butt-joined by friction stir welding and subsequently cold rolled. The cold-rolling operation proved to be very advantageous because small voids present after friction stir welding were closed, the interface area per material thickness was enlarged, a thin intermetallic layer was partitioned, and the joint was strengthened by strain hardening. Tensile test specimens fractured in the heat-affected zone in the aluminum material; tensile strengths of the joints exceeded the tensile strengths of the base materials and were as high as 335 MPa. During soft annealing of the composite material, a 6-8-μm-thick intermetallic layer was grown at the interface. Nevertheless, tensile fracture still occurred in the heat-affected zone of the aluminum material. Electrical resistivity of the joint was smaller than resistivity of the aluminum material. Production of such composite material would result in coiled sheet material that could be subjected to further treatments such as electroplating and forming operations in an efficient and economically viable manner. The new composite material is promising for emerging automotive and industrial electrical applications.

  19. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Corrosion Characteristics of Welding Zones Welded with 1.25Cr-0.5 Mo Filler Metal to Forged Steel for Piston Crown Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Sung-Yul; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Moon, Kyung-Man [Korea Maritime University, Dong Sam-Dong,Yong Do-ku, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Tae-Sil [Pohang College, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    A heavy oil of low quality has been mainly used in the diesel engine of the merchant ship as the oil price has been significantly jumped for several years. Thus, a combustion chamber of the engine has been often exposed to severely corrosive environment more and more because temperature of the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber has been getting higher and higher with increasing of using the heavy oil of low quality. As a result, wear and corrosion of the engine parts such as exhaust valve, piston crown and cylinder head surrounded with combustion chamber are more serious compared to the other parts of the engine. Therefore, an optimum repair welding for these engine parts is very important to prolong their lifetime in a economical point of view. In this study, 1.25Cr-0.5Mo filler metal was welded with SMAW method in the forged steel which would be generally used with piston crown material. And the corrosion properties of weld metal, heat affected and base metal zones were investigated using electrochemical methods such as measurement of corrosion potential, anodic polarization curves, cyclic voltammogram and impedance etc. in 35% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution. The weld metal and base metal zones exhibited the highest and lowest values of hardness respectively. And, the corrosion resistance of the heat affected and weld metal zones was also increased than that of the base metal zone. Furthermore, it appeared that the corrosive products with red color and local corrosion like as a pitting corrosion were more frequently observed on the surface of the base metal zone compared to the heat affected and weld metal zones. Consequently, it is suggested that the mechanical and corrosion characteristics of the piston crown can be predominantly improved by repair welding method using the 1.25Cr-0.5Mo electrode.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Distribution and Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding 2017A Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimouni Oussama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the use of fluid dynamic code, FLUENT to model the flow of metal in the AA2017A case around the welding tool pin (FSW. A standard threaded tool profile is used for the analysis of phenomena during welding such as heat generation and flow of the material are included. The main objective is to gain a better understanding of the flow of material around a tool. The model showed a large number of phenomena similar to those of the real process. The model has also generated a sufficient amount of heat, which leads to a good estimate of the junction temperature. These results were obtained using a viscosity which is near the solidus softening.

  2. Laser Welding Characterization of Kovar and Stainless Steel Alloys as Suitable Materials for Components of Photonic Devices Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhali, M. M. A.; Zainal, Saktioto J.; Munajat, Y.; Jalil, A.; Rahman, R.

    2010-03-01

    The weldability of Kovar and stainless steel alloys by Nd:YAG laser beam is studied through changing of some laser beam parameters. It has been found that there is a suitable interaction of the pulsed laser beam of low power laser pulse with both the two alloys. The change of thermophysical properties with absorbed energy from the laser pulse is discussed in this paper which reports the suitability of both Kovar and stainless steel 304 as the base materials for photonic devices packaging. We used laser weld system (LW4000S from Newport) which employs Nd:YAG laser system with two simultaneous beams output for packaging 980 nm high power laser module. Results of changing both laser spot weld width and penetration depth with changing both the pulse peak power density, pulse energy and pulse duration show that there are good linear relationships between laser pulse energy or peak power density and pulse duration with laser spot weld dimensions( both laser spot weld width and penetration depth). Therefore we concluded that there should be an optimization for both the pulse peak power and pulse duration to give a suitable aspect ratio (laser spot width to penetration depth) for achieving the desired welds with suitable penetration depth and small spot width. This is to reduce the heat affected zone (HAZ) which affects the sensitive optical components. An optimum value of the power density in the order of 105 w/cm2 found to be suitable to induce melting in the welded joints without vaporization. The desired ratio can also be optimized by changing the focus position on the target material as illustrated from our measurements. A theoretical model is developed to simulate the temperature distribution during the laser pulse heating and predict the penetration depth inside the material. Samples have been investigated using SEM with EDS. The metallographic measurements on the weld spot show a suitable weld yield with reasonable weld width to depth ratio.

  3. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ met

  4. Quantitative ultrasonic testing of acoustically anisotropic materials with verification on austenitic and dissimilar weld joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, C.; Pudovikov, S.; Bulavinov, A.

    2012-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steel materials are widely used in a variety of industry sectors. In particular, the material is qualified to meet the design criteria of high quality in safety related applications. For example, the primary loop of the most of the nuclear power plants in the world, due to high durability and corrosion resistance, is made of this material. Certain operating conditions may cause a range of changes in the integrity of the component, and therefore require nondestructive testing at reasonable intervals. These in-service inspections are often performed using ultrasonic techniques, in particular when cracking is of specific concern. However, the coarse, dendritic grain structure of the weld material, formed during the welding process, is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of ultrasonic Phased Array techniques becomes desirable. The "Sampling Phased Array" technique, invented and developed by Fraunhofer IZFP, allows the acquisition of time signals (A-scans) for each individual transducer element of the array along with fast image reconstruction techniques based on synthetic focusing algorithms. The reconstruction considers the sound propagation from each image pixel to the individual sensor element. For anisotropic media, where the sound beam is deflected and the sound path is not known a-priori, a novel phase adjustment technique called "Reverse Phase Matching" is implemented. By taking into account the anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the weld structure, a ray tracing algorithm for modeling the acoustic wave propagation and calculating the sound propagation time is applied. This technique can be utilized for 2D and 3D real time image reconstruction. The

  5. Investigation of the structure and properties of the material of various zones of the welded joint of the austenitic nitrogen-containing steel upon elastoplastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkunov, E. S.; Putilova, E. A.; Zadvorkin, S. M.; Makarov, A. V.; Pecherkina, N. L.; Kalinin, G. Yu.; Mushnikova, S. Yu.; Fomina, O. V.

    2016-11-01

    The structural, mechanical, and magnetic properties of metal cut out from the welded joint and from the near-weld zone of the welded joint of high-strength nitrogen-containing 04Kh20N6G11M2AFB austenitic steel have been investigated. The behavior of the magnetic parameters of materials under study subjected to various schemes of loading, such as tension, torsion, internal pressure, and combination of tension and torsion have been investigated. It has been established that the metal of the welded joint and near-weld zone of the welded joint, just as the base metal, has a stable phase composition and magnetic properties under various loading conditions. It has been concluded that 04Kh20N6G11M2AFB steel can be used in the fabrication of welded parts and elements of welded constructions that require low magnetization and high stability of magnetic characteristics under the force action.

  6. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  7. A Comparative Study of Material Flow Behavior in Friction Stir Welding Using Laminar and Turbulent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadian, Arun Kumar; Biswas, Pankaj

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding has been quite successful in joining aluminum alloy which has gained importance in almost all industrial sectors over the past two decades. It is a newer technique and therefore needs more attention in many sectors, flow of material being one among them. The material flow pattern actually helps in deciding the parameters required for particular tool geometry. The knowledge of material flow is very significant in removing defects from the weldment. In the work presented in this paper, the flow behavior of AA6061 under a threaded tool has been studied. The convective heat loss has been considered from all the surfaces, and a comparative study has been made with and without the use of temperature-dependent properties and their significance in the finite volume method model. The two types of models that have been implemented are turbulent and laminar models. Their thermal histories have been studied for all the cases. The material flow velocity has been analyzed to predict the flow of material. A swirl inside the weld material has been observed in all the simulations.

  8. A simple methodology for predicting laser-weld properties from material and laser parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, D. B.; Iammi, J.; Folkes, J.

    2011-11-01

    In laser material processing, understanding the laser interaction and the effect of processing parameters on this interaction is fundamental to any process if the system is to be optimized. Expanding this to different materials or other laser systems with different beam characteristics makes this interaction more complex and difficult to resolve. This work presents a relatively simple physical model to understand these interactions in terms of mean surface enthalpy values derived from both material parameters and laser parameters. From these fundamental properties the melt depth and width for any material can be predicted using a simple theory. By considering the mean enthalpy of the surface, the transition from conduction limited melting to keyholing can also be accurately predicted. The theory is compared to experimental results and the predicted and observed data are shown to correspond well for these experimental results as well as for published results for stainless steel and for a range of metals. The results suggest that it is important to keep the Fourier number of the weld much smaller than one to make it efficient. It is also discussed that the surface enthalpy could be used to prodict other effects in the weld such as porosity and material expulsion.

  9. Metallic layered composite materials produced by explosion welding: Structure, properties, and structure of the transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal'tseva, L. A.; Tyushlyaeva, D. S.; Mal'tseva, T. V.; Pastukhov, M. V.; Lozhkin, N. N.; Inyakin, D. V.; Marshuk, L. A.

    2014-10-01

    The structure, morphology, and microhardness of the transition zone in multilayer metallic composite joints are studied, and the cohesion strength of the plates to be joined, the mechanical properties of the formed composite materials, and fracture surfaces are analyzed. The materials to be joined are plates (0.1-1 mm thick) made of D16 aluminum alloy, high-strength maraging ZI90-VI (03Kh12N9K4M2YuT) steel, BrB2 beryllium bronze, and OT4-1 titanium alloy. Composite materials made of different materials are shown to be produced by explosion welding. The dependence of the interface shape (smooth or wavelike) on the physicomechanical properties of the materials to be joined is found. The formation of a wavelike interface is shown to result in the formation of intense-mixing regions in transition zones. Possible mechanisms of layer adhesion are discussed.

  10. The results and analysis of irradiation experiments conducted on reactor vessel plate and weld materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biemiller, E.C. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States); Carter, R.G.; Rosinski, S.T. [Electric Power Research Inst., Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This paper documents the extensive amount of experimental work on radiation damage to reactor vessel materials carried out by Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) and others in support of a licensing effort to restart the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. The effect of plate nickel content and microstructure on irradiation damage sensitivity was assessed. Typical reactor pressure vessel plate materials each containing 0.24% (by weight) copper, but different nickel contents at 0.19% and 0.63% were heat treated to produce different microstructures. A Linde 80 weld containing 0.30% copper and 1.00% nickel was produced and heat treated to test microstructure effects on the irradiation response of weld metal. Materials taken from plate surface locations (vs 1/4%) were included to test whether or not the improved toughness properties of the plate surface layer, resulting from a rapid quench, is maintained after irradiation. Irradiations were conducted at two irradiation temperatures, 500 F (260 C) and 550 F (288 C), to determine the effect of irradiation temperature on embrittlement. The results of this irradiation testing and additional data from a DOE/Sandia National Laboratories irradiation study show an irradiation temperature effect that is not consistent, but varies with the materials tested. The test results demonstrate that for nickel bearing steels, the superior toughness of plate surface material is maintained even after irradiation to high fluences, and for the copper content tested, nickel has little effect on irradiation response. A mixed effect of microstructure/heat treatment on the materials` irradiation response was noted. Phosphorus potentially played a role in the irradiation response of the low nickel material irradiated at 500 F (288 C) but did not show prominence in the irradiations for the same material conducted at 500 F (260 C).

  11. Material flow analysis in dissimilar friction stir welding of AA2024 and Ti6Al4V butt joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BuffaGianluca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex material flow occurring during the weld of dissimilar AA2024 to Ti6Al4V butt and lap joints was highlighted through a dedicated numerical model able to take into account the effects of the different materials as well as the phase transformation of the used titanium alloy.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Similar and Dissimilar Materials Welding Process; Quantifications of Temperature, Stress, Strain and Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit Shrestha

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, 3 Dimensional welding simulation was carried out in the FE software ANSYS in order to predict temperature, stress, strain and deformation in the joining of similar and dissimilar materials. The numerical simulation shows that temperature exceeds well above the melting temperature of the substrate material in the welding region. It is found that, higher residual stress is distributed in the weld bead area and surrounding heat affected zone. The stress and strain distribution patterns in the specimen showed that both tended to concentrate at or near points of application of thermal load, and were generally not uniform in these areas. It is also found that Stress and strain were concentrated at corners, edges, and other areas of abrupt change in the shape of the specimen and was also not uniform where the cross-section of the structure changed suddenly, and had large gradients at localized points. The deformation was found maximum at the beginning and the end of welding direction (Y-axis and minimum at the ends of X-axis as they are simply supported in both ends. In addition, among the six different cases of similar and dissimilar materials (S40C+S40C, STS304+STS304, STS316L+STS316L, S40C+STS304, S40C+STS316L, STS304+STS316L, the minimum temperature was found in S40C+STS304 whereas the maximum temperature was S40C+STS316L; the minimum stress was found in case of S40C+STS304 and maximum stress was found in 40C+STS316L; the minimum strain was found in case of S40C+STS304 and maximum strain was found in STS304+STS304; the minimum deformation was found in S40C+S40C and maximum in S40C+STS316L.The prediction show qualitative good agreement with the experimental results found in the literature and hence it was confirmed that the method of finite elements has proved to be successful for proper design analysis.

  13. Testing of New Materials and Computer Aided Optimization of Process Parameters and Clamping Device During Predevelopment of Laser Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidinger, Peter; Günther, Kay; Fitzel, Martin; Logvinov, Ruslan; Ilin, Alexander; Ploshikhin, Vasily; Hugger, Florian; Mann, Vincent; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    The necessity for weight reduction in motor vehicles in order to save fuel consumption pushes automotive suppliers to use materials of higher strength. Due to their excellent crash behavior high strength steels are increasingly applied in various structures. In this paper some predevelopment steps for a material change from a micro alloyed to dual phase and complex phase steels of a T-joint assembly are displayed. Initially the general weldability of the materials regarding pore formation, hardening in the heat affected zone and hot cracking susceptibility is discussed. After this basic investigation, the computer aided design optimization of a clamping device is shown, in which influences of the clamping jaw, the welding position and the clamping forces upon weld quality are presented. Finally experimental results of the welding process are displayed, which validate the numerical simulation.

  14. The effect of adhesive thickness on spot weld-bonded joints of dissimilar materials using finite element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Al-Bahkali

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In present work, the bonded and spot weld-bonded of dissimilar materialsjoints for three dimensional models using the finite element technique werestudied for different adhesive thicknesses. The results show that the stressesin adhesive bonded joints are concentrated at the ends of the overlappedarea. When the spot-welding is combined with the adhesive bonding, thestresses are concentrated at the adhesive bond ends and at both ends of theweld nugget. The results show also that the stresses are more concentratedtowards the material of the lowest melting point. Changing the thickness ofthe adhesive layer for various dissimilar material models give us the optimalthickness for each case that one can use in designing lap joints of twodissimilar materials. The results in general show that the thinner the adhesiveis, the higher is the peak stresses developed in the weld-bonded joint.

  15. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, M.; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11-14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge® software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within 4%, and the position of the joint interface to within 10%, of the experimental results.

  16. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, Michael; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Yuri

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11–14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge* software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within percent, and the position of the joint interface to within 10 percent, of the experimental results.

  17. Exploring material flow in friction stir welding using stacked structure of 2024 and 606 1 aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马正斌; 董春林; 李继忠; 陈巍; 栾国红

    2014-01-01

    An experimental technique based on stacked structures was developed to observe the material flow behavior ofthe friction stir welding (FSW)process.Analysis ofsection views along different directions revealed important new details ofthe material flow in FSW process.In this work,a general flow model ofFSW was constructed based on the analysis ofdifferent static section views ofstacked structure weld.The formation ofonion rings was found to be a geometric effect due to layered deposition and the extrusion occurred at the interface between flow arm (FA)and stirring zone (SZ).

  18. Creep performance of welded pipe material made of 7CrMoVTiB10-10 (T/P24) steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantala, Juhani; Auerkari, Pertti; Salonen, Jorma; Holmstroem, Stefan; Nevasmaa, Pekka [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Haekkilae, Juha [Foster Wheeler Energia, Varkaus (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    The creep strength of welded low-alloy ferritic steels is typically somewhat lower than that for parent metal, but this is generally due to an inherent weakness of the heat affected zone and accounted for in the common design codes. However, the parent material strength is much higher in certain modern low alloy steels such as 7CrMoVTiB10-10 (P24), and then it can be a significant challenge to develop weld metals (welding consumables) to match this strength. Acceptable weld performance has been previously demonstrated for thin-wall tubes where sufficient mixing with the base material can occur. The objective of this work was to achieve satisfactory properties for a thick-wall welded pipe by using an Nb-modified consumable to avoid weld metal weakening due to arc losses of Ti of a consumable composition approximately matching the base material. A considerable improvement was indeed noted in comparison with earlier experience using matching electrode composition. All short term test results for weld qualification showed acceptable properties, the cross-weld creep strength remain very close to the -20% band from the parent metal creep strength. However, creep testing at lowest stress levels approaching those expected in service resulted in weld metal failure. Although a clear improvement is evident from the previous generation of weld metals, there appears to be some further scope of development of the welding consumables, to improve the long term creep ductility of the welded joints particularly when applying production-like welding parameters. (orig.)

  19. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  20. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  1. Effect of viscosity on material behavior in friction stir welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-wu; ZHANG Zhao; BIE Jun; ZHOU Lei; CHEN Jin-tao

    2006-01-01

    Temperature-dependent elastic viscoplastic material model was used for the numerical simulation of the friction stir welding process. The non-elastic response of the rate-dependent material in the large deformation problems was calculated by using the closest point algorithm. The numerical results show that the shape of the equivalent plastic strain looks like onion rings and the spacing of the rings is approximately equal to the forward movement of the tool in one rotation. The equivalent plastic strain is increased with the increase of viscosity coefficient due to the increase of friction stress in the pin-plate interface. The region which is influenced by the rotating tool is decreased with the decrease of viscosity coefficient. The radial and circumferential stresses in front of the pin are greater than the ones behind the pin. This difference can be reduced with the decrease of viscosity.

  2. Effects of X-rays Radiation on AISI 304 Stainless Steel Weldings with AISI 316L Filler Material: A Study of Resistance and Pitting Corrosion Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Cárcel-Carrasco

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the effect of low-level ionizing radiation, namely X-rays, on the micro structural characteristics, resistance, and corrosion resistance of TIG-welded joints of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel made using AISI 316L filler rods. The welds were made in two different environments: natural atmospheric conditions and a closed chamber filled with inert argon gas. The influence of different doses of radiation on the resistance and corrosion characteristics of the welds is analyzed. Welded material from inert Ar gas chamber TIG showed better characteristics and lesser irradiation damage effects.

  3. An Assessment of the Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Analysis of Dissimilar Material Welded Joint between Alloy 617 and 12Cr Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Waqar Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most effective method to reduce CO2 gas emission from the steam power plant is to improve its performance by elevating the steam temperature to more than 700 °C. For this, it is necessary to develop applicable materials at high temperatures. Ni-based Alloy 617 and 12Cr steel are used in steam power plants, due to their remarkable mechanical properties, high corrosion resistance, and creep strength. However, since Alloy 617 and 12Cr steel have different chemical compositions and thermal and mechanical properties, it is necessary to develop dissimilar material welding technologies. Moreover, in order to guarantee the reliability of dissimilar material welded structures, the assessment of mechanical and metallurgical properties, fatigue strength, fracture mechanical analysis, and welding residual stress analysis should be conducted on dissimilar material welded joints. In this study, first, multi-pass dissimilar material welding between Alloy 617 and 12Cr steel was performed under optimum welding conditions. Next, mechanical properties were assessed, including the static tensile strength, hardness distribution, and microstructural analysis of a dissimilar material welded joint. The results indicated that the yield strength and tensile strength of the dissimilar metal welded joint were higher than those of the Alloy 617 base metal, and lower than those of the 12Cr steel base metal. The hardness distribution of the 12Cr steel side was higher than that of Alloy 617 and the dissimilar material weld metal zone. It was observed that the microstructure of Alloy 617 HAZ was irregular austenite grain, while that of 12Cr steel HAZ was collapsed martensite grain, due to repeatable heat input during multi-pass welding.

  4. Fine structure at the diffusion welded interface of Fe3Al/Q235 dissimilar materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wang Juan; Li Yajiang; Wu Huiqiang

    2001-12-01

    The interface of Fe3Al/Q235 dissimilar materials joint, which was made by vacuum diffusion welding, combines excellently. There are Fe3Al, FeAl phases and -Fe (Al) solid solution at the interface of Fe3Al/Q235. Aluminum content decreases from 28% to 1.5% and corresponding phase changes from Fe3Al with DO3 type body centred cubic (bcc) structure to -Fe (Al) solid solution with B2 type bcc structure. All phases are present in sub-grain structure level and there is no obvious brittle phases or micro-defects such as pores and cracks at the interface of Fe3Al/Q235 diffusion joint.

  5. Modeling of AA5083 Material-Microstructure Evolution During Butt Friction-Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    B. Clausen, and K. An, In Situ Neutron Diffraction Measurements of Temperature and Stresses During Friction Stir Welding of 6061 -T6 Aluminium Alloy...Analytical Modelling of Friction Stir Welding, INALCO98: Seventh International Conference on Joints in Aluminium , M.J. Russell and R. Shercliff R, Ed...Fujii, M. Maeda, and K. Nogi, Tensile Fracture Location Characterisation of Friction Stir Welded Joints of Different Aluminium Alloys, J. Mater. Sci

  6. History of Resistance Welding Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Cladding and other High Temperature Materials at Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Zirker; Nathan Jerred; Dr. Indrajit Charit; James Cole

    2012-03-01

    Research proposal 08-1079, 'A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding Materials for AFCI/GNEP,' was funded in 2008 under an Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Research and Development Funding Opportunity, number DE-PS07-08ID14906. Th proposal sought to conduct research on joining oxide dispersion strengthen (ODS) tubing material to a solid end plug. This document summarizes the scientific and technical progress achieved during the project, which ran from 2008 to 2011.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Three-Dimensional (3-D) Material Flow Pattern in Thick Dissimilar 2050 Friction-Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avettand-Fènoël, Marie-Noëlle; Taillard, Roland; Laye, Julien; Odièvre, Thierry

    2014-02-01

    The current microstructural investigation performed at various scales deals with the three-dimensional (3-D) material flow in thick dissimilar Airware™ 2050 friction-stir butt welds (Airware, Newport Beach, CA) because of the scarcity of the results obtained with thicker than 8 mm joints and the lack of detailed interpretation of features in the longitudinal direction. An additional originality consists in the study of material flow under the probe tip. In the current case of thick plates, the variation of local temperature along the weld depth is of key importance for the material flow. Indeed, it governs the slight difference of local mechanical behavior between both materials and therefore the shift of the interface, which was clearly put into evidence by means of a difference of Mn content as small as 0.3 pct between both alloys. This importance of temperature for the malleability also entails the pear shape of the nugget as well as a change of grains orientation along the depth in the thermomechanically affected zone. Due to the modification of tool-material adhesion with temperature, a new phenomenological model of material flow for thick friction-stir welds is proposed. In accordance with their difference of origin, the coexistence of onion rings and serrated interface is also highlighted.

  8. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  9. A Review: Welding Of Dissimilar Metal Alloys by Laser Beam Welding & Friction Stir Welding Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Deepika Harwani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Welding of dissimilar metals has attracted attention of the researchers worldwide, owing to its many advantages and challenges. There is no denial in the fact that dissimilar welded joints offer more flexibility in the design and production of the commercial and industrial components. Many welding techniques have been analyzed to join dissimilar metal combinations. The objective of this paper is to review two such techniques – Laser welding and Friction stir welding. Laser beam welding, a high power density and low energy-input process, employs a laser beam to produce welds of dissimilar materials. Friction stir welding, a solid-state joining process, is also successfully used in dissimilar welding applications like aerospace and ship building industries. This paper summarizes the trends and advances of these two welding processes in the field of dissimilar welding. Future aspects of the study are also discussed.

  10. Influence of Material Model on Prediction Accuracy of Welding Residual Stress in an Austenitic Stainless Steel Multi-pass Butt-Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dean; Zhang, Chaohua; Pu, Xiaowei; Liang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Both experimental method and numerical simulation technology were employed to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a SUS304 steel multi-pass butt-welded joint in the current study. The main objective is to clarify the influence of strain hardening model and the yield strength of weld metal on prediction accuracy of welding residual stress. In the experiment, a SUS304 steel butt-welded joint with 17 passes was fabricated, and the welding residual stresses on both the upper and bottom surfaces of the middle cross section were measured. Meanwhile, based on ABAQUS Code, an advanced computational approach considering different plastic models as well as annealing effect was developed to simulate welding residual stress. In the simulations, the perfect plastic model, the isotropic strain hardening model, the kinematic strain hardening model and the mixed isotropic-kinematic strain hardening model were employed to calculate the welding residual stress distributions in the multi-pass butt-welded joint. In all plastic models with the consideration of strain hardening, the annealing effect was also taken into account. In addition, the influence of the yield strength of weld metal on the simulation result of residual stress was also investigated numerically. The conclusions drawn by this work will be helpful in predicting welding residual stresses of austenitic stainless steel welded structures used in nuclear power plants.

  11. Multi-Criteria Optimization in Friction Stir Welding Using a Thermal Model with Prescribed Material Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Deb, Kalyanmoy; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is an innovative solid-state joining process providing products with superior mechanical properties. It utilizes a rotating tool being submerged into the joint line and traversed while stirring the two pieces of metal together to form the weld. The temperature distribu...

  12. Investigation of Using Waste Welded Tuff Material as Mineral Filler in Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebnem KARAHANCER

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the welded tuff waste- known as koyke in Isparta region - was used in the hot mix asphalt (HMA as mineral filler for reduction of the moisture susceptibility of HMA. Optimum binder content was assessed with Marshall Design Method. First of all, welded tuff was substituted as filler with limestone filler in proportion of 50% and 100%. After that Marshall Stability test was performed on specimens. The results showed that the 50% substitution was more effective than the 100% substitution. Therefore, welded tuff was substituted with limestone filler in proportion of 25%, 50%, 65% and 75%. Next, Indirect Tensile Strength test was practiced on the fabricated specimens and the results were assessed. According to the Indirect Tensile Strength results, welded tuff with 65% was given higher strength than the limestone filler. As a result, it has come up that welded tuff can be used as mineral filler in the hot mix asphalt.

  13. Guidelines for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    in a large void at the termination point of the weld, the effects the exit hole will have on structural integrity must be considered. The...3.6 Cavity. A void -type discontinuity within a solid-state weld. See Figure 3.4. 3.7 Complex weld joint. A continuous weld...except as affected by corner radii. 3.61 Underfill . A depression resulting when the weld face is below the adjacent parent material surface. See

  14. Preliminary stress corrosion cracking modeling study of a dissimilar material weld of alloy (INCONEL) 182 with Stainless Steel 316

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel, E-mail: ofaly@ipen.br, E-mail: mmattar@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M., E-mail: monicas@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Dissimilar welds (DW) are normally used in many components junctions in structural project of PWR (Pressurized Water Reactors) in Nuclear Plants. One had been departed of a DW of a nozzle located at a Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) of a PWR reactor, that joins the structural vessel material with an A316 stainless steel safe end. This weld is basically done with Alloy 182 with a weld buttering of Alloy 82. It had been prepared some axial cylindrical specimens retired from the Alloy 182/A316 weld end to be tested in the slow strain rate test machine located at CDTN laboratory. Based in these stress corrosion susceptibility results, it was done a preliminary semi-empirical modeling application to study the failure initiation time evolution of these specimens. The used model is composed by a deterministic part, and a probabilistic part according to the Weibull distribution. It had been constructed a specific Microsoft Excel worksheet to do the model application of input data. The obtained results had been discussed according with literature and also the model application limits. (author)

  15. Investigations of Spot Weld Material Characterization for Hat Beam Component Impact Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Patil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With a greater emphasis placed on weight reduction the ground vehicle industry has increased the use of higher strength, thinner gage steels, particularly cold rolled high strength steels (HSS. Choice of a particular HSS will depend upon such factors as cost, formability, fatigue resistance and weldability, in particular spot weldability. Vehicle collision characteristics significantly influenced by spot welded joints in vehicle steel body components.In engineering practice, spot welds are normally not modeled in detail, but as connection elements which transfer forces and moments. Therefore a proper methodology for the development detailed weld model to study structural response of the weld when the applied load range is beyond the yield strength discussed in this paper. Three-dimensional finite element (FE models of spot welded joints are developed using LS-Dyna. Simple spot weld models are developed based on the detailed model behavior developed earlier. In order to generate testing data, virtual tensile testing simulations are carried out with mesh sensitivity in the necking zone. This high mesh resolution around necking zone is required to capture the steep gradients in the pressure and stress tri-axility, etc. Once the stress strain curve are generated in the simulations examined damage function and evolution to represent failure. Various EHSS steels grades used in this study. The results from this study shows reasonable agreement between the simulations and the test results. Hence, spot weld model obtained should be considered for crash analysis applications to understand behaviors of structural parts.

  16. Recent Corrosion Research Trends in Weld Joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwan Tae; Kil, Sang Cheol [Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Woon Suk [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The increasing interest in the corrosion properties of weld joints in the corrosive environment is placing stringent demands on the manufacturing techniques and performance requirements, and the manufacture employs the high quality and efficiency welding process to produce welds. Welding plays an important role in the fabrication of chemical plants, nuclear power plant, ship construction, and this has led to an increasing attention to the corrosion resistant weld joints. This paper covers recent technical trends of welding technologies for corrosion resistance properties including the COMPENDEX DB analysis of welding materials, welding process, and welding fabrications

  17. SANS response of VVER440-type weld material after neutron irradiation, post-irradiation annealing and reirradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ulbricht, Andreas; Bergner, Frank; Boehmert, Juergen; Valo, Matti; Mathon, Marie-Helene; Heinemann, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Abstract It is well accepted that the reirradiation behaviour of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel after annealing can be different from the original irradiation behaviour. We present the first small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of neutron irradiated, annealed and reirradiated VVER440-type RPV weld material. The SANS results are analysed both in terms of the size distribution of irradiation-induced defect/solute atom clusters and in terms of the ratio of total and nuclea...

  18. 3D modeling of material flow and temperature in Friction Stir Welding Modelagem 3D do fluxo de material e da temperatura na soldagem "Friction Stir"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Santiago

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The process of Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a welding method developed by the "The Welding Institute" (TWI of England in 1991. The welding equipment consists of a tool that rotates and progresses along the joint of two restrained sheets. The joint is produced by frictional heating which causes the softening of both components into a viscous-plastic condition and also by the resultant flow between the sheets to be joined. Numerical Modeling of the process can provide realistic prediction of the main variables of the process, reducing the number of experimental tests, thus accelerating the design processes while reducing costs and optimizing the involved technological variables. In this study the friction stir welding process is modeled using a general purpose finite element based program, reproducing the material thermal map and the corresponding mass flow. Numerical thermal results are compared against experimental thermographic maps and numerical material flow results are compared with material flow visualization techniques, with acceptable concordance.O processo denominado "Friction Stir Welding" (FSW é um método de soldagem desenvolvido pelo "The Welding Institute" (TWI na Inglaterra em 1991. O equipamento de soldagem consiste de uma ferramenta que gira e avança ao longo da interface entre duas chapas fixas. A junção é produzida pelo calor gerado por fricção o qual causa o amolecimento de ambos os componentes atingindo uma condição visco-plástica e também pelo escoamento resultante entre as laminas a ser unidas. A modelagem numérica do processo pode fornecer uma predição real das principais variáveis do processo, reduzindo o número de testes experimentais, acelerando, portanto os processos de projeto ao mesmo tempo em que reduz custos e permite a otimização das variáveis tecnológicas envolvidas. Neste trabalho, o processo de soldagem por fricção é modelado empregando um programa de propósito geral baseado no m

  19. Irradiation-induced structural changes in surveillance material of VVER 440-type weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, M.; Denner, V.; Böhmert, J.; Mathon, M.-H.

    2000-01-01

    The irradiation-induced microstructural changes in surveillance materials of the VVER 440-type weld metal Sv-10KhMFT were investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and anomalous small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Due to the high fluence, a strong effect was found in the SANS experiment. No significant effect of the irradiation is detected by SAXS. The reason for this discrepancy is the different scattering contrast of irradiation-induced defects for neutrons and X-rays. An analysis of the SAXS shows that the scattering intensity is mainly caused by vanadium-containing (VC) precipitates and grain boundaries. Both types of scattering defects are hardly changed by irradiation. Neutron irradiation rather produces additional scattering defects of a few nanometers in size. Assuming these defects are clusters containing copper and other foreign atoms with a composition according to results of atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) investigations, both the high SANS and the low SAXS effect can be explained.

  20. Flux dependence of cluster formation in neutron-irradiated weld material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, F.; Ulbricht, A.; Hein, H.; Kammel, M.

    2008-03-01

    The effect of neutron flux on the formation of irradiation-induced clusters in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is an unresolved issue. Small-angle neutron scattering was measured for a neutron-irradiated RPV weld material containing 0.22 wt% impurity Cu. The experiment was focused on the influence of neutron flux on the formation of irradiation-induced clusters at fixed fluence. The aim was to separate and tentatively interpret the effect of flux on the characteristics of the cluster size distribution. We have observed a pronounced effect of neutron flux on cluster size, whereas the total volume fraction of irradiation-induced clusters is insensitive to the level of flux. The result is compatible with a rate theory model according to which the range of applied fluxes covers the transition from a flux-independent regime at lower fluxes to a regime of decelerating cluster growth. The results are confronted with measured irradiation-induced changes of mechanical properties. Despite the observed flux effect on cluster size, both yield stress increase and transition temperature shift turned out to be independent of flux. This is in agreement with the volume fraction of irradiation-induced clusters being insensitive to the level of flux.

  1. Simplified approaches for the numerical simulation of welding processes with filler material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmignani, B.; Toselli, G. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    Due to the very high computation times, required by the methodologies pointed out during the studies carried out at ENEA-Bologna concerning the numerical simulations of welds with filler material of steel pieces of high thickness (studies presented also at the 12. and 13. International ABAQUS Users' Conferences), new simplified methodologies have been proposed and applied to an experimental model of significant dimensions. (These studies are of interest in the nuclear field for the construction of the toroidal field coil case, TFCC, for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor, ITER machine). In this paper these new methodologies are presented together the obtained results, which have been compared, successfully, with the ones obtained by the use of the previous numerical methodologies considered and also with the corresponding experimental measures. These new calculation techniques are in course of application for the simulation of welds of pieces constituting a real component of ITER TF coil case. [Italian] A causa dei tempi di calcolo molto elevati richiesti dalle metodologie individuate e messe a punto durante gli studi eseguiti in ENEA-Bologna riguardanti le simulazioni numeriche di saldature, con apporto di materiale, di pezzi di acciaio di grande spessore (studi presentati anche alle precedenti Conferenze Utenti ABAQUS, 12{sup 0} e 13{sup 0} ABAQUS Users' Conferences), sono state cercate e proposte nuove metodologie semplificate, che sono state poi applicate ad un modello sperimentale di dimensioni significative. (Si ricorda che questi studi sono di interesse nel campo nucleare per la costruzione delle casse per contenere le bobine che daranno luogo al campo magnetico della macchina ITER, reattore internazione sperimentale termonucleare). Nel lavoro qui presentato sono descritte queste nuove metodologie e sono riportati i risultati ottenuti dalla loro applicazione unitamente ai confronti (abbastanza soddisfacenti) con i risultati

  2. Equipment for Solid State Stir Welding of High Temperature Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stir welding generates high-quality joints in fabricated structure and is the baseline joining process for most NASA aluminum alloy structures such as cryogenic...

  3. Investigations of Spot Weld Material Characterization for Hat Beam Component Impact Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sachin Patil; Hamid Lankarani

    2016-01-01

    With a greater emphasis placed on weight reduction the ground vehicle industry has increased the use of higher strength, thinner gage steels, particularly cold rolled high strength steels (HSS). Choice of a particular HSS will depend upon such factors as cost, formability, fatigue resistance and weldability, in particular spot weldability. Vehicle collision characteristics significantly influenced by spot welded joints in vehicle steel body components.In engineering practice, spot welds are n...

  4. A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding materials for AFCI/GNEP Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indrajit Charit; Megan Frary; Darryl Butt; K.L. Murty; Larry Zirker; James Cole; Mitchell Meyer; Rajiv S. Mishra; Mark Woltz

    2011-03-31

    This research project involved working on the pressure resistance welding of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys which will have a large role to play in advanced nuclear reactors. The project also demonstrated the research collaboration between four universities and one nation laboratory (Idaho National Laboratory) with participation from an industry for developing for ODS alloys. These alloys contain a high number density of very fine oxide particles that can impart high temperature strength and radiation damage resistance suitable for in-core applications in advanced reactors. The conventional fusion welding techniques tend to produce porosity-laden microstructure in the weld region and lead to the agglomeration and non-uniform distribution of the neededoxide particles. That is why two solid state welding methods - pressure resistance welding (PRW) and friction stir welding (FSW) - were chosen to be evaluated in this project. The proposal is expected to support the development of Advanced Burner Reactors (ABR) under the GNEP program (now incorporated in Fuel Cycle R&D program). The outcomes of the concluded research include training of graduate and undergraduate students and get them interested in nuclear related research.

  5. Simulation of welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Song WU; Michael RETHMEIER; Christopher SCHWENK

    2011-01-01

    @@ Welding has become the most important materials processing technology in manufacturing, and has critical effects on the quality, reliability and life of products as well as production cost, efficiency and response speed to market.As various kinds of high performance metallic materials are widely used in engineering, there are more demands in manufacturing industry for advanced welding technology.

  6. Structure and mechanical properties of a multilayer carbide-hardened niobium composite material fabricated by diffusion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhov, V. P.; Ershov, A. E.; Stroganova, T. S.; Prokhorov, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    The structure, the bending strength, and the fracture mechanism of an artificial niobium-based composite material, which is fabricated by high-pressure diffusion welding of multilayer stacks assembled from niobium foils with a two-sided carbon coating, are studied. The microstructure of the composite material is found to consist of alternating relatively plastic layers of the solid solution of carbon in niobium and hardening niobium carbide layers. The room-temperature proportional limit of the developed composite material is threefold that of the composite material fabricated from coating-free niobium foils using the proposed technology. The proportional limit of the developed composite material and the stress corresponding to the maximum load at 1100°C are 500 and 560 MPa, respectively. The developed material is considered as an alternative to Ni-Al superalloys.

  7. Numerical modelling of liquid material flow in the fusion zone of hybrid welded joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kubiak

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns modelling of liquid metal motion in the fusion zone of laser-arc hybrid butt-welded plate. Velocity field in the fusion zone and temperature field in welded plate were obtained on the basis of the solution of mass, momentum and energy conservationsequations. Differential equations were solved using Chorin’s projection method and finite volume method. Melting and solidificationprocesses were taken into account in calculations assuming fuzzy solidification front where fluid flow is treated as a flow through porous medium. Double-ellipsoidal heat source model was used to describe electric arc and laser beam heat sources. On the basis of developed solution algorithms simulation of hybrid welding process was performed and the influence of liquid metal motion in the fusion zone on the results of calculations was analyzed.

  8. Experimental Research Of Charged Particles Streams, Emitted From Area Of Eb Acting On Material, In Order To Estimate The Possibilities Of Using Them To Eb Welding Control

    CERN Document Server

    Olszewska, K

    2001-01-01

    The basic parameters of electron beam (EB) welding process are position and dimensions of so called EB active zone. Wrong position of active zone make impossible to obtain desirable shape of a weld and may cause various defects of a weld. Relatively reach source of information about EB welding process are charged particles emitted from the area of EB acting on material. The measurements of various types of signals for the three largest groups of charged particles: back-scattered electrons, really secondary electrons and ions were carried out. It was estimated that practically none of them could be used directly in procedures of EB active zone position control. It is result of ambiguous of information, they contain and susceptibility to interferences or impossibility of real time data acquisition. Using the neural networks can solve this problem. The computer simulations of various models of neural networks were done. The best result was obtained for network, which has as input signals: accelerating voltage, E...

  9. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  10. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  11. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  12. Numerical Simulation of the Inertia Friction Welding Process of Dissimilar Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hadek, Medhat A.

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional axisymmetric finite element analyses have been performed to analyze the coupled thermo-mechanical oscillatory transient problem of friction welding of two dissimilar hollow cylinders. The analysis included the effect of conduction and convection heat transfer implementing three independent variables specifically the welding time, the rotational velocity, and the thrust pressure. Experimental evaluation of the non-linear copper and Aluminum 6061 stress-strain responses, the thermal conductivities, and the specific heat coefficients were conducted using an environmental-controlled compartment for at least four different temperatures. These results were incorporated in the finite element model calculating a real joint transient temperature distribution and a full field view of the residual stresses in weldment. Variables of angular rotational velocity of (200, 400, and 600 rpm), thrust pressure of (10E5, 10E6, and 10E7 Pa), and total welding time of (1, 2, and 4 seconds) were used in the model simulation. The optimum welding conditions were selected using Taguchi method. Finally, the deformation shape predicted by the finite element simulations was compared to the deformations obtained by the experimental results.

  13. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  14. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  15. New technology for production of granular adding material with nanomodifying additives for steel arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLDYREV Alexander Mikhaylovich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemical analysis of metal seam showed that introduction of titanium dioxide with MCA intensifies transition of Al2O3 from slag into metal pool and provides double concentration of titanium in the seam compared to the one which appears in the interaction of bathtub with melted flux AH-47 without TiO2 additives. The presence of oxides of titanium and aluminium of endogenous origin in the melt leads to formation of refractory particles with the center of TiO2 and Al2O3 in it. These particles are the centers of crystallization in the tail part of the molten pool and they remain in seam metal in the form of evenly distributed fine nonmetallic inclusions, which have crystallographic affinity with a matrix (α-iron. That provides the fine-grained seam structure with the raised and stable strength characteristics. This article compares the existing and developed technologies for production of MCA. The granulometric analysis of the powder TiO2 has demonstrated that when MCA is processed in the planetary mill, particles of titanium dioxide are crushed to a nanodimensional order. It is shown that the preparation of MCA in high-energy planetary mill (due to double increase of durability in coupling of the modifier with granulate provides its stable structure, increases the cold resistance (20–25% and stability of strength characteristics along the length of welded seam. Metalgraphic researches determined that the fine-grained structure which linear size of grain is twice smaller than the one obtained in the old technology welding is formed in a seam. However the direct introduction of nanomodifiers in a molten pool through the flux or an electrode wire is not efficient because of their deactivation and high temperature in welding zone. Therefore it was offered to use modifiers in the mix with the cooling macroparticles in case of automatic welding of a bridge metalware under flux using metalchemical additive (MCA. The MCA consists of a chopped

  16. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  17. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  18. Materials development for waste-to-energy plants. New materials for overlay welding. Final report; Udvikling af materialer til affaldsforbraending - Nye materialer til overlagssvejsning. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skat Tiedje, N.

    2010-07-01

    This part of the project was to develop a method for rapid benchmarking of new alloys for overlay welding and to apply the method in combination with thermodynamic modeling of microstructures in welded Ni-based alloys. Based on these analyses new, improved alloys were to be developed to be produced in the laboratory and tested using the benchmarking method. Accelerated electrochemical tests proved to be difficult, and the method that was chosen was unreliable. There were two reasons for this. 1: It was difficult to obtain stable experimental conditions in the measuring cell. 2: The sample geometry and various uncontrolled chemical reactions within the welding and in the salt melt surface. The problems of achieving stability turned out to be an Achilles' heel in this part of the project, and it was the cause of significant delays. Thermodynamic modeling gave a number of interesting results, including the coupling between the content of iron and carbon and in terms of how the various alloying elements segregate in the material. The method alone does not tell anything about the risk of corrosion. Here the coupling to the electrostatic experiments were missing which should give information about the phases of greatest importance for corrosion. Calculations of the chemical equilibrium between the alloying elements, oxygen, and chlorine show that all metals react with both chlorine and oxygen at 450 to 500 deg. C. Oxides are the most stable reaction products viz. that once they are formed, they do not participate in further chemical reactions. (LN)

  19. Friction stir welding of copper alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Shuhua; Liu Meng; Wang Deqing; Xu Zhenyue

    2007-01-01

    Copper plates,brass plates and copper/brass plates were friction stir welded with various parameters. Experimental results show that the microstructure of the weld is characterized by its much finer grains as contrasted with the coarse grains of parent materials and the heat-affected zones are very narrow. The microhardness of the copper weld is a little higher than that of parent plate. The microhardness of brass weld is about 25% higher than that of parent material. The tensile strength of copper joints increases with increasing welding speed in the test range. The range of parameters to obtain good welds for copper is much wider than that for brass. When different materials were welded, the position of copper plate before welding affected the quality of FSW joints. If the copper plate was put on the advancing side of weld, the good quality of weld could be got under proper parameters.

  20. Comparison between hybrid laser-MIG welding and MIG welding for the invar36 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Li, Yubo; Ou, Wenmin; Yu, Fengyi; Chen, Jie; Wei, Yanhong

    2016-11-01

    The invar36 alloy is suitable to produce mold of composite materials structure because it has similar thermal expansion coefficient with composite materials. In the present paper, the MIG welding and laser-MIG hybrid welding methods are compared to get the more appropriate method to overcome the poor weldability of invar36 alloy. According to the analysis of the experimental and simulated results, it has been proved that the Gauss and cone combined heat source model can characterize the laser-MIG hybrid welding heat source well. The total welding time of MIG welding is 8 times that of hybrid laser-MIG welding. The welding material consumption of MIG welding is about 4 times that of hybrid laser-MIG welding. The stress and deformation simulation indicate that the peak value of deformation during MIG welding is 3 times larger than that of hybrid laser-MIG welding.

  1. Friction stir welding process and material microstructure evolution modeling in 2000 and 5000 series of aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalavarthy, Harshavardhan

    Interactions between the rotating and advancing pin-shaped tool (terminated at one end with a circular-cylindrical shoulder) with the clamped welding-plates and the associated material and heat transport during a Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process are studied computationally using a fully-coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element analysis. To surmount potential numerical problems associated with extensive mesh distortions/entanglement, an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation was used which enabled adaptive re-meshing (to ensure the continuing presence of a high-quality mesh) while allowing full tracking of the material free surfaces. To demonstrate the utility of the present computational approach, the analysis is applied to the cases of same-alloy FSW of two Aluminum-alloy grades: (a) AA5083 (a solid-solution strengthened and strain-hardened/stabilized Al-Mg-Mn alloy); and (b) AA2139 (a precipitation hardened quaternary Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy). Both of these alloys are currently being used in military-vehicle hull structural and armor systems. In the case of non-age-hardenable AA5083, the dominant microstructure evolution processes taking place during FSW are extensive plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization of highly-deformed material subjected to elevated temperatures approaching the melting temperature. To account for the competition between plastic-deformation controlled strengthening and dynamic-recrystallization induced softening phenomena during the FSW process, the original Johnson-Cook strain- and strain-rate hardening and temperature-softening material strength model is modified in the present work using the available recrystallization-kinetics experimental data. In the case of AA2139, in addition to plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization, precipitates coarsening, over-aging, dissolution and re-precipitation had to be also considered. Limited data available in the open literature pertaining to the kinetics of the aforementioned

  2. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  3. Explosive welding of pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drennov, O.; Burtseva, O.; Kitin, A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    2006-08-15

    Arrangement of pipelines for the transportation of oil and gas is a complicated problem. In this paper it is suggested to use the explosive welding method to weld pipes together. This method is rather new. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its static analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. We suggest to perform explosive welding according to the following scheme: the ends of the 2 pipes are connected, the external surfaces are kept at a similar level. A cylindrical steel layer of diameter larger than the pipe diameter is set around the pipe joint and an explosive charge is placed on its external surface. The basic problem is the elimination of strains and reduction of pipe diameter in the area of the dynamic effect. The suggestion is to use water as filler: the volume of pipes in the area adjacent to the zone of explosive welding is totally filled with water. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gas dynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water. Model experiments with pipes having radii R = 57 mm confirmed results of the calculations and the possibility in principle to weld pipes by explosion with use of water as filler.

  4. Fully Coupled Thermomechanical Finite Element Analysis of Material Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-03

    Sharma, S. R., and Mishra, R. S. Effect of friction stir processing on the microstructure of cast A356 aluminum . Mater. Sci. Engng A, 2006, 433, 269...J. and Thomas, W. M. Friction stir process welds aluminum alloys. Welding J., 1996, 75, 41–52. 3 Thomas, W. M. and Dolby, R. E. Friction stir welding...273. 8 Su, J. Q., Nelson, T. W., Mishra, R., and Mahoney, M. Microstructural investigation of friction stir welded 7050-T651 aluminum . Acta Mater., 2003

  5. Global and Local Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Friction Stir Welds with Dissimilar Materials and/or Thicknesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadpoor, A.A.; Sinke, J.; Benedictus, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article studies the properties of a wide range of friction-stir-welded joints with dissimilar aluminum alloys or thicknesses. Two aluminum alloys, namely, 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study and are welded in ten different combinations of alloys and thicknesses. The welding paramete

  6. Global and Local Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Friction Stir Welds with Dissimilar Materials and/or Thicknesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadpoor, A.A.; Sinke, J.; Benedictus, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article studies the properties of a wide range of friction-stir-welded joints with dissimilar aluminum alloys or thicknesses. Two aluminum alloys, namely, 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study and are welded in ten different combinations of alloys and thicknesses. The welding

  7. 49 CFR 192.235 - Preparation for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preparation for welding. 192.235 Section 192.235... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.235 Preparation for welding. Before beginning any welding, the welding surfaces must be clean and free of any material...

  8. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  9. CHOSEN PROPERTIES OF SANDWICH MATERIAL Ti-304 STAINLESS STEEL AFTER EXPLOSIVE WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro Ostroushko

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The work deals with evaluation of joint of stainless steel 304 SS (sheet and commercially pure Ti both after welding explosion and followed-up annealing at 600°C/1.5h/air. The bonding line shows sinusoidal character with curls in crest unlike the trough of the sine curve. The heat treatment does not change the character of the interface. In work amplitude, wave length and the interface thickness were measured. Thickness of compressed cladded matrix of Ti was measured in area of crests and troughs. In crest of joint melted zones were studied, where complex oxides and intermetallic phases were revealed.

  10. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...... in the weld causing expulsion of the melt pool. Trailing beams were applied to melt additional material and ensure a melt pool. The method showed good results for increasing tolerances to impurities and reduction of scrapped parts from blowouts during laser welding....

  11. Laser Impact Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Daehn, Glenn S.; Lippold, John; Liu, Deijan; Taber, Geoff; Wang, Huimin

    2012-01-01

    Laser impact welding is a solid-state, collision-based welding process. In this process, laser-generated optical energy is converted to kinetic energy through the ablation at the surface and confinement of the gas generated between a flyer and backing plate. The launch of the flyer can be affected by many factors, for example, backing material, ablative layer, and flyer thickness. In this paper, the effect of three backing materials: glass, polycarbonate and cellophane tape, we...

  12. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarraf, Z.; Lucas, M.

    2012-08-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.

  13. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  14. Simulation of Metal Flow During Friction Stir Welding Based on the Model of Interactive Force Between Tool and Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. Q.; Shi, Q. Y.; Fujiya, Y.; Horie, T.

    2014-04-01

    In this research, the three-dimensional flow of metal in friction stir welding (FSW) has been simulated based on computational fluid dynamics. Conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy were solved in three dimensions. The interactive force was imposed as boundary conditions on the tool/material boundary in the model. The strain rate- and temperature-dependent non-Newtonian viscosity was adopted for the calculation of metal flow. The distribution of temperature, velocity, and strain rate were simulated based on the above models. The simulated temperature distribution agreed well with the experimental results. The simulation results showed that the velocity on the pin was much higher than that on the shoulder. From the comparison between the simulation results and the experiments results, contours line, corresponding to strain rate = 4 s-1, reflected reasonably well the shape of stir zone, especially at the ground portion.

  15. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  16. Magnetic Pulse Welding Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. Jassim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the benefits of using Magnetic Pulse machine which is belong to Non-conventional machine instead of conventional machine. Magnetic Pulse Technology is used for joining dissimilar metals, and for forming and cutting metals. It is a non contact technique. Magnetic field is used to generate impact magnetic pressure for welding and forming the work piece by converted the electrical energy to mechanical energy. It is enable us to design previously not possible by welding dissimilar materials and allowing to welds light and stronger materials together. It can be used to weld metallic with non metallic materials to created mechanical lock on ceramics, polymers, rubbers and composites. It is green process; there is no heat, no radiation, no gas, no smoke and sparks, therefore the emissions are negligible.

  17. Trends in Development of Weld Overlaying During The 21ST Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolov Mitko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present article discusses the trends in the development of welding and weld overlaying on the threshold of the new millennium and during it. It presents the trends in the production of welding materials for welding and weld overlaying in industrially developed and developing countries. The structure of welding methods is also shown, giving priority to its development until 2020.

  18. Weld penetration and defect control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, B.A.

    1992-05-15

    Highly engineered designs increasingly require the use of improved materials and sophisticated manufacturing techniques. To obtain optimal performance from these engineered products, improved weld properties and joint reliability are a necessarily. This requirement for improved weld performance and reliability has led to the development of high-performance welding systems in which pre-programmed parameters are specified before any welding takes place. These automated systems however lack the ability to compensate for perturbations which arise during the welding process. Hence the need for systems which monitor and control the in-process status of the welding process. This report discusses work carried out on weld penetration indicators and the feasibility of using these indicators for on-line penetration control.

  19. Numerical simulation of effect of rotational tool with screw on material flow behavior of friction stir welding of Ti6Al4V alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shude JI; Aili ZOU; Yumei YUE; Guohong LUAN; Yanye JIN; Fu LI

    2012-01-01

    The rotational tool is put forward,which is composed of the one-spiral-flute shoulder and the rotational pin with screw.Using the turbulent model of the FLUENT software,material plastic flow behavior during the process of friction stir welding of Ti6Al4V alloy is researched by the numerical simulation method and then the effect of rotational tool geometry on material flow during the welding process is attained.The results show that the flow direction of the material near the rotational tool is mainly the same as the rotational direction of the tool while the material near tool flows more violently than the other regions.For the tapered rotational pin,the flow velocity of material inside the workpiece decreases with the increase of the distance away from the workpiece surface because of the change of pin diameter.For the rotational tool,the flute added to the shoulder and the screw added to the pin can greatly increase the flow velocity of material during the welding process while the peak value of the flow velocity of material appears on the flute or the screw.Moreover,the rotational tool with the one-spiral-flute shoulder is better than the tool with the concentriccircles-flute shoulder.Decreasing the width of pin screw and increasing the diameter of pin tip are both good for the increase of flow velocity.

  20. Transformation behaviour and residual stresses in welding of new LTT filler materials; Umwandlungsverhalten und Eigenspannungen beim Schweissen neuartiger LTT-Zusatzwerkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kromm, Arne

    2011-07-06

    is seen to occur. This is observed for the considered alloys to be particularly pronounced in transverse direction of the weld. By contrast, the residual stress level in longitudinal weld direction is nearly independent of the shrinkage conditions. With the help of residual stress depth gradients it could be established that the additional shrinkage restraint manifests itself in a parallel shift of the residual stress level in the weld metal. Application of energy-dispersive diffraction methods additionally allowed it for the first time to determine residual stresses in the austenitic phase of the LTT alloy which is present parallel to martensite. Results gained under laboratory conditions mostly need to be verified under real fabrication conditions. For this purpose, a component weld test was performed in a special large-scale testing facility. Under structural shrinkage restraint, the load relieving effect of a specific LTT welding filler material could be proven by means of a pronounced stress reduction duringwelding. Overall, evidence was furnished that the concept of Low Transformation Temperature (LTT)alloys is successful and that the proven austenite-martensite transformation exerts a significanteffect on the residual stress level. [German] Die Erkenntnis, dass die Phasenumwandlung bei der Schweisseigenspannungsentstehung hochfester Staehle eine bedeutende Rolle spielt, gibt es bereits seit langer Zeit. Bisher existierten jedoch keine Ansaetze, diesen Effekt praktisch zur Schweisseigenspannungskontrolle zu nutzen. Neuartige Low Transformation Temperature (LTT) Legierungen bieten aufgrund ihrer charakteristischen chemischen Zusammensetzung die Moeglichkeit, hochfeste Staehle auf deren Festigkeitsniveau zu fuegen. Die martensitische Phasenumwandlung soll zudem eine gezielte Einstellung der Schweisseigenspannungen erlauben. Die im Schrifttum vorliegenden Untersuchungen zu diesem Thema sind zwar zahlreich, bieten jedoch nur wenige Erkenntnisse zur Wechselwirkung

  1. Effect of weld reinforcement on axial plastic buckling of welded steel cylindrical shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chu-lin YU; Zhi-ping CHEN; Ji WANG; Shun-juan YAN; Li-cai YANG

    2012-01-01

    The effect of weld reinforcement on axial plastic buckling of welded steel cylindrical shells is investigated through experimental and numerical buckling analysis using six welded steel cylindrical shell specimens.The relationship between the amplitude of weld reinforcement and the axial plastic buckling critical load is explored.The effect of the material yield strength and the number of circumferential welds on the axial plastic buckling is studied.Results show that circumferential weld reinforcement represents a severe imperfect form of axially compressed welded steel cylindrical shells and the axial plastic buckling critical load decreases with the increment of the mean amplitude of circumferential weld reinforcement.The material yield strength and the number of circumferential welds are found to have no significant effect on buckling waveforms; however,the axial plastic buckling critical load can be decreased to some extent with the increase of the number of circumferential welds.

  2. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  3. Microstructure and fracture behaviour of Ti3Al/TC4 dissimilar materials joints welded by electron beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H T Zhang; H Y Zhao; W X He

    2010-12-01

    Electron beam was used to join TC4 alloy to Ti3Al-based alloy. The composition of the weld was analysed by XRD and TEM and the results showed that the weld mainly composed of ' martensites. The change of heat input had little influence on the composition of the weld but can make the grain size increasing. The fracture path of the joints was mainly decided by the microstructure of the weld and started from coarse grain zone to HAZ and base metal of Ti3Al alloy.

  4. A Study on Process Characteristics and Performance of Hot Wire Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Process for High Temperature Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Padmanaban MR,Anantha; Neelakandan, Baskar; Kandasamy,Devakumaran

    2016-01-01

    Hot wire gas tungsten arc welding (HW-GTAW) process is the one where the filler wire is pre-heated close to its melting point before it is fed in to the arc. The effect of HW-GTAW parameters such as welding current, hot wire current and the wire feed rate during welding of super ASS 304H stainless steel tubes were evaluated in terms of heat input, voltage-current (V-I) characteristics and weld bead characteristics such as bead weight and geometry. The results obtained indicate that for a cons...

  5. Fusion Welding Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    RD-AlSO 253 FUSION WELDING RESEARCH(U) MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH L/I CAMBRIDGE DEPT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING T W EAGAR ET AL. 30 RPR 85...NUMBER 12. GOV’ ACCESSION NO. 3. RECICIE-S CATALOG NUMBER 4. T TL V nd Subtitle) S. P OFRPR PERIOD COVERED 5t h A~nnual Technical Report Fusion Welding ...research S on welding processes. Studies include metal vapors in the arc, development of a high speed infrared temperature monitor, digital signal

  6. Plasticity Theory of Fillet Welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with simple methods for calculation of fillet welds based on the theory of plasticity. In developing the solutions the lower-bound theorem is used. The welding material and parts of the base material are subdivided into triangular regions with homogeneous stress fields; thereby...

  7. Effect of Self-etch Adhesives on Self-sealing Ability of High-Copper Amalgams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Moosavi, Horieh; Moddaber, Maryam; Parvizi, Reza; Moayed, Mohamad Hadi; Mokhber, Nima; Meharry, Michael; B Kazemi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Similar to conventional amalgam, high-copper amalgam alloy may also undergo corrosion, but it takes longer time for the resulting products to reduce microleakage by sealing the micro-gap at the tooth/amalgam interface. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of self-etch adhesives with different pH levels on the interfacial corrosion behavior of high-copper amalgam restoration and its induction potential for self-sealing ability of the micro-gap in the early hours after setting by means of Electro-Chemical Tests (ECTs). Materials and Method: Thirty cylindrical cavities of 4.5mm x 4.7mm were prepared on intact bicuspids. The samples were divided into five main groups of application of Adhesive Resin (AR)/ liner/ None (No), on the cavity floor. The first main group was left without an AR/ liner (No). In the other main groups, the types of AR/ liner used were I-Bond (IB), Clearfil S3 (S3), Single Bond (SB) and Varnish (V). Each main group (n=6) was divided into two subgroups (n=3) according to the types of the amalgams used, either admixed ANA 2000 (ANA) or spherical Tytin (Tyt). The ECTs, Open Circuit Potential (OCP), and the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) for each sample were performed and measured 48 hours after the completion of the samples. Results: The Tyt-No and Tyt-IB samples showed the highest and lowest OCP values respectively. In LPR tests, the Rp values of ANA-V and Tyt-V were the highest (lowest corrosion rate) and contrarily, the ANA-IB and Tyt-IB samples, with the lowest pH levels, represented the lowest Rp values (highest corrosion rates). Conclusion: Some self-etch adhesives may increase interfacial corrosion potential and self-sealing ability of high-copper amalgams. PMID:27942548

  8. Technical specifications on the welding in fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karino, Motonobu; Uryu, Mitsuru; Matsui, N.; Nakazawa, Fumio; Imanishi, Makoto; Koizumi; Kazuhiko; Sugawara, Junichi; Tanaka, Hideo

    1999-04-01

    The past specifications SGN of the welding in JNC was reexamined for the reprocessing plants in order to further promote the quality control. The specification first concerns the quality of raw materials, items of the quality tests, material management, and qualification standards of the welders. It extends over details of the welding techniques, welding design, welding testings, inspection and the judgment standards. (H. Baba)

  9. Weldability of AISI 304 to copper by friction welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirik, Ihsan [Batman Univ. (Turkey); Balalan, Zulkuf [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

    2013-06-01

    Friction welding is a solid-state welding method, which can join different materials smoothly and is excessively used in manufacturing industry. Friction welding method is commonly used in welding applications of especially cylindrical components, pipes and materials with different properties, for which other welding methods remain incapable. AISI 304 stainless steel and a copper alloy of 99.6 % purity were used in this study. This couple was welded in the friction welding machine. After the welding process, samples were analyzed macroscopically and microscopically, and their microhardness was measured. Tensile test was used to determine the bond strength of materials that were joined using the friction welding method. At the end of the study, it was observed that AISI 304 stainless steel and copper could be welded smoothly using the friction welding method and the bond strength is close to the tensile strength of copper. (orig.)

  10. A516Gr.60低温钢使用国产焊材的工艺研究%Study on the welding process of domestic welding material for A516-Gr.60 low-temperature steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文学

    2011-01-01

    The polypropylene device in the certain petrochemical industry,which our company is in charge of manufacturing part of expansion joints.The product design temperature is -46 ℃ ,the pressure needs to choose A516 Gr.60 low-temperature steel materials which is recommended by ASME criterion. In order to ensure product performance we make process evaluation experiment preproduction,the experimental data show that the welding connector performance can satisfy with GB150-1998 or ASME requirement by choosing domestic J507DR ,J507 welding rod ,but it must draw up reasonable welding process and strictly control the welding heat input and the layer temperature.%某石化行业的聚丙烯装置由泰德管业科技有限公司承揽部分膨胀节的制造,设计温度为-46℃,承压接管材料选用ASME规范中推荐使用的A516-Gr.60无镍低温钢,为保证产品的低温使用性能,生产前进行了工艺评定试验,通过试验数据表明,合理制定焊接工艺,选用国产J507DR、J507焊条,严格控制焊接线能量和层间温度,获得的焊接接头性能能满足GB150-1998或ASME标准[1]的要求.

  11. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  12. The Effect of Tool Position for Aluminum and Copper at High Rotational Friction Stir Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Recep Çakır; Sare Çelik

    2015-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process used for welding similar and dissimilar materials. This welding technique allows welding of Aluminum alloys which present difficulties in fusion joining and allows different material couples to be welded continuously. In this study, 1050 aluminum alloy and commercially pure copper to increase heat input were produced at high rotation rate (2440 rev/min) with four different pin position (0-1-1.5-2 mm) and three different weld speeds ...

  13. Predicting effects of diffusion welding parameters on welded joint properties by artificial neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘黎明; 祝美丽; 牛济泰; 张忠典

    2001-01-01

    The static model for metal matrix composites in diffusion welding was established by means of artificial neural network method. The model presents the relationship between weld joint properties and welding parameters such as welding temperature, welding pressure and welding time. Through simulating the diffusion welding process of SiCw/6061Al composite, the effects of welding parameters on the strength of welded joint was studied and optimal technical parameters was obtained. It is proved that this method has good fault-tolerant ability and versatility and can overcome the shortage of the general experiment. The established static model is in good agreement with the actual welding process, so it becomes a new path for studying the weldability of new material.

  14. Investigation of the micro contact profile welding technics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The cladding preparation technology for the micro contact profile is investigated through the way of seam welding. The effects of the seam welding on different conditions including welding electrical current, welding time, electrode force and electrode material were contrasted through the way of metallographic structure, electron scanning, experiments of rectification and twist fatigue.The parameters of welding several kinds of materials were obtained. As a result, the qualified contact profile can be produced by making a control of the technical conditions: welding current, welding time, electrode force and electrode material.

  15. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  16. Investigation on the Mechanism and Failure Mode of Laser Transmission Spot Welding Using PMMA Material for the Automotive Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Liu, Baoguang; Liu, Wei; Zhong, Xuejiao; Jiang, Yingjie; Liu, Huixia

    2017-01-01

    To satisfy the need of polymer connection in lightweight automobiles, a study on laser transmission spot welding using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is conducted by using an Nd:YAG pulse laser. The influence of three variables, namely peak voltages, defocusing distances and the welding type (type I (pulse frequency and the duration is 25 Hz, 0.6 s) and type II (pulse frequency and the duration is 5 Hz, 3 s)) to the welding quality was investigated. The result showed that, in the case of the same peak voltages and defocusing distances, the number of bubbles for type I was obviously more than type II. The failure mode of type I was the base plate fracture along the solder joint, and the connection strength of type I was greater than type II. The weld pool diameter:depth ratio for type I was significantly greater than type II. It could be seen that there was a certain relationship between the weld pool diameter:depth ratio and the welding strength. By the finite element simulation, the weld pool for type I was more slender than type II, which was approximately the same as the experimental results.

  17. Investigation on the Mechanism and Failure Mode of Laser Transmission Spot Welding Using PMMA Material for the Automotive Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To satisfy the need of polymer connection in lightweight automobiles, a study on laser transmission spot welding using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA is conducted by using an Nd:YAG pulse laser. The influence of three variables, namely peak voltages, defocusing distances and the welding type (type I (pulse frequency and the duration is 25 Hz, 0.6 s and type II (pulse frequency and the duration is 5 Hz, 3 s to the welding quality was investigated. The result showed that, in the case of the same peak voltages and defocusing distances, the number of bubbles for type I was obviously more than type II. The failure mode of type I was the base plate fracture along the solder joint, and the connection strength of type I was greater than type II. The weld pool diameter:depth ratio for type I was significantly greater than type II. It could be seen that there was a certain relationship between the weld pool diameter:depth ratio and the welding strength. By the finite element simulation, the weld pool for type I was more slender than type II, which was approximately the same as the experimental results.

  18. Optimization and verification of ultrasonic testability of acoustically anisotropic materials on austenitic and dissimilar welds; Optimierung und Nachweis der Ultraschallpruefbarkeit von akustisch anisotropen Werkstoffen an austenitischen Schweiss- und Mischverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudovikov, Sergey

    2013-11-21

    Austenitic and dissimilar welds with respect to the ultrasonic testing (UT) methods are considered normally as ''difficult-to-test'' objects. During the solidification process in such welds a distinct dendrite microstructure evolves, which is coarse-grained, anisotropic and inhomogeneous simultaneously. The reliability of available ultrasonic methods on austenitic welds depends significantly on the selected UT-parameters as well as on the inspection personnel experience. In the present dissertation, an ultrasonic testing method was developed, which allows the flaw detection and evaluation in acoustically anisotropic inhomogeneous materials, especially in austenitic and dissimilar welds with a quantitative statement to the defect size, type, and location. The principle of synthetic focusing with taking into account the material anisotropy and inhomogeneity along with two- and three-dimensional visualization provides a reliable and quantitative assessment of the inspection results in acoustically anisotropic inhomogeneous test objects. Among others, an iterative algorithm for the determination of unknown elastic properties of inhomogeneous anisotropic materials has been developed. It allows practical application of the developed UT method, since the anisotropy of most of austenitic and dissimilar welds (especially of hand-welded joints) in practice is usually unknown. The functionality of the developed inspection technique has been validated by many experiments on welded austenitic specimens having artificial and natural defects. For the practical application of the new ultrasonic technique different testing strategies are proposed, which can be used depending on the current inspection task.

  19. 49 CFR 195.224 - Welding: Weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Weather. 195.224 Section 195.224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.224 Welding: Weather. Welding must be protected from weather conditions...

  20. Friction welding thermal and metallurgical characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami

    2014-01-01

    This book provides insight into the thermal analysis of friction welding incorporating welding parameters such as external, duration, breaking load, and material properties. The morphological and metallurgical changes associated with the resulting weld sites are analysed using characterization methods such as electron scanning microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Nuclear reaction analysis.

  1. Attachment of lead wires to thin film thermocouples mounted on high temperature materials using the parallel gap welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Pencil, Eric; Groth, Mary; Danzey, Gerald A.

    1990-01-01

    Parallel gap resistance welding was used to attach lead wires to sputtered thin film sensors. Ranges of optimum welding parameters to produce an acceptable weld were determined. The thin film sensors were Pt13Rh/Pt thermocouples; they were mounted on substrates of MCrAlY-coated superalloys, aluminum oxide, silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The entire sensor system is designed to be used on aircraft engine parts. These sensor systems, including the thin-film-to-lead-wire connectors, were tested to 1000 C.

  2. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  3. Industrial laser welding evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hella, R.; Locke, E.; Ream, S.

    1974-01-01

    High power laser welding was evaluated for fabricating space vehicle boosters. This evaluation was made for 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. aluminum (2219) and 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. D6AC steel. The Avco HPL 10 kW industrial laser was used to perform the evaluation. The objective has been achieved through the completion of the following technical tasks: (1) parameter study to optimize welding and material parameters; (2) preparation of welded panels for MSFC evaluation; and (3) demonstration of the repeatability of laser welding equipment. In addition, the design concept for a laser welding system capable of welding large space vehicle boosters has been developed.

  4. Localization of welding material on Q690E low alloy high strength steel for offshore drilling platform construction%海洋钻井平台中Q690E焊材的国产化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王博; 陈光亮; 盛万里; 李龙

    2012-01-01

    For the large floating crane and other marine products of Q690E high strength low alloy steel welding is easy to produce cold crack, heat affected zone by heating rate and cooling rate on formation of softening zone and brittle structure easy. Welding shall be used for preheating before welding, welding thermal insulation and heat input. Analyze the weldability of Q690E low alloy high strength steel, analyze and contrast of domestic and foreign welding materials in mechanical property and the mechanical property of deposited metal and weld metal,on the reliable welding craft standard condition,the foreign welding materials which is imported from outside the country can be completely replaced by the domestic welding materials.%用于大型浮吊等海工产品的Q690E低合金高强钢焊接时易产生冷裂纹,热影响区受加热速度和冷却速度的影响易形成软化带和脆性组织.焊接时应采用焊前预热、焊后保温和较小的热输入.对比分析国产焊材和国外焊材的化学成分、熔敷金属的力学性能和焊后焊缝金属的力学性能,在可靠的焊接工艺规范下,国产焊材是完全能够替代进口焊材的.

  5. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  6. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  7. Studies on CO2-laser Hybrid-Welding of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    CO2-laser welding of copper is known to be difficult due to the high heat conductivity of the material and the high reflectivity of copper at the wavelength of the CO2-laser light. THis paper presents a study of laser welding of copper, applying laser hybrid welding. Welding was performed...... as a hybrid CO2-laser and GTAW welding process in 2 mm pure copper sheets. The purpose was to identify maximum welding speeds for the three independent welding processes, i.e. GTAW alone, laser alone and combined processes. After welding, representative welds were quality assesed according to inernational...... norms. The paper describes the results obtained, showing significant productivity improvements and good weld qualities applying laser hybrid welding....

  8. Studies on CO2-laser Hybrid-Welding of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    CO2-laser welding of copper is known to be difficult due to the high heat conductivity of the material and the high reflectivity of copper at the wavelength of the CO2-laser light. THis paper presents a study of laser welding of copper, applying laser hybrid welding. Welding was performed...... as a hybrid CO2-laser and GTAW welding process in 2 mm pure copper sheets. The purpose was to identify maximum welding speeds for the three independent welding processes, i.e. GTAW alone, laser alone and combined processes. After welding, representative welds were quality assesed according to inernational...... norms. The paper describes the results obtained, showing significant productivity improvements and good weld qualities applying laser hybrid welding....

  9. Local equivalent welding element to predict the welding deformations of plate-type structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Considering the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of welding joint, the residual strain be-haviors of material under constraint and temperature circulation, as well as the activating mechanism of welding process, this paper addresses a new type welding element for numerical simulation of welding deformation, which is called the LEWE (the local equivalent welding element). This element can describe the basic char-acteristics of welded seam: the local position points of inherent strain, the equiva-lent size, the bending radius (or bending angle) from inherent strain, etc. It could be used to predict the welding deformation of plate-type structure. The comparisons between the computed deflection of welded plate and its experiment measurement are present. The results showed that the LEWE possesses a potential to simulate the deformation of welding process high-efficiently and precisely.

  10. Influence of weld structure on cross-weld creep behavior in P23 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.J.; Degnan, C.C. [E.ON Engineering (United Kingdom); Brett, S.J. [RWE npower (United Kingdom); Buchanan, L.W. [Doosan Babcock (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    A thick section pipe weld in low alloy steel P23 has been characterised by cross-weld creep rupture testing at a range of stresses, together with all-weld-metal and parent material testing, under the auspices of the UK High Temperature Power Plant Forum. The results generally show that the weld metal can be weak when tested in the transverse (cross-weld) orientation, and can fail with limited overall ductility by cracking in the zone of refined weld metal beneath the fusion boundary of the superposed weld bead. However, one specimen showed a much superior performance, which could be understood in terms of its locally more creep resistant weld macrostructure. The implications for P23 performance and weld manufacture are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Characterisation of the fracture properties in the ductile to brittle transition region of the weld material of a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scibetta, M. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Ferreno, D., E-mail: ferrenod@unican.es [University of Cantabria, ETS Ingenieros de Caminos, Av/Los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain); Gorrochategui, I. [Centro Tecnologico de Componentes (CTC), Parque Cientifico y Tecnologico de Cantabria, Isabel Torres No 1, 39011 Santander (Spain); Nuclenor, SA, C/Hernan Cortes 26, 39003 Santander (Spain); Lacalle, R. [University of Cantabria, ETS Ingenieros de Caminos, Av/Los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain); Walle, E. van [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Martin, J. [Nuclenor, SA, C/Hernan Cortes 26, 39003 Santander (Spain); Gutierrez-Solana, F. [University of Cantabria, ETS Ingenieros de Caminos, Av/Los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    This work presents the results of the fracture characterisation of the weld material of a nuclear vessel, currently in service, in the ductile to brittle transition region. The tests consisted of Charpy impact and tensile tests, performed in the framework of the surveillance programme of the plant. Moreover, in the context of this research, K{sub Jc} fracture toughness tests on pre-cracked Charpy V notch specimens (evaluated according to the Master Curve methodology) together with some mini-tensile tests, were performed; non-irradiated and several irradiated material conditions were characterised. The analysis of the experimental results revealed some inconsistencies concerning the material embrittlement as measured through Charpy and K{sub Jc} fracture tests: in order to obtain an adequate understanding of the results, an extended experimental scope well beyond the regulatory framework was developed, including Charpy tests and K{sub Jc} fracture tests, both performed on reconstituted specimens. Moreover, Charpy specimens irradiated in the high flux BR2 material test reactor were tested with the same purpose. With this extensive experimental programme, a coherent and comprehensive description of the irradiation behaviour of the weld material in the transition region was achieved. Furthermore it revealed better material properties in comparison with the initial expectations based on the information obtained in the framework of the surveillance programme.

  12. on the High-Temperature Performance of Ni-Based Welding Material NiCrFe-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Wenlin; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2014-10-01

    The effects of M 23C6 ( M = Cr, Fe) on the high-temperature performance of the NiCrFe-7 welding rods and weld metals were studied by high-temperature tensile tests and microstructure analysis. M 23C6 at the grain boundaries (GBs) has a cube-on-cube coherence with one grain in the NiCrFe-7 weld metals, and the adjacent M 23C6 has the coherence relationship with the same grain. The grain with a coherent M 23C6 has a Cr-depletion region. The number and size of M 23C6 particles can be adjusted by heat treatment and alloying. There are two temperatures [ T E1: 923 K to 1083 K (650 °C to 810 °C) and T E2: 1143 K to 1203 K (870 °C to 930 °C)] at which the GBs and grains of the NiCrFe-7 welding rod have equal strength during the high-temperature tensile test. When the temperatures are between T E1 and T E2, the strength of the GBs is lower than that of the grains, and the tensile fractures are intergranular. When the temperatures are below T E1 or over T E2, the strength of the GBs is higher than that of the grains, and the tensile fractures are dimples. M 23C6 precipitates at the GBs, which deteriorates the ductility of the welding rods at temperature between T E1 and T E2. M 23C6 aggravates ductility-dip-cracking (DDC) in the weld metals. The addition of Nb and Ti can form MX ( M = Ti, Nb, X = C, N), fix C in grain, decrease the initial precipitation temperature of M 23C6, and mitigate the precipitation of M 23C6, which is helpful for minimizing DDC in the weld.

  13. 超声波焊接制备功能梯度材料%Study on the functional gradient materials prepared by ultrasonic welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱政强; 吴宗辉; 曾纯; 王倩

    2011-01-01

    采用超声波焊接的方法成功制备了功能梯度材料,它具有简便、环保、快速成型的特点.实验以铝合金6061、3003、纯钛、钛合金Ti-6Al-4V和纯镍为材料,利用超声波焊接方法制备Al/Ti/Ni功能梯度材料.通过金相显微分析、显微硬度分析、EDS分析对其焊接界面的微观结构、显微硬度、焊缝原子扩散程度进行测试和表征.结果表明:接头的结合形式常伴有机械嵌合,结合程度趋于金属间的键合,接头总体硬度值增大,在焊缝处达到峰值,界面两侧金属元素能在不到0.2 s的焊接时间下实现界面间的元素相互扩散和渗透,达到梯度材料的设计要求.%This article takes the lead in using ultrasonic welding method successfully to prepare Ti/Al/Ni functional gradient materials with 6061 aluminum alloy,pure titanium,titanium alloy,3003Ti-6Al-4V and pure nickel.This method is simple,environment-friendly and forming rapid,its welding interface microstructure, microhardness,weld atomic diffusion degree was investigated by metallographic micro-structure,micro-hardness and EDS analysis. The results showed that the combining form of the joint is often accompanied by mechanical tabling and combining degree tends to the bonding between metals. The total hardness value of joint increases and the maximum hardness value is the one of weld seams, the metal elements on both sides of the interface can diffuse and penetrate through the interface in less than 0.2 seconds welding time. This gradient materials can achieve the design requirements of gradient materials.

  14. Effect of Self-etch Adhesives on Self-sealing Ability of High-Copper Amalgams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saied Mostafa Moazzami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Similar to conventional amalgam, high-copper amalgam alloy may also undergo corrosion, but it takes longer time for the resulting products to reduce microleakage by sealing the micro-gap at the tooth/amalgam interface. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of self-etch adhesives with different pH levels on the interfacial corrosion behavior of high-copper amalgam restoration and its induction potential for self-sealing ability of the micro-gap in the early hours after setting by means of Electro-Chemical Tests (ECTs. Materials and Method: Thirty cylindrical cavities of 4.5mm x 4.7mm were prepared on intact bicuspids. The samples were divided into five main groups of application of Adhesive Resin (AR/ liner/ None (No, on the cavity floor. The first main group was left without an AR/ liner (No. In the other main groups, the types of AR/ liner used were I-Bond (IB, Clearfil S3 (S3, Single Bond (SB and Varnish (V. Each main group (n=6 was divided into two subgroups (n=3 according to the types of the amalgams used, either admixed ANA 2000 (ANA or spherical Tytin (Tyt. The ECTs, Open Circuit Potential (OCP, and the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR for each sample were performed and measured 48 hours after the completion of the samples. Results: The Tyt-No and Tyt-IB samples showed the highest and lowest OCP values respectively. In LPR tests, the Rp values of ANA-V and Tyt-V were the highest (lowest corrosion rate and contrarily, the ANA-IB and Tyt-IB samples, with the lowest pH levels, represented the lowest Rp values (highest corrosion rates. Conclusion: Some self-etch adhesives may increase interfacial corrosion potential and self-sealing ability of high-copper amalgams. Keywords ● Electrochemical Test ● Dental Amalgam ● Corrosion ● Self-etch adhesive;

  15. Effect of activating fluxes on weld mechanical properties in TIG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Activating TIG (A-TIG) welding has received many attentions worldwide since the end of 1990s. Compared with conventional TIG welding A-TIG welding can greatly improve the welding productivity and reduce the welding cost without altering the equipments under the same welding procedures and is considered as a innovative variant of conventional TIG welding. The materials applied by A-TIG welding have ranged from original titanium alloy to stainless steel, carbon steel, high temperature alloy steel and so forth. The effects of activating fluxes with single component on weld mechanical properties such as tensile strength, hardness and elastics during A-TIG welding of stainless steel are discussed in this paper. The experimental results show that different fluxes have different effects on the weld mechanical properties. Among these fluxes the flux SiO2 is the best in the performance of tensile strength and ductility, while flux Cr2O3 is the best in the performance of weld hardness compared with conventional TIG welding. These experiments provide the foundation for selecting the most suitable fluxes for stainless steel in practical welding production.

  16. Effect of weld schedule variation on the weldability and durability of AHSS spot weld joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weishaupt, Eric Raymond

    Tensile strength testing and high cycle fatigue testing of advanced high strength steel spot welded shear lap joints were performed for the various weld conditions. The materials used in this study were DP 980, DP 780 and TRIP 780. The microstructure and microhardness of the shear lap joints were examined in an effort to identify the effect of microstructural changes on the strength and fatigue durability of the spot weld specimens. The occurrence of interfacial failure was recorded for the differing weld processes. Several weld schedules were examined and used to produce shear lap spot weld joints, specifically varying the squeeze force and the average current. The weld force used to produce a spot weld does not have a significant effect on the fracture mode of the specimen given the average current is constant. The average current used to produce a spot weld has a significant effect on the fracture mode of the spot weld for several squeeze forces. Interfacial failure of spot welded TRIP 780 can be mitigated using a certain range of currents when welding. This appears to come as a tradeoff for sacrificing the strength of the joint. Higher values of weld strength were obtainable; however, welds that failed with higher strengths also experienced interfacial failure. A fracture mechanics approach to estimating the high cycle fatigue life of the shear lap specimen is also proposed and represents a conservative estimate of the shear lap specimen durability.

  17. An improved method to spot-weld difficult junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrenz, Elizabeth E.; Amare, Andinet; Arumainayagam, Christopher R.

    2001-12-01

    Recent advances in spot-welding technology such as high frequency direct current inverter welders provide an improved and reproducible method to spot-weld difficult junctions. The importance of removing the oxide layers on metal surfaces, accurately delivering the weld pulse profile, and controlling the force applied to the materials during the welding process are discussed in the context of resistance spot-welding a molybdenum crystal to a tantalum loop and attaching a tungsten-rhenium thermocouple to the crystal.

  18. [Clinical analysis of laser welding on porcelain bonded metal surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jia-wei; Dai, Wen-an; Wu, Xue-ying

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of laser-welded crowns and bridges. Two hundred defective crowns and bridges were welded by using Heraplus laser welding machine, and then restored by porcelain. After being welded ,those defective crowns and bridges of different materials fit well and their marginal areas were also satisfactory. During the follow up period of one year, no fractured porcelain and crack were found at welding spots. The technology of laser welding has no direct effect on welding spots between metal and porcelain and could be used to deal with the usual problems of the crowns and bridges.

  19. Reactor pressure boundary material; the modeling for the prediction of the welding characteristics of SA508-cl.3 pressure vessel steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Uhm, Sang Ho; Seo, Young Dae; Moon, Younk Ju; Kim, Bum Joo; Shim, Min Hyo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    A metallurgical model for predicting the welding characteristics such as final microstructure and mechanical properties of HAZ was established and various kinetic parameters which was necessary to the model were measured and formulated through isothermal grain growth and isothermal transformation experiments. This model consisted of two sub-models; Grain growth model and Transformation model. Grain growth model was developed to calculate the thermal cycle from heat input and the change of austenite grain size which occurred during heating cycle. Transformation model described the phase transition behavior and predicted the final mechanical properties determined by structure-property relationships. The isothermal kinetics of grain growth and dissolution of precipitates were respectively described by well-known equation, dD/dt = M( {delta}F{sub e}ff ){sup m} and Whelan's analytical model. Isothermal transformation kinetics was expressed by Avrami equation. The reliabilities of each model were evaluated by HAZ microstructural simulation tests. It was found the both models were in good agreement. The applicability of this model was discussed by illustrating the results of the model. 129 refs., 81 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  20. Evaluation of interfacial bonding in dissimilar materials of YSZ-alumina composites to 6061 aluminium alloy using friction welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uday, M.B., E-mail: ummb2008@gmail.com [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Ahmad Fauzi, M.N., E-mail: afauzi@eng.usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Zuhailawati, H.; Ismail, A.B. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2011-01-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Friction-welding process. {yields} Joining between ceramic composite and metal alloy. {yields} Slip casting of the yttria stabilized zirconia/alumina composite samples. - Abstract: The interfacial microstructures characteristics of alumina ceramic body reinforced with yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was evaluated after friction welding to 6061 aluminum alloy using optical and electron microscopy. Alumina rods containing 25 and 50 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia were fabricated by slip casting in plaster of Paris (POP) molds and subsequently sintered at 1600 deg. C. On the other hand, aluminum rods were machine down to the required dimension using a lathe machine. The diameter of the ceramic and the metal rods was 16 mm. Rotational speeds for the friction welding were varied between 900 and 1800 rpm. The friction pressure was maintained at 7 MPa for a friction time of 30 s. Optical and scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the microstructure of the resultant joints, particularly at the interface. The joints were also examined with EDX line (energy dispersive X-ray) in order to determine the phases formed during the welding. The mechanical properties of the friction welded YSZ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite to 6061 alloy were determined with a four-point bend test and Vickers microhardness. The experimental results showed the degree of deformation varied significantly for the 6061 Al alloy than the ceramic composite part. The mechanical strength of friction-welded ceramic composite/6061 Al alloy components were obviously affected by joining rotational speed selected which decreases in strength with increasing rotational speed.

  1. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  2. Effects of filling material and laser power on the formation of intermetallic compounds during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of steel and aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xinjiang; Jin, Xiangzhong; Peng, Nanxiang; Ye, Ying; Wu, Sigen; Dai, Houfu

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, two kinds of materials, Ni and Zn, are selected as filling material during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of Q235 steel and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, and their influences on the formation of intermetallic compounds on the steel/aluminum interface of the joints were first studied. SEM was used to analyze the profile of the intermetallic compound layer and the fractography of tensile fracture surfaces. In addition, EDS was applied to investigate the types of the intermetallic compounds. The results indicate that a thin iron-abundant intermetallic compound layer forms and ductile fracture mode occurs when Ni is added, but a thick aluminum-abundant intermetallic compound layer generates and brittle fracture mode occurs when Zn is added. So the tensile strength of the welds with Ni as filling material is greater than that with Zn as filling material. Besides, the effect of laser power on the formation of intermetallic compound layer when Ni is added was investigated. The preheated temperature field produced by laser beam in the cross section of workpiece was calculated, and the tensile strength of the joints at different laser powers was tested. Results show that only when suitable laser power is adopted, can suitable preheating temperature of the steel reach, then can thin intermetallic compound layer form and high tensile strength of the joints reach. Either excessive or insufficient laser power will reduce the tensile strength of the joints.

  3. Transformation behaviour and residual stresses in welding of new LTT filler materials; Umwandlungsverhalten und Eigenspannungen beim Schweissen neuartiger LTT-Zusatzwerkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kromm, Arne

    2011-07-06

    is seen to occur. This is observed for the considered alloys to be particularly pronounced in transverse direction of the weld. By contrast, the residual stress level in longitudinal weld direction is nearly independent of the shrinkage conditions. With the help of residual stress depth gradients it could be established that the additional shrinkage restraint manifests itself in a parallel shift of the residual stress level in the weld metal. Application of energy-dispersive diffraction methods additionally allowed it for the first time to determine residual stresses in the austenitic phase of the LTT alloy which is present parallel to martensite. Results gained under laboratory conditions mostly need to be verified under real fabrication conditions. For this purpose, a component weld test was performed in a special large-scale testing facility. Under structural shrinkage restraint, the load relieving effect of a specific LTT welding filler material could be proven by means of a pronounced stress reduction duringwelding. Overall, evidence was furnished that the concept of Low Transformation Temperature (LTT)alloys is successful and that the proven austenite-martensite transformation exerts a significanteffect on the residual stress level. [German] Die Erkenntnis, dass die Phasenumwandlung bei der Schweisseigenspannungsentstehung hochfester Staehle eine bedeutende Rolle spielt, gibt es bereits seit langer Zeit. Bisher existierten jedoch keine Ansaetze, diesen Effekt praktisch zur Schweisseigenspannungskontrolle zu nutzen. Neuartige Low Transformation Temperature (LTT) Legierungen bieten aufgrund ihrer charakteristischen chemischen Zusammensetzung die Moeglichkeit, hochfeste Staehle auf deren Festigkeitsniveau zu fuegen. Die martensitische Phasenumwandlung soll zudem eine gezielte Einstellung der Schweisseigenspannungen erlauben. Die im Schrifttum vorliegenden Untersuchungen zu diesem Thema sind zwar zahlreich, bieten jedoch nur wenige Erkenntnisse zur Wechselwirkung

  4. Residual stresses in welded plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a simple model which could be used to study residual stress. The mechanism that results in residual stresses in the welding process starts with the deposition of molten weld metal which heats the immediately adjacent material. After solidification of weld material, normal thermal shrinkage is resisted by the adjacent, cooler material. When the thermal strain exceeds the elastic strain corresponding to the yield point stress, the stress level is limited by this value, which decreases with increasing temperature. Cooling then causes elastic unloading which is restrained by the adjoining material. Permanent plastic strain occurs, and tension is caused in the region immediately adjacent to the weld material. Compression arises in the metal farther from the weld in order to maintain overall static equilibrium. Subsequent repair welds may add to the level of residual stresses. The level of residual stress is related to the onset of fracture during welding. Thus, it is of great importance to be able to predict the level of residual stresses remaining after a weld procedure, and to determine the factors, such as weld speed, temperature, direction, and number of passes, which may affect the magnitude of remaining residual stress. It was hoped to use traditional analytical modeling techniques so that it would be easier to comprehend the effect of these variables on the resulting stress. This approach was chosen in place of finite element methods so as to facilitate the understanding of the physical processes. The accuracy of the results was checked with some existing experimental studies giving residual stress levels found from x-ray diffraction measurements.

  5. DEFORMATION INFLUENCE ON A LIFETIME OF WELDING ELECTRODE TIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Viňáš

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the influence of welding electrode tips deformation on their lifetime. The influence of material properties, production technology and the intensity of welding electrodes load on their lifetime are presented. The electrode tips of the most used type of CuCr1Zr alloy of three basic standard shapes before and after the process of welding are evaluated. The process of welding is realized with low, middle and maximum welding parameters on programmable pneumatic spot welding machine VTS BPK 20. The influence of welding parameters on chosen material characteristics of welding tips is observed. Through the use of upsetting test, dependency of forming strength and deformation of material on used technology of welding tip production is observed.

  6. Irradiation behavior of a submerged arc welding material with different copper content; Bestrahlungsverhalten einer UP-Versuchsschweissnaht mit unterschiedlichen Kupfergehalten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, R. [Siemens AG Energieerzeugung KWU, Erlangen (Germany); Bartsch, R. [Kernkraftwerk Obrigheim GmbH (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Che report presents results of an irradiation program on specimens of submerged arc weldings with copper contents of 0.14% up to 0.42% and a fluence up to 2.2E19 cm{sup -2} (E>1MeV). Unirradiated and irradiated tensile- Charpy-, K{sub lc}- and Pellini-specimens were tested of material with a copper content of 0.22%. On the other materials Charpy tests and tensile tests were performed. The irradiation of the specimens took place in the KWO - ``RPV, a PWR with low flux and in the VAK - RPV, a small BWR with high flux. - The irradiation induced embrittlemnt shows a copper dependence up to about 30%. The specimens with a copper content higher than 0.30% show no further embrittlement. Irradiation in different reactors with different flux (factor > 33) shows the same state of embrittlement. Determination of a K{sub lc}, T-curve with irradiated specimens is possible. The conservative of the RT{sub NDT} - concept could be confirmed by the results of Charpy-V, drop weight- and K{sub lc}-test results. [Deutsch] Zur zusaetzlichen Absicherung des KWO-RDB wurde Ende 1979 eine UP-Versuchsschweissnaht mit vergleichbarer chemischer Zusammensetzung und vergleibaren mechanisch-technologischen Werkstoffen im unbestrahlten Ausgangszustand wie die RDB Core-Rundnaht hergestellt. Teile der Naht wurden durch Verkupfern der Schweissdraehte auf unterschiedliche Gehalte von Cu=0,14% bis 0,42% eingestellt. Aus dieser Schweissverbindung wurden Proben im VAK und KWO-RDB bestrahlt. Im Rahmen der Aktivitaeten zur Absicherung des KWO-RDBs erfolgte 1995 die Pruefung der bestrahlten Proben. Die mechanisch technologischen Werkstoffwerte vor und nach Bestrahlung werden gegenuebergestellt und praesentiert. Mit dem Ergebnis wurde ein weiterer Nachweis fuer die Konservativitaet des RT{sub NDT}-Konzeptes erbracht. Es wurde nachgewiesen, dass fuer den untersuchten Bereich kein Dose-Rate Effekt bzw. Bestrahlungszeiteinfluss existiert. Fuer UP-Schweissungen mit den vorliegenden Fertigungsparametern und bei

  7. Susceptibility and occurrence condition of HAZ liquation cracking on rail steels. Report 4. Study on rail welding with high-C welding materials; Reru ko no HAZ ekika ware hassei joken to ware kanjusei. 4. Reru no kotanso yoyu yosetsu gijutsu no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimine, K.; Uchino, K.; Okumura, M. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-08-05

    In connection with HAZ liquation cracks which occur in the low-C EAW method which is currently used as a field welding process for rails, the effects of the critical carbon content and the critical welding conditions necessary for avoiding crack occurrence are elucidated, and the susceptibility of HAZ liquation cracks for rails is investigated to study the mechanism of crack occurrence. The trend of HAZ liquation cracks of rails is closely related to the difference in the C contents in the weld metal and the base rail metal, and the crack incidence increases with the increase in the difference of the C content in the range of higher than 0.3% C content. On the other hand, crack incidence can be avoided if the difference in the C content is less than 0.2%. Higher welding heat input increases HAZ liquation crack incidence with larger difference in the C contents between the weld metal and the base metal. When the difference in the C content is large, it is desirable to limit the use of high current using large size welding rods. Purification of steel materials by reducing such impurity elements as P and S is effective to reduce the susceptibility of HAZ liquation cracks. 9 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Laser welding of fused quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  9. Numerical simulation of friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding is a solid-state welding technique that utilizes thermo-mechanical influence of the rotating welding tool on parent material resulting with monolith joint-weld. On the contact of welding tool and parent material, significant stirring and deformation of parent material appears, and during this process mechanical energy is partially transformed into heat. The paper describes the software for the numerical simulation of friction stir welding developed at Mechanical Engineering Faculty, University of Nis. Numerical solution for estimation of welding plates temperature is estimated using finite difference method-explicit scheme with adaptive grid, considering influence of temperature on material's conductivity, contact conditions between welding tool and parent material, material flow around welding tool etc. The calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental results. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR35034: The research of modern non-conventional technologies application in manufacturing companies with the aim of increase efficiency of use, product quality, reduce of costs and save energy and materials

  10. Welding defects at friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Podržaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of different types of defects at friction stir welding. In order to explain the reasons for their occurrence a short theoretical background of the process is given first. The main emphasis is on the parameters that influence the process. An energy supply based division of defects into three disjoint groups was used. The occurring defects are demonstrated on various materials.

  11. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process developed and patented by The Welding Institute in Cambridge, England. Friction stir welding has been implemented in the aerospace industry in the fabrication of longitudinal welds in pressurized cryogenic propellant tanks. As the industry looks to implement friction stir welding in circumferential welds in pressurized cryogenic propellant tanks, techniques to close out the termination hole associated with retracting the pin tool are being evaluated. Friction pull plug welding is under development as a one means of closing out the termination hole. A friction pull plug weld placed in a friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite, plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size in the test or service environments. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in two aluminum alloy friction plug weld configurations is presented.

  12. Corrosion rate of parent and weld materials of F82H and JPCA steels under LBE flow with active oxygen control at 450 and 500 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: kikuchi.kenji21@jaea.go.jp; Kamata, Kinya; Ono, Mikinori; Kitano, Teruaki; Hayashi, Kenichi [Mitsui Engineering and Ship-building Co., Ltd., 5-6-4 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-8439 (Japan); Oigawa, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2008-06-30

    Corrosion behavior of parent and weld materials of F82H and JPCA was studied in the circulating LBE loop under impinging flow. These are candidate materials for Japanese Accelerator Driven System (ADS) beam windows. Maximum temperatures were kept to 450 and 500 deg. C with 100 deg. C constant temperature difference. Main flow velocity was 0.4-0.6 m/s in every case. Oxygen concentration was controlled to 2-4 x 10{sup -5} mass% although there was one exception. Testing time durations were 500-3000 h. Round bar type specimens were put in the circular tube of the loop. An electron beam weld in the middle of specimens was also studied. Optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray element analyses and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate corrosion in these materials. Consequently corrosion depth and stability of those oxide layers were characterized based on the analyses. For a long-term behavior a linear law is recommended to predict corrosion in the ADS target design.

  13. Forming Completely Penetrated Welded T-joints when Pulsed Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampit, N. Yu; Krampit, M. A.; Sapozhkov, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is focused on revealing the influence of welding parameters on weld formation when pulsed arc welding. As an experimental sample a T-joint over 10 mm was selected. Welding was carried out in flat position, which required no edge preparation but provided mono-directional guaranteed root penetration. The following parameters of welding were subjected to investigation: gap in the joint, wire feed rate and incline angles of the torch along and across the weld axis. Technological recommendations have been made with respect to pulsed arc welding; the cost price of product manufacturing can be reduced on their basis due to reduction of labor input required by machining, lowering consumption of welding materials and electric power.

  14. Case Study Regarding the Design of a Direct Current Electromagnet for the MIG Welding of Metallic Materials Part I: Description of the Welding Methods and Preliminary Calculus of the Electromagnet

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The paper refers to the design of a direct current electromagnet, located on the head of a swan neck welding gun of a MIG welding equipment and used for magnetising the rotation space of two additional electric arches, in order to preheat the electrode wire and of the protective gas, partially turned into plasma jet. One describes the MIG welding method in which the electromagnet is used as well as its preliminary calculus.

  15. Case Study Regarding the Design of a Direct Current Electromagnet for the MIG Welding of Metallic Materials Part I: Description of the Welding Methods and Preliminary Calculus of the Electromagnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudorel Ene

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to the design of a direct current electromagnet, located on the head of a swan neck welding gun of a MIG welding equipment and used for magnetising the rotation space of two additional electric arches, in order to preheat the electrode wire and of the protective gas, partially turned into plasma jet. One describes the MIG welding method in which the electromagnet is used as well as its preliminary calculus.

  16. Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weiju

    2014-11-11

    A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

  17. ELECTRIC WELDING EQUIPMENT AND AUTOMATION OF WELDING IN CONSTRUCTION,

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELDING , *ARC WELDING , AUTOMATION, CONSTRUCTION, INDUSTRIES, POWER EQUIPMENT, GENERATORS, POWER TRANSFORMERS, RESISTANCE WELDING , SPOT WELDING , MACHINES, AUTOMATIC, STRUCTURES, WIRING DIAGRAMS, USSR.

  18. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  19. Rheology of welding: Field constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, K.; Quane, S.

    2003-04-01

    Pyroclastic deposits emplaced at high temperature and having sufficient thickness become welded via sintering, compaction and flattening of hot glassy particles. The welding process is attended by pronounced changes in the physical properties of the deposit and welding intensity can be tracked by measuring the density, porosity, fabric or strength of samples. Ultimately, the intensity of welding reflects the aggregate effects of load and residence time at temperatures above the glass transition temperature (Tg). This results in welding intensity varying with stratigraphic depth; vertical sections through welded ignimbrite deposits commonly show maximum (e.g., density) or minimum (porosity) values in physical properties in the lower half (30--40% above the base) of the unit. Here we explore the extent to which these data, serving as proxies for strain, can be used constrain the rheological properties of the pyroclastic deposit during the welding process. Our data include measurements of density, porosity, fabric and rock strength as a function of stratigraphic position for 4 sections through the Bandelier tuff, New Mexico. These profiles record changes in physical properties and, thus, map the cumulative strain associated with welding as a function of depth (load). We have used simple conductive heat transfer models to estimate cooling curves for each sample. Essentially, these curves provide the residence time within the "welding window" for each sample. The curves are dependent on sample position, thickness of ignimbrite, emplacement temperature and the glass transition temperature of the material. The unknowns in the problem are a number of physical constants in a generalized power-law relationship between strain-rate (ɛ') and stress (σ) for steady-state creep at constant load: ɛ' = A σ^n e[-Q/R T]. Specifically, we adopt an inverse-model approach whereby the observations on the natural material are used to constrain the pre-exponential constant (A), stress

  20. Weld penetration and defect control. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, B.A.

    1992-05-15

    Highly engineered designs increasingly require the use of improved materials and sophisticated manufacturing techniques. To obtain optimal performance from these engineered products, improved weld properties and joint reliability are a necessarily. This requirement for improved weld performance and reliability has led to the development of high-performance welding systems in which pre-programmed parameters are specified before any welding takes place. These automated systems however lack the ability to compensate for perturbations which arise during the welding process. Hence the need for systems which monitor and control the in-process status of the welding process. This report discusses work carried out on weld penetration indicators and the feasibility of using these indicators for on-line penetration control.

  1. Residual stress simulation of circumferential welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melicher R.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses are an important consideration in the component integrity and life assessment of welded structure. The welding process is very complex time dependent physical phenomenon with material nonlinearity. The welding is a thermal process with convection between fluid flow and welding body, between welding bodyand environment. Next type of boundary conditions is radiation and thermo-mechanical contact on the outer surface of gas pipe in the near of weld. The temperature variation so obtained is utilised to find the distribution of the stress field.In this paper, a brief review of weld simulation and residual stress modelling using the finite element method (FEM by commercial software ANSYS is presented. Thermo-elastic-plastic formulations using a von Mises yield criterion with nonlinear kinematics hardening has been employed. Residual axial and hoop stresses obtained from the analysis have been shown. The commercial FEM code ANSYS was used for coupled thermalmechanical analysis.

  2. Non-destructive Residual Stress Analysis Around The Weld-Joint of Fuel Cladding Materials of ZrNbMoGe Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikin

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The residual stress measurements around weld-joint of ZrNbMoGe alloy have been carried out by using X-ray diffraction technique in PTBIN-BATAN. The research was performed to investigate the structure of a cladding material with high temperature corrosion resistance and good weldability. The equivalent composition of the specimens (in %wt. was 97.5%Zr1%Nb1%Mo½%Ge. Welding was carried out by using TIG (tungsten inert gas technique that completed butt-joint with a current 20 amperes. Three region tests were taken in specimen while diffraction scanning, While diffraction scanning, tests were performed on three regions, i.e., the weldcore, the heat-affected zone (HAZ and the base metal. The reference region was determined at the base metal to be compared with other regions of the specimen, in obtaining refinement structure parameters. Base metal, HAZ and weldcore were diffracted by X-ray, and lattice strain changes were calculated by using Rietveld analysis program. The results show that while the quantity of minor phases tend to increase in the direction from the base metal to the HAZ and to the weldcore, the quantity of the ZrGe phase in the HAZ is less than the quantity of the ZrMo2 phase due to tGe element evaporation. The residual stress behavior in the material shows that minor phases, i.e., Zr3Ge and ZrMo2, are more dominant than the Zr matrix. The Zr3Ge and ZrMo2 experienced sharp straining, while the Zr phase was weak-lined from HAZ to weldcore. The hydrostatic residual stress ( in around weld-joint of ZrNbMoGe alloy is compressive stress which has minimum value at about -2.73 GPa in weldcore region

  3. Numerical evaluation of multipass welding temperature field in API 5L X80 steel welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nóbrega

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many are the metallurgical changes suffered by materials when subjected to welding thermal cycle, promoting a considerable influence on the welded structures thermo mechanical properties. In project phase, one alternative for evaluating the welding cycle variable, would be the employment of computational methods through simulation. So, this paper presents an evaluation of the temperature field in a multipass welding of API 5L X80 steel used for oil and gas transportation, using the ABAQUS ® software, based on Finite Elements Method (FEM. During the simulation complex phenomena are considerable including: Variation in physical and mechanical properties of materials as a function of temperature, welding speed and the different mechanisms of heat exchange with the environment (convection and radiation were used. These considerations allow a more robust mathematical modeling for the welding process. An analytical heat source proposed by Goldak, to model the heat input in order to characterize the multipass welding through the GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process on root and the SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding process for the filling passes were used. So, it was possible to evaluate the effect of each welding pass on the welded joint temperature field, through the temperature peaks and cooling rates values during the welding process.

  4. Differences between Laser and Arc Welding of HSS Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Němeček, Stanislav; Mužík, Tomáš; Míšek, Michal

    Conventional welding processes often fail to provide adequate joints in high strength steels with multiphase microstructures. One of the promising techniques is laser beam welding: working without filler metal and with sufficient capacity for automotive and transportation industry (where the amount of AHSS steels increases each year, as well as the length of laser welds). The paper compares microstructures and properties of HSS (high strength steel) joints made by MAG (Metal Active Gas) and laser welding. The effects of main welding parameters (heat input, welding speed and others) are studied on multiphase TRIP 900 steel tubes and martensitic sheets DOCOL 1200, advanced materials for seat frames and other automotive components. Whereas the strength of conventional welds is significantly impaired, laser welding leaves strength of the base material nearly unaffected. As the nature of fracture changes during loading and depending on the welding method, failure mechanisms upon cross tension tests have been studied as well.

  5. Dependence of the mechanical properties of joints welded according to the parameters of the metal active gas (MAG welding regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dobrotă

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective followed in the realization of welded structures is to obtain superior mechanical characteristics for these structures. The research aimed at setting ranges of values for the welding voltage (Uw, respectively for the welding current (Iw so as to obtain superior mechanical features for welded constructions. The research was carried out using E 36-4 steel as base material and SG2 wire as filler material, whereas the applied welding process was MAG. The optimization was done with the help of a number of 31 test bars considering various welding procedures for each test bar, and the experimental data were processed using the STATISTCA program.

  6. Welding characteristics of 27, 40 and 67 kHz ultrasonic plastic welding systems using fundamental- and higher-resonance frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Hongoh, Misugi; Yoshikuni, Masafumi; Hashii, Hidekazu; Ueoka, Tetsugi

    2004-04-01

    The welding characteristics of 27, 40 and 67 kHz ultrasonic plastic welding systems that are driven at only the fundamental-resonance frequency vibration were compared, and also those of the welding systems that were driven at the fundamental and several higher resonance frequencies simultaneously were studied. At high frequency, welding characteristics can be improved due to the larger vibration loss of plastic materials. For welding of rather thin or small specimens, as the fundamental frequency of these welding systems is higher and the numbers of driven higher frequencies are driven simultaneously, larger welded area and weld strength were obtained.

  7. Development of Welding Procedures for NPP Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jang Wook; Cho, Hong Seok; Lee, Dong Min; Park, Yu Deog; Choi, Sang Hoon [Korea Plant Service and Engineering Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Nuclear primary system consists of various materials according to the function. Recently, concern about the integrity on Dissimilar Metal Weld (DMW) which was made of inconel material such as alloy 600/82/182 has arisen from industry. Leak from hot leg nozzle weld at V.C Summer and axial cracks in hot leg nozzle welds at Ringhals 3 and 4 were took placed at the DMW zone, which is major degradation mechanism known as Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). In order to ensure operational ability of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to obtain measures against unexpected risks. KPS has developed the DMW technology, Narrow Groove Welding (NGW) system and field implementation procedures for alloy 600 since March 2005.

  8. Novel Process Revolutionizes Welding Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Glenn Research Center, Delphi Corporation, and the Michigan Research Institute entered into a research project to study the use of Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW) in the construction and repair of stationary structures with multiple geometries and dissimilar materials, such as those NASA might use on the Moon or Mars. Traditional welding technologies are burdened by significant business and engineering challenges, including high costs of equipment and labor, heat-affected zones, limited automation, and inconsistent quality. DRW addresses each of those issues, while drastically reducing welding, manufacturing, and maintenance costs.

  9. Quality control of laser tailor welded blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi

    2008-03-01

    Tailor welded blanks were widely used in the automobile industry for their special advantages. A combination of different materials, thickness, and coatings could be welded together to form a blank for stamping car body panels. With the gradually growing consciousness on safety requirement of auto body structural, the business of laser tailor welded blanks is developing rapidly in China. Laser tailor welded blanks were just the semi products between steel factory and automobile manufacturers. As to the laser welding defects such as convexity and concavity, automobile industry had the strict requirement. In this paper, quality standard on laser tailor welded blanks were discussed. As for the production of laser tailor welded blanks, online quality control of laser tailor welded blanks was introduced. The image processing system for welding laser positioning and weld seam monitoring were used in the production of laser tailor welded blanks. The system analyzes images from the individual cameras and transmits the results to the machine control system via a CAN bus.

  10. Repair welding of cast iron coated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuk, M.; Górka, J.; Dojka, R.; Czupryński, A.

    2017-08-01

    Welding cast iron is a complex production procedure. Repair welding was used to repair damaged or poorly made castings. This is due to a tendency to cracking of the material during welding as well as after it. Welding cast iron can be carried out on hot or on cold. Hot welding requires high heat material and the use of welding material in the form of cast iron. In the case of cold welding, it is possible to use different materials. Mostly used filler metals are nickel and copper based. The work shows the course of research concerning repairmen of ductile iron with arc welding method. For the reparation process four types of ESAB company coated electrodes dedicated for cast iron were used with diameter 3.2 and 4 mm: ES 18-8-6B (4mm), EB 150 (4mm), OK NiCl, EŻM. In the cast iron examined during the testing grooves were made using plasma methods, in order to simulate the removed casting flaws. Then the welding process with coated electrodes was executed. The process utilized low welding current row of 100A, so there would only be a small amount of heat delivered to the heat affected zone (HAZ). Short stitches were made, after welding it was hammered, in order to remove stresses. After the repair welding the part of studies commenced which purpose was finding surface defects using visual testing (VT) and penetration testing (PT). In the second part, a series of macro and microscopic studies were executed witch the purpose of disclosuring the structure. Then the hardness tests for welds cross sections were performed. An important aspect of welding cast iron is the colour of the padding weld after welding, more precisely the difference between the base material and padding weld, the use of different materials extra gives the extra ability to select the best variant. The research of four types of coated electrode was executed, based on the demands the best option in terms of aesthetic, strength and hardness.

  11. Welding in space and the construction of space vehicles by welding; Proceedings of the Conference, New Carrollton, MD, Sept. 24-26, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present conference discusses such topics in spacecraft welding as the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility's evidence on material properties degradation, EVA/telerobotic construction techniques, welding of the superfluid helium on-orbit transfer flight demonstration tanks and hardware, electron-beam welding of aerospace vehicles, variable-polarity plasma arc keyhole welding of Al, aircraft experiments of low-gravity fusion welding, flash-butt welding of Al alloys, and a computer-aided handbook for space welding fabrication. Also discussed are the welded nozzle extension for Ariane launch vehicles, the existence of on-orbit cold-welding, structural materials performance in long-term space service, high-strength lightweight alloys, steels, and heat-resistant alloys for aerospace welded structures, the NASA-Goddard satellite repair program, and the uses of explosion welding and cutting in aerospace engineering.

  12. The optimization of welding regime parameters at shielded metal arc welding (SMAW by mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Petrescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The realized researches followed the determining of mathematical models that allow the optimization of the welding process in order to obtain welded joints with certain values of the mechanical characteristics. Thus, there were established mathematical models of dependence of mechanical characteristics of welded joints (Rm, Rp02, Z, A, KCV 20°C of each parameter of welding regime (Iw, Uw, and also, mathematical models that offer cumulative dependence of mechanical characteristics of both parameters of welding regime.The researches have been carried out using steel E 36-4 as base material and as filler material basic electrodes, type E7018 and the applied welding procedure was the process: shielded metal arc welding (SMAW.

  13. Studi Perbandingan Proses Pengelasan Smaw Pada Lingkungan Darat dan Bawah Air Terhadap Ketahanan Uji Bending Weld Joint Material A36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safira Dwi Anggraeni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui perbedaan nilai kekuatan uji bending,  dan kekerasan pada sambungan weld joint plat baja A36 pada proses pengelasan SMAW di lingkungan darat dan bawah air. Penelitian ini menggunakan Baja A36 dengan variasi lingkungan pengelasan yakni di darat dan di bawah air dengan menggunakan las SMAW dan memakai elektroda E7018 diameter 3,2 mm. Spesimen dilakukan pengujian bending berupa face bend dan root bend, pengujian kekerasan dan foto mikro. Pada pengujian bending pengelasan di darat tidak menghasilkan cacat yang berarti, sedangkan untuk hasil pengujian bending face dan root pada pengelasan bawah air terdapat cacat sepanjang daerah lasan sebesar 38 mm, hal ini tidak dapat diterima karena ukuran cacat lebih besar dari persyaratan yang ada pada ASME Section IX edisi 2015. Pada pengujian kekerasan, nilai kekerasan tertinggi pada pengelasan di darat adalah 200,5 HVN sedangkan nilai kekerasan teritinggi pada pengelasan bawah air adalah 290,2 HVN. Hasil pengujian kekerasan tertinggi pada pengelasan bawah air lebih rendah dari persyaratan AWS D3.6M – Underwater Welding Code, sehinga nilai kekerasan memenuhi persyaratan standar. Hasil foto mikro pada pengelasan di darat pada daerah base metal, persentase struktur mikro untuk ferit adalah 75,44% dan perlit adalah 24,56%. Pada daerah HAZ, persentase struktur mikro untuk ferit adalah 70,11% dan perlit adalah 28,89%. Pada daerah weld metal, persentase struktur mikro untuk ferit adalah 61,11% dan perlit adalah 38,89%. Sedangkan untuk hasil foto mikro pada pengelasan di bawah air pada daerah base metal, persentase struktur mikro untuk ferit adalah 74,89% dan perlit adalah 25,11%. Pada daerah HAZ, persentase struktur mikro untuk martensit adalah 46,11%,   struktur mikro ferit adalah 18,22% dan struktur mikro perlit adalah 35,67%. Pada daerah weld metal, persentase struktur mikro untuk ferit adalah 48,9% dan struktur mikro perlit adalah 51,1%. 

  14. Research on the properties of laser welded joints of aluminum killed cold rolled steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎启; 曹能; 俞宁峰

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum killed cold rolled steel used for automobiles was welded shows that high quality of welding can be realized at welding speed of laser welded joints for aluminum killed cold rolled steel increased compared to those of the base metal while the formability decreased. Forming limit diagram of joint material indicated that the laser weld seam should avoid the maximum deformation area of automobile parts during the designing period for the position of weld seam.

  15. 75 FR 14243 - Pipeline Safety: Girth Weld Quality Issues Due to Improper Transitioning, Misalignment, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Girth Weld Quality Issues Due to... and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA); DOT. ACTION: Notice; issuance of advisory... girth weld failures due to welding quality issues. Misalignment during welding of large diameter line...

  16. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The iconic, orange external tank of the space shuttle launch system not only contains the fuel used by the shuttle s main engines during liftoff but also comprises the shuttle s backbone, supporting the space shuttle orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Given the tank s structural importance and the extreme forces (7.8 million pounds of thrust load) and temperatures it encounters during launch, the welds used to construct the tank must be highly reliable. Variable polarity plasma arc welding, developed for manufacturing the external tank and later employed for building the International Space Station, was until 1994 the best process for joining the aluminum alloys used during construction. That year, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers began experimenting with a relatively new welding technique called friction stir welding (FSW), developed in 1991 by The Welding Institute, of Cambridge, England. FSW differs from traditional fusion welding in that it is a solid-state welding technique, using frictional heat and motion to join structural components without actually melting any of the material. The weld is created by a shouldered pin tool that is plunged into the seam of the materials to be joined. The tool traverses the line while rotating at high speeds, generating friction that heats and softens but does not melt the metal. (The heat produced approaches about 80 percent of the metal s melting temperature.) The pin tool s rotation crushes and stirs the plasticized metal, extruding it along the seam as the tool moves forward. The material cools and consolidates, resulting in a weld with superior mechanical properties as compared to those weld properties of fusion welds. The innovative FSW technology promises a number of attractive benefits. Because the welded materials are not melted, many of the undesirables associated with fusion welding porosity, cracking, shrinkage, and distortion of the weld are minimized or avoided. The process is more energy efficient, safe

  17. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF WELD SEAM SHAPE AND THE FATIGUE IN CASE OF THE FILLET WELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu BABIS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The stress concentrators at MA/MB welding joint will increase by the cross sectional convexity of the fillet weld. Therefore, for variable loaded structures, based on a satisfactory fatigue life, concave fillet welds are preferred likely to ensure low stress concentrators at the MA/MB welding joint due to a smooth passing from the fillet weld to the basic material. The present paper aims is analyse the fatigue life duration raising durability curves based on experimental determination and using the Finite Element Analysis Method.

  19. Welded Kimberlite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straaten, B. I.; Kopylova, M. G.; Russell, J. K.; Scott Smith, B. H.

    2009-05-01

    Welding of pyroclastic deposits generally involves the sintering of hot glassy vesicular particles and requires the presence of a load and/or high temperatures. Welding can occur on various scales as observed in large welded pyroclastic flows, in small-volume agglutinated spatter rims, or as in coalesced clastogenic lava flows. In all these examples welding occurs mainly by reduction or elimination of porosity within the vesicular clasts and/or inter-clast pore space. The end result of welding in pyroclastic deposits is to produce dense, massive, coherent deposits. Here, we present a possible new end-member of the welding process: welding of non- vesicular pyroclasts in intra-crater kimberlite deposits. Kimberlite melt is a low-viscosity liquid carrying abundant crystals. Because of this, kimberlite eruptions generally produce non-vesicular pyroclasts. During welding, these pyroclast cannot deform by volume reduction to form typical fiamme. As a result, welding and compaction in kimberlites proceeds via the reduction of inter-clast pore space alone. The lack of porous pyroclasts limits the maximum amount of volumetric strain within pyroclastic kimberlite deposits to about 30%. This value is substantially lower than the limiting values for welding of more common felsic pyroclastic flows. The lower limit for volumetric strain in welded kimberlite deposits severely restricts the development of a fabric. In addition, pyroclastic kimberlite deposits commonly feature equant-shaped pyroclasts, and equant-shaped crystals. This, in turn, limits the visibility of the results of compaction and pore space reduction, as there are few deformable markers and elongate rigid markers that are able to record the strain during compaction. These features, together with the low viscosity of kimberlite magma and the stratigraphic position of these kimberlite deposits within the upper reaches of the volcanic conduit, call for careful interpretation of coherent-looking rocks in these

  20. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  1. Comparison of microleakage in high copper spherical amalgam restorations using three different dentin bondin systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasini E.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Amalgam is one of the mostly used restorative materials, but has some disadvantages. Microleakage is one of the short comings of amalgam which may lead to sensitivity and recurrent caries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three dentin bonding systems on reduction of microleakage in amalgam restorations. "nMaterials and Methods: Class II amalgam restorations were made in 40 noncarious molar and premolar teeth. Then the specimens were divided into four equal groups. Scotch Bond Multi Purpose, Single bond, "niBond, were used as liner in groups one to three respectively and in group four no liner was used. The teeth were restored with high copper spherical amalgam. After thermocycling for 500 cycles at 50C and 550C, the specimens were immersed in basic fuchsin for 24 hours, bisectioned mesiodistally and evaluated under stereomicroscope at X25 for dye penetration. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-wallis and Scheffe. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance. "nResults: The groups showed significant difference (p=0.003. The group four had significantly less microleakage than the first and second groups (p<0.05. The second and third groups showed significantly different microleakage (p=0.038. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this investigation applying dentin bonding agents has no effect on reducing microleakage in amalgam restorations, however more studies are recommended.

  2. Laser welding in a reduced gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results on the effects of reduced gravity on laser welding of stainless steel and other materials are reported. Laser welding experiments using a low power (10-18 watts) Nd-YAG laser have been performed on the NASA KC-135, which flies parabolic maneuvers to simulate reduced gravity conditions. Experiments on 0.005-0.010 inch thick stainless steel samples displayed a pronounced change in weld bead width, depth of penetration and surface ripple with changes in gravity level.

  3. Residual Stresses and Critical Initial Flaw Size Analyses of Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, Frederick W.; Raju, Ivatury, S.; Dawocke, David S.; Cheston, Derrick

    2009-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). A series of weld analyses are performed to determine the residual stresses in a critical region of the USS. Weld residual stresses both increase constraint and mean stress thereby having an important effect on the fatigue life. The purpose of the weld analyses was to model the weld process using a variety of sequences to determine the 'best' sequence in terms of weld residual stresses and distortions. The many factors examined in this study include weld design (single-V, double-V groove), weld sequence, boundary conditions, and material properties, among others. The results of this weld analysis are included with service loads to perform a fatigue and critical initial flaw size evaluation.

  4. APPLICATION OF TRIZ METHODOLOGY IN DIFFUSION WELDING SYSTEM OPTIMIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. RAVINDER REDDY

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Welding is tremendously used in metal joining processes in the manufacturing process. In recent years, diffusion welding method has significantly increased the quality of a weld. Nevertheless, diffusion welding has some extent short research and application progress. Therefore, diffusion welding has a lack of relevant information, concerned with the joining of thick and thin materials with or without interlayers, on welding design such as fixture, parameters selection and inte-grated design. This article intends to combine innovative methods in the application of diffusion welding design. This will help to decrease trial and error or failure risks in the welding process being guided by the theory of inventive problem solving (TRIZ design method. This article hopes to provide welding design personnel with innovative design ideas under research and for practical application.

  5. Linear friction welding of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhamji, Imran, E-mail: imran.bhamji@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [Manchester Materials Science Centre, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Preuss, Michael [Manchester Materials Science Centre, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Threadgill, Philip L. [Formerly with TWI Ltd., Cambridge, UK (now retired) (United Kingdom); Moat, Richard J. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Addison, Adrian C. [TWI Ltd., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Peel, Matthew J. [University of Bristol, Queens Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Linear friction welding is a feasible process for joining AISI316L. {yields} Most welds had tensile strengths superior to the parent material. {yields} Welding parameters had a significant impact on weld microstructure. {yields} Control of microstructure by controlling welding parameters is a process benefit. - Abstract: Linear friction welding is a solid state joining process established as a niche technology for the joining of aeroengine bladed disks. However, the process is not limited to this application, and therefore the feasibility of joining a common engineering austenitic steel, AISI 316L, has been explored. It was found that mechanically sound linear friction welds could be produced in 316L, with tensile properties in most welds exceeding those of the parent material. The mechanical properties of the welds were also found to be insensitive to relatively large changes in welding parameters. Texture was investigated in one weld using high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Results showed a strong {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace}< 1 1 2 > type texture at the centre of the weld, which is a typical shear texture in face centre cubic materials. Variations in welding parameters were seen to have a significant impact on the microstructures of welds. This was particularly evident in the variation of the fraction of delta ferrite, in the thermo-mechanically affected zone of the welds, with different process parameters. Analysis of the variation in delta ferrite, with different welding parameters, has produced some interesting insights into heat generation and dissipation during the process. It is hoped that a greater understanding of the process could help to make the parameter optimisation process, when welding 316L as well as other materials, more efficient.

  6. Aluminum-Scandium Alloys: Material Characterization, Friction Stir Welding, and Compatibility With Hydrogen Peroxide (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Proj. No. 04-14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.; Chen, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the development of several high-strength aluminum (Al) alloys that are compatible with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) propellant for NASA Hypersonic-X (Hyper-X) vehicles fuel tanks and structures. The yield strengths for some of these Al-magnesium-based alloys are more than 3 times stronger than the conventional 5254-H112 Al alloy, while maintaining excellent H2O2 compatibility similar to class 1 5254 alloy. The alloy development strategy is to add scandium, zirconium, and other transitional metals with unique electrochemical properties, which will not act as catalysts, to decompose the highly concentrated 90 percent H2O2. Test coupons are machined from sheet metals for H2O2 long-term exposure testing and mechanical properties testing. In addition, the ability to weld the new alloys using friction stir welding has also been explored. The new high-strength alloys could represent an enabling material technology for Hyper-X vehicles, where flight weight reduction is a critical requirement.

  7. Effect of Welding Current and Time on the Microstructure, Mechanical Characterizations, and Fracture Studies of Resistance Spot Welding Joints of AISI 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianersi, Danial; Mostafaei, Amir; Mohammadi, Javad

    2014-09-01

    This article aims at investigating the effect of welding parameters, namely, welding current and welding time, on resistance spot welding (RSW) of the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel sheets. The influence of welding current and welding time on the weld properties including the weld nugget diameter or fusion zone, tensile-shear load-bearing capacity of welded materials, failure modes, energy absorption, and microstructure of welded nuggets was precisely considered. Microstructural studies and mechanical properties showed that the region between interfacial to pullout mode transition and expulsion limit is defined as the optimum welding condition. Electron microscopic studies indicated different types of delta ferrite in welded nuggets including skeletal, acicular, and lathy delta ferrite morphologies as a result of nonequilibrium phases, which can be attributed to a fast cooling rate in the RSW process. These morphologies were explained based on Shaeffler, WRC-1992, and pseudo-binary phase diagrams. The optimum microstructure and mechanical properties were achieved with 8-kA welding current and 4-cycle welding time in which maximum tensile-shear load-bearing capacity or peak load of the welded materials was obtained at 8070 N, and the failure mode took place as button pullout with tearing from the base metal. Finally, fracture surface studies indicated that elongated dimples appeared on the surface as a result of ductile fracture in the sample welded in the optimum welding condition.

  8. Refurbishment of damaged tools using the combination of GTAW and laser beam welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tušek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of two welding processes for the refurbishment of damaged industrial tools. In the first part the problem is presented followed by the comparison of GTAW and laser welding in terms of repair welding of damaged tools. The macrosections of the welds show the difference between both welding processes in repairing of damaged tools. At the conclusion the main findings are presented. In many cases it is useful to use both welding processes in order to achieve better weld quality and to make welding more economical. The order of the technology used depends on the tool material, the use of the tool and the tool damage.

  9. Welding Curtains

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Concept of transparent welding curtains made of heavy duty vinyl originated with David F. Wilson, President of Wilson Sales Company. In 1968, Wilson's curtains reduced glare of welding arc and blocked ultraviolet radiation. When later research uncovered blue light hazards, Wilson sought improvement of his products. He contracted Dr. Charles G. Miller and James B. Stephens, both of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and they agreed to undertake development of a curtain capable of filtering out harmful irradiance, including ultraviolet and blue light and provide protection over a broad range of welding operation. Working on their own time, the JPL pair spent 3 years developing a patented formula that includes light filtering dyes and small particles of zinc oxide. The result was the Wilson Spectra Curtain.

  10. Hybrid manufacturing processes for fusion welding and friction stir welding of aerospace grade aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegesky, Megan Alexandra

    Friction stir welding and processing can provide for joints in aerospace grade aluminum alloys that have preferable material properties as compared to fusion welding techniques. Aerospace grade aluminum alloys such as AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 are considered non-weldable by traditional fusion welding techniques. Improved mechanical properties over previously used techniques are usually preferable for aerospace applications. Therefore, by combining traditional fusion welding and friction stir processing techniques, it could be plausible to create more difficult geometries in manufactured parts instead of using traditional techniques. While this combination of fusion welding and friction stir processing is not a new technology, its introduction to aerospace grade aluminum alloys as well as non-weldable alloys, is new. This is brought about by a lowered required clamping force required by adding a fusion weld before a friction stir processing technique. The changes in properties associated with joining techniques include: microstructural changes, changes in hardness, tensile strength, and corrosion resistance. This thesis illustrates these changes for the non-weldable AA2024-T351 and AA7075-T651 as well as the weldable alloy AA5052-H32. The microhardness, tensile strength and corrosion resistance of the four processing states: base material, fusion welded material, friction stir welded material, and friction stir processed fusion welded material is studied. The plausibility of this hybrid process for the three different materials is characterized, as well as plausible applications for this joining technique.

  11. The effect of post-welding conditions in friction stir welds: From weld simulation to Ductile Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    The post-welding stress state, strain history and material conditions of friction stir welded joints are often strongly idealized when used in subsequent modeling analyses, typically by neglecting one or more of the features above. But, it is obvious that the conditions after welding do influence...... software ANSYS, a thermo-mechanical model is employed to predict the thermally induced stresses and strains during welding, while an in-house finite element code is used to study the plastic flow localization and failure in a subsequent structural analysis. The coupling between the two models is made...... to plastic flow localization was observed, with a substantial influence on the specimen elongation at the onset of localization and thereby failure. This influence is, however, shown to be strongly affected by the applied boundary conditions. Specimens cut from the welded plate, transverse to the weld line...

  12. Explosive welding of undersea pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalker, A.W.

    1978-02-01

    The phenomenon of explosive welding has been known informally for many years. A number of investigations reported the occurerence of solid phase bonds as an incidental effect when using high explosives in association with adjacent metal surfaces and probably the earliest formal record was the observation by Carl in 1944 of a bond between two copper discs in contact with a detonator. In 1957 Philipchuk reported what is now recognized as an explosive weld between aluminium channel sections and a steel die when carrying out explosive forming trials. Since then a great deal of development work has resulted in explosive welding becoming a well established manufacturing technique, particularly in the fields of cladding and the joining of tube/tubeplates. In more recent years the process has been extended to the welding of large diameter line pipe materials.

  13. 600 MW燃煤空冷机组特殊材料的焊接工艺%Special material welding process of 600 MW coal-fired air cooling unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨德云; 石南辉

    2013-01-01

    In order to of air cooling unit welding construction can have a better understanding, through their participation in the installation of the observation of shanxi mountain power plant phase ii 2×600 MW coal-fired empty cold engineering #3 unit project construction management experience was summarized, with emphasis on the special materials of the main parts of welding process (such as: SA335 - P91 joint of hot,WB36 steel welding,TP347H welding) were introduced,the hope can give similar unit installation construction and provide some reference,this project won the "2009 annual national excellent welding engineering award".%为更好地了解空冷机组焊接施工,通过对某发电厂二期2×600 MW燃煤空冷工程#3机组工程的施工管理经验进行总结,重点对特殊材料主要部件的焊接工艺(如:SA335-P91焊口的后热、WB36钢焊接、TP347H的焊接)加以介绍,希望能给类似机组的安装施工提供一些借鉴.

  14. Laser welding of maraging steel rocket motor casing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This presentation looks at the experimental procedure and results of laser welding of maraging steel rocker motor casing. It concludes that a fracture occurred in weld metal of autogenous welding and that a fracture occurred in base material when...

  15. Marangoni driven free surface flows in liquid weld pools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saldi, Z.S.

    2012-01-01

    Extending the weldability of novel materials, and improving the weld quality by tailoring weld microstructures are key factors to obtain the welding techniques demanded in the modern manufacturing industries. This can be done, for example, by feeding chemical elements from a consumable wire into the

  16. Marangoni driven free surface flows in liquid weld pools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saldi, Z.S.

    2012-01-01

    Extending the weldability of novel materials, and improving the weld quality by tailoring weld microstructures are key factors to obtain the welding techniques demanded in the modern manufacturing industries. This can be done, for example, by feeding chemical elements from a consumable wire into the

  17. The Low Pressure Gas Effects on the Potency of AN Electron Beam on Ceramic Fabric Materials for Space Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C.; Fragomeni, James M.

    2002-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal or electron beam impingement could damage or burn through the fabric of the astronauts extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) during electron beam welding exercises performed in space. An 8 kV electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 mA from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427°C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 s at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6 to 24 in. At both closer (2 in) and farther (48 in) standoff distances, the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  18. Weld repair method for aluminum lithium seam

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, William Floyd (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel John (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium plates are butt-welded by juxtaposing the plates and making a preliminary weld from the rear or root side of the seam. An initial weld is then made from the face side of the seam, which may cause a defect in the root portion. A full-size X-ray is made and overlain over the seam to identify the defects. The defect is removed from the root side, and rewelded. Material is then removed from the face side, and the cavity is rewelded. The procedure repeats, alternating from the root side to the face side, until the weld is sound.

  19. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  20. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  1. Microstructure analysis in friction welding of copper and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, A. G. Wahyu; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.

    2016-04-01

    The Friction welding is a welding method with utilizing heat generated due to friction. Surfaces of two materials to be joined, one rotates the other being idle, is contacted by a pressure force. Friction on the second contact surface is done continuously so that the heat generated by the continuous friction will continue to rise. With the heat and the pressure force on the second surface to the second meeting of the material reaches its melting temperature then there is the process of welding. This paper examines the influence of the pressure force, rotational speed and contact time on friction welding of Aluminum (Al) and Copper (Cu) to the quality of welded joints. Friction welding process is performed on a friction welding machine that is equipped with the loading mechanism. The parameters used are the pressure force, rotational speed and friction time. Determination of the quality of welding is done by testing the tensile strength, hardness, and micro structure on the weld joint areas. The results showed that the friction welding quality is very good, this is evidenced by the results of a tensile strength test where the fault occurs outside the weld joint and increased violence in the weld joint. On the results visually cuts the welding area did not reveal any porosity so that it can be concluded that each metal contacts have melted perfectly and produce a connection with good quality.

  2. Analysis of welding distortion due to narrow-gap welding of upper port plug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Pankaj, E-mail: panu012@yahoo.co.i [Department of Ocean Engineering and Naval Architecture, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, Pin 721302 (India); Mandal, N.R., E-mail: nrm@naval.iitkgp.ernet.i [Department of Ocean Engineering and Naval Architecture, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, Pin 721302 (India); Vasu, Parameswaran, E-mail: parameswaran.vasu@iter-india.or [ITER-India, Institute of Plasma Research, Ahmedabad (India); Padasalag, Shrishail B., E-mail: subhasis.panja@iter-india.or [ITER-India, Institute of Plasma Research, Ahmedabad (India)

    2010-08-15

    Narrow-gap welding is a low distortion welding process. This process allows very thick plates to be joined using fewer weld passes as compared to conventional V-groove or double V-groove welding. In case of narrow-gap arc welding as the heat input and weld volume is low, it reduces thermal stress leading to reduction of both residual stress and distortion. In this present study the effect of narrow-gap welding was studied on fabrication of a scaled down port plug in the form of a trapezoidal box made of 10 mm thick mild steel (MS) plates using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Inherent strain method was used for numerical prediction of resulting distortions. The numerical results compared well with that of the experimentally measured distortion. The validated numerical scheme was used for prediction of weld induced distortion due to narrow-gap welding of full scale upper port plug made of 60 mm thick SS316LN material as is proposed for use in ITER project. It was observed that it is feasible to fabricate the said port plug keeping the distortions minimum within about 7 mm using GTAW for root pass welding followed by SMAW for filler runs.

  3. Resistance Welding of Thermoplastic Composites: Process and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to thermoset composites, thermoplastic composites are drawing more and more attention by aircraft industries not only due to their excellent material properties but also due to their potentials to reduce cycle time and structure cost by using low-cost manufacturing technologies such as welding. Resistance welding has been regarded as one of the most promising welding techniques owing to the low energy consumption, simplicity of welding operation and capability for scaling up. Previou...

  4. Influence of the parameters of a high-frequency acoustic wave on the structure, properties, and plastic flow of metal in the zone of a joint of materials welded by ultrasound-assisted explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, A. P.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Kuz'min, E. V.; Dorodnikov, A. N.

    2017-05-01

    The results of an investigation of the influence of the parameters of high-frequency acoustic wave on the structure and properties of the zone of joint of homogeneous metals bonded by explosive welding under the action of ultrasound have been presented. The influence of the frequency and amplitude of ultrasonic vibrations on the structure and properties of the explosively welded joints compared with the samples welded without the application of ultrasound has been established. The action of high-frequency acoustic waves on the metal leads to a reduction in the dynamic yield stress, which changes the properties of the surface layers of the metal and the conditions of the formation of the joint of the colliding plates upon the explosive welding. It has been shown that the changes in the length and amplitude of waves that arise in the weld joint upon the explosive welding with the simultaneous action of ultrasonic vibrations are connected with a decrease in the magnitude of the deforming pulse and time of action of the compressive stresses that exceed the dynamic yield stress beyond the point of contact.

  5. Structural and mechanical properties of welded joints of reduced activation martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filacchioni, G. E-mail: gianni.filacchioni@casaccia.enea.it; Montanari, R.; Tata, M.E.; Pilloni, L

    2002-12-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding and electron beam welding methods were used to realise welding pools on plates of reduced activation martensitic steels. Structural and mechanical features of these simulated joints have been investigated in as-welded and post-welding heat-treated conditions. The research allowed to assess how each welding technique affects the original mechanical properties of materials and to find suitable post-welding heat treatments. This paper reports results from experimental activities on BATMAN II and F82H mod. steels carried out in the frame of the European Blanket Project - Structural Materials Program.

  6. Follow the track: The effects of silicon dioxide on GTA welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2001-01-01

    Silicon dioxide, in other words sand, turns out to be a highly useful helper for arc welding processes. It can be used as a tracer for a welding robot to follow the weld line and it can also make welding go faster and "deeper". At the Materials Science department of the Delft University of Technolog

  7. Resistance spot welding of a complicated joint in new advanced high strength steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nick den Uijl; Joop Pauwelussen

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this article is to investigate resistance spot welding of a complicated welding configuration of three sheets of dissimilar steel sheet materials with shunt welds, using simulations. The configuration used resembles a case study of actual welds in automotive applications. One of the

  8. Resistance spot welding of a complicated joint in new advanced high strength steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijl, Nick den; Pauwelussen, Joop

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this article is to investigate resistance spot welding of a complicated welding configuration of three sheets of dissimilar steel sheet materials with shunt welds, using simulations. The configuration used resembles a case study of actual welds in automotive applications. One of the stee

  9. Laser micro welding of copper and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mys, Ihor; Schmidt, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Aluminum combines comparably good thermal and electrical properties with a low price and a low material weight. These properties make aluminum a promising alternative to copper for a large number of electronic applications, especially when manufacturing high volume components. However, a main obstacle for a wide use of this material is the lack of a reliable joining process for the interconnection of copper and aluminum. The reasons for this are a large misalignment in the physical properties and even more a poor metallurgical affinity of both materials that cause high crack sensitivity and the formation of brittle intermetallic phases during fusion welding. This paper presents investigations on laser micro welding of copper and aluminum with the objective to eliminate brittle intermetallic phases in the welding structure. For these purposes a combination of spot welding, a proper beam offset and special filler material are applied. The effect of silver, nickel and tin filler materials in the form of thin foils and coatings in a thickness range 3-100 μm has been investigated. Use of silver and tin filler materials yields to a considerable improvement of the static and dynamic mechanical stability of welded joints. The analysis of the weld microstructure shows that an application even of small amounts of suitable filler materials helps to avoid critical, very brittle intermetallic phases on the interface between copper and solidified melt in the welded joints.

  10. A new method for welding aluminum alloy LY12CZ sheet with high strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    From the viewpoint of welding mechanics, a new welding technology-trailing peening was applied firstly to weld aluminum alloy LY12CZ sheet with high susceptibility to hot cracking. Trailing peening can exert a transverse extrusion strain on the metal in brittle temperature region (BTR) which can compensate for the tensioning strain during the cooling procedure post welding. So, welding hot cracking of LY12CZ sheet can be controlled effectively on the special jig for hot cracking experiment, and the phenomenon of hot cracking can't be found in specimens with large dimensions finally. At the same time, welding with trailing peening can decrease welding distortion caused by longitudinal and transverse shrinkage of weld obviously. Due to strengthening the poor position-weld toe during the process of welding, the residual stress distribution of welded joint is more reasonable. Contrast with conventional welding, mechanical properties such as tensile strength, prolongation ratio and cold-bending angle of welded joint with trailing peening can be improved obviously, and rupture position of welded joint transits from weld toe at conventional welding to weld metal at trailing peening. So, welding with trailing peening can be regarded as a dynamic welding method with low stress, little distortion and hot cracking-free really. As far as theoretical analysis is concerned, the technology of trailing peening can be used to weld the materials with high susceptibility to hot cracking such as LY12CZ and LD10, and solve the welding distortion of thin plate-shell welded structures which contain closed welds such as flange. In addition, the technology of trailing peening has many advantages: simple device, high efficiency, low cost and flexible application which make the welding method have widely applied foreground in the field of aeronautics and aerospace.

  11. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Yurtisik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex microstructure without compromising the welding efficiency. 11.1 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plates were joined in a single-pass using this novel technique. Same plates were also subjected to conventional gas metal arc and plasma arc welding processes, providing benchmarks for the investigation of the weldability of the material. In the first place, the hybrid welding process enabled us to achieve less heat input compared to gas metal arc welding. Consequently, the precipitation of secondary phases, which are known to be detrimental to the toughness and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels, was significantly suppressed in both fusion and heat affected zones. Secondly, contrary to other keyhole techniques, proper cooling time and weld metal chemistry were achieved during the process, facilitating sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite in the ferrite phase.

  12. Fundamentals of Welding. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    These instructional materials assist teachers in improving instruction on the fundamentals of welding. The following introductory information is included: use of this publication; competency profile; instructional/task analysis; related academic and workplace skills list; tools, materials, and equipment list; and 27 references. Seven units of…

  13. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 3: Materials for Non-Welded Rotors, Buckets, and BoltingMaterials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Deepak

    2015-09-15

    The primary objective of the task was to characterize the materials suitable for mechanically coupled rotor, buckets and bolting operating with an inlet temperature of 760°C (1400°F). A previous study DOE-FC26-05NT42442, identified alloys such as Haynes®282®, Nimonic 105, Inconel 740, Waspaloy, Nimonic 263, and Inconel 617 as potential alloys that met the requirements for the necessary operating conditions. Of all the identified materials, Waspaloy has been widely utilized in the aviation industry in the form of disk and other smaller forgings, and sufficient material properties and vendor experience exist, for the design and manufacture of large components. The European program characterizing materials for A-USC conditions are evaluating Nimonic 263 and Inconel 617 for large components. Inconel 740 has been studied extensively as a part of the boiler consortium and is code approved. Therefore, the consortium focused efforts in the development of material properties for Haynes®282® and Nimonic 105 to avoid replicative efforts and provide material choices/trade off during the detailed design of large components. Commercially available Nimonic 105 and Haynes®282® were evaluated for microstructural stability by long term thermal exposure studies. Material properties requisite for design such as tensile, creep / rupture, low cycle fatigue, high cycle fatigue, fatigue crack growth rate, hold-time fatigue, fracture toughness, and stress relaxation are documented in this report. A key requisite for the success of the program was a need demonstrate the successful scale up of the down-selected alloys, to large components. All property evaluations in the past were performed on commercially available bar/billet forms. Components in power plant equipment such as rotors and castings are several orders in magnitude larger and there is a real need to resolve the scalability issue. Nimonic 105 contains high volume fraction y’ [>50%], and hence the alloy is best suited

  14. Laser based spot weld characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  15. Research on CMT welding of nickel-based alloy with stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) welding technique is a new welding technique introduced by Fronius company. CMT welding of nickel-based alloy with stainless steel was carried out using CuSi3 filler wire in this paper. Effects of welding parameters, including welding current, welding speed, etc, on weld surface appearance were tested. Microstructure and mechanical properties of CMT weld were studied. The results show that the thickness of interface reaction layer of the nickel-based alloy is 14.3μm, which is only 4.33% of base material. The weld is made up of two phases,α-copper and iron-based solid solution. Rupture occurs initially at the welded seam near the edge of stainless steel in shear test. The maximum shear strength of the CuSi3 welded joint is 184.9MPa.

  16. Friction stir welding characteristics of two aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘会杰; 藤井英俊; 前田将克; 野城清

    2003-01-01

    The friction stir welding characteristics of the strain-hardened AA1050-H24 and precipitate-hardened AA2017-T351 aluminum alloys were examined in order to reveal the effects of the alloy properties on the friction stir welding behavior of the base materials. The results show that (1) for AA1050-H24, the weld possesses a smooth surface and clear ripples, there is no elliptical weld nugget in the weld, there is not discernible interface between the stir zone and the thermo-mechanically affected zone(TMAZ), and the internal defect of the weld looks like a long crack and is located in the lower part of the weld; (2) for AA2017-T351, the weld usually possesses a rough surface and visible ripples, the elliptical weld nugget clearly exists in the weld and there is obvious plastic flow and a discernible interface between the nugget and the TMAZ, and the internal defect of the weld is composed of many voids and distributed in the middle part of the weld; (3) the effective ranges of the welding parameters for AA1050-H24 and AA2017-T351 are both narrow, especially for the latter; and (4) the tensile strength efficiencies of the joints for the two typical alloys are similar, i e 79% for AA1050-H24 and 82% for AA2017-T351.

  17. Nanostructurization and thermal properties of polyethylenes' welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galchun, Anatoliy; Korab, Nikolay; Kondratenko, Volodymyr; Demchenko, Valeriy; Shadrin, Andriy; Anistratenko, Vitaliy; Iurzhenko, Maksym

    2015-03-01

    As it is known, polyethylene (PE) is one of the common materials in the modern world, and PE products take the major share on industrial and trade markets. For example, various types of technical PE like PE-63, PE-80, and PE-100 have wide industrial applications, i.e., in construction, for pipeline systems etc. A rapid development of plastics industry outstrips detailed investigation of welding processes and welds' formation mechanism, so they remain unexplored. There is still no final answer to the question how weld's microstructure forms. Such conditions limit our way to the understanding of the problem and, respectively, prevent scientific approaches to the welding of more complicated (from chemical point of view) types of polymers than PE. Taking into account state-of-the-art, the article presents results of complex studies of PE weld, its structure, thermophysical and operational characteristics, analysis of these results, and basing on that some hypotheses of welded joint and weld structure formation. It is shown that welding of dissimilar types of polyethylene, like PE-80 and PE-100, leads to the formation of better-ordered crystallites, restructuring the crystalline phase, and amorphous areas with internal stresses in the welding zone.

  18. Improving Fatigue Performance of AHSS Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; ERDMAN III, DONALD L [ORNL; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Kelly, Steve [ArcelorMittal USA; Hou, Wenkao [ArcelorMittal USA; Yan, Benda [ArcelorMittal USA; Wang, Zhifeng [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Yu, Zhenzhen [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Liu, Stephen [Colorado School of Mines, Golden

    2015-03-01

    Reported herein is technical progress on a U.S. Department of Energy CRADA project with industry cost-share aimed at developing the technical basis and demonstrate the viability of innovative in-situ weld residual stresses mitigation technology that can substantially improve the weld fatigue performance and durability of auto-body structures. The developed technology would be costeffective and practical in high-volume vehicle production environment. Enhancing weld fatigue performance would address a critical technology gap that impedes the widespread use of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and other lightweight materials for auto body structure light-weighting. This means that the automotive industry can take full advantage of the AHSS in strength, durability and crashworthiness without the concern of the relatively weak weld fatigue performance. The project comprises both technological innovations in weld residual stress mitigation and due-diligence residual stress measurement and fatigue performance evaluation. Two approaches were investigated. The first one was the use of low temperature phase transformation (LTPT) weld filler wire, and the second focused on novel thermo-mechanical stress management technique. Both technical approaches have resulted in considerable improvement in fatigue lives of welded joints made of high-strength steels. Synchrotron diffraction measurement confirmed the reduction of high tensile weld residual stresses by the two weld residual stress mitigation techniques.

  19. Development of a comprehensive weld process model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Zacharia, T.; Paul, A.

    1997-05-01

    This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) combines CTC`s expertise in the welding area and that of LMES to develop computer models and simulation software for welding processes. This development is of significant impact to the industry, including materials producers and fabricators. The main thrust of the research effort was to develop a comprehensive welding simulation methodology. A substantial amount of work has been done by several researchers to numerically model several welding processes. The primary drawback of most of the existing models is the lack of sound linkages between the mechanistic aspects (e.g., heat transfer, fluid flow, and residual stress) and the metallurgical aspects (e.g., microstructure development and control). A comprehensive numerical model which can be used to elucidate the effect of welding parameters/conditions on the temperature distribution, weld pool shape and size, solidification behavior, and microstructure development, as well as stresses and distortion, does not exist. It was therefore imperative to develop a comprehensive model which would predict all of the above phenomena during welding. The CRADA built upon an already existing three-dimensional (3-D) welding simulation model which was developed by LMES which is capable of predicting weld pool shape and the temperature history in 3-d single-pass welds. However, the model does not account for multipass welds, microstructural evolution, distortion and residual stresses. Additionally, the model requires large resources of computing time, which limits its use for practical applications. To overcome this, CTC and LMES have developed through this CRADA the comprehensive welding simulation model described above.

  20. Thermomechanical Modelling of Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2009-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a fully coupled thermomechanical process and should in general be modelled as such. Basically, there are two major application areas of thermomechanical models in the investigation of the FSW process: i) Analysis of the thermomechanical conditions such as e.g. heat...... generation and local material deformation (often referred to as flow) during the welding process itself. ii) Prediction of the residual stresses that will be present in the joint structure post to welding. While the former in general will call for a fully-coupled thermomechanical procedure, however...... for the FSW process at hand, the heat generation must either be prescribed analytically or based on a fully coupled analysis of the welding process itself. Along this line, a recently proposed thermal-pseudo-mechanical model is presented in which the temperature dependent yield stress of the weld material...

  1. Shielding gas effect on weld characteristics in arc-augmented laser welding process of super austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiya, P.; Kumar Mishra, Mahendra; Soundararajan, R.; Shanmugarajan, B.

    2013-02-01

    A series of hybrid welding (gas metal arc welding-CO2 laser beam welding) experiments were conducted on AISI 904L super austenitic stainless steel sheet of 5 mm thickness. A detailed study of CO2 Laser-GMAW hybrid welding experiments with different shielding gas mixtures (100% He, 50% He+50% Ar, 50%He+45% Ar+5% O2, and 45% He+45% Ar+10% N2) were carried out and the results are presented. The resultant welds were subjected to detailed mechanical and microstructural characterization. Hardness testing revealed that the hardness values in the fusion zone were higher than the base material irrespective of the parameters. Transverse tensile testing showed that the joint efficiency is 100% with all the shielding gas experimented. Impact energy values of the welds were also found to be higher than the base material and the fractrograph taken in scanning electron microscope (SEM) has shown that the welds exhibited dimple fracture similar to the base material.

  2. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  3. Influência do material de base sobre o rendimento de fusão em soldagem a arco Influence of base material on the melting efficiency in arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruham Pablo Reis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar o comportamento do rendimento bruto de fusão em soldagem a arco frente a diferentes tipos de material de base (aço ao carbono, aço inoxidável e alumínio. Como extensão, objetivou-se também estimar de forma indireta o rendimento térmico do processo em questão usando-se estimação de isotermas por método analítico. Para isto, foram feitas soldagens sobre placas de teste utilizando-se o processo TIG nos três materiais em dois níveis de corrente de soldagem. Foi verificado que o rendimento bruto de fusão é muito baixo (menor que 10%, mas tende a aumentar com a elevação do nível de corrente de soldagem (efeito da dimensão da peça. O alumínio apresentou o menor rendimento de fusão, tendo o aço inoxidável apresentado o melhor aproveitamento do calor imposto. Em relação ao rendimento térmico, a metodologia proposta não se mostrou adequada.The aim of this work was to determine the behavior of the gross melting efficiency in arc welding towards different types of materials (carbon steel, stainless steel and aluminum alloy. An extra objective was to indirectly estimate the thermal efficiency of the process using the estimation of isotherms by analytic methods. For that, welds were carried out over three materials at two welding current levels using the GTAW process. It was verified that the melting efficiency is very low (lower than 10%, yet it rises by increasing the current level (effect of material size. The aluminum alloy presented the lowest melting efficiency in contrast to the highest heat yield of the stainless steel. With respect to the thermal efficiency, the proposed methodology was not adequate.

  4. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  5. MM99.81 Projection welding of complex geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars

    The objective of this work has been to establish a profound knowledge about design rules for projection welding geometries dependent of the actual material combination.Design rules and recommendations for geometries and projections in projection welding given in literature is summarised...... and these are catalogued into geometry-classes. A simulation software, SORPAS, based on the finite element method (FEM) is chosen as tool to investigate projection weld quality. SORPAS needs input of the material flow stress as function of strain, strain rate and temperature. Flow stress experiments are performed using...... been investigated.Two different welding geometries, disc with triangular ring projection welded to ring and hat welded to inside hole in ring, are both experimentally and numerically used to investigate the influence of different geometric parameters (thicknesses and angles) on weldability and weld...

  6. Laser welding in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Workman, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Autogenous welds in 304 stainless steel were performed by Nd-YAG laser heating in a simulated space environment. Simulation consists of welding on the NASA KC-135 aircraft to produce the microgravity and by containing the specimen in a vacuum chamber. Experimental results show that the microgravity welds are stronger, harder in the fusion zone, have deeper penetration and have a rougher surface rippling of the weld pool than one-g welds. To perform laser welding in space, a solar-pumped laser concept that significantly increases the laser conversion efficiency and makes welding viable despite the limited power availability of spacecraft is proposed.

  7. Prediction of welding residual stress of dissimilar metal weld of nozzle using finite element analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Nam Su; Kim, Jong Wook; Choi, Suhn; Kim, Tae Wan [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    The Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) of dissimilar metal weld based on Alloy 82/182 is one of major issues in material degradation of nuclear components. It is well known that the crack initiation and growth due to PWSCC is influenced by material's susceptibility to PWSCC and distribution of welding residual stress. Therefore, modeling the welding residual stress is of interest in understanding crack formation and growth in dissimilar metal weld. Currently in Korea, a numerical round robin study is undertaken to provide guidance on the welding residual stress analysis of dissimilar metal weld. As a part of this effort, the present paper investigates distribution of welding resisual stress of a ferritic low alloy steel nozzle with dissimilar metal weld using Alloy 82/182. Two-dimensional thermo-mechanical finite element analyses are carried out to simulate multi-pass welding process on the basis of the detailed design and fabrication data. The present results are compared with those from other participants, and more works incorporating physical measurements are going to be performed to quantify the uncertainties relating to modelling assumptions.

  8. Microstructures and electrochemical behaviors of the friction stir welding dissimilar weld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Changbin; Zhang, Jiayan; Ge, Jiping

    2011-06-01

    By using optical microscope, the microstructures of 5083/6082 friction stir welding (FSW) weld and parent materials were analyzed. Meanwhile, at ambient temperature and in 0.2 mol/L NaHS03 and 0.6 mol/L NaCl solutionby gravimetric test, potentiodynamic polarization curve test, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, the electrochemical behavior of 5083/6082 friction stir welding weld and parent materials were comparatively investigated by gravimetric test, potentiodynamic polarization curve test, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation. The results indicated that at given processing parameters, the anti-corrosion property of the dissimilar weld was superior to those of the 5083 and 6082 parent materials.

  9. Numerical modeling of electron-beam welding of dissimilar metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krektuleva, R. A.; Cherepanov, O. I.; Cherepanov, R. O.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is devoted to numerical modeling of heat transfer processes and estimation of thermal stresses in weld seams created by electron beam welding of heterogeneous metals. The mathematical model is based on a system of equations that includes the Lagrange's variational equation of theory of plasticity and variational equation of M. Biot's principle to simulate the heat transfer processes. The two-dimensional problems (plane strain and plane stress) are considered for estimation of thermal stresses in welds considering differences of mechanical properties of welded materials. The model is developed for simulation of temperature fields and stresses during electron beam welding.

  10. Friction stir welding (FSW of aluminium foam sandwich panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bušić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the influence of welding speed and tool tilt angle upon the mechanical properties at the friction stir welding of aluminium foam sandwich panels. Double side welding was used for producing butt welds of aluminium sandwich panels applying insertion of extruded aluminium profile. Such insertion provided lower pressure of the tool upon the aluminium panels, providing also sufficient volume of the material required for the weldment formation. Ultimate tensile strength and flexural strength for three-point bending test have been determined for samples taken from the welded joints. Results have confirmed anticipated effects of independent variables.

  11. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  12. Alternating grain orientation and weld solidification cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, S.; Le, Y.

    1985-10-01

    A new mechanism for reducing weld solidification cracking was proposed, based on the concept of the crack path and resistance to crack propagation, and its effectiveness was verified in magnetically oscillated GTA welds of a rather crack susceptible material 2014 aluminum alloy. This mechanism, i.e., alternating grain orientation, was most pronounced in welds made with transverse arc oscillation of low frequency and high amplitude, and solidification cracking was dramatically reduced in these welds. The effect of the arc oscillation pattern, amplitude, and frequency on the formation of alternating columnar grains and the reduction of solidification cracking in GTA welds of 2014 aluminum alloy was examined and explained. The present study demonstrated for the first time that columnar grains can, in fact, be very effective in reducing solidification cracking, provided that they are oriented favorably.

  13. Assessment of the integrity of welded pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Šarkoćević, Živče; Arsić, Miodrag; Sedmak, Aleksandar; MEĐO, Bojan; Mišić, Milan; id_orcid 0000-0003-0550-1851

    2014-01-01

    The subject of the paper is analysis of the integrity of welded pipes made of API J55 steel by high frequency contact welding (HF). Experimental research on the mechanical properties of the base material was conducted on pipes withdrawn from exploatation after 70 000 hours at service. Defect influence of the surface crack on the integrity of pipes was tested using hydrostatic pressure of pipes with axial surface crack in the base material. Fracture behaviour was tested using modified compact ...

  14. Grooving corrosion of seam welded oil pipelines

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    24” pipeline carrying oil was failed in the form of longitudinal crack at the 6 O’clock position resulting in oil spill. The failed pipe was investigated to reveal the main cause of its failure. The procedure of investigation was built on studying the intact pipe, rupture area, parent material, and intact weld. Results of chemical analysis, mechanical properties, and microstructure of the pipe material were confirmed with the specified standard. Cracks were originated from weld defected sites...

  15. Mechanics Model of Plug Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Q. K.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed for the mechanics of friction plug welding. The model accounts for coupling of plastic deformation (material flow) and thermal response (plastic heating). The model predictions of the torque, energy, and pull force on the plug were compared to the data of a recent experiment, and the agreements between predictions and data are encouraging.

  16. Welding. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual on modern gas and arc welding is one of a series of power mechanics texts and visual aids on the servicing of automotive and off-the-road agricultural and construction equipment. Materials provide basic information with illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and laymen. The eight sections…

  17. Effect of welding parameters and tool shape on properties of friction stir welding of Aluminum alloy AA- 6061

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hussain Albloushi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is a widely used solid state joining process for soft materials such as aluminium alloys because it avoids many of the common problems of fusion welding. It has many benefits when applied to welding of aluminum alloys. FSW process parameters such as welding speed, rotational speed and tool geometry play vital roles in the weld quality. The aim of this research is to investigate the effects of different welding speeds, rotational speeds and tool pin profile on the weld quality of a AA6061 aluminum alloy. A friction stir welding tool consists of rotating shoulder and pin that heats the working piece by friction and moves a softened alloy around it to form a joint. In this research work the effect of the tool shape and welding parameters (rotating speed and welding speed on the mechanical properties of an aluminium plates will be investigated experimentally. The induced heat during the welding process played the main role in the mechanical and appearance of the joints, which is related to the welding parameters.

  18. Laser power coupling efficiency in conduction and keyhole welding of austenitic stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Nath; R Sridhar; P Ganesh; R Kaul

    2002-06-01

    Laser welding of thin sheets of AISI 304 stainless steel was carried out with high power CW CO2 laser. The laser power utilized in the welding process was estimated using the experimental results and the dimensionless parameter model for laser welding; and also the energy balance equation model. Variation of laser welding efficiency with welding speed and mode of welding was studied. Welding efficiency was high for high-speed conduction welding of thin sheets and also in keyhole welding process at high laser powers. Effect of pre-oxidization of the surface and powder as filler material on laser power coupling is also reported. The paper also discusses effect of microstructure on the cracking susceptibility of laser welds.

  19. Laser transmission welding of Clearweld-coated polyethylene glycol terephthalate by incremental scanning technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Wang, A. H.; Weng, Z. K.; Xia, H. B.

    2016-06-01

    Transmission laser welding using Incremental Scanning Technique(TWIST) mode and conventional contour welding mode were adopted to investigate laser transmission welding of 0.5 mm thick PET plate. A 1064 nm fiber laser was used to weld PET at the (TWIST) mode, and an 808 nm diode laser was applied to conduct the conventional contour welding. The Clearweld coating was used as laser absorbing material. The influences of laser parameters (i.e. defocusing distance, distance between two circles) on the quality of weld seams were analyzed by optical microscopy. Moreover, geometry and shear strength of the weld zone were tested to optimize laser parameters. Additionally, the water vapor permeability (WVP) of weld seams was measured to test hermetical capacity. Results show that the shear strength and hermetic capacity of weld seam by TWIST mode are at the same level in comparison with that of the conventional contour welding.

  20. Development of a Comprehensive Weld Process Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Zacharia, T.

    1997-05-01

    This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) combines CTC's expertise in the welding area and that of LMES to develop computer models and simulation software for welding processes. This development is of significant impact to the industry, including materials producers and fabricators. The main thrust of the research effort was to develop a comprehensive welding simulation methodology. A substantial amount of work has been done by several researchers to numerically model several welding processes. The primary drawback of most of the existing models is the lack of sound linkages between the mechanistic aspects (e.g., heat transfer, fluid flow, and residual stress) and the metallurgical aspects (e.g., microstructure development and control). A comprehensive numerical model which can be used to elucidate the effect of welding parameters/conditions on the temperature distribution, weld pool shape and size, solidification behavior, and microstructure development, as well as stresses and distortion, does not exist. It was therefore imperative to develop a comprehensive model which would predict all of the above phenomena during welding. The CRADA built upon an already existing three- dimensional (3-D) welding simulation model which was developed by LMES which is capable of predicting weld pool shape and the temperature history in 3-d single-pass welds. However, the model does not account for multipass welds, microstructural evolution, distortion and residual stresses. Additionally, the model requires large resources of computing time, which limits its use for practical applications. To overcome this, CTC and LMES have developed through this CRADA the comprehensive welding simulation model described above. The following technical tasks have been accomplished as part of the CRADA. 1. The LMES welding code has been ported to the Intel Paragon parallel computer at

  1. Microhardness Testing of Aluminum Alloy Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohanon, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    A weld is made when two pieces of metal are united or fused together using heat or pressure, and sometimes both. There are several different types of welds, each having their own unique properties and microstructure. Strength is a property normally used in deciding which kind of weld is suitable for a certain metal or joint. Depending on the weld process used and the heat required for that process, the weld and the heat-affected zone undergo microstructural changes resulting in stronger or weaker areas. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is the region that has experienced enough heat to cause solid-state microstructural changes, but not enough to melt the material. This area is located between the parent material and the weld, with the grain structure growing as it progresses respectively. The optimal weld would have a short HAZ and a small fluctuation in strength from parent metal to weld. To determine the strength of the weld and decide whether it is suitable for the specific joint certain properties are looked at, among these are ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% offset yield strength and hardness. Ultimate tensile strength gives the maximum load the metal can stand while the offset yield strength gives the amount of stress the metal can take before it is 0.2% longer than it was originally. Both of these are good tests, but they both require breaking or deforming the sample in some way. Hardness testing, however, provides an objective evaluation of weld strengths, and also the difference or variation in strength across the weld and HAZ which is difficult to do with tensile testing. Hardness is the resistance to permanent or plastic deformation and can be taken at any desired point on the specimen. With hardness testing, it is possible to test from parent metal to weld and see the difference in strength as you progress from parent material to weld. Hardness around grain boundaries and flaws in the material will show how these affect the strength of the metal while still

  2. EVALUATION OF MICROSTRUCTURAL STABILITY OF DISSIMILAR WELD JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Šohaj

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The microstructural changes occurring in the weld joint P92/316Ti during his long-term exposure at high temperature were studied. In parallel to experiments were carried out calculations of phase equilibria for the base materials and the weld joint using the ThermoCalc software. Based on the experimental results and computational modeling results were evaluated a microstructural stability and the application of the base materials and the weld joint.

  3. EVALUATION OF MICROSTRUCTURAL STABILITY OF DISSIMILAR WELD JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Šohaj

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The microstructural changes occurring in the weld joint P92/316Ti during his long-term exposure at high temperature were studied. In parallel to experiments were carried out calculations of phase equilibria for the base materials and the weld joint using the ThermoCalc software. Based on the experimental results and computational modeling results were evaluated a microstructural stability and the application of the base materials and the weld joint.

  4. EVALUATION OF MICROSTRUCTURAL STABILITY OF DISSIMILAR WELD JOINTS

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Šohaj

    2012-01-01

    The microstructural changes occurring in the weld joint P92/316Ti during his long-term exposure at high temperature were studied. In parallel to experiments were carried out calculations of phase equilibria for the base materials and the weld joint using the ThermoCalc software. Based on the experimental results and computational modeling results were evaluated a microstructural stability and the application of the base materials and the weld joint.

  5. Retractable Pin Tools for the Friction Stir Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Two companies have successfully commercialized a specialized welding tool developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Friction stir welding uses the high rotational speed of a tool and the resulting frictional heat created from contact to crush, 'stir' together, and forge a bond between two metal alloys. It has had a major drawback, reliance on a single-piece pin tool. The pin is slowly plunged into the joint between two materials to be welded and rotated as high speed. At the end of the weld, the single-piece pin tool is retracted and leaves a 'keyhole,' something which is unacceptable when welding cylindrical objects such as drums, pipes and storage tanks. Another drawback is the requirement for different-length pin tools when welding materials of varying thickness. An engineer at the MSFC helped design an automatic retractable pin tool that uses a computer-controlled motor to automatically retract the pin into the shoulder of the tool at the end of the weld, preventing keyholes. This design allows the pin angle and length to be adjusted for changes in material thickness and results in a smooth hole closure at the end of the weld. Benefits of friction stir welding, using the MSFC retractable pin tool technology, include the following: The ability to weld a wide range of alloys, including previously unweldable and composite materials; provision of twice the fatigue resistance of fusion welds and no keyholes; minimization of material distortion; no creation of hazards such as welding fumes, radiation, high voltage, liquid metals, or arcing; automatic retraction of the pin at the end of the weld; and maintaining full penetration of the pin.

  6. Welded solar cell interconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofel, E. J.; Browne, E. R.; Meese, R. A.; Vendura, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of the welding of solar-cell interconnects is compared with the efficiency of soldering such interconnects, and the cases in which welding may be superior are examined. Emphasis is placed on ultrasonic welding; attention is given to the solar-cell welding machine, the application of the welding process to different solar-cell configurations, producibility, and long-life performance of welded interconnects. Much of the present work has been directed toward providing increased confidence in the reliability of welding using conditions approximating those that would occur with large-scale array production. It is concluded that there is as yet insufficient data to determine which of three methods (soldering, parallel gap welding, and ultrasonic welding) provides the longest-duration solar panel life.

  7. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, S D; Wong, F M G; Gordon, S R; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2003-09-07

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the Yucca Mountain waste package program has been the integrity of container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal to determine their relative corrosion behavior in SCW at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCl at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the electrochemical behavior in the three tested solutions.

  8. Twinning in weld HAZ of ZK21 commercial magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The microstructure and properties of Mg ZK21 laser beam weld without filler were researched using optical microscopy (OM), electron microscopy and mechanical test. The results show that the fracture strain of the joints after laser beam welding reduces by about 10.7% at room temperature. By means of laser beam welding, the fusion zones contain tensile RS, while the base material far away from the fusion line is under balancing compressive RS. The microstructm-es of the weld were characterized by a narrow heat affected zone and twins. Significant { 10-12 } tension twins occur in the weld HAZ during laser welding processing. Due to the influence of temperature field and stress on morphologies, most of twins form twinning bands, which are nearly parallel to the welding direction.

  9. Friction stir welding (FSW process of copper alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miličić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyzes the structure of the weld joint of technically pure copper, which is realized using friction stir welding (FSW. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical processes of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Parameters of the FSW welding technology influencing the zone of the seam material and the mechanical properties of the resulting joint were analyzed. The physical joining consists of intense mixing the base material along the joint line in the “doughy” phase. Substantial plastic deformations immediately beneath the frontal surface of tool provide fine-grained structure and a good quality joint. The optimum shape of the tool and the optimum welding regime (pressure force, rotation speed and the traverse speed of the tool in the heat affected zone enable the achievement of the same mechanical properties as those of the basic material, which justifies its use in welding reliable structures.

  10. Friction Stir Welding of a Thick Al-Zn-Mg Alloy Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchibabu, V.; Reddy, G. M.; Kulkarni, D.; De, A.

    2016-03-01

    Al-Zn-Mg alloys are widely used as structural materials due to high strength-to-weight ratio and impact toughness. As fusion welds in these alloys commonly face hot cracking and macro porosity, friction stir welding is increasingly becoming the preferred recourse. We report here a detailed experimental study on friction stir welding of a specific Al-Zn-Mg alloy with its chemical compositions close to AA7039. The effect of tool rotational speed and welding speed on the weld profile, joint microstructure, and mechanical properties is studied extensively. The results show sound weld profiles and joint properties within the selected range of process conditions. Within the selected range of welding conditions, the welds made at a tool rotational speed of 350 rpm and welding speed of 3 mm/s have showed joint structure, tensile, and impact toughness properties fairly close to that of the base material.

  11. High Power Laser Welding. [of stainless steel and titanium alloy structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    A review of recent developments in high power, carbon dixoide laser welding is presented. Deep penetration welding in stainless steel to 0.5-in. thick, high speed welding in thin gage rimmed steel and gas shielded welding in Ti-6Al-4V alloy are described. The effects of laser power, power density, focusing optics, gas-shielding techniques, material properties and weld speed on weld quality and penetration are discussed. It is shown that laser welding performance in thin materials is comparable to that of electron beams. It is further shown that high quality welds, as evidenced by NDT, mechanical and metal-lographic tests, can be achieved. The potential of the laser for industrial welding applications is indicated.

  12. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plasti...... as a knowledge handbook for laser welding of plastic components. This document should provide the information for all aspects of plastic laser welding and help the design engineers to take all critical issues into consideration from the very beginning of the design phase....

  13. Structure and properties of joints produced by ultrasound-assisted explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, A. P.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Kuz'min, E. V.; Dorodnikov, A. N.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results of the effect of ultrasound on explosion welded materials. It has been established that simultaneous treatment with ultrasonic vibrations and explosion welding of the materials to be welded has a significant effect on the structure and properties of the heat-affected zone of formed joints.

  14. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wei [ORNL; Chen, Gaoqiang [ORNL; Chen, Jian [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  15. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Aneja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases with decreasing welding speed. Furthermore mechanical properties were also found to improve as the rotary speed increases and the same phenomenon was found to happen while using straight cylindrical threaded pin profile tool. The microstructure of the dissimilar joints revealed that at low welding speeds, the improved material mixing was observed. The similar phenomenon was found to happen at higher rotational speeds using straight cylindrical threaded tool.

  16. Joint performance of CO2 laser beam welding 5083-H321 aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Junfeng; Zhang Dongyun; Xiao Rongshi; Chen Kai; Zuo Tiechuan

    2007-01-01

    Laser beam welding of aluminum alloys is expected to offer good mechanical properties of welded joints. In this experimental work reported, CO2 laser beam autogenous welding and wire feed welding are conducted on 4mm thick 5083-H321 aluminum alloy sheets at different welding variables. The mechanical properties and microstructure characteristics of the welds are evaluated through tensile tests, micro-hardness tests, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental results indicate that both the tensile strength and hardness of laser beam welds are affected by the constitution of filler material, except the yield strength. The soften region of laser beam welds is not in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The tensile fracture of laser beam welded specimens takes place in the weld zone and close to the weld boundary because of different filler materials. Some pores are found on the fracture face, including hydrogen porosities and blow holes, but these pores have no influence on the tensile strength of laser beam welds. Tensile strength values of laser beam welds with filler wire are up to 345.57MPa, 93% of base material values, and yield strengths of laser beam welds are equivalent to those of base metal (264.50MPa).

  17. Laser welding of tailored blanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peças, P.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser welding has an incrising role in the automotive industry, namely on the sub-assemblies manufacturing. Several sheet-shape parts are laser welded, on a dissimilar combination of thicknesses and materials, and are afterwards formed (stamped being transformed in a vehicle body component. In this paper low carbon CO2 laser welding, on the thicknesses of 1,25 and 0,75 mm, formability investigation is described. There will be a description of how the laser welded blanks behave in different forming tests, and the influence of misalignment and undercut on the formibility. The quality is evaluated by measuring the limit strain and limit effective strain for the laser welded sheets and the base material, which will be presented in a forming limit diagram.

    A soldadura laser assume um papel cada vez mais importante na indústria automóvel, principalmente para a fabricação de sub-conjuntos constituídos por varias partes de chapa de diferentes espessuras (e diferentes materiais, que depois de estampados constituem um componente para integrar num veículo. Descreve-se neste artigo o trabalho de investigação de enformabilidade de chapa de ac.o de baixo carbono soldada por laser de CO2, nas espessuras de 1,25 e 0,75 mm. Apresenta-se uma descrição do comportamento das chapas soldadas por laser em diferentes testes de enformação, e a influência dos defeitos das soldaduras (desalinhamento e queda do banho-undercut no comportamento à enformação. A qualidade é avaliada pela medição da extensão limite e da extensão limite efectiva no material base e no material soldado, que serão representadas num diagrama de limite de enformabilidade.

  18. Ship construction and welding

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Nisith R

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses various aspects of ship construction, from ship types and construction materials, to welding technologies and accuracy control. The contents of the book are logically organized and divided into twenty-one chapters. The book covers structural arrangement with longitudinal and transverse framing systems based on the service load, and explains basic structural elements like hatch side girders, hatch end beams, stringers, etc. along with structural subassemblies like floors, bulkheads, inner bottom, decks and shells. It presents in detail double bottom construction, wing tanks & duct keels, fore & aft end structures, etc., together with necessary illustrations. The midship sections of various ship types are introduced, together with structural continuity and alignment in ship structures. With regard to construction materials, the book discusses steel, aluminum alloys and fiber reinforced composites. Various methods of steel material preparation are discussed, and plate cutting and form...

  19. MODELLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER WELDED INCOLOY 800 HT JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathiya Paulraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at finding the effect of laser welding speed on incoloy 800 HT. This alloy is one of the potential materials for Generation IV nuclear plants. Laser welding has several advantages over arc welding such as low fusion zone, low heat input and concentrated heat intensity. Three different welding speeds were chosen and CO2 laser welding was performed. 2D modeling and simulation were done using ANSYS 15 to find out the temperature distribution at different welding speeds and it was found that an increase in the welding speed decreased the temperature. Mechanical properties such as tensile strength, toughness and hardness were evaluated. The effect of welding speed on metallurgical characteristics was studied using optical microscopy (OM, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM with EDS, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD technique and fractographic analysis. From the results it was found that high welding speed (1400 mm/min decreased the joint strength. The M23C6 and Ni3Ti carbides were formed in a discrete chain and in a globular form along the grain boundaries of the weld region which increased the strength of the grain boundaries. Fractographic evaluations of the tested specimens for welding speed (1000 and 1200 mm/min showed deep and wide dimples indicating ductile failures.

  20. Narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding of ASTM A508 Class 4 steel for improved toughness properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penik, M.A. Jr. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Welding of heavy section steel has traditionally used the automatic submerged arc welding (ASAW) process because of the high deposition rates achievable. However, the properties, particularly fracture toughness, of the weld are often inferior when compared to base material. This project evaluated the use of narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to improve weld material properties. The welding procedures were developed for ASTM A508 Class 4 base material using a 1% Ni filler material complying to AWS Specification A.23-90-EF3-F3-N. A narrow groove joint preparation was used in conjunction with the GTAW process so competitive fabrication rates could be achieved when compared to the ASAW process. Weld procedures were developed to refine weld substructure to achieve better mechanical properties. Two heaters of weld wire were used to examine the effects of minor filler metal chemistry differences on weld mechanical properties. Extensive metallographic evaluations showed excellent weld quality with a refined microstructure. Chemical analysis of the weld metal showed minimal weld dilution by the base metal. Mechanical testing included bend and tensile tests to ensure weld quality and strength. A Charpy impact energy curve versus temperature and fracture toughness curve versus temperature were developed for each weld wire heat. Results of fracture toughness and Charpy impact testing indicated an improved transition temperature closer to that of the base material properties.

  1. Creep damage in welds of X 20 CrMoV 12 1 steel. Part 2 - Studies of long term service exposed material and damage data base and calculation of damage distribution and damage resistance; Krypskador i svetsar av X 20 CrMoV 12 1 staal. Etapp 2 - Studier av lingtidspiverkat material och skadedatabas samt berakning av skadefordelning och skadetilighet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan; Borggreen, Kjeld; Weilin Zang; Nilsson, Henrik; Samuelson, Aake

    2004-09-01

    The present project has been consisted of the following pieces of work on welds of X20 CrMoV 12 1: Analysis of, by use of replica testing, creep damage development in 368 welds in 11 Danish high pressure steam lines with operation up to 200,000 h. Metallographic investigations of four welds from a retired live steam line with approximately 182 000 h in operation. - Evaluation of the influence of the two most common etching methods on the interpretation of creep cavitation. Analysis of the time security of the material, i.e. influence of enhanced temperature or stress on creep life time. Finite element simulations of the creep behaviour of X20 welds where effects of HAZ creep properties, system stresses and degree of multiaxiality in the rupture criterion are studied. In addition a literature study on publications of creep life time in X20 steel was performed in a first, already reported part of the project. The results of the comprehensive replica testing and the metallographic investigations show clear-cut that welds of this material have an excellently long creep life that indeed will reach 200,000 h. The creep damage at that time is in general very limited. The typical creep life for welds of X20 can be evaluated to at least 250,000 h. The reason for that it is not possible to evaluate an even longer creep life is the fact that creep testing and finite element simulations show that creep elongation and creep damage will accelerate considerably later in the creep life than some low alloy steels. In the worst case this acceleration could start already just after 200,000 h. It is also demonstrated that welds of the X20 steel can stand system stresses much better than low alloy steels. Recommendations for how and when inspections and testing of welds of the current material should be performed have been issued. They have been adapted to the findings in the project. The recommendations can, as long as severe damage is absent, allow for longer inspection intervals

  2. Multilayered titanium-steel composite produced by explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyutina, Yu. N.; Skorohod, K. A.; Shevtsova, K. E.; Chesnokova, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    Multilayered titanium-steel composite consisting of alternating high-strength and ductile metallic materials were produced by explosive welding. Different types of weld joints formed in the composite were recognized by methods of microstructural analysis. Wave-shaped and flat geometry of welds are typical of steel and titanium layers, respectively. Structural features such as lack of penetration, shear bands, recrystallized metals and martensitic structure were detected in the vortex and weld-adjacent zones of impacted materials. The impact strength of the layered composite was 65% higher as compared to that of VT23 titanium alloy. A favorable role of interlayers in the multilayered composite has been confirmed by toughness tests.

  3. Ultrasonic Welding of Wires and Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Stefan; Wagner, Guntram; Eifler, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    In the automobile industry, ultrasonic metal welding is an established method. At the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering (WKK) at the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany, systematic investigations of the weldability of Al-wires and flat flexible copper cables were carried out. In the case of Al-wires, joints with cross-sectional area of up to 80 mm2 and tensile shear load of about 3500 N were finally realized. Furthermore, methods to reduce unintentional adherence between the sonotrode coupling face and the Al-wires were developed. To realize FFC joints, ultrasonic spot welding systems and ultrasonic torsion welding systems were used. A central purpose of these investigations is the development of a system to enable welding through the insulation of the FFC without weakening the base material.

  4. Ultrasonic Welding of Thermoplastic Composite Coupons for Mechanical Characterization of Welded Joints through Single Lap Shear Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Irene F; Palardy, Genevieve

    2016-02-11

    This paper presents a novel straightforward method for ultrasonic welding of thermoplastic-composite coupons in optimum processing conditions. The ultrasonic welding process described in this paper is based on three main pillars. Firstly, flat energy directors are used for preferential heat generation at the joining interface during the welding process. A flat energy director is a neat thermoplastic resin film that is placed between the parts to be joined prior to the welding process and heats up preferentially owing to its lower compressive stiffness relative to the composite substrates. Consequently, flat energy directors provide a simple solution that does not require molding of resin protrusions on the surfaces of the composite substrates, as opposed to ultrasonic welding of unreinforced plastics. Secondly, the process data provided by the ultrasonic welder is used to rapidly define the optimum welding parameters for any thermoplastic composite material combination. Thirdly, displacement control is used in the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the welded joints. According to this method, thermoplastic-composite flat coupons are individually welded in a single lap configuration. Mechanical testing of the welded coupons allows determining the apparent lap shear strength of the joints, which is one of the properties most commonly used to quantify the strength of thermoplastic composite welded joints.

  5. Identification of the Quality Spot Welding used Non Destructive Test-Ultrasonic Testing: (Effect of Welding Time)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifa, A.; Endramawan, T.; Badruzzaman

    2017-03-01

    Resistance Spot Welding (RSW) is frequently used as one way of welding is used in the manufacturing process, especially in the automotive industry [4][5][6][7]. Several parameters influence the process of welding points. To determine the quality of a welding job needs to be tested, either by damaging or testing without damage, in this study conducted experimental testing the quality of welding or identify quality of the nugget by using Non-Destructive Test (NDT) –Ultrasonic Testing (UT), in which the identification of the quality of the welding is done with parameter thickness of worksheet after welding using NDT-UT with use same material worksheet and have more thickness of worksheet, the thickness of the worksheet single plate 1mm, with the capability of propagation Ultrasonic Testing (UT) standard limited> 3 mm [1], welding process parameters such as the time difference between 1-10s and the welding current of 8 KV, visually Heat Affected Zone ( HAZ ) have different results due to the length of time of welding. UT uses a probe that is used with a frequency of 4 MHz, diameter 10 mm, range 100 and the couplant used is oil. Identification techniques using drop 6dB, with sound velocity 2267 m / s of Fe, with the result that the effect of the Welding time affect the size of the HAZ, identification with the lowest time 1s show results capable identified joined through NDT - UT.

  6. 9Ni钢及其焊材的研究与应用%Research and Application of 9Ni Steel and Its Welding Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚军; 杨飞

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the development history of low temperature 9Ni steel used for storage and transportation liquefied natural gas(LNG) was simply introduced, as well as the common chemical composition and mechanical properties of 9Ni steel at home and abroad. It emphasized some problems easily occurred in 9Ni steel welding process, such as hot crack, cold crack, arc blow and so on, provided control measures for welding hot crack. The submerged-arc welding flux CHF205 matched with wire CHW-NiCrMo-3, and submerged-arc welding flux CHF206 matched with wire CHW-NiCrMo-4. After welding, the weld deslagging is easy, without slag inclusion, undercut, stomates and other defects, moreover the weld possesses perfect plasticity, toughness and anti-cracking ability.%介绍了储存和运输液化天然气所用低温9Ni钢的发展历程,以及国内外常见9Ni钢的化学成分和力学性能。重点介绍了9Ni钢焊接过程中容易出现的问题,如热裂纹、冷裂纹、电弧磁偏吹等,给出了控制焊接热裂纹的措施。研制的埋弧焊剂CHF205配套焊丝CHW-NiCrMo-3、焊剂CHF206配套焊丝CHW-NiCrMo-4,焊接后焊缝脱渣容易,无夹渣、咬边、气孔等缺陷,且焊缝具有优良的塑性、韧性和抗裂性能。

  7. The Effect of Welding Current and Composition of Stainless steel on the Panetration in GTAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Yılmaz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, welding was performed on the plates of two different types of AISI 316 and AISI 316Ti austenitic stainless steels by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding without using welding consumable in flat position. Automatic GTAW welding machine was used to control and obtain the exact values. The effects of welding currents used in welding process and the compositions of the stainless steels materials on the penetration were investigated. Weld bead size and shape such as bead width and dept were important considerations for penetration. Welding process was performed using various welding current values. The study showed that both welding parameters and composition of the stainless steels has influence on the penetration and It is increased with increasing of welding current. Besides, P/W rate of the weldments were influenced by the current and hardness values of the weld metal decrease with increasing welding current. The microstructure of the weld metal was also changed by variation of welding current.

  8. LHS (latin hypercubes) sampling of the material properties of steels for the analysis of the global sensitivity in welding numerical simulation; Echantillonnage LHS des proprietes materiau des aciers pour l analyse de sensibilite globale en simulation numerique du soudage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petelet, Matthieu; Asserin, Olivier [CEA, DRT / LITEN / DTH / LTA, Bat 611, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Iooss, Bertrand [CEA, DEN / CAD / DER / SESI / LCFR, Bat 212, 13108 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Petelet, Matthieu; Loredo, Alexandre [ISAT / LRMA, 49 rue Melle Bourgeois, BP 31, 58027 Nevers Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    In this work, the method of sensitivity analysis allowing to identify the inlet data the most influential on the variability of the responses (residual stresses and distortions). Classically, the sensitivity analysis is carried out locally what limits its validity domain to a given material. A global sensitivity analysis method is proposed; it allows to cover a material domain as wide as those of the steels series. A probabilistic modeling giving the variability of the material parameters in the steels series is proposed. The original aspect of this work consists in the use of the sampling method by latin hypercubes (LHS) of the material parameters which forms the inlet data (dependent of temperature) of the numerical simulations. Thus, a statistical approach has been applied to the welding numerical simulation: LHS sampling of the material properties, global sensitivity analysis what has allowed the reduction of the material parameterization. (O.M.)

  9. Improved Gas Metal Arc Welding Multi-Physics Process Model and Its Application to MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Steel Butt-welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    within the weld. Design/methodology/approach The improved GMAW process model is next applied to the case of butt-welding of MIL A46100 (a...improved GMAW process model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and properties within the MIL A46100 butt-weld are

  10. Thermal modelling of friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to present the basic elements of the thermal modelling of friction stir welding as well as to clarify some of the uncertainties in the literature regarding the different contributions to the heat generation. Some results from a new thermal pseudomechanical model...... in which the temperature-dependent yield stress of the weld material controls the heat generation are also presented....

  11. Practical significance of weld strength matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloterdijk, W. [N.V. Nederlandse Gasunie, Groningen (Netherlands); Schipaanboord, W.N. [N.V. Nederlandse Gasunie, Groningen (Netherlands)

    1996-10-01

    Defect tolerance in welds in pipelines constructed in modern high strength material depends on the balance in strength between weld material and pipe material. The Guidelines on the assessment of girth weld defects published by the European Pipeline Research Group (EPRG) define in Tier 2 defect limits assuming that the (actual) weld metal yield strength is equal or greater than the yield strength of the parent material. The defect limits according to Tier 2 exceed the defect limits in `workmanship standards` (l>25 mm). Nevertheless, the draft European welding standard EN 288 does not yet require a test to measure and verify the weld metal yield strength. Gasunie has performed a test program with the aim to look at the practical significance of weld strength matching in a strain controlled situation and to verify the relevance of limits given in the European welding and line pipe codes, in combination with the EPRG Guidelines. It is concluded that the results of the tests confirm the defect acceptance limits according to Tier 2 of the EPRG Guidelines. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Zulaessigkeit von Fehlern in Rundschweissnaehten in Rohrleitungen aus modernen hochfesten Baustaehlen haengt von dem Verhaeltnis der Werkstofffestigkeit des Schweissgutes zu der des Grundwerkstoffs ab. Die von der European Pipeline Research Group (EPRG) veroeffentlichte Richtlinie zur Bewertung von Schweissnahtfehlern gibt in der zweiten Bewertungsstufe (Tier 2) Werte fuer zulaessige Schweissnahtfehlergroessen unter der Bedingung an, dass die Dehngrenze des Schweissgutes groesser oder gleich der Dehngrenze des Grundwerkstoffs ist. Die nach Tier 2 zulaessigen Fehler sind groesser als die in `Good-workmanship`-Regelwerken angegebenen Fehlerlaenge (l>25 mm). Demgegenueber fehlt im Entwurf der europaeischen Schweissnorm EN 288 bislang ein solcher Dehngrenzennachweis. Gasunie hat ein Versuchsprogramm durchgefuehrt, um die Bedeutung der Schweissgutfestigkeit bei dehnungskontrollierter Belastung sowie

  12. Impact welding of foils by water jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgutlu, A.; Akyurt, M. [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Al-Hassani, S.T.S. [UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    Impact welding is a practical and economically feasible process for the solid-phase welding of similar and dissimilar metals. The versatile process is applicable to combinations of materials usually considered incompatible using more conventional joining methods. Thus, unlike with other spot welding methods, it is possible to use impact spot welding to join two metals of widely different melting points. Considerable research is needed to gain a thorough understanding of this process, its potential and possible new applications. Impact spot welding is similar to the familiar explosive welding process. Impact spot welding can be brought about by the action of a high-velocity object, such as projectile, on the material comprising the impacting object-target interface. The projectile impinging onto the top surface of a flyer plate at the target provides the energy of collision. Subsequently, the flyer plate moves with the projectile toward the base plate. A second impact occurs between the center of the bulge of the flyer plate and the base plate. The central collision of impact spreads radially out with an angle of collision. This oblique collision is an important feature of this process. The manner in which the flyer plate deforms due to the impact of a high-speed object is significant in defining spot welding geometry. The deformation is produced by a combination of elastic, plastic and hydrodynamic wave propagation involving normal, bending and shear stresses. Metallic materials are forcibly driven together by the use of an impactor in such a way that a strong metallurgical bond is formed. Therefore, the use of either explosives or impactors, which may be water jets or solid projectiles, is incidental. Bonding results, in general, only from the impact of the two or more materials. In this sense the resulting bonding may be called impact bonding instead of explosive bonding.

  13. Pin Tool Geometry Effects in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querin, J. A.; Rubisoff, H. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW) there is significant evidence that material can take one of two different flow paths when being displaced from its original position in front of the pin tool to its final position in the wake of the weld. The geometry of the pin tool, along with the process parameters, plays an important role in dictating the path that the material takes. Each flow path will impart a different thermomechanical history on the material, consequently altering the material microstructure and subsequent weld properties. The intention of this research is to isolate the effect that different pin tool attributes have on the flow paths imparted on the FSWed material. Based on published weld tool geometries, a variety of weld tools were fabricated and used to join AA2219. Results from the tensile properties and microstructural characterization will be presented.

  14. Comparison of Residual Stress Distributions of Similar and Dissimilar Thick Butt-Weld Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Katsuyama, Jinya; Morii, Yukio

    Residual stress distributions of 35 mm thick dissimilar metal butt-weld between A533B ferritic steel and Type 304 austenitic stainless steel (304SS) with Ni alloy welds and similar metal butt-weld of 304SS were measured using neutron diffraction. Effects of differences in thermal expansion coefficients (CTEs) and material strengths on the weld residual stress distributions were discussed by comparison of the residual stress distributions between the similar and dissimilar metal butt-welds. Residual stresses in the similar metal butt-weld exhibited typical distributions found in a thick butt-weld and they were distributed symmetrically on either side of the weld line. Meanwhile, asymmetric residual stress distributions were observed near the root of the dissimilar metal butt-weld, which was caused by differences in CTEs and yield strengths among both parent materials and weld metals. Transverse residual stress distribution of the dissimilar metal butt-weld was similar trend to that of the similar metal butt-weld, since effect of difference in CTEs were negligible, while magnitude of the transverse residual stress near the root depended on the yield strengths of each metal. In contrast, the normal and longitudinal residual stresses in the dissimilar metal butt-weld distributed asymmetrically on either side of weld line due to influence of differences in CTEs.

  15. MICROSTRUCTURE AND FATIGUE PROPERTIES OF DISSIMILAR SPOT WELDED JOINTS OF AISI 304 AND AISI 1008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachimani Charde

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon steel and stainless steel composites are being more frequently used for applications requiring a corrosion resistant and attractive exterior surface and a high strength structural substrate. Spot welding is a potentially useful and efficient jointing process for the production of components consisting of these two materials. The spot welding characteristics of weld joints between these two materials are discussed in this paper. The experiment was conducted on dissimilar weld joints using carbon steel and 304L (2B austenitic stainless steel by varying the welding currents and electrode pressing forces. Throughout the welding process; the electrical signals from the strain sensor, current transducer and terminal voltage clippers are measured in order to understand each and every millisecond of the welding process. In doing so, the dynamic resistances, heat distributions and forging forces are computed for various currents and force levels within the good welds’ regions. The other process controlling parameters, particularly the electrode tip and weld time, remained constant throughout the experiment. The weld growth was noted for the welding current increment, but in the electrode force increment it causes an adverse reaction to weld growth. Moreover, the effect of heat imbalance was clearly noted during the welding process due to the different electrical and chemical properties. The welded specimens finally underwent tensile, hardness and metallurgical testing to characterise the weld growth.

  16. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  17. Friction stir welding joint of dissimilar materials between AZ31B magnesium and 6061 aluminum alloys: Microstructure studies and mechanical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran 141554933 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behnamian, Y. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada); Mostafaei, A., E-mail: amir.mostafaei@gmail.com [Young Researchers and Elites Club, Tehran North Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Izadi, H. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada); Saeid, T. [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz 513351996 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 113659466 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gerlich, A.P., E-mail: adrian.gerlich@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining dissimilar alloys, which can dramatically reduce grain sizes and offer high mechanical joint efficiency. Lap FSW joints between dissimilar AZ31B and Al 6061 alloy sheets were made at various tool rotation and travel speeds. Rotation and travel speeds varied between 560–1400 r/min and 16–40 mm/min respectively, where the ratio between these parameters was such that nearly constant pitch distances were applied during welding. X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), optical microscopy images (OM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) were used to investigate the microstructures of the joints welded. Intermetallic phases including Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17} (γ) and Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} (β) were detected in the weld zone (WZ). For different tool rotation speeds, the morphology of the microstructure in the stir zone changed significantly with travel speed. Lap shear tensile test results indicated that by simultaneously increasing the tool rotation and travel speeds to 1400 r/min and 40 mm/min, the joint tensile strength and ductility reached a maximum. Microhardness measurements and tensile stress–strain curves indicated that mechanical properties were affected by FSW parameters and mainly depended on the formation of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone. In addition, a debonding failure mode in the Al/Mg dissimilar weld nugget was investigated by SEM and surface fracture studies indicated that the presence of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone controlled the failure mode. XRD analysis of the fracture surface indicated the presence of brittle intermetallic compounds including Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17} (γ) and Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} (β). - Highlights: • Dissimilar Al/Mg joint was obtained by lap friction stir welding technique. • Effect of rotation and travel speeds on the formation of intermetallic

  18. Coil Welding Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  19. Variable polarity arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  20. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  1. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  2. Reduction of Defects in Al-6061 Friction Stir Welding and Verified by Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravel, D.; Bupesh Raja, V. K., Dr; Potnuru, Chakravarthy; Polina, Navakanth

    2017-05-01

    Friction Stir Welding is a new innovating process of joining of two work pieces. It is an relatively a new joining process and highly useful in welding method, which can produce high strength weld without using any toxic materials like electrodes. In this method, weld is obtained by frictional produced between shoulder and work piece [1, 2]. Main parameters which are to be considered for FSW are spindle speed and feed rate. By providing suitable parameter during welding defects will not be occurring. Also, FSW is an eco-friendly process because there is no fumes production and no filler material. To get high quality of weld, then high heat should be generated. In this paper, Al-6061 material is welded by H-13 tool with different parameters and quality of weld is examined by using a non destructive testing method called Radiography.

  3. Effect of Welding Speeds on Mechanical Properties of Level Compensation Friction Stir Welded 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Quan; Yue, Yumei; Ji, Shude; Li, Zhengwei; Gao, Shuangsheng

    2016-04-01

    In order to eliminate the flash, arc corrugation and concave in weld zone, level compensation friction stir welding (LCFSW) was put forward and successfully applied to weld 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with varied welding speed at a constant tool rotational speed of 1,800 rpm in the present study. The glossy joint with equal thickness of base material can be attained, and the shoulder affected zone (SAZ) was obviously reduced. The results of transverse tensile test indicate that the tensile strength and elongation reach the maximum values of 248 MPa and 7.1% when the welding speed is 600 mm/min. The microhardness of weld nugget (WN) is lower than that of base material. The tensile fracture position locates at the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the advancing side (AS), where the microhardness is the minimum. The fracture surface morphology represents the typical ductile fracture.

  4. Optimal welding of beta titanium orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, K R; Burstone, C J; Goldberg, A J

    1987-09-01

    Today the orthodontist is confronted by an array of new orthodontic wire materials that, when applied to appliance design, can vastly increase the flexibility and versatility of therapy. Welded joints, especially for the newer titanium alloy wires, provide a means to extend the useful applications of these materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum settings for electrical resistance welding of various configurations of titanium-molybdenum (TMA) wires. Specimens were of a t-joint configuration and were mechanically tested in torsion to simulate the failure mode most often observed in clinical practice. Variables included wire size, wire orientation, and welding voltage. Results indicated that excellent welds can be obtained with very little loss of strength and ductility in the area of the weld joint. Torsional loads at failure were at least 90% of the unwelded base material. Although a wide range of voltage settings resulted in high-strength welds, typically a narrow range of voltages yielded optimal ductility.

  5. Ranking welding intensity in pyroclastic deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quane, S. L.; Russell, J. K.

    2003-04-01

    Pyroclastic deposits emplaced at high temperatures and having sufficient thickness become welded. The welding process involves sintering, compaction and flattening of hot glassy pyroclastic material and is attended by systematic changes in physical properties. Historically, the terms nonwelded, incipiently welded, partially welded with pumice, partially welded with fiamme, moderately welded and densely welded have been used as field descriptors for welding intensity (e.g., Smith &Bailey, 1966; Smith, 1979; Ross &Smith, 1980; Streck &Grunder, 1995). While using these descriptive words is often effective for delineating variations of welding intensity within a single deposit, their qualitative character does not provide for consistency between field areas or workers, and inhibits accurate comparison between deposits. Hence, there is a need for a universal classification of welding intensity in pyroclastic deposits. Here we develop an objective ranking system. The system recognizes 8 ranks (I to VIII) based on measurements of physical properties and petrographic characteristics. The physical property measurements include both lab and field observations: density, porosity, uniaxial compressive strength, point load strength, fiamme elongation, and foliation/fabric. The values are normalized in order to make the system universal. The rank divisions are adaptations of a rock mass-rating scheme based on rock strength (Hoek &Brown, 1980) and previous divisions of welding degree based on physical properties (e.g., density: Ragan &Sheridan, 1972, Streck &Grunder, 1995; fiamme elongation: Peterson, 1979). Each rank comprises a range of normalized values for each of the physical properties and a corresponding set of petrographic characteristics. Our new ranking system provides a consistent, objective means by which each sample or section of welded tuff can be evaluated, thus providing a much needed uniformity in nomenclature for degree of welding. References: Hoek, E. &Brown, E

  6. Ferrous friction stir weld physical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Seth Jason

    2006-04-01

    Traditional fusion welding processes have several drawbacks associated with the melting and solidification of metal. Weld defects associated with the solidification of molten metal may act as initiation sites for cracks. Segregation of alloying elements during solidification may cause local changes in resistance to corrosion. The high amount of heat required to produce the molten metal in the weld can produce distortion from the intended position on cooling. The heat from the electric arc commonly used to melt metal in fusion welds may also produce metal fumes which are a potential health hazard. Friction stir welding is one application which has the potential to make full thickness welds in a single pass, while eliminating fume, reducing distortion, and eliminating solidification defects. Currently the friction stir welding process is used in the aerospace industry on aluminum alloys. Interest in the process by industries which rely on iron and its alloys for structural material is increasing. While friction stir welding has been shown to be feasible with iron alloys, the understanding of friction stir welding process effects on these materials is in its infancy. This project was aimed to better that understanding by developing a procedure for physical simulation of friction stir welding. Friction stir weld material tracer experiments utilizing stainless steel markers were conducted with plates of ingot iron and HSLA-65. Markers of 0.0625" diameter 308 stainless steel worked well for tracing the end position of material moved by the friction stir welding tool. The markers did not produce measurable increases in the loading of the tool in the direction of travel. Markers composed of 0.25" diameter 304 stainless steel did not perform as well as the smaller markers and produced increased loads on the friction stir welding tool. The smaller markers showed that material is moved in a curved path around the tool and deposited behind the tool. Material near the surface

  7. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavdar, U.; Gulsahin, I.

    2014-10-01

    The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM) compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW) were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined. (Author)

  8. Oxide Evolution in ODS Steel Resulting From Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Metal Arc Welding GTAW Gas Tungsten Arc Welding HAZ Heat Affected Zone HI Heat Index IPM Inches Per Minute LBW Laser Beam Welding LLNL...by modern day reactors causes hardening of the structural materials (embrittlement), loss of fracture toughness, loss of strain ductility...embrittlement. RAFM steels also provide high fracture toughness, thermal creep strength and a strong resistance to low temperature 2 embrittlement [4

  9. VIBRATORY STRESS, SOLIDIFICATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF WELDMENTS UNDER VIBRATORY WELDING CONDITION-A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKANKSHA VERMA,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding processes induce a state of residual stress into materials and jobs. This poses a series of problems, in terms of dimensional stability, corrosion cracking, reduced fatigue life and structural integrity . Thermal cycle produced near weld line generates residual stress and inhomogeneous plastic deformation in weldments. Understanding of grain nucleation and grain growth becomes necessary that are influenced under welding conditions. After completion of nucleation, the solidification process will continue with nucleus growth .With vibratory weld conditioning, the enhancement of weld metal microstructure can be achieved. The mechanical properties, level of residual stresses, and deformation can also be affected . Structural changes of the welds prepared under vibratory conditions affects the mechanical properties of the welds. The vibration duringwelding benefits energy absorbed in impact toughness test of weld metal and improves fracture behavior. This paper presents the microstructure, solidification behaviour and residual stress relaxation under vibratory welding condition.

  10. Ultrashort pulse laser micro-welding of cyclo-olefin copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Gian-Luca; Rung, Stefan; Hellmann, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    We report on the joining of transparent thermoplastic polymers using infrared femtosecond laser pulses. Due to nonlinear absorption, the developed micro-welding process for cyclo-olefin copolymers does not require any intermediate absorbing layers or any surface pre-processing of the welding partners. In view of an optimized and stable micro-welding process, the influence of the welding speed and focal position on both, the quality and shear force strength are investigated. We highlight that welding seam widths of down to 65 μm are feasible for welding speeds of up to 75 mm/s. However, a variation of the welding speed affects the required focal position for a successful joining process. The shear force strength of the welding seam is determined to 37 MPa, which corresponds to 64% of the shear strength of the bulk material and is not affected by the welding speed.

  11. Solid state impact welding of BMG and copper by vaporizing foil actuator welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivek, Anupam, E-mail: vivek.4@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Presley, Michael [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Flores, Katharine M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Hutchinson, Nicholas H.; Daehn, Glenn S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-05-14

    The objective of this study was to create impact welds between a Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) and copper at a laboratory scale and subsequently investigate the relationship between interfacial structure and mechanical properties. Vaporizing Foil Actuator (VFA) has recently been demonstrated as a versatile tool for metalworking applications: impact welding of dissimilar materials being one of them. Its implementation for welding is termed as VFA Welding or VFAW. With 8 kJ input energy into an aluminum foil actuator, a 0.5 mm thick Cu110 alloy sheet was launched toward a BMG target resulting in an impact at a velocity of nearly 600 m/s. For this experiment, the welded interface was straight with a few BMG fragments embedded in the copper sheet in some regions. Hardness tests across the interface showed increase in strength on the copper side. Instrumented peel test resulted in failure in the parent copper sheet. A slower impact velocity during a separate experiment resulted in a weld, which had wavy regions along the interface and in peel failure again happened in the parent copper sheet. Some through-thickness cracks were observed in the BMG plate and there was some spall damage in the copper flyers. TEM electron diffraction on a sample, cut out from the wavy weld interface region using a focused ion beam, showed that devitrification of the BMG was completely avoided in this welding process.

  12. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  13. Research on Welding Test of Grey Cast Iron and Low-Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Grey cast iron's welding itself is a complex proble m.So proper welding materials must be selected,complex welding techniques such as preheating before weldingslow cooling after welding etc,should be taken. However the carbon component in low-carbon steel is comparatively low,the carbo n of welded joint will diffuse to the low-carbon steel when it is welded with gr ey cast iron,which will cause the component of carbon greatly increased at the low-carbon steel side in HAZ,high carbon martensite and cracks ...

  14. Welding repair of a dissimilar weld and respective consequences for other German plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brummer, G. [High Energy Weapons (United States); Dauwel, W.; Wesseling, U. [Framatome ANP GmbH-NBTT, Erlangen (Germany); Ilg, U. [EnBW, Milano (Italy); Lauer, P.; Widera, M. [E.ON Kernkraft (Germany); Wachter, O. [RWE Power (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    During a regular refueling outage in a German nuclear power plant in year 2000, additional non-destructive examinations have been performed on request of the Authority, to fulfill some recommendations of the independent experts with regard to the retrospective application of the Basic Safety Concept for the ferritic main coolant piping of this plant. During these inspections, indications were found in a dissimilar weld between one of the fifteen MCL (main coolant lines) nozzles and the ECC (emergency core cooling) system piping. By means of on-site metallography and laboratory investigations on three boat samples taken from this weld, it could be shown that the indications were due to hot cracking in the surface layer of the weld. In the course of these investigations, at three locations at the circumference of the weld, dis-bonding defects were found between the ferritic base metal of the nozzle and the austenitic weld butter, which has been applied to join the nozzle to the austenitic safe-end. According to the results of the extensive investigations, the dis-bonding occurred during the manufacturing process after stress-relief heat-treatment of the buttering during the welding of the austenitic safe-end to the butter material. There was no evidence for any crack growth during operation of the plant. Due to the large size of the boat-samples, a weld repair was mandatory. This repair has been performed using the so-called temper-bead technique as specified in the ASME Code, without subsequent stress relief heat treatment, using an advanced automatic orbital TIG welding process. The welding has been successfully performed without the need of further repair work. For those dissimilar welds, all other plants, except one, had used Inconel welding material for buttering the ferritic nozzle instead of stainless steel welding metal. For metallurgical reasons, dis-bonding along the fusion line for Inconel buttered dissimilar welds is unlikely to occur. Nevertheless all

  15. PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

    2012-04-16

    During final preparations for start of the PDCF Inner Can (IC) qualification effort, welding was performed on an automated weld system known as the PICN. During the initial weld, using a pedigree canister and plug, a weld defect was observed. The defect resulted in a hole in the sidewall of the canister, and it was observed that the plug sidewall had not been consumed. This was a new type of failure not seen during development and production of legacy Bagless Transfer Cans (FB-Line/Hanford). Therefore, a team was assembled to determine the root cause and to determine if the process could be improved. After several brain storming sessions (MS and T, R and D Engineering, PDC Project), an evaluation matrix was established to direct this effort. The matrix identified numerous activities that could be taken and then prioritized those activities. This effort was limited by both time and resources (the number of canisters and plugs available for testing was limited). A discovery process was initiated to evaluate the Vendor's IC fabrication process relative to legacy processes. There were no significant findings, however, some information regarding forging/anneal processes could not be obtained. Evaluations were conducted to compare mechanical properties of the PDC canisters relative to the legacy canisters. Some differences were identified, but mechanical properties were determined to be consistent with legacy materials. A number of process changes were also evaluated. A heat treatment procedure was established that could reduce the magnetic characteristics to levels similar to the legacy materials. An in-situ arc annealing process was developed that resulted in improved weld characteristics for test articles. Also several tack welds configurations were addressed, it was found that increasing the number of tack welds (and changing the sequence) resulted in decreased can to plug gaps and a more stable weld for test articles. Incorporating all of the process

  16. Plasma heating effects during laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G. K.; Dixon, R. D.

    Laser welding is a relatively low heat input process used in joining precisely machined components with minimum distortion and heat affects to surrounding material. The CO2 (10.6 (MU)m) and Nd-YAG (1.06 (MU)m) lasers are the primary lasers used for welding in industry today. Average powers range up to 20 kW for CO2 and 400 W for Nd-YAG with pulse lengths of milliseconds to continuous wave. Control of the process depends on an understanding of the laser-plasma-material interaction and characterization of the laser beam being used. Inherent plasma formation above the material surface and subsequent modulation of the incident laser radiation directly affect the energy transfer to the target material. The temporal and spatial characteristics of the laser beam affect the available power density incident on the target, which is important in achieving repeatability in the process. Other factors such as surface texture, surface contaminants, surface chemistry, and welding environment affect plasma formation which determines the weld penetration. This work involves studies of the laser-plasma-material interaction process and particularly the effect of the plasma on the coupling of laser energy to a material during welding. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser was used with maximum average power of 400 W.

  17. Effect of welding parameters of Gas Metal Arc welding on weld bead geometry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushp Kumar Baghel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Weld quality comprises bead geometry and its microstructure, which influence the mechanical properties of the weld. This brief review illustrates the effect of pulse parameters on weld quality. The responsefactors, namely bead penetration, weld width, reinforcement height, weld penetration shape factor and weld reinforcement form factor as affected by arc voltage, wire feed rate, welding speed, gas flow rate and nozzle-toplate distance has also been analysed

  18. The algorithm of verification of welding process for plastic pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzasinski, R.

    2017-08-01

    The study analyzes the process of butt welding of PE pipes in terms of proper selection of connector parameters. The process was oriented to the elements performed as a series of types of pipes. Polymeric materials commonly referred to as polymers or plastics, synthetic materials are produced from oil products in the polyreaction compounds of low molecular weight, called monomers. During the polyreactions monomers combine to build a macromolecule material monomer named with the prefix poly polypropylene, polyethylene or polyurethane, creating particles in solid state on the order of 0,2 to 0,4 mm. Finished products from polymers of virtually any shape and size are obtained by compression molding, injection molding, extrusion, laminating, centrifugal casting, etc. Weld can only be a thermoplastic that softens at an elevated temperature, and thus can be connected via a clamp. Depending on the source and method of supplying heat include the following welding processes: welding contact, radiant welding, friction welding, dielectric welding, ultrasonic welding. The analysis will be welding contact. In connection with the development of new generation of polyethylene, and the production of pipes with increasing dimensions (diameter, wall thickness) is important to select the correct process.

  19. Design of Boiler Welding for Improvement of Lifetime and Cost Control

    OpenAIRE

    Atcharawadi Thong-On; Chatdanai Boonruang

    2016-01-01

    Fe-2.25Cr-1Mo a widely used material for headers and steam tubes of boilers. Welding of steam tube to header is required for production of boiler. Heat affected zone of the weld can have poor mechanical properties and poor corrosion behavior leading to weld failure. The cost of material used for steam tube and header of boiler should be controlled. This study propose a new materials design for boiler welding to improve the lifetime and cost control, using tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of F...

  20. Optically controlled welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  1. Método integral configurable y flexible de ensayo de materiales consumibles de soldadura por arco eléctrico. // Integral, flexible and shaped method for electric arc welding consumable materials test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. García Rodríguez

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available La presente publicación propone un método integral configurable y flexible para facilitar el ensayo de materialesconsumibles de soldadura por arco eléctrico en las condiciones tecnológicas para las que han sido diseñados estosmateriales, en relación a la calidad de la unión soldada. Se puede llegar a conclusiones definitivas sobre la calidad de lasoldadura usando un determinado material consumible mediante: la relación operacional de técnicas de inteligencia naturaly/o artificial, el uso de sistemas expertos, el trabajo con bases de datos, la simulación y la realización práctica del procesomientras se registran ciertos parámetros del arco eléctrico, digitalmente procesados estadísticamente y relacionados a losresultados de la caracterización de la unión soldada. El método permite registrar adecuadamente la información referente acada aspecto del proceso exigida en los procesos de certificación de la calidad de los consumibles, así como en lainvestigación dirigida a optimizar la composición química y las propiedades físicas de un material, para obtener calidadesóptimas en un determinado proceso; además es posible obtener las bases de datos de parámetros del arco eléctrico útilespara investigar, desarrollar y valorar métodos y algoritmos para el monitoreo en tiempo real de la calidad de la soldaduradurante un determinado proceso tecnológico de soldadura con arco eléctrico.Palabras Clave: Ensayo, materiales, soldadura, arco eléctrico, estabilidad, calidad, simulación, optimización,unión soldada.___________________________________________________________________________Abstract.This paper presenst an integral, flexible and shaped method that make easy the electric arc welding consumable materials test at thedesigned technological conditions, related to the quality of the welding joint. It is possible to arrive to definitive conclusions about thewelding quality using a fixed material through: operational

  2. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Bead-on-plate and butt welds were previously performed to depths of about 4 mm with a 6-kW CO{sub 2} laser on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys. These welds were made at a speed of 0.042 m/s using argon purging at a flow rate of 2.8 m{sup 3}/s. The purge was distributed with a diffuser nozzle aimed just behind the laser beam during the welding operation. The fusion zones of welds made under these conditions consisted of very fine, needle-shaped grains and were also harder than the bulk metal (230-270 dph, compared to {approx}180 dph for the bulk metal). A limited number of impact tests showed that the as-welded ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTT) was above room temperature, but heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h in vacuum reduced the DBTT to <{minus}25{degrees}C. Activities during this reporting period focused on improvements in the purging system and determination of the effect of welding speed on welds. A 2-kW continuous YAG laser at Lumonics Corp. in Livonia, MI, was used to make 34 test welds for this study.

  3. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied...... with all laser parameters fixed. The welds were quality assessed and hardness measured transversely to the welding direction in the top, middle and root of the seam. In the seams welded by laser alone, hardness values between 275 and 304 HV1 were measured, about the double of the base material, 150 HV1...

  4. Laser powder technology for cladding and welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J.; Volz, R.

    1999-06-01

    Laser powder technology offers several advantages compared to conventional cladding and welding techniques and is attracting increasing industrial interest. The laser materials processing group of the German Aerospace Center at Stuttgart, Germany, is currently developing these new methods for application in industrial process engineering. Key areas of the work include the design and implementation of a modular working head that can be universally used for laser welding and surface treatment, the development of powder nozzles for cladding and welding, and the construction of new systems for special applications (e.g., for inner cladding). Some of these developments are described, as well as some important examples that highlight the potential of welding and surface treatment using laser powder techniques.

  5. The influence of the weld toe grinding and wig remelting weld toe rehabilitation techniques, on variable stresses, in case of cross fillet welds, reinforced with additional welding rows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babis Claudiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Variable stresses where the load value varies between a maximum and a minimum value, or varies the position in time, cause after accumulating a large number of load cycles in those structures, the emergence of drug fatigue. Fatigue is characterized by failure on values of the applied stress from the load cycles, below the material flow, values which in case of static stress would not have caused problems. Knowing that the variable stressed structures are sensitive to stress concentrators, the paper aims to highlight the influence of two techniques to reduce stress concentrator weld toe grinding and WIG remelting weld toe, on the behavior of variable tensile test of cross corner welded specimens, reinforced with additional welding rows.

  6. Experimental Development of Dual Phase Steel Laser-arc Hybrid Welding and its Comparison to Laser and Gas Metal Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Duarte Antunes

    Full Text Available Abstract Dual phase DP600 steels have been used in many automobile structures and laser welding has been the standard method for the joining of different sections. This work proposed a comparison between laser welding with arc welding (GMAW and with hybrid laser-arc welding in order to access the microstructures and the mechanical behavior. The laser and hybrid welds are competitive in terms of microstructure and mechanical behavior, presenting both acceptable and tough welds. The maximum ductility of the laser and hybrid welds are very similar, around 14%, and near to the values observed in the base material. The GMAW presents low ductility due to the softening caused by tampering of the martensite, and thus is unacceptable as the welding procedure.

  7. Electron beam welding of 8-inch thick 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Charles M.

    1980-08-01

    Electron beam welding procedures were developed and used to make sound welds in 8-inch thick 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo in the horizontal position. A two-pass technique, one pass from each side, was developed for welding the 8-inch thickness. Techniques for eliminating various weld defects were developed. It was learned that the beam oscillation conditions strongly influenced welding performance. Procedures were developed for hard and soft vacuum operation, but hard vacuum was preferred. Procedures for starting and stopping the welding sequence were developed, along with a repair technique involving re-welding over a plug filled hole. The joint fit-up requirements were determined: a joint mismatch of 3/4 in. was welded, and a joint gap opening of 0.100 in. was welded without alteration of the welding procedure. It was shown that it is not necessary to demagnetize the material for successful welding, but that a special magnetic shield may be needed to protect the electron beam from stray magnetic fields. A demonstration weld failed to meet the NDE requirements of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code due to poor base metal quality which adversely affected weld performance. The mechanical properties (hardness, strength, ductility, and impact), and the microstructure of electron beam welded 8-inch thick SA387 Grade 22 Class 2 were determined and appeared to be adequate.

  8. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds in an Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks. Self-reacting friction stir welding is one variation of the friction stir weld process being developed for manufacturing tanks. Friction pull plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential self-reacting friction stir weld. A friction plug weld placed in a self-reacting friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in an aluminum alloy friction plug weld will be presented.

  9. Experimental tests of irradiation-anneal-reirradiation effects on mechanical properties of RPV plate and weld materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosinski, S.T. [Electric Power Research Inst., Charlotte, NC (United States); Hawthorne, J.R. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States); Rochau, G.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1999-10-01

    The Charpy-V (C{sub v}) notch ductility and tensile properties of three reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel materials were determined for the 288 C (550 F) irradiated (I), 288 C (550 F) irradiated + 454 C (850 F) - 168 h postirradiation annealed (IA), and 288 C (550 F) reirradiated (IAR) conditions. Total fluences of the I condition and the IAR condition were, respectively, 3.33 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} and 4.18 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV. The irradiation portion of the IAR condition represents an incremental fluence increase of 1.05 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV, over the I-condition fluence. The annealing treatment produced full C{sub v} upper shelf recovery and full or nearly full recovery in the C{sub v} 41 J (30 ft-lb) transition temperature. The C{sub v} transition temperature increases produced by the reirradiation exposure were 22% to 43% of the increase produced by the first cycle irradiation exposure. A somewhat greater radiation embrittlement sensitivity and a somewhat greater reirradiation embrittlement sensitivity were exhibited by the low nickel content plate than the high nickel content plate. The IAR-condition properties of the surface vs. interior regions of the low nickel content plate are also compared.

  10. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten ARC Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Daniel Day; Frank M.G. Wong; Steven R. Gordon; Lana L. Wong; Raul B. Rebak

    2006-05-08

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIC method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCI at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes.

  11. Enhancing a service life of torch components for MIG/MAG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filonov, A. V.; Kryukov, A. V.; Galimov, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    The paper analyzes the main vulnerable elements of torches used in mechanized gas-shielded welding. Particular attention is given to the gas nozzle designs, materials they are made of, and other welding torch elements exposed to increased electrical and thermal stresses during the welding process.

  12. Calculation of temperature field near stagnation point in explosive welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jinxiang; Li Xiaojie; Wang Zhanlei; Chen Tao

    2006-01-01

    Energy deposition at the interface of explosive welding is analyzed by symmetrical impaction model of uncompressible liquid.Equation of energy in the flow field of explosive welding is deduced and the distribution of temperature in the flow field is solved by finite difference method on the basis that the adiabatic compression is considered.The results show that the temperature rise increases with the increasing of the velocity of approaching flow and impactangle, under appropriate velocity of approaching flow and impact angle the temperature rise near the welding interface will be higher than the melting point of the material and the thin melted layer is localized on the region near welding interface.

  13. Energetic peculiarities of metal heating under laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oparin, M.I.; Nikiforov, G.D.; Fedorov, S.A. (Moskovskij Aviatsionnyj Tekhnologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1981-07-01

    A connection between the energy and thermal parameters of the welding process of laser welding is studied. It is established that the connection between energy and thermal parameters of laser welding regime is carried out through the coefficient of metal absorption. Experimental determination of absorption coefficients of various metals (aluminium alloys, copper, 12Kh18N10T steel, St 3 steel, 0T4 titanium alloy, VN2 niobium alloy) has permitted to develope the methodics of approximated thermal calculations and to built up a nomogram for determining parameters of lazer welding regime. Limits of the thickness of welded sheets of the above materials in dependence on the welding speed are determined according to the nomogram.

  14. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Lasers do not require a vacuum (as do electron beam welders) and the welds they produce high depth-to-width ratios. Scoping with a small pulsed 50 J YAG laser indicated that lasers could produce successful welds in vanadium alloy (V-5%Cr-5%Ti) sheet (1 mm thick) when the fusion zone was isolated from air. The pulsed laser required an isolating chamber filled with inert gas to produce welds that did not contain cracks and showed only minor hardness increases. Following the initial scoping tests, a series of tests were preformed with a 6 kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser. Successful bead-on-plate welds were made on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys to depths of about 4 mm with this laser.

  15. Picosecond laser welding of optical to metal components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard M.; Troughton, Michael; Chen, Jinanyong; Elder, Ian; Thomson, Robert R.; Lamb, Robert A.; Esser, M. J. Daniel; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    We report on practical, industrially relevant, welding of optical components to themselves and aluminum alloy components. Weld formation is achieved through the tight focusing of a 5.9ps, 400kHz Trumpf laser operating at 1030nm. By selecting suitable surface preparation, clamping and laser parameters, the plasma can be confined, even with comparatively rough surfaces, by exploiting the melt properties of the glass. The short interaction time allows for a permanent weld to form between the two materials with heating limited to a region ~300 µm across. Practical application of these weld structures is typically limited due to the induced stress within the glass and, critically, the issues surrounding post-weld thermal expansion. We report on the measured strength of the weld, with a particular emphasis on laser parameters and surface preparation.

  16. Fatigue assessment of load-carrying welded cruciform joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Petinov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available T-form and cruciform joints in which the stress flow is transferred via weld material are widely applied in welded structures. A special type of these joints is presented by fillet-welded joints with incomplete penetration used by economical and manufacturing reasons. At a certain width of the cavity it becomes an active notch which in current design rules is regarded as an initial crack. In that way, fatigue life of the joint is characterized by the crack extensions towards the outer surface of weld bead. Fatigue assessment of these joints requires reliable data on the stress intensity factors values along the crack path. The results of systematic FEA-based calculations of stress intensity factors and respective S-N curves for the considered welded joints are presented. Main results obtained during this investigation can be used in solution of engineering tasks in reference to the fatigue assessment of welded cruciform joints with incomplete penetration.

  17. Tensile Strength of Welded Joint of 1Cr18Ni9 Stainless Steel and Nb-1Zr Alloy Jointed by Electron Beam Self-material Brazing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Compared with Nb-1Zr alloy stainless steels have a quite difference in melting point, thermalphysical and electromagnetism properties etc.. Therefore, it is very difficulty to joint by melting weldingmethod. Electron beam self-brazing method is an accepted method to use for this kind of welding. Make

  18. GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) process development for girth welding of high strength pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, Vaidyanath; Daniel, Joe; Quintana, Marie [The Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chen, Yaoshan [Center for Reliable Energy Systems (CRES), Dublin, OH (United States); Souza, Antonio [Lincoln Electric do Brasil, Guarulhos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper highlights some of the results and findings from the first phase of a consolidated program co-funded by US Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) and Pipeline Research Council Inc (PRCI) to develop pipe weld assessment and qualification methods and optimize X 100 pipe welding technologies. One objective of the program is to establish the range of viable welding options for X 100 line pipe, and define the essential variables to provide welding process control for reliable and consistent mechanical performance of the weldments. In this first phase, a series of narrow gap girth welds were made with pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW), instrumented with thermocouples in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal to obtain the associated thermal profiles, and instrumented to measure true energy input as opposed to conventional heat input. Results reveal that true heat input is 16%-22% higher than conventional heat input. The thermal profile measurements correlate very well with thermal model predictions using true energy input data, which indicates the viability of treating the latter as an essential variable. Ongoing microstructural and mechanical testing work will enable validation of an integrated thermal-microstructural model being developed for these applications. Outputs from this model will be used to correlate essential welding process variables with weld microstructure and hardness. This will ultimately enable development of a list of essential variables and the ranges needed to ensure mechanical properties are achieved in practice, recommendations for controlling and monitoring these essential variables and test methods suitable for classification of welding consumables. (author)

  19. Distribution of tensile property and microstructure in friction stir weld of 6063 aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki

    2001-12-01

    Dominant microstructural factors governing the global tensile properties of a friction-stir-welded joint of 6063 aluminum were examined by estimating distribution of local tensile properties corresponding to local microstructure and hardness. Yield and ultimate tensile strengths of the as-welded weld were significantly lower than those of the base material. Postweld aging and postweld solution heat-treatment and aging (SHTA) restored the strengths of the weld to the levels of the base material. Elongation was found to increase with increasing strength. Hardness tests showed that the as-welded weld was soft around the weld center and that the aged weld and the SHTA weld had relatively homogeneous distributions of high hardness. Hardness profiles of the welds were explained by precipitate distributions and precipitation sequences during the postweld heat treatments. The strengths of the welds were related to each minimum hardness value. In a weld having a heterogeneous hardness profile, the fracture occurred in the region with minimum hardness. When a weld had a homogeneous hardness profile, its fracture site depended on both crystallographic-orientation distribution of the matrix grains and strain tensor of the imposed deformation, i.e., it fractured in the region with a minimum average Taylor factor.

  20. Structure of the welding zone between titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide for explosion welding: I. Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybin, V. V.; Grinberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Elkina, O. A.; Patselov, A. M.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Antonova, O. V.; Kozhevnikov, V. E.

    2011-10-01

    The structures of the interfaces and transition zones of bimetallic metal-intermetallide joints produced by explosion welding under various conditions have been studied. The welded materials were commercial-purity titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide of two alloying schemes. The specific features of the structure and substructure of the zones under study are discussed. Wave formation and formation of isolated vortex zones, as well as tracks of particles related to the transfer of particles of one metal into the other one, were observed. A possible scenario of formation of interfaces, depending on the composition of titanium aluminide and welding conditions, is proposed.

  1. Mechanical property variation within Inconel 82/182 dissimilar metal weld between low alloy steel and 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Changheui [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: chjang@kaist.ac.kr; Lee, Jounghoon [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sung Kim, Jong; Eun Jin, Tae [Korea Power Engineering Company, 360-9 Mabuk-ri, Guseong-eup, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 449-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    In several locations of pressurized water reactors, dissimilar metal welds using Inconel welding wires are used to join the low alloy steel components to stainless-steel pipes. Because of the existence of different materials and chemistry variation within welds, mechanical properties, such as tensile and fracture properties, are expected to show spatial variation. For design and integrity assessment of the dissimilar welds, these variations should be evaluated. In this study, dissimilar metal welds composed of low alloy steel, Inconel 82/182 weld, and stainless steel were prepared by gas tungsten arc welding and shielded metal arc welding techniques. Microstructures were observed using optical and electron microscopes. Typical dendrite structures were observed in Inconel 82/182 welds. Tensile tests using standard and mini-sized specimens and micro-hardness tests were conducted to measure the variation in strength along the thickness of the weld as well as across the weld. In addition, fracture toughness specimens were taken at the bottom, middle, and top of the welds and tested to evaluate the spatial variation along the thickness. It was found that while the strength is about 50-70 MPa greater at the bottom of the weld than at the top of the weld, fracture toughness values at the top of the weld are about 70% greater than those at the bottom of the weld.

  2. Fatigue Crack Growth on Double Butt Weld with Toe Crack of Pipelines Steel

    OpenAIRE

    HADJOUI, Féthi; Benachour, Mustapha; Benguediab,Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The welded structures have a broad applicability (car industry, aeronautical, marine, pipelines, etc.). The welding being an assembled process, presents both advantages and disadvantages. A simple existing defect after welding can generate a catastrophic fracture. This work studies the fatigue crack growth of double butt weld with toe crack. Two types of pipeline material are studied with knowing API 5L grades X60 and X70 where tension form of loading is applied. In order to p...

  3. A review of using computational fluid dynamic in simulating of friction stir welding and parametric studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hamza, Esam

    2016-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is still gradually evolving where it is newer than most thermomechanical processes and due to its ability to avoid many of the common defects in other welding techniques it has become largely used, particularly for those materials that are soft.[1]\\ud Since the invention of friction stir welding by The Welding Institute (TWI), Cambridge, UK, there have been many attempts to comprehend the physical phenomena that take place during this process. These phenomena can b...

  4. An investigation into geometry and microstructural effects upon the ultimate tensile strengths of butt welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical theory was evaluated empirically. This theory predicts weld ultimate tensile strength based on material properties and fusion line angles, mismatch, peaking, and weld widths. Welds were made on 1/4 and 1/2 in. aluminum 2219-T87, their geometries were measured, they were tensile tested, and these results were compared to theoretical predictions. Statistical analysis of results was performed to evaluate correlation of theory to results for many different categories of weld geometries.

  5. VPPA weld model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-07-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  6. Formation of welding residual stresses in low transformation temperature (LTT materials Tensões residuais de soldagem em materias de baixa temperatura de transformação (BTT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kannengiesser

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available For the safety and cost efficiency of welded high-strength steel structures, precise knowledge of the level and distribution of welding- and cooling-specific stresses and residual stresses is essential, since they exert a decisive influence on strength, crack resistance, and finally on the bearable service load. This paper presents innovative filler materials, of which the phase transformation temperature was deliberately adjusted via the chemical composition. The transformation behaviour of these martensitic Low Transformation Temperature (LTT- filler materials shows direct effects on the local residual stresses in the weld and the HAZ. These effects can purposefully be exploited to counteract the thermally induced shrinkage of the material and to produce significant compressive residual stresses in the weld. Comparative welding experiments were carried out on 690 MPa high-strength base materials using various LTT-filler materials. High energy synchrotron radiation was used for residual stress measurement. Particularly the use of high energy synchrotron radiation makes it possible to detect the residual stress condition fast without destruction of material. Thereby, residual stress depth gradients can be determined simultaneously without removing material. In steel, gradients of up to 150 µm can be resolved in such a way. Furthermore, the application of high energy radiation permits determination of residual stresses of any available residual austenite contents. Results show significant dependence of transformation temperatures on the resulting residual stress level and distribution.Para a segurança e eficiência do custo de estruturas soldadas de aço de alta resistência, um conhecimento preciso do nível e distribuição das tensões residuais de soldagem é essencial pois estas exercem uma influência decisiva na resistência à fissuração e na carga suportada em serviço. Este artigo apresenta metais de adição inovativos nos quais a

  7. Totally confined explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The undesirable by-products of explosive welding are confined and the association noise is reduced by the use of a simple enclosure into which the explosive is placed and in which the explosion occurs. An infrangible enclosure is removably attached to one of the members to be bonded at the point directly opposite the bond area. An explosive is completely confined within the enclosure at a point in close proximity to the member to be bonded and a detonating means is attached to the explosive. The balance of the enclosure, not occupied by explosive, is filled with a shaped material which directs the explosive pressure toward the bond area. A detonator adaptor controls the expansion of the enclosure by the explosive force so that the enclosure at no point experiences a discontinuity in expansion which causes rupture. The use of the technique is practical in the restricted area of a space station.

  8. NASA welding assessment program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofel, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A long duration test was conducted for comparing various methods of attaching electrical interconnects to solar cells for near Earth orbit spacecraft. Representative solar array modules were thermally cycled for 36,000 cycles between -80 and +80 C. The environmental stress of more than 6 years on a near Earth spacecraft as it cycles in and out of the earth's shadow was simulated. Evaluations of the integrity of these modules were made by visual and by electrical examinations before starting the cycling and then at periodic intervals during the cycling tests. Modules included examples of parallel gap and of ultrasonic welding, as well as soldering. The materials and fabrication processes are state of the art, suitable for forming large solar arrays of spacecraft quality. The modules survived this extensive cycling without detectable degradation in their ability to generate power under sunlight illumination.

  9. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  10. Thermo-Mechanical Processing in Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid-phase joining, or welding process that was invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute (TWI). The process is potentially capable of joining a wide variety of aluminum alloys that are traditionally difficult to fusion weld. The friction stir welding (FSW) process produces welds by moving a non-consumable rotating pin tool along a seam between work pieces that are firmly clamped to an anvil. At the start of the process, the rotating pin is plunged into the material to a pre-determined load. The required heat is produced by a combination of frictional and deformation heating. The shape of the tool shoulder and supporting anvil promotes a high hydrostatic pressure along the joint line as the tool shears and literally stirs the metal together. To produce a defect free weld, process variables (RPM, transverse speed, and downward force) and tool pin design must be chosen carefully. An accurate model of the material flow during the process is necessary to guide process variable selection. At MSFC a plastic slip line model of the process has been synthesized based on macroscopic images of the resulting weld material. Although this model appears to have captured the main features of the process, material specific interactions are not understood. The objective of the present research was to develop a basic understanding of the evolution of the microstructure to be able to relate it to the deformation process variables of strain, strain rate, and temperature.

  11. Weld defect formation in FSWed coppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheisari, Yousof; Pashazadeh, Hamed; Teimournezhad, Jamal; Masoumi, Abolfazl

    2014-06-01

    This work was undertaken to explore the formation of weld defects in FSWed copper metals via both numerical and experimental approaches. The 4 mm-thick copper sheets were friction stir welded at a tool rotational speed of 710 rpm and tool translational speed of 40 mm/min. Microstructural evaluations were performed on the welded specimens. Also a 3D arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian numerical model was developed to obtain temperature and material velocity profiles. To this aim, DEFORM-3D was implemented for developing the numerical simulation. Numerical results for temperature values showed good agreement with the recorded experimental data. They also suggest that on the advancing side (AS) of the trailing side, the pin velocity has the minimum amount (zero), and this is the main reason for the formation of tunneling cavity. Experimental results show that a force is created between the reminder of material at the joint and the rim of AS. This force causes a prong of surface material from the AS rim to penetrate into lower parts of weld. It seems that the inadequate pressure (low values of the plunge depth), inadequate surface materials, and the trapped air are the main causes for the formation of the weld defects.

  12. Effects of the laser beam superficial heat treatment on the gas Tungsten arc Ti-6al-4v welded metal microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiculescu, I.; Dontu, Octavian; Geanta, V.; Ganatsios, S.

    2008-03-01

    The microstructure of the weld and the extent to which it is different from the thermo-mechanically processed base material is strongly influenced by the thermal cycle of welding. The mechanical properties of composite weld structures in titanium alloys depend on structural characteristics of each region (weld, base material and heat affected area), influenced by the specific thermal cycle imposed during welding and the subsequent post-weld heat treatment. In order to improve the as-welded metal toughness and ductility, the welded metal was subjected to various post weld laser heat treatments, above and below beta transus temperature in a shielding atmosphere of pure argon. Standard micro-hardness measurements and tensile strength techniques showed higher mechanical properties of the heat treated samples in different conditions with respect to the base metal. Metallographic investigations attribute this to the formation of α'phases in heat treated material, especially in the weld metal.

  13. Welding Wires To Thin Thermocouple Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Danzey, Gerald A.; Pencil, Eric; Wadel, Mary

    1993-01-01

    Parallel-gap resistance welding yields joints surviving temperatures of about 1,000 degrees C. Much faster than thermocompression bonding. Also exceeds conductive-paste bonding and sputtering thin films through porous flame-sprayed insulation on prewelded lead wires. Introduces no foreign material into thermocouple circuit and does not require careful control of thickness of flame-sprayed material.

  14. Chemical characterization of selected high copper dental amalgams using XPS and XRD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talik, E. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)]. E-mail: talik@us.edu.pl; Babiarz-Zdyb, R. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Dziedzic, A. [Medical University of Silesia, Department of Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology, Akademicki 17 Sqr., 41-209 Bytom (Poland)

    2005-08-02

    The study was carried out to analyze some dependencies between the composition of seven high copper dental amalgams and mercury release behavior, as well as oxygen reactivity of metallic elements. Chemical comparative analysis of selected dental amalgams was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The X-ray powder diffraction measurements revealed two main phases for measured amalgams: {gamma}{sub 1}-(Ag{sub 2}Hg{sub 3}) and {eta}'-(Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5}). The amount of mercury obtained by the XPS method was lower than the value quoted in the manufacturer's literature, which suggested evaporation of mercury under the UHV conditions. A linear decrease of oxygen and carbon contamination with the growing amount of Cu and Ag was observed. The XPS analysis showed that a high Sn concentration caused less resistance to oxidation. Some of the amalgams contained some extra elements, such as Bi, In, and Zn. All samples contained lead in metallic state and oxides. The amount of Ag, Cu, Sn ingredients determines the main properties of high copper amalgams and plays an important role in mercury evaporation. High tin concentration combined with the presence of smaller amounts of silver and copper (high Sn/Ag ratio) may influence the increase of mercury vaporization.

  15. Weld pool temperatures of steel S235 while applying a controlled short-circuit gas metal arc welding process and various shielding gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakov, R.; Schöpp, H.; Gött, G.; Sperl, A.; Wilhelm, G.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2013-11-01

    The temperature determination of liquid metals is difficult and depends strongly on the emissivity. However, the surface temperature distribution of the weld pool is an important characteristic of an arc weld process. As an example, short-arc welding of steel with a cold metal transfer (CMT) process is considered. With optical emission spectroscopy in the spectral region between 660 and 840 nm and absolute calibrated high-speed camera images the relation between temperature and emissivity of the weld pool is determined. This method is used to obtain two-dimensional temperature profiles in the pictures. Results are presented for welding materials (wire G3Si1 on base material S235) using different welding CMT processes with CO2 (100%), Corgon 18 (18% CO2 + 82% Ar), VarigonH6 (93.5% Ar + 6.5% H2) and He (100%) as shielding gases. The different gases are used to study their influence on the weld pool temperature.

  16. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Ying An; Francisco Piorino Neto; Eder Paduan Alves

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW), which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The results we...

  17. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  18. Effects of surface treatments of galvanized steels on projection welding procedure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏; 王宸煜

    2003-01-01

    A group of projection welding experiments and joints tension-shear tests are carried out for cold-rolled steel sheets, galvanized steel sheets (GSS) without treatment, GSS with phosphating and GSS with surface greasing, respectively. The experimental results are regressively analyzed on the computers, then the projection welded joint tension-shear strength curve and the perfect welding currents range of each material are obtained. The results show that surface treatments of galvanized steels have effects on their spot weldabilities. Among the four kinds of materials, GSS with surface greasing have the worst spot weldability, for they need higher welding current and have a narrow welding current range.

  19. Laser-welded V-Cr-Ti alloys: Microstructural and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Smith, D.L.; Sanders, P.G.; Leong, K.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    A systematic study has been initiated to examine the use of lasers to weld sheet materials of V-Cr-Ti alloys and to characterize the microstructural and mechanical properties of the laser-welded materials. In addition, several post-welding heat treatments are being applied to the welded samples to evaluate their benefits, if any, to the structure and properties of the weldments. Hardness measurements are made across the welded regions of different samples to evaluate differences in the characteristics of various weldments.

  20. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  1. Plasma ARC keyhole welding of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostervoll, H.

    1993-02-01

    An increasing and more advanced use of aluminum as a construction material make higher demands to the effectiveness and quality in aluminum joining. Furthermore, if the advantages of aluminum shall be exploited in the best possible way, it is necessary to use the best processes available for the certain application. Today, the most widely used processes of aluminum welding are gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Plasma arc welding (PAW) is another interesting process, which is rather newly adopted for aluminum welding. However, up to now the use is limited and most of the users are within the space industry in USA (NASA); also the new space industry in Europe has adopted the process. The reason for the great interest for PAW in the space industry is, according to NASA, higher weld quality and less repair costs, less heat distortion, and less groove preparations costs. Of these reasons, PAW should also be of interest for the aluminum industry in Scandinavia. The aim of the project is to focus on the possibilities and to some extent testing the PAW process.

  2. Manganese Content Control in Weld Metal During MAG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinakhov, D. A.; Chinakhova, E. D.; Sapozhkov, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of the welding current and method of gas shielding in MAG welding on the content of manganese is considered in the paper. Results of study of the welded specimens of steels 45 when applying welding wire of different formulas and different types of gas shielding (traditional shielding and double-jet shielding) are given. It is found that in MAG welding the value of the welding current and the speed of the gas flow from the welding nozzle have a considerable impact on the chemical composition of the weld metal. The consumable electrode welding under double-jet gas shielding provides the directed gas-dynamics in the welding area and enables controlling the electrode metal transfer and the chemical composition of a weld.

  3. Study on weld pool behaviors and ripple formation in dissimilar welding under pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rong; Luo, Yu

    2017-08-01

    A three-transient numerical model is developed to study the dissimilar metal welding under pulsed laser. The melting, resolidification and vaporization inducing recoil pressure are considered in this model. Their effects on molten pool dynamic and the weld bead formation are studied. The similar metal welding and dissimilar metal welding under pulsed laser are respectively simulated by using this model. It is found that surface ripples are caused mainly by the periodical laser and molten pool solidification. In the first, this model is validated by the weld bead geometry comparison between the simulated and experimental results in similar metal welding. Then, this model is applied to simulate the dissimilar metal welding under pulsed laser. The results show that the distributions of the temperature, melt-flow velocity and surface ripples are asymmetric due to the differences in physical properties of the materials. The higher pulse overlapping factor decreases the solidification rate, leading to the more uniform penetration depths and the finer ripples. Good agreements between the experimental observations and simulation results are obtained by the proposed model.

  4. Studies of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krupa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of a welded joint were described. The joint was made as a result of the reconstruction of a truss and one of the possible means to make a repair. The studies were of a simulation character and were targeted at the detection of welding defects and imperfections thatshould be eliminated in a real structure. A model was designed and on this model the tests and examinations were carried out. The modelwas made under the same conditions as the conditions adopted for repair. It corresponded to the real object in shape and dimensions, and in the proposed technique of welding and welding parameters. The model was composed of five plates joined together with twelve beads.The destructive and non-destructive tests were carried out; the whole structure and the respective welds were also examined visually. Thedefects and imperfections in welds were detected by surface methods of inspection, penetration tests and magnetic particle flaw detection.The model of the welded joint was prepared by destructive methods, a technique that would never be permitted in the case of a realstructure. For the investigations it was necessary to cut out the specimens from the welded joint in direction transverse to the weld run. The specimens were subjected to metallographic examinations and hardness measurements. Additionally, the joint cross-section was examined by destructive testing methods to enable precise determination of the internal defects and imperfections. The surface methods were applied again, this time to determine the severity of welding defects. The analysis has proved that, fabricated under proper conditions and with parameters of the welding process duly observed, the welded joint has good properties and repairs of this type are possible in practice.

  5. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The erosion of materials by the impact of solid particles has received increasing attention during the past twenty years. Recently, research has been initiated with the event of advanced coal conversion processes in which erosion plays an important role. The resulting damage, termed Solid Particle Erosion (SPE), is of concern primarily because of the significantly increased operating costs which result in material failures. Reduced power plant efficiency due to solid particle erosion of boiler tubes and waterfalls has led to various methods to combat SPE. One method is to apply coatings to the components subjected to erosive environments. Protective weld overlay coatings are particularly advantageous in terms of coating quality. The weld overlay coatings are essentially immune to spallation due to a strong metallurgical bond with the substrate material. By using powder mixtures, multiple alloys can be mixed in order to achieve the best performance in an erosive environment. However, a review of the literature revealed a lack of information on weld overlay coating performance in erosive environments which makes the selection of weld overlay alloys a difficult task. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of weld overlay coating composition and microstructure on erosion resistance. These results will lead to a better understanding of erosion mitigation in CFB's.

  6. Tensile and Fatigue Testing and Material Hardening Model Development for 508 LAS Base Metal and 316 SS Similar Metal Weld under In-air and PWR Primary Loop Water Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Soppet, William [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, Saurin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, Ken [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in September 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In an April 2015 report we presented a baseline mechanistic finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) for systemlevel heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis and fatigue life estimation under reactor thermal-mechanical cycles. In the present report, we provide tensile and fatigue test data for 508 low-alloy steel (LAS) base metal, 508 LAS heat-affected zone metal in 508 LAS–316 stainless steel (SS) dissimilar metal welds, and 316 SS-316 SS similar metal welds. The test was conducted under different conditions such as in air at room temperature, in air at 300 oC, and under PWR primary loop water conditions. Data are provided on materials properties related to time-independent tensile tests and time-dependent cyclic tests, such as elastic modulus, elastic and offset strain yield limit stress, and linear and nonlinear kinematic hardening model parameters. The overall objective of this report is to provide guidance to estimate tensile/fatigue hardening parameters from test data. Also, the material models and parameters reported here can directly be used in commercially available finite element codes for fatigue and ratcheting evaluation of reactor components under in-air and PWR water conditions.

  7. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  8. Sheet metal welding using a pulsed Nd: YAG laser-robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qi; Kullberg, Gunnar; Skoog, Hans

    This paper presents a pulsed Nd: YAG laser-robot system for spot and seam welding of mild steel sheets. The study evaluates the laser beams behaviour for welding, and then investigates pulsed Nd: YAG laser spot and seam welding processes. High pulse power intensity is needed to initiate the key-hole welding process and a threshold pulse energy to reach full penetration. In seam welding, a weld consists of successive overlapping spots. Both high pulse energy and high average power are needed to keep the key-hole welding going. A 70% overlap is used to define overlapping spot welding as seam welding and to optimize process parameters because a high tensile strength joint compatible with the strength of the base material can be obtained when the overlap is ≥ 70%; at the same time a smooth seam with full penetration is obtained. In these cases, the joints in pulsed Nd: YAG laser welding are comparable in strength to those obtained with CO 2 laser welding. Robot positioning and motion accuracies can meet the demands of Nd: YAG laser sheet metal welding, but its cornering accuracy affects the welding processes. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the YAG laser-robot system for production in the automotive industry.

  9. Modeling cast IN-738 superalloy gas tungsten arc welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonifaz, E.A. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, E2-327F EITC, Winnipeg, Man., R3T 5V6 (Canada); Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Casilla Postal: 17-12-841 Circulo de Cumbaya, Quito (Ecuador)], E-mail: bonifaz@cc.umanitoba.ca; Richards, N.L. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, E2-327F EITC, Winnipeg, Man., R3T 5V6 (Canada)], E-mail: nrichar@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2009-04-15

    A three-dimensional finite-element thermal model has been developed to generate weld profiles, and to analyze transient heat flow, thermal gradients and thermal cycles in cast IN-738 superalloy gas tungsten arc welds. Outputs of the model (cooling rates, the thermal gradient G and the growth rate R) were used to describe solidification structures found around the weld pool for three different welding speeds at constant heat input. Calculations around the weld pool indicate that the cooling rate increases from the fusion line to the centerline at all welding speeds. It was also observed that the cooling rate (G x R) and the ratio G/R fall with welding speed. For instance, as the welding speed is increased, the cooling rates at the centerline, fusion line and penetration depth decrease. Moreover, it was observed that as the power and welding speed both increase (but keeping the heat input constant), the weld pool becomes wider and more elongated, shifting from circular to elliptical shaped. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS FE code on the basis of a time-increment Lagrangian formulation. The heat source represented by a moving Gaussian power density distribution is applied over the top surface of the specimen during a period of time that depends on the welding speed. Temperature-dependent material properties and the effect of forced convection due to the flow of the shielding gas are included in the model. Numerically predicted sizes of the melt-pool zone and dendrite secondary arm spacing induced by the gas tungsten arc welding process are also given.

  10. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This method is a solid-state weld process capable of joining metallic alloys without melting. The weld workpieces to be joined by thermal stir welding (TSW) are drawn, by heavy forces, between containment plates past the TSW stir tool that then causes joining of the weld workpiece. TSW is similar to friction stir welding (FSW) in that material is heated into a plastic state (not melted) and stirred using a stir rod. The FSW pin tool is an integrated geometrical structure consisting of a large-diameter shoulder, and a smaller-diameter stir pin protruding from the shoulder. When the pin is plunged into a weld workpiece, the shoulder spins on the surface of the weld workpiece, thus inducing frictional heat into the part. The pin stirs the fraying surfaces of the weld joint, thus joining the weld workpiece into one structure. The shoulder and stir pin of the FSW pin tool must rotate together at a desired rotational speed. The induced frictional energy control and stir pin control of the pin tool cannot be de-coupled. The two work as one integrated unit. TSW, on the other hand, de-couples the heating and stirring of FSW, and allows for independent control of each process element. A uniquely designed induction coil heats the weld workpiece to a desired temperature, and once heated, the part moves into a stir rod whose RPM is also independently controlled. As the weld workpiece moves into the stir rod, the piece is positioned, or sandwiched, between upper and lower containment plates. The plate squeezes together, thus compressing the upper and lower surfaces of the weld workpiece. This compressive force, also called consolidation force, consolidates the plastic material within the weld nugget material as it is being stirred by the stir rod. The stir rod is positioned through the center of the top containment plate and protrudes midway through the opposite lower containment plate where it is mechanically captured. The upper and lower containment plates are separated by a

  11. A population-based study on welding exposures at work and respiratory symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillienberg, L; Zock, J-P; Kromhout, H; Plana, E; Jarvis, D; Torén, K; Kogevinas, M

    2008-03-01

    In the first European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS I), an excess asthma risk was associated with high exposure to gases and fumes, mineral and biological dusts. In a 9-year follow-up study (ECRHS II), the aim was to study if welding at work increases the risk of asthma symptoms, wheeze and chronic bronchitis symptoms. The study also aimed to identify specific welding risk factors. In a random population sample of individuals from 22 European centres in 10 countries, 316 males reported welding at work during the follow-up period. These individuals responded to a supplemental questionnaire about frequency of welding, use of different methods and materials, welding environment and respiratory protection. Cumulative exposure to welding fumes for the follow-up period was estimated by using a database on welding fume exposures. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate prevalence ratios (PR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for prevalence of asthma symptoms or asthma medication, wheeze and chronic bronchitis symptoms in relation to welding methods and welded materials as well as estimated cumulative welding fume exposure compared to an external reference group. In the study population of 316 males, 62% performed welding 4 h day(-1). Welding was a common task in many occupations and only 7% of the individuals actually called themselves welders and flame cutters, while the largest groups doing welding worked in construction or were motor, agricultural and industrial mechanics and fitters. Welding at work was not associated with an increased prevalence of asthma symptoms or wheeze but there was an association with chronic bronchitis symptoms (PR = 1.33, 1.00-1.76). Using assigned cumulative exposure in tertiles showed that the lowest exposed tertile had the highest PR of bronchitis symptoms. Chronic bronchitis symptoms was significantly higher in those frequently welding in galvanized steel or iron (PR = 2.14, 1.24-3.68) and in those frequently

  12. Modeling of plasma and thermo-fluid transport in hybrid welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribic, Brandon D.

    processes parameters on heat transfer, fluid flow, and plasma characteristics for arc and laser welding. However, numerical modeling of laser/GTA hybrid welding is just beginning. Arc and laser welding plasmas have been previously analyzed successfully using optical emission spectroscopy in order to better understand arc and laser plasma properties as a function of plasma radius. Variation of hybrid welding plasma properties with radial distance is not known. Since plasma properties can affect arc and laser energy absorption and weld integrity, a better understanding of the change in hybrid welding plasma properties as a function of plasma radius is important and necessary. Material composition influences welding plasma properties, arc and laser energy absorption, heat transfer, and fluid flow. The presence of surface active elements such as oxygen and sulfur can affect weld pool fluid flow and bead geometry depending upon the significance of heat transfer by convection. Easily vaporized and ionized alloying elements can influence arc plasma characteristics and arc energy absorption. The effects of surface active elements on heat transfer and fluid flow are well understood in the case of arc and conduction mode laser welding. However, the influence of surface active elements on heat transfer and fluid flow during keyhole mode laser welding and laser/arc hybrid welding are not well known. Modeling has been used to successfully analyze the influence of surface active elements during arc and conduction mode laser welding in the past and offers promise in the case of laser/arc hybrid welding. A critical review of the literature revealed several important areas for further research and unanswered questions. (1) The understanding of heat transfer and fluid flow during hybrid welding is still beginning and further research is necessary. (2) Why hybrid welding weld bead width is greater than that of laser or arc welding is not well understood. (3) The influence of arc power and

  13. Analysis of Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloys and Optimization of Welding Parameters for Maximum Tensile Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. S. K. Aditya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Friction Stir Welding (FSW process is an innovative technique to join metals in the plastic state thus not reaching the liquid state as it happen in traditional welding processes. This feature of the FSW proved that a modification can be done on the fatigue behavior and strength of the welding joints so, some of the leading companies to adopted the process for the manufacturing of Automotive, Locomotive, Shipping & Aerospace. The FSW is a variant of the linear friction welding process in which the material is being welded without bulk melting. The FSW parameters such as tool Rotational speed, Welding speed, Axial Force, Tool tilt angle, Welding Tool Shoulder Diameter, and Welded Plate thickness play a major role in determining the properties like Tensile strength, hardness, residual stress, HAZ etc. of the joints. Our objective is to optimize the welding parameters to achieve Max. Tensile Strength of Aluminium Alloys (especially on AA-2xxx, AA-5xxx under FSW. We only wish to optimize (by Taguchi and ANOVA method with three variable input parameters (Rotational speed in rpm, Translation speed in mm/min & Axial force in KN considering a cylindrical pin.

  14. 30万吨/年合成氨气化炉耐热Cr-Mo钢焊接材料的研制%The Development of Heat-resistance Cr-Mo Steel Welding Material for the Gasifier Used for 300,000 Ton/Year Ammonia Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建俊; 郑见明; 黄有仁; 郑秀芹; 孙业宏

    2000-01-01

    This article briefly describes the development process of th e heat resistance Cr-Mo steel welding material for the gasifier used for 300,000 Ton/Year ammonia project,which includes the technical specification,the formulat ion selection and all test results.The successful development of this welding ma terial with excellent high temperature properity as well as low temperature toug hness (AKV>54J,at-20℃),not only satisfies the design and fabrication req uirements of the gasifier,but also changes the situation that the welding materi al can only depend on import in ths past,which saves the country plenty of forei gn exchanges.

  15. Improved diffusion welding and roll welding of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holko, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Auto-vacuum cleaning technique was applied to titanium parts prior to welding. This provides oxide-free welding surfaces. Diffusion welding can be accomplished in as little as five minutes of hot pressing. Roll welding can be accomplished with only ten percent deformation.

  16. Grooving corrosion of seam welded oil pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hanafy El-Sayed

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available 24” pipeline carrying oil was failed in the form of longitudinal crack at the 6 O’clock position resulting in oil spill. The failed pipe was investigated to reveal the main cause of its failure. The procedure of investigation was built on studying the intact pipe, rupture area, parent material, and intact weld. Results of chemical analysis, mechanical properties, and microstructure of the pipe material were confirmed with the specified standard. Cracks were originated from weld defected sites, initiated by grooving corrosion, propagated by inertia at the normal designed pressure condition, and stopped when stress relief is attained. It is recommended to use high quality ERW pipe, with its seam weld line positioned around the 12 O’clock during installation, to minimize and decelerate grooving corrosion. It is also important to perform regular or routine inspection, on suitable intervals, determined by past experience.

  17. Infrared welding of cross-linkable polyamide 66

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Leisen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiation cross-linking of polyamide 66 with electron beams alters the material’s characteristics. This leads to a varied relationship amongst the process, structure, and properties for infrared welding cross-linked polyamide 66. A threedimensional network of covalent bonds results in an impeded melt flow and altered welding characteristics. Compared to non-cross linked polyamide, a changed energy input in the weld during infrared heating and a reduced meltdown can be observed. Such thermal developments and a reduced meltdown affect the resulting weld strengths. Welding factors of almost 60% of base material strengths can be achieved. A clear influence of the heating time on the weld strength can be observed. The scope of this article is to investigate the influence of radiation cross-linking on the material characteristics and, by extension, the resulting processing and welding characteristics. Mechanical and optical investigations serve to highlight the influence of radiation cross-linking on the infrared welding process of polyamide 66.

  18. Friction Stir Welding of Shipbuilding Steel with Primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Azevedo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Friction Stir Welding has proven its merits for welding of aluminium alloys and is focused in expanding its material database to steel and titanium and also to assess new joint configurations. The use of welded structures in shipbuilding industry has a long tradition and continuously seeks for innovation in terms of materials and processes maintaining, or even, reducing costs. Several studies have been performed in the past years on FSW of steel. However, just recently were reported defect-free welds, free of martensite with stable parameters in steel without Primer. FSW of steel with primer has not been addressed. This work aims to fulfil a knowledge gap related to the use of friction stir for welding shipbuilding steel by analysing the effect of welding parameters on the metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties of welds obtained with an innovative FSW tool in joining steel plates with a primer. Welds were performed in 4mm thick GL-A36 steel plates painted with a zinc based primer followed by a detailed microscopic, chemical and mechanical analysis. The results that matching fatigue properties are obtained using this technique, in FSW of shipbuilding steel with Primer.

  19. Method for laser spot welding monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassero, Giorgio

    1994-09-01

    As more powerful solid state laser sources appear on the market, new applications become technically possible and important from the economical point of view. For every process a preliminary optimization phase is necessary. The main parameters, used for a welding application by a high power Nd-YAG laser, are: pulse energy, pulse width, repetition rate and process duration or speed. In this paper an experimental methodology, for the development of an electrooptical laser spot welding monitoring system, is presented. The electromagnetic emission from the molten pool was observed and measured with appropriate sensors. The statistical method `Parameter Design' was used to obtain an accurate analysis of the process parameter that influence process results. A laser station with a solid state laser coupled to an optical fiber (1 mm in diameter) was utilized for the welding tests. The main material used for the experimental plan was zinc coated steel sheet 0.8 mm thick. This material and the related spot welding technique are extensively used in the automotive industry, therefore, the introduction of laser technology in production line will improve the quality of the final product. A correlation, between sensor signals and `through or not through' welds, was assessed. The investigation has furthermore shown the necessity, for the modern laser production systems, to use multisensor heads for process monitoring or control with more advanced signal elaboration procedures.

  20. Friction Stir.Welding is an advance metal joining process: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umasankar Das,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The friction stir welding is recently developed solid state welding process which overcome the problem associated with fusion welding technology. The properties achieved by friction stir welding is better than that achieve by fusion welding technique It has been invented as a solid-state joining technique and initially applied to aluminum alloys. FSW is used to replace rivets joints in the aeronautical industry. Recently the aircraft and military industries widely have been using aluminum alloys particularly because of their fine strength to weight ratio. However in compare with steels they represent welding difficulties and also lower ductility. In last years it has been observed that Friction Stir Welding (FSW method represents better microstructure and mechanical properties than conventional methods in welding aluminum alloys. It has been widely investigated for mostly low melting materials, such as Al, Mg and Cu alloys. Aluminum is the most usable material in engineering application and a lot of improvement is needed in the area of its welding. The latest works on friction stir welding of aluminum have been directed towards improving the quality of weld, reducing defects and applying the process of FSW to aluminum for specific applications. This joining technique is energy efficient, environment friendly, and versatile. In particular, it can be used to join high-strength aerospace aluminum alloys and other metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. FSW is considered to be the most significant development in metal joining in a last decade. The FSW of Aluminums and its alloys has been commercialized; and recent interest is focused on joining dissimilar materials. However, in order to commercialize the process, research studies are required to characterize and establish proper process parameters for FSW. This paper summarizes the trends and advances of this welding processes in the field of welding. Future aspects of

  1. Fine welding with lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  2. Optimization of Friction Welding Process Parameters for Joining Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel%Optimization of Friction Welding Process Parameters for Joining Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R Paventhan; P R Lakshminarayanan; V Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    Friction weIding is a solid state joining process used extensively currently owing to its advantages such as low heat input, high production efficiency, ease of manufacture, and environment friendliness. Materials difficult to be welded by fusion welding processes can be successfully welded by friction welding. An attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the tensile strength of friction welded AISI 1040 grade medium carbon steel and AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel, incorporating the process parameters such as friction pressure, forging pressure, friction time and forging time, which have great influence on strength of the joints. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the friction welding process parameters to attain maximum tensile strength of the joint. The maximum tensile strength of 543 MPa could be obtained for the joints fabricated under the welding conditions of friction pressure of 90 MPa, forging pressure of 90 MPa, friction time of 6 s and forging time of 6 s.

  3. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  4. The effect of welding fixtures on welding distortions

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is to examine the effect of welding fixture used to prevent the distortions duringcooling process utilizing a robot controlled gas metal arc welding method on cooling rate and distortions ofwelded structures.Design/methodology/approach: Using a specially designed welding fixture for a welded steel structure, sixdifferent types of AISI 1020 steel specimens are tested in three different welding speeds and two differentcooling conditions either at fixture or without using ...

  5. Low temperature impact testing of welded structural wrought iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Zachary

    During the second half of the 19th century, structural wrought iron was commonly used in construction of bridges and other structures. Today, these remaining structures are still actively in use and may fall under the protection of historic preservation agencies. Continued use and protection leads to the need for inspection, maintenance, and repair of the wrought iron within these structures. Welding can be useful to achieve the appropriate repair, rehabilitation, or replacement of wrought iron members. There is currently very little published on modern welding techniques for historic wrought iron. There is also no pre-qualified method for this welding. The demand for welding in the repair of historic structural wrought iron has led to a line of research investigating shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of historic wrought iron at the University of Colorado Denver. This prior research selected the weld type and other weld specifications to try and achieve a recognized specific welding procedure using modern SMAW technology and techniques. This thesis continues investigating SMAW of historic wrought iron. Specifically, this thesis addresses the toughness of these welds from analysis of the data collected from performing Charpy V-Notch (CVN) Impact Tests. Temperature was varied to observe the material response of the welds at low temperature. The wrought iron used in testing was from a historic vehicle bridge in Minnesota, USA. This area, and many other areas with wrought iron structures, can experience sustained or fluctuating temperatures far below freezing. Investigating the toughness of welds in historic wrought iron at these temperatures is necessary to fully understand material responses of the existing structures in need of maintenance and repair. It was shown that welded wrought iron is tougher and more ductile than non-welded wrought iron. In regards to toughness, welding is an acceptable repair method. Information on wrought iron, low temperature failure

  6. Rheomorphism of welded tuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, J. A.; Wright, J. V.

    1981-05-01

    Peralkaline welded tuffs from the islands of Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, and Pantelleria, Italy, show abundant evidence for post-depositional flow. It is demonstrated that rheomorphism, or secondary mass flowage, can occur in welded tuffs of ignimbrite and air-fall origin. The presence of a linear fabric is taken as the diagnostic criterion for the recognition of the process. Deposition on a slope is an essential condition for the development of rheomorphism after compaction and welding. Internal structures produced during rheomorphic flow can be studied by the methods of structural geology and show similar dispositions to comparable features in sedimentary slump sheets. It is shown that secondary flowage can occur in welded tuffs emplaced on gentle slopes, provided that the apparent viscosity of the magma is sufficiently low. Compositional factors favor the development of rheomorphism in densely welded tuffs of peralkaline type.

  7. Effects of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Similar- and Dissimilar-Alloy Friction Stir Welded Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Sinke, Jos

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state joining process with relatively low welding temperatures. Nevertheless, the mechanical properties of friction stir welded blanks are degraded after welding. Indeed, both strength and ductility of the welds are decreased after welding. Often, the resulting friction stir welded blanks need to be formed to their final structural shape. Therefore, the formability of friction stir welded blanks is of primary importance in the manufacturing of structural parts. This paper studies how the mechanical properties and particularly formability of friction stir welded blanks can be improved by applying a post weld heat treatment. Two aluminum alloys from 2000 and 7000 series, namely 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study. The sheet thickness of both materials is 2,0 mm. The selected alloys are welded in three configurations: 2024-T3 and 2024-T3, 7075-T6 and 7075-T6, and 2024-T3 and 7075-T6. The resulting welds are naturally aged for a few months. Three sets of standard dog bone shape tensile test specimens are then machined from the welds. The first set of the specimens is tested without any heat treatment. The second set of the specimens is solution heat treated and quenched before testing. The third set of the specimens is solution heat treated, quenched, and naturally aged for a week before testing. The mechanical properties of the three different sets of specimens are compared with each other. It is shown that careful selection of post weld heat-treatment can greatly improve the formability of friction stir welded blanks.

  8. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding process, can be in service without failures. It was found that the corrosion of the weld analyzed in this research resulted from the simultaneous activity of different types of corrosion. In this study, electrochemical techniques including polarization and metallographic analysis were used to analyze the corrosion of a weld material of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels. Based on surface, chemical and electrochemical analyses, it was concluded that corrosion occurrence was the result of the simultaneous activity of contact corrosion (ferrite and austenitic material conjuction, stress corrosion (originating from deformed ferrite structure and inter-granular corrosion (due to chromium carbide precipitation. The value of corrosion potential of –0.53 V shows that this weld, after the thermal treatment, is not able to repassivate a protective oxide film.

  9. Novel Optimization Methodology for Welding Process/Consumable Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintana, Marie A; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Vitek, John; Babu, Suresh

    2006-01-15

    Advanced materials are being developed to improve the energy efficiency of many industries of future including steel, mining, and chemical, as well as, US infrastructures including bridges, pipelines and buildings. Effective deployment of these materials is highly dependent upon the development of arc welding technology. Traditional welding technology development is slow and often involves expensive and time-consuming trial and error experimentation. The reason for this is the lack of useful predictive tools that enable welding technology development to keep pace with the deployment of new materials in various industrial sectors. Literature reviews showed two kinds of modeling activities. Academic and national laboratory efforts focus on developing integrated weld process models by employing the detailed scientific methodologies. However, these models are cumbersome and not easy to use. Therefore, these scientific models have limited application in real-world industrial conditions. On the other hand, industrial users have relied on simple predictive models based on analytical and empirical equations to drive their product development. The scopes of these simple models are limited. In this research, attempts were made to bridge this gap and provide the industry with a computational tool that combines the advantages of both approaches. This research resulted in the development of predictive tools which facilitate the development of optimized welding processes and consumables. The work demonstrated that it is possible to develop hybrid integrated models for relating the weld metal composition and process parameters to the performance of welds. In addition, these tools can be deployed for industrial users through user friendly graphical interface. In principle, the welding industry users can use these modular tools to guide their welding process parameter and consumable composition selection. It is hypothesized that by expanding these tools throughout welding industry

  10. CO2 laser welding of magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhahri, Mohammed; Masse, Jean Eric; Mathieu, J. F.; Barreau, Gerard; Autric, Michel L.

    2000-02-01

    Metallic alloys with a low mass density can be considered to be basic materials in aeronautic and automotive industry. Magnesium alloys have better properties than aluminum alloys in respect of their low density and high resistance to traction. The main problems of magnesium alloy welding are the inflammability, the crack formation and the appearance of porosity during the solidification. The laser tool is efficient to overcome the difficulties of manufacturing by conventional processing. Besides, the laser processing mainly using shielding gases allows an effective protection of the metal against the action of oxygen and a small heat affected zone. In this paper, we present experimental results about 5 kW CO2 laser welding of 4 mm-thick magnesium alloy plates provided by Eurocopter France. The focused laser beam has about 0.15 mm of diameter. We have investigated the following sample: WE43, alloy recommended in aeronautic and space applications, is constituted with Mg, Y, Zr, rare earth. More ductile, it can be used at high temperatures until 250 degrees Celsius for times longer than 5000 hours without effects on its mechanical properties. A sample of RZ5 (French Norm: GZ4TR, United States Norm ZE41) is composed of Mg, Zn, Zr, La, rare earth. This alloy has excellent properties of foundry and it allows to the realization of components with complex form. Also, it has a good resistance and important properties of tightness. The parameters of the process were optimized in the following fields: laser power: 2 to 5 kW, welding speed: 1 to 4.5 m/min, focal position: -3 mm to +3 mm below or on the top of the metal surface, shielding gas: helium with a flow of 10 to 60 l/min at 4 bars. Metallurgical analyses and mechanical control are made (macroscopic structure, microscopic structure, interpretations of the structures and localization of possible defects, analyse phases, chemical composition, hardness, tensile test etc.) to understand the parameters influence of welding

  11. Characteristics of coated copper wire specimens using high frequency ultrasonic complex vibration welding equipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, J; Ihara, S; Harada, Y; Kasahara, K; Sakamaki, N

    2004-04-01

    Welding characteristic of thin coated copper wires were studied using 40, 60, 100 kHz ultrasonic complex vibration welding equipments with elliptical to circular vibration locus. The complex vibration systems consisted of a longitudinal-torsional vibration converter and a driving longitudinal vibration system. Polyurethane coated copper wires of 0.036 mm outer diameter and copper plates of 0.3 mm thickness and the other dimension wires were used as welding specimens. The copper wire part is completely welded on the copper substrate and the insulated coating material is driven from welded area to outsides of the wire specimens by high frequency complex vibration.

  12. Problems in repair-welding of duplex-treated tool steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Muhič

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses problems in laser welding of die-cast tools used for aluminum pressure die-castings and plastic moulds. To extend life cycle of tools various surface improvements are used. These surface improvements significantly reduce weldability of the material. This paper presents development of defects in repair welding of duplex-treated tool steel. The procedure is aimed at reduction of defects by the newly developed repair laser welding techniques. Effects of different repair welding process parameters and techniques are considered. A microstructural analysis is conducted to detect defect formation and reveal the best laser welding method for duplex-treated tools.

  13. Influence of Friction Stir Welding on Corrosion Properties of Aw-7020M Alloy in Sea Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudzik K.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW, provides an alternative to MIG and TIG welding methods for joining aluminium alloys. The article presents the results of electrochemical corrosion resistance test of alloy AW- 7020M and its joints welded by FSW. The study was performed using the method of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Impedance spectroscopy studies showed that both, the FSW welded joint and base material AW-7020M has a good resistance to electrochemical corrosion in sea water environment, wherein the welded joint has a higher susceptibility to this type of corrosion. Research has indicated the desirability of applying the FSW method for joining AW-7020M alloy in shipbuilding industry.

  14. Improving Hygienic Characteristics of Coated Electrodes for Welding High-Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Ivanov, K. V.; Sadikov, I. D.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies showing that the use of an inverter power supply instead of a diode rectifier provides:: fine-droplet electrode metal transfer which reduces generation time by 46% and transfer time by 28%; transfer of alloying elements from welding materials into the weld metal which reduces its loss from the welding line by 6% and the heat affected area by 3%; reducing the emission rate of welding fumes and their components by 23%; reducing specific emission of welding fumes and their components by 23%.

  15. Welding of the steel grade S890QL: Varjenje jekla kvalitete S890QL:

    OpenAIRE

    Bernetič, Jure; Celin, Roman; Skobir Balantič, Danijela Anica

    2014-01-01

    Quenched and tempered high-strength steels are widely used in the construction of steel structures. However, because of their properties, care must be taken in order to determine suitable welding parameters. One way is to use the weld-heat-flow theory with the use of the weld-bead cooling time t8/5 and the recommendations of the standard EN 1011-2. The chosen weld parent material was high-strength S890QL steel with the filler welding wire G Mn4Ni1.5CrMo, which were used to produce a sound but...

  16. Characterization of the mechanical properties and structural integrity of T-welded connections repaired by grinding and wet welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terán, G., E-mail: gteran@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Cuamatzi-Meléndez, R., E-mail: rcuamatzi@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Albiter, A., E-mail: aalbiter@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Maldonado, C., E-mail: cmzepeda@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, UMSNH, PO Box 52-B, 58000, México (Mexico); Bracarense, A.Q., E-mail: bracarense@ufmg.br [UFMG Departamento de Engeharia Mecánica Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental methodology to characterize the structural integrity and mechanical properties of repaired T-welded connections using in fixed offshore structures. Grinding is employed to remove localized damage like cracking and corrosion and subsequent wet welding can be used to fill the grinded material. But it is important to define the grinding depth and profile in order to maintain structural integrity during the repair. Therefore, in this work different grinding depths were performed, for damage material removal, at the weld toe of the T-welded connections. The grinding was filled by wet welding in a hyperbaric chamber, simulating three different water depths: 50 m, 70 m and 100 m. The electrodes were coated with vinilic varnish, which is cheap and easy to apply. The characterization of the mechanical properties of the T-welded connections was done with standard tensile, hardness and Charpy tests; microstructure and porosity analysis were also performed. The samples were obtained from the welded connections in regions of the wet weld beads. The test results were compared with the mechanical properties of the T-welded connections welded in air conditions performed by other authors. The results showed that the wet welding technique performed in this work produced good mechanical properties of the repaired T-welded connection. The mechanical properties, measured in wet conditions, for 6 mm grinding depth, were similar for the 3 different water depths measured in air conditions. But for 10 mm grinding depth, the values of the mechanical properties measured in wet conditions were quite lower than that for air conditions for the 3 water depths. However a porosity analysis, performed with a Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM), showed that the level of porosity in the resulted wet weld beads is in the range of that published in the literature and some samples revealed lower level of porosity. The main resulting microstructure was polygonal

  17. Hastelloy C-276Weld Overlay bySMAW Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Er. Rahul Sharma; Er. Manoj Kumar; Dr. Abhishek Kamboj

    2017-01-01

    ... diameter.Hastelloy C-276weld overlay on ferrous material is developed for outstanding resistance to wide variety of chemical process environments such as ferric and cupric chlorides, hot contaminated mineral...

  18. Laser Welding of Sub-assemblies before Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mads; Olsen, Flemmming Ove; Pecas, Paulo

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes some experimental investigations of the formability of CO2-laser-welded 0.75 mm and 1.25 mm low carbon steel. There will be a description of how the laser welded blanks behave in different forming tests, and the influene of misalignment and undercut on the formability....... The quality is evalutated by measuring the imit strain and the limit effective strain for the laser welded sheets and the base material. These strains will be presented in a forming limit diagram (FLD). Finally the formability of the laser sheets is compared to that of the base materials....

  19. Process Model for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn

    1996-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new process being applied for joining of metal alloys. The process was initially developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, UK. The FSW process is being investigated at NASA/MSEC as a repair/initial weld procedure for fabrication of the super-light-weight aluminum-lithium shuttle external tank. The FSW investigations at MSFC were conducted on a horizontal mill to produce butt welds of flat plate material. The weldment plates are butted together and fixed to a backing plate on the mill bed. A pin tool is placed into the tool holder of the mill spindle and rotated at approximately 400 rpm. The pin tool is then plunged into the plates such that the center of the probe lies at, one end of the line of contact, between the plates and the shoulder of the pin tool penetrates the top surface of the weldment. The weld is produced by traversing the tool along the line of contact between the plates. A lead angle allows the leading edge of the shoulder to remain above the top surface of the plate. The work presented here is the first attempt at modeling a complex phenomenon. The mechanical aspects of conducting the weld process are easily defined and the process itself is controlled by relatively few input parameters. However, in the region of the weld, plasticizing and forging of the parent material occurs. These are difficult processes to model. The model presented here addresses only variations in the radial dimension outward from the pin tool axis. Examinations of the grain structure of the weld reveal that a considerable amount of material deformation also occurs in the direction parallel to the pin tool axis of rotation, through the material thickness. In addition, measurements of the axial load on the pin tool demonstrate that the forging affect of the pin tool shoulder is an important process phenomenon. Therefore, the model needs to be expanded to account for the deformations through the material thickness and the

  20. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  1. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  2. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  3. Nanoindentation of Electropolished FeCrAl Alloy Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Jordan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aydogan, Eda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mara, Nathan Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-13

    The present report summarizes Berkovich nanoindentation modulus and hardness measurements on two candidate FeCrAl alloys (C35M and C37M) on as-received (AR) and welded samples. In addition, spherical nanoindentation stress-strain measurements were performed on individual grains to provide further information and demonstrate the applicability of these protocols to mechanically characterizing welds in FeCrAl alloys. The indentation results are compared against the reported tensile properties for these alloys to provide relationships between nanoindentation and tensile tests and insight into weldsoftening for these FeCrAl alloys. Hardness measurements revealed weld-softening for both alloys in good agreement with tensile test results. C35M showed a larger reduction in hardness at the weld center from the AR material compared to C37M; this is also consistent with tensile tests. In general, nanohardness was shown to be a good predictor of tensile yield strength and ultimate tensile stress for FeCrAl alloys. Spherical nanoindentation measurements revealed that the fusion zone (FZ) + heat affected zone (HAZ) has a very low defect density typical of well-annealed metals as indicated by the frequent pop-in events. Spherical nanoindentation yield strength, Berkovich hardness, and tensile yield strength measurements on the welded material all show that the C37M welded material has a higher strength than C35M welded material. From the comparison of nanoindentation and tensile tests, EBSD microstructure analysis, and information on the processing history, it can be deduced that the primary driver for weld-softening is a change in the defect structure at the grain-scale between the AR and welded material. These measurements serve as baseline data for utilizing nanoindentation for studying the effects of radiation damage on these alloys.

  4. Effect of Interfacial Reaction on the Mechanical Performance of Steel to Aluminum Dissimilar Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Li; Chen, Ying-Chun; Robson, Joe D.; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    The early stages of formation of intermetallic compounds (IMC) have been investigated in dissimilar aluminum to steel welds, manufactured by high power (2.5 kW) ultrasonic spot welding (USW). To better understand the influence of alloy composition, welds were produced between a low-carbon steel (DC04) and two different aluminum alloys (6111 and 7055). The joint strengths were measured in lap shear tests and the formation and growth behavior of IMCs at the weld interface were characterized by electron microscopy, for welding times from 0.2 to 2.4 seconds. With the material combinations studied, the η (Fe2Al5) intermetallic phase was found to form first, very rapidly in the initial stage of welding, with a discontinuous island morphology. Continuous layers of η and then θ (FeAl3) phase were subsequently seen to develop on extending the welding time to greater than 0.7 second. The IMC layer formed in the DC04-AA7055 combination grew thicker than for the DC04-AA6111 welds, despite both weld sets having near identical thermal histories. Zinc was also found to be dissolved in the IMC phases when welding with the AA7055 alloy. After post-weld aging of the aluminum alloy, fracture in the lap shear tests always occurred along the joint interface; however, the DC04-AA6111 welds had higher fracture energy than the DC04-AA7055 combination.

  5. An investigation on SA 213-Tube to SA 387-Tube plate using friction welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, S. Pandia; Kumaraswamidhas, L. A. [Indian Institute of Technology, Jharkhand (India); Kumaran, S. Senthil [RVS School of Engineering and Technology, Tamil Nadu (India); Muthukumaran, S. [National Institute of Technology, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-01-15

    Friction welding of tube to tube plate using an external tool (FWTPET) is a relatively newer solid state welding process used for joining tube to tube plate of either similar or dissimilar materials with enhanced mechanical and metallurgical properties. In the present study, FWTPET has been used to weld SA 213 (Grade T12) tube with SA 387 (Grade 22) tube plate. The welded samples are found to have satisfactory joint strength and the Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study showed that inter metallic compound is absent in the weld zone. The different weld joints have been identified and the phase composition is found using EDX and XRD. Microstructures have been analyzed using optical and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties such as hardness, compressive shear strength and peel test for different weld conditions are studied and the hardness survey revealed that there is increase in hardness at the weld interface due to grain refinement. The corrosion behavior for different weld conditions have been analyzed and the weld zone is found to have better corrosion resistance due to the influence of the grain refinement after FWTPET welding process. Hence, the present investigation is carried out to study the behavior of friction welded dissimilar joints of SA 213 tube and SA 387 tube plate joints and the results are presented. The present study confirms that a high quality tube to tube plate joint can be achieved using FWTPET process at 1120 rpm.

  6. Corrosion behavior of a welded stainless-steel orthopedic implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reclaru, L; Lerf, R; Eschler, P Y; Meyer, J M

    2001-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of combinations of materials used in an orthopedic implant: the spherical part (forged or forged and annealed) constituting the head, the weld (tungsten inert gas (TIG) or electron beam (EB) techniques), and the cylindrical part (annealed) constituting the shaft of a femoral prosthesis - has been investigated. Open-circuit potentials, potentiodynamic curves, Tafel slope, mixed potential theory and susceptibility to intergranular attack are electrochemical and chemical procedures selected for this work. Electrochemical measurements using a microelectrode have been made in the following zones: spherical part, cylindrical part, weld, and weld/sphere, and weld/shaft interfaces. To detect intergranular attack, the Strauss test has been used. At the interfaces, corrosion currents, measured (Icorr) and predicted (Icouple) are low, in the order of the pico- to nanoampere. The electrochemical behavior of the electron beam (EB) weld is better than that of the tungsten inert gas (TIG). Welds at interfaces can behave either anodically or cathodically. It is better if welds, which are sensitive parts of the femoral prosthesis, behave cathodically. In this way, the risk of starting localized corrosion (pitting, crevice or intergranular corrosion) from a galvanic couple, remains low. From this point of view, the sample with the EB weld offers the best behavior. All the other samples containing a TIG type of weld exhibit a less favorable behavior. The mechanical treatments (forged, and forged and annealed) of the steel sphere did not show any difference in the corrosion behavior. No intergranular corrosion has been observed at the weld/steel interface for unsensitized samples. With sensitized samples, however, a TIG sample has exhibited some localized intergranular corrosion at a distance of 500 microm along the weld/stainless steel (sphere) interface.

  7. Friction Stir Welding of very thin plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Galvão

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The results obtained in present research, relative to friction stir welding of 1 mm thick plates of aluminium, copper, copper-zinc and zinc alloys, prove that the application of the process in the joining of very thin plates is feasible and desirable. In fact, independently of the base material, the welds produced presented very good morphological characteristics and significant grain refinement in the nugget. Tensile and hardness tests proved that all the welds were at least in even-match relative to the base material properties. Based on the AA 5182 aluminium alloy results it was also possible to conclude that augmenting the welding speed, which improves process productivity, increases grain refinement in the nugget, improving the mechanical properties of the welds.Os resultados obtidos no presente estudo, referentes a friction stir welding de chapas de alumínio, cobre, cobre-zinco e zinco com 1 mm de espessura, provam que a aplicação desta tecnologia para a ligação de chapas muito finas é possível e desejável. De fato, independentemente do material de base, as soldas produzidas apresentaram características morfológicas muito boas e um significativo refinamento do grão na zona do nugget. Ensaios de dureza e tração provaram que todas as soldas apresentavam, no mínimo, propriedades mecânicas semelhantes às dos materiais de base. Com base nos resultados da liga de alumínio AA 5182 foi também possível concluir que ao aumentar a velocidade de soldagem, o que melhora a produtividade do processo, aumenta-se o refinamento do grão no nugget, melhorando as propriedades mecânicas das soldas.

  8. Elucidation of laser welding phenomena and factors affecting weld penetration and welding defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Seiji; Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami

    The behavior and effect of a plasma plume on the weld penetration are greatly different between CO2 laser welding and YAG, disk or fiber laser welding. The effects of the power and the power density on the weld penetration are elucidated. Spattering leading to the formation of underfilled weld beads is controlled by inclining the laser beam. Porosity is formed from bubbles generated from the tip of the keyhole at low welding speed or from the middle part of the keyhole at high laser power density. Cracking easily occurs in pulsed spot welding of aluminum alloys.

  9. Autofocus imaging: Experimental results in an anisotropic austenitic weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.; Hunter, A.

    2012-05-01

    The quality of an ultrasonic array image, especially for anisotropic material, depends on accurate information about acoustic properties. Inaccuracy of acoustic properties causes image degradation, e.g., blurring, errors in locating of reflectors and introduction of artifacts. In this paper, for an anisotropic austenitic steel weld, an autofocus imaging technique is presented. The array data from a series of beacons is captured and then used to statistically extract anisotropic weld properties by using a Monte-Carlo inversion approach. The beacon and imaging systems are realized using two separated arrays; one acts as a series of beacons and the other images these beacons. Key to the Monte-Carlo inversion scheme is a fast forward model of wave propagation in the anisotropic weld and this is based on the Dijkstra algorithm. Using this autofocus approach a measured weld map was extracted from an austenitic weld and used to reduce location errors, initially greater than 6mm, to less than 1mm.

  10. GAP WIDTH STUDY IN LASER BUTT-WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    In this paper the maximum allowable gap width in laser butt-welding is intensively studied. The gap width study (GWS) is performed on the material of SST of W1.4401 (AISI 316) under various welding conditions, which are the gap width : 0.00-0.50 mm, the welding speed : 0.5-2.0 m/min, the laser...... to the welding speed, (2) the larger laser power leads to the bigger maximum allowable gap width and (3) the focal point position has very little influence on the maximum gap width....... power : 2 and 2.6 kW and the focal point position : 0 and -1.2 mm. Quality of all the butt welds are destructively tested according to ISO 13919-1.Influences of the variable process parameters to the maximum allowable gap width are observed as (1) the maximum gap width is inversely related...

  11. The effect of laser pulse tailored welding of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccay, T. Dwayne; Mccay, Mary Helen; Sharp, C. Michael; Womack, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    Pulse tailored laser welding has been applied to wrought, wrought grain grown, and cast Inconel 718 using a CO2 laser. Prior to welding, the material was characterized metallographically and the solid state transformation regions were identified using Differential Scanning Calorimetry and high temperature x-ray diffraction. Bead on plate welds (restrained and unrestrained) were then produced using a matrix of pulse duty cycles and pulsed average power. Subsequent characterization included heat affected zone width, penetration and underbead width, the presence of cracks, microfissures and porosity, fusion zone curvature, and precipitation and liquated region width. Pedigree welding on three selected processing conditions was shown by microstructural and dye penetrant analysis to produce no microfissures, a result which strongly indicates the viability of pulse tailored welding for microfissure free IN 718.

  12. Corrosion of friction stir welded magnesium alloy AM50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Rongchang [School of Material Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Xingshenglu Rd. 4, Chongqing 400050 (China)], E-mail: rczeng2001@yahoo.com.cn; Chen Jun [School of Material Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Xingshenglu Rd. 4, Chongqing 400050 (China); Dietzel, Wolfgang; Zettler, Rudolf; Santos, Jorge F. dos [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Max Planck Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Lucia Nascimento, M. [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Fachgebiet Werkstofftechnik, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Kainer, Karl Ulrich [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Max Planck Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The microstructure of a friction stir welded magnesium alloy AM50 was examined by means of optical light microscopy. The chemical composition, particularly the iron content, and morphology of the oxide film were analyzed and discerned via auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Corrosion behaviour of the welds and base materials were investigated by virtue of neutral salt spray tests and potentiodynamic polarization measurements in conventional cells and in a mini cell. The results demonstrate that minor increases in iron concentration as might be speculated to occur as a consequence of tool/work piece interaction during the welding process on the corrosion resistance of the weld can be ignored. The corrosion morphology was predominantly influenced by the distribution of the Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase. Here, it was also found that the corrosion resistance of the friction stir weld varied in response to changes in the joint microstructure.

  13. Microstructural Aspects of Bifocal Laser Welding of Trip Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajcar A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with comparative tests involving single-spot and twin-spot laser welding of thermomechanically rolled TRIP steel. The welding tests were carried out using keyhole welding and a solid state laser. In the case of twin-spot laser beam welding, the power distribution of beams was 50%:50%. The changes in macro- and microstructures were investigated using light and scanning electron microscopy. Three main zones subjected to the tests included the fusion zone, the heat affected zone and the intercritical heat affected zone (transition zone between the base material and the HAZ. Special attention was paid to the effect of various thermal cycles on the microstructure of each zone and on martensite morphology. The tests involved hardness measurements carried out in order to investigate the effect of different microstructures on mechanical properties of welds.

  14. Verification of Strength of the Welded Joints by using of the Aramis Video System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pała Tadeusz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper are presented the results of strength analysis for the two types of the welded joints made according to conventional and laser technologies of high-strength steel S960QC. The hardness distributions, tensile properties and fracture toughness were determined for the weld material and heat affect zone material for both types of the welded joints. Tests results shown on advantage the laser welded joints in comparison to the convention ones. Tensile properties and fracture toughness in all areas of the laser joints have a higher level than in the conventional one. The heat affect zone of the conventional welded joints is a weakness area, where the tensile properties are lower in comparison to the base material. Verification of the tensile tests, which carried out by using the Aramis video system, confirmed this assumption. The highest level of strains was observed in HAZ material and the destruction process occurred also in HAZ of the conventional welded joint.

  15. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    alloy /Ag interlayer/steel non-centered electron beam welded joints, Transaction of non- Ferrous Metals Society of China 21 (2011) 2592-2596. [53] K.-J...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release. 1 UNCLASSIFIED Welding of aluminum alloys to steels: an overview M. Mazar...different materials, iron-based alloys and aluminum-based alloys are among the most significant materials that are finding applications on the various

  16. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., including 2-post and 4-post weld presses. (8) Safety pins. On large machines, four safety pins with plugs... equipped with a hood to control flying flash. In cases of high production, where materials may contain a film of oil and where toxic elements and metal fumes are given off, ventilation shall be provided in...

  17. Weld manufacturing of big heat-exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeutigam, M.; Huppertz, P.H.

    1986-06-24

    The topic of this article are big heat exchangers, which are developed and constructed to minimize energy losses in plants of process engineering. Some welding specifications are discussed in detail. Some constructive details, as e.g. materials selection and vibration safety complete this contribution.

  18. Numerical Simulation Of The Laser Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Siwek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The model takes into consideration thermophysical and metallurgical properties of theremelting steel, laser beam parameters and boundary conditions of the process. As a resultof heating the material, in the area of laser beam operation a weld pool is being created,whose shape and size depends on convection caused by the Marangoni force. The directionof the liquid stream depends on the temperature gradient on the surface and on the chemicalcomposition as well. The model created allows to predict the weld pool shape depending onmaterial properties, beam parameters, and boundary conditions of the sample.

  19. Smart-GFEM for welding simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, D.; Aguado, J. V.; Chinesta, F.; Cueto, E.; Vincent, Y.; Boitout, F.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a new and efficient method for welding simulation is proposed. This method, known as Smart-GFEM introduces in a GFEM framework an enrichment function which is capable of adapting the approximation space optimally. The enrichment function can be seen as a computational vademecum which depends on technological and material parameters of the process and it is completely computed off-line. In this work we present how to perform the thermal analysis of the welding and a general strategy to address the mechanical analysis.

  20. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  1. Modification of creep and low cycle fatigue behaviour induced by welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carofalo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the mechanical properties of Waspaloy superalloy have been evaluated in case of welded repaired material and compared to base material. Test program considered flat specimens on base and TIG welded material subjected to static, low-cycle fatigue and creep test at different temperatures. Results of uniaxial tensile tests showed that the presence of welded material in the gage length specimen does not have a relevant influence on yield strength and UTS. However, elongation at failure of TIG material was reduced with respect to the base material. Moreover, low-cycle fatigue properties have been determined carrying out tests at different temperature (room temperature RT and 538°C in both base and TIG welded material. Welded material showed an increase of the data scatter and lower fatigue strength, which was anyway not excessive in comparison with base material. During test, all the hysteresis cycles were recorded in order to evaluate the trend of elastic modulus and hysteresis area against the number of cycles. A clear correlation between hysteresis and fatigue life was found. Finally, creep test carried out on a limited number of specimens allowed establishing some changes about the creep rate and time to failure of base and welded material. TIG welded specimen showed a lower time to reach a fixed strain or failure when a low stress level is applied. In all cases, creep behaviour of welded material is characterized by the absence of the tertiary creep.

  2. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  3. Recent Developments in Friction Stir Welding of Al-alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çam, Gürel; Mistikoglu, Selcuk

    2014-06-01

    The diversity and never-ending desire for a better life standard result in a continuous development of the existing manufacturing technologies. In line with these developments in the existing production technologies the demand for more complex products increases, which also stimulates new approaches in production routes of such products, e.g., novel welding procedures. For instance, the friction stir welding (FSW) technology, developed for joining difficult-to-weld Al-alloys, has been implemented by industry in manufacturing of several products. There are also numerous attempts to apply this method to other materials beyond Al-alloys. However, the process has not yet been implemented by industry for joining these materials with the exception of some limited applications. The microstructures and mechanical properties of friction stir welded Al-alloys existing in the open literature will be discussed in detail in this review. The correlations between weld parameters used during FSW and the microstructures evolved in the weld region and thus mechanical properties of the joints produced will be highlighted. However, the modeling studies, material flow, texture formation and developments in tool design are out of the scope of this work as well as the other variants of this technology, such as friction stir spot welding (FSSW).

  4. The Effect of Tool Position for Aluminum and Copper at High Rotational Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Çakır

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid state welding process used for welding similar and dissimilar materials. This welding technique allows welding of Aluminum alloys which present difficulties in fusion joining and allows different material couples to be welded continuously. In this study, 1050 aluminum alloy and commercially pure copper to increase heat input were produced at high rotation rate (2440 rev/min with four different pin position (0-1-1.5-2 mm and three different weld speeds (20-30-50 mm/min by friction stir welding. The influence of welding parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints was investigated. Tensile and bending tests and microhardness measurements were used to determine of mechanical properties. Nugget zone microstructures were investigated by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM and were analyzed in energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Depending on the XRD analysis results intermetallic phase was observed to form in the interfacial region. In the tensile test results, 83.55% weld performance was obtained in the friction stir welding merge of Al-Cu.

  5. The Electrochemical Investigation of the Corrosion Rates of Welded Pipe ASTM A106 Grade B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinet Yingsamphancharoen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the corrosion rate of welded carbon steel pipe (ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials A106 Grade B by GTAW under the currents of 60, 70, and 80 A. All welded pipes satisfied weld procedure specifications and were verified by a procedure qualification record. The property of used materials was in agreement with the ASME standard: section IX. The welded pipe was used for schematic model corrosion measurements applied in 3.5 wt % NaCl at various flow rates and analyzed by using the electrochemical technique with Tafel’s equation. The results showed the correlation between the flow rate and the corrosion rate of the pipe; the greater the flow rate, the higher corrosion rate. Moreover, the welded pipe from the welding current of 70 A exhibited higher tensile strength and corrosion resistance than those from currents of 60 and 80 A. It indicated that the welding current of 70 A produced optimum heat for the welding of A106 pipe grade B. In addition, the microstructure of the welded pipe was observed by SEM. The phase transformation and crystallite size were analyzed by XRD and Sherrer’s equation. The results suggested that the welding current could change the microstructure and phase of the welded pipe causing change in the corrosion rate.

  6. Taguchi analysis of dissimilar aluminum sheets joined by friction stir spot welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kemal BİLİCİ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the welding of materials of new and complex structure constitutes a problem for the industry. The solid state welding method for joining of these materials were effective. Sheets produced from aluminum and aluminum alloys, especially in areas such as automotive, railway and defense industry have revealed the requirement of the application of solid state welding methods. The friction stir spot welding is one of the solid state welding method. Welding parameters is very important FSSW in order to obtain the maximum welding strength in FSSW. SKNK as parameters (tool rotational speed, depth, dive team, team and team inclination angle of standby time is selected. In this study has investigated the joining of AA2024-T3 and AA5754-H22 aluminum alloy sheets with FSSW technique by Taguchi analysis. “The highest -the better” quality control characteristic using the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA method were obtained the optimum welding parameters. The results have been analyzed both the graphical methods and numerical data. The most important parameters affecting the weld tensile strength were detected as tool rotation speed (44.74% and the team of waiting time (31.60%. Weld tensile strength by Taguchi analysis result conducted for comparing experiments the increased by 42% compared to the initial parameters.Keywords: Friction stir spot welding, Mechanical properties, Taguchi method, Optimization

  7. Application of explosive welding to heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, G.

    1983-10-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: advantages of explosive welding; principle of explosive welding; explosive welding of tubes; metallurgy of explosive welds (micrographs; microhardness); tubular heat exchangers; plugging; sleeving; retubing; construction of new heat exchangers; thermal sleeves.

  8. Mechanical properties of thin films of laser-welded titanium and their associated welding defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yulu; Xin, Haitao; Zhang, Chunbao; Tang, Zhongbin; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Weifeng

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of thin films of laser-welded cast titanium using an interference strain/displacement gauge (ISDG) and to analyze factors that affect laser welding. Dog-bone-shaped small specimens of cast titanium were prepared by wire cutting after they were laser-welded. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the gap distance of the laser weld; the control was non-welded titanium. Small specimens without cast defects detected by X-ray screening were measured by a tensile test machine using ISDG, and stress-strain curves were drawn. Finally, the fracture texture was analyzed. The ultimate tensile strengths (UTSs) of specimens with a gap distance of 0.00, 0.25, and 0.50 mm were 492.16 ± 33.19, 488.09 ± 43.18, and 558.45 ± 10.80 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in UTS between the test groups and the control group (p > 0.05). However, the plastic deformation and the percent elongation increased as the gap distance increased. Incomplete penetration defects appeared in groups that had small gap distances, which may have affected the properties of the laser-welded titanium. However, the welding material was still pure titanium. These results suggest that an appropriate gap distance should be maintained to improve the application of dental laser welding.

  9. Mechanical Properties, Microstructure and Crystallographic Texture of Magnesium AZ91-D Alloy Welded by Friction Stir Welding (FSW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouadri-Henni, A.; Barrallier, L.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the study was to characterize the properties of a magnesium alloy welded by friction stir welding. The results led to a better understanding of the relationship between this process and the microstructure and anisotropic properties of alloy materials. Welding principally leads to a large reduction in grain size in welded zones due to the phenomenon of dynamic recrystallization. The most remarkable observation was that crystallographic textures appeared from a base metal without texture in two zones: the thermo-mechanically affected and stir-welded zones. The latter zone has the peculiarity of possessing a marked texture with two components on the basal plane and the pyramidal plane. These characteristics disappeared in the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), which had only one component following the basal plane. These modifications have been explained by the nature of the plastic deformation in these zones, which occurs at a moderate temperature in the TMAZ and high temperature in the SWZ.

  10. Possibilities in optical monitoring of laser welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horník, Petr; Mrňa, Libor; Pavelka, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Laser welding is a modern, widely used but still not really common method of welding. With increasing demands on the quality of the welds, it is usual to apply automated machine welding and with on-line monitoring of the welding process. The resulting quality of the weld is largely affected by the behavior of keyhole. However, its direct observation during the welding process is practically impossible and it is necessary to use indirect methods. At ISI we have developed optical methods of monitoring the process. Most advanced is an analysis of radiation of laser-induced plasma plume forming in the keyhole where changes in the frequency of the plasma bursts are monitored and evaluated using Fourier and autocorrelation analysis. Another solution, robust and suitable for industry, is based on the observation of the keyhole inlet opening through a coaxial camera mounted in the welding head and the subsequent image processing by computer vision methods. A high-speed camera is used to understand the dynamics of the plasma plume. Through optical spectroscopy of the plume, we can study the excitation of elements in a material. It is also beneficial to monitor the gas flow of shielding gas using schlieren method.

  11. Characterisation of fume from hyperbaric welding operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, John A S; Semple, Sean [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Duffin, Rodger [ELEGI Colt Laboratory, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kelly, Frank [Lung Biology Group, Kings College, University of London (United Kingdom); Seldmann, Joerg; Raab, Andrea, E-mail: j.a.ross@abdn.ac.u [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, University of Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    We report preliminary work characterising dust from hyperbaric welding trials carried out at increased pressure in a helium and oxygen atmosphere. Particle size and concentration were measured during welding. Samples for quartz and metal analysis and toxicity assessment were taken from a filter in the local fume extraction system. The residue of dust after metal extraction by nitric acid in hydrogen peroxide predominantly a non-metallic white powder assumed to be dust from welding rod coatings and thermal insulation material. Metallic analysis showed predominantly calcium, from the welding rod coating, and period 4 transition metals such as iron, manganese, magnesium and titanium (inductively coupled mass spectrometry, Agilent 7500c). The presence of zirconium indicated a contribution from grinding. The fume was nanoparticulate in nature with a mean particle diameter of 20-30 nm (MSI Inc WPS 1000XP). It showed an intermediate level of oxidative potential regarding the low-molecular weight respiratory tract lining fluid antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione and caused release of the inflammatory marker IL-8 in a human lung A 549 epithelial cell culture with no indication of cytotoxicity. The study findings have strong implications for the measurement techniques needed to assess fume exposure in hyperbaric welding and the provision of respiratory protection.

  12. Automatic Submerged ARC Welding With Metal Power Additions to Increase Productivity and Maintain Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    Manager of Welding Engineering PROPOSAL WELDING OF CARBON STEEL AND HY80 UTILIZING THE BULK WELDING PROCESS May 9, 1983 PREPARED BY: NEWPORT NEwS...12 joints with carbon steel and 12 with HY80 , utilizing three The joints will requirements of Benefits 1. Deposition times that different size double...of Joint Variations and Deposition Rates Filler Metal/Base Material Chemical Analyses; Carbon Steel /HIS Filler Metal/Base Material Chemical Analyses

  13. Duplex 2209 Weld Overlay by ESSC Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er. Manoj Kumar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the modern world of industrialization the wear is eating metal assets worth millions of dollars per year. The wear is in the form of corrosion, erosion, abrasion etc. which occur in the process industries like oil & gas, refineries, cement plants, steel plants, shipping and offshore working structures. The equipments like pressure vessels, heat exchangers, hydro processing reactors which very often work at elevated temperatures face corrosion in the internal diameter. Duplex 2209 weld overlay on ferrous material is developed for high corrosion resistance properties and having high productivity by Electroslag strip cladding process due to its less dilution ~10% as compared to SMAW , GTAW or FCAW process. Because of Low Dilution ~10% undiluted chemistry can be achieved with single layer as compared to other weld overlay processes. The facility was developed inhouse to carry out weld overlay by ESSC and Testing

  14. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  15. Welding Stainless Steels and Refractory Metals Using Diode-Pumped Continuous Wave Nd:YAG Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Pong, R; Gauthier, M D

    2004-09-27

    This report provides an overview of a series of developmental welding studies performed on a 2.2 kW Rofin Sinar DY-022 Diode Pumped Continuous Wave (CW) Nd:YAG welder at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Several materials systems, ranging from refractory metals, such as commercially pure tantalum and vanadium, to austenitic stainless steels, including both 304L and 21-6-9 grades, are examined. Power input and travel speed are systematically varied during the welding of each materials system, and the width, depth, and cross sectional area of the resulting weld fusion zones are measured. These individual studies are undertaken in order to characterize the response of the welder to changes in these welding parameters for a range of materials and to determine the maximum depth of penetration of which this welder is capable in each materials system. The maximum weld depths, which are on the order of 5.4 mm, are observed in the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel at the maximum laser power setting (2200 W) and a slow travel speed (6.4 mm/sec). The next highest weld depth is observed in the 304L stainless steel, followed by that observed in the vanadium and, finally, in the tantalum. Porosity, which is attributed to the collapse of the keyhole during welding, is also observed in the welds produced in tantalum, vanadium, and 304L stainless steel. Only the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel welds displayed little or no porosity over the range of welding parameters. Comparisons with similar laser welding systems are also made for several of these same materials systems. When compared with the welds produced by these other systems, the LLNL system typically produces welds of an equivalent or slightly higher depth.

  16. Computational Analysis and Experimental Validation of the Friction-Stir Welding Behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-04

    investigated using various optical and scanning electron microscopy techni- ques, while the weld properties were investigated using microhardness ...measurements, transverse and all-weld tensile testing techniques, as well as surface profilometry. The main findings/observations made in refer- ences [16...formation in the centre of the weld. 9. Material microhardness within the weld nugget is typically found to be affected by the workpiece thickness

  17. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this work, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  18. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  19. Welding rework data acquisition and automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum-Lithium is a modern material that NASA MSFC is evaluating as an option for the aluminum alloys and other aerospace metals presently in use. The importance of aluminum-lithium is in it's superior weight to strength characteristics. However, aluminum-lithium has produced many challenges in regards to manufacturing and maintenance. The solution to these problems are vital to the future uses of the shuttle for delivering larger payloads into earth orbit and are equally important to future commercial applications of aluminum-lithium. The Metals Processes Branch at MSFC is conducting extensive tests on aluminum-lithium which includes the collection of large amounts of data. This report discusses the automation and data acquisition for two processes: the initial weld and the repair. The new approach reduces the time required to collect the data, increases the accuracy of the data, and eliminates several types of human errors during data collection and entry. The same material properties that enhance the weight to strength characteristics of aluminum-lithium contribute to the problems with cracks occurring during welding, especially during the repair/rework process. The repairs are required to remove flaws or defects discovered in the initial weld, either discovered by x-ray, visual inspection, or some other type of nondestructive evaluation. It has been observed that cracks typically appear as a result of or beyond the second repair. MSFC scientists have determined that residual mechanical stress introduced by the welding process is a primary cause of the cracking. Two obvious solutions are to either prevent or minimize the stress introduced during the welding process, or remove or reduce the stress after the welding process and MSFC is investigating both of these.

  20. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded thin sheets of 2024-T4 aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lian; TONG Jian-hua; WAN Fa-rong; LONG Yi

    2006-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a new and promising welding processing that can produce low-cost and high-quality joints of aluminum alloys. 1 mm thick sheets of 2024-T4 aluminum alloys which are always used as building and decorating materials were welded by FSW. The microstrueture and mechanical properties of friction stir welded 1 mm thick sheets of 2024-T4 aluminum alloy were studied. It was found that the thinner the 2024 aluminum alloy, the larger the FSW technological parameters field. The grains size of weld nugget zone (WNZ) is approximately 10 times smaller than that of the parent material, but the second phase in the material is not refined apparently in the welding. The FS welded joints have about 40% higher yield strength than the parent material,but the elongation of FS welded joints is under about 50% of the parent material. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)results show that there are much more low angle boundaries (LAB) in WNZ than that in parent material, which indicates that FSW causes a number of sub-grain structures in WNZ, and this is also the reason of the increase of yield strength and Vickers hardness of the welded joint.