WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-content live-cell imaging

  1. Information management for high content live cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Michael RH

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High content live cell imaging experiments are able to track the cellular localisation of labelled proteins in multiple live cells over a time course. Experiments using high content live cell imaging will generate multiple large datasets that are often stored in an ad-hoc manner. This hinders identification of previously gathered data that may be relevant to current analyses. Whilst solutions exist for managing image data, they are primarily concerned with storage and retrieval of the images themselves and not the data derived from the images. There is therefore a requirement for an information management solution that facilitates the indexing of experimental metadata and results of high content live cell imaging experiments. Results We have designed and implemented a data model and information management solution for the data gathered through high content live cell imaging experiments. Many of the experiments to be stored measure the translocation of fluorescently labelled proteins from cytoplasm to nucleus in individual cells. The functionality of this database has been enhanced by the addition of an algorithm that automatically annotates results of these experiments with the timings of translocations and periods of any oscillatory translocations as they are uploaded to the repository. Testing has shown the algorithm to perform well with a variety of previously unseen data. Conclusion Our repository is a fully functional example of how high throughput imaging data may be effectively indexed and managed to address the requirements of end users. By implementing the automated analysis of experimental results, we have provided a clear impetus for individuals to ensure that their data forms part of that which is stored in the repository. Although focused on imaging, the solution provided is sufficiently generic to be applied to other functional proteomics and genomics experiments. The software is available from: fhttp://code.google.com/p/livecellim/

  2. High-content live cell imaging with RNA probes: advancements in high-throughput antimalarial drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervantes Serena

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria, a major public health issue in developing nations, is responsible for more than one million deaths a year. The most lethal species, Plasmodium falciparum, causes up to 90% of fatalities. Drug resistant strains to common therapies have emerged worldwide and recent artemisinin-based combination therapy failures hasten the need for new antimalarial drugs. Discovering novel compounds to be used as antimalarials is expedited by the use of a high-throughput screen (HTS to detect parasite growth and proliferation. Fluorescent dyes that bind to DNA have replaced expensive traditional radioisotope incorporation for HTS growth assays, but do not give additional information regarding the parasite stage affected by the drug and a better indication of the drug's mode of action. Live cell imaging with RNA dyes, which correlates with cell growth and proliferation, has been limited by the availability of successful commercial dyes. Results After screening a library of newly synthesized stryrl dyes, we discovered three RNA binding dyes that provide morphological details of live parasites. Utilizing an inverted confocal imaging platform, live cell imaging of parasites increases parasite detection, improves the spatial and temporal resolution of the parasite under drug treatments, and can resolve morphological changes in individual cells. Conclusion This simple one-step technique is suitable for automation in a microplate format for novel antimalarial compound HTS. We have developed a new P. falciparum RNA high-content imaging growth inhibition assay that is robust with time and energy efficiency.

  3. A versatile, bar-coded nuclear marker/reporter for live cell fluorescent and multiplexed high content imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Krylova

    Full Text Available The screening of large numbers of compounds or siRNAs is a mainstay of both academic and pharmaceutical research. Most screens test those interventions against a single biochemical or cellular output whereas recording multiple complementary outputs may be more biologically relevant. High throughput, multi-channel fluorescence microscopy permits multiple outputs to be quantified in specific cellular subcompartments. However, the number of distinct fluorescent outputs available remains limited. Here, we describe a cellular bar-code technology in which multiple cell-based assays are combined in one well after which each assay is distinguished by fluorescence microscopy. The technology uses the unique fluorescent properties of assay-specific markers comprised of distinct combinations of different 'red' fluorescent proteins sandwiched around a nuclear localization signal. The bar-code markers are excited by a common wavelength of light but distinguished ratiometrically by their differing relative fluorescence in two emission channels. Targeting the bar-code to cell nuclei enables individual cells expressing distinguishable markers to be readily separated by standard image analysis programs. We validated the method by showing that the unique responses of different cell-based assays to specific drugs are retained when three assays are co-plated and separated by the bar-code. Based upon those studies, we discuss a roadmap in which even more assays may be combined in a well. The ability to analyze multiple assays simultaneously will enable screens that better identify, characterize and distinguish hits according to multiple biologically or clinically relevant criteria. These capabilities also enable the re-creation of complex mixtures of cell types that is emerging as a central area of interest in many fields.

  4. Quantitative analysis of mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in living cells using high-content imaging, machine learning, and morphological binning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Anthony P; Cameron, Robert B; Speiser, Jaime L; Wolf, Bethany J; Peterson, Yuri K; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beeson, Craig C; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the processes of mitochondrial dynamics (fission, fusion, biogenesis, and mitophagy) has been hampered by the lack of automated, deterministic methods to measure mitochondrial morphology from microscopic images. A method to quantify mitochondrial morphology and function is presented here using a commercially available automated high-content wide-field fluorescent microscopy platform and R programming-language-based semi-automated data analysis to achieve high throughput morphological categorization (puncta, rod, network, and large & round) and quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential. In conjunction with cellular respirometry to measure mitochondrial respiratory capacity, this method detected that increasing concentrations of toxicants known to directly or indirectly affect mitochondria (t-butyl hydroperoxide [TBHP], rotenone, antimycin A, oligomycin, ouabain, and carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone [FCCP]), decreased mitochondrial networked areas in cultured 661w cells to 0.60-0.80 at concentrations that inhibited respiratory capacity to 0.20-0.70 (fold change compared to vehicle). Concomitantly, mitochondrial swelling was increased from 1.4- to 2.3-fold of vehicle as indicated by changes in large & round areas in response to TBHP, oligomycin, or ouabain. Finally, the automated identification of mitochondrial location enabled accurate quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential by measuring intramitochondrial tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) fluorescence intensity. Administration of FCCP depolarized and administration of oligomycin hyperpolarized mitochondria, as evidenced by changes in intramitochondrial TMRM fluorescence intensities to 0.33- or 5.25-fold of vehicle control values, respectively. In summary, this high-content imaging method accurately quantified mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in hundreds of thousands of cells on a per-cell basis, with sufficient throughput for pharmacological

  5. Teachable, high-content analytics for live-cell, phase contrast movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alworth, Samuel V; Watanabe, Hirotada; Lee, James S J

    2010-09-01

    CL-Quant is a new solution platform for broad, high-content, live-cell image analysis. Powered by novel machine learning technologies and teach-by-example interfaces, CL-Quant provides a platform for the rapid development and application of scalable, high-performance, and fully automated analytics for a broad range of live-cell microscopy imaging applications, including label-free phase contrast imaging. The authors used CL-Quant to teach off-the-shelf universal analytics, called standard recipes, for cell proliferation, wound healing, cell counting, and cell motility assays using phase contrast movies collected on the BioStation CT and BioStation IM platforms. Similar to application modules, standard recipes are intended to work robustly across a wide range of imaging conditions without requiring customization by the end user. The authors validated the performance of the standard recipes by comparing their performance with truth created manually, or by custom analytics optimized for each individual movie (and therefore yielding the best possible result for the image), and validated by independent review. The validation data show that the standard recipes' performance is comparable with the validated truth with low variation. The data validate that the CL-Quant standard recipes can provide robust results without customization for live-cell assays in broad cell types and laboratory settings.

  6. Toward high-content screening of mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, Eligio F; Willems, Peter H G M; Pellegrini, Mina; Beyrath, Julien; Smeitink, Jan A M; Blanchet, Lionel; Koopman, Werner J H

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are double membrane organelles involved in various key cellular processes. Governed by dedicated protein machinery, mitochondria move and continuously fuse and divide. These "mitochondrial dynamics" are bi-directionally linked to mitochondrial and cell functional state in space and time. Due to the action of the electron transport chain (ETC), the mitochondrial inner membrane displays a inside-negative membrane potential (Δψ). The latter is considered a functional readout of mitochondrial "health" and required to sustain normal mitochondrial ATP production and mitochondrial fusion. During the last decade, live-cell microscopy strategies were developed for simultaneous quantification of Δψ and mitochondrial morphology. This revealed that ETC dysfunction, changes in Δψ and aberrations in mitochondrial structure often occur in parallel, suggesting they are linked potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we discuss how combining high-content and high-throughput strategies can be used for analysis of genetic and/or drug-induced effects at the level of individual organelles, cells and cell populations. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  7. Live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster are also used by the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties with regard to keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick, hazy cytoplasm. This article outlines the major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping the cells alive. It describes various imaging and associated techniques best suited to following changes in the distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules in real time in these tissues. Imaging, in general, is a rapidly developing discipline, and recent advances in imaging technology are able to greatly extend what can be achieved with live cell imaging of Drosophila tissues. As far as possible, this article includes the latest technical developments and discusses likely future developments in imaging methods that could have an impact on research using Drosophila.

  8. Bioluminescence imaging in live cells and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Jack K; Berglund, Ken; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Gross, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The use of bioluminescent reporters in neuroscience research continues to grow at a rapid pace as their applications and unique advantages over conventional fluorescent reporters become more appreciated. Here, we describe practical methods and principles for detecting and imaging bioluminescence from live cells and animals. We systematically tested various components of our conventional fluorescence microscope to optimize it for long-term bioluminescence imaging. High-resolution bioluminescence images from live neurons were obtained with our microscope setup, which could be continuously captured for several hours with no signs of phototoxicity. Bioluminescence from the mouse brain was also imaged noninvasively through the intact skull with a conventional luminescence imager. These methods demonstrate how bioluminescence can be routinely detected and measured from live cells and animals in a cost-effective way with common reagents and equipment.

  9. Multiplexed high-content analysis of mitochondrial morphofunction using live-cell microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, Eligio F; Smeitink, Jan A M; Beyrath, Julien; Willems, Peter H G M; Koopman, Werner J H

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria have a central role in cellular (patho)physiology, and they display a highly variable morphology that is probably coupled to their functional state. Here we present a protocol that allows unbiased and automated quantification of mitochondrial 'morphofunction' (i.e., morphology and membrane potential), cellular parameters (size, confluence) and nuclear parameters (number, morphology) in intact living primary human skin fibroblasts (PHSFs). Cells are cultured in 96-well plates and stained with tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), calcein-AM (acetoxy-methyl ester) and Hoechst 33258. Next, multispectral fluorescence images are acquired using automated microscopy and processed to extract 44 descriptors. Subsequently, the descriptor data are subjected to a quality control (QC) algorithm based upon principal component analysis (PCA) and interpreted using univariate, bivariate and multivariate analysis. The protocol requires a time investment of ∼4 h distributed over 2 d. Although it is specifically developed for PHSFs, which are widely used in preclinical research, the protocol is portable to other cell types and can be scaled up for implementation in high-content screening.

  10. Design of microdevices for long-term live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaying; Rosengarten, Gary; Li, Musen; Nordon, Robert E.

    2012-06-01

    Advances in fluorescent live cell imaging provide high-content information that relates a cell's life events to its ancestors. An important requirement to track clonal growth and development is the retention of motile cells derived from an ancestor within the same microscopic field of view for days to weeks, while recording fluorescence images and controlling the mechanical and biochemical microenvironments that regulate cell growth and differentiation. The aim of this study was to design a microwell device for long-term, time-lapse imaging of motile cells with the specific requirements of (a) inoculating devices with an average of one cell per well and (b) retaining progeny of cells within a single microscopic field of view for extended growth periods. A two-layer PDMS microwell culture device consisting of a parallel-plate flow cell bonded on top of a microwell array was developed for cell capture and clonal culture. Cell deposition statistics were related to microwell geometry (plate separation and well depth) and the Reynolds number. Computational fluid dynamics was used to simulate flow in the microdevices as well as cell-fluid interactions. Analysis of the forces acting upon a cell was used to predict cell docking zones, which were confirmed by experimental observations. Cell-fluid dynamic interactions are important considerations for design of microdevices for long-term, live cell imaging. The analysis of force and torque balance provides a reasonable approximation for cell displacement forces. It is computationally less intensive compared to simulation of cell trajectories, and can be applied to a wide range of microdevice geometries to predict the cell docking behavior.

  11. Live cell in vitro and in vivo imaging applications: accelerating drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isherwood, Beverley; Timpson, Paul; McGhee, Ewan J; Anderson, Kurt I; Canel, Marta; Serrels, Alan; Brunton, Valerie G; Carragher, Neil O

    2011-04-04

    Dynamic regulation of specific molecular processes and cellular phenotypes in live cell systems reveal unique insights into cell fate and drug pharmacology that are not gained from traditional fixed endpoint assays. Recent advances in microscopic imaging platform technology combined with the development of novel optical biosensors and sophisticated image analysis solutions have increased the scope of live cell imaging applications in drug discovery. We highlight recent literature examples where live cell imaging has uncovered novel insight into biological mechanism or drug mode-of-action. We survey distinct types of optical biosensors and associated analytical methods for monitoring molecular dynamics, in vitro and in vivo. We describe the recent expansion of live cell imaging into automated target validation and drug screening activities through the development of dedicated brightfield and fluorescence kinetic imaging platforms. We provide specific examples of how temporal profiling of phenotypic response signatures using such kinetic imaging platforms can increase the value of in vitro high-content screening. Finally, we offer a prospective view of how further application and development of live cell imaging technology and reagents can accelerate preclinical lead optimization cycles and enhance the in vitro to in vivo translation of drug candidates.

  12. Single Molecule Imaging in Living Cell with Optical Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Significance, difficult, international developing actuality and our completed works for single molecules imaging in living cell with optical method are described respectively. Additionally we give out some suggestions for the technology development further.

  13. Live-cell imaging of mammalian RNAs with Spinach2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, Rita L.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to monitor RNAs of interest in living cells is crucial to understanding the function, dynamics, and regulation of this important class of molecules. In recent years, numerous strategies have been developed with the goal of imaging individual RNAs of interest in living cells, each with their own advantages and limitations. This chapter provides an overview of current methods of live-cell RNA imaging, including a detailed discussion of genetically encoded strategies for labeling RNAs in mammalian cells. This chapter then focuses on the development and use of “RNA mimics of GFP” or Spinach technology for tagging mammalian RNAs, and includes a detailed protocol for imaging 5S and CGG60 RNA with the recently described Spinach2 tag. PMID:25605384

  14. Live cell imaging of in vitro human trophoblast syncytialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Dang, Yan-Li; Zheng, Ru; Li, Yue; Li, Weiwei; Lu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Li-Juan; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Hai-Yan; Wang, Hongmei

    2014-06-01

    Human trophoblast syncytialization, a process of cell-cell fusion, is one of the most important yet least understood events during placental development. Investigating the fusion process in a placenta in vivo is very challenging given the complexity of this process. Application of primary cultured cytotrophoblast cells isolated from term placentas and BeWo cells derived from human choriocarcinoma formulates a biphasic strategy to achieve the mechanism of trophoblast cell fusion, as the former can spontaneously fuse to form the multinucleated syncytium and the latter is capable of fusing under the treatment of forskolin (FSK). Live-cell imaging is a powerful tool that is widely used to investigate many physiological or pathological processes in various animal models or humans; however, to our knowledge, the mechanism of trophoblast cell fusion has not been reported using a live- cell imaging manner. In this study, a live-cell imaging system was used to delineate the fusion process of primary term cytotrophoblast cells and BeWo cells. By using live staining with Hoechst 33342 or cytoplasmic dyes or by stably transfecting enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and DsRed2-Nuc reporter plasmids, we observed finger-like protrusions on the cell membranes of fusion partners before fusion and the exchange of cytoplasmic contents during fusion. In summary, this study provides the first video recording of the process of trophoblast syncytialization. Furthermore, the various live-cell imaging systems used in this study will help to yield molecular insights into the syncytialization process during placental development. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  15. Automated live cell imaging systems reveal dynamic cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirieleison, Steven M; Bissell, Taylor A; Scelfo, Christopher C; Anderson, Jordan E; Li, Yong; Koebler, Doug J; Deasy, Bridget M

    2011-07-01

    Automated time-lapsed microscopy provides unique research opportunities to visualize cells and subcellular components in experiments with time-dependent parameters. As accessibility to these systems is increasing, we review here their use in cell science with a focus on stem cell research. Although the use of time-lapsed imaging to answer biological questions dates back nearly 150 years, only recently have the use of an environmentally controlled chamber and robotic stage controllers allowed for high-throughput continuous imaging over long periods at the cell and subcellular levels. Numerous automated imaging systems are now available from both companies that specialize in live cell imaging and from major microscope manufacturers. We discuss the key components of robots used for time-lapsed live microscopic imaging, and the unique data that can be obtained from image analysis. We show how automated features enhance experimentation by providing examples of uniquely quantified proliferation and migration live cell imaging data. In addition to providing an efficient system that drastically reduces man-hours and consumes fewer laboratory resources, this technology greatly enhances cell science by providing a unique dataset of temporal changes in cell activity. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  16. Highly stable organic fluorescent nanorods for living- cell imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minhuan Lan[1,3; Jinfeng Zhang[1,3; Xiaoyue Zhu[1; Pengfei Wang[2; Xianfeng Chen[1; Chun-Sing Lee[1; Wenjun Zhang[1

    2015-01-01

    Metal-free, organic-dye-based fluorescent nanorods were fabricated through a simple solvent-exchange procedure. The as-prepared nanorods exhibit low toxicity to living cells and excellent photostability. Furthermore, they are stable in solutions of various pHs and high ionic strength and in solutions with interfering metal ions. Compared with the free DPP-Br molecules in THF, these nanorods exhibit larger Stokes shift, broader absorption spectra, and greatly improved photostability. We successfully demonstrated the application of the nanorods, including their aforementioned beneficial characteristics, as a good fluorescence probe for bio-imaging.

  17. Live-cell imaging: new avenues to investigate retinal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahne, Manuela; Hyde, David R

    2017-08-01

    Sensing and responding to our environment requires functional neurons that act in concert. Neuronal cell loss resulting from degenerative diseases cannot be replaced in humans, causing a functional impairment to integrate and/or respond to sensory cues. In contrast, zebrafish (Danio rerio) possess an endogenous capacity to regenerate lost neurons. Here, we will focus on the processes that lead to neuronal regeneration in the zebrafish retina. Dying retinal neurons release a damage signal, tumor necrosis factor α, which induces the resident radial glia, the Müller glia, to reprogram and re-enter the cell cycle. The Müller glia divide asymmetrically to produce a Müller glia that exits the cell cycle and a neuronal progenitor cell. The arising neuronal progenitor cells undergo several rounds of cell divisions before they migrate to the site of damage to differentiate into the neuronal cell types that were lost. Molecular and immunohistochemical studies have predominantly provided insight into the mechanisms that regulate retinal regeneration. However, many processes during retinal regeneration are dynamic and require live-cell imaging to fully discern the underlying mechanisms. Recently, a multiphoton imaging approach of adult zebrafish retinal cultures was developed. We will discuss the use of live-cell imaging, the currently available tools and those that need to be developed to advance our knowledge on major open questions in the field of retinal regeneration.

  18. Live-cell imaging: new avenues to investigate retinal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Lahne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensing and responding to our environment requires functional neurons that act in concert. Neuronal cell loss resulting from degenerative diseases cannot be replaced in humans, causing a functional impairment to integrate and/or respond to sensory cues. In contrast, zebrafish (Danio rerio possess an endogenous capacity to regenerate lost neurons. Here, we will focus on the processes that lead to neuronal regeneration in the zebrafish retina. Dying retinal neurons release a damage signal, tumor necrosis factor α, which induces the resident radial glia, the Müller glia, to reprogram and re-enter the cell cycle. The Müller glia divide asymmetrically to produce a Müller glia that exits the cell cycle and a neuronal progenitor cell. The arising neuronal progenitor cells undergo several rounds of cell divisions before they migrate to the site of damage to differentiate into the neuronal cell types that were lost. Molecular and immunohistochemical studies have predominantly provided insight into the mechanisms that regulate retinal regeneration. However, many processes during retinal regeneration are dynamic and require live-cell imaging to fully discern the underlying mechanisms. Recently, a multiphoton imaging approach of adult zebrafish retinal cultures was developed. We will discuss the use of live-cell imaging, the currently available tools and those that need to be developed to advance our knowledge on major open questions in the field of retinal regeneration.

  19. Open Source High Content Analysis Utilizing Automated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görlitz, Frederik; Kelly, Douglas J; Warren, Sean C; Alibhai, Dominic; West, Lucien; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Garcia, Edwin; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Serwa, Remigiusz A; Thinon, Emmanuelle; da Paola, Vincenzo; Murray, Edward J; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A A; Tate, Edward W; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M W

    2017-01-18

    We present an open source high content analysis instrument utilizing automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for assaying protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based readouts of fixed or live cells in multiwell plates. This provides a means to screen for cell signaling processes read out using intramolecular FRET biosensors or intermolecular FRET of protein interactions such as oligomerization or heterodimerization, which can be used to identify binding partners. We describe here the functionality of this automated multiwell plate FLIM instrumentation and present exemplar data from our studies of HIV Gag protein oligomerization and a time course of a FRET biosensor in live cells. A detailed description of the practical implementation is then provided with reference to a list of hardware components and a description of the open source data acquisition software written in µManager. The application of FLIMfit, an open source MATLAB-based client for the OMERO platform, to analyze arrays of multiwell plate FLIM data is also presented. The protocols for imaging fixed and live cells are outlined and a demonstration of an automated multiwell plate FLIM experiment using cells expressing fluorescent protein-based FRET constructs is presented. This is complemented by a walk-through of the data analysis for this specific FLIM FRET data set.

  20. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Contreras, Ricardo; Vaca, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular functions. Molecular beacons (MBs) are stem-loop hairpin-structured oligonucleotides equipped with a fluorescence quencher at one end and a fluorescent dye (also called reporter or fluorophore) at the opposite end. This structure permits that MB in the absence of their target complementary sequence do not fluoresce. Upon binding to targets, MBs emit fluorescence, due to the spatial separation of the quencher and the reporter. Molecular beacons are promising probes for the development of RNA imaging techniques; nevertheless much work remains to be done in order to obtain a robust technology for imaging various RNA molecules together in real time and in living cells. The present work concentrates on the different requirements needed to use successfully MB for cellular studies, summarizing recent advances in this area. PMID:21876785

  1. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Monroy-Contreras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular functions. Molecular beacons (MBs are stem-loop hairpin-structured oligonucleotides equipped with a fluorescence quencher at one end and a fluorescent dye (also called reporter or fluorophore at the opposite end. This structure permits that MB in the absence of their target complementary sequence do not fluoresce. Upon binding to targets, MBs emit fluorescence, due to the spatial separation of the quencher and the reporter. Molecular beacons are promising probes for the development of RNA imaging techniques; nevertheless much work remains to be done in order to obtain a robust technology for imaging various RNA molecules together in real time and in living cells. The present work concentrates on the different requirements needed to use successfully MB for cellular studies, summarizing recent advances in this area.

  2. Fluorescent ligand for human progesterone receptor imaging in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstain, Roy; Kanter, Joan; Friedman, Beth; Ellies, Lesley G; Baker, Michael E; Tsien, Roger Y

    2013-05-15

    We employed molecular modeling to design and then synthesize fluorescent ligands for the human progesterone receptor. Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) or tetramethylrhodamine were conjugated to the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (Mifepristone) through an extended hydrophilic linker. The fluorescent ligands demonstrated comparable bioactivity to the parent antagonist in live cells and triggered nuclear translocation of the receptor in a specific manner. The BODIPY labeled ligand was applied to investigate the dependency of progesterone receptor nuclear translocation on partner proteins and to show that functional heat shock protein 90 but not immunophilin FKBP52 activity is essential. A tissue distribution study indicated that the fluorescent ligand preferentially accumulates in tissues that express high levels of the receptor in vivo. The design and properties of the BODIPY-labeled RU486 make it a potential candidate for in vivo imaging of PR by positron emission tomography through incorporation of (18)F into the BODIPY core.

  3. Shedding light on filovirus infection with high-content imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Gianluca; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G

    2012-08-01

    Microscopy has been instrumental in the discovery and characterization of microorganisms. Major advances in high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and automated, high-content image analysis tools are paving the way to the systematic and quantitative study of the molecular properties of cellular systems, both at the population and at the single-cell level. High-Content Imaging (HCI) has been used to characterize host-virus interactions in genome-wide reverse genetic screens and to identify novel cellular factors implicated in the binding, entry, replication and egress of several pathogenic viruses. Here we present an overview of the most significant applications of HCI in the context of the cell biology of filovirus infection. HCI assays have been recently implemented to quantitatively study filoviruses in cell culture, employing either infectious viruses in a BSL-4 environment or surrogate genetic systems in a BSL-2 environment. These assays are becoming instrumental for small molecule and siRNA screens aimed at the discovery of both cellular therapeutic targets and of compounds with anti-viral properties. We discuss the current practical constraints limiting the implementation of high-throughput biology in a BSL-4 environment, and propose possible solutions to safely perform high-content, high-throughput filovirus infection assays. Finally, we discuss possible novel applications of HCI in the context of filovirus research with particular emphasis on the identification of possible cellular biomarkers of virus infection.

  4. Shedding Light on Filovirus Infection with High-Content Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha G. Panchal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Microscopy has been instrumental in the discovery and characterization of microorganisms. Major advances in high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and automated, high-content image analysis tools are paving the way to the systematic and quantitative study of the molecular properties of cellular systems, both at the population and at the single-cell level. High-Content Imaging (HCI has been used to characterize host-virus interactions in genome-wide reverse genetic screens and to identify novel cellular factors implicated in the binding, entry, replication and egress of several pathogenic viruses. Here we present an overview of the most significant applications of HCI in the context of the cell biology of filovirus infection. HCI assays have been recently implemented to quantitatively study filoviruses in cell culture, employing either infectious viruses in a BSL-4 environment or surrogate genetic systems in a BSL-2 environment. These assays are becoming instrumental for small molecule and siRNA screens aimed at the discovery of both cellular therapeutic targets and of compounds with anti-viral properties. We discuss the current practical constraints limiting the implementation of high-throughput biology in a BSL-4 environment, and propose possible solutions to safely perform high-content, high-throughput filovirus infection assays. Finally, we discuss possible novel applications of HCI in the context of filovirus research with particular emphasis on the identification of possible cellular biomarkers of virus infection.

  5. A multi-channel high time resolution detector for high content imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lapington, J S; Miller, G M; Ashton, T J R; Jarron, P; Despeisse, M; Powolny, F; Howorth, J; Milnes, J

    2009-01-01

    Medical imaging has long benefited from advances in photon counting detectors arising from space and particle physics. We describe a microchannel plate-based detector system for high content (multi-parametric) analysis, specifically designed to provide a step change in performance and throughput for measurements in imaged live cells and tissue for the ‘omics’. The detector system integrates multi-channel, high time resolution, photon counting capability into a single miniaturized detector with integrated ASIC electronics, comprising a fast, low power amplifier discriminator and TDC for every channel of the discrete pixel electronic readout, and achieving a pixel density improvement of order two magnitudes compared with current comparable devices. The device combines high performance, easy reconfigurability, and economy within a compact footprint. We present simulations and preliminary measurements in the context of our ultimate goals of 20 ps time resolution with multi-channel parallel analysis (1024 chan...

  6. Image analysis benchmarking methods for high-content screen design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C J; Straight, A F

    2010-05-01

    The recent development of complex chemical and small interfering RNA (siRNA) collections has enabled large-scale cell-based phenotypic screening. High-content and high-throughput imaging are widely used methods to record phenotypic data after chemical and small interfering RNA treatment, and numerous image processing and analysis methods have been used to quantify these phenotypes. Currently, there are no standardized methods for evaluating the effectiveness of new and existing image processing and analysis tools for an arbitrary screening problem. We generated a series of benchmarking images that represent commonly encountered variation in high-throughput screening data and used these image standards to evaluate the robustness of five different image analysis methods to changes in signal-to-noise ratio, focal plane, cell density and phenotype strength. The analysis methods that were most reliable, in the presence of experimental variation, required few cells to accurately distinguish phenotypic changes between control and experimental data sets. We conclude that by applying these simple benchmarking principles an a priori estimate of the image acquisition requirements for phenotypic analysis can be made before initiating an image-based screen. Application of this benchmarking methodology provides a mechanism to significantly reduce data acquisition and analysis burdens and to improve data quality and information content.

  7. Immunolabeling artifacts and the need for live-cell imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnell, Ulrike; Dijk, Freark; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent fusion proteins have revolutionized examination of proteins in living cells. Still, studies using these proteins are met with criticism because proteins are modified and ectopically expressed, in contrast to immunofluorescence studies. However, introducing immunoreagents inside cells can

  8. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-09-22

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution.

  9. Multicolor Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots for Live Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fengyi; Li, Jianan; Hua, Ye; Zhang, Miaomiao; Zhou, Zhou; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Jun; Peng, Wanxin; Zhang, Li; Xia, Sheng; Wang, Dongqing; Yang, Shiming; Xu, Wenrong; Gong, Aihua; Shao, Qixiang

    2015-05-01

    Doping carbon dots with nitrogen atoms considerably enhances their fluorescence properties. However, the mechanism by which the carbon dots are doped is not fully understood. We developed a facile bottom-up hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process that uses glucose and glycine as precursors for the synthesis of photoluminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped carbon dots were mono-dispersed spherical particles with a diameter of -2.8 nm. The doped nitrogen atoms assumed pyridinic type and pyrrolic type configurations to participate in the nanocrystal structure of the carbon dots. It appeared that the nitrogen doping introduces a new internal structure. The aqueous solution of nitrogen-doped carbon dots showed excitation wavelength-dependent multicolor photoluminescence. Further, these nitrogen-doped carbon dots readily entered the cytoplasm of A549 cancer cells and showed no significant cytotoxicity. The internalized nitrogen-doped carbon dots were localized to the cell membrane and cytoplasm, particularly around the nucleus. Further, the as-prepared, biocompatible, nitrogen-doped carbon dots demonstrated the potential to be used as fluorescent probes for multicolor live cell labeling, tracking, and imaging.

  10. Direct imaging of APP proteolysis in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Niccoló; Del Grosso, Ambra; Antoni, Claudia; Cecchini, Marco; Corradetti, Renato; Pavone, Francesco S; Calamai, Martino

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial disorder caused by the interaction of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. The formation of cytotoxic oligomers consisting of Aβ peptide is widely accepted as being one of the main key events triggering the development of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ peptide production results from the specific proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Deciphering the factors governing the activity of the secretases responsible for the cleavage of APP is still a critical issue. Kits available commercially measure the enzymatic activity of the secretases from cells lysates, in vitro. By contrast, we have developed a prototypal rapid bioassay that provides visible information on the proteolytic processing of APP directly in living cells. APP was fused to a monomeric variant of the green fluorescent protein and a monomeric variant of the red fluorescent protein at the C-terminal and N-terminal (mChAPPmGFP), respectively. Changes in the proteolytic processing rate in transfected human neuroblastoma and rat neuronal cells were imaged with confocal microscopy as changes in the red/green fluorescence intensity ratio. The significant decrease in the mean red/green ratio observed in cells over-expressing the β-secretase BACE1, or the α-secretase ADAM10, fused to a monomeric blue fluorescent protein confirms that the proteolytic site is still accessible. Specific siRNA was used to evaluate the contribution of endogenous BACE1. Interestingly, we found that the degree of proteolytic processing of APP is not completely homogeneous within the same single cell, and that there is a high degree of variability between cells of the same type. We were also able to follow with a fluorescence spectrometer the changes in the red emission intensity of the extracellular medium when BACE1 was overexpressed. This represents a complementary approach to fluorescence microscopy for rapidly detecting changes in the proteolytic processing of

  11. Enhanced live cell imaging via photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weili; Long, Kenneth D; Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-11-21

    We demonstrate photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) microscopy as a surface-specific fluorescence imaging technique to study the adhesion of live cells by visualizing variations in cell-substrate gap distance. This approach utilizes a photonic crystal surface incorporated into a standard microscope slide as the substrate for cell adhesion, and a microscope integrated with a custom illumination source as the detection instrument. When illuminated with a monochromatic light source, angle-specific optical resonances supported by the photonic crystal enable efficient excitation of surface-confined and amplified electromagnetic fields when excited at an on-resonance condition, while no field enhancement occurs when the same photonic crystal is illuminated in an off-resonance state. By mapping the fluorescence enhancement factor for fluorophore-tagged cellular components between on- and off-resonance states and comparing the results to numerical calculations, the vertical distance of labelled cellular components from the photonic crystal substrate can be estimated, providing critical and quantitative information regarding the spatial distribution of the specific components of cells attaching to a surface. As an initial demonstration of the concept, 3T3 fibroblast cells were grown on fibronectin-coated photonic crystals with fluorophore-labelled plasma membrane or nucleus. We demonstrate that PCEF microscopy is capable of providing information about the spatial distribution of cell-surface interactions at the single-cell level that is not available from other existing forms of microscopy, and that the approach is amenable to large fields of view, without the need for coupling prisms, coupling fluids, or special microscope objectives.

  12. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir; Sanjiv , Pritha; Ray

    2009-04-28

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  13. Quantitative imaging of glutathione in live cells using a reversible reaction-based ratiometric fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining redox homeostasis inside cells. Currently, there are no methods available to quantitatively assess the GSH concentration in live cells. Live cell fluorescence imaging revolutionized the understanding of cell biology and has become an indispens...

  14. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Monroy-Contreras; Luis Vaca

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular fu...

  15. Single-Molecule Imaging of RNA Splicing in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rino, José; Martin, Robert M; Carvalho, Célia; de Jesus, Ana C; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Expression of genetic information in eukaryotes involves a series of interconnected processes that ultimately determine the quality and amount of proteins in the cell. Many individual steps in gene expression are kinetically coupled, but tools are lacking to determine how temporal relationships between chemical reactions contribute to the output of the final gene product. Here, we describe a strategy that permits direct measurements of intron dynamics in single pre-mRNA molecules in live cells. This approach reveals that splicing can occur much faster than previously proposed and opens new avenues for studying how kinetic mechanisms impact on RNA biogenesis.

  16. Live cell calcium imaging at the single ion hit facility of GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Guanghua, E-mail: gh_du@impcas.ac.cn [Gesellschaft Fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt D-64291 (Germany); E12, Physics Department, James-Franck-Str. 1, Garching D-85748 (Germany); Institute of Modern Physics, Nanchang Rd. 509, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Fischer, Bernd E.; Voss, Kay-Obbe [Gesellschaft Fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt D-64291 (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    To study the fast intracellular calcium response after ion irradiation in living mammalian cells, a live cell calcium imaging set-up was constructed at the targeted cell irradiation facility at GSI. This work introduces the live cell calcium imaging system, shows its performance, an example of the ratio-metric calcium measurement and its application to on-line study calcium response to targeted ion irradiation in human cells.

  17. Imaging proteolytic activity in live cells and animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Galbán

    Full Text Available In addition to their degradative role in protein turnover, proteases play a key role as positive or negative regulators of signal transduction pathways and therefore their dysregulation contributes to many disease states. Regulatory roles of proteases include their hormone-like role in triggering G protein-coupled signaling (Protease-Activated-Receptors; their role in shedding of ligands such as EGF, Notch and Fas; and their role in signaling events that lead to apoptotic cell death. Dysregulated activation of apoptosis by the caspase family of proteases has been linked to diseases such as cancer, autoimmunity and inflammation. In an effort to better understand the role of proteases in health and disease, a luciferase biosensor is described which can quantitatively report proteolytic activity in live cells and mouse models. The biosensor, hereafter referred to as GloSensor Caspase 3/7 has a robust signal to noise (50-100 fold and dynamic range such that it can be used to screen for pharmacologically active compounds in high throughput campaigns as well as to study cell signaling in rare cell populations such as isolated cancer stem cells. The biosensor can also be used in the context of genetically engineered mouse models of human disease wherein conditional expression using the Cre/loxP technology can be implemented to investigate the role of a specific protease in living subjects. While the regulation of apoptosis by caspase's was used as an example in these studies, biosensors to study additional proteases involved in the regulation of normal and pathological cellular processes can be designed using the concepts presented herein.

  18. Influence of the environment and phototoxicity of the live cell imaging system at IMP microbeam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjing; Du, Guanghua; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Wei, Junzhe; Chen, Hao; Li, Yaning; Zhao, Jing; Li, Xiaoyue

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of DNA damage and repair after the ion irradiation, an online live cell imaging system has been established based on the microbeam facility at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). The system could provide a sterile and physiological environment by making use of heating plate and live cell imaging solution. The phototoxicity was investigated through the evaluation of DNA repair protein XRCC1 foci formed in HT1080-RFP cells during the imaging exposure. The intensity of the foci induced by phototoxicity was much lower compared with that of the foci induced by heavy ion hits. The results showed that although spontaneous foci were formed due to RFP exposure during live cell imaging, they had little impact on the analysis of the recruitment kinetics of XRCC1 in the foci induced by the ion irradiation.

  19. Live-cell imaging of mitosis in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, James A

    2010-06-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a wonderful model system for live imaging studies of mitosis. A huge collection of research tools is readily available to facilitate experimentation. For imaging, C. elegans embryos provide large clear cells, an invariant pattern of cell division, only six chromosomes, a very short cell cycle, and remain healthy and happy at room temperature. Mitosis is a complicated process and the types of research questions being asked about the mechanisms involved are continuously expanding. For each experiment, the details of imaging methods need to be tailored to the question. Specific imaging methods will depend on the microscopy hardware and software available to each researcher. This article presents points to consider when choosing a microscope, designing an imaging experiment, or selecting appropriate worm strains for imaging. A method for mounting C. elegans embryos and guidelines for fluorescence and differential interference contrast imaging of mitosis in live embryos are presented.

  20. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of oxygen in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, H.C.; Sanders, R.; Draaijer, A.; Ince, C.; Levine, Y.K.

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of the fluorescent probe ruthenium tris(2,2′-dipyridyl) dichloride hydrate (RTDP) for the quantitative imaging of oxygen in single cells was investigated utilizing fluorescence life-time imaging. The results indicate that the fluorescence behavior of RTDP in the presence of oxygen can

  1. Alkyne-tag Raman imaging for visualization of mobile small molecules in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Palonpon, Almar; Ando, Jun; Fujita, Katsumasa; Kawata, Satoshi; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2012-12-26

    Alkyne has a unique Raman band that does not overlap with Raman scattering from any endogenous molecule in live cells. Here, we show that alkyne-tag Raman imaging (ATRI) is a promising approach for visualizing nonimmobilized small molecules in live cells. An examination of structure-Raman shift/intensity relationships revealed that alkynes conjugated to an aromatic ring and/or to a second alkyne (conjugated diynes) have strong Raman signals in the cellular silent region and can be excellent tags. Using these design guidelines, we synthesized and imaged a series of alkyne-tagged coenzyme Q (CoQ) analogues in live cells. Cellular concentrations of diyne-tagged CoQ analogues could be semiquantitatively estimated. Finally, simultaneous imaging of two small molecules, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) and a CoQ analogue, with distinct Raman tags was demonstrated.

  2. Non-invasive monitoring of living cell culture by lensless digital holography imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunxin Wang; Dayong Wang; Jie Zhao; Yishu Yang; Xiangqian Xiao; Huakun Cui

    2011-01-01

    @@ A non-invasive detection method for the status analysis of cell culture is presented based on digital holography technology.Lensless Fourier transform digital holography (LFTDH) configuration is developed for living cell imaging without prestaining.Complex amplitude information is reconstructed by a single inverse fast Fourier transform, and the phase aberration is corrected through the two-step phase subtraction method.The image segmentation is then applied to the automatic evaluation of confluency.Finally,the cervical cancer cell TZMbl is employed for experimental validation, and the results demonstrate that LFTDH imaging with the corresponding image post-processing can provide an automatic and non-invasive approach for monitoring living cell culture.%A non-invasive detection method for the status analysis of cell culture is presented based on digital holography technology. Lensless Fourier transform digital holography (LFTDH) configuration is developed for living cell imaging without prestaining. Complex amplitude information is reconstructed by a single inverse fast Fourier transform, and the phase aberration is corrected through the two-step phase subtraction method. The image segmentation is then applied to the automatic evaluation of confluency. Finally,the cervical cancer cell TZMbl is employed for experimental validation, and the results demonstrate that LFTDH imaging with the corresponding image post-processing can provide an automatic and non-invasive approach for monitoring living cell culture.

  3. Sub-diffraction limited quantum imaging of a living cell

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Michael A; Daria, Vincent; Knittel, Joachim; Hage, Boris; Bachor, Hans-A; Bowen, Warwick P

    2014-01-01

    Quantum techniques allow the resolution constraints of classical imaging to be overcome, and are expected to have important applications in biology. We report the first demonstration of sub-diffraction limited quantum imaging in biology. Naturally occurring lipid granules of approximately 300nm diameter are used to image the local mechanical properties of the cellular cytoplasm, with spatial resolution enabled by thermal diffusion. Spatial structure is resolved at length scales down to 10nm. Our results confirm the longstanding prediction that use of quantum correlated light can enhance spatial resolution in biology, allowing a 14% enhancement over that achievable with coherent light. Combined with state-of-the-art sources of quantum correlated light, this technique provides a path towards an order of magnitude improvement in resolution over similar classical imaging techniques.

  4. Identification and super-resolution imaging of ligand-activated receptor dimers in live cells

    CERN Document Server

    Winckler, Pascale; Giannone, Gregory; De Giorgi, Francesca; Ichas, François; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Molecular interactions are key to many chemical and biological processes like protein function. In many signaling processes they occur in sub-cellular areas displaying nanoscale organizations and involving molecular assemblies. The nanometric dimensions and the dynamic nature of the interactions make their investigations complex in live cells. While super-resolution fluorescence microscopies offer live-cell molecular imaging with sub-wavelength resolutions, they lack specificity for distinguishing interacting molecule populations. Here we combine super-resolution microscopy and single-molecule F\\"orster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) to identify dimers of receptors induced by ligand binding and provide super-resolved images of their membrane distribution in live cells. By developing a two-color universal-Point-Accumulation-In-the-Nanoscale-Topography (uPAINT) method, dimers of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) activated by EGF are studied at ultra-high densities, revealing preferential cell-edge sub-...

  5. Small Molecule-Photoactive Yellow Protein Labeling Technology in Live Cell Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Gao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the chemical environment, movement, trafficking and interactions of proteins in live cells is essential to understanding their functions. Labeling protein with functional molecules is a widely used approach in protein research to elucidate the protein location and functions both in vitro and in live cells or in vivo. A peptide or a protein tag fused to the protein of interest and provides the opportunities for an attachment of small molecule probes or other fluorophore to image the dynamics of protein localization. Here we reviewed the recent development of no-wash small molecular probes for photoactive yellow protein (PYP-tag, by the means of utilizing a quenching mechanism based on the intramolecular interactions, or an environmental-sensitive fluorophore. Several fluorogenic probes have been developed, with fast labeling kinetics and cell permeability. This technology allows quick live-cell imaging of cell-surface and intracellular proteins without a wash-out procedure.

  6. Enhanced 3D fluorescence live cell imaging on nanoplasmonic substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartia, Manas Ranjan [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hsiao, Austin; Logan Liu, G [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sivaguru, Mayandi [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chen Yi, E-mail: loganliu@illinois.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    We have created a randomly distributed nanocone substrate on silicon coated with silver for surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence detection and 3D cell imaging. Optical characterization of the nanocone substrate showed it can support several plasmonic modes (in the 300-800 nm wavelength range) that can be coupled to a fluorophore on the surface of the substrate, which gives rise to the enhanced fluorescence. Spectral analysis suggests that a nanocone substrate can create more excitons and shorter lifetime in the model fluorophore Rhodamine 6G (R6G) due to plasmon resonance energy transfer from the nanocone substrate to the nearby fluorophore. We observed three-dimensional fluorescence enhancement on our substrate shown from the confocal fluorescence imaging of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown on the substrate. The fluorescence intensity from the fluorophores bound on the cell membrane was amplified more than 100-fold as compared to that on a glass substrate. We believe that strong scattering within the nanostructured area coupled with random scattering inside the cell resulted in the observed three-dimensional enhancement in fluorescence with higher photostability on the substrate surface.

  7. Quantum Dots for Live Cell and In Vivo Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R. E. Shepard

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades, technology has made immeasurable strides to enable visualization, identification, and quantitation in biological systems. Many of these technological advancements are occurring on the nanometer scale, where multiple scientific disciplines are combining to create new materials with enhanced properties. The integration of inorganic synthetic methods with a size reduction to the nano-scale has lead to the creation of a new class of optical reporters, called quantum dots. These semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals have emerged as an alternative to organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, and are brighter and more stable against photobleaching than standard fluorescent indicators. Quantum dots have tunable optical properties that have proved useful in a wide range of applications from multiplexed analysis such as DNA detection and cell sorting and tracking, to most recently demonstrating promise for in vivo imaging and diagnostics. This review provides an in-depth discussion of past, present, and future trends in quantum dot use with an emphasis on in vivo imaging and its related applications.

  8. High content image cytometry in the context of subnuclear organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, W H; Van Neste, L; Dieriks, B; Joss, G H; Van Oostveldt, P

    2010-01-01

    The organization of proteins in space and time is essential to their function. To accurately quantify subcellular protein characteristics in a population of cells with regard for the stochasticity of events in a natural context, there is a fast-growing need for image-based cytometry. Simultaneously, the massive amount of data that is generated by image-cytometric analyses, calls for tools that enable pattern recognition and automated classification. In this article, we present a general approach for multivariate phenotypic profiling of individual cell nuclei and quantification of subnuclear spots using automated fluorescence mosaic microscopy, optimized image processing tools, and supervised classification. We demonstrate the efficiency of our analysis by determination of differential DNA damage repair patterns in response to genotoxic stress and radiation, and we show the potential of data mining in pinpointing specific phenotypes after transient transfection. The presented approach allowed for systematic analysis of subnuclear features in large image data sets and accurate classification of phenotypes at the level of the single cell. Consequently, this type of nuclear fingerprinting shows potential for high-throughput applications, such as functional protein assays or drug compound screening.

  9. Minimal paths and probabilistic models for origin-destination traffic estimation in live cell imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Pecot, Thierry; Kervrann, Charles; Bouthemy, P.

    2008-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-tagging and time-lapse fluorescence microscopy enable to observe molecular dynamics and interactions in live cells. Original image analysis methods are then required to process challenging 2D or 3D image sequences. To address the tracking problem of several hundreds of objects, we propose an original framework that provides general information about vesicle transport, that is traffic flows between origin and destination regions detected in the image sequence. T...

  10. Fungicidal mechanisms of cathelicidins LL-37 and CATH-2 revealed by live-cell imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordonez Alvarez, Soledad; Amarullah, Ilham H; Wubbolts, Richard W; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Haagsman, Henk P

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal mechanisms of action of two cathelicidins, chicken CATH-2 and human LL-37, were studied and compared with the mode of action of the salivary peptide histatin 5 (Hst5). Candida albicans was used as a model organism for fungal pathogens. Analysis by live-cell imaging showed that the peptide

  11. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and live cell imaging of novel fluorescent duocarmycin analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, Lutz F; Behrendt, Frank; Pestel, Galina F; Schuberth, Ingrid; Mitkovski, Mišo

    2012-11-01

    For a better understanding of the mode of action of duocarmycin and its analogs, the novel fluorescent duocarmycin derivatives 13-15 and 17b-19b were synthesized, and their bioactivity as well as their cellular uptake investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in live-cell imaging experiments. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  12. Motion artefact detection in structured illumination microscopy for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Ronny; Wicker, Kai; Müller, Walter; Jost, Aurélie; Heintzmann, Rainer

    2016-09-19

    The reconstruction process of structured illumination microscopy (SIM) creates substantial artefacts if the specimen has moved during the acquisition. This reduces the applicability of SIM for live cell imaging, because these artefacts cannot always be recognized as such in the final image. A movement is not necessarily visible in the raw data, due to the varying excitation patterns and the photon noise. We present a method to detect motion by extracting and comparing two independent 3D wide-field images out of the standard SIM raw data without needing additional images. Their difference reveals moving objects overlaid with noise, which are distinguished by a probability theory-based analysis. Our algorithm tags motion-artefacts in the final high-resolution image for the first time, preventing the end-user from misinterpreting the data. We show and explain different types of artefacts and demonstrate our algorithm on a living cell.

  13. Complementarity of PALM and SOFI for super-resolution live cell imaging of focal adhesions

    CERN Document Server

    Deschout, Hendrik; Sharipov, Azat; Szlag, Daniel; Feletti, Lely; Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Lasser, Theo; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging of focal adhesions requires a sufficiently high temporal resolution, which remains a challenging task for super-resolution microscopy. We have addressed this important issue by combining photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). Using simulations and fixed cell focal adhesion images, we investigated the complementarity between PALM and SOFI in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. This PALM-SOFI framework was used to image focal adhesions in living cells, while obtaining a temporal resolution below 10 s. We visualized the dynamics of focal adhesions, and revealed local mean velocities around 190 nm per minute. The complementarity of PALM and SOFI was assessed in detail with a methodology that integrates a quantitative resolution and signal-to-noise metric. This PALM and SOFI concept provides an enlarged quantitative imaging framework, allowing unprecedented functional exploration of focal adhesions through the estimation of m...

  14. Complementarity of PALM and SOFI for super-resolution live-cell imaging of focal adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschout, Hendrik; Lukes, Tomas; Sharipov, Azat; Szlag, Daniel; Feletti, Lely; Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Lasser, Theo; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-12-01

    Live-cell imaging of focal adhesions requires a sufficiently high temporal resolution, which remains a challenge for super-resolution microscopy. Here we address this important issue by combining photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). Using simulations and fixed-cell focal adhesion images, we investigate the complementarity between PALM and SOFI in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. This PALM-SOFI framework is used to image focal adhesions in living cells, while obtaining a temporal resolution below 10 s. We visualize the dynamics of focal adhesions, and reveal local mean velocities around 190 nm min-1. The complementarity of PALM and SOFI is assessed in detail with a methodology that integrates a resolution and signal-to-noise metric. This PALM and SOFI concept provides an enlarged quantitative imaging framework, allowing unprecedented functional exploration of focal adhesions through the estimation of molecular parameters such as fluorophore densities and photoactivation or photoswitching kinetics.

  15. High resolution quantitative phase imaging of live cells with constrained optimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; Khare, Kedar; John, Renu

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) aims at studying weakly scattering and absorbing biological specimens with subwavelength accuracy without any external staining mechanisms. Use of a reference beam at an angle is one of the necessary criteria for recording of high resolution holograms in most of the interferometric methods used for quantitative phase imaging. The spatial separation of the dc and twin images is decided by the reference beam angle and Fourier-filtered reconstructed image will have a very poor resolution if hologram is recorded below a minimum reference angle condition. However, it is always inconvenient to have a large reference beam angle while performing high resolution microscopy of live cells and biological specimens with nanometric features. In this paper, we treat reconstruction of digital holographic microscopy images as a constrained optimization problem with smoothness constraint in order to recover only complex object field in hologram plane even with overlapping dc and twin image terms. We solve this optimization problem by gradient descent approach iteratively and the smoothness constraint is implemented by spatial averaging with appropriate size. This approach will give excellent high resolution image recovery compared to Fourier filtering while keeping a very small reference angle. We demonstrate this approach on digital holographic microscopy of live cells by recovering the quantitative phase of live cells from a hologram recorded with nearly zero reference angle.

  16. High-contrast fluorescence imaging in fixed and living cells using optimized optical switches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangxing Wu

    Full Text Available We present the design, synthesis and characterization of new functionalized fluorescent optical switches for rapid, all-visible light-mediated manipulation of fluorescence signals from labelled structures within living cells, and as probes for high-contrast optical lock-in detection (OLID imaging microscopy. A triazole-substituted BIPS (TzBIPS is identified from a rational synthetic design strategy that undergoes robust, rapid and reversible, visible light-driven transitions between a colorless spiro- (SP and a far-red absorbing merocyanine (MC state within living cells. The excited MC-state of TzBIPS may also decay to the MC-ground state emitting near infra-red fluorescence, which is used as a sensitive and quantitative read-out of the state of the optical switch in living cells. The SP to MC transition for a membrane-targeted TzBIPS probe (C₁₂-TzBIPS is triggered at 405 nm at an energy level compatible with studies in living cells, while the action spectrum of the reverse transition (MC to SP has a maximum at 650 nm. The SP to MC transition is complete within the 790 ns pixel dwell time of the confocal microscope, while a single cycle of optical switching between the SP and MC states in a region of interest is complete within 8 ms (125 Hz within living cells, the fastest rate attained for any optical switch probe in a biological sample. This property can be exploited for real-time correction of background signals in living cells. A reactive form of TzBIPS is linked to secondary antibodies and used, in conjunction with an enhanced scope-based analysis of the modulated MC-fluorescence in immuno-stained cells, for high-contrast immunofluorescence microscopic analysis of the actin cytoskeleton.

  17. High resolution 3D imaging of living cells with sub-optical wavelength phonons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cota, Fernando; Smith, Richard J.; Moradi, Emilia; Marques, Leonel; Webb, Kevin F.; Clark, Matt

    2016-12-01

    Label-free imaging of living cells below the optical diffraction limit poses great challenges for optical microscopy. Biologically relevant structural information remains below the Rayleigh limit and beyond the reach of conventional microscopes. Super-resolution techniques are typically based on the non-linear and stochastic response of fluorescent labels which can be toxic and interfere with cell function. In this paper we present, for the first time, imaging of live cells using sub-optical wavelength phonons. The axial imaging resolution of our system is determined by the acoustic wavelength (λa = λprobe/2n) and not on the NA of the optics allowing sub-optical wavelength acoustic sectioning of samples using the time of flight. The transverse resolution is currently limited to the optical spot size. The contrast mechanism is significantly determined by the mechanical properties of the cells and requires no additional contrast agent, stain or label to image the cell structure. The ability to breach the optical diffraction limit to image living cells acoustically promises to bring a new suite of imaging technologies to bear in answering exigent questions in cell biology and biomedicine.

  18. Enhanced fluorescence imaging of live cells by effective cytosolic delivery of probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Massignani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microscopic techniques enable real-space imaging of complex biological events and processes. They have become an essential tool to confirm and complement hypotheses made by biomedical scientists and also allow the re-examination of existing models, hence influencing future investigations. Particularly imaging live cells is crucial for an improved understanding of dynamic biological processes, however hitherto live cell imaging has been limited by the necessity to introduce probes within a cell without altering its physiological and structural integrity. We demonstrate herein that this hurdle can be overcome by effective cytosolic delivery. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show the delivery within several types of mammalian cells using nanometre-sized biomimetic polymer vesicles (a.k.a. polymersomes that offer both highly efficient cellular uptake and endolysomal escape capability without any effect on the cellular metabolic activity. Such biocompatible polymersomes can encapsulate various types of probes including cell membrane probes and nucleic acid probes as well as labelled nucleic acids, antibodies and quantum dots. SIGNIFICANCE: We show the delivery of sufficient quantities of probes to the cytosol, allowing sustained functional imaging of live cells over time periods of days to weeks. Finally the combination of such effective staining with three-dimensional imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy allows cell imaging in complex three-dimensional environments under both mono-culture and co-culture conditions. Thus cell migration and proliferation can be studied in models that are much closer to the in vivo situation.

  19. Live-cell stimulated Raman scattering imaging of alkyne-tagged biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Senlian; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Yuntao; Li, Ang; Huang, Yanyi; Chen, Xing

    2014-06-02

    Alkynes can be metabolically incorporated into biomolecules including nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and glycans. In addition to the clickable chemical reactivity, alkynes possess a unique Raman scattering within the Raman-silent region of a cell. Coupling this spectroscopic signature with Raman microscopy yields a new imaging modality beyond fluorescence and label-free microscopies. The bioorthogonal Raman imaging of various biomolecules tagged with an alkyne by a state-of-the-art Raman imaging technique, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, is reported. This imaging method affords non-invasiveness, high sensitivity, and molecular specificity and therefore should find broad applications in live-cell imaging.

  20. Rapid three-dimensional isotropic imaging of living cells using Bessel beam plane illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchon, Thomas A; Gao, Liang; Milkie, Daniel E; Davidson, Michael W; Galbraith, James A; Galbraith, Catherine G; Betzig, Eric

    2012-01-01

    A key challenge when imaging living cells is how to noninvasively extract the most spatiotemporal information possible. Unlike popular wide-field and confocal methods, plane-illumination microscopy limits excitation to the information-rich vicinity of the focal plane, providing effective optical sectioning and high speed while minimizing out-of-focus background and premature photobleaching. Here we used scanned Bessel beams in conjunction with structured illumination and/or two-photon excitation to create thinner light sheets (<0.5 μm) better suited to three-dimensional (3D) subcellular imaging. As demonstrated by imaging the dynamics of mitochondria, filopodia, membrane ruffles, intracellular vesicles and mitotic chromosomes in live cells, the microscope currently offers 3D isotropic resolution down to ~0.3 μm, speeds up to nearly 200 image planes per second and the ability to noninvasively acquire hundreds of 3D data volumes from single living cells encompassing tens of thousands of image frames. PMID:21378978

  1. Aberration-free FTIR spectroscopic imaging of live cells in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2013-07-21

    The label-free, non-destructive chemical analysis offered by FTIR spectroscopic imaging is a very attractive and potentially powerful tool for studies of live biological cells. FTIR imaging of live cells is a challenging task, due to the fact that cells are cultured in an aqueous environment. While the synchrotron facility has proven to be a valuable tool for FTIR microspectroscopic studies of single live cells, we have demonstrated that high quality infrared spectra of single live cells using an ordinary Globar source can also be obtained by adding a pair of lenses to a common transmission liquid cell. The lenses, when placed on the transmission cell window, form pseudo hemispheres which removes the refraction of light and hence improve the imaging and spectral quality of the obtained data. This study demonstrates that infrared spectra of single live cells can be obtained without the focus shifting effect at different wavenumbers, caused by the chromatic aberration. Spectra of the single cells have confirmed that the measured spectral region remains in focus across the whole range, while spectra of the single cells measured without the lenses have shown some erroneous features as a result of the shift of focus. It has also been demonstrated that the addition of lenses can be applied to the imaging of cells in microfabricated devices. We have shown that it was not possible to obtain a focused image of an isolated cell in a droplet of DPBS in oil unless the lenses are applied. The use of the approach described herein allows for well focused images of single cells in DPBS droplets to be obtained.

  2. Lanthanide near infrared imaging in living cells with Yb3+ nano metal organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault-Collet, Alexandra; Gogick, Kristy A; White, Kiley A; Villette, Sandrine; Pallier, Agnès; Collet, Guillaume; Kieda, Claudine; Li, Tao; Geib, Steven J; Rosi, Nathaniel L; Petoud, Stéphane

    2013-10-22

    We have created unique near-infrared (NIR)-emitting nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (nano-MOFs) incorporating a high density of Yb(3+) lanthanide cations and sensitizers derived from phenylene. We establish here that these nano-MOFs can be incorporated into living cells for NIR imaging. Specifically, we introduce bulk and nano-Yb-phenylenevinylenedicarboxylate-3 (nano-Yb-PVDC-3), a unique MOF based on a PVDC sensitizer-ligand and Yb(3+) NIR-emitting lanthanide cations. This material has been structurally characterized, its stability in various media has been assessed, and its luminescent properties have been studied. We demonstrate that it is stable in certain specific biological media, does not photobleach, and has an IC50 of 100 μg/mL, which is sufficient to allow live cell imaging. Confocal microscopy and inductively coupled plasma measurements reveal that nano-Yb-PVDC-3 can be internalized by cells with a cytoplasmic localization. Despite its relatively low quantum yield, nano-Yb-PVDC-3 emits a sufficient number of photons per unit volume to serve as a NIR-emitting reporter for imaging living HeLa and NIH 3T3 cells. NIR microscopy allows for highly efficient discrimination between the nano-MOF emission signal and the cellular autofluorescence arising from biological material. This work represents a demonstration of the possibility of using NIR lanthanide emission for biological imaging applications in living cells with single-photon excitation.

  3. Correlation of live-cell imaging with volume scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Miriam S; Günthert, Maja; Bittermann, Anne Greet; de Marco, Alex; Wepf, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Live-cell imaging is one of the most widely applied methods in live science. Here we describe two setups for live-cell imaging, which can easily be combined with volume SEM for correlative studies. The first procedure applies cell culture dishes with a gridded glass support, which can be used for any light microscopy modality. The second approach is a flow-chamber setup based on Ibidi μ-slides. Both live-cell imaging strategies can be followed up with serial blockface- or focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. Two types of resin embedding after heavy metal staining and dehydration are presented making best use of the particular advantages of each imaging modality: classical en-bloc embedding and thin-layer plastification. The latter can be used only for focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy, but is advantageous for studying cell-interactions with specific substrates, or when the substrate cannot be removed. En-bloc embedding has diverse applications and can be applied for both described volume scanning electron microscopy techniques. Finally, strategies for relocating the cell of interest are discussed for both embedding approaches and in respect to the applied light and scanning electron microscopy methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Imaging live cells at high spatiotemporal resolution for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lip Ket; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Chen, Bi-Chang

    2016-05-24

    Conventional optical imaging techniques are limited by the diffraction limit and difficult-to-image biomolecular and sub-cellular processes in living specimens. Novel optical imaging techniques are constantly evolving with the desire to innovate an imaging tool that is capable of seeing sub-cellular processes in a biological system, especially in three dimensions (3D) over time, i.e. 4D imaging. For fluorescence imaging on live cells, the trade-offs among imaging depth, spatial resolution, temporal resolution and photo-damage are constrained based on the limited photons of the emitters. The fundamental solution to solve this dilemma is to enlarge the photon bank such as the development of photostable and bright fluorophores, leading to the innovation in optical imaging techniques such as super-resolution microscopy and light sheet microscopy. With the synergy of microfluidic technology that is capable of manipulating biological cells and controlling their microenvironments to mimic in vivo physiological environments, studies of sub-cellular processes in various biological systems can be simplified and investigated systematically. In this review, we provide an overview of current state-of-the-art super-resolution and 3D live cell imaging techniques and their lab-on-a-chip applications, and finally discuss future research trends in new and breakthrough research areas of live specimen 4D imaging in controlled 3D microenvironments.

  5. Photoluminescence Lifetime Imaging of Newly Synthesized Proteins in Living Cells with Iridium-alkyne Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinrong; Wang, Jinyu; Xue, Jie; Yan, Zihe; Zhang, Sichun; Qiao, Juan

    2017-09-23

    Designing probes for real-time imaging of dynamic processes in living cells is a continual challenge. Herein, a novel near-infrared photoluminescence probe with long lifetime was exploited for photoluminescence lifetime imaging (PLIM) based on an Iridium-alkyne complex. This probe offers benefits of desirable deep-red to NIR emission, long stokes shift, excellent cell penetration, low cytotoxicity and good resistance to photobleaching. To the best of our knowledge this is the first PLIM probe applicable to click reaction of Cu(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition with remarkable lifetime shifts of 414 ns before and after click reaction. The approach fully eliminates the background interference and well distinguishes the reacted probes from the unreacted probes, thus enabling the wash-free imaging of the newly synthesized proteins in single living cells. Based on the unique properties of the Iridium complexes, it is anticipated to be applied in more important issues in living cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A drug-compatible and temperature-controlled microfluidic device for live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Gomez-Escoda, Blanca; Munoz-Garcia, Javier; Babic, Julien; Griscom, Laurent; Wu, Pei-Yun Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring cellular responses to changes in growth conditions and perturbation of targeted pathways is integral to the investigation of biological processes. However, manipulating cells and their environment during live-cell-imaging experiments still represents a major challenge. While the coupling of microfluidics with microscopy has emerged as a powerful solution to this problem, this approach remains severely underexploited. Indeed, most microdevices rely on the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which strongly absorbs a variety of molecules commonly used in cell biology. This effect of the microsystems on the cellular environment hampers our capacity to accurately modulate the composition of the medium and the concentration of specific compounds within the microchips, with implications for the reliability of these experiments. To overcome this critical issue, we developed new PDMS-free microdevices dedicated to live-cell imaging that show no interference with small molecules. They also integrate a module for maintaining precise sample temperature both above and below ambient as well as for rapid temperature shifts. Importantly, changes in medium composition and temperature can be efficiently achieved within the chips while recording cell behaviour by microscopy. Compatible with different model systems, our platforms provide a versatile solution for the dynamic regulation of the cellular environment during live-cell imaging. PMID:27512142

  7. Development of automatic image analysis methods for high-throughput and high-content screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di, Zi

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the development of image analysis methods for ultra-high content analysis of high-throughput screens where cellular phenotype responses to various genetic or chemical perturbations that are under investigation. Our primary goal is to deliver efficient and robust image analysis

  8. Development of automatic image analysis methods for high-throughput and high-content screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di, Zi

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the development of image analysis methods for ultra-high content analysis of high-throughput screens where cellular phenotype responses to various genetic or chemical perturbations that are under investigation. Our primary goal is to deliver efficient and robust image analysis

  9. Monitoring of live cell cultures during apoptosis by phase imaging and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharikova, Anna; Saide, George; Sfakis, Lauren; Park, Jun Yong; Desta, Habben; Maloney, Maxwell C.; Castracane, James; Mahajan, Supriya D.; Khmaladze, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Non-invasive live cell measurements are an important tool in biomedical research. We present a combined digital holography/Raman spectroscopy technique to study live cell cultures during apoptosis. Digital holographic microscopy records an interference pattern between object and reference waves, so that the computationally reconstructed holographic image contains both amplitude and phase information about the sample. When the phase is mapped across the sample and converted into height information for each pixel, a three dimensional image is obtained. The measurement of live cell cultures by digital holographic microscopy yields information about cell shape and volume, changes to which are reflective of alterations in cell cycle and initiation of cell death mechanisms. Raman spectroscopy, on the other hand, is sensitive to rotational and vibrational molecular transitions, as well as intermolecular vibrations. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy provides complementary information about cells, such as protein, lipid and nucleic acid content, and, particularly, the spectral signatures associated with structural changes in molecules. The cell cultures are kept in the temperature-controlled environmental chamber during the experiment, which allows monitoring over multiple cell cycles. The DHM system combines a visible (red) laser source with conventional microscope base, and LabVIEW-run data processing. We analyzed and compared cell culture information obtained by these two methods.

  10. Two-colour live-cell nanoscale imaging of intracellular targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottanelli, Francesca; Kromann, Emil B.; Allgeyer, Edward S.; Erdmann, Roman S.; Wood Baguley, Stephanie; Sirinakis, George; Schepartz, Alanna; Baddeley, David; Toomre, Derek K.; Rothman, James E.; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy allows observations of subcellular dynamics at the nanoscale. Applications have, however, been severely limited by the lack of a versatile STED-compatible two-colour labelling strategy for intracellular targets in living cells. Here we demonstrate a universal labelling method based on the organic, membrane-permeable dyes SiR and ATTO590 as Halo and SNAP substrates. SiR and ATTO590 constitute the first suitable dye pair for two-colour STED imaging in living cells below 50 nm resolution. We show applications with mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane and Golgi-localized proteins, and demonstrate continuous acquisition for up to 3 min at 2-s time resolution. PMID:26940217

  11. Sulfonate-based fluorescent probes for imaging hydrogen peroxide in living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the mechanism of H2O2-mediated hydrolysis of sulfonates, two fluorescein disulfonates compounds (FS-1 and FS-2) were designed and synthesized as the highly selective and sensitive fluorescent probes for imaging H2O2 in living cells. The probes were detected with elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR. Upon reaction with H2O2, the probes exhibit strong fluorescence responses and high selectivity for H2O2 over other reactive oxygen species and some biological compounds. Furthermore, the sulfonate-based probes, as novel fluorescent reagents, are cell-permeable and can detect micromolar changes in H2O2 concentrations in living cells by using confocal microscopy.

  12. Sulfonate-based fluorescent probes for imaging hydrogen peroxide in living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU KeHua; LIU Fen; WANG HuiXia; WANG ShanShan; WANG LuLu; TANG Bo

    2009-01-01

    Based on the mechanism of H2O2-mediated hydrolysis of sulfonates, two fluorescein disulfonates compounds (FS-1 and FS-2) were designed and synthesized as the highly selective and sensitive fluo-rescent probes for imaging H2O2 in living cells. The probes were detected with elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR. Upon reaction with H2O2, the probes exhibit strong fluorescence responses and high selectivity for H202 over other reactive oxygen species and some biological compounds. Fur-thermore, the sulfonate-based probes, as novel fluorescent reagents, are cell-permeable and can detect micromolar changes in H202 concentrations in living cells by using confocal microscopy.

  13. A highly specific gold nanoprobe for live-cell single-molecule imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Leduc, Cecile; Gautier, Jérémie; Soto-Ribeiro, Martinho; Wehrle-Haller, B; Gautreau, Alexis; Giannone, Gregory; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim

    2013-01-01

    Single molecule tracking in live cells is the ultimate tool to study subcellular protein dynamics, but it is often limited by the probe size and photostability. Due to these issues, long-term tracking of proteins in confined and crowded environments, such as intracellular spaces, remains challenging. We have developed a novel optical probe consisting of 5-nm gold nanoparticles functionalized with a small fragment of camelid antibodies that recognize widely used GFPs with a very high affinity, which we call GFP-nanobodies. These small gold nanoparticles can be detected and tracked using photothermal imaging for arbitrarily long periods of time. Surface and intracellular GFP-proteins were effectively labeled even in very crowded environments such as adhesion sites and cytoskeletal structures both in vitro and in live cell cultures. These nanobody-coated gold nanoparticles are probes with unparalleled capabilities; small size, perfect photostability, high specificity, and versatility afforded by combination with...

  14. Application of Live-Cell RNA Imaging Techniques to the Study of Retroviral RNA Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses produce full-length RNA that serves both as a genomic RNA (gRNA, which is encapsidated into virus particles, and as an mRNA, which directs the synthesis of viral structural proteins. However, we are only beginning to understand the cellular and viral factors that influence trafficking of retroviral RNA and the selection of the RNA for encapsidation or translation. Live cell imaging studies of retroviral RNA trafficking have provided important insight into many aspects of the retrovirus life cycle including transcription dynamics, nuclear export of viral RNA, translational regulation, membrane targeting, and condensation of the gRNA during virion assembly. Here, we review cutting-edge techniques to visualize single RNA molecules in live cells and discuss the application of these systems to studying retroviral RNA trafficking.

  15. An Aza-Cope Reactivity-Based Fluorescent Probe for Imaging Formaldehyde in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Thomas F; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-09-02

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a reactive carbonyl species (RCS) produced in living systems that has been implicated in epigenetics as well as in the pathologies of various cancers, diabetes, and heart, liver, and neurodegenerative diseases. Traditional methods for biological FA detection rely on sample destruction and/or extensive processing, resulting in a loss of spatiotemporal information. To help address this technological gap, we present the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a fluorescent probe for live-cell FA imaging that relies on a FA-induced aza-Cope rearrangement. Formaldehyde probe-1 (FAP-1) is capable of detecting physiologically relevant concentrations of FA in aqueous buffer and in live cells with high selectivity over potentially competing biological analytes. Moreover, FAP-1 can visualize endogenous FA produced by lysine-specific demethylase 1 in a breast cancer cell model, presaging the potential utility of this chemical approach to probe RCS biology.

  16. An ICT-based approach to ratiometric fluorescence imaging of hydrogen peroxide produced in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikun, Duangkhae; Miller, Evan W; Domaille, Dylan W; Chang, Christopher J

    2008-04-09

    We present the synthesis, properties, and biological applications of Peroxy Lucifer 1 (PL1), a new fluorescent probe for imaging hydrogen peroxide produced in living cells by a ratiometric response. PL1 utilizes a chemoselective boronate-based switch to detect hydrogen peroxide by modulation of internal charge transfer (ICT) within a 1,8-naphthalimide dye. PL1 features high selectivity for hydrogen peroxide over similar reactive oxygen species, including superoxide, and nitric oxide, and a 65 nm shift in emission from blue-colored fluorescence to green-colored fluorescence upon reaction with peroxide. Two-photon confocal microscopy experiments in live macrophages show that PL1 can ratiometrically visualize localized hydrogen peroxide bursts generated in living cells at immune response levels.

  17. Nanoscale live cell optical imaging of the dynamics of intracellular microvesicles in neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sohee; Heo, Chaejeong; Suh, Minah; Lee, Young Hee

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology and imaging technology have provided great opportunities to investigate cellular dynamics. Conventional imaging methods such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy are powerful techniques for cellular imaging, even at the nanoscale level. However, these techniques have limitations applications in live cell imaging because of the experimental preparation required, namely cell fixation, and the innately small field of view. In this study, we developed a nanoscale optical imaging (NOI) system that combines a conventional optical microscope with a high resolution dark-field condenser (Cytoviva, Inc.) and halogen illuminator. The NOI system's maximum resolution for live cell imaging is around 100 nm. We utilized NOI to investigate the dynamics of intracellular microvesicles of neural cells without immunocytological analysis. In particular, we studied direct, active random, and moderate random dynamic motions of intracellular microvesicles and visualized lysosomal vesicle changes after treatment of cells with a lysosomal inhibitor (NH4Cl). Our results indicate that the NOI system is a feasible, high-resolution optical imaging system for live small organelles that does not require complicated optics or immunocytological staining processes.

  18. Deep Learning Automates the Quantitative Analysis of Individual Cells in Live-Cell Imaging Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Valen, David A; Kudo, Takamasa; Lane, Keara M; Macklin, Derek N; Quach, Nicolas T; DeFelice, Mialy M; Maayan, Inbal; Tanouchi, Yu; Ashley, Euan A; Covert, Markus W

    2016-11-01

    Live-cell imaging has opened an exciting window into the role cellular heterogeneity plays in dynamic, living systems. A major critical challenge for this class of experiments is the problem of image segmentation, or determining which parts of a microscope image correspond to which individual cells. Current approaches require many hours of manual curation and depend on approaches that are difficult to share between labs. They are also unable to robustly segment the cytoplasms of mammalian cells. Here, we show that deep convolutional neural networks, a supervised machine learning method, can solve this challenge for multiple cell types across the domains of life. We demonstrate that this approach can robustly segment fluorescent images of cell nuclei as well as phase images of the cytoplasms of individual bacterial and mammalian cells from phase contrast images without the need for a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker. These networks also enable the simultaneous segmentation and identification of different mammalian cell types grown in co-culture. A quantitative comparison with prior methods demonstrates that convolutional neural networks have improved accuracy and lead to a significant reduction in curation time. We relay our experience in designing and optimizing deep convolutional neural networks for this task and outline several design rules that we found led to robust performance. We conclude that deep convolutional neural networks are an accurate method that require less curation time, are generalizable to a multiplicity of cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, and expand live-cell imaging capabilities to include multi-cell type systems.

  19. High-resolution, label-free imaging of living cells with direct electron-beam-excitation-assisted optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-06-01

    High spatial resolution microscope is desired for deep understanding of cellular functions, in order to develop medical technologies. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging of un-labelled organelles in living cells, in which live cells on a 50 nm thick silicon nitride membrane are imaged by autofluorescence excited with a focused electron beam through the membrane. Electron beam excitation enables ultrahigh spatial resolution imaging of organelles, such as mitochondria, nuclei, and various granules. Since the autofluorescence spectra represent molecular species, this microscopy allows fast and detailed investigations of cellular status in living cells.

  20. Graph cut and image intensity-based splitting improves nuclei segmentation in high-content screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Muhammad; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Emmenlauer, Mario; Rämö, Pauli; Yli-Harja, Olli; Dehio, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Quantification of phenotypes in high-content screening experiments depends on the accuracy of single cell analysis. In such analysis workflows, cell nuclei segmentation is typically the first step and is followed by cell body segmentation, feature extraction, and subsequent data analysis workflows. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that the first steps of high-content analysis are done accurately in order to guarantee correctness of the final analysis results. In this paper, we present a novel cell nuclei image segmentation framework which exploits robustness of graph cut to obtain initial segmentation for image intensity-based clump splitting method to deliver the accurate overall segmentation. By using quantitative benchmarks and qualitative comparison with real images from high-content screening experiments with complicated multinucleate cells, we show that our method outperforms other state-of-the-art nuclei segmentation methods. Moreover, we provide a modular and easy-to-use implementation of the method for a widely used platform.

  1. Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) imaging of tissues and live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Chan, K L; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2016-04-07

    FTIR spectroscopic imaging is a label-free, non-destructive and chemically specific technique that can be utilised to study a wide range of biomedical applications such as imaging of biopsy tissues, fixed cells and live cells, including cancer cells. In particular, the use of FTIR imaging in attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode has attracted much attention because of the small, but well controlled, depth of penetration and corresponding path length of infrared light into the sample. This has enabled the study of samples containing large amounts of water, as well as achieving an increased spatial resolution provided by the high refractive index of the micro-ATR element. This review is focused on discussing the recent developments in FTIR spectroscopic imaging, particularly in ATR sampling mode, and its applications in the biomedical science field as well as discussing the future opportunities possible as the imaging technology continues to advance.

  2. Intracellular protein target detection by quantum dots optimized for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngseon; Kim, Keumhyun; Hong, Sukmin; Kim, Hichul; Kwon, Yong-Jun; Song, Rita

    2011-08-17

    Imaging of specific intracellular target proteins in living cells has been of great challenge and importance for understanding intracellular events and elucidating various biological phenomena. Highly photoluminescent and water-soluble semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) have been extensively applied to various cellular imaging applications due to the long-term photostability and the tunable narrow emission spectra with broad excitation. Despite the great success of various bioimaging and diagnostic applications, visualization of intracellular targets in live cells still has been of great challenge. Nonspecific binding, difficulty of intracellular delivery, or endosomal trapping of nanosized QDs are the main reasons to hamper specific target binding in live cells. In this context, we prepared the polymer-coated QDs (pcQD) of which the surface was optimized for specific intracellular targeting in live cells. Efficient intracellular delivery was achieved through PEGylation and subsequent cell penetrating peptide (i.e., TAT) conjugation to the pcQD in order to avoid significant endosomal sequestration and to facilitate internalization of the QDs, respectively. In this study, we employed HEK293 cell line overexpressing endothelin A receptor (ET(A)R), a family of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), of which the cytosolic c-terminal site is genetically engineered to possess green fluorescent protein (GFP) as our intracellular protein target. The fluorescence signal of the target protein and the well-defined intracellular behavior of the GPCR help to evaluate the targeting specificity of QDs in living cells. To test the hypothesis that the TAT-QDs conjugated with antibody against intracellular target of interest can find the target, we conjugated anti-GFP antibody to TAT-PEG-pcQD using heterobifunctional linkers. Compared to the TAT-PEG-pcQD, which was distributed throughout the cytoplasm, the antiGFP-functionalized TAT-PEG-pcQD could penetrate the cell membrane

  3. Combining PALM and SOFI for quantitative imaging of focal adhesions in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschout, Hendrik; Lukes, Tomas; Sharipov, Azat; Feletti, Lely; Lasser, Theo; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2017-02-01

    Focal adhesions are complicated assemblies of hundreds of proteins that allow cells to sense their extracellular matrix and adhere to it. Although most focal adhesion proteins have been identified, their spatial organization in living cells remains challenging to observe. Photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) is an interesting technique for this purpose, especially since it allows estimation of molecular parameters such as the number of fluorophores. However, focal adhesions are dynamic entities, requiring a temporal resolution below one minute, which is difficult to achieve with PALM. In order to address this problem, we merged PALM with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) by applying both techniques to the same data. Since SOFI tolerates an overlap of single molecule images, it can improve the temporal resolution compared to PALM. Moreover, an adaptation called balanced SOFI (bSOFI) allows estimation of molecular parameters, such as the fluorophore density. We therefore performed simulations in order to assess PALM and SOFI for quantitative imaging of dynamic structures. We demonstrated the potential of our PALM-SOFI concept as a quantitative imaging framework by investigating moving focal adhesions in living cells.

  4. Imaging live cell in micro-liquid enclosure by X-ray laser diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa; Shibuya, Akemi; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sangsoo; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Tamakoshi, Masatada; Moriya, Toshiyuki; Oshima, Tairo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Emerging X-ray free-electron lasers with femtosecond pulse duration enable single-shot snapshot imaging almost free from sample damage by outrunning major radiation damage processes. In bioimaging, it is essential to keep the sample close to its natural state. Conventional high-resolution imaging, however, suffers from severe radiation damage that hinders live cell imaging. Here we present a method for capturing snapshots of live cells kept in a micro-liquid enclosure array by X-ray laser diffraction. We place living Microbacterium lacticum cells in an enclosure array and successively expose each enclosure to a single X-ray laser pulse from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser. The enclosure itself works as a guard slit and allows us to record a coherent diffraction pattern from a weakly-scattering submicrometre-sized cell with a clear fringe extending up to a 28-nm full-period resolution. The reconstructed image reveals living whole-cell structures without any staining, which helps advance understanding of intracellular phenomena. PMID:24394916

  5. An integrated on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Weikang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen; Wang, Yugang

    2015-09-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a threat to genome integrity by introducing DNA damages, particularly DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Understanding how cells react to DSB and maintain genome integrity is of major importance, since increasing evidences indicate the links of DSB with genome instability and cancer predispositions. However, tracking the dynamics of DNA damages and repair response to ionizing radiation in individual cell is difficult. Here we describe the development of an on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system based on isotopic sources at Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The system was designed to irradiate cells and in situ observe the cellular responses to ionizing radiation in real time. On-line irradiation was achieved by mounting a metal framework that hold an isotopic γ source above the cell culture dish for γ irradiation; or by integrating an isotopic α source to an objective lens under the specialized cell culture dish for α irradiation. Live cell imaging was performed on a confocal microscope with an environmental chamber installed on the microscope stage. Culture conditions in the environment chamber such as CO2, O2 concentration as well as temperature are adjustable, which further extends the capacity of the system and allows more flexible experimental design. We demonstrate the use of this system by tracking the DSB foci formation and disappearance in individual cells after exposure to irradiation. On-line irradiation together with in situ live cell imaging in adjustable culture conditions, the system overall provides a powerful tool for investigation of cellular and subcellular response to ionizing radiation under different physiological conditions such as hyperthermia or hypoxia.

  6. An integrated on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Weikang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen, E-mail: gen.yang@pku.edu.cn; Wang, Yugang

    2015-09-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a threat to genome integrity by introducing DNA damages, particularly DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Understanding how cells react to DSB and maintain genome integrity is of major importance, since increasing evidences indicate the links of DSB with genome instability and cancer predispositions. However, tracking the dynamics of DNA damages and repair response to ionizing radiation in individual cell is difficult. Here we describe the development of an on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system based on isotopic sources at Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The system was designed to irradiate cells and in situ observe the cellular responses to ionizing radiation in real time. On-line irradiation was achieved by mounting a metal framework that hold an isotopic γ source above the cell culture dish for γ irradiation; or by integrating an isotopic α source to an objective lens under the specialized cell culture dish for α irradiation. Live cell imaging was performed on a confocal microscope with an environmental chamber installed on the microscope stage. Culture conditions in the environment chamber such as CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} concentration as well as temperature are adjustable, which further extends the capacity of the system and allows more flexible experimental design. We demonstrate the use of this system by tracking the DSB foci formation and disappearance in individual cells after exposure to irradiation. On-line irradiation together with in situ live cell imaging in adjustable culture conditions, the system overall provides a powerful tool for investigation of cellular and subcellular response to ionizing radiation under different physiological conditions such as hyperthermia or hypoxia.

  7. IncucyteDRC: An R package for the dose response analysis of live cell imaging data

    OpenAIRE

    Philip J. Chapman; Dominic I. James; Amanda J. Watson; Hopkins, Gemma V.; Waddell, Ian D.; Ogilvie, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    We present IncucyteDRC, an R package for the analysis of data from live cell imaging cell proliferation experiments carried out on the Essen Biosciences IncuCyte ZOOM instrument. The package provides a simple workflow for summarising data into a form that can be used to calculate dose response curves and EC50 values for small molecule inhibitors. Data from different cell lines, or cell lines grown under different conditions, can be normalised as to their doubling time. A simple graphical web ...

  8. Concentration-dependent fluorescence live-cell imaging and tracking of intracellular nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Hye; Joo, Sang-Woo [Department of Chemistry, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Keunchang [Logos Biosystems, Incorporated, Anyang 431-070 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So Yeong, E-mail: leeso@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: sjoo@ssu.ac.kr [Laboratory of Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-10

    Using live-cell imaging techniques we investigated concentration-dependent intracellular movements of fluorescence nanoparticles (NPs) in real-time after their entry into HeLa cells via incubation. Intracellular particle traces appeared to be a mixture of both random and fairly unidirectional movements of the particles. At rather low concentrations of NPs, a majority of the non-random intracellular particle trajectories are assumed to mostly go along microtubule networks after endocytosis, as evidenced from the inhibition test with nocodazole. On the other hand, as the concentrations of NPs increased, random motions were more frequently observed inside the cells.

  9. A modified agar pad method for mycobacterial live-cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Brian D

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two general approaches to prokaryotic live-cell imaging have been employed to date, growing bacteria on thin agar pads or growing bacteria in micro-channels. The methods using agar pads 'sandwich' the cells between the agar pad on the bottom and a glass cover slip on top, before sealing the cover slip. The advantages of this technique are that it is simple and relatively inexpensive to set up. However, once the cover slip is sealed, the environmental conditions cannot be manipulated. Furthermore, desiccation of the agar pad, and the growth of cells in a sealed environment where the oxygen concentration will be in gradual decline, may not permit longer term studies such as those required for the slower growing mycobacteria. Findings We report here a modified agar pad method where the cells are sandwiched between a cover slip on the bottom and an agar pad on top of the cover slip (rather than the reverse and the cells viewed from below using an inverted microscope. This critical modification overcomes some of the current limitations with agar pad methods and was used to produce time-lapse images and movies of cell growth for Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Conclusions This method offers improvement on the current agar pad methods in that long term live cell imaging studies can be performed and modification of the media during the experiment is permitted.

  10. Live cell imaging combined with high-energy single-ion microbeam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Na; Du, Guanghua; Liu, Wenjing; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Chen, Hao; Wei, Junzhe

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand breaks can lead to cell carcinogenesis or cell death if not repaired rapidly and efficiently. An online live cell imaging system was established at the high energy microbeam facility at the Institute of Modern Physics to study early and fast cellular response to DNA damage after high linear energy transfer ion radiation. The HT1080 cells expressing XRCC1-RFP were irradiated with single high energy nickel ions, and time-lapse images of the irradiated cells were obtained online. The live cell imaging analysis shows that strand-break repair protein XRCC1 was recruited to the ion hit position within 20 s in the cells and formed bright foci in the cell nucleus. The fast recruitment of XRCC1 at the ion hits reached a maximum at about 200 s post-irradiation and then was followed by a slower release into the nucleoplasm. The measured dual-exponential kinetics of XRCC1 protein are consistent with the proposed consecutive reaction model, and the measurements obtained that the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 recruitment to DNA strand break is 1.2 × 10(-3) s(-1) and the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 release from the break-XRCC1 complex is 1.2 × 10(-2) s(-1).

  11. A Two-Photon Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for Imaging Carboxylesterase 2 in Living Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiang; Feng, Lei; Wang, Dan-Dan; Dai, Zi-Ru; Wang, Ping; Zou, Li-Wei; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Jia-Yue; Yu, Yang; Ge, Guang-Bo; Cui, Jing-Nan; Yang, Ling

    2015-12-30

    In this study, a two-photon ratiometric fluorescent probe NCEN has been designed and developed for highly selective and sensitive sensing of human carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2) based on the catalytic properties and substrate preference of hCE2. Upon addition of hCE2, the probe could be readily hydrolyzed to release 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimide (NAH), which brings remarkable red-shift in fluorescence (90 nm) spectrum. The newly developed probe exhibits good specificity, ultrahigh sensitivity, and has been successfully applied to determine the real activities of hCE2 in complex biological samples such as cell and tissue preparations. NCEN has also been used for two-photon imaging of intracellular hCE2 in living cells as well as in deep-tissues for the first time, and the results showed that the probe exhibited high ratiometric imaging resolution and deep-tissue imaging depth. All these findings suggested that this probe holds great promise for applications in bioimaging of endogenous hCE2 in living cells and in exploring the biological functions of hCE2 in complex biological systems.

  12. Live cell imaging combined with high-energy single-ion microbeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Na; Du, Guanghua; Liu, Wenjing; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Chen, Hao; Wei, Junzhe

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand breaks can lead to cell carcinogenesis or cell death if not repaired rapidly and efficiently. An online live cell imaging system was established at the high energy microbeam facility at the Institute of Modern Physics to study early and fast cellular response to DNA damage after high linear energy transfer ion radiation. The HT1080 cells expressing XRCC1-RFP were irradiated with single high energy nickel ions, and time-lapse images of the irradiated cells were obtained online. The live cell imaging analysis shows that strand-break repair protein XRCC1 was recruited to the ion hit position within 20 s in the cells and formed bright foci in the cell nucleus. The fast recruitment of XRCC1 at the ion hits reached a maximum at about 200 s post-irradiation and then was followed by a slower release into the nucleoplasm. The measured dual-exponential kinetics of XRCC1 protein are consistent with the proposed consecutive reaction model, and the measurements obtained that the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 recruitment to DNA strand break is 1.2 × 10-3 s-1 and the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 release from the break-XRCC1 complex is 1.2 × 10-2 s-1.

  13. Live-cell imaging to measure BAX recruitment kinetics to mitochondria during apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Margaret E; Schlamp, Cassandra L; Nickells, Robert W

    2017-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BCL2 gene family member, BAX, plays a pivotal role in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Under cellular stress, BAX recruitment to the mitochondria occurs when activated BAX forms dimers, then oligomers, to initiate mitochondria outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), a process critical for apoptotic progression. The activation and recruitment of BAX to form oligomers has been studied for two decades using fusion proteins with a fluorescent reporter attached in-frame to the BAX N-terminus. We applied high-speed live cell imaging to monitor the recruitment of BAX fusion proteins in dying cells. Data from time-lapse imaging was validated against the activity of endogenous BAX in cells, and analyzed using sigmoid mathematical functions to obtain detail of the kinetic parameters of the recruitment process at individual mitochondrial foci. BAX fusion proteins behave like endogenous BAX during apoptosis. Kinetic studies show that fusion protein recruitment is also minimally affected in cells lacking endogenous BAK or BAX genes, but that the kinetics are moderately, but significantly, different with different fluorescent tags in the fusion constructs. In experiments testing BAX recruitment in 3 different cell lines, our results show that regardless of cell type, once activated, BAX recruitment initiates simultaneously within a cell, but exhibits varying rates of recruitment at individual mitochondrial foci. Very early during BAX recruitment, pro-apoptotic molecules are released in the process of MOMP, but different molecules are released at different times and rates relative to the time of BAX recruitment initiation. These results provide a method for BAX kinetic analysis in living cells and yield greater detail of multiple characteristics of BAX-induced MOMP in living cells that were initially observed in cell free studies.

  14. Deep Learning Automates the Quantitative Analysis of Individual Cells in Live-Cell Imaging Experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Van Valen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Live-cell imaging has opened an exciting window into the role cellular heterogeneity plays in dynamic, living systems. A major critical challenge for this class of experiments is the problem of image segmentation, or determining which parts of a microscope image correspond to which individual cells. Current approaches require many hours of manual curation and depend on approaches that are difficult to share between labs. They are also unable to robustly segment the cytoplasms of mammalian cells. Here, we show that deep convolutional neural networks, a supervised machine learning method, can solve this challenge for multiple cell types across the domains of life. We demonstrate that this approach can robustly segment fluorescent images of cell nuclei as well as phase images of the cytoplasms of individual bacterial and mammalian cells from phase contrast images without the need for a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker. These networks also enable the simultaneous segmentation and identification of different mammalian cell types grown in co-culture. A quantitative comparison with prior methods demonstrates that convolutional neural networks have improved accuracy and lead to a significant reduction in curation time. We relay our experience in designing and optimizing deep convolutional neural networks for this task and outline several design rules that we found led to robust performance. We conclude that deep convolutional neural networks are an accurate method that require less curation time, are generalizable to a multiplicity of cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, and expand live-cell imaging capabilities to include multi-cell type systems.

  15. Aptamer-based single-molecule imaging of insulin receptors in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Minhyeok; Kwon, Mijin; Kim, Sooran; Yunn, Na-Oh; Kim, Daehyung; Ryu, Sung Ho; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2014-05-01

    We present a single-molecule imaging platform that quantitatively explores the spatiotemporal dynamics of individual insulin receptors in living cells. Modified DNA aptamers that specifically recognize insulin receptors (IRs) with a high affinity were selected through the SELEX process. Using quantum dot-labeled aptamers, we successfully imaged and analyzed the diffusive motions of individual IRs in the plasma membranes of a variety of cell lines (HIR, HEK293, HepG2). We further explored the cholesterol-dependent movement of IRs to address whether cholesterol depletion interferes with IRs and found that cholesterol depletion of the plasma membrane by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduces the mobility of IRs. The aptamer-based single-molecule imaging of IRs will provide better understanding of insulin signal transduction through the dynamics study of IRs in the plasma membrane.

  16. An iminocoumarin benzothiazole-based fluorescent probe for imaging hydrogen sulfide in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huatang; Xie, Yusheng; Wang, Ping; Chen, Ganchao; Liu, Ruochuan; Lam, Yun-Wah; Hu, Yi; Zhu, Qing; Sun, Hongyan

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has recently been identified as the third gaseous signaling molecule that is involved in regulating many important cellular processes. We report herein a novel fluorescent probe for detecting H2S based on iminocoumarin benzothiazole scaffold. The probe displayed high sensitivity and around 80-fold increment in fluorescence signal after reacting with H2S under physiological condition. The fluorescent intensity of the probe was linearly related to H2S concentration in the range of 0-100 μM with a detection limit of 0.15 μM (3σ/slope). The probe also showed excellent selectivity towards H2S over other biologically relevant species, including ROS, RSS and RNS. Its selectivity for H2S is 32 folds higher than other reactive sulfur species. Furthermore, the probe has been applied for imaging H2S in living cells. Cell imaging experiments demonstrated that the probe is cell-permeable and can be used to monitor the alteration of H2S concentrations in living cells. We envisage that this probe can provide useful tools to further elucidate the biological roles of H2S.

  17. Interferometric and nonlinear-optical spectral-imaging techniques for outer space and live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    Multidimensional signals such as the spectral images allow us to have deeper insights into the natures of objects. In this paper the spectral imaging techniques that are based on optical interferometry and nonlinear optics are presented. The interferometric imaging technique is based on the unified theory of Van Cittert-Zernike and Wiener-Khintchine theorems and allows us to retrieve a spectral image of an object in the far zone from the 3D spatial coherence function. The retrieval principle is explained using a very simple object. The promising applications to space interferometers for astronomy that are currently in progress will also be briefly touched on. An interesting extension of interferometric spectral imaging is a 3D and spectral imaging technique that records 4D information of objects where the 3D and spectral information is retrieved from the cross-spectral density function of optical field. The 3D imaging is realized via the numerical inverse propagation of the cross-spectral density. A few techniques suggested recently are introduced. The nonlinear optical technique that utilizes stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) for spectral imaging of biomedical targets is presented lastly. The strong signals of SRS permit us to get vibrational information of molecules in the live cell or tissue in real time. The vibrational information of unstained or unlabeled molecules is crucial especially for medical applications. The 3D information due to the optical nonlinearity is also the attractive feature of SRS spectral microscopy.

  18. Live-cell imaging of post-golgi transport vesicles in cultured hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Stampe; Misonou, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The subcellular localization of neuronal membrane signaling molecules such as receptors and ion channels depends on intracellular trafficking mechanisms. Essentially, vesicular trafficking mechanisms ensure that a large number of membrane proteins are correctly targeted to different subcellular...... compartments of neurons. In the past two decades, the establishment and advancement of fluorescent protein technology have provided us with opportunities to study how proteins are trafficked in living cells. However, live imaging of trafficking processes in neurons necessitate imaging tools to distinguish...... the several different routes that neurons use for protein trafficking. Here we provide a novel protocol to selectively visualize post-Golgi transport vesicles carrying fluorescent-labeled ion channel proteins in living neurons. Further, we provide a number of analytical tools we developed to quantify...

  19. Evaluation of chemical fluorescent dyes as a protein conjugation partner for live cell imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Hayashi-Takanaka

    Full Text Available To optimize live cell fluorescence imaging, the choice of fluorescent substrate is a critical factor. Although genetically encoded fluorescent proteins have been used widely, chemical fluorescent dyes are still useful when conjugated to proteins or ligands. However, little information is available for the suitability of different fluorescent dyes for live imaging. We here systematically analyzed the property of a number of commercial fluorescent dyes when conjugated with antigen-binding (Fab fragments directed against specific histone modifications, in particular, phosphorylated H3S28 (H3S28ph and acetylated H3K9 (H3K9ac. These Fab fragments were conjugated with a fluorescent dye and loaded into living HeLa cells. H3S28ph-specific Fab fragments were expected to be enriched in condensed chromosomes, as H3S28 is phosphorylated during mitosis. However, the degree of Fab fragment enrichment on mitotic chromosomes varied depending on the conjugated dye. In general, green fluorescent dyes showed higher enrichment, compared to red and far-red fluorescent dyes, even when dye:protein conjugation ratios were similar. These differences are partly explained by an altered affinity of Fab fragment after dye-conjugation; some dyes have less effect on the affinity, while others can affect it more. Moreover, red and far-red fluorescent dyes tended to form aggregates in the cytoplasm. Similar results were observed when H3K9ac-specific Fab fragments were used, suggesting that the properties of each dye affect different Fab fragments similarly. According to our analysis, conjugation with green fluorescent dyes, like Alexa Fluor 488 and Dylight 488, has the least effect on Fab affinity and is the best for live cell imaging, although these dyes are less photostable than red fluorescent dyes. When multicolor imaging is required, we recommend the following dye combinations for optimal results: Alexa Fluor 488 (green, Cy3 (red, and Cy5 or CF640 (far-red.

  20. Culture of Adult Transgenic Zebrafish Retinal Explants for Live-cell Imaging by Multiphoton Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahne, Manuela; Gorsuch, Ryne A; Nelson, Craig M; Hyde, David R

    2017-02-24

    An endogenous regeneration program is initiated by Müller glia in the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) retina following neuronal damage and death. The Müller glia re-enter the cell cycle and produce neuronal progenitor cells that undergo subsequent rounds of cell divisions and differentiate into the lost neuronal cell types. Both Müller glia and neuronal progenitor cell nuclei replicate their DNA and undergo mitosis in distinct locations of the retina, i.e. they migrate between the basal Inner Nuclear Layer (INL) and the Outer Nuclear Layer (ONL), respectively, in a process described as Interkinetic Nuclear Migration (INM). INM has predominantly been studied in the developing retina. To examine the dynamics of INM in the adult regenerating zebrafish retina in detail, live-cell imaging of fluorescently-labeled Müller glia/neuronal progenitor cells is required. Here, we provide the conditions to isolate and culture dorsal retinas from Tg[gfap:nGFP](mi2004) zebrafish that were exposed to constant intense light for 35 h. We also show that these retinal cultures are viable to perform live-cell imaging experiments, continuously acquiring z-stack images throughout the thickness of the retinal explant for up to 8 h using multiphoton microscopy to monitor the migratory behavior of gfap:nGFP-positive cells. In addition, we describe the details to perform post-imaging analysis to determine the velocity of apical and basal INM. To summarize, we established conditions to study the dynamics of INM in an adult model of neuronal regeneration. This will advance our understanding of this crucial cellular process and allow us to determine the mechanisms that control INM.

  1. Continuous-Wave Stimulated Emission Depletion Microscope for Imaging Actin Cytoskeleton in Fixed and Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Neupane

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stimulated emission depletion (STED microscopy provides a new opportunity to study fine sub-cellular structures and highly dynamic cellular processes, which are challenging to observe using conventional optical microscopy. Using actin as an example, we explored the feasibility of using a continuous wave (CW-STED microscope to study the fine structure and dynamics in fixed and live cells. Actin plays an important role in cellular processes, whose functioning involves dynamic formation and reorganization of fine structures of actin filaments. Frequently used confocal fluorescence and STED microscopy dyes were employed to image fixed PC-12 cells (dyed with phalloidin- fluorescein isothiocyante and live rat chondrosarcoma cells (RCS transfected with actin-green fluorescent protein (GFP. Compared to conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, CW-STED microscopy shows improved spatial resolution in both fixed and live cells. We were able to monitor cell morphology changes continuously; however, the number of repetitive analyses were limited primarily by the dyes used in these experiments and could be improved with the use of dyes less susceptible to photobleaching. In conclusion, CW-STED may disclose new information for biological systems with a proper characteristic length scale. The challenges of using CW-STED microscopy to study cell structures are discussed.

  2. Development of background-free tame fluorescent probes for intracellular live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamudi, Samira Husen; Satapathy, Rudrakanta; Kim, Jihyo; Su, Dongdong; Ren, Haiyan; Das, Rajkumar; Hu, Lingna; Alvarado-Martínez, Enrique; Lee, Jung Yeol; Hoppmann, Christian; Peña-Cabrera, Eduardo; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Park, Hee-Sung; Wang, Lei; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence labelling of an intracellular biomolecule in native living cells is a powerful strategy to achieve in-depth understanding of the biomolecule's roles and functions. Besides being nontoxic and specific, desirable labelling probes should be highly cell permeable without nonspecific interactions with other cellular components to warrant high signal-to-noise ratio. While it is critical, rational design for such probes is tricky. Here we report the first predictive model for cell permeable background-free probe development through optimized lipophilicity, water solubility and charged van der Waals surface area. The model was developed by utilizing high-throughput screening in combination with cheminformatics. We demonstrate its reliability by developing CO-1 and AzG-1, a cyclooctyne- and azide-containing BODIPY probe, respectively, which specifically label intracellular target organelles and engineered proteins with minimum background. The results provide an efficient strategy for development of background-free probes, referred to as ‘tame' probes, and novel tools for live cell intracellular imaging. PMID:27321135

  3. Nanomechanical and topographical imaging of living cells by atomic force microscopy with colloidal probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puricelli, Luca; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Schulte, Carsten; Podestà, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.podesta@mi.infn.it; Milani, Paolo [CIMaINa and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a great potential as a tool to characterize mechanical and morphological properties of living cells; these properties have been shown to correlate with cells’ fate and patho-physiological state in view of the development of novel early-diagnostic strategies. Although several reports have described experimental and technical approaches for the characterization of cellular elasticity by means of AFM, a robust and commonly accepted methodology is still lacking. Here, we show that micrometric spherical probes (also known as colloidal probes) are well suited for performing a combined topographic and mechanical analysis of living cells, with spatial resolution suitable for a complete and accurate mapping of cell morphological and elastic properties, and superior reliability and accuracy in the mechanical measurements with respect to conventional and widely used sharp AFM tips. We address a number of issues concerning the nanomechanical analysis, including the applicability of contact mechanical models and the impact of a constrained contact geometry on the measured Young’s modulus (the finite-thickness effect). We have tested our protocol by imaging living PC12 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in order to demonstrate the importance of the correction of the finite-thickness effect and the change in Young’s modulus induced by the action of a cytoskeleton-targeting drug.

  4. Quantitative imaging of single mRNA splice variants in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyuwan; Cui, Yi; Lee, Luke P.; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Alternative messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing is a fundamental process of gene regulation, and errors in RNA splicing are known to be associated with a variety of different diseases. However, there is currently a lack of quantitative technologies for monitoring mRNA splice variants in cells. Here, we show that a combination of plasmonic dimer probes and hyperspectral imaging can be used to detect and quantify mRNA splice variants in living cells. The probes are made from gold nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides and can hybridize to specific mRNA sequences, forming nanoparticle dimers that exhibit distinct spectral shifts due to plasmonic coupling. With this approach, we show that the spatial and temporal distribution of three selected splice variants of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1, can be monitored at single-copy resolution by measuring the hybridization dynamics of the nanoplasmonic dimers. Our study provides insights into RNA and its transport in living cells, which could improve our understanding of cellular protein complexes, pharmacogenomics, genetic diagnosis and gene therapies.

  5. Topographical and electrochemical nanoscale imaging of living cells using voltage-switching mode scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yasufumi; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Novak, Pavel; Babakinejad, Babak; Macpherson, Julie; Unwin, Patrick R; Shiku, Hitoshi; Gorelik, Julia; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2012-07-17

    We describe voltage-switching mode scanning electrochemical microscopy (VSM-SECM), in which a single SECM tip electrode was used to acquire high-quality topographical and electrochemical images of living cells simultaneously. This was achieved by switching the applied voltage so as to change the faradaic current from a hindered diffusion feedback signal (for distance control and topographical imaging) to the electrochemical flux measurement of interest. This imaging method is robust, and a single nanoscale SECM electrode, which is simple to produce, is used for both topography and activity measurements. In order to minimize the delay at voltage switching, we used pyrolytic carbon nanoelectrodes with 6.5-100 nm radii that rapidly reached a steady-state current, typically in less than 20 ms for the largest electrodes and faster for smaller electrodes. In addition, these carbon nanoelectrodes are suitable for convoluted cell topography imaging because the RG value (ratio of overall probe diameter to active electrode diameter) is typically in the range of 1.5-3.0. We first evaluated the resolution of constant-current mode topography imaging using carbon nanoelectrodes. Next, we performed VSM-SECM measurements to visualize membrane proteins on A431 cells and to detect neurotransmitters from a PC12 cells. We also combined VSM-SECM with surface confocal microscopy to allow simultaneous fluorescence and topographical imaging. VSM-SECM opens up new opportunities in nanoscale chemical mapping at interfaces, and should find wide application in the physical and biological sciences.

  6. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  7. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian

  8. SpatTrack: an imaging toolbox for analysis of vesicle motility and distribution in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Frederik Wendelboe; Jensen, Marie Louise; Christensen, Tanja;

    2014-01-01

    SpatTrack, an open source, platform-independent program collecting a variety of methods for analysis of vesicle dynamics and distribution in living cells. SpatTrack performs 2D particle tracking, trajectory analysis and fitting of diffusion models to the calculated mean square displacement. It allows......The endocytic pathway is a complex network of highly dynamic organelles, which has been traditionally studied by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The data generated by this method can be overwhelming and its analysis, even for the skilled microscopist, is tedious and error-prone. We developed...... for spatial analysis of detected vesicle patterns including calculation of the radial distribution function and particle-based colocalization. Importantly, all analysis tools are supported by Monte Carlo simulations of synthetic images. This allows the user to assess the reliability of the analysis...

  9. Microtubules in Plant Cells: Strategies and Methods for Immunofluorescence, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Live Cell Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celler, Katherine; Fujita, Miki; Kawamura, Eiko; Ambrose, Chris; Herburger, Klaus; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are required throughout plant development for a wide variety of processes, and different strategies have evolved to visualize and analyze them. This chapter provides specific methods that can be used to analyze microtubule organization and dynamic properties in plant systems and summarizes the advantages and limitations for each technique. We outline basic methods for preparing samples for immunofluorescence labelling, including an enzyme-based permeabilization method, and a freeze-shattering method, which generates microfractures in the cell wall to provide antibodies access to cells in cuticle-laden aerial organs such as leaves. We discuss current options for live cell imaging of MTs with fluorescently tagged proteins (FPs), and provide chemical fixation, high pressure freezing/freeze substitution, and post-fixation staining protocols for preserving MTs for transmission electron microscopy and tomography. PMID:26498784

  10. Red fluorescent chitosan nanoparticles grafted with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Fan, Xingliang; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Xiqi; Chen, Yi; Wei, Yen

    2016-08-01

    Poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) conjugated red fluorescent chitosan nanoparticles (GCC-pMPC) were facilely fabricated by "grafting from" method via surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Firstly, glutaraldehyde crosslinked red fluorescent chitosan nanoparticles (GCC NPs) with many amino groups and hydroxyl groups on their surface were prepared, which were then reacted with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide to form GCC-Br; subsequently, poly(MPC) (pMPC) brushes were grafted onto GCC NPs surface using GCC-Br as initiator via ATRP. Compared with PEGylated nanoparticles, zwitterionic polymers modified nanoparticles demonstrated better performance in their cellular uptake. Moreover, the obtained GCC-pMPC demonstrated excellent water-dispersibility, biocompatibility, and photostability, which made them highly potential for long-term tracing applications. Importantly, the successful live cell imaging of GCC-pMPC would remarkably advance the research of their further bioapplications.

  11. A sensitive and specific Raman probe based on bisarylbutadiyne for live cell imaging of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Palonpon, Almar; Dodo, Kosuke; Ando, Jun; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-02-01

    We previously showed that bisarylbutadiyne (BADY), which has a conjugated diyne structure, exhibits an intense peak in the cellular Raman-silent region. Here, we synthesized a mitochondria-selective Raman probe by linking bisphenylbutadiyne with triphenylphosphonium, a well-known mitochondrial targeting moiety. This probe, named MitoBADY, has a Raman peak 27 times more intense than that of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine. Raman microscopy using submicromolar extracellular probe concentrations successfully visualized mitochondria in living cells. A full Raman spectrum is acquired at each pixel of the scanned sample, and we showed that simultaneous Raman imaging of MitoBADY and endogenous cellular biomolecules can be achieved in a single scan. MitoBADY should be useful for the study of mitochondrial dynamics.

  12. The large-scale digital cell analysis system: an open system for nonperturbing live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul J; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A; Sun, Yuansheng; Ianzini, Fiorenza; Mackey, Michael A

    2007-12-01

    The Large-Scale Digital Cell Analysis System (LSDCAS) was designed to provide a highly extensible open source live cell imaging system. Analysis of cell growth data has demonstrated a lack of perturbation in cells imaged using LSDCAS, through reference to cell growth data from cells growing in CO(2) incubators. LSDCAS consists of data acquisition, data management and data analysis software, and is currently a Core research facility at the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa. Using LSDCAS analysis software, this report and others show that although phase-contrast imaging has no apparent effect on cell growth kinetics and viability, fluorescent image acquisition in the cell lines tested caused a measurable level of growth perturbation using LSDCAS. This report describes the current design of the system, reasons for the implemented design, and details its basic functionality. The LSDCAS software runs on the GNU/Linux operating system, and provides easy to use, graphical programs for data acquisition and quantitative analysis of cells imaged with phase-contrast or fluorescence microscopy (alone or in combination), and complete source code is freely available under the terms of the GNU Public Software License at the project website (http://lsdcas.engineering.uiowa.edu).

  13. Live-cell super-resolution imaging of intrinsically fast moving flagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogger, M.; Stichler, S.; Subota, I.; Bertlein, S.; Spindler, M.-C.; Teßmar, J.; Groll, J.; Engstler, M.; Fenz, S. F.

    2017-02-01

    Recent developments in super-resolution microscopy make it possible to resolve structures in biological cells at a spatial resolution of a few nm and observe dynamical processes with a temporal resolution of ms to μs. However, the optimal structural resolution requires repeated illumination cycles and is thus limited to chemically fixed cells. For live cell applications substantial improvement over classical Abbe-limited imaging can already be obtained in adherent or slow moving cells. Nonetheless, a large group of cells are fast moving and thus could not yet be addressed with live cell super-resolution microscopy. These include flagellate pathogens like African trypanosomes, the causative agents of sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in livestock. Here, we present an embedding method based on a in situ forming cytocompatible UV-crosslinked hydrogel. The fast cross-linking hydrogel immobilizes trypanosomes efficiently to allow microscopy on the nanoscale. We characterized both the trypanosomes and the hydrogel with respect to their autofluorescence properties and found them suitable for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy (SMFM). As a proof of principle, SMFM was applied to super-resolve a structure inside the living trypanosome. We present an image of a flagellar axoneme component recorded by using the intrinsic blinking behavior of eYFP. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J Phys D. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Susanne Fenz was selected by the Editorial Board of J Phys D as an Emerging Talent/Leader.

  14. Imaging living cells with a combined high-resolution multi-photon-acoustic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkl, Selma; Weiss, Eike; Stark, Martin; Stracke, Frank; Riemann, Iris; Lemor, Robert; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    With increasing demand for in-vivo observation of living cells, microscope techniques that do not need staining become more and more important. In this talk we present a combined multi-photon-acoustic microscope with the possibility to measure synchronously properties addressed by ultrasound and two-photon fluorescence. Ultrasound probes the local mechanical properties of a cell, while the high resolution image of the two-photon fluorescence delivers insight in cell morphology and activity. In the acoustic part of the microscope an ultrasound wave, with a frequency of GHz, is focused by an acoustic sapphire lens and detected by a piezo electric transducer assembled to the lens. The achieved lateral resolution is in the range of 1μm. Contrast in the images arises mainly from the local absorption of sound in the cells, related to properties, such as mass density, stiffness and viscose damping. Additionally acoustic microscopy can access the cell shape and the state of the cell membrane as it is a intrinsic volume scanning technique.The optical part bases on the emission of fluorescent biomolecules naturally present in cells (e.g. NAD(P)H, protophorphyrin IX, lipofuscin, melanin). The nonlinear effect of two-photon absorption provides a high lateral and axial resolution without the need of confocal detection. In addition, in the near-IR cell damages are drastically reduced in comparison to direct excitation in the visible or UV. Both methods can be considered as minimal invasive, as they relay on intrinsic contrast mechanisms and dispense with the need of staining. First results on living cells are presented and discussed.

  15. High-content analysis of single cells directly assembled on CMOS sensor based on color imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Saeki, Tatsuya; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-12-15

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor was applied to high-content analysis of single cells which were assembled closely or directly onto the CMOS sensor surface. The direct assembling of cell groups on CMOS sensor surface allows large-field (6.66 mm×5.32 mm in entire active area of CMOS sensor) imaging within a second. Trypan blue-stained and non-stained cells in the same field area on the CMOS sensor were successfully distinguished as white- and blue-colored images under white LED light irradiation. Furthermore, the chemiluminescent signals of each cell were successfully visualized as blue-colored images on CMOS sensor only when HeLa cells were placed directly on the micro-lens array of the CMOS sensor. Our proposed approach will be a promising technique for real-time and high-content analysis of single cells in a large-field area based on color imaging.

  16. Low-power, Confocal Imaging of Protein Localization in Living Cells (7214-150) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed technology genetically labels intracellular structures and visualizes protein interactions in living cells using a compact, confocal microscope with...

  17. Antibody-protein A conjugated quantum dots for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Takashi; Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Tanaka, Shin-Ichi; Inouye, Yasushi; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Tomonobu M

    2010-11-01

    To use quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescent probes for receptor imaging, QD surface should be modified with biomolecules such as antibodies, peptides, carbohydrates, and small-molecule ligands for receptors. Among these QDs, antibody conjugated QDs are the most promising fluorescent probes. There are many kinds of coupling reactions that can be used for preparing antibody conjugated QDs. Most of the antibody coupling reactions, however, are non-selective and time-consuming. In this paper, we report a facile method for preparing antibody conjugated QDs for surface receptor imaging. We used ProteinA as an adaptor protein for binding of antibody to QDs. By using ProteinA conjugated QDs, various types of antibodies are easily attached to the surface of the QDs via non-covalent binding between the F(c) (fragment crystallization) region of antibody and ProteinA. To show the utility of ProteinA conjugated QDs, HER2 (anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) in KPL-4 human breast cancer cells were stained by using anti-HER2 antibody conjugated ProteinA-QDs. In addition, multiplexed imaging of HER2 and CXCR4 (chemokine receptor) in the KPL-4 cells was performed. The result showed that CXCR4 receptors coexist with HER2 receptors in the membrane surface of KPL-4 cells. ProteinA mediated antibody conjugation to QDs is very useful to prepare fluorescent probes for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

  18. Lanthanide-based imaging of protein-protein interactions in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Megha; Yapici, Engin; Miller, Lawrence W

    2014-02-17

    In order to deduce the molecular mechanisms of biological function, it is necessary to monitor changes in the subcellular location, activation, and interaction of proteins within living cells in real time. Förster resonance energy-transfer (FRET)-based biosensors that incorporate genetically encoded, fluorescent proteins permit high spatial resolution imaging of protein-protein interactions or protein conformational dynamics. However, a nonspecific fluorescence background often obscures small FRET signal changes, and intensity-based biosensor measurements require careful interpretation and several control experiments. These problems can be overcome by using lanthanide [Tb(III) or Eu(III)] complexes as donors and green fluorescent protein (GFP) or other conventional fluorophores as acceptors. Essential features of this approach are the long-lifetime (approximately milliseconds) luminescence of Tb(III) complexes and time-gated luminescence microscopy. This allows pulsed excitation, followed by a brief delay, which eliminates nonspecific fluorescence before the detection of Tb(III)-to-GFP emission. The challenges of intracellular delivery, selective protein labeling, and time-gated imaging of lanthanide luminescence are presented, and recent efforts to investigate the cellular uptake of lanthanide probes are reviewed. Data are presented showing that conjugation to arginine-rich, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be used as a general strategy for the cellular delivery of membrane-impermeable lanthanide complexes. A heterodimer of a luminescent Tb(III) complex, Lumi4, linked to trimethoprim and conjugated to nonaarginine via a reducible disulfide linker rapidly (∼10 min) translocates into the cytoplasm of Maden Darby canine kidney cells from the culture medium. With this reagent, the intracellular interaction between GFP fused to FK506 binding protein 12 (GFP-FKBP12) and the rapamycin binding domain of mTOR fused to Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (FRB

  19. Confocal fluorescence anisotropy and FRAP imaging of α-synuclein amyloid aggregates in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Julia Roberti

    Full Text Available We assessed the intracellular association states of the Parkinson's disease related protein α-synuclein (AS in living cells by transfection with a functional recombinant mutant protein (AS-C4 bearing a tetracysteine tag binding the fluorogenic biarsenical ligands FlAsH and ReAsH, The aggregation states of AS-C4 were assessed by in situ microscopy of molecular translational mobility with FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and of local molecular density with confocal fluorescence anisotropy (CFA. FRAP recovery was quantitative and rapid in regions of free protein, whereas AS in larger aggregates was>80% immobile. A small 16% recovery characterized by an apparent diffusion constant of 0.03-0.04 µm(2/s was attributed to the dynamics of smaller, associated forms of AS-C4 and the exchange of mobile species with the larger immobile aggregates. By CFA, the larger aggregates exhibited high brightness and very low anisotropy, consistent with homoFRET between closely packed AS, for which a Förster distance (R(o of 5.3 nm was calculated. Other bright regions had high anisotropy values, close to that of monomeric AS, and indicative of membrane-associated protein with both low mobility and low degree of association. The anisotropy-fluorescence intensity correlations also revealed regions of free protein or of small aggregates, undetectable by conventional fluorescence imaging alone. The combined strategy (FRAP+CFA provides a highly sensitive means for elucidating both the dynamics and structural features of protein aggregates and other intracellular complexes in living cells, and can be extended to other amyloid systems and to drug screening protocols.

  20. Measurement of drug-target engagement in live cells by two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Brand, Christian; Lee, Sungon; Nibbs, Antoinette E; Stapleton, Shawn; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-07-01

    The ability to directly image and quantify drug-target engagement and drug distribution with subcellular resolution in live cells and whole organisms is a prerequisite to establishing accurate models of the kinetics and dynamics of drug action. Such methods would thus have far-reaching applications in drug development and molecular pharmacology. We recently presented one such technique based on fluorescence anisotropy, a spectroscopic method based on polarization light analysis and capable of measuring the binding interaction between molecules. Our technique allows the direct characterization of target engagement of fluorescently labeled drugs, using fluorophores with a fluorescence lifetime larger than the rotational correlation of the bound complex. Here we describe an optimized protocol for simultaneous dual-channel two-photon fluorescence anisotropy microscopy acquisition to perform drug-target measurements. We also provide the necessary software to implement stream processing to visualize images and to calculate quantitative parameters. The assembly and characterization part of the protocol can be implemented in 1 d. Sample preparation, characterization and imaging of drug binding can be completed in 2 d. Although currently adapted to an Olympus FV1000MPE microscope, the protocol can be extended to other commercial or custom-built microscopes.

  1. Simultaneous live cell imaging using dual FRET sensors with a single excitation light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Niino

    Full Text Available Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between fluorescent proteins is a powerful tool for visualization of signal transduction in living cells, and recently, some strategies for imaging of dual FRET pairs in a single cell have been reported. However, these necessitate alteration of excitation light between two different wavelengths to avoid the spectral overlap, resulting in sequential detection with a lag time. Thus, to follow fast signal dynamics or signal changes in highly motile cells, a single-excitation dual-FRET method should be required. Here we reported this by using four-color imaging with a single excitation light and subsequent linear unmixing to distinguish fluorescent proteins. We constructed new FRET sensors with Sapphire/RFP to combine with CFP/YFP, and accomplished simultaneous imaging of cAMP and cGMP in single cells. We confirmed that signal amplitude of our dual FRET measurement is comparable to of conventional single FRET measurement. Finally, we demonstrated to monitor both intracellular Ca(2+ and cAMP in highly motile cardiac myocytes. To cancel out artifacts caused by the movement of the cell, this method expands the applicability of the combined use of dual FRET sensors for cell samples with high motility.

  2. A multi-functional imaging approach to high-content protein interaction screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Matthews

    Full Text Available Functional imaging can provide a level of quantification that is not possible in what might be termed traditional high-content screening. This is due to the fact that the current state-of-the-art high-content screening systems take the approach of scaling-up single cell assays, and are therefore based on essentially pictorial measures as assay indicators. Such phenotypic analyses have become extremely sophisticated, advancing screening enormously, but this approach can still be somewhat subjective. We describe the development, and validation, of a prototype high-content screening platform that combines steady-state fluorescence anisotropy imaging with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM. This functional approach allows objective, quantitative screening of small molecule libraries in protein-protein interaction assays. We discuss the development of the instrumentation, the process by which information on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET can be extracted from wide-field, acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging and cross-checking of this modality using lifetime imaging by time-correlated single-photon counting. Imaging of cells expressing protein constructs where eGFP and mRFP1 are linked with amino-acid chains of various lengths (7, 19 and 32 amino acids shows the two methodologies to be highly correlated. We validate our approach using a small-scale inhibitor screen of a Cdc42 FRET biosensor probe expressed in epidermoid cancer cells (A431 in a 96 microwell-plate format. We also show that acceptor fluorescence anisotropy can be used to measure variations in hetero-FRET in protein-protein interactions. We demonstrate this using a screen of inhibitors of internalization of the transmembrane receptor, CXCR4. These assays enable us to demonstrate all the capabilities of the instrument, image processing and analytical techniques that have been developed. Direct correlation between acceptor anisotropy and donor FLIM is observed for FRET

  3. Selective-plane illumination microscopy for high-content volumetric biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGorty, Ryan; Huang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Light-sheet microscopy, also named selective-plane illumination microscopy, enables optical sectioning with minimal light delivered to the sample. Therefore, it allows one to gather volumetric datasets of developing embryos and other light-sensitive samples over extended times. We have configured a light-sheet microscope that, unlike most previous designs, can image samples in formats compatible with high-content imaging. Our microscope can be used with multi-well plates or with microfluidic devices. In designing our optical system to accommodate these types of sample holders we encounter large optical aberrations. We counter these aberrations with both static optical components in the imaging path and with adaptive optics. Potential applications of this microscope include studying the development of a large number of embryos in parallel and over long times with subcellular resolution and doing high-throughput screens on organisms or cells where volumetric data is necessary.

  4. An excited-state intramolecular photon transfer fluorescence probe for localizable live cell imaging of cysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Wen; Liu, Si-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2017-03-01

    Small molecule probes suitable for selective and specific fluorescence imaging of some important but low-concentration intracellular reactive sulfur species such as cysteine (Cys) pose a challenge in chemical biology. We present a readily available, fast-response fluorescence probe CHCQ-Ac, with 2-(5‧-chloro-2-hydroxyl-phenyl)-6-chloro-4(3 H)-quinazolinone (CHCQ) as the fluorophore and acrylate group as the functional moiety, that enables high-selectivity and high-sensitivity for detecting Cys in both solution and biological system. After specifically reacted with Cys, the probe undergoes a seven-membered intramolecular cyclization and released the fluorophore CHCQ with excited-state intramolecular photon transfer effect. A highly fluorescent, insoluble aggregate was then formed to facilitate high-sensitivity and high-resolution imaging. The results showed that probe CHCQ-Ac affords a remarkably large Stokes shift and can detect Cys under physiological pH condition with no interference from other analytes. Moreover, this probe was proved to have excellent chemical stability, low cytotoxicity and good cell permeability. Our design of this probe provides a novel potential tool to visualize and localize cysteine in bioimaging of live cells that would greatly help to explore various Cys-related physiological and pathological cellular processes in cell biology and diagnostics.

  5. High spatiotemporal resolution imaging of mechanical processes in live cells using T-shaped cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandriota, Nicola; Sahin, Ozgur

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical properties of cells are paramount regulators of a plethora of physiological processes, such as cell adhesion, motility and proliferation. Yet, their knowledge is currently hampered by the lack of techniques with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to monitor the dynamics of such biological processes. We introduce an atomic force microscopy-based imaging platform based on newly-designed cantilevers with increased force sensitivity, while minimizing viscous drag. This allows us to uncover mechanical properties of a wide variety of living cells - including fibroblasts, neurons and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells - with an unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution. Our mechanical maps approach 50nm resolution and monitor cellular features within a minute's timescale. To identify the counterparts of our mechanical maps' features we perform simultaneous fluorescence microscopy and recognize cytoskeletal elements as the main molecular contributors of cellular stiffness at the nanoscale. Furthermore, the enhanced resolution and speed of our method allows the recognition of dynamic changes in the mechanics of fine cellular structures, which occurred independently of changes within optical images of fluorescently-labeled actin.

  6. SpatTrack: an imaging toolbox for analysis of vesicle motility and distribution in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Frederik W; Jensen, Maria Louise V; Christensen, Tanja; Nielsen, Gitte K; Heegaard, Christian W; Wüstner, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The endocytic pathway is a complex network of highly dynamic organelles, which has been traditionally studied by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The data generated by this method can be overwhelming and its analysis, even for the skilled microscopist, is tedious and error-prone. We developed SpatTrack, an open source, platform-independent program collecting a variety of methods for analysis of vesicle dynamics and distribution in living cells. SpatTrack performs 2D particle tracking, trajectory analysis and fitting of diffusion models to the calculated mean square displacement. It allows for spatial analysis of detected vesicle patterns including calculation of the radial distribution function and particle-based colocalization. Importantly, all analysis tools are supported by Monte Carlo simulations of synthetic images. This allows the user to assess the reliability of the analysis and to study alternative scenarios. We demonstrate the functionality of SpatTrack by performing a detailed imaging study of internalized fluorescence-tagged Niemann Pick C2 (NPC2) protein in human disease fibroblasts. Using SpatTrack, we show that NPC2 rescued the cholesterol-storage phenotype from a subpopulation of late endosomes/lysosomes (LE/LYSs). This was paralleled by repositioning and active transport of NPC2-containing vesicles to the cell surface. The potential of SpatTrack for other applications in intracellular transport studies will be discussed.

  7. Real-time imaging of microparticles and living cells with CMOS nanocapacitor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, C.; Pittino, F.; Verhoeven, H. A.; Lemay, S. G.; Selmi, L.; Jongsma, M. A.; Widdershoven, F. P.

    2015-09-01

    Platforms that offer massively parallel, label-free biosensing can, in principle, be created by combining all-electrical detection with low-cost integrated circuits. Examples include field-effect transistor arrays, which are used for mapping neuronal signals and sequencing DNA. Despite these successes, however, bioelectronics has so far failed to deliver a broadly applicable biosensing platform. This is due, in part, to the fact that d.c. or low-frequency signals cannot be used to probe beyond the electrical double layer formed by screening salt ions, which means that under physiological conditions the sensing of a target analyte located even a short distance from the sensor (∼1 nm) is severely hampered. Here, we show that high-frequency impedance spectroscopy can be used to detect and image microparticles and living cells under physiological salt conditions. Our assay employs a large-scale, high-density array of nanoelectrodes integrated with CMOS electronics on a single chip and the sensor response depends on the electrical properties of the analyte, allowing impedance-based fingerprinting. With our platform, we image the dynamic attachment and micromotion of BEAS, THP1 and MCF7 cancer cell lines in real time at submicrometre resolution in growth medium, demonstrating the potential of the platform for label/tracer-free high-throughput screening of anti-tumour drug candidates.

  8. Self-referencing digital holographic microscope for dynamic imaging of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Arun; Chhaniwal, Vani; Mahajan, Swapnil; Trivedi, Vismay; Singh, Amardeep; Leitgeb, Rainer; Javidi, Bahram

    2014-06-01

    Digital holographic microscope is an ideal tool for quantitative phase contrast imaging of living cells. It yields the thickness distribution of the object under investigation from a single hologram. From a series of holograms the dynamics of the cell under investigation can be obtained. But two-beam digital holographic microscopes has low temporal stability due to uncorrelated phase changes occurring in the reference and object arms. One way to overcome is to use common path techniques, in which, the reference beam is derived from the object beam itself. Both the beams travel along the same path, increasing the temporal stability of the setup. In self-referencing techniques a portion of the object beam is converted into reference beam. It could be achieved by example, using a glass plate to create two laterally sheared versions of the object beam at the sensor, which interfere to produce the holograms/interferograms. This created a common path setup, leading to high temporal stability (~0.6nm). This technique could be used to map cell membrane fluctuations with high temporal stability. Here we provide an overview of our work on the development of temporally stable quantitative phase contrast techniques for dynamic imaging of micro-objects and biological specimen including red blood cells.

  9. Live-cell imaging of conidial fusion in the bean pathogen, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Francine H; Souza, Elaine A; Read, Nick D; Roca, M Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    Fusion of conidia and conidial germlings by means of conidial anastomosis tubes (CATs) is a common phenomenon in filamentous fungi, including many plant pathogens. It has a number of different roles, and has been speculated to facilitate parasexual recombination and horizontal gene transfer between species. The bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum naturally undergoes CAT fusion on the host surface and within asexual fruiting bodies in anthracnose lesions on its host. It has not been previously possible to analyze the whole process of CAT fusion in this or any other pathogen using live-cell imaging techniques. Here we report the development of a robust protocol for doing this with C. lindemuthianum in vitro. The percentage of conidial germination and CAT fusion was found to be dependent on culture age, media and the fungal strain used. Increased CAT fusion was correlated with reduced germ tube formation. We show time-lapse imaging of the whole process of CAT fusion in C. lindemuthianum for the first time and monitored nuclear migration through fused CATs using nuclei labelled with GFP. CAT fusion in this pathogen was found to exhibit significant differences to that in the model system Neurospora crassa. In contrast to N. crassa, CAT fusion in C. lindemuthianum is inhibited by nutrients (it only occurs in water) and the process takes considerably longer. Copyright © 2009 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Live-cell imaging of Salmonella Typhimurium interaction with zebrafish larvae after injection and immersion delivery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas, Macarena; Fariña, Alonso; Díaz-Pascual, Francisco; Ortíz-Severín, Javiera; Marcoleta, Andrés E; Allende, Miguel L; Santiviago, Carlos A; Chávez, Francisco P

    2017-04-01

    The zebrafish model has been used to determine the role of vertebrate innate immunity during bacterial infections. Here, we compare the in vivo immune response induced by GFP-tagged Salmonella Typhimurium inoculated by immersion and microinjection in transgenic zebrafish larvae. Our novel infection protocols in zebrafish allow live-cell imaging of Salmonella colonization.

  11. Long-Term Live Cell Imaging of Cell Migration: Effects of Pathogenic Fungi on Human Epithelial Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllert, Torsten; Langford, George M

    2016-01-01

    Long-term live cell imaging was used in this study to determine the responses of human epithelial cells to pathogenic biofilms formed by Candida albicans. Epithelial cells of the skin represent the front line of defense against invasive pathogens such as C. albicans but under certain circumstances, especially when the host's immune system is compromised, the skin barrier is breached. The mechanisms by which the fungal pathogen penetrates the skin and invade the deeper layers are not fully understood. In this study we used keratinocytes grown in culture as an in vitro model system to determine changes in host cell migration and the actin cytoskeleton in response to virulence factors produced by biofilms of pathogenic C. albicans. It is clear that changes in epithelial cell migration are part of the response to virulence factors secreted by biofilms of C. albicans and the actin cytoskeleton is the downstream effector that mediates cell migration. Our goal is to understand the mechanism by which virulence factors hijack the signaling pathways of the actin cytoskeleton to alter cell migration and thereby invade host tissues. To understand the dynamic changes of the actin cytoskeleton during infection, we used long-term live cell imaging to obtain spatial and temporal information of actin filament dynamics and to identify signal transduction pathways that regulate the actin cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Long-term live cell imaging was achieved using a high resolution, multi-mode epifluorescence microscope equipped with specialized light sources, high-speed cameras with high sensitivity detectors, and specific biocompatible fluorescent markers. In addition to the multi-mode epifluorescence microscope, a spinning disk confocal long-term live cell imaging system (Olympus CV1000) equipped with a stage incubator to create a stable in vitro environment for long-term real-time and time-lapse microscopy was used. Detailed descriptions of these two long-term live

  12. Optical scatter imaging: a microscopic modality for the rapid morphological assay of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boustany, Nada N.

    2007-02-01

    Tumors derived from epithelial cells comprise the majority of human tumors and their growth results from the accumulation of multiple mutations affecting cellular processes critical for tissue homeostasis, including cell proliferation and cell death. To understand these processes and address the complexity of cancer cell function, multiple cellular responses to different experimental conditions and specific genetic mutations must be analyzed. Fundamental to this endeavor is the development of rapid cellular assays in genetically defined cells, and in particular, the development of optical imaging methods that allow dynamic observation and real-time monitoring of cellular processes. In this context, we are developing an optical scatter imaging technology that is intended to bridge the gap between light and electron microscopy by rapidly providing morphometric information about the relative size and shape of non-spherical organelles, with sub-wavelength resolution. Our goal is to complement current microscopy techniques used to study cells in-vitro, especially in long-term time-lapse studies of living cells, where exogenous labels can be toxic, and electron microscopy will destroy the sample. The optical measurements are based on Fourier spatial filtering in a standard microscope, and could ultimately be incorporated into existing high-throughput diagnostic platforms for cancer cell research and histopathology of neoplastic tissue arrays. Using an engineered epithelial cell model of tumor formation, we are currently studying how organelle structure and function are altered by defined genetic mutations affecting the propensity for cell death and oncogenic potential, and by environmental conditions promoting tumor growth. This talk will describe our optical scatter imaging technology and present results from our studies on apoptosis, and the function of BCL-2 family proteins.

  13. Intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer and living cell imaging of novel pyridyltriphenylamine dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Duojun; Qian, Ying

    2016-07-01

    A novel pyridyltriphenylamine-rhodamine dye PTRh and a pyridyltriphenylamine derivative PTO were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and HRMS-MALDI-TOF. PTRh performed typical fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal from pyridyltriphenylamine to rhodamine along with notable color change from green to rose when interacting with Hg2+ in EtOH/H2O. And PTRh as a ratiometric probe for Hg2+ based on FRET could achieve a very low detection limit of 32 nM and energy transfer efficiency of 83.7% in aqueous organic system. On the other hand, spectra properties of PTO in its aggregates, THF/H2O mixed solution and silica nanoparticles (Si-NPs) dispersed in water were investigated. And the results indicated PTO exhibited bright green fluorescence in solid state, and PTO was successfully encapsulated in silica matrix (30-40 nm), emitting bright blue fluorescence with 11.7% quantum yield. Additionally, living cell imaging experiments demonstrated that PTRh could effectively response to intracellular Hg2+ and PTO-doped Si-NPs were well uptaken by MCF-7 breast cancer cells. It could be concluded that the chromophores are promising materials used as biosensors.

  14. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-04-15

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme, in human myeloid PLB-985 cells and showed by high-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy that GFP-Rac2 and GFP-gp91(phox) are targeted to the cytosol and to membranes, respectively. Frequency-domain FLIM experiments on these PLB-985 cells resulted in average fluorescence lifetimes of 2.70 ns for cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and 2.31 ns for membrane-bound GFP-gp91(phox). By comparing these lifetimes with a calibration curve obtained by measuring GFP lifetimes in PBS/glycerol mixtures of known refractive index, we found that the local refractive indices of cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and membrane-targeted GFP-gp91(phox) are approximately 1.38 and approximately 1.46, respectively, which is in good correspondence with reported values for the cytosol and plasma membrane measured by other techniques. The ability to measure the local refractive index of proteins in living cells by FLIM may be important in revealing intracellular spatial heterogeneities within organelles such as the plasma and phagosomal membrane.

  15. Two-photon fluorescent sensor for K+ imaging in live cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Binglin; Yue, Xiling; Kim, Bosung; Belfield, Kevin D.

    2016-03-01

    It is difficult to overstate the physiological importance of potassium for life as its indispensable roles in a variety of biological processes are widely known. As a result, efficient methods for determining physiological levels of potassium are of paramount importance. Despite this, relatively few K+ fluorescence sensors have been reported, with only one being commercially available. A new two-photon excited fluorescent K+ sensor is reported. The sensor is comprised of three moieties, a highly selective K+ chelator as the K+ recognition unit, a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivative modified with phenylethynyl groups as the fluorophore, and two polyethylene glycol chains to afford water solubility. The sensor displays very high selectivity (physiological metal cations. Upon binding K+, the sensor switches from non-fluorescent to highly fluorescent, emitting red to near-IR (NIR) fluorescence. The sensor exhibited a good two-photon absorption cross section, 500 GM at 940 nm. Moreover, it is not sensitive to pH in the physiological pH range. Time-dependent cell imaging studies via both one- and two-photon fluorescence microscopy demonstrate that the sensor is suitable for dynamic K+ sensing in living cells.

  16. Live-cell imaging study of mitochondrial morphology in mammalian cells exposed to X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, M; Kanari, Y; Yokoya, A; Narita, A; Fujii, K

    2015-09-01

    Morphological changes in mitochondria induced by X-irradiation in normal murine mammary gland cells were studied with a live-cell microscopic imaging technique. Mitochondria were visualised by staining with a specific fluorescent probe in the cells, which express fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator 2 (Fucci2) probes to visualise cell cycle. In unirradiated cells, the number of cells with fragmented mitochondria was about 20 % of the total cells through observation period (96 h). In irradiated cells, the population with fragmented mitochondria significantly increased depending on the absorbed dose. Particularly, for 8 Gy irradiation, the accumulation of fragmentation persists even in the cells whose cell cycle came to a stand (80 % in G1 (G0-like) phase). The fraction reached to a maximum at 96 h after irradiation. The kinetics of the fraction with fragmented mitochondria was similar to that for cells in S/G2/M phase (20 %) through the observation period (120 h). The evidences show that, in irradiated cells, some signals are continually released from a nucleus or cytoplasm even in the G0-like cells to operate some sort of protein machineries involved in mitochondrial fission. It is inferred that this delayed mitochondrial fragmentation is strongly related to their dysfunction, and hence might modulate radiobiological effects such as mutation or cell death.

  17. An optimized electroporation method for delivering nanoparticles into living cells for surface-enhanced Raman scattering imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun; Wang, Jing; Lin, Juqiang; Lin, Duo; Chen, Weiwei; Feng, Shangyuan; Huang, Zufang; Li, Yongzeng; Huang, Hao; Shi, Hong; Chen, Rong

    2016-04-01

    The existing electroporation method can rapidly deliver nanoparticles (NPs) into living cells for intracellular surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging. Unfortunately, the cellular SERS signals are major from molecules located near the two poles of the cell facing toward to the electrodes because most NPs enter cells through these two poles and easily happen to aggregate there. Here, we present an optimized electroporation method for transferring NPs into living cells to obtain a uniform NPs distribution. The distribution of intracellular NPs was monitored by the SERS signal of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid, which is sandwiched between the Au-Ag core-shell and validated by TEM images. In addition, based on this uniform distribution of NPs, we then detected the distribution of cellular molecules like phenylalanine and lipid via SERS imaging. Results demonstrate the great potential for the optimized electroporation-based SERS imaging in cellular study.

  18. Quantitative high content imaging of cellular adaptive stress response pathways in toxicity for chemical safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Steven; Hiemstra, Steven; Huppelschoten, Suzanna; Danen, Erik; Niemeijer, Marije; Hendriks, Giel; Vrieling, Harry; Herpers, Bram; van de Water, Bob

    2014-03-17

    Over the past decade, major leaps forward have been made on the mechanistic understanding and identification of adaptive stress response landscapes underlying toxic insult using transcriptomics approaches. However, for predictive purposes of adverse outcome several major limitations in these approaches exist. First, the limited number of samples that can be analyzed reduces the in depth analysis of concentration-time course relationships for toxic stress responses. Second these transcriptomics analysis have been based on the whole cell population, thereby inevitably preventing single cell analysis. Third, transcriptomics is based on the transcript level, totally ignoring (post)translational regulation. We believe these limitations are circumvented with the application of high content analysis of relevant toxicant-induced adaptive stress signaling pathways using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter cell-based assays. The goal is to establish a platform that incorporates all adaptive stress pathways that are relevant for toxicity, with a focus on drug-induced liver injury. In addition, cellular stress responses typically follow cell perturbations at the subcellular organelle level. Therefore, we complement our reporter line panel with reporters for specific organelle morphometry and function. Here, we review the approaches of high content imaging of cellular adaptive stress responses to chemicals and the application in the mechanistic understanding and prediction of chemical toxicity at a systems toxicology level.

  19. A High-Content Larval Zebrafish Brain Imaging Method for Small Molecule Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Harrison; Chen, Steven; Huang, Kevin; Kim, Jeffrey; Mo, Han; Iovine, Raffael; Gendre, Julie; Pascal, Pauline; Li, Qiang; Sun, Yaping; Dong, Zhiqiang; Arkin, Michelle; Guo, Su

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery in whole-organisms such as zebrafish is a promising approach for identifying biologically-relevant lead compounds. However, high content imaging of zebrafish at cellular resolution is challenging due to the difficulty in orienting larvae en masse such that the cell type of interest is in clear view. We report the development of the multi-pose imaging method, which uses 96-well round bottom plates combined with a standard liquid handler to repose the larvae within each well multiple times, such that an image in a specific orientation can be acquired. We have validated this method in a chemo-genetic zebrafish model of dopaminergic neuron degeneration. For this purpose, we have developed an analysis pipeline that identifies the larval brain in each image and then quantifies neuronal health in CellProfiler. Our method achieves a SSMD* score of 6.96 (robust Z’-factor of 0.56) and is suitable for screening libraries up to 105 compounds in size. PMID:27732643

  20. Homo-FRET Based Biosensors and Their Application to Multiplexed Imaging of Signalling Events in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sean C.; Margineanu, Anca; Katan, Matilda; Dunsby, Chris; French, Paul M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Multiplexed imaging of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based biosensors potentially presents a powerful approach to monitoring the spatio-temporal correlation of signalling pathways within a single live cell. Here, we discuss the potential of homo-FRET based biosensors to facilitate multiplexed imaging. We demonstrate that the homo-FRET between pleckstrin homology domains of Akt (Akt-PH) labelled with mCherry may be used to monitor 3′-phosphoinositide accumulation in live cells and show how global analysis of time resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements can be used to quantify this accumulation. We further present multiplexed imaging readouts of calcium concentration, using fluorescence lifetime measurements of TN-L15-a CFP/YFP based hetero-FRET calcium biosensor-with 3′-phosphoinositide accumulation. PMID:26133241

  1. Exploring Feasibility for Application of Luminescent CdTe Quantum Dots Prepared in Aqueous Phase to Live Cell Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Fang WENG; Xing Tao SONG; Liang LI; Hui Feng QIAN; Ke Ying CHEN; Xue Ming XU; Cheng Xi CAO; Ji Cun REN

    2006-01-01

    This paper explored the feasibility for the application of luminescent CdTe quantum dots prepared in aqueous phase to live cell imaging. The highly luminescent CdTe quantum dots (QDs)were first prepared in aqueous phase, and then were covalently coupled to a plant lectin (UEA-1),as a fluorescent probe. After incubating with of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), the QD probe with UEA-1 was able to specifically bind the corresponding cell receptor. The good cell images were obtained in live cells using laser confocal scanning microscopy. We predict that QDs prepared in water phase will probably become an attractive alternative probe in cellular imaging and bio-labeling.

  2. Imaging Cellular Dynamics with Spectral Relaxation Imaging Microscopy: Distinct Spectral Dynamics in Golgi Membranes of Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajevardipour, Alireza; Chon, James W. M.; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2016-11-01

    Spectral relaxation from fluorescent probes is a useful technique for determining the dynamics of condensed phases. To this end, we have developed a method based on wide-field spectral fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to extract spectral relaxation correlation times of fluorescent probes in living cells. We show that measurement of the phase and modulation of fluorescence from two wavelengths permit the identification and determination of excited state lifetimes and spectral relaxation correlation times at a single modulation frequency. For NBD fluorescence in glycerol/water mixtures, the spectral relaxation correlation time determined by our approach exhibited good agreement with published dielectric relaxation measurements. We applied this method to determine the spectral relaxation dynamics in membranes of living cells. Measurements of the Golgi-specific C6-NBD-ceramide probe in living HeLa cells revealed sub-nanosecond spectral dynamics in the intracellular Golgi membrane and slower nanosecond spectral dynamics in the extracellular plasma membrane. We interpret the distinct spectral dynamics as a result of structural plasticity of the Golgi membrane relative to more rigid plasma membranes. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute one of the first measurements of Golgi rotational dynamics.

  3. Imaging Cellular Dynamics with Spectral Relaxation Imaging Microscopy: Distinct Spectral Dynamics in Golgi Membranes of Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajevardipour, Alireza; Chon, James W M; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Clayton, Andrew H A

    2016-11-22

    Spectral relaxation from fluorescent probes is a useful technique for determining the dynamics of condensed phases. To this end, we have developed a method based on wide-field spectral fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to extract spectral relaxation correlation times of fluorescent probes in living cells. We show that measurement of the phase and modulation of fluorescence from two wavelengths permit the identification and determination of excited state lifetimes and spectral relaxation correlation times at a single modulation frequency. For NBD fluorescence in glycerol/water mixtures, the spectral relaxation correlation time determined by our approach exhibited good agreement with published dielectric relaxation measurements. We applied this method to determine the spectral relaxation dynamics in membranes of living cells. Measurements of the Golgi-specific C6-NBD-ceramide probe in living HeLa cells revealed sub-nanosecond spectral dynamics in the intracellular Golgi membrane and slower nanosecond spectral dynamics in the extracellular plasma membrane. We interpret the distinct spectral dynamics as a result of structural plasticity of the Golgi membrane relative to more rigid plasma membranes. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute one of the first measurements of Golgi rotational dynamics.

  4. Imaging of mobile long-lived nanoplatforms in the live cell plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brameshuber, Mario; Weghuber, Julian; Ruprecht, Verena; Gombos, Imre; Horváth, Ibolya; Vigh, László; Eckerstorfer, Paul; Kiss, Endre; Stockinger, Hannes; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2010-12-31

    The plasma membrane has been hypothesized to contain nanoscopic lipid platforms, which are discussed in the context of "lipid rafts" or "membrane rafts." Based on biochemical and cell biological studies, rafts are believed to play a crucial role in many signaling processes. However, there is currently not much information on their size, shape, stability, surface density, composition, and heterogeneity. We present here a method that allows for the first time the direct imaging of nanoscopic long-lived platforms with raft-like properties diffusing in the live cell plasma membrane. Our method senses these platforms by their property to assemble a characteristic set of fluorescent marker proteins or lipids on a time scale of seconds. A special photobleaching protocol was used to reduce the surface density of labeled mobile platforms down to the level of well isolated diffraction-limited spots without altering the single spot brightness. The statistical distribution of probe molecules per platform was determined by single molecule brightness analysis. For demonstration, we used the consensus raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric GFP and the fluorescent lipid analog BODIPY-G(M1), which preferentially partitions into liquid-ordered phases. For both markers, we found cholesterol-dependent homo-association in the plasma membrane of living CHO and Jurkat T cells in the resting state, thereby demonstrating the existence of small, mobile, long-lived platforms containing these probes. We further applied the technology to address structural changes in the plasma membrane during fever-type heat shock: at elevated temperatures, the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric GFP homo-association disappeared, accompanied by an increase in the expression of the small heat shock protein Hsp27.

  5. Validation of a high-content screening assay using whole-well imaging of transformed phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Christina N; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Takagi, Toshimitsu; Antczak, Christophe; Shum, David; Graves, Robert; Holland, Eric C; Djaballah, Hakim

    2011-06-01

    Automated microscopy was introduced two decades ago and has become an integral part of the discovery process as a high-content screening platform with noticeable challenges in executing cell-based assays. It would be of interest to use it to screen for reversers of a transformed cell phenotype. In this report, we present data obtained from an optimized assay that identifies compounds that reverse a transformed phenotype induced in NIH-3T3 cells by expressing a novel oncogene, KP, resulting from fusion between platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα) and kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), that was identified in human glioblastoma. Initial image acquisitions using multiple tiles per well were found to be insufficient as to accurately image and quantify the clusters; whole-well imaging, performed on the IN Cell Analyzer 2000, while still two-dimensional imaging, was found to accurately image and quantify clusters, due largely to the inherent variability of their size and well location. The resulting assay exhibited a Z' value of 0.79 and a signal-to-noise ratio of 15, and it was validated against known effectors and shown to identify only PDGFRα inhibitors, and then tested in a pilot screen against a library of 58 known inhibitors identifying mostly PDGFRα inhibitors as reversers of the KP induced transformed phenotype. In conclusion, our optimized and validated assay using whole-well imaging is robust and sensitive in identifying compounds that reverse the transformed phenotype induced by KP with a broader applicability to other cell-based assays that are challenging in HTS against chemical and RNAi libraries.

  6. Fast live-cell conventional fluorophore nanoscopy with ImageJ through super-resolution radial fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Nils; Culley, Siân; Ashdown, George; Owen, Dylan M; Pereira, Pedro Matos; Henriques, Ricardo

    2016-08-12

    Despite significant progress, high-speed live-cell super-resolution studies remain limited to specialized optical setups, generally requiring intense phototoxic illumination. Here, we describe a new analytical approach, super-resolution radial fluctuations (SRRF), provided as a fast graphics processing unit-enabled ImageJ plugin. In the most challenging data sets for super-resolution, such as those obtained in low-illumination live-cell imaging with GFP, we show that SRRF is generally capable of achieving resolutions better than 150 nm. Meanwhile, for data sets similar to those obtained in PALM or STORM imaging, SRRF achieves resolutions approaching those of standard single-molecule localization analysis. The broad applicability of SRRF and its performance at low signal-to-noise ratios allows super-resolution using modern widefield, confocal or TIRF microscopes with illumination orders of magnitude lower than methods such as PALM, STORM or STED. We demonstrate this by super-resolution live-cell imaging over timescales ranging from minutes to hours.

  7. Imaging of Fluoride Ion in Living Cells and Tissues with a Two-Photon Ratiometric Fluorescence Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyue Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A reaction-based two-photon (TP ratiometric fluorescence probe Z2 has been developed and successfully applied to detect and image fluoride ion in living cells and tissues. The Z2 probe was designed designed to utilize an ICT mechanism between n-butylnaphthalimide as a fluorophore and tert-butyldiphenylsilane (TBDPS as a response group. Upon addition of fluoride ion, the Si-O bond in the Z2 would be cleaved, and then a stronger electron-donating group was released. The fluorescent changes at 450 and 540 nm, respectively, made it possible to achieve ratiometric fluorescence detection. The results indicated that the Z2 could ratiometrically detect and image fluoride ion in living cells and tissues in a depth of 250 μm by two-photon microscopy (TPM.

  8. Live-cell Imaging of Pol II Promoter Activity to Monitor Gene expression with RNA IMAGEtag reporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ilchung [Ames Laboratory; Ray, Judhajeet [Ames Laboratory; Gupta, Vinayak [Iowa State University; Ilgu, Muslum [Ames Laboratory; Beasley, Jonathan [Iowa State University; Bendickson, Lee [Ames Laboratory; Mehanovic, Samir [Molecular Express; Kraus, George A. [Iowa State University; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit [Ames Laboratory

    2014-04-20

    We describe a ribonucleic acid (RNA) reporter system for live-cell imaging of gene expression to detect changes in polymerase II activity on individual promoters in individual cells. The reporters use strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags) that can be expressed from a promoter of choice. For imaging, the cells are incubated with their ligands that are separately conjugated with one of the FRET pair, Cy3 and Cy5. The IMAGEtags were expressed in yeast from the GAL1, ADH1 or ACT1 promoters. Transcription from all three promoters was imaged in live cells and transcriptional increases from the GAL1 promoter were observed with time after adding galactose. Expression of the IMAGEtags did not affect cell proliferation or endogenous gene expression. Advantages of this method are that no foreign proteins are produced in the cells that could be toxic or otherwise influence the cellular response as they accumulate, the IMAGEtags are short lived and oxygen is not required to generate their signals. The IMAGEtag RNA reporter system provides a means of tracking changes in transcriptional activity in live cells and in real time.

  9. Anti-cancer agents in Saudi Arabian herbals revealed by automated high-content imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjar, Dina

    2017-06-13

    Natural products have been used for medical applications since ancient times. Commonly, natural products are structurally complex chemical compounds that efficiently interact with their biological targets, making them useful drug candidates in cancer therapy. Here, we used cell-based phenotypic profiling and image-based high-content screening to study the mode of action and potential cellular targets of plants historically used in Saudi Arabia\\'s traditional medicine. We compared the cytological profiles of fractions taken from Juniperus phoenicea (Arar), Anastatica hierochuntica (Kaff Maryam), and Citrullus colocynthis (Hanzal) with a set of reference compounds with established modes of action. Cluster analyses of the cytological profiles of the tested compounds suggested that these plants contain possible topoisomerase inhibitors that could be effective in cancer treatment. Using histone H2AX phosphorylation as a marker for DNA damage, we discovered that some of the compounds induced double-strand DNA breaks. Furthermore, chemical analysis of the active fraction isolated from Juniperus phoenicea revealed possible anti-cancer compounds. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of cell-based phenotypic screening of natural products to reveal their biological activities.

  10. Discovering Molecules That Regulate Efferocytosis Using Primary Human Macrophages and High Content Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Santulli-Marotto

    Full Text Available Defective clearance of apoptotic cells can result in sustained inflammation and subsequent autoimmunity. Macrophages, the "professional phagocyte" of the body, are responsible for efficient, non-phlogistic, apoptotic cell clearance. Controlling phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages is an attractive therapeutic opportunity to ameliorate inflammation. Using high content imaging, we have developed a system for evaluating the effects of antibody treatment on apoptotic cell uptake in primary human macrophages by comparing the Phagocytic Index (PI for each antibody. Herein we demonstrate the feasibility of evaluating a panel of antibodies of unknown specificities obtained by immunization of mice with primary human macrophages and show that they can be distinguished based on individual PI measurements. In this study ~50% of antibodies obtained enhance phagocytosis of apoptotic cells while approximately 5% of the antibodies in the panel exhibit some inhibition. Though the specificities of the majority of antibodies are unknown, two of the antibodies that improved apoptotic cell uptake recognize recombinant MerTK; a receptor known to function in this capacity in vivo. The agonistic impact of these antibodies on efferocytosis could be demonstrated without addition of either of the MerTK ligands, Gas6 or ProS. These results validate applying the mechanism of this fundamental biological process as a means for identification of modulators that could potentially serve as therapeutics. This strategy for interrogating macrophages to discover molecules regulating apoptotic cell uptake is not limited by access to purified protein thereby increasing the possibility of finding novel apoptotic cell uptake pathways.

  11. Turn-on fluorogenic and chromogenic detection of Fe(III) and its application in living cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, Gandhi; Sathiyaraja, Vijayaraj; Chellappa, Duraisamy, E-mail: dcmku123@gmail.com

    2014-01-15

    Two rhodamine-based sensors RDI-1, RDI-2 was designed and synthesized by incorporation of the rhodamine 6G fluorophore and 2-formyl imidazole as the recognizing unit via the imine linkages. RDI-1, RDI-2 exhibits very high selectivity and an excellent sensitivity towards Fe(III) ions in aqueous buffer solution on compared with other probes. The color change from colorless to pink and turn-on fluorescence after binding with iron (III) was observed. Based on jobs plot and ESI-MS studies, the 1:1 binding mode was proposed. Live cell imaging experiments with each probe showed that these probes widely applicable to detect Fe{sup 3+} in living cells. -- Highlights: • Two rhodamine based probes was synthesized and used to recognize iron (III). • The chemosensors can be applied to detect iron(III) ions by color and turn-on fluorescent changes. • The very low detection limit was reported. • The applicability of these probes for live cell fluorescence imaging was studied.

  12. Continuous live cell imaging of cellulose attachment by microbes under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions using confocal microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Wu Wang; Seung-Hwan Lee; James G.Elkins; Yongchao Li; Scott Hamilton-Brehm; Jennifer L.Morrell-Falvey

    2013-01-01

    Live cell imaging methods provide important insights into the dynamics of cellular processes that cannot be derived easily from population-averaged datasets.In the bioenergy field,much research is focused on fermentation of cellulosic biomass by thermophilic microbes to produce biofuels; however,little effort is dedicated to the development of imaging tools to monitor this dynamic biological process.This is,in part,due to the experimental challenges of imaging ceils under both anaerobic and thermophilic conditions.Here an imaging system is described that integrates confocal microscopy,a flow cell device,and a lipophilic dye to visualize cells.Solutions to technical obstacles regarding suitable fluorescent markers,photodamage during imaging,and maintenance of environmental conditions during imaging are presented.This system was utilized to observe cellulose colonization by Clostridium thermocellum under anaerobic conditions at 60℃.This method enables live cell imaging of bacterial growth under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions and should be widely applicable to visualizing different cell types or processes in real time.

  13. Highly resolved chemical imaging of living cells by using synchrotron infrared microspectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, Nadège; Dumas, Paul; Moncuit, Janine; Fridman, Wolf-Herman; Teillaud, Jean-Luc; Carr, G. Lawrence; Williams, Gwyn P.

    1998-01-01

    Using synchrotron radiation as an ultra-bright infrared source, we have been able to map the distributions of functional groups such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids inside a single living cell with a spatial resolution of a few microns. In particular, we have mapped the changes in the lipid and protein distributions in both the final stages of cell division and also during necrosis. PMID:9560189

  14. Simple and fast spectral domain algorithm for quantitative phase imaging of living cells with digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Junwei; Yao, Baoli; Ketelhut, Steffi; Engwer, Christian; Greve, Burkhard; Kemper, Björn

    2017-01-15

    We present a simple and fast phase aberration compensation method in digital holographic microscopy (DHM) for quantitative phase imaging of living cells. By analyzing the frequency spectrum of an off-axis hologram, phase aberrations can be compensated for automatically without fitting or pre-knowledge of the setup and/or the object. Simple and effective computation makes the method suitable for quantitative online monitoring with highly variable DHM systems. Results from automated quantitative phase imaging of living NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts demonstrate the effectiveness and the feasibility of the method.

  15. Biological implications of possible unattainability of comprehensive, molecular-resolution, real-time, volume imaging of the living cell

    CERN Document Server

    Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite the impressive advances in biological imaging, no imaging modality today generates, in a comprehensive manner, high-resolution images of crowded molecules working deep inside the living cell in real time. In this paper, instead of tackling this engineering problem in the hope of solving it, we ask a converse question: What if such imaging is \\emph{fundamentally} impossible? We argue that certain decoherence processes could be suppressed because the internal workings of the cell are not being closely "observed" in the quantum mechanical sense, as implied by the assumed impossibility of imaging. It is certainly true that the "wet and warm" living cell should not exhibit quantum behavior merely because of the lack of observation. Despite this, we plow ahead to see what \\emph{might} result from such absence of the outward flow of information. We suggest that chaotic dynamics in the cell could be quantum mechanically suppressed --- a known phenomenon in quantum chaology, which is potentially resistant to v...

  16. Three dimensional time lapse imaging of live cell mitochondria with photothermal optical lock-in optical coherence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison, Miguel; Chakrabortty, Sabyasachi; Extermann, Jerome; Nahas, Amir; Pache, Christophe; Weil, Tanja; Lasser, Theo

    2016-03-01

    The photothermal optical lock-in optical coherence microscope (poli-OCM) introduced molecular specificity to OCM imaging, which is conventionally, a label-free technique. Here we achieve three-dimensional live cell and mitochondria specific imaging using ~4nm protein-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). These nanoparticles do not photobleach and we demonstrate they're suitability for long-term time lapse imaging. We compare the accuracy of labelling with these AuNPs using classical fluorescence confocal imaging with a standard mitochondria specific marker. Furthermore, time lapse poli-OCM imaging every 5 minutes over 1.5 hours period was achieved, revealing the ability for three-dimensional monitoring of mitochondria dynamics.

  17. Live-cell imaging of Aspergillus nidulans autophagy: RAB1 dependence, Golgi independence and ER involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Pinar, Mario; Pantazopoulou, Areti; Peñalva, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    We exploited the amenability of the fungus Aspergillus nidulans to genetics and live-cell microscopy to investigate autophagy. Upon nitrogen starvation, GFP-Atg8-containing pre-autophagosomal puncta give rise to cup-shaped phagophores and circular (0.9-μm diameter) autophagosomes that disappear in the vicinity of the vacuoles after their shape becomes irregular and their GFP-Atg8 fluorescence decays. This ‘autophagosome cycle’ gives rise to characteristic cone-shaped traces in kymographs. Aut...

  18. Automated image analysis to quantify the subnuclear organization of transcriptional coregulatory protein complexes in living cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Ty C.; Demarco, Ignacio A.; Booker, Cynthia F.; Day, Richard N.

    2004-06-01

    Regulated gene transcription is dependent on the steady-state concentration of DNA-binding and coregulatory proteins assembled in distinct regions of the cell nucleus. For example, several different transcriptional coactivator proteins, such as the Glucocorticoid Receptor Interacting Protein (GRIP), localize to distinct spherical intranuclear bodies that vary from approximately 0.2-1 micron in diameter. We are using multi-spectral wide-field microscopy of cells expressing coregulatory proteins labeled with the fluorescent proteins (FP) to study the mechanisms that control the assembly and distribution of these structures in living cells. However, variability between cells in the population makes an unbiased and consistent approach to this image analysis absolutely critical. To address this challenge, we developed a protocol for rigorous quantification of subnuclear organization in cell populations. Cells transiently co-expressing a green FP (GFP)-GRIP and the monomeric red FP (mRFP) are selected for imaging based only on the signal in the red channel, eliminating bias due to knowledge of coregulator organization. The impartially selected images of the GFP-coregulatory protein are then analyzed using an automated algorithm to objectively identify and measure the intranuclear bodies. By integrating all these features, this combination of unbiased image acquisition and automated analysis facilitates the precise and consistent measurement of thousands of protein bodies from hundreds of individual living cells that represent the population.

  19. Inferring Toxicological Responses of HepG2 Cells from ToxCast High Content Imaging Data (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the dynamic perturbation of cell states by chemicals can aid in for predicting their adverse effects. High-content imaging (HCI) was used to measure the state of HepG2 cells over three time points (1, 24, and 72 h) in response to 976 ToxCast chemicals for 10 differe...

  20. "Turn-on" fluorescent dipodal chemosensor for nano-molar detection of Zn(2+): application in living cells imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegade, Umesh; Sharma, Hemant; Bondhopadhyay, Banashree; Basu, Anupam; Attarde, Sanjay; Singh, Narinder; Kuwar, Anil

    2014-07-01

    A malonohydrazide derivative bearing an imine and phenolic group was synthesized and had a high affinity and selectivity towards Zn(2+). The recognition properties of receptor 1 were evaluated using absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy. The 1:1 stoichiometry of 1.Zn(2+) was confirmed from job's plot, mass spectra and density functional theory (DFT). The detection of Zn(2+) in intracellular environment of HeLa cell through confocal microscopy was successfully applied for live cell imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Monitoring of adherent live cells morphology using the undecimated wavelet transform multivariate image analysis (UWT-MIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneau, Pierre-Marc; Garnier, Alain; Duchesne, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Cell morphology is an important macroscopic indicator of cellular physiology and is increasingly used as a mean of probing culture state in vitro. Phase contrast microscopy (PCM) is a valuable tool for observing live cells morphology over long periods of time with minimal culture artifact. Two general approaches are commonly used to analyze images: individual object segmentation and characterization by pattern recognition. Single-cell segmentation is difficult to achieve in PCM images of adherent cells since their contour is often irregular and blurry, and the cells bundle together when the culture reaches confluence. Alternatively, pattern recognition approaches such as the undecimated wavelet transform multivariate image analysis (UWT-MIA), allow extracting textural features from PCM images that are correlated with cellular morphology. A partial least squares (PLS) regression model built using textural features from a set of 200 ground truth images was shown to predict the distribution of cellular morphological features (major and minor axes length, orientation, and roundness) with good accuracy for most images. The PLS models were then applied on a large dataset of 631,136 images collected from live myoblast cell cultures acquired under different conditions and grown in two different culture media. The method was found sensitive to morphological changes due to cell growth (culture time) and those introduced by the use of different culture media, and was able to distinguish both sources of variations. The proposed approach is promising for application on large datasets of PCM live-cell images to assess cellular morphology and growth kinetics in real-time which could be beneficial for high-throughput screening as well as automated cell culture kinetics assessment and control applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 141-153. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications. PMID:26525841

  3. Experimental comparison of the high-speed imaging performance of an EM-CCD and sCMOS camera in a dynamic live-cell imaging test case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hope T Beier

    Full Text Available The study of living cells may require advanced imaging techniques to track weak and rapidly changing signals. Fundamental to this need is the recent advancement in camera technology. Two camera types, specifically sCMOS and EM-CCD, promise both high signal-to-noise and high speed (>100 fps, leaving researchers with a critical decision when determining the best technology for their application. In this article, we compare two cameras using a live-cell imaging test case in which small changes in cellular fluorescence must be rapidly detected with high spatial resolution. The EM-CCD maintained an advantage of being able to acquire discernible images with a lower number of photons due to its EM-enhancement. However, if high-resolution images at speeds approaching or exceeding 1000 fps are desired, the flexibility of the full-frame imaging capabilities of sCMOS is superior.

  4. Live Cell Imaging Reveals Structural Associations between the Actin and Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis [W] [OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Lindeboom, Jelmer J.; Debolt, Seth; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ehrhardt, David W.; Ketelaar, Tijs; Persson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks are dynamic structures that organize intracellular processes and facilitate their rapid reorganization. In plant cells, actin filaments (AFs) and MTs are essential for cell growth and morphogenesis. However, dynamic interactions between these two essential components in live cells have not been explored. Here, we use spinning-disc confocal microscopy to dissect interaction and cooperation between cortical AFs and MTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, utilizing fluorescent reporter constructs for both components. Quantitative analyses revealed altered AF dynamics associated with the positions and orientations of cortical MTs. Reorganization and reassembly of the AF array was dependent on the MTs following drug-induced depolymerization, whereby short AFs initially appeared colocalized with MTs, and displayed motility along MTs. We also observed that light-induced reorganization of MTs occurred in concert with changes in AF behavior. Our results indicate dynamic interaction between the cortical actin and MT cytoskeletons in interphase plant cells. PMID:21693695

  5. Interaction between the moss Physcomitrella patens and Phytophthora: a novel pathosystem for live-cell imaging of subcellular defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdijk, Elysa J R; DE Keijzer, Jeroen; DE Groot, Deborah; Schoina, Charikleia; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine

    2016-08-01

    Live-cell imaging of plant-pathogen interactions is often hampered by the tissue complexity and multicell layered nature of the host. Here, we established a novel pathosystem with the moss Physcomitrella patens as host for Phytophthora. The tip-growing protonema cells of this moss are ideal for visualizing interactions with the pathogen over time using high-resolution microscopy. We tested four Phytophthora species for their ability to infect P. patens and showed that P. sojae and P. palmivora were only rarely capable to infect P. patens. In contrast, P. infestans and P. capsici frequently and successfully penetrated moss protonemal cells, showed intracellular hyphal growth and formed sporangia. Next to these successful invasions, many penetration attempts failed. Here the pathogen was blocked by a barrier of cell wall material deposited in papilla-like structures, a defence response that is common in higher plants. Another common response is the upregulation of defence-related genes upon infection and also in moss we observed this upregulation in tissues infected with Phytophthora. For more advanced analyses of the novel pathosystem we developed a special set-up that allowed live-cell imaging of subcellular defence processes by high-resolution microscopy. With this set-up, we revealed that Phytophthora infection of moss induces repositioning of the nucleus, accumulation of cytoplasm and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, but not of microtubules.

  6. Rational design of reversible fluorescent probes for live-cell imaging and quantification of fast glutathione dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Keitaro; Yoshida, Masafumi; Kamiya, Mako; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Urano, Yasuteru

    2017-03-01

    Alterations in glutathione (GSH) homeostasis are associated with a variety of diseases and cellular functions, and therefore, real-time live-cell imaging and quantification of GSH dynamics are important for understanding pathophysiological processes. However, existing fluorescent probes are unsuitable for these purposes due to their irreversible fluorogenic mechanisms or slow reaction rates. In this work, we have successfully overcome these problems by establishing a design strategy inspired by Mayr's work on nucleophilic reaction kinetics. The synthesized probes exhibit concentration-dependent, reversible and rapid absorption/fluorescence changes (t1/2 = 620 ms at [GSH] = 1 mM), as well as appropriate Kd values (1-10 mM: within the range of intracellular GSH concentrations). We also developed FRET-based ratiometric probes, and demonstrated that they are useful for quantifying GSH concentration in various cell types and also for real-time live-cell imaging of GSH dynamics with temporal resolution of seconds.

  7. Illuminating cellular structure and function in the early secretory pathway by multispectral 3D imaging in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietdorf, Jens; Stephens, David J.; Squire, Anthony; Simpson, Jeremy; Shima, David T.; Paccaud, Jean-Pierre; Bastiaens, Philippe I.; Pepperkok, Rainer

    2000-04-01

    Membrane traffic between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi complex is regulated by two vesicular coat complexes, COPII and COPI. COPII has been implicated in selective packaging of anterograde cargo into coated transport vesicles budding from the ER. COPI-coated vesicles are proposed to mediate recycling of proteins from the Golgi complex to the ER. We have used multi spectral 3D imaging to visualize COPI and COPII behavior simultaneously with various GFP-tagged secretory markers in living cells. This shows that COPII and COPI act sequentially whereby COPI association with anterograde transport complexes is involved in microtubule-based transport and the en route segregation of ER recycling molecules from secretory cargo within TCS in transit to the Golgi complex. We have also investigated the possibility to discriminate spectrally GFP fusion proteins by fluorescence lifetime imaging. This shows that at least two, and possibly up to three GFP fusion proteins can be discriminated and localized in living cells using a single excitation wavelength and a single broad band emission filter.

  8. In Vitro Ovule Cultivation for Live-cell Imaging of Zygote Polarization and Embryo Patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Daisuke; Kimata, Yusuke; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Ueda, Minako

    2017-09-11

    In most flowering plants, the zygote and embryo are hidden deep in the mother tissue, and thus it has long been a mystery of how they develop dynamically; for example, how the zygote polarizes to establish the body axis and how the embryo specifies various cell fates during organ formation. This manuscript describes an in vitro ovule culture method to perform live-cell imaging of developing zygotes and embryos of Arabidopsis thaliana. The optimized cultivation medium allows zygotes or early embryos to grow into fertile plants. By combining it with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) micropillar array device, the ovule is held in the liquid medium in the same position. This fixation is crucial to observe the same ovule under a microscope for several days from the zygotic division to the late embryo stage. The resulting live-cell imaging can be used to monitor the real-time dynamics of zygote polarization, such as nuclear migration and cytoskeleton rearrangement, and also the cell division timing and cell fate specification during embryo patterning. Furthermore, this ovule cultivation system can be combined with inhibitor treatments to analyze the effects of various factors on embryo development, and with optical manipulations such as laser disruption to examine the role of cell-cell communication.

  9. Live cell imaging techniques to study T cell trafficking across the blood-brain barrier in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coisne Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central nervous system (CNS is an immunologically privileged site to which access for circulating immune cells is tightly controlled by the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB located in CNS microvessels. Under physiological conditions immune cell migration across the BBB is low. However, in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis, many immune cells can cross the BBB and cause neurological symptoms. Extravasation of circulating immune cells is a multi-step process that is regulated by the sequential interaction of different adhesion and signaling molecules on the immune cells and on the endothelium. The specialized barrier characteristics of the BBB, therefore, imply the existence of unique mechanisms for immune cell migration across the BBB. Methods and design An in vitro mouse BBB model maintaining physiological barrier characteristics in a flow chamber and combined with high magnification live cell imaging, has been established. This model enables the molecular mechanisms involved in the multi-step extravasation of T cells across the in vitro BBB, to be defined with high-throughput analyses. Subsequently these mechanisms have been verified in vivo using a limited number of experimental animals and a spinal cord window surgical technique. The window enables live observation of the dynamic interaction between T cells and spinal cord microvessels under physiological and pathological conditions using real time epifluorescence intravital imaging. These in vitro and in vivo live cell imaging methods have shown that the BBB endothelium possesses unique and specialized mechanisms involved in the multi-step T cell migration across this endothelial barrier under physiological flow. The initial T cell interaction with the endothelium is either mediated by T cell capture or by T cell rolling. Arrest follows, and then T cells polarize and especially CD4+ T cells crawl over long distances against the direction of

  10. Live cell imaging techniques to study T cell trafficking across the blood-brain barrier in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coisne, Caroline; Lyck, Ruth; Engelhardt, Britta

    2013-01-21

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immunologically privileged site to which access for circulating immune cells is tightly controlled by the endothelial blood-brain barrier (BBB) located in CNS microvessels. Under physiological conditions immune cell migration across the BBB is low. However, in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis, many immune cells can cross the BBB and cause neurological symptoms. Extravasation of circulating immune cells is a multi-step process that is regulated by the sequential interaction of different adhesion and signaling molecules on the immune cells and on the endothelium. The specialized barrier characteristics of the BBB, therefore, imply the existence of unique mechanisms for immune cell migration across the BBB. An in vitro mouse BBB model maintaining physiological barrier characteristics in a flow chamber and combined with high magnification live cell imaging, has been established. This model enables the molecular mechanisms involved in the multi-step extravasation of T cells across the in vitro BBB, to be defined with high-throughput analyses. Subsequently these mechanisms have been verified in vivo using a limited number of experimental animals and a spinal cord window surgical technique. The window enables live observation of the dynamic interaction between T cells and spinal cord microvessels under physiological and pathological conditions using real time epifluorescence intravital imaging. These in vitro and in vivo live cell imaging methods have shown that the BBB endothelium possesses unique and specialized mechanisms involved in the multi-step T cell migration across this endothelial barrier under physiological flow. The initial T cell interaction with the endothelium is either mediated by T cell capture or by T cell rolling. Arrest follows, and then T cells polarize and especially CD4+ T cells crawl over long distances against the direction of flow to find the rare sites permissive for diapedesis through

  11. A coumarin based Schiff base probe for selective fluorescence detection of Al3 + and its application in live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Bhaskar; Sheet, Sanjoy Kumar; Thounaojam, Romita; Jamatia, Ramen; Pal, Amarta Kumar; Aguan, Kripamoy; Khatua, Snehadrinarayan

    2017-02-01

    A new coumarin based Schiff base compound, CSB-1 has been synthesized to detect metal ion based on the chelation enhanced fluorescence (CHEF). The cation binding properties of CSB-1 was thoroughly examined in UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. In fluorescence spectroscopy the compound showed high selectivity toward Al3 + ion and the Al3 + can be quantified in mixed aqueous buffer solution (MeOH: 0.01 M HEPES Buffer; 9:1; v/v) at pH 7.4 as well as in BSA media. The fluorescence intensity of CSB-1 was enhanced by 24 fold after addition of only five equivalents of Al3 +. The fluorescence titration of CSB-1 with Al3 + in mixed aqueous buffer afforded a binding constant, Ka = (1.06 ± 0.2) × 104 M- 1. The colour change from light yellow to colourless and the appearance of blue fluorescence, which can be observed by the naked eye, provides a real-time method for Al3 + sensing. Further the live cell imaging study indicated that the detection of intracellular Al3 + ions are also readily possible in living cell.

  12. Indole-based cyanine as a nuclear RNA-selective two-photon fluorescent probe for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Chan, Miu Shan; Xu, Di; Tam, Dick Yan; Bolze, Frédéric; Lo, Pik Kwan; Wong, Man Shing

    2015-05-15

    We have demonstrated that the subcellular targeting properties of the indole-based cyanines can be tuned by the functional substituent attached onto the indole moiety in which the first example of a highly RNA-selective and two-photon active fluorescent light-up probe for high contrast and brightness TPEF images of rRNA in the nucleolus of live cells has been developed. It is important to find that this cyanine binds much stronger toward RNA than DNA in a buffer solution as well as selectively stains and targets to rRNA in the nucleolus. Remarkably, the TPEF brightness (Φσmax) is dramatically increased with 11-fold enhancement in the presence of rRNA, leading to the record high Φσmax of 228 GM for RNA. This probe not only shows good biocompatibility and superior photostability but also offers general applicability to various live cell lines including HeLa, HepG2, MCF-7, and KB cells and excellent counterstaining compatibility with commercially available DNA or protein trackers.

  13. Interfacing 3D magnetic twisting cytometry with confocal fluorescence microscopy to image force responses in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuejin; Wei, Fuxiang; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Jia, Qiong; Chen, Junjian; Chen, Junwei; Luo, Junyu; Yao, Wenting; Zhou, Wenwen; Huang, Wei; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Ning

    2017-07-01

    Cells and tissues can undergo a variety of biological and structural changes in response to mechanical forces. Only a few existing techniques are available for quantification of structural changes at high resolution in response to forces applied along different directions. 3D-magnetic twisting cytometry (3D-MTC) is a technique for applying local mechanical stresses to living cells. Here we describe a protocol for interfacing 3D-MTC with confocal fluorescence microscopy. In 3D-MTC, ferromagnetic beads are bound to the cell surface via surface receptors, followed by their magnetization in any desired direction. A magnetic twisting field in a different direction is then applied to generate rotational shear stresses in any desired direction. This protocol describes how to combine magnetic-field-induced mechanical stimulation with confocal fluorescence microscopy and provides an optional extension for super-resolution imaging using stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy. This technology allows for rapid real-time acquisition of a living cell's mechanical responses to forces via specific receptors and for quantifying structural and biochemical changes in the same cell using confocal fluorescence microscopy or STED. The integrated 3D-MTC-microscopy platform takes ∼20 d to construct, and the experimental procedures require ∼4 d when carried out by a life sciences graduate student.

  14. Retrieval of the vacuolar H-ATPase from phagosomes revealed by live cell imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Clarke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The vacuolar H+-ATPase, or V-ATPase, is a highly-conserved multi-subunit enzyme that transports protons across membranes at the expense of ATP. The resulting proton gradient serves many essential functions, among them energizing transport of small molecules such as neurotransmitters, and acidifying organelles such as endosomes. The enzyme is not present in the plasma membrane from which a phagosome is formed, but is rapidly delivered by fusion with endosomes that already bear the V-ATPase in their membranes. Similarly, the enzyme is thought to be retrieved from phagosome membranes prior to exocytosis of indigestible material, although that process has not been directly visualized. METHODOLOGY: To monitor trafficking of the V-ATPase in the phagocytic pathway of Dictyostelium discoideum, we fed the cells yeast, large particles that maintain their shape during trafficking. To track pH changes, we conjugated the yeast with fluorescein isothiocyanate. Cells were labeled with VatM-GFP, a fluorescently-tagged transmembrane subunit of the V-ATPase, in parallel with stage-specific endosomal markers or in combination with mRFP-tagged cytoskeletal proteins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We find that the V-ATPase is commonly retrieved from the phagosome membrane by vesiculation shortly before exocytosis. However, if the cells are kept in confined spaces, a bulky phagosome may be exocytosed prematurely. In this event, a large V-ATPase-rich vacuole coated with actin typically separates from the acidic phagosome shortly before exocytosis. This vacuole is propelled by an actin tail and soon acquires the properties of an early endosome, revealing an unexpected mechanism for rapid recycling of the V-ATPase. Any V-ATPase that reaches the plasma membrane is also promptly retrieved. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, live cell microscopy has revealed both a usual route and alternative means of recycling the V-ATPase in the endocytic pathway.

  15. Live cell imaging to understand monocyte, macrophage, and dendritic cell function in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Sara; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Ley, Klaus

    2016-06-27

    Intravital imaging is an invaluable tool for understanding the function of cells in healthy and diseased tissues. It provides a window into dynamic processes that cannot be studied by other techniques. This review will cover the benefits and limitations of various techniques for labeling and imaging myeloid cells, with a special focus on imaging cells in atherosclerotic arteries. Although intravital imaging is a powerful tool for understanding cell function, it alone does not provide a complete picture of the cell. Other techniques, such as flow cytometry and transcriptomics, must be combined with intravital imaging to fully understand a cell's phenotype, lineage, and function.

  16. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Enhanced (NIR-FE) Molecular Imaging of Live Cells on Gold Substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Guosong; Welsher, Kevin; Chen, Zhuo; Robinson, Joshua T; Wang, Hailiang; Zhang, Bo; Dai, Hongjie

    2011-01-01

    Low quantum yields of near infrared (NIR) fluorophores have limited their capabilities as imaging probes in a transparent, low background imaging window. Here for the first time we reported near-infrared fluorescence enhance (NIR-FE) cell imaging using nanostructured Au substrate, which was employed as a general platform for both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and organic fluorescent labels in the NIR region. Fluorescence intensity, as well as cell targeting specificity, was greatly improved by this novel imaging technique. With NIR-FE imaging, we were able to image SWNT-stained cells at short exposure time of 300ms, and push the detectable limit of SWNT staining of cells down to an ultralow concentration of ~50 pM. Further, different degrees of fluorescence enhancement for endocytosed, intracellular SWNTs vs. nanotubes on the cell membrane at the cell/gold interface were observed, suggesting the possibility of using this technique to track the transmembrane behavior of NIR fluorophores.

  17. Perylene-labeled silica nanoparticles: synthesis and characterization of three novel silica nanoparticle species for live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechinger, Julia; Herrmann, Rudolf; Kiener, Daniel; García-García, F Javier; Scheu, Christina; Reller, Armin; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2010-11-05

    The increasing exposure of humans to nanoscaled particles requires well-defined systems that enable the investigation of the toxicity of nanoparticles on the cellular level. To facilitate this, surface-labeled silica nanoparticles, nanoparticles with a labeled core and a silica shell, and a labeled nanoparticle network-all designed for live-cell imaging-are synthesized. The nanoparticles are functionalized with perylene derivatives. For this purpose, two different perylene species containing one or two reactive silica functionalities are prepared. The nanoparticles are studied by transmission electron microscopy, widefield and confocal fluorescence microscopy, as well as by fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with fluorescence anisotropy, in order to characterize the size and morphology of the nanoparticles and to prove the success and homogeneity of the labeling. Using spinning-disc confocal measurements, silica nanoparticles are demonstrated to be taken up by HeLa cells, and they are clearly detectable inside the cytoplasm of the cells.

  18. A fluorescent probe based upon anthrancene-dopamine thioether for imaging Hg(2+) ions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenjie; Xia, Qing; Zhou, Haiyan; Ni, Yun; Wang, Liulin; Jing, Su; Li, Lin; Ji, Wei

    2017-05-15

    A novel anthrancene-dopamine thioether L compound was designed as fluorescent probe for detecting Hg(2+) in living cells sample. L exhibits a good sensitive and selective recognition towards Hg(2+) ions in the presence of other important relevant metal ions and amino acids in HEPES solution. The addition of Hg(2+) causes a marked enhancement in the fluorescence emission intensity with the detection limit as low as 1.1×10(-6)M, combining with obvious colormetric change from colorless to pale brown. Mechanistic studies show that catechol group and sulfur atom in L all participate in the coordination with Hg(2+), though catechol group contributes mainly to chelation-enhanced fluorescence enhancement and sulfur atom to selectivity. Furthermore, L demonstrates good cell permeability and compatibility for sensitive fluorescent detection of Hg(2+) in HepG2 cells. This present probe will have broad applications in biological imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High-Resolution Live-Cell Imaging and Analysis by Laser Desorption/Ionization Droplet Delivery Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Jansson, Erik T; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2016-05-17

    We have developed a new ambient-ionization mass spectrometric technique named laser desorption/ionization droplet delivery mass spectrometry (LDIDD-MS). LDIDD-MS permits high-resolution, high-sensitivity imaging of tissue samples as well as measurements of both single-cell apoptosis and live-cell exocytosis. A pulsed (15 Hz) UV laser beam (266 nm) is focused on a surface covered with target analytes to trigger their desorption and ionization. A spray of liquid droplets is simultaneously directed onto the laser-focused surface region to capture the ionized analytes and deliver them to a mass spectrometer. The approach of rapid and effective capturing of molecules after laser desorption/ionization allows the limit of detection for the amino acid lysine to be as low as 2 amol under ambient ionization conditions. Two-dimensional maps of the desorbed/ionized species are recorded by moving the sample on an XY translational stage. The spatial resolution for imaging with LDIDD-MS was determined to be 2.4 μm for an ink-printed pattern and 3 μm for mouse brain tissue. We applied LDIDD-MS to single-cell analysis of apoptotic HEK cells. Differences were observed in the profiles of fatty acids and lipids between healthy HEK cells and those undergoing apoptosis. We observed upregulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) with a relatively shorter carbon chain length and downregulation of PC with a relatively longer carbon chain length. We also applied LDIDD-MS for a real-time direct measurements of live-cell exocytosis. The catecholamine dopamine and trace amines (phenethylamine and tyramine) were detected from live PC12 cells without damaging them.

  20. Development of a quantitative morphological assessment of toxicant-treated zebrafish larvae using brightfield imaging and high-content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Samantha; Wambaugh, John; Judson, Richard; Mosher, Shad; Radio, Nick; Houck, Keith; Padilla, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    One of the rate-limiting procedures in a developmental zebrafish screen is the morphological assessment of each larva. Most researchers opt for a time-consuming, structured visual assessment by trained human observer(s). The present studies were designed to develop a more objective, accurate and rapid method for screening zebrafish for dysmorphology. Instead of the very detailed human assessment, we have developed the computational malformation index, which combines the use of high-content imaging with a very brief human visual assessment. Each larva was quickly assessed by a human observer (basic visual assessment), killed, fixed and assessed for dysmorphology with the Zebratox V4 BioApplication using the Cellomics® ArrayScan® V(TI) high-content image analysis platform. The basic visual assessment adds in-life parameters, and the high-content analysis assesses each individual larva for various features (total area, width, spine length, head-tail length, length-width ratio, perimeter-area ratio). In developing the computational malformation index, a training set of hundreds of embryos treated with hundreds of chemicals were visually assessed using the basic or detailed method. In the second phase, we assessed both the stability of these high-content measurements and its performance using a test set of zebrafish treated with a dose range of two reference chemicals (trans-retinoic acid or cadmium). We found the measures were stable for at least 1 week and comparison of these automated measures to detailed visual inspection of the larvae showed excellent congruence. Our computational malformation index provides an objective manner for rapid phenotypic brightfield assessment of individual larva in a developmental zebrafish assay. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A sensitive fluorescent sensor for the detection of endogenous hydroxyl radicals in living cells and bacteria and direct imaging with respect to its ecotoxicity in living zebra fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Du, Juan; Song, Da; Xu, Meiying; Sun, Guoping

    2016-03-28

    We have synthesized a novel fluorescent probe, , which shown a high potential for imaging of endogenous ˙OH in living cells and various types of bacteria. In addition, it is an excellent sensor for in vivo imaging of ˙OH generated following treatment with TiO2NPs in zebra fish.

  2. Live-cell multiplane three-dimensional super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissbuehler, Stefan; Sharipov, Azat; Godinat, Aurélien; Bocchio, Noelia L; Sandoz, Patrick A; Huss, Anja; Jensen, Nickels A; Jakobs, Stefan; Enderlein, Jörg; Gisou van der Goot, F; Dubikovskaya, Elena A; Lasser, Theo; Leutenegger, Marcel

    2014-12-18

    Super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) provides an elegant way of overcoming the diffraction limit in all three spatial dimensions by computing higher-order cumulants of image sequences of blinking fluorophores acquired with a classical widefield microscope. Previously, three-dimensional (3D) SOFI has been demonstrated by sequential imaging of multiple depth positions. Here we introduce a multiplexed imaging scheme for the simultaneous acquisition of multiple focal planes. Using 3D cross-cumulants, we show that the depth sampling can be increased. The simultaneous acquisition of multiple focal planes significantly reduces the acquisition time and thus the photobleaching. We demonstrate multiplane 3D SOFI by imaging fluorescently labelled cells over an imaged volume of up to 65 × 65 × 3.5 μm(3) without depth scanning. In particular, we image the 3D network of mitochondria in fixed C2C12 cells immunostained with Alexa 647 fluorophores and the 3D vimentin structure in living Hela cells expressing the fluorescent protein Dreiklang.

  3. Microscopic imaging of intracellular calcium in live cells using lifetime-based ratiometric measurements of Oregon Green BAPTA-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattarulo, Carli; Thyssen, Diana; Kuchibholta, Kishore V; Hyman, Bradley T; Bacskaiq, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger that has important functions in normal neuronal function. The pathology of Alzheimer's disease has been shown to alter calcium homeostasis in neurons and astrocytes. Several calcium dye indicators are available to measure intracellular calcium within cells, including Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (OGB-1). Using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we adapted this single wavelength calcium dye into a ratiometric dye to allow quantitative imaging of cellular calcium. We used this approach for in vitro calibrations, single-cell microscopy, high-throughput imaging in automated plate readers, and in single cells in the intact living brain. While OGB is a commonly used fluorescent dye for imaging calcium qualitatively, there are distinct advantages to using a ratiometric approach, which allows quantitative determinations of calcium that are independent of dye concentration. Taking advantage of the distinct lifetime contrast of the calcium-free and calcium-bound forms of OGB, we used time-domain lifetime measurements to generate calibration curves for OGB lifetime ratios as a function of calcium concentration. In summary, we demonstrate approaches using commercially available tools to measure calcium concentrations in live cells at multiple scales using lifetime contrast. These approaches are broadly applicable to other fluorescent readouts that exhibit lifetime contrast and serve as powerful alternatives to spectral or intensity readouts in multiplexing experiments.

  4. Fast, label-free super-resolution live-cell imaging using rotating coherent scattering (ROCS) microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jünger, Felix; Olshausen, Philipp V.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Living cells are highly dynamic systems with cellular structures being often below the optical resolution limit. Super-resolution microscopes, usually based on fluorescence cell labelling, are usually too slow to resolve small, dynamic structures. We present a label-free microscopy technique, which can generate thousands of super-resolved, high contrast images at a frame rate of 100 Hertz and without any post-processing. The technique is based on oblique sample illumination with coherent light, an approach believed to be not applicable in life sciences because of too many interference artefacts. However, by circulating an incident laser beam by 360° during one image acquisition, relevant image information is amplified. By combining total internal reflection illumination with dark-field detection, structures as small as 150 nm become separable through local destructive interferences. The technique images local changes in refractive index through scattered laser light and is applied to living mouse macrophages and helical bacteria revealing unexpected dynamic processes.

  5. Depth-resolved mid-infrared photothermal imaging of living cells and organisms with submicrometer spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Delong; Li, Chen; Zhang, Chi; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Eakins, Gregory; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Chemical contrast has long been sought for label-free visualization of biomolecules and materials in complex living systems. Although infrared spectroscopic imaging has come a long way in this direction, it is thus far only applicable to dried tissues because of the strong infrared absorption by water. It also suffers from low spatial resolution due to long wavelengths and lacks optical sectioning capabilities. We overcome these limitations through sensing vibrational absorption–induced photothermal effect by a visible laser beam. Our mid-infrared photothermal (MIP) approach reached 10 μM detection sensitivity and submicrometer lateral spatial resolution. This performance has exceeded the diffraction limit of infrared microscopy and allowed label-free three-dimensional chemical imaging of live cells and organisms. Distributions of endogenous lipid and exogenous drug inside single cells were visualized. We further demonstrated in vivo MIP imaging of lipids and proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans. The reported MIP imaging technology promises broad applications from monitoring metabolic activities to high-resolution mapping of drug molecules in living systems, which are beyond the reach of current infrared microscopy. PMID:27704043

  6. Depth-resolved mid-infrared photothermal imaging of living cells and organisms with submicrometer spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Delong; Li, Chen; Zhang, Chi; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Eakins, Gregory; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-09-01

    Chemical contrast has long been sought for label-free visualization of biomolecules and materials in complex living systems. Although infrared spectroscopic imaging has come a long way in this direction, it is thus far only applicable to dried tissues because of the strong infrared absorption by water. It also suffers from low spatial resolution due to long wavelengths and lacks optical sectioning capabilities. We overcome these limitations through sensing vibrational absorption-induced photothermal effect by a visible laser beam. Our mid-infrared photothermal (MIP) approach reached 10 μM detection sensitivity and submicrometer lateral spatial resolution. This performance has exceeded the diffraction limit of infrared microscopy and allowed label-free three-dimensional chemical imaging of live cells and organisms. Distributions of endogenous lipid and exogenous drug inside single cells were visualized. We further demonstrated in vivo MIP imaging of lipids and proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans. The reported MIP imaging technology promises broad applications from monitoring metabolic activities to high-resolution mapping of drug molecules in living systems, which are beyond the reach of current infrared microscopy.

  7. Super-resolution imaging of fluorescently labeled, endogenous RNA Polymerase II in living cells with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jayanth, Namrata; Mullen, Susan; Tan, Tzer Han; Jung, Yoon J; Cissé, Ibrahim I

    2016-10-26

    Live cell imaging of mammalian RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has previously relied on random insertions of exogenous, mutant Pol II coupled with the degradation of endogenous Pol II using a toxin, α-amanitin. Therefore, it has been unclear whether over-expression of labeled Pol II under an exogenous promoter may have played a role in reported Pol II dynamics in vivo. Here we label the endogenous Pol II in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system. Using single-molecule based super-resolution imaging in the living cells, we captured endogenous Pol II clusters. Consistent with previous studies, we observed that Pol II clusters were short-lived (cluster lifetime ~8 s) in living cells. Moreover, dynamic responses to serum-stimulation, and drug-mediated transcription inhibition were all in agreement with previous observations in the exogenous Pol II MEF cell line. Our findings suggest that previous exogenously tagged Pol II faithfully recapitulated the endogenous polymerase clustering dynamics in living cells, and our approach may in principle be used to directly label transcription factors for live cell imaging.

  8. Super-resolution imaging of fluorescently labeled, endogenous RNA Polymerase II in living cells with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jayanth, Namrata; Mullen, Susan; Tan, Tzer Han; Jung, Yoon J.; Cissé, Ibrahim I.

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging of mammalian RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has previously relied on random insertions of exogenous, mutant Pol II coupled with the degradation of endogenous Pol II using a toxin, α-amanitin. Therefore, it has been unclear whether over-expression of labeled Pol II under an exogenous promoter may have played a role in reported Pol II dynamics in vivo. Here we label the endogenous Pol II in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system. Using single-molecule based super-resolution imaging in the living cells, we captured endogenous Pol II clusters. Consistent with previous studies, we observed that Pol II clusters were short-lived (cluster lifetime ~8 s) in living cells. Moreover, dynamic responses to serum-stimulation, and drug-mediated transcription inhibition were all in agreement with previous observations in the exogenous Pol II MEF cell line. Our findings suggest that previous exogenously tagged Pol II faithfully recapitulated the endogenous polymerase clustering dynamics in living cells, and our approach may in principle be used to directly label transcription factors for live cell imaging. PMID:27782203

  9. Long-term live cell imaging and automated 4D analysis of drosophila neuroblast lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina C F Homem

    Full Text Available The developing Drosophila brain is a well-studied model system for neurogenesis and stem cell biology. In the Drosophila central brain, around 200 neural stem cells called neuroblasts undergo repeated rounds of asymmetric cell division. These divisions typically generate a larger self-renewing neuroblast and a smaller ganglion mother cell that undergoes one terminal division to create two differentiating neurons. Although single mitotic divisions of neuroblasts can easily be imaged in real time, the lack of long term imaging procedures has limited the use of neuroblast live imaging for lineage analysis. Here we describe a method that allows live imaging of cultured Drosophila neuroblasts over multiple cell cycles for up to 24 hours. We describe a 4D image analysis protocol that can be used to extract cell cycle times and growth rates from the resulting movies in an automated manner. We use it to perform lineage analysis in type II neuroblasts where clonal analysis has indicated the presence of a transit-amplifying population that potentiates the number of neurons. Indeed, our experiments verify type II lineages and provide quantitative parameters for all cell types in those lineages. As defects in type II neuroblast lineages can result in brain tumor formation, our lineage analysis method will allow more detailed and quantitative analysis of tumorigenesis and asymmetric cell division in the Drosophila brain.

  10. Label-free imaging of gold nanoparticles in single live cells by photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chao; Qian, Wei; Shao, Xia; Xie, Zhixing; Cheng, Xu; Liu, Shengchun; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Bing; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored as a model nanostructure in nanomedicine and have been widely used to provide advanced biomedical research tools in diagnostic imaging and therapy. Due to the necessity of targeting AuNPs to individual cells, evaluation and visualization of AuNPs in the cellular level is critical to fully understand their interaction with cellular environment. Currently imaging technologies, such as fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy all have advantages and disadvantages. In this paper, we synthesized AuNPs by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation, modified their surface chemistry through sequential bioconjugation, and targeted the functionalized AuNPs with individual cancer cells. Based on their high optical absorption contrast, we developed a novel, label-free imaging method to evaluate and visualize intracellular AuNPs using photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). Preliminary study shows that the PAM imaging technique is capable of imaging cellular uptake of AuNPs in vivo at single-cell resolution, which provide an important tool for the study of AuNPs in nanomedicine.

  11. Live cell CRISPR-imaging in plants reveals dynamic telomere movements

    KAUST Repository

    Dreissig, Steven

    2017-05-16

    Elucidating the spatio-temporal organization of the genome inside the nucleus is imperative to understand the regulation of genes and non-coding sequences during development and environmental changes. Emerging techniques of chromatin imaging promise to bridge the long-standing gap between sequencing studies which reveal genomic information and imaging studies that provide spatial and temporal information of defined genomic regions. Here, we demonstrate such an imaging technique based on two orthologues of the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system. By fusing eGFP/mRuby2 to the catalytically inactive version of Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9, we show robust visualization of telomere repeats in live leaf cells of Nicotiana benthamiana. By tracking the dynamics of telomeres visualized by CRISPR-dCas9, we reveal dynamic telomere movements of up to 2 μm within 30 minutes during interphase. Furthermore, we show that CRISPR-dCas9 can be combined with fluorescence-labelled proteins to visualize DNA-protein interactions in vivo. By simultaneously using two dCas9 orthologues, we pave the way for imaging of multiple genomic loci in live plants cells. CRISPR-imaging bears the potential to significantly improve our understanding of the dynamics of chromosomes in live plant cells.

  12. A Novel Automated High-Content Analysis Workflow Capturing Cell Population Dynamics from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Live Imaging Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerz, Maximilian; Folarin, Amos; Meleckyte, Ruta; Watt, Fiona M.; Dobson, Richard J.; Danovi, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Most image analysis pipelines rely on multiple channels per image with subcellular reference points for cell segmentation. Single-channel phase-contrast images are often problematic, especially for cells with unfavorable morphology, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Live imaging poses a further challenge, because of the introduction of the dimension of time. Evaluations cannot be easily integrated with other biological data sets including analysis of endpoint images. Here, we present a workflow that incorporates a novel CellProfiler-based image analysis pipeline enabling segmentation of single-channel images with a robust R-based software solution to reduce the dimension of time to a single data point. These two packages combined allow robust segmentation of iPSCs solely on phase-contrast single-channel images and enable live imaging data to be easily integrated to endpoint data sets while retaining the dynamics of cellular responses. The described workflow facilitates characterization of the response of live-imaged iPSCs to external stimuli and definition of cell line–specific, phenotypic signatures. We present an efficient tool set for automated high-content analysis suitable for cells with challenging morphology. This approach has potentially widespread applications for human pluripotent stem cells and other cell types. PMID:27256155

  13. Studying the Protein Quality Control System of D. discoideum Using Temperature-controlled Live Cell Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovska, Liliana; Alberti, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The complex lifestyle of the social amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum makes it a valuable model for the study of various biological processes. Recently, we showed that D. discoideum is remarkably resilient to protein aggregation and can be used to gain insights into the cellular protein quality control system. However, the use of D. discoideum as a model system poses several challenges to microscopy-based experimental approaches, such as the high motility of the cells and their susceptibility to photo-toxicity. The latter proves to be especially challenging when studying protein homeostasis, as the phototoxic effects can induce a cellular stress response and thus alter to behavior of the protein quality control system. Temperature increase is a commonly used way to induce cellular stress. Here, we describe a temperature-controllable imaging protocol, which allows observing temperature-induced perturbations in D. discoideum. Moreover, when applied at normal growth temperature, this imaging protocol can also noticeably reduce photo-toxicity, thus allowing imaging with higher intensities. This can be particularly useful when imaging proteins with very low expression levels. Moreover, the high mobility of the cells often requires the acquisition of multiple fields of view to follow individual cells, and the number of fields needs to be balanced against the desired time interval and exposure time. PMID:28060267

  14. Refractive Index Sensing of Green Fluorescent Proteins in Living Cells Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manen, van Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; Berg, van den Timo K.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91phox, which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase

  15. A Scalable Perfusion Culture System with Miniature Peristaltic Pumps for Live-Cell Imaging Assays with Provision for Microfabricated Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Sreenath; Suma, M.S.; Raju, Shilpa R.; Bhargav, Santosh D.B.; Arunima, S.; Das, Saumitra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a perfusion culture system with miniature bioreactors and peristaltic pumps. The bioreactors are designed for perfusion, live-cell imaging studies, easy incorporation of microfabricated scaffolds, and convenience of operation in standard cell culture techniques. By combining with miniature peristaltic pumps—one for each bioreactor to avoid cross-contamination and to maintain desired flow rate in each—we have made a culture system that facilitates perfusion culture inside standard incubators. This scalable system can support multiple parallel perfusion experiments. The major components are fabricated by three-dimensional printing using VeroWhite, which we show to be amenable to ex vivo cell culture. Furthermore, the components of the system can be reused, thus making it economical. We validate the system and illustrate its versatility by culturing primary rat hepatocytes, live imaging the growth of mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) on microfabricated ring-scaffolds inserted into the bioreactor, performing perfusion culture of breast cancer cells (MCF7), and high-magnification imaging of hepatocarcinoma cells (HuH7). PMID:26309810

  16. Vibrational imaging of glucose uptake activity in live cells and tissues by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fanghao; Chen, Zhixing; Zhang, Luyuan; Shen, Yihui; Wei, Lu; Min, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is consumed as an energy source by virtually all living organisms, from bacteria to humans. Its uptake activity closely reflects the cellular metabolic status in various pathophysiological transformations, such as diabetes and cancer. Extensive efforts such as positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence microscopy have been made to specifically image glucose uptake activity but all with technical limitations. Here, we report a new platform to visualize glucose uptake activity in live cells and tissues with subcellular resolution and minimal perturbation. A novel glucose analogue with a small alkyne tag (carbon-carbon triple bond) is developed to mimic natural glucose for cellular uptake, which can be imaged with high sensitivity and specificity by targeting the strong and characteristic alkyne vibration on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope to generate a quantitative three dimensional concentration map. Cancer cells with differing metabolic characteristics can be distinguished. Heterogeneous uptake patterns are observed in tumor xenograft tissues, neuronal culture and mouse brain tissues with clear cell-cell variations. Therefore, by offering the distinct advantage of optical resolution but without the undesirable influence of bulky fluorophores, our method of coupling SRS with alkyne labeled glucose will be an attractive tool to study energy demands of living systems at the single cell level.

  17. A nucleic acid probe labeled with desmethyl thiazole orange: a new type of hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligonucleotide for live-cell RNA imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sugizaki, Kaori; Yuki, Mizue; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Shuji; Sueoka, Takuma; Hayashi, Gosuke; Wang, Dan Ohtan

    2013-01-14

    A new fluorescent nucleotide with desmethyl thiazole orange dyes, D'(505), has been developed for expansion of the function of fluorescent probes for live-cell RNA imaging. The nucleoside unit of D'(505) for DNA autosynthesis was soluble in organic solvents, which made the preparation of nucleoside units and the reactions in the cycles of DNA synthesis more efficient. The dyes of D'(505)-containing oligodeoxynucleotide were protonated below pH 7 and the oligodeoxynucleotide exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission through the control of excitonic interactions of the dyes of D'(505). The simplified procedure and effective hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission produced multicolored hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probes, which were useful for live-cell RNA imaging. The acceptor-bleaching method gave us information on RNA in a specific cell among many living cells.

  18. Quantification of patient-derived 3D cancer spheroids in high-content screening images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Rhee, Seon-Min; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2017-02-01

    We present a cell image quantification method for image-based drug response prediction from patient-derived glioblastoma cells. Drug response of each person differs at the cellular level. Therefore, quantification of a patient-derived cell phenotype is important in drug response prediction. We performed fluorescence microscopy to understand the features of patient-derived 3D cancer spheroids. A 3D cell culture simulates the in-vivo environment more closely than 2D adherence culture, and thus, allows more accurate cell analysis. Furthermore, it allows assessment of cellular aggregates. Cohesion is an important feature of cancer cells. In this paper, we demonstrate image-based quantification of cellular area, fluorescence intensity, and cohesion. To this end, we first performed image stitching to create an image of each well of the plate with the same environment. This image shows colonies of various sizes and shapes. To automatically detect the colonies, we used an intensity based classification algorithm. The morphological features of each cancer cell colony were measured. Next, we calculated the location correlation of each colony that is appeal of the cell density in the same well environment. Finally, we compared the features for drug-treated and untreated cells. This technique could potentially be applied for drug screening and quantification of the effects of the drugs.

  19. Non-fused phospholes as fluorescent probes for imaging of lipid droplets in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öberg, Elisabet; Appelqvist, Hanna; Nilsson, K. Peter R.

    2017-04-01

    Molecular tools for fluorescent imaging of specific compartments in cells are essential for understanding the function and activity of cells. Here, we report the synthesis of a series of pyridyl- and thienyl-substituted phospholes and the evaluation of these dyes for fluorescent imaging of cells. The thienyl-substituted phospholes proved to be successful for staining of cultured normal and malignant cells due to their fluorescent properties and low toxicity. Co-staining experiments demonstrated that these probes target lipid droplets, which are, lipid-storage organelles found in the cytosol of nearly all cell types. Our findings confirm that thienyl-substituted phospholes can be utilized as fluorescent tools for vital staining of cells, and we foresee that these fluorescent dyes might be used in studies to unravel the roles that lipid droplets play in cellular physiology and their role in diseases.

  20. HIGH-SPEED SINGLE QUANTUM DOT IMAGING OF IN LIVE CELLS REVEAL HOP DIFFUSION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Clausen, Mathias P.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra high-speed single particle tracking (image frame rates 40-50 kHz) experiments with 40 nm gold particles has indicated that lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane undergo hop-diffusion between nanometer sized compartments (Fujiwara et al. (2002) J Cell Biol. 157:1071-81). These findings...... have yet to be independently confirmed. In this work, we show that high-speed single particle tracking with quantum dots (QDs) and using a standard wide-field fluorescence microscope and an EMCCD is possible at image acquisition rates of up to ~2000 Hz. The spatial precision in these experiments is ~40...... nm (as determined from the standard deviation of repeated position measurements of an immobile QD on a cell). Using this system, we show that membrane proteins and lipids, which have been exogenously labeled with functionalized QDs, show examples of three types of motion in the plasma membrane...

  1. Surface engineering and characterization of quantum dots and its application in living cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han QIU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective  Surface modification of hydrophobic nanoparticles is a key process for their application in the biological medicine fields. The aim of present study is to prepare the immunofluorescent probes by conjugation of hydrophilic surface-engineered quantum dots (QDs and monoclonal antibody for use of fluorescence labeled cells tracing. Methods  The bovine serum albumin (BSA with excellent water-solubility and biocompatibility was employed as the emulsifying agent, and used for surface modification of hydrophobic QDs under ultrasonication. The diameter, fluorescence spectrum and cytotoxicity of BSA-coated QDs (BSA-triP.QDs were analyzed. Then the BSA-coated QDs were conjugated with trastuzumab, which can be recognized and bound specifically to HER2. SKBR-3 breast cancer cells, with over-expression of HER-2, were labeled with hydrophilic QDstrastuzumab and imaged on a fluorescence planar imaging system. Results  The experimental results revealed that BSA as the emulsifying agent, combined with other polymers, can effectively phase transfer hydrophobic QDs. The BSA functionalized QDs exhibited excellent colloidal stability with fine hydrodynamic size distribution (about 70nm in a wide range of pH and ionic strengths values. Moreover, no significant cytotoxic effect was observed in SKBR-3 cells treated with BSA-coated QDs. After being coupled with trastuzumab, the hydrophilic QDs can be used as an immunofluorescence probe for HER2-positive breast cancer cell imaging. Conclusions  The advantages of BSA-coated QDs include straight forward synthesis, high colloidal stability, and promising immunofluorescence characteristic when coupled with specific antibody. These are therefore proved to be ideal nano systems for biomedical labeling, targeting, and imaging. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.05.04

  2. Real time imaging of live cell ATP leaking or release events by chemiluminescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-12-18

    The purpose of this research was to expand the chemiluminescence microscopy applications in live bacterial/mammalian cell imaging and to improve the detection sensitivity for ATP leaking or release events. We first demonstrated that chemiluminescence (CL) imaging can be used to interrogate single bacterial cells. While using a luminometer allows detecting ATP from cell lysate extracted from at least 10 bacterial cells, all previous cell CL detection never reached this sensitivity of single bacteria level. We approached this goal with a different strategy from before: instead of breaking bacterial cell membrane and trying to capture the transiently diluted ATP with the firefly luciferase CL assay, we introduced the firefly luciferase enzyme into bacteria using the modern genetic techniques and placed the CL reaction substrate D-luciferin outside the cells. By damaging the cell membrane with various antibacterial drugs including antibiotics such as Penicillins and bacteriophages, the D-luciferin molecules diffused inside the cell and initiated the reaction that produces CL light. As firefly luciferases are large protein molecules which are retained within the cells before the total rupture and intracellular ATP concentration is high at the millmolar level, the CL reaction of firefly luciferase, ATP and D-luciferin can be kept for a relatively long time within the cells acting as a reaction container to generate enough photons for detection by the extremely sensitive intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera. The result was inspiring as various single bacterium lysis and leakage events were monitored with 10-s temporal resolution movies. We also found a new way of enhancing diffusion D-luciferin into cells by dehydrating the bacteria. Then we started with this novel single bacterial CL imaging technique, and applied it for quantifying gene expression levels from individual bacterial cells. Previous published result in single cell gene expression quantification

  3. Biocompatible Optically Transparent MEMS for Micromechanical Stimulation and Multimodal Imaging of Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fior, Raffaella; Kwok, Jeanie; Malfatti, Francesca; Sbaizero, Orfeo; Lal, Ratnesh

    2015-08-01

    Cells and tissues in our body are continuously subjected to mechanical stress. Mechanical stimuli, such as tensile and contractile forces, and shear stress, elicit cellular responses, including gene and protein alterations that determine key behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and adhesion. Several tools and techniques have been developed to study these mechanobiological phenomena, including micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). MEMS provide a platform for nano-to-microscale mechanical stimulation of biological samples and quantitative analysis of their biomechanical responses. However, current devices are limited in their capability to perform single cell micromechanical stimulations as well as correlating their structural phenotype by imaging techniques simultaneously. In this study, a biocompatible and optically transparent MEMS for single cell mechanobiological studies is reported. A silicon nitride microfabricated device is designed to perform uniaxial tensile deformation of single cells and tissue. Optical transparency and open architecture of the device allows coupling of the MEMS to structural and biophysical assays, including optical microscopy techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate the design, fabrication, testing, biocompatibility and multimodal imaging with optical and AFM techniques, providing a proof-of-concept for a multimodal MEMS. The integrated multimodal system would allow simultaneous controlled mechanical stimulation of single cells and correlate cellular response.

  4. A fluorogenic aryl fluorosulfate for intraorganellar transthyretin imaging in living cells and in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranczak, Aleksandra; Liu, Yu; Connelly, Stephen; Du, Wen-Ge Han; Greiner, Erin R; Genereux, Joseph C; Wiseman, R Luke; Eisele, Yvonne S; Bradbury, Nadine C; Dong, Jiajia; Noodleman, Louis; Sharpless, K Barry; Wilson, Ian A; Encalada, Sandra E; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2015-06-17

    Fluorogenic probes, due to their often greater spatial and temporal sensitivity in comparison to permanently fluorescent small molecules, represent powerful tools to study protein localization and function in the context of living systems. Herein, we report fluorogenic probe 4, a 1,3,4-oxadiazole designed to bind selectively to transthyretin (TTR). Probe 4 comprises a fluorosulfate group not previously used in an environment-sensitive fluorophore. The fluorosulfate functional group does not react covalently with TTR on the time scale required for cellular imaging, but does red shift the emission maximum of probe 4 in comparison to its nonfluorosulfated analogue. We demonstrate that probe 4 is dark in aqueous buffers, whereas the TTR·4 complex exhibits a fluorescence emission maximum at 481 nm. The addition of probe 4 to living HEK293T cells allows efficient binding to and imaging of exogenous TTR within intracellular organelles, including the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, live Caenorhabditis elegans expressing human TTR transgenically and treated with probe 4 display TTR·4 fluorescence in macrophage-like coelomocytes. An analogue of fluorosulfate probe 4 does react selectively with TTR without labeling the remainder of the cellular proteome. Studies on this analogue suggest that certain aryl fluorosulfates, due to their cell and organelle permeability and activatable reactivity, could be considered for the development of protein-selective covalent probes.

  5. Molecular component distribution imaging of living cells by multivariate curve resolution analysis of space-resolved Raman spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masahiro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2014-01-01

    Label-free Raman microspectroscopy combined with a multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis can be a powerful tool for studying a wide range of biomedical molecular systems. The MCR with the alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) technique, which retrieves the pure component spectra from complicatedly overlapped spectra, has been successfully applied to in vivo and molecular-level analysis of living cells. The principles of the MCR-ALS analysis are reviewed with a model system of titanium oxide crystal polymorphs, followed by two examples of in vivo Raman imaging studies of living yeast cells, fission yeast, and budding yeast. Due to the non-negative matrix factorization algorithm used in the MCR-ALS analysis, the spectral information derived from this technique is just ready for physical and/or chemical interpretations. The corresponding concentration profiles provide the molecular component distribution images (MCDIs) that are vitally important for elucidating life at the molecular level, as stated by Schroedinger in his famous book, "What is life?" Without any a priori knowledge about spectral profiles, time- and space-resolved Raman measurements of a dividing fission yeast cell with the MCR-ALS elucidate the dynamic changes of major cellular components (lipids, proteins, and polysaccharides) during the cell cycle. The MCR-ALS technique also resolves broadly overlapped OH stretch Raman bands of water, clearly indicating the existence of organelle-specific water structures in a living budding yeast cell.

  6. Super-resolved 3-D imaging of live cells organelles from bright-field photon transmission micrographs

    CERN Document Server

    Rychtarikova, Renata; Shi, Kevin; Malakhova, Daria; Machacek, Petr; Smaha, Rebecca; Urban, Jan; Stys, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    Current biological and medical research is aimed at obtaining a detailed spatiotemporal map of a live cell's interior to describe and predict cell's physiological state. We present here an algorithm for complete 3-D modelling of cellular structures from a z-stack of images obtained using label-free wide-field bright-field light-transmitted microscopy. The method visualizes 3-D objects with a volume equivalent to the area of a camera pixel multiplied by the z-height. The computation is based on finding pixels of unchanged intensities between two consecutive images of an object spread function. These pixels represent strongly light-diffracting, light-absorbing, or light-emitting objects. To accomplish this, variables derived from R\\'{e}nyi entropy are used to suppress camera noise. Using this algorithm, the detection limit of objects is only limited by the technical specifications of the microscope setup--we achieve the detection of objects of the size of one camera pixel. This method allows us to obtain 3-D re...

  7. Highly selective "Off-On" fluorescent probe for histidine and its imaging in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tiantian; Yin, Liyan; Huang, Chusen; Qin, Yiqiao; Zhu, Weiping; Xu, Yufang; Qian, Xuhong

    2015-04-15

    A naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe CP has been synthesized with simple steps. It can selectively and sensitively recognize copper ions (Cu(2+)) in HEPES buffer (50mM, pH 7.2). The fluorescence intensity of CP is linearly proportional to the concentration of Cu(2+) ranging from 0-8.3μM (correlation coefficient R(2)=0.9808). The resulted complex CP@Cu can serve as a turn-on fluorescent probe for the detection of histidine and histidine rich proteins in broad pH application range. Upon the addition of histidine, the fluorescence intensity of CP@Cu exhibits a linear correlation with the concentration of histidine ranging from 0-200μM (correlation coefficient R(2)=0.9912). Moreover, CP@Cu has potential for imaging histidine in vitro experiments and has promise in real sample applications with great validity.

  8. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle modulated turn-on fluorescent probes for histidine detection and its imaging in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Tingbi; Nie, Zhou; Miao, Zhuang; Liu, Yang; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle (N-CNP) modulated turn-on fluorescent probes were developed for rapid and selective detection of histidine. The as synthesized N-CNPs exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and excellent biocompatibility. The fluorescence of N-CNPs can be quenched selectively by Cu(ii) ions with high efficiency, and restored by the addition of histidine owing to the competitive binding of Cu(ii) ions and histidine that removes Cu(ii) ions from the surface of the N-CNPs. Under the optimal conditions, a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion conjugates and the concentration of histidine was established in the range from 0.5 to 60 μM. The detection limit was as low as 150 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In addition, the as-prepared N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion nanoprobes showed excellent biocompatibility and were applied for a histidine imaging assay in living cells, which presented great potential in the bio-labeling assay and clinical diagnostic applications.In this work, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle (N-CNP) modulated turn-on fluorescent probes were developed for rapid and selective detection of histidine. The as synthesized N-CNPs exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and excellent biocompatibility. The fluorescence of N-CNPs can be quenched selectively by Cu(ii) ions with high efficiency, and restored by the addition of histidine owing to the competitive binding of Cu(ii) ions and histidine that removes Cu(ii) ions from the surface of the N-CNPs. Under the optimal conditions, a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion conjugates and the concentration of histidine was established in the range from 0.5 to 60 μM. The detection limit was as low as 150 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In addition, the as-prepared N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion nanoprobes showed excellent biocompatibility and were applied for a histidine imaging assay in living cells, which

  9. High-Content Imaging Assays for Identifying Compounds that Generate Superoxide and Impair Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Adherent Eukaryotic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billis, Puja; Will, Yvonne; Nadanaciva, Sashi

    2014-02-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced in cells as a result of aerobic metabolism. When there is an excessive production of ROS and the cell's antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, oxidative stress occurs. The superoxide anion is a type of ROS that is produced primarily in mitochondria but is also generated in other regions of the cell including peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane, and cytosol. Here, a high-content imaging assay using the dye dihydroethidium is described for identifying compounds that generate superoxide in eukaryotic cells. A high-content imaging assay using the fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester is also described to identify compounds that impair mitochondrial membrane potential in eukaryotic cells. The purpose of performing both assays is to identify compounds that (1) generate superoxide at lower concentrations than they impair mitochondrial membrane potential, (2) impair mitochondrial membrane potential at lower concentrations than they generate superoxide, (3) generate superoxide and impair mitochondrial function at similar concentrations, and (4) do not generate superoxide or impair mitochondrial membrane potential during the duration of the assays.

  10. Multiparametric Cell Cycle Analysis Using the Operetta High-Content Imager and Harmony Software with PhenoLOGIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Massey

    Full Text Available High-content imaging is a powerful tool for determining cell phenotypes at the single cell level. Characterising the effect of small molecules on cell cycle distribution is important for understanding their mechanism of action especially in oncology drug discovery but also for understanding potential toxicology liabilities. Here, a high-throughput phenotypic assay utilising the PerkinElmer Operetta high-content imager and Harmony software to determine cell cycle distribution is described. PhenoLOGIC, a machine learning algorithm within Harmony software was employed to robustly separate single cells from cell clumps. DNA content, EdU incorporation and pHH3 (S10 expression levels were subsequently utilised to separate cells into the various phases of the cell cycle. The assay is amenable to multiplexing with an additional pharmacodynamic marker to assess cell cycle changes within a specific cellular sub-population. Using this approach, the cell cycle distribution of γH2AX positive nuclei was determined following treatment with DNA damaging agents. Likewise, the assay can be multiplexed with Ki67 to determine the fraction of quiescent cells and with BrdU dual labelling to determine S-phase duration. This methodology therefore provides a relatively cheap, quick and high-throughput phenotypic method for determining accurate cell cycle distribution for small molecule mechanism of action and drug toxicity studies.

  11. High-content imaging with micropatterned multiwell plates reveals influence of cell geometry and cytoskeleton on chromatin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Ty; McNulty, Jason D; Prestil, Ryan; Seymour, Stephanie K; Klann, Tyler; Murrell, Michael; Ashton, Randolph S; Saha, Krishanu

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underpinning cellular responses to microenvironmental cues requires tight control not only of the complex milieu of soluble signaling factors, extracellular matrix (ECM) connections and cell-cell contacts within cell culture, but also of the biophysics of human cells. Advances in biomaterial fabrication technologies have recently facilitated detailed examination of cellular biophysics and revealed that constraints on cell geometry arising from the cellular microenvironment influence a wide variety of human cell behaviors. Here, we create an in vitro platform capable of precise and independent control of biochemical and biophysical microenvironmental cues by adapting microcontact printing technology into the format of standard six- to 96-well plates to create MicroContact Printed Well Plates (μCP Well Plates). Automated high-content imaging of human cells seeded on μCP Well Plates revealed tight, highly consistent control of single-cell geometry, cytoskeletal organization, and nuclear elongation. Detailed subcellular imaging of the actin cytoskeleton and chromatin within live human fibroblasts on μCP Well Plates was then used to describe a new relationship between cellular geometry and chromatin dynamics. In summary, the μCP Well Plate platform is an enabling high-content screening technology for human cell biology and cellular engineering efforts that seek to identify key biochemical and biophysical cues in the cellular microenvironment.

  12. Morphometric Characterization of Rat and Human Alveolar Macrophage Cell Models and their Response to Amiodarone using High Content Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ewelina; Patel, Aateka; Ball, Doug; Klapwijk, Jan; Millar, Val; Kumar, Abhinav; Martin, Abigail; Mahendran, Rhamiya; Dailey, Lea Ann; Forbes, Ben; Hutter, Victoria

    2017-05-24

    Progress to the clinic may be delayed or prevented when vacuolated or "foamy" alveolar macrophages are observed during non-clinical inhalation toxicology assessment. The first step in developing methods to study this response in vitro is to characterize macrophage cell lines and their response to drug exposures. Human (U937) and rat (NR8383) cell lines and primary rat alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage were characterized using high content fluorescence imaging analysis quantification of cell viability, morphometry, and phospholipid and neutral lipid accumulation. Cell health, morphology and lipid content were comparable (p content. Responses to amiodarone, a known inducer of phospholipidosis, required analysis of shifts in cell population profiles (the proportion of cells with elevated vacuolation or lipid content) rather than average population data which was insensitive to the changes observed. A high content image analysis assay was developed and used to provide detailed morphological characterization of rat and human alveolar-like macrophages and their response to a phospholipidosis-inducing agent. This provides a basis for development of assays to predict or understand macrophage vacuolation following inhaled drug exposure.

  13. Real time imaging of mRNA expression dynamics in live cells using protein complementation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Amit

    2009-03-01

    Traditional methods for mRNA quantification in cells, such as northern blots, quantitative PCR or microarrays assays, require cell lysis and therefore do not preserve its dynamics. These methods cannot be used to probe the spatio-temporal localization of mRNA in cells, which provide useful information for a wide range biomolecular process, including RNA metabolizim, expression kinetics and RNA interference. To probe mRNA dynamics in live prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, we develop a method, which exploit the strong affinity of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) to specific RNA aptamers. Two parts of the eIF4A are fused to a split Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP), and are expressed in the cells at high abundance. However, only when the RNA apatmer is also present, the two protein parts complement and become fluorescent. Thus, the fluorescent background remains low, allowing us to directly image the expression of mRNA molecules in live e-coli cells from its early onset, over hours. We find that the expression kinetics can be classified in one out of at least three forms, which also display distinct spatial distributions. I will discuss the possible biological origin for these distributions and their time evolution.

  14. Simultaneous quantitative live cell imaging of multiple FRET-based biosensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Woehler

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel method for multi-color spectral FRET analysis which is used to study a system of three independent FRET-based molecular sensors composed of the combinations of only three fluorescent proteins. This method is made possible by a novel routine for computing the 3-D excitation/emission spectral fingerprint of FRET from reference measurements of the donor and acceptor alone. By unmixing the 3D spectrum of the FRET sample, the total relative concentrations of the fluorophores and their scaled FRET efficiencies are directly measured, from which apparent FRET efficiencies can be computed. If the FRET sample is composed of intramolecular FRET sensors it is possible to determine the total relative concentration of the sensors and then estimate absolute FRET efficiency of each sensor. Using multiple tandem constructs with fixed FRET efficiency as well as FRET-based calcium sensors with novel fluorescent protein combinations we demonstrate that the computed FRET efficiencies are accurate and changes in these quantities occur without crosstalk. We provide an example of this method's potential by demonstrating simultaneous imaging of spatially colocalized changes in [Ca(2+], [cAMP], and PKA activity.

  15. Novel insights into host-fungal pathogen interactions derived from live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Judith; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars-Peter

    2015-03-01

    The theoretical physicist and Nobel laureate Richard Feynman outlined in his 1959 lecture, "There's plenty of room at the bottom", the enormous possibility of producing and visualising things at smaller scales. The advent of advanced scanning and transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution microscopy has begun to open the door to visualise host-pathogen interactions at smaller scales, and spinning disc confocal and two-photon microscopy has improved our ability to study these events in real time in three dimensions. The aim of this review is to illustrate some of the advances in understanding host-fungal interactions that have been made in recent years in particular those relating to the interactions of live fungal pathogens with phagocytes. Dynamic imaging of host-pathogen interactions has recently revealed novel detail and unsuspected mechanistic insights, facilitating the dissection of the phagocytic process into its component parts. Here, we will highlight advances in our knowledge of host-fungal pathogen interactions, including the specific effects of fungal cell viability, cell wall composition and morphogenesis on the phagocytic process and try to define the relative contributions of neutrophils and macrophages to the clearance of fungal pathogens in vitro and the infected host.

  16. Imaging Live Cells at the Nanometer-Scale with Single-Molecule Microscopy: Obstacles and Achievements in Experiment Optimization for Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L. Haas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy enables biological investigations inside living cells to achieve millisecond- and nanometer-scale resolution. Although single-molecule-based methods are becoming increasingly accessible to non-experts, optimizing new single-molecule experiments can be challenging, in particular when super-resolution imaging and tracking are applied to live cells. In this review, we summarize common obstacles to live-cell single-molecule microscopy and describe the methods we have developed and applied to overcome these challenges in live bacteria. We examine the choice of fluorophore and labeling scheme, approaches to achieving single-molecule levels of fluorescence, considerations for maintaining cell viability, and strategies for detecting single-molecule signals in the presence of noise and sample drift. We also discuss methods for analyzing single-molecule trajectories and the challenges presented by the finite size of a bacterial cell and the curvature of the bacterial membrane.

  17. Imaging metabolite dynamics in living cells using a Spinach-based riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Mingxu; Litke, Jacob L; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2015-05-26

    Riboswitches are natural ligand-sensing RNAs typically that are found in the 5' UTRs of mRNA. Numerous classes of riboswitches have been discovered, enabling mRNA to be regulated by diverse and physiologically important cellular metabolites and small molecules. Here we describe Spinach riboswitches, a new class of genetically encoded metabolite sensor derived from naturally occurring riboswitches. Drawing upon the structural switching mechanism of natural riboswitches, we show that Spinach can be swapped for the expression platform of various riboswitches, allowing metabolite binding to induce Spinach fluorescence directly. In the case of the thiamine 5'-pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitch from the Escherichia coli thiM gene encoding hydroxyethylthiazole kinase, we show that insertion of Spinach results in an RNA sensor that exhibits fluorescence upon binding TPP. This TPP Spinach riboswitch binds TPP with affinity and selectivity similar to that of the endogenous riboswitch and enables the discovery of agonists and antagonists of the TPP riboswitch using simple fluorescence readouts. Furthermore, expression of the TPP Spinach riboswitch in Escherichia coli enables live imaging of dynamic changes in intracellular TPP concentrations in individual cells. Additionally, we show that other riboswitches that use a structural mechanism similar to that of the TPP riboswitch, including the guanine and adenine riboswitches from the Bacillus subtilis xpt gene encoding xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, and the S-adenosyl-methionine-I riboswitch from the B. subtilis yitJ gene encoding methionine synthase, can be converted into Spinach riboswitches. Thus, Spinach riboswitches constitute a novel class of RNA-based fluorescent metabolite sensors that exploit the diversity of naturally occurring ligand-binding riboswitches.

  18. Knockin’ on pollen’s door: live cell imaging of early polarization events in germinating Arabidopsis pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eVogler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pollen tubes are an excellent system for studying the cellular dynamics and complex signaling pathways that coordinate polarized tip growth. Although several signaling mechanisms acting in the tip-growing pollen tube have been described, our knowledge on the subcellular and molecular events during pollen germination and growth site selection at the pollen plasma membrane is rather scarce. To simultaneously track germinating pollen from up to 12 genetically different plants we developed an inexpensive and easy mounting technique, suitable for every standard microscope setup. We performed high magnification live-cell imaging during Arabidopsis pollen activation, germination, and the establishment of pollen tube tip growth by using fluorescent marker lines labeling either the pollen cytoplasm, vesicles, the actin cytoskeleton or the sperm cell nuclei and membranes. Our studies revealed distinctive vesicle and F-actin polarization during pollen activation and characteristic growth kinetics during pollen germination and pollen tube formation. Initially, the germinating Arabidopsis pollen tube grows slowly and forms a uniform roundish bulge, followed by a transition phase with vesicles heavily accumulating at the growth site before switching to rapid tip growth. Furthermore, we found the two sperm cells to be transported into the pollen tube after the phase of rapid tip growth has been initiated. The method presented here is suitable to quantitatively study subcellular events during Arabidopsis pollen germination and growth, and for the detailed analysis of pollen mutants with respect to pollen polarization, bulging, or growth site selection at the pollen plasma membrane.

  19. Live Cell Imaging During Germination Reveals Dynamic Tubular Structures Derived from Protein Storage Vacuoles of Barley Aleurone Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Ibl

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The germination of cereal seeds is a rapid developmental process in which the endomembrane system undergoes a series of dynamic morphological changes to mobilize storage compounds. The changing ultrastructure of protein storage vacuoles (PSVs in the cells of the aleurone layer has been investigated in the past, but generally this involved inferences drawn from static pictures representing different developmental stages. We used live cell imaging in transgenic barley plants expressing a TIP3-GFP fusion protein as a fluorescent PSV marker to follow in real time the spatially and temporally regulated remodeling and reshaping of PSVs during germination. During late-stage germination, we observed thin, tubular structures extending from PSVs in an actin-dependent manner. No extensions were detected following the disruption of actin microfilaments, while microtubules did not appear to be involved in the process. The previously-undetected tubular PSV structures were characterized by complex movements, fusion events and a dynamic morphology. Their function during germination remains unknown, but might be related to the transport of solutes and metabolites.

  20. In vitro cytotoxicity of fluorescent silica nanoparticles hybridized with aggregation-induced emission luminogens for living cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yun; Li, Min; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Weijie; Xiong, Jun; Hu, Qinggang; Song, Zifang; Zheng, Qichang

    2013-01-07

    Fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) can provide high-intensity and photostable fluorescent signals as a probe for biomedical analysis. In this study, FSNPs hybridized with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) luminogens (namely FSNP-SD) were successfully fabricated by a surfactant-free sol-gel method. The FSNP-SD were spherical, monodisperse and uniform in size, with an average diameter of approximately 100 nm, and emitted strong fluorescence at the peak of 490 nm. The FSNP-SD selectively stained the cytoplasmic regions and were distributed in the cytoplasm. Moreover, they can stay inside cells, enabling the tacking of cells over a long period of time. The intracellular vesicles and multinucleated cells were increase gradually with the rise of FSNP-SD concentration. Both cell viability and survival only lost less than 20% when the cells were exposed to the high concentration of 100 μg/mL FSNP-SD. Additionally, the cell apoptosis and intracellular ROS assay indicated that FSNP-SD had no significant toxic effects at the maximum working concentration of 80 μg/mL. This study demonstrated that the FSNP-SD are promising biocompatible fluorescent probes for living cell imaging.

  1. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles Hybridized with Aggregation-Induced Emission Luminogens for Living Cell Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Xia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs can provide high-intensity and photostable fluorescent signals as a probe for biomedical analysis. In this study, FSNPs hybridized with aggregation-induced emission (AIE luminogens (namely FSNP-SD were successfully fabricated by a surfactant-free sol-gel method. The FSNP-SD were spherical, monodisperse and uniform in size, with an average diameter of approximately 100 nm, and emitted strong fluorescence at the peak of 490 nm. The FSNP-SD selectively stained the cytoplasmic regions and were distributed in the cytoplasm. Moreover, they can stay inside cells, enabling the tacking of cells over a long period of time. The intracellular vesicles and multinucleated cells were increase gradually with the rise of FSNP-SD concentration. Both cell viability and survival only lost less than 20% when the cells were exposed to the high concentration of 100 μg/mL FSNP-SD. Additionally, the cell apoptosis and intracellular ROS assay indicated that FSNP-SD had no significant toxic effects at the maximum working concentration of 80 μg/mL. This study demonstrated that the FSNP-SD are promising biocompatible fluorescent probes for living cell imaging.

  2. A NIR fluorescent probe for the rapid detection of Hg2+ in living cells and in vivo mice imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaoliang; Long, Liping; Xia, Li; Fang, Fang

    2017-06-01

    A near-infrared fluorescent probe NIR-Hg, for the detection of Hg2+ ion, has been synthesized directly by condensing Changsha dye with 4-Phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazide and the structure has fully characterized by 1HNMR, 13CNMR, and ESI-MS. The probe has been designed on the basis of the reaction that Hg2+ ion promotes thiosemicarbazide to oxazole in aqueous media and had been induced to produce turn-on fluorescence via an irreversible spirolactam ring-opening process. The probe NIR-Hg has exhibited fast response (1 min), high sensitivity with 44-fold fluorescence intensity enhancement under six equivalent amounts of Hg2+ added, high selectivity over other related metal ions and a low detection limit of 5.8 × 10-8 M in the phosphate buffer. The linear response range covers the concentration of Hg2+ from 5 × 10-7 to 5 × 10-6 M. In addition, the probe has good cell-membrane permeability, which is suitable for fluorescence imaging for Hg2+ in living cells and in vivo mice.

  3. A highly sensitive, single selective, fluorescent sensor for Al{sup 3+} detection and its application in living cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xing-Pei [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Sun, Shao-bo; Li, Ying-dong [Institute of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine, Gansu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhi, Li-hua [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Wu, Wei-na, E-mail: wuwn08@hpu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Wang, Yuan, E-mail: wangyuan08@hpu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China)

    2014-11-15

    A new o-aminophenol-based fluorogenic chemosensor methyl 3,5-bis((E)-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl)-4-hydroxybenzoate 1 have been synthesized by Schiff base condensation of methyl 3,5-diformyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with o-aminophenol, which exhibits high selectivity and sensitivity toward Al{sup 3+}. Fluorescence titration studies of receptors 1 with different metal cations in CH{sub 3}OH medium showed highly selective and sensitive towards Al{sup 3+} ions even in the presence of other commonly coexisting metal ions. The detection limit of Al{sup 3+} ions is at the parts per billion level. Interestingly, the Al(III) complex of 1 offered a large Stokes shift (>120 nm), which can miximize the selfquenching effect. In addition, possible utilization of this receptor as bio-imaging fluorescent probe to detect Al{sup 3+} in human cervical HeLa cancer cell lines was also investigated by confocal fluorescence microscopy. - Highlights: • A new Schiff base chemosensor is reported. • The sensor for Al{sup 3+} offers large Stokes shift. • The detection limit of Al{sup 3+} in CH{sub 3}OH solution is at the parts per billion level. • The utilization of sensor for the monitoring of Al{sup 3+} levels in living cells was examined.

  4. A NBD-based simple but effective fluorescent pH probe for imaging of lysosomes in living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiang-Jian [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Taishan College, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Chen, Li-Na [Institute of Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhang, Xuan [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Taishan College, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Jin-Ting [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Chen, Ming-Yu [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Taishan College, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wu, Qiu-Rong [Institute of Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Taishan College, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Miao, Jun-Ying, E-mail: miaojy@sdu.edu.cn [Institute of Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhao, Bao-Xiang, E-mail: bxzhao@sdu.edu.cn [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2016-05-12

    NBDlyso with lysosome-locating morpholine moiety has been developed as a high selective and sensitive fluorescent pH probe. This probe can respond to acidic pH (2.0–7.0) in a short time (less than 1 min) and not almost change after continuously illuminated for an extended period by ultraviolet light. The fluorescence intensity of NBDlyso enhanced 100-fold in acidic solution, with very good linear relationship (R{sup 2} = 0.996). The pK{sub a} of probe NBDlyso is 4.10. Therefore, NBDlyso was used to detect lysosomal pH changes successfully. Besides, X-ray crystallography was used to verify the structure of NBDlyso, and the recognition mechanism involving photo-induced electron transfer was interpreted theoretically by means of DFT and TDDFT calculations skillfully when NBDlyso comes into play under the acidic condition. This probe showed good ability to sense pH change in living cell image. - Highlights: • An effective NBD-based fluorescent pH probe was developed. • The sensing mechanism was interpreted by theoretical calculation. • This probe was successfully used to monitor lysosoml pH changes in Hela cells.

  5. Electrostatic nucleic acid nanoassembly enables hybridization chain reaction in living cells for ultrasensitive mRNA imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhan; Liu, Gao-Qin; Yang, Xiao-Li; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2015-06-03

    Efficient approaches for intracellular delivery of nucleic acid reagents to achieve sensitive detection and regulation of gene and protein expressions are essential for chemistry and biology. We develop a novel electrostatic DNA nanoassembly that, for the first time, realizes hybridization chain reaction (HCR), a target-initiated alternating hybridization reaction between two hairpin probes, for signal amplification in living cells. The DNA nanoassembly has a designed structure with a core gold nanoparticle, a cationic peptide interlayer, and an electrostatically assembled outer layer of fluorophore-labeled hairpin DNA probes. It is shown to have high efficiency for cellular delivery of DNA probes via a unique endocytosis-independent mechanism that confers a significant advantage of overcoming endosomal entrapment. Moreover, electrostatic assembly of DNA probes enables target-initialized release of the probes from the nanoassembly via HCR. This intracellular HCR offers efficient signal amplification and enables ultrasensitive fluorescence activation imaging of mRNA expression with a picomolar detection limit. The results imply that the developed nanoassembly may provide an invaluable platform in low-abundance biomarker discovery and regulation for cell biology and theranostics.

  6. Multiple origins of spontaneously arising micronuclei in HeLa cells: Direct evidence from long-term live cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao Xiaotang; Zhang Yingyin; Yi Qiyi; Hou Heli; Xu Bo; Chu Liang; Huang Yun; Zhang Wenrui [Laboratory of Molecular and Cell Genetics, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Fenech, Michael [CSIRO Human Nutrition, PO Box 10041, Adelaide BC, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); Shi Qinghua [Laboratory of Molecular and Cell Genetics, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)], E-mail: qshi@ustc.edu.cn

    2008-11-10

    Although micronuclei (MNi) are extensively used to evaluate genotoxic effects and chromosome instability, the most basic issue regarding their origins has not been completely addressed due to limitations of traditional methods. Recently, long-term live cell imaging was developed to monitor the dynamics of single cell in a real-time and high-throughput manner. In the present study, this state-of-the-art technique was employed to examine spontaneous micronucleus (MN) formation in untreated HeLa cells. We demonstrate that spontaneous MNi are derived from incorrectly aligned chromosomes in metaphase (displaced chromosomes, DCs), lagging chromosomes (LCs) and broken chromosome bridges (CBs) in later mitotic stages, but not nuclear buds in S phase. However, most of bipolar mitoses with DCs (91.29%), LCs (73.11%) and broken CBs (88.93%) did not give rise to MNi. Our data also show directly, for the first time, that MNi could originate spontaneously from (1) MNi already presented in the mother cells; (2) nuclear fragments that appeared during mitosis with CB; and (3) chromosomes being extruded into a minicell which fused with one of the daughter cells later. Quantitatively, most of MNi originated from LCs (63.66%), DCs (10.97%) and broken CBs (9.25%). Taken together, these direct evidences show that there are multiple origins for spontaneously arising MNi in HeLa cells and each mechanism contributes to overall MN formation to different extents.

  7. Live-cell imaging of Marburg virus-infected cells uncovers actin-dependent transport of nucleocapsids over long distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schudt, Gordian; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Dolnik, Olga; Sodeik, Beate; Becker, Stephan

    2013-08-27

    Transport of large viral nucleocapsids from replication centers to assembly sites requires contributions from the host cytoskeleton via cellular adaptor and motor proteins. For the Marburg and Ebola viruses, related viruses that cause severe hemorrhagic fevers, the mechanism of nucleocapsid transport remains poorly understood. Here we developed and used live-cell imaging of fluorescently labeled viral and host proteins to characterize the dynamics and molecular requirements of nucleocapsid transport in Marburg virus-infected cells under biosafety level 4 conditions. The study showed a complex actin-based transport of nucleocapsids over long distances from the viral replication centers to the budding sites. Only after the nucleocapsids had associated with the matrix viral protein VP40 at the plasma membrane were they recruited into filopodia and cotransported with host motor myosin 10 toward the budding sites at the tip or side of the long cellular protrusions. Three different transport modes and velocities were identified: (i) Along actin filaments in the cytosol, nucleocapsids were transported at ∼200 nm/s; (ii) nucleocapsids migrated from one actin filament to another at ∼400 nm/s; and (iii) VP40-associated nucleocapsids moved inside filopodia at 100 nm/s. Unique insights into the spatiotemporal dynamics of nucleocapsids and their interaction with the cytoskeleton and motor proteins can lead to novel classes of antivirals that interfere with the trafficking and subsequent release of the Marburg virus from infected cells.

  8. Live Cell Imaging During Germination Reveals Dynamic Tubular Structures Derived from Protein Storage Vacuoles of Barley Aleurone Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibl, Verena; Stoger, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The germination of cereal seeds is a rapid developmental process in which the endomembrane system undergoes a series of dynamic morphological changes to mobilize storage compounds. The changing ultrastructure of protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) in the cells of the aleurone layer has been investigated in the past, but generally this involved inferences drawn from static pictures representing different developmental stages. We used live cell imaging in transgenic barley plants expressing a TIP3-GFP fusion protein as a fluorescent PSV marker to follow in real time the spatially and temporally regulated remodeling and reshaping of PSVs during germination. During late-stage germination, we observed thin, tubular structures extending from PSVs in an actin-dependent manner. No extensions were detected following the disruption of actin microfilaments, while microtubules did not appear to be involved in the process. The previously-undetected tubular PSV structures were characterized by complex movements, fusion events and a dynamic morphology. Their function during germination remains unknown, but might be related to the transport of solutes and metabolites.

  9. Design and implementation of high-content imaging platforms: lessons learned from end user-developer collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Cynthia L; Sjaastad, Michael D

    2009-11-01

    Automated high-content screening and analysis (HCS/HCA) technology solutions have become indispensable in expediting the pace of drug discovery. Because of the complexity involved in designing, building, and validating HCS/HCA platforms, it is important to design, build, and validate a HCS/HCA platform before it is actually needed. Managed properly, collaboration between technology providers and end users in research is essential in accelerating development of the hardware and software of new HCS/HCA platforms before they become commercially available. Such a collaboration results in the cost effective creation of new technologies that meet specific and customized industrial requirements. This review outlines the history of, and considerations relevant to, the development of the Cytometrix Profiling System by Cytokinetics, Inc. and the "Complete Imaging Solution" for high-content screening, developed by Molecular Devices Corporation (MDC) (now MDS Analytical Technologies), from original conception and testing of various components, to multiple development cycles from 1998 to the present, and finally to market consolidation.

  10. Live-cell FRET imaging reveals clustering of the prion protein at the cell surface induced by infectious prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Evandro; Macedo, Joana A; Paulo, Pedro M R; Tavares, Catarina; Lopes, Carlos; Melo, Eduardo P

    2014-07-01

    Prion diseases are associated to the conversion of the prion protein into a misfolded pathological isoform. The mechanism of propagation of protein misfolding by protein templating remains largely unknown. Neuroblastoma cells were transfected with constructs of the prion protein fused to both CFP-GPI-anchored and to YFP-GPI-anchored and directed to its cell membrane location. Live-cell FRET imaging between the prion protein fused to CFP or YFP was measured giving consistent values of 10±2%. This result was confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and indicates intermolecular interactions between neighbor prion proteins. In particular, considering that a maximum FRET efficiency of 17±2% was determined from a positive control consisting of a fusion CFP-YFP-GPI-anchored. A stable cell clone expressing the two fusions containing the prion protein was also selected to minimize cell-to-cell variability. In both, stable and transiently transfected cells, the FRET efficiency consistently increased in the presence of infectious prions - from 4±1% to 7±1% in the stable clone and from 10±2% to 16±1% in transiently transfected cells. These results clearly reflect an increased clustering of the prion protein on the membrane in the presence of infectious prions, which was not observed in negative control using constructs without the prion protein and upon addition of non-infected brain. Our data corroborates the recent view that the primary site for prion conversion is the cell membrane. Since our fluorescent cell clone is not susceptible to propagate infectivity, we hypothesize that the initial event of prion infectivity might be the clustering of the GPI-anchored prion protein.

  11. Impact of image segmentation on high-content screening data quality for SK-BR-3 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yizheng

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High content screening (HCS is a powerful method for the exploration of cellular signalling and morphology that is rapidly being adopted in cancer research. HCS uses automated microscopy to collect images of cultured cells. The images are subjected to segmentation algorithms to identify cellular structures and quantitate their morphology, for hundreds to millions of individual cells. However, image analysis may be imperfect, especially for "HCS-unfriendly" cell lines whose morphology is not well handled by current image segmentation algorithms. We asked if segmentation errors were common for a clinically relevant cell line, if such errors had measurable effects on the data, and if HCS data could be improved by automated identification of well-segmented cells. Results Cases of poor cell body segmentation occurred frequently for the SK-BR-3 cell line. We trained classifiers to identify SK-BR-3 cells that were well segmented. On an independent test set created by human review of cell images, our optimal support-vector machine classifier identified well-segmented cells with 81% accuracy. The dose responses of morphological features were measurably different in well- and poorly-segmented populations. Elimination of the poorly-segmented cell population increased the purity of DNA content distributions, while appropriately retaining biological heterogeneity, and simultaneously increasing our ability to resolve specific morphological changes in perturbed cells. Conclusion Image segmentation has a measurable impact on HCS data. The application of a multivariate shape-based filter to identify well-segmented cells improved HCS data quality for an HCS-unfriendly cell line, and could be a valuable post-processing step for some HCS datasets.

  12. Whole organism high-content screening by label-free, image-based Bayesian classification for parasitic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A Paveley

    Full Text Available Sole reliance on one drug, Praziquantel, for treatment and control of schistosomiasis raises concerns about development of widespread resistance, prompting renewed interest in the discovery of new anthelmintics. To discover new leads we designed an automated label-free, high content-based, high throughput screen (HTS to assess drug-induced effects on in vitro cultured larvae (schistosomula using bright-field imaging. Automatic image analysis and Bayesian prediction models define morphological damage, hit/non-hit prediction and larval phenotype characterization. Motility was also assessed from time-lapse images. In screening a 10,041 compound library the HTS correctly detected 99.8% of the hits scored visually. A proportion of these larval hits were also active in an adult worm ex-vivo screen and are the subject of ongoing studies. The method allows, for the first time, screening of large compound collections against schistosomes and the methods are adaptable to other whole organism and cell-based screening by morphology and motility phenotyping.

  13. Imaging of conformational changes of proteins with a new environment-sensitive fluorescent probe designed for site-specific labeling of recombinant proteins in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, J; Nakajima, T; Sato, M; Ozawa, T; Tohda, K; Umezawa, Y

    2001-07-01

    We demonstrate herein a new method for imaging conformational changes of proteins in live cells using a new synthetic environment-sensitive fluorescent probe, 9-amino-6,8-bis(1,3,2-dithioarsolan-2-yl)-5H-benzo[a]phenoxazin-5-one. This fluorescent probe can be attached to recombinant proteins containing four cysteine residues at the i, i + 1, i + 4, and i + 5 positions of an alpha-helix. The specific binding of the fluorescent probe to this 4Cys motif enables fluorescent labeling inside cells by its extracellular administration. The high sensitivity of the fluorophore to its environment enables monitoring of the conformational changes of the proteins in live cells as changes in its fluorescence intensity. The present method was applied to calmodulin (CaM), a Ca2+-binding protein that was well-known to expose hydrophobic domains, depending on the Ca2+ concentration. A recombinant CaM fused at its C-terminal with a helical peptide containing a 4Cys motif was labeled with the fluorescent probe inside live cells. The fluorescence intensity changed reversibly depending on the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which reflected the conformational change of the recombinant CaM in the live cells.

  14. 3D tracking of single nanoparticles and quantum dots in living cells by out-of-focus imaging with diffraction pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, Lucia; Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-11-01

    Live cells are three-dimensional environments where biological molecules move to find their targets and accomplish their functions. However, up to now, most single molecule investigations have been limited to bi-dimensional studies owing to the complexity of 3d-tracking techniques. Here, we present a novel method for three-dimensional localization of single nano-emitters based on automatic recognition of out-of-focus diffraction patterns. Our technique can be applied to track the movements of single molecules in living cells using a conventional epifluorescence microscope. We first demonstrate three-dimensional localization of fluorescent nanobeads over 4 microns depth with accuracy below 2 nm in vitro. Remarkably, we also establish three-dimensional tracking of Quantum Dots, overcoming their anisotropic emission, by adopting a ligation strategy that allows rotational freedom of the emitter combined with proper pattern recognition. We localize commercially available Quantum Dots in living cells with accuracy better than 7 nm over 2 microns depth. We validate our technique by tracking the three-dimensional movements of single protein-conjugated Quantum Dots in living cell. Moreover, we find that important localization errors can occur in off-focus imaging when improperly calibrated and we give indications to avoid them. Finally, we share a Matlab script that allows readily application of our technique by other laboratories.

  15. Towards semantic-driven high-content image analysis: an operational instantiation for mitosis detection in digital histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racoceanu, D; Capron, F

    2015-06-01

    This study concerns a novel symbolic cognitive vision framework emerged from the Cognitive Microscopy (MICO(1)) initiative. MICO aims at supporting the evolution towards digital pathology, by studying cognitive clinical-compliant protocols involving routine virtual microscopy. We instantiate this paradigm in the case of mitotic count as a component of breast cancer grading in histopathology. The key concept of our approach is the role of the semantics as driver of the whole slide image analysis protocol. All the decisions being taken into a semantic and formal world, MICO represents a knowledge-driven platform for digital histopathology. Therefore, the core of this initiative is the knowledge representation and the reasoning. Pathologists' knowledge and strategies are used to efficiently guide image analysis algorithms. In this sense, hard-coded knowledge, semantic and usability gaps are to be reduced by a leading, active role of reasoning and of semantic approaches. Integrating ontologies and reasoning in confluence with modular imaging algorithms, allows the emergence of new clinical-compliant protocols for digital pathology. This represents a promising way to solve decision reproducibility and traceability issues in digital histopathology, while increasing the flexibility of the platform and pathologists' acceptance, the one always having the legal responsibility in the diagnosis process. The proposed protocols open the way to increasingly reliable cancer assessment (i.e. multiple slides per sample analysis), quantifiable and traceable second opinion for cancer grading, and modern capabilities for cancer research support in histopathology (i.e. content and context-based indexing and retrieval). Last, but not least, the generic approach introduced here is applicable for number of additional challenges, related to molecular imaging and, in general, to high-content image exploration.

  16. Fluorescent CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugates for long-term, nontoxic imaging and nuclear targeting in living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fanqing; Gerion, Daniele

    2004-06-14

    One of the biggest challenges in cell biology is the imaging of living cells. For this purpose, the most commonly used visualization tool is fluorescent markers. However, conventional labels, such as organic fluorescent dyes or green fluorescent proteins (GFP), lack the photostability to allow the tracking of cellular events that happen over minutes to days. In addition, they are either toxic to cells (dyes), or difficult to construct and manipulate (GFP). We report here the use of a new class of fluorescent labels, silanized CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugates, for imaging the nuclei of living cells. CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals, or so called quantum dots (qdots), are extremely photostable, and have been used extensively in cellular imaging of fixed cells. However, most of the studies about living cells so far have been concerned only with particle entry into the cytoplasm or the localization of receptors on the cell membrane. Specific targeting of qdots to the nucleus of living cells ha s not been reported in previous studies, due to the lack of a targeting mechanism and proper particle size. Here we demonstrate for the first time the construction of a CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugate that carries the SV40 large T antigen nuclear localization signal (NLS), and the transfection of the complex into living cells. By a novel adaptation of commonly used cell transfection techniques for qdots, we were able to introduce and retain the NLS-qdots conjugate in living cells for up to a week without detectable negative cellular effects. Moreover, we can visualize the movement of the CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugates from cytoplasm to the nucleus, and the accumulation of the complex in the cell nucleus, over a long observation time period. This report opens the door for using qdots to visualize long-term biological events that happen in the cell nucleus, and provides a new nontoxic, long-term imaging platform for cell nuclear processes.

  17. Fluorescent CdSe/ZnS Nanocrystal-Peptide Conjugates for Long-term, Nontoxic Imaging and Nuclear Targeting in Living Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, F; Gerion, D

    2004-06-08

    One of the biggest challenges in cell biology is the imaging of living cells. For this purpose, the most commonly used visualization tool is fluorescent markers. However, conventional labels, such as organic fluorescent dyes or green fluorescent proteins (GFP), lack the photostability to allow the tracking of cellular events that happen over minutes to days. In addition, they are either toxic to cells (dyes), or difficult to construct and manipulate (GFP). We report here the use of a new class of fluorescent labels, silanized CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugates, for imaging the nuclei of living cells. CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals, or so called quantum dots (qdots), are extremely photostable, and have been used extensively in cellular imaging of fixed cells. Most of the studies about living cells so far have been concerned only with particle entry into the cytoplasm or the localization of receptors on the cell membrane. Specific targeting of qdots to the nucleus of living cells has not been reported in previous studies, due to the lack of a targeting mechanism and proper particle size. Here we demonstrate for the first time the construction of a CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugate that carries the SV40 large T antigen nuclear localization signal (NLS), and the transfection of the complex into living cells. By a novel adaptation of a commonly used cell transfection technique for qdots, we were able to introduce and retain the NLS-qdot conjugates in living cells for up to a week without detectable negative cellular effects. Moreover, we can visualize the movement of the CdSe/ZnS qdot-peptide conjugates from cytoplasm to the nucleus, and the accumulation of the complex in the cell nucleus, over a long observation time period. This report opens the door for using qdots to visualize long-term biological events that happen in the cell nucleus, and provides a new nontoxic, long-term imaging platform for nuclear trafficking mechanisms and cell nuclear processes.

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon dots with real-time live-cell imaging and blood–brain barrier penetration capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shousi; Guo, Shanshan; Xu, Pingxiang; Li, Xiaorong; Zhao, Yuming; Gu, Wei; Xue, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) were synthesized using a one-pot hydrothermal treatment with citric acid in the presence of polyethylenimine. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the N-CDs were monodispersed and quasi-spherical with an average size of ~2.6 nm. Under ultraviolet irradiation the N-CDs emitted a strong blue luminescence with a quantum yield as high as 51%. Moreover, the N-CDs exhibited a negligible cytotoxicity and could be applied as efficient nanoprobes for real-time imaging of live cells. In addition, the ability of the N-CDs to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in a concentration-dependent manner was demonstrated using an in vitro BBB model. Therefore, these PEI-passivated N-CDs with real-time live-cell imaging and BBB-penetration capabilities hold promise for traceable drug delivery to the brain. PMID:27932880

  19. Integrating high-content imaging and chemical genetics to probe host cellular pathways critical for Yersinia pestis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna P Kota

    Full Text Available The molecular machinery that regulates the entry and survival of Yersinia pestis in host macrophages is poorly understood. Here, we report the development of automated high-content imaging assays to quantitate the internalization of virulent Y. pestis CO92 by macrophages and the subsequent activation of host NF-κB. Implementation of these assays in a focused chemical screen identified kinase inhibitors that inhibited both of these processes. Rac-2-ethoxy-3 octadecanamido-1-propylphosphocholine (a protein Kinase C inhibitor, wortmannin (a PI3K inhibitor, and parthenolide (an IκB kinase inhibitor, inhibited pathogen-induced NF-κB activation and reduced bacterial entry and survival within macrophages. Parthenolide inhibited NF-κB activation in response to stimulation with Pam3CSK4 (a TLR2 agonist, E. coli LPS (a TLR4 agonist or Y. pestis infection, while the PI3K and PKC inhibitors were selective only for Y. pestis infection. Together, our results suggest that phagocytosis is the major stimulus for NF-κB activation in response to Y. pestis infection, and that Y. pestis entry into macrophages may involve the participation of protein kinases such as PI3K and PKC. More importantly, the automated image-based screening platform described here can be applied to the study of other bacteria in general and, in combination with chemical genetic screening, can be used to identify host cell functions facilitating the identification of novel antibacterial therapeutics.

  20. Live-cell imaging of the early stages of colony development in Fusarium oxysporum in vitro and ex vivo during infection of a human corneal model

    OpenAIRE

    Kurian, Smija Mariam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe University of ManchesterName: Smija Mariam KurianDegree title: Doctor of PhilosophyResearch title: Live-cell imaging of the early stages of colony development in Fusarium oxysporum in vitro and ex vivo during infection of a human corneal modelDate: May 2016Abstract: Fusarium oxysporum is a major fungal plant pathogen and emerging human pathogen. It has been hypothesised that conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) fusion may facilitate horizontal gene/chromosome transfer that could result...

  1. High-content screening of drug-induced cardiotoxicity using quantitative single cell imaging cytometry on microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Su Chul; Pal, Sukdeb; Han, Eunyoung; Song, Joon Myong

    2011-01-07

    Drug-induced cardiotoxicity or cytotoxicity followed by cell death in cardiac muscle is one of the major concerns in drug development. Herein, we report a high-content quantitative multicolor single cell imaging tool for automatic screening of drug-induced cardiotoxicity in an intact cell. A tunable multicolor imaging system coupled with a miniaturized sample platform was destined to elucidate drug-induced cardiotoxicity via simultaneous quantitative monitoring of intracellular sodium ion concentration, potassium ion channel permeability and apoptosis/necrosis in H9c2(2-1) cell line. Cells were treated with cisapride (a human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel blocker), digoxin (Na(+)/K(+)-pump blocker), camptothecin (anticancer agent) and a newly synthesized anti-cancer drug candidate (SH-03). Decrease in potassium channel permeability in cisapride-treated cells indicated that it can also inhibit the trafficking of the hERG channel. Digoxin treatment resulted in an increase of intracellular [Na(+)]. However, it did not affect potassium channel permeability. Camptothecin and SH-03 did not show any cytotoxic effect at normal use (≤300 nM and 10 μM, respectively). This result clearly indicates the potential of SH-03 as a new anticancer drug candidate. The developed method was also used to correlate the cell death pathway with alterations in intracellular [Na(+)]. The developed protocol can directly depict and quantitate targeted cellular responses, subsequently enabling an automated, easy to operate tool that is applicable to drug-induced cytotoxicity monitoring with special reference to next generation drug discovery screening. This multicolor imaging based system has great potential as a complementary system to the conventional patch clamp technique and flow cytometric measurement for the screening of drug cardiotoxicity.

  2. A quantitative method to track protein translocation between intracellular compartments in real-time in live cells using weighted local variance image analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Calmettes

    Full Text Available The genetic expression of cloned fluorescent proteins coupled to time-lapse fluorescence microscopy has opened the door to the direct visualization of a wide range of molecular interactions in living cells. In particular, the dynamic translocation of proteins can now be explored in real time at the single-cell level. Here we propose a reliable, easy-to-implement, quantitative image processing method to assess protein translocation in living cells based on the computation of spatial variance maps of time-lapse images. The method is first illustrated and validated on simulated images of a fluorescently-labeled protein translocating from mitochondria to cytoplasm, and then applied to experimental data obtained with fluorescently-labeled hexokinase 2 in different cell types imaged by regular or confocal microscopy. The method was found to be robust with respect to cell morphology changes and mitochondrial dynamics (fusion, fission, movement during the time-lapse imaging. Its ease of implementation should facilitate its application to a broad spectrum of time-lapse imaging studies.

  3. Real-time Molecular Study of Bystander Effects of Low dose Low LET radiation Using Living Cell Imaging and Nanoparticale Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, Mohan [UT Health Science Center at San Antonio; Xu, Nancy R [Old Dominion University; Mohan, Sumathy [UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

    2013-06-03

    In this study two novel approaches are proposed to investigate precisely the low dose low LET radiation damage and its effect on bystander cells in real time. First, a flow shear model system, which would provide us a near in vivo situation where endothelial cells in the presence of extra cellular matrix experiencing continuous flow shear stress, will be used. Endothelial cells on matri-gel (simulated extra cellular matrix) will be subjected to physiological flow shear (that occurs in normal blood vessels). Second, a unique tool (Single nano particle/single live cell/single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy; Figure A) will be used to track the molecular trafficking by single live cell imaging. Single molecule chemical microscopy allows one to single out and study rare events that otherwise might be lost in assembled average measurement, and monitor many target single molecules simultaneously in real-time. Multi color single novel metal nanoparticle probes allow one to prepare multicolor probes (Figure B) to monitor many single components (events) simultaneously and perform multi-complex analysis in real-time. These nano-particles resist to photo bleaching and hence serve as probes for unlimited timeframe of analysis. Single live cell microscopy allows one to image many single cells simultaneously in real-time. With the combination of these unique tools, we will be able to study under near-physiological conditions the cellular and sub-cellular responses (even subtle changes at one molecule level) to low and very low doses of low LET radiation in real time (milli-second or nano-second) at sub-10 nanometer spatial resolution. This would allow us to precisely identify, at least in part, the molecular mediators that are responsible of radiation damage in the irradiated cells and the mediators that are responsible for initiating the signaling in the neighboring cells. Endothelial cells subjected to flow shear (2 dynes/cm2 or 16 dynes/cm2) and exposed to 0.1, 1 and 10

  4. Differences in the origins of kinetochore-positive and kinetochore-negative micronuclei: A live cell imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Erkang, E-mail: erkangj@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Most Kinetochore-negative micronuclei were derived from kinetochore-negative displaced chromosomes, kinetochore-negative lagging chromosomes and fragments of broken chromosome bridges in mitosis of MN-free cells. • Most Kinetochore-positive micronuclei were derived from kinetochore-positive displaced chromosomes, kinetochore-positive lagging chromosomes and fragments of broken chromosome bridges in mitosis of MN-free cells. • Kinetochore-positive lagging chromosomes developed into kinetochore-positive micronuclei at the higher frequency than kinetochore-positive displaced chromosomes, kinetochore-negative lagging chromosomes developed into kinetochore-negative micronuclei at the higher rate than kinetochore-negative displaced chromosomes and broken chromosome bridges produced K−MNi and/or K+MNi. - Abstract: Micronuclei (MNi) are extensively used to evaluate genotoxicity and chromosomal instability. Classification of kinetochore-negative (K−MNi) and kinetochore-positive micronuclei (K+MNi) improves the specificity and sensitivity of the micronucleus (MN) test; however, the fundamental differences in the origins of K−MNi and K+MNi have not been addressed due to the limitations of traditional methods. In the current study, HeLa CENP B-GFP H2B-mCherry cells were constructed in which histone 2B (H2B) and centromere protein B (CENP B) were expressed as fusion proteins to monomeric Cherry (mCherry) and EGFP, respectively. MNi were identified using H2B-mCherry; K+MN contained CENP B-GFP, while K−MN did not. Long-term live cell imaging was conducted to examine MN formation in the dual-color fluorescent HeLa cells. The results suggested that K−MNi were derived from kinetochore-negative displaced chromosomes (K−DCs), kinetochore-negative lagging chromosomes (K−LCs) and fragments of broken chromosome bridges (CBs) during late mitotic stages. The results also indicated that K+MNi are derived from kinetochore-positive displaced chromosomes (K

  5. Live cell imaging with protein domains capable of recognizing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate; a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemmon Mark A

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5P2] is a critically important regulatory phospholipid found in the plasma membrane of all eukaryotic cells. In addition to being a precursor of important second messengers, PtdIns(4,5P2 also regulates ion channels and transporters and serves the endocytic machinery by recruiting clathrin adaptor proteins. Visualization of the localization and dynamic changes in PtdIns(4,5P2 levels in living cells is critical to understanding the biology of PtdIns(4,5P2. This has been mostly achieved with the use of the pleckstrin homology (PH domain of PLCδ1 fused to GFP. Here we report on a comparative analysis of several recently-described yeast PH domains as well as the mammalian Tubby domain to evaluate their usefulness as PtdIns(4,5P2 imaging tools. Results All of the yeast PH domains that have been previously shown to bind PtdIns(4,5P2 showed plasma membrane localization but only a subset responded to manipulations of plasma membrane PtdIns(4,5P2. None of these domains showed any advantage over the PLCδ1PH-GFP reporter and were compromised either in their expression levels, nuclear localization or by causing peculiar membrane structures. In contrast, the Tubby domain showed high membrane localization consistent with PtdIns(4,5P2 binding and displayed no affinity for the soluble headgroup, Ins(1,4,5P3. Detailed comparison of the Tubby and PLCδ1PH domains showed that the Tubby domain has a higher affinity for membrane PtdIns(4,5P2 and therefore displays a lower sensitivity to report on changes of this lipid during phospholipase C activation. Conclusion These results showed that both the PLCδ1PH-GFP and the GFP-Tubby domain are useful reporters of PtdIns(4,5P2 changes in the plasma membrane, with distinct advantages and disadvantages. While the PLCδ1PH-GFP is a more sensitive reporter, its Ins(1,4,5P3 binding may compromise its accuracy to measure PtdIns(4,5P2changes. The Tubby domain

  6. MATtrack: A MATLAB-Based Quantitative Image Analysis Platform for Investigating Real-Time Photo-Converted Fluorescent Signals in Live Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Courtney

    Full Text Available We introduce here MATtrack, an open source MATLAB-based computational platform developed to process multi-Tiff files produced by a photo-conversion time lapse protocol for live cell fluorescent microscopy. MATtrack automatically performs a series of steps required for image processing, including extraction and import of numerical values from Multi-Tiff files, red/green image classification using gating parameters, noise filtering, background extraction, contrast stretching and temporal smoothing. MATtrack also integrates a series of algorithms for quantitative image analysis enabling the construction of mean and standard deviation images, clustering and classification of subcellular regions and injection point approximation. In addition, MATtrack features a simple user interface, which enables monitoring of Fluorescent Signal Intensity in multiple Regions of Interest, over time. The latter encapsulates a region growing method to automatically delineate the contours of Regions of Interest selected by the user, and performs background and regional Average Fluorescence Tracking, and automatic plotting. Finally, MATtrack computes convenient visualization and exploration tools including a migration map, which provides an overview of the protein intracellular trajectories and accumulation areas. In conclusion, MATtrack is an open source MATLAB-based software package tailored to facilitate the analysis and visualization of large data files derived from real-time live cell fluorescent microscopy using photoconvertible proteins. It is flexible, user friendly, compatible with Windows, Mac, and Linux, and a wide range of data acquisition software. MATtrack is freely available for download at eleceng.dit.ie/courtney/MATtrack.zip.

  7. MATtrack: A MATLAB-Based Quantitative Image Analysis Platform for Investigating Real-Time Photo-Converted Fluorescent Signals in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Jane; Woods, Elena; Scholz, Dimitri; Hall, William W; Gautier, Virginie W

    2015-01-01

    We introduce here MATtrack, an open source MATLAB-based computational platform developed to process multi-Tiff files produced by a photo-conversion time lapse protocol for live cell fluorescent microscopy. MATtrack automatically performs a series of steps required for image processing, including extraction and import of numerical values from Multi-Tiff files, red/green image classification using gating parameters, noise filtering, background extraction, contrast stretching and temporal smoothing. MATtrack also integrates a series of algorithms for quantitative image analysis enabling the construction of mean and standard deviation images, clustering and classification of subcellular regions and injection point approximation. In addition, MATtrack features a simple user interface, which enables monitoring of Fluorescent Signal Intensity in multiple Regions of Interest, over time. The latter encapsulates a region growing method to automatically delineate the contours of Regions of Interest selected by the user, and performs background and regional Average Fluorescence Tracking, and automatic plotting. Finally, MATtrack computes convenient visualization and exploration tools including a migration map, which provides an overview of the protein intracellular trajectories and accumulation areas. In conclusion, MATtrack is an open source MATLAB-based software package tailored to facilitate the analysis and visualization of large data files derived from real-time live cell fluorescent microscopy using photoconvertible proteins. It is flexible, user friendly, compatible with Windows, Mac, and Linux, and a wide range of data acquisition software. MATtrack is freely available for download at eleceng.dit.ie/courtney/MATtrack.zip.

  8. Hyperspectral imaging and characterization of live cells by broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy with singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Jasensky, Joshua; Price, Erika; Zhang, Chi; Boughton, Andrew; Han, Xiaofeng; Seeley, Emily; Liu, Xinran; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Chen, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy can be used as a powerful imaging technique to identify chemical compositions of complex samples in biology, biophysics, medicine, and materials science. In this work we developed a CARS microscopic system capable of hyperspectral imaging. By employing an ultrafast laser source, a photonic crystal fiber, and a scanning laser microscope together with spectral detection by a highly sensitive back-illuminated cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, we were able to rapidly acquire and process hyperspectral images of live cells with chemical selectivity. We discuss various aspects of hyperspectral CARS image analysis and demonstrate the use of singular value decomposition methods to characterize the cellular lipid content.

  9. HoloMonitor M4: holographic imaging cytometer for real-time kinetic label-free live-cell analysis of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebesta, Mikael; Egelberg, Peter J.; Langberg, Anders; Lindskov, Jens-Henrik; Alm, Kersti; Janicke, Birgit

    2016-03-01

    Live-cell imaging enables studying dynamic cellular processes that cannot be visualized in fixed-cell assays. An increasing number of scientists in academia and the pharmaceutical industry are choosing live-cell analysis over or in addition to traditional fixed-cell assays. We have developed a time-lapse label-free imaging cytometer HoloMonitorM4. HoloMonitor M4 assists researchers to overcome inherent disadvantages of fluorescent analysis, specifically effects of chemical labels or genetic modifications which can alter cellular behavior. Additionally, label-free analysis is simple and eliminates the costs associated with staining procedures. The underlying technology principle is based on digital off-axis holography. While multiple alternatives exist for this type of analysis, we prioritized our developments to achieve the following: a) All-inclusive system - hardware and sophisticated cytometric analysis software; b) Ease of use enabling utilization of instrumentation by expert- and entrylevel researchers alike; c) Validated quantitative assay end-points tracked over time such as optical path length shift, optical volume and multiple derived imaging parameters; d) Reliable digital autofocus; e) Robust long-term operation in the incubator environment; f) High throughput and walk-away capability; and finally g) Data management suitable for single- and multi-user networks. We provide examples of HoloMonitor applications of label-free cell viability measurements and monitoring of cell cycle phase distribution.

  10. N-doped carbon dots derived from bovine serum albumin and formic acid with one- and two-photon fluorescence for live cell nuclear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingqian; Li, Xintong; Wu, Hao; Wang, Beibei; Wu, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dots with both one- and two-photon fluorescence have drawn great attention for biomedical imaging. Herein, nitrogen-doped carbon dots were facilely developed by one-pot hydrothermal method using bovine serum albumin and formic acid as carbon sources. They are highly water-soluble with strong fluorescence when excited with ultraviolet or near infrared light. The carbon dots have a diameter of ~8.32 nm and can emit strong two-photon induced fluorescence upon excitation at 750 nm with a femtosecond laser. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer analysis revealed that the carbon dots contained three components, C, N and O, corresponding to the peak at 285, 398 and 532 eV, respectively. The Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analysis revealed that there are carboxyl and carboxylic groups on the surface, which allowed further linking of functional molecules. pH stability study demonstrated that the carbon dots are able to be used in a wide range of pH values. The fluorescence mechanism is also discussed in this study. Importantly, these carbon dots are biocompatible and highly photostable, which can be directly applied for both one- and two-photon living cell imaging. After proper surface functionalization with TAT peptide, they can be used as fluorescent probes for live cell nuclear-targeted imaging.

  11. A highly selective long-wavelength fluorescent probe for hydrazine and its application in living cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuanqiang; Zhang, Yintang; Ruan, Kehong; Meng, Fanteng; Li, Ting; Guan, Jinsheng; Du, Lulu; Qu, Peng; Xu, Maotian

    2017-09-01

    A highly selective long-wavelength turn-on fluorescent probe has been developed for the detection of N2H4. The probe was prepared by conjugation the tricyanofuran-based D-π-A system with a recognizing moiety of acetyl group. In the presence of N2H4, the probe can be effectively hydrazinolysized and produce a turn-on fluorescent emission at 610 nm as well as a large red-shift in the absorption spectrum corresponding to a color change from yellow to blue. The sensing mechanism was confirmed by HPLC, MS, UV-vis, emission spectroscopic and theoretical calculation studies. The probe displayed high selectivity and sensitivity for N2H4 with a LOD (limit of detection) of 0.16 μM. Moreover, the probe was successfully utilized for the detection of hydrazine in living cells.

  12. A rhodamine chromene-based turn-on fluorescence probe for selectively imaging Cu²+ in living cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Yong; Li, Hai-Ying; Lv, Hong-Shui; Zhao, Bao-Xiang; Miao, Jun-Ying

    2012-09-01

    We describe the development of a rhodamine chromene-based turn-on fluorescence probe to monitor the intracellular Cu(2+) level in living cells. The new fluorescent probe with a chlorine group in chromene moiety exhibits good membrane-permeable property than previous reported because the predicted lipophilicity of present probe 4 is stronger than that of methoxyl substituted probe in our previous work (CLogP of 4: 8.313, CLogP of methoxyl substituted probe: 7.706), and a fluorescence response toward Cu(2+) under physiological conditions with high sensitivity and selectivity, and facilitates naked-eye detection of Cu(2+). The fluorescence intensity was remarkably increased upon the addition of Cu(2+) within 1 or 2 min, while the other sixteen metal ions caused no significant effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An integrated environmental perfusion chamber and heating system for long-term, high resolution imaging of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, W A; Poole, C A; Jensen, C G; Watson, M

    2000-08-01

    This communication presents the design and application of an integrated environmental perfusion chamber and stage heating blanket suitable for time-lapse video microscopy of living cells. The system consists of two independently regulated components: a perfusion chamber suitable for the maintenance of cell viability and the variable delivery of environmental factors, and a separate heating blanket to control the temperature of the microscope stage and limit thermal conduction from the perfusion chamber. Two contrasting experiments are presented to demonstrate the versatility of the system. One long-term sequence illustrates the behaviour of cells exposed to ceramic fibres. The other shows the shrinking response of cultured articular cartilage chondrons under dynamic hyper-osmotic conditions designed to simulate joint loading. The chamber is simple in design, economical to produce and permits long-term examination of dynamic cellular behaviour while satisfying the fundamental requirements for the maintenance of environmental factors that influence cell viability.

  14. Imaging the nanomolar range of nitric oxide with an amplifier-coupled fluorescent indicator in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Moritoshi; Hida, Naoki; Umezawa, Yoshio

    2005-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a small uncharged free radical that is involved in diverse physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. NO is generated by three isoforms of NO synthase, endothelial, neuronal, and inducible ones. When generated in vascular endothelial cells, NO plays a key role in vascular tone regulation, in particular. Here, we describe an amplifier-coupled fluorescent indicator for NO to visualize physiological nanomolar dynamics of NO in living cells (detection limit of 0.1 nM). This genetically encoded high-sensitive indicator revealed that 1 nM of NO, which is enough to relax blood vessels, is generated in vascular endothelial cells even in the absence of shear stress. The nanomolar range of basal endothelial NO thus revealed appears to be fundamental to vascular homeostasis. fluorescence resonance energy transfer | genetic encoding

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon dots with real-time live-cell imaging and blood–brain barrier penetration capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu SS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Shousi Lu,1,2 Shanshan Guo,1 Pingxiang Xu,1 Xiaorong Li,1 Yuming Zhao,1 Wei Gu,3 Ming Xue1 1Department of Pharmacology, Beijing Laboratory for Biomedical Detection Technology and Instrument, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Capital Medical University, 2China Rehabilitation Research Center, 3Department of Chemistry and Biology, School of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China Abstract: Nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs were synthesized using a one-pot hydrothermal treatment with citric acid in the presence of polyethylenimine. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the N-CDs were monodispersed and quasi-spherical with an average size of ~2.6 nm. Under ultraviolet irradiation the N-CDs emitted a strong blue luminescence with a quantum yield as high as 51%. Moreover, the N-CDs exhibited a negligible cytotoxicity and could be applied as efficient nanoprobes for real-time imaging of live cells. In addition, the ability of the N-CDs to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB in a concentration-dependent manner was demonstrated using an in vitro BBB model. Therefore, these PEI-passivated N-CDs with real-time live-cell imaging and BBB-penetration capabilities hold promise for traceable drug delivery to the brain. Keywords: hydrothermal synthesis, nitrogen-doped carbon dots, bioimaging

  16. Sulfur and nitrogen binary doped carbon dots derived from ammonium thiocyanate for selective probing doxycycline in living cells and multicolor cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mingyue; Zhang, Liangliang; Zhan, Zhihua; Zou, Mengbing; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Shulin

    2016-04-01

    A novel sulfur and nitrogen binary doped carbon dots (S,N-CDs) was synthesized by one-step manner through the hydrothermal treatment of citric acid (CA) and ammonium thiocyanate, and the procedures for biomedical applications, including probing doxycycline in living cells and multicolor cell imaging were developed. The obtained S,N-CDs are stable in aqueous solution, possess a very high quantum yield (QY, 74.15%) and good photostability. The fluorescence of S,N-CDs can be specifically quenched by doxycycline, providing a convenient turn-off assay of doxycycline. This assay shows a wide linear detection range from 0.08 to 60 μM with a low detection limit of 20 nM. The present method also displays a good selectivity. More importantly, the S,N-CDs have an excellent biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity, allowing the multicolor cell imaging and doxycycline detection in living cells. Consequently, the developed doxycycline methods is facile, low-cost, biocompatible, sensitive and selective, which may hold the potential applications in the fields of food safety and environmental monitoring, as well as cancer therapy and related mechanism research.

  17. Imaging the uptake of gold nanoshells in live cells using plasmon resonance enhanced four wave mixing microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Natalie; Whiteman, Matt; Moger, Julian

    2011-08-29

    Gold nanoshells (GNS) are novel metal nanoparticles exhibiting attractive optical properties which make them highly suitable for biophotonics applications. We present a novel investigation using plasmon-enhanced four wave mixing microscopy combined with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to visualize the distribution of 75 nm radius GNS within live cells. During a laser tolerance study we found that cells containing nanoshells could be exposed to nanoshell uptake using two donor molecules, NaHS and GYY4137. As GYY4137 concentration was increased from 10 µM to 1 mM, the nanoshell pixel percentage as a function of cell volume (PPCV) increased from 2.15% to 3.77%. As NaHS concentration was increased over the same range, the nanoshell PPCV decreased from 12.67% to 11.47%. The most important factor affecting uptake in this study was found to be the rate of H2S release, with rapid-release from NaHS resulting in significantly greater uptake.

  18. Preparation of Yellow-Green-Emissive Carbon Dots and Their Application in Constructing a Fluorescent Turn-On Nanoprobe for Imaging of Selenol in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Shengrui; Zhong, Yaogang; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Zheng; Li, Hua

    2017-02-07

    Selenocysteine (Sec) carries out the majority of the functions of the various Se-containing species in vivo. Thus, it is of great importance to develop sensitive and selective assays to detect Sec. Herein, a carbon-dot-based fluorescent turn-on probe for highly selective detection of selenol in living cells is presented. The highly photoluminescent carbon dots that emit yellow-green fluorescence (Y-G-CDs; λmax = 520 nm in water) were prepared by using m-aminophenol as carbon precursor through a facile solvothermal method. The surface of Y-G-CDs was then covalently functionalized with 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride (DNS-Cl) to afford the 2,4-dinitrobenzene-functionalized CDs (CD-DNS) as a nanoprobe for selenol. CD-DNS is almost nonfluorescent. However, upon treating with Sec, the DNS moiety of CD-DNS can be readily cleaved by selenolate through a nucleophilic substitution process, resulting in the formation of highly fluorescent Y-G-CDs and hence leads to a dramatic increase in fluorescence intensity. The proposed nanoprobe exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity toward Sec over biothiols and other biological species. A preliminary study shows that CD-DNS can function as a useful tool for fluorescence imaging of exogenous and endogenous selenol in living cells.

  19. Sensitive near-infrared fluorescent probes for thiols based on Se-N bond cleavage: imaging in living cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Chen, Lingxin; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Yunqing

    2012-09-03

    Cy-NiSe and Cy-TfSe were designed and synthesized as sensitive near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes for detecting thiols on the basis of Se-N bond cleavage both in cells and in tissues. Since a donor-excited photoinduced electron transfer (d-PET) process occurs between the modulator and the fluorophore, Cy-NiSe and Cy-TfSe have weak fluorescence. On titration with glutathione, the free dye exhibits significant fluorescence enhancement. The two probes are sensitive and selective for thiols over other relevant biological species. They can function rapidly at pH 7.4, and their emission lies in the NIR region. Confocal imaging confirms that Cy-NiSe and Cy-TfSe can be used for detecting thiols in living cells and tissues. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. An amide-containing metal-organic tetrahedron responding to a spin-trapping reaction in a fluorescent enhancement manner for biological imaging of NO in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; He, Cheng; Wu, Pengyan; Wang, Jing; Duan, Chunying

    2011-08-17

    Metal-organic polyhedra represent a unique class of functional molecular containers that display interesting molecular recognition properties and fascinating reactivity reminiscent of the natural enzymes. By incorporating a triphenylamine moiety as a bright blue emitter, a robust cerium-based tetrahedron was developed as a luminescent detector of nitronyl nitroxide (PTIO), a specific spin-labeling nitric oxide (NO) trapper. The tetrahedron encapsulates molecules of NO and PTIO within the cavity to prompt the spin-trapping reaction and transforms the normal EPR responses into a more sensitively luminescent signaling system with the limit of detection improved to 5 nM. Twelve-fold amide groups are also functionalized within the tetrahedron to modify the hydrophilic/lipophilic environment, ensuring the successful application of biological imaging in living cells.

  1. Real-time and quantitative fluorescent live-cell imaging with quadruplex-specific red-edge probe (G4-REP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sunny Y; Amor, Souheila; Laguerre, Aurélien; Wong, Judy M Y; Monchaud, David

    2016-12-10

    The development of quadruplex-directed molecular diagnostic and therapy rely on mechanistic insights gained at both cellular and tissue levels by fluorescence imaging. This technique is based on fluorescent reporters that label cellular DNA and RNA quadruplexes to spatiotemporally address their complex cell biology. The photophysical characteristics of quadruplex probes usually dictate the modality of cell imaging by governing the selection of the light source (lamp, LED, laser), the optical light filters and the detection modality. Here, we report the characterizations of prototype from a new generation of quadruplex dye termed G4-REP (for quadruplex-specific red-edge probe) that provides fluorescence responses regardless of the excitation wavelength and modality (owing to the versatility gained through the red-edge effect), thus allowing for diverse applications and most imaging facilities. This is demonstrated by cell images (and associated quantifications) collected through confocal and multiphoton microscopy as well as through real-time live-cell imaging system over extended period, monitoring both non-cancerous and cancerous human cell lines. Our results promote a new way of designing versatile, efficient and convenient quadruplex-reporting dyes for tracking these higher-order nucleic acid structures in living human cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "G-quadruplex" Guest Editor: Dr. Concetta Giancola and Dr. Daniela Montesarchio.

  2. Live-Cell Imaging Visualizes Frequent Mitotic Skipping During Senescence-Like Growth Arrest in Mammary Carcinoma Cells Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masatoshi, E-mail: msuzuki@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki (Japan); Yamauchi, Motohiro; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi [Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Senescence-like growth arrest in human solid carcinomas is now recognized as the major outcome of radiotherapy. This study was designed to analyze cell cycle during the process of senescence-like growth arrest in mammary carcinoma cells exposed to X-rays. Methods and Materials: Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators were introduced into the human mammary carcinoma cell line MCF-7. Cell cycle was sequentially monitored by live-cell imaging for up to 5 days after exposure to 10 Gy of X-rays. Results: Live-cell imaging revealed that cell cycle transition from G2 to G1 phase without mitosis, so-called mitotic skipping, was observed in 17.1% and 69.8% of G1- and G2-irradiated cells, respectively. Entry to G1 phase was confirmed by the nuclear accumulation of mKO{sub 2}-hCdt1 as well as cyclin E, which was inversely correlated to the accumulation of G2-specific markers such as mAG-hGeminin and CENP-F. More than 90% of cells skipping mitosis were persistently arrested in G1 phase and showed positive staining for the senescent biochemical marker, which is senescence-associated ss-galactosidase, indicating induction of senescence-like growth arrest accompanied by mitotic skipping. While G2 irradiation with higher doses of X-rays induced mitotic skipping in approximately 80% of cells, transduction of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for p53 significantly suppressed mitotic skipping, suggesting that ionizing radiation-induced mitotic skipping is associated with p53 function. Conclusions: The present study found the pathway of senescence-like growth arrest in G1 phase without mitotic entry following G2-irradiation.

  3. Intact Doxil is taken up intracellularly and released doxorubicin sequesters in the lysosome: evaluated by in vitro/in vivo live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seynhaeve, Ann L B; Dicheva, Bilyana M; Hoving, Saske; Koning, Gerben A; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2013-11-28

    Doxil, also known as Caelyx, is an established liposomal formulation of doxorubicin used for the treatment of ovarian cancer, sarcoma and multiple myeloma. While showing reduced doxorubicin related toxicity, Doxil does not greatly improve clinical outcome. To become biologically active, doxorubicin needs to be released from its carrier. Uptake and breakdown of the liposomal carrier and subsequent doxorubicin release is not fully understood and in this study we explored the hypothesis that Doxil is taken up by tumor cells and slowly degraded intracellularly. We investigated the kinetics of liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) in vitro as well as in vivo by measuring cytotoxic effect, intracellular bioavailability and fate of the carrier and its content. To prevent fixation artifacts we applied live cell imaging in vitro and intravital microscopy in vivo. Within 8h after administration of free doxorubicin, 26% of the drug translocated to the nucleus and when reaching a specific concentration killed the cell. Unlike free doxorubicin, only 0.4% of the doxorubicin added as liposomal formulation entered the nucleus. Looking at the kinetics, we observed a build-up of nuclear doxorubicin within minutes of adding free doxorubicin. This was in contrast to Doxil showing slow translocation of doxorubicin to the nucleus and apparent accumulation in the cytoplasm. Observations made with time-lapse live cell imaging as well as in vivo intravital microscopy revealed the liposomal carrier colocalizing with doxorubicin in the cytoplasm. We also demonstrated the sequestering of liposomal doxorubicin in the lysosomal compartment resulting in limited delivery to the nucleus. This entrapment makes the bioavailable concentration of Doxil-delivered doxorubicin significantly lower and therefore ineffective as compared to free doxorubicin in killing tumor cells. © 2013.

  4. An RNA replication-center assay for high content image-based quantifications of human rhinovirus and coxsackievirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lötzerich Mark

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Picornaviruses are common human and animal pathogens, including polio and rhinoviruses of the enterovirus family, and hepatits A or food-and-mouth disease viruses. There are no effective countermeasures against the vast majority of picornaviruses, with the exception of polio and hepatitis A vaccines. Human rhinoviruses (HRV are the most prevalent picornaviruses comprising more than one hundred serotypes. The existing and also emerging HRVs pose severe health risks for patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Here, we developed a serotype-independent infection assay using a commercially available mouse monoclonal antibody (mabJ2 detecting double-strand RNA. Results Immunocytochemical staining for RNA replication centers using mabJ2 identified cells that were infected with either HRV1A, 2, 14, 16, 37 or coxsackievirus (CV B3, B4 or A21. MabJ2 labeled-cells were immunocytochemically positive for newly synthesized viral capsid proteins from HRV1A, 14, 16, 37 or CVB3, 4. We optimized the procedure for detection of virus replication in settings for high content screening with automated fluorescence microscopy and single cell analysis. Our data show that the infection signal was dependent on multiplicity, time and temperature of infection, and the mabJ2-positive cell numbers correlated with viral titres determined in single step growth curves. The mabJ2 infection assay was adapted to determine the efficacy of anti-viral compounds and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs blocking enterovirus infections. Conclusions We report a broadly applicable, rapid protocol to measure infection of cultured cells with enteroviruses at single cell resolution. This assay can be applied to a wide range of plus-sense RNA viruses, and hence allows comparative studies of viral infection biology without dedicated reagents or procedures. This protocol also allows to directly compare results from small compound or siRNA infection screens

  5. An RNA replication-center assay for high content image-based quantifications of human rhinovirus and coxsackievirus infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Picornaviruses are common human and animal pathogens, including polio and rhinoviruses of the enterovirus family, and hepatits A or food-and-mouth disease viruses. There are no effective countermeasures against the vast majority of picornaviruses, with the exception of polio and hepatitis A vaccines. Human rhinoviruses (HRV) are the most prevalent picornaviruses comprising more than one hundred serotypes. The existing and also emerging HRVs pose severe health risks for patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Here, we developed a serotype-independent infection assay using a commercially available mouse monoclonal antibody (mabJ2) detecting double-strand RNA. Results Immunocytochemical staining for RNA replication centers using mabJ2 identified cells that were infected with either HRV1A, 2, 14, 16, 37 or coxsackievirus (CV) B3, B4 or A21. MabJ2 labeled-cells were immunocytochemically positive for newly synthesized viral capsid proteins from HRV1A, 14, 16, 37 or CVB3, 4. We optimized the procedure for detection of virus replication in settings for high content screening with automated fluorescence microscopy and single cell analysis. Our data show that the infection signal was dependent on multiplicity, time and temperature of infection, and the mabJ2-positive cell numbers correlated with viral titres determined in single step growth curves. The mabJ2 infection assay was adapted to determine the efficacy of anti-viral compounds and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) blocking enterovirus infections. Conclusions We report a broadly applicable, rapid protocol to measure infection of cultured cells with enteroviruses at single cell resolution. This assay can be applied to a wide range of plus-sense RNA viruses, and hence allows comparative studies of viral infection biology without dedicated reagents or procedures. This protocol also allows to directly compare results from small compound or siRNA infection screens for different serotypes

  6. TimeLapseAnalyzer: Multi-target analysis for live-cell imaging and time-lapse microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huth, Johannes; Buchholz, Malte; Kraus, Johann M.;

    2011-01-01

    , we developed TimeLapseAnalyzer. Apart from general purpose image enhancements and segmentation procedures, this extensible, self-contained, modular cross-platform package provides dedicated modalities for fast and reliable analysis of multi-target cell tracking, scratch wound healing analysis, cell...

  7. High-resolution imaging of redox signaling in live cells through an oxidation-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Labate, Valentina; Mele, Marina;

    2008-01-01

    quantitation of the distribution of fluorescence by confocal microscopy, allows us to draw real-time "redox maps" of adherent cells and to score subtle changes in the intracellular redox state, such as those induced by overexpression of redox-active proteins. This strategy for in vivo imaging of redox...

  8. Live cell linear dichroism imaging reveals extensive membrane ruffling within the docking structure of natural killer cell immune synapses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benninger, Richard K P; Vanherberghen, Bruno; Young, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We have applied fluorescence imaging of two-photon linear dichroism to measure the subresolution organization of the cell membrane during formation of the activating (cytolytic) natural killer (NK) cell immune synapse (IS). This approach revealed that the NK cell plasma membrane is convoluted int...

  9. Survival and death of epiblast cells during embryonic stem cell derivation revealed by long-term live-cell imaging with an Oct4 reporter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Kazuo; Ueda, Jun; Mizutani, Eiji; Saitou, Mitinori; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-10-01

    Despite the broad literature on embryonic stem cells (ESCs), their derivation process remains enigmatic. This may be because of the lack of experimental systems that can monitor this prolonged cellular process. Here we applied a live-cell imaging technique to monitor the process of ESC derivation over 10 days from morula to outgrowth phase using an Oct4/eGFP reporter system. Our imaging reflects the 'natural' state of ESC derivation, as the ESCs established after the imaging were both competent in chimeric mice formation and germ-line transmission. Using this technique, ESC derivation in conventional conditions was imaged. After the blastocoel was formed, the intensity of Oct4 signals attenuated in the trophoblast cells but was maintained in the inner cell mass (ICM). Thereafter, the Oct4-positive cells scattered and their number decreased along with apoptosis of the other Oct4-nagative cells likely corresponds to trophoblast and hypoblast cells, and then only the surviving Oct4-positive cells proliferated and formed the colony. All embryos without exception passed through this cell death phase. Importantly, the addition of caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK to the medium dramatically suppressed the loss of Oct4-positive cells and also other embryo-derived cells, suggesting that the cell deaths was induced by a caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Next we imaged the ESC derivation in 3i medium, which consists of chemical compounds that can suppress differentiation. The most significant difference between the conventional and 3i methods was that there was no obvious cell death in 3i, so that the colony formation was rapid and all of the Oct4-positive cells contributed to the formation of the outgrown colony. These data indicate that the prevention of cell death in epiblast cells is one of the important events for the successful establishment of ESCs. Thus, our imaging technique can advance the understanding of the time-dependent cellular changes during ESC derivation.

  10. Semiautomatic High-Content Analysis of Complex Images from Cocultures of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophages: A CellProfiler Showcase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeper, Matthias; Braun-Dullaeus, Ruediger C; Weinert, Sönke

    2017-08-01

    Automatization in microscopy, cell culture, and the ease of digital imagery allow obtainment of more information from single samples and upscaling of image-based analysis to high-content approaches. Simple segmentation algorithms of biological imagery are nowadays widely spread in biomedical research, but processing of complex sample structures, for example, variable sample compositions, cell shapes, and sizes, and rare events remains a difficult task. As there is no perfect method for image segmentation and fully automatic image analysis of complex content, we aimed to succeed by identification of unique and reliable features within the sample. Through exemplary use of a coculture of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and macrophages (MPs), we demonstrate how rare interactions within this highly variable sample type can be analyzed. Because of limitations in immunocytochemistry in our specific setup, we developed a semiautomatic approach to examine the interaction of lipid-laden MPs with VSMCs under hypoxic conditions based on nuclei morphology by high-content analysis using the open-source software CellProfiler ( www.cellprofiler.org ). We provide evidence that, in comparison with fully automatic analysis, a low threshold within the analysis workflow and subsequent manual control save time, while providing more objective and reliable results.

  11. Use of genetically-encoded calcium indicators for live cell calcium imaging and localization in virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jacob L; Ramachandran, Nina K; Utama, Budi; Hyser, Joseph M

    2015-11-15

    Calcium signaling is a ubiquitous and versatile process involved in nearly every cellular process, and exploitation of host calcium signals is a common strategy used by viruses to facilitate replication and cause disease. Small molecule fluorescent calcium dyes have been used by many to examine changes in host cell calcium signaling and calcium channel activation during virus infections, but disadvantages of these dyes, including poor loading and poor long-term retention, complicate analysis of calcium imaging in virus-infected cells due to changes in cell physiology and membrane integrity. The recent expansion of genetically-encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), including blue and red-shifted color variants and variants with calcium affinities appropriate for calcium storage organelles like the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), make the use of GECIs an attractive alternative for calcium imaging in the context of virus infections. Here we describe the development and testing of cell lines stably expressing both green cytoplasmic (GCaMP5G and GCaMP6s) and red ER-targeted (RCEPIAer) GECIs. Using three viruses (rotavirus, poliovirus and respiratory syncytial virus) previously shown to disrupt host calcium homeostasis, we show the GECI cell lines can be used to detect simultaneous cytoplasmic and ER calcium signals. Further, we demonstrate the GECI expression has sufficient stability to enable long-term confocal imaging of both cytoplasmic and ER calcium during the course of virus infections.

  12. Cell Painting, a high-content image-based assay for morphological profiling using multiplexed fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Mark-Anthony; Singh, Shantanu; Han, Han; Davis, Chadwick T; Borgeson, Blake; Hartland, Cathy; Kost-Alimova, Maria; Gustafsdottir, Sigrun M; Gibson, Christopher C; Carpenter, Anne E

    2016-09-01

    In morphological profiling, quantitative data are extracted from microscopy images of cells to identify biologically relevant similarities and differences among samples based on these profiles. This protocol describes the design and execution of experiments using Cell Painting, which is a morphological profiling assay that multiplexes six fluorescent dyes, imaged in five channels, to reveal eight broadly relevant cellular components or organelles. Cells are plated in multiwell plates, perturbed with the treatments to be tested, stained, fixed, and imaged on a high-throughput microscope. Next, an automated image analysis software identifies individual cells and measures ∼1,500 morphological features (various measures of size, shape, texture, intensity, and so on) to produce a rich profile that is suitable for the detection of subtle phenotypes. Profiles of cell populations treated with different experimental perturbations can be compared to suit many goals, such as identifying the phenotypic impact of chemical or genetic perturbations, grouping compounds and/or genes into functional pathways, and identifying signatures of disease. Cell culture and image acquisition takes 2 weeks; feature extraction and data analysis take an additional 1-2 weeks.

  13. Microencapsulation Of Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Manchium; Kendall, James M.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental technique, living cells and other biological materials encapsulated within submillimeter-diameter liquid-filled spheres. Sphere material biocompatible, tough, and compliant. Semipermeable, permitting relatively small molecules to move into and out of sphere core but preventing passage of large molecules. New technique promises to make such spherical capsules at high rates and in uniform, controllable sizes. Capsules injected into patient through ordinary hypodermic needle. Promising application for technique in treatment of diabetes. Also used to encapsulate pituitary cells and thyroid hormone adrenocortical cells for treatment of other hormonal disorders, to encapsulate other secreting cells for transplantation, and to package variety of pharmaceutical products and agricultural chemicals for controlled release.

  14. Live Cell Bioluminescence Imaging in Temporal Reaction of G Protein-Coupled Receptor for High-Throughput Screening and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are notable targets of basic therapeutics. Many screening methods have been established to identify novel agents for GPCR signaling in a high-throughput manner. However, information related to the temporal reaction of GPCR with specific ligands remains poor. We recently developed a bioluminescence method for the quantitative detection of the interaction between GPCR and β-arrestin using split luciferase complementation. To monitor time-course variation of the interactions, a new imaging system contributes to the accurate evaluation of drugs for GPCRs in a high-throughput manner.

  15. Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell staining and sorting with the live-cell fluorescence imaging probe CDy1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam-Young; Yun, Seong-Wook; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Park, Sung-Jin; Chang, Young-Tae

    2011-06-30

    Detecting and isolating specific types of cells is crucial to understanding a variety of biological processes, including development, aging, regeneration and pathogenesis; this understanding, in turn, allows the use of cells for therapeutic purposes, for which stem cells have emerged recently as invaluable materials. The current methods of isolation and characterization of stem cells depend on cell morphology in culture or on immunostaining of specific markers. These methods are, however, time consuming and involve the use of antibodies that may often make the cells unsuitable for further study. We recently developed a fluorescent small molecule named CDy1 (compound of designation yellow 1) that selectively stains live embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This protocol describes detailed procedures for staining ESC and iPSC in live conditions and for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of ESC using CDy1. Cell staining, image acquisition and FACS can be done within 6 h.

  16. Quantitative measurement of Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin-target binding by Fura-2 and CFP and YFP FRET imaging in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masayuki X; Imai, Yuko; Itsuki, Kyohei; Inoue, Ryuji

    2011-05-31

    Calcium dynamics and its linked molecular interactions cause a variety of biological responses; thus, exploiting techniques for detecting both concurrently is essential. Here we describe a method for measuring the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and protein-protein interactions within the same cell, using Fura-2 and superenhanced cyan and yellow fluorescence protein (seCFP and seYFP, respectively) FRET imaging techniques. Concentration-independent corrections for bleed-through of Fura-2 into FRET cubes across different time points and [Ca(2+)](i) values allowed for an effective separation of Fura-2 cross-talk signals and seCFP and seYFP cross-talk signals, permitting calculation of [Ca(2+)](i) and FRET with high fidelity. This correction approach was particularly effective at lower [Ca(2+)](i) levels, eliminating bleed-through signals that resulted in an artificial enhancement of FRET. By adopting this correction approach combined with stepwise [Ca(2+)](i) increases produced in living cells, we successfully elucidated steady-state relationships between [Ca(2+)](i) and FRET derived from the interaction of seCFP-tagged calmodulin (CaM) and the seYFP-fused CaM binding domain of myosin light chain kinase. The [Ca(2+)](i) versus FRET relationship for voltage-gated sodium, calcium, and TRPC6 channel CaM binding domains (IQ domain or CBD) revealed distinct sensitivities for [Ca(2+)](i). Moreover, the CaM binding strength at basal or subbasal [Ca(2+)](i) levels provided evidence of CaM tethering or apoCaM binding in living cells. Of the ion channel studies, apoCaM binding was weakest for the TRPC6 channel, suggesting that more global Ca(2+) and CaM changes rather than the local CaM-channel interface domain may be involved in Ca(2+)CaM-mediated regulation of this channel. This simultaneous Fura-2 and CFP- and YFP-based FRET imaging system will thus serve as a simple but powerful means of quantitatively elucidating cellular events associated with Ca(2

  17. Live-cell imaging to detect phosphatidylserine externalization in brain endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation: implications for the treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Johnson, Michael S; Chen, Biyi; Grace, Michael; Ukath, Jaysree; Lee, Vivienne S; McRobb, Lucinda S; Sedger, Lisa M; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established intervention for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The processes of AVM vessel occlusion after SRS are poorly understood. To improve SRS efficacy, it is important to understand the cellular response of blood vessels to radiation. The molecular changes on the surface of AVM endothelial cells after irradiation may also be used for vascular targeting. This study investigates radiation-induced externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) on endothelial cells using live-cell imaging. METHODS An immortalized cell line generated from mouse brain endothelium, bEnd.3 cells, was cultured and irradiated at different radiation doses using a linear accelerator. PS externalization in the cells was subsequently visualized using polarity-sensitive indicator of viability and apoptosis (pSIVA)-IANBD, a polarity-sensitive probe. Live-cell imaging was used to monitor PS externalization in real time. The effects of radiation on the cell cycle of bEnd.3 cells were also examined by flow cytometry. RESULTS Ionizing radiation effects are dose dependent. Reduction in the cell proliferation rate was observed after exposure to 5 Gy radiation, whereas higher radiation doses (15 Gy and 25 Gy) totally inhibited proliferation. In comparison with cells treated with sham radiation, the irradiated cells showed distinct pseudopodial elongation with little or no spreading of the cell body. The percentages of pSIVA-positive cells were significantly higher (p = 0.04) 24 hours after treatment in the cultures that received 25- and 15-Gy doses of radiation. This effect was sustained until the end of the experiment (3 days). Radiation at 5 Gy did not induce significant PS externalization compared with the sham-radiation controls at any time points (p > 0.15). Flow cytometric analysis data indicate that irradiation induced growth arrest of bEnd.3 cells, with cells accumulating in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. CONCLUSIONS Ionizing radiation

  18. A live cell, image-based approach to understanding the enzymology and pharmacology of 2-bromopalmitate and palmitoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Ivana; Planey, Sonia; Zhang, Jun; Ceballos, Carolina; Seron, Terri; von Massenbach, Benedikt; Watson, Rachael; Callaway, Scott; McDonough, Patrick M; Price, Jeffrey H; Hunter, Edward; Zacharias, David

    2006-01-01

    The addition of a lipid moiety to a protein increases its hydrophobicity and subsequently its attraction to lipophilic environments like membranes. Indeed most lipid-modified proteins are localized to membranes where they associate with multiprotein signaling complexes. Acylation and prenylation are the two common categories of lipidation. The enzymology and pharmacology of prenylation are well understood but relatively very little is known about palmitoylation, the most common form of acylation. One distinguishing characteristic of palmitoylation is that it is a dynamic modification. To understand more about how palmitoylation is regulated, we fused palmitoylation substrates to fluorescent proteins and reported their subcellular distribution and trafficking. We used automated high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and a specialized computer algorithm to image and measure the fraction of palmitoylation reporter on the plasma membrane versus the cytoplasm. Using this system we determined the residence half-life of palmitate on the dipalmitoyl substrate peptide from GAP43 as well as the EC(50) for 2-bromopalmitate, a common inhibitor of palmitoylation.

  19. Revealing the sequence of interactions of PuroA peptide with Candida albicans cells by live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2017-03-01

    To determine the mechanism(s) of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) it is desirable to provide details of their interaction kinetics with cellular, sub-cellular and molecular targets. The synthetic peptide, PuroA, displays potent antimicrobial activities which have been attributed to peptide-induced membrane destabilization, or intracellular mechanisms of action (DNA-binding) or both. We used time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to directly monitor the localization and interaction kinetics of a FITC- PuroA peptide on single Candida albicans cells in real time. Our results reveal the sequence of events leading to cell death. Within 1 minute, FITC-PuroA was observed to interact with SYTO-labelled nucleic acids, resulting in a noticeable quenching in the fluorescence lifetime of the peptide label at the nucleus of yeast cells, and cell-cycle arrest. A propidium iodide (PI) influx assay confirmed that peptide translocation itself did not disrupt the cell membrane integrity; however, PI entry occurred 25-45 minutes later, which correlated with an increase in fractional fluorescence of pores and an overall loss of cell size. Our results clarify that membrane disruption appears to be the mechanism by which the C. albicans cells are killed and this occurs after FITC-PuroA translocation and binding to intracellular targets.

  20. Revealing the sequence of interactions of PuroA peptide with Candida albicans cells by live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the mechanism(s) of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) it is desirable to provide details of their interaction kinetics with cellular, sub-cellular and molecular targets. The synthetic peptide, PuroA, displays potent antimicrobial activities which have been attributed to peptide-induced membrane destabilization, or intracellular mechanisms of action (DNA-binding) or both. We used time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to directly monitor the localization and interaction kinetics of a FITC- PuroA peptide on single Candida albicans cells in real time. Our results reveal the sequence of events leading to cell death. Within 1 minute, FITC-PuroA was observed to interact with SYTO-labelled nucleic acids, resulting in a noticeable quenching in the fluorescence lifetime of the peptide label at the nucleus of yeast cells, and cell-cycle arrest. A propidium iodide (PI) influx assay confirmed that peptide translocation itself did not disrupt the cell membrane integrity; however, PI entry occurred 25–45 minutes later, which correlated with an increase in fractional fluorescence of pores and an overall loss of cell size. Our results clarify that membrane disruption appears to be the mechanism by which the C. albicans cells are killed and this occurs after FITC-PuroA translocation and binding to intracellular targets. PMID:28252014

  1. Application of high-content image analysis for quantitatively estimating lipid accumulation in oleaginous yeasts with potential for use in biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capus, Aurélie; Monnerat, Marianne; Ribeiro, Luiz Carlos; de Souza, Wanderley; Martins, Juliana Lopes; Sant'Anna, Celso

    2016-03-01

    Biodiesel from oleaginous microorganisms is a viable substitute for a fossil fuel. Current methods for microorganism lipid productivity evaluation do not analyze lipid dynamics in single cells. Here, we described a high-content image analysis (HCA) as a promising strategy for screening oleaginous microorganisms for biodiesel production, while generating single-cell lipid dynamics data in large cell density. Rhodotorula slooffiae yeast were grown in standard (CTL) or lipid trigger medium (LTM), and lipid droplet (LD) accumulation was analyzed in deconvolved confocal microscopy images of cells stained with the lipophilic fluorescent Nile red (NR) dye using automated cell and LD segmentation. The 'vesicle segmentation' method yielded valid morphometric results for limited lipid accumulation in smaller LDs (CTL samples) and for high lipid accumulation in larger LDs (LTM samples), and detected LD localization changes. Thus, HCA can be used to analyze the lipid accumulation patterns likely to be encountered in screens for biodiesel production.

  2. Evanescent Light-Scattering Microscopy for Label-Free Interfacial Imaging: From Single Sub-100 nm Vesicles to Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnarsson, Björn; Lundgren, Anders; Gunnarsson, Anders; Rabe, Michael; Kunze, Angelika; Mapar, Mokhtar; Simonsson, Lisa; Bally, Marta; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2015-12-22

    Advancement in the understanding of biomolecular interactions has benefited greatly from the development of surface-sensitive bioanalytical sensors. To further increase their broad impact, significant efforts are presently being made to enable label-free and specific biomolecule detection with high sensitivity, allowing for quantitative interpretation and general applicability at low cost. In this work, we have addressed this challenge by developing a waveguide chip consisting of a flat silica core embedded in a symmetric organic cladding with a refractive index matching that of water. This is shown to reduce stray light (background) scattering and thereby allow for label-free detection of faint objects, such as individual sub-20 nm gold nanoparticles as well as sub-100 nm lipid vesicles. Measurements and theoretical analysis revealed that light-scattering signals originating from single surface-bound lipid vesicles enable characterization of their sizes without employing fluorescent lipids as labels. The concept is also demonstrated for label-free measurements of protein binding to and enzymatic (phospholipase A2) digestion of individual lipid vesicles, enabling an analysis of the influence on the measured kinetics of the dye-labeling of lipids required in previous assays. Further, diffraction-limited imaging of cells (platelets) binding to a silica surface showed that distinct subcellular features could be visualized and temporally resolved during attachment, activation, and spreading. Taken together, these results underscore the versatility and general applicability of the method, which due to its simplicity and compatibility with conventional microscopy setups may reach a widespread in life science and beyond.

  3. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Physiological Free Cu(II) Levels in Live Cells with a Cu(II)-Selective Carbonic Anhydrase-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCranor, Bryan J.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Zeng, Hui Hui; Stoddard, A.K.; Hurst, Tamiika; Fierke, Carol A.; Lakowicz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a required trace element that plays key roles in a number of human enzymes, such that copper deficiency or genetic defects in copper transport lead to serious or fatal disease. Rae, et al., had famously predicted that free copper ion levels in the cell cytoplasm were extremely low, typically too low to be observable. We recently developed a variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase II for sensing metal ions that exhibits 25-fold better selectivity for Cu(II) over Zn(II) than the wild type protein, enabling us to accurately measure Cu(II) in the presence of ordinary cellular (picomolar) concentrations of free zinc. We inserted a fluorescent labeled Cu(II)-specific variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase into PC-12 cells and found that the levels are indeed extremely low (in the femtomolar range). We imaged the free Cu(II) levels in living cells by means of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy. Implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:24671220

  4. Highly fluorescent carbon dots as selective and sensitive "on-off-on" probes for iron(III) ion and apoferritin detection and imaging in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cuiping; Wang, Ru; Wang, Keying; Xu, Huiting; Sui, Meirong; Li, Jingjing; Xu, Kai

    2016-09-15

    Highly blue luminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) with a fluorescence quantum yield of 42.3% were prepared by an efficient one-step pyrolytic route from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and urea. The as-synthesized N-CDs were demonstrated as an effective fluorescent probe for label-free, selective and sensitive recognition of Fe(3+) with a linear range of 0.5μM to 2mM and a detection limit of 13.6nM due to Fe(3+)-quenched fluorescence (turn-off). The quenched fluorescence could be turned on after the addition of apoferritin owing to the removal of ferric species from the surface of N-CDs by apoferritin, making complex N-CDs/Fe(3+) a selective apoferritin probe with a linear range of 0.1-25μM and a detection limit as low as 2.6nM. In addition, the application of this novel N-CDs-based probe for imaging Fe(3+) ions and apoferritin in living cells suggest that this sensing system has great potential applications in biosensing, bioimaging, and many other fields.

  5. A high-content image-based method for quantitatively studying context-dependent cell population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Colleen M; Spiller, Erin; Lindsay, Danika; Chiang, Chun-Te; Choi, Nathan C; Agus, David B; Mallick, Parag; Foo, Jasmine; Mumenthaler, Shannon M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor progression results from a complex interplay between cellular heterogeneity, treatment response, microenvironment and heterocellular interactions. Existing approaches to characterize this interplay suffer from an inability to distinguish between multiple cell types, often lack environmental context, and are unable to perform multiplex phenotypic profiling of cell populations. Here we present a high-throughput platform for characterizing, with single-cell resolution, the dynamic phenotypic responses (i.e. morphology changes, proliferation, apoptosis) of heterogeneous cell populations both during standard growth and in response to multiple, co-occurring selective pressures. The speed of this platform enables a thorough investigation of the impacts of diverse selective pressures including genetic alterations, therapeutic interventions, heterocellular components and microenvironmental factors. The platform has been applied to both 2D and 3D culture systems and readily distinguishes between (1) cytotoxic versus cytostatic cellular responses; and (2) changes in morphological features over time and in response to perturbation. These important features can directly influence tumor evolution and clinical outcome. Our image-based approach provides a deeper insight into the cellular dynamics and heterogeneity of tumors (or other complex systems), with reduced reagents and time, offering advantages over traditional biological assays.

  6. High content image-based screening of a protease inhibitor library reveals compounds broadly active against Rift Valley fever virus and other highly pathogenic RNA viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini Mudhasani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High content image-based screening was developed as an approach to test a protease inhibitor small molecule library for antiviral activity against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV and to determine their mechanism of action. RVFV is the causative agent of severe disease of humans and animals throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Of the 849 compounds screened, 34 compounds exhibited ≥ 50% inhibition against RVFV. All of the hit compounds could be classified into 4 distinct groups based on their unique chemical backbone. Some of the compounds also showed broad antiviral activity against several highly pathogenic RNA viruses including Ebola, Marburg, Venezuela equine encephalitis, and Lassa viruses. Four hit compounds (C795-0925, D011-2120, F694-1532 and G202-0362, which were most active against RVFV and showed broad-spectrum antiviral activity, were selected for further evaluation for their cytotoxicity, dose response profile, and mode of action using classical virological methods and high-content imaging analysis. Time-of-addition assays in RVFV infections suggested that D011-2120 and G202-0362 targeted virus egress, while C795-0925 and F694-1532 inhibited virus replication. We showed that D011-2120 exhibited its antiviral effects by blocking microtubule polymerization, thereby disrupting the Golgi complex and inhibiting viral trafficking to the plasma membrane during virus egress. While G202-0362 also affected virus egress, it appears to do so by a different mechanism, namely by blocking virus budding from the trans Golgi. F694-1532 inhibited viral replication, but also appeared to inhibit overall cellular gene expression. However, G202-0362 and C795-0925 did not alter any of the morphological features that we examined and thus may prove to be good candidates for antiviral drug development. Overall this work demonstrates that high-content image analysis can be used to screen chemical libraries for new antivirals and to determine their

  7. Live cell refractometry using microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Niyom; Popescu, Gabriel; Ikeda, Takahiro; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Badizadegan, Kamran; Feld, Michael S

    2006-09-15

    Using Hilbert phase microscopy for extracting quantitative phase images, we measured the average refractive index associated with live cells in culture. To decouple the contributions to the phase signal from the cell refractive index and thickness, we confined the cells in microchannels. The results are confirmed by comparison with measurements of spherical cells in suspension.

  8. Label-free detection of neuronal differentiation in cell populations using high-throughput live-cell imaging of PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weber

    Full Text Available Detection of neuronal cell differentiation is essential to study cell fate decisions under various stimuli and/or environmental conditions. Many tools exist that quantify differentiation by neurite length measurements of single cells. However, quantification of differentiation in whole cell populations remains elusive so far. Because such populations can consist of both proliferating and differentiating cells, the task to assess the overall differentiation status is not trivial and requires a high-throughput, fully automated approach to analyze sufficient data for a statistically significant discrimination to determine cell differentiation. We address the problem of detecting differentiation in a mixed population of proliferating and differentiating cells over time by supervised classification. Using nerve growth factor induced differentiation of PC12 cells, we monitor the changes in cell morphology over 6 days by phase-contrast live-cell imaging. For general applicability, the classification procedure starts out with many features to identify those that maximize discrimination of differentiated and undifferentiated cells and to eliminate features sensitive to systematic measurement artifacts. The resulting image analysis determines the optimal post treatment day for training and achieves a near perfect classification of differentiation, which we confirmed in technically and biologically independent as well as differently designed experiments. Our approach allows to monitor neuronal cell populations repeatedly over days without any interference. It requires only an initial calibration and training step and is thereafter capable to discriminate further experiments. In conclusion, this enables long-term, large-scale studies of cell populations with minimized costs and efforts for detecting effects of external manipulation of neuronal cell differentiation.

  9. A new and robust method of tethering IgG surrogate antigens on lipid bilayer membranes to facilitate the TIRFM based live cell and single molecule imaging experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaosen Zhang

    Full Text Available Our understanding of cell-cell interactions has been significantly improved in the past years with the help of Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope (TIRFM in combination with an antigen presenting system supported by planar lipid bilayer (PLB membranes, which are used to mimic the extensive receptor and ligand interactions within cell-cell contact interface. In TIRFM experiments, it is a challenge to uniformly present ligand molecules in monomeric format on the surface of PLB membranes. Here, we introduce a new and robust method of tethering IgG surrogate antigen ligands on the surface of Ni(2+-containing PLB membranes. In this method, we use a modified D domain from staphylococcal protein A molecule that is fused with an N-terminus polyhistidine tag (H12-D-domain to tether IgG surrogate antigens on Ni(2+-containing PLB membranes. We systematically assessed the specificity and capability of H12-D-domain construct to capture IgG molecules from different species through live cell and single molecule TIRFM imaging. We find that these IgG surrogate antigens tethered by H12-D-domain show better lateral mobility and are more uniformly distributed on PLB membranes than the ones tethered by streptavidin. Neither IgM molecules, nor Fab or F(ab'2 fragments of IgG molecules can be tethered on PLB membranes by H12-D-domain construct. These tethered IgG surrogate antigens strongly induce the formation and accumulation of signaling active antigen receptor microclusters within the immunological synapse in B or T lymphocyte cells. Thus our method provides a new and robust method to tether IgG surrogate antigens or other molecules fused with IgG Fc portion on PLB membranes for TIRFM based molecule imaging experiments.

  10. Vanillin inhibits translation and induces messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granule formation in saccharomyces cerevisiae: application and validation of high-content, image-based profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Aya; Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Suga, Yohei; Izawa, Shingo; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin, generated by acid hydrolysis of lignocellulose, acts as a potent inhibitor of the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the cellular processes affected by vanillin using high-content, image-based profiling. Among 4,718 non-essential yeast deletion mutants, the morphology of those defective in the large ribosomal subunit showed significant similarity to that of vanillin-treated cells. The defects in these mutants were clustered in three domains of the ribosome: the mRNA tunnel entrance, exit and backbone required for small subunit attachment. To confirm that vanillin inhibited ribosomal function, we assessed polysome and messenger ribonucleoprotein granule formation after treatment with vanillin. Analysis of polysome profiles showed disassembly of the polysomes in the presence of vanillin. Processing bodies and stress granules, which are composed of non-translating mRNAs and various proteins, were formed after treatment with vanillin. These results suggest that vanillin represses translation in yeast cells.

  11. Simultaneous multi-parametric analysis of Leishmania and of its hosting mammal cells: A high content imaging-based method enabling sound drug discovery process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestier, Claire-Lise; Späth, Gerald Frank; Prina, Eric; Dasari, Sreekanth

    2015-11-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease for which only limited therapeutic options are available. The disease is ranked among the six most important tropical infectious diseases and represents the second-largest parasitic killer in the world. The development of new therapies has been hampered by the lack of technologies and methodologies that can be integrated into the complex physiological environment of a cell or organism and adapted to suitable in vitro and in vivo Leishmania models. Recent advances in microscopy imaging offer the possibility to assess the efficacy of potential drug candidates against Leishmania within host cells. This technology allows the simultaneous visualization of relevant phenotypes in parasite and host cells and the quantification of a variety of cellular events. In this review, we present the powerful cellular imaging methodologies that have been developed for drug screening in a biologically relevant context, addressing both high-content and high-throughput needs. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of intra-vital microscopy imaging in the context of the anti-leishmanial drug discovery process.

  12. Live cell imaging of the nascent inactive X chromosome during the early differentiation process of naive ES cells towards epiblast stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélia Guyochin

    Full Text Available Random X-chromosome inactivation ensures dosage compensation in mammals through the transcriptional silencing of one of the two X chromosomes present in each female cell. Silencing is initiated in the differentiating epiblast of the mouse female embryos through coating of the nascent inactive X chromosome by the non-coding RNA Xist, which subsequently recruits the Polycomb Complex PRC2 leading to histone H3-K27 methylation. Here we examined in mouse ES cells the early steps of the transition from naive ES cells towards epiblast stem cells as a model for inducing X chromosome inactivation in vitro. We show that these conditions efficiently induce random XCI. Importantly, in a transient phase of this differentiation pathway, both X chromosomes are coated with Xist RNA in up to 15% of the XX cells. In an attempt to determine the dynamics of this process, we designed a strategy aimed at visualizing the nascent inactive X-chromosome in live cells. We generated transgenic female XX ES cells expressing the PRC2 component Ezh2 fused to the fluorescent protein Venus. The fluorescent fusion protein was expressed at sub-physiological levels and located in nuclei of ES cells. Upon differentiation of ES cell towards epiblast stem cell fate, Venus-fluorescent territories appearing in interphase nuclei were identified as nascent inactive X chromosomes by their association with Xist RNA. Imaging of Ezh2-Venus for up to 24 hours during the differentiation process showed survival of some cells with two fluorescent domains and a surprising dynamics of the fluorescent territories across cell division and in the course of the differentiation process. Our data reveal a strategy for visualizing the nascent inactive X chromosome and suggests the possibility for a large plasticity of the nascent inactive X chromosome.

  13. Ionomycin-induced calcium influx induces neurite degeneration in mouse neuroblastoma cells: analysis of a time-lapse live cell imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Saki; Nakanishi, Ayumi; Takazawa, Minami; Okihiro, Shunsuke; Urano, Shiro; Fukui, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species induce neuronal cell death. However, the detailed mechanisms of cell death have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we reported neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death. Here, we attempted to elucidate the mechanisms of neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death using the neuroblastoma N1E-115 cell line and a time-lapse live cell imaging system. Treatment with the calcium ionophore ionomycin induced cell death and neurite degeneration in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Treatment with a low concentration of ionomycin immediately produced a significant calcium influx into the intracellular region in N1E-115 cells. After 1-h incubation with ionomycin, the fluorescence emission of MitoSOX(TM) increased significantly compared to the control. Finally, analysis using a new mitochondrial specific fluorescence dye, MitoPeDPP, indicated that treatment with ionomycin significantly increased the mitochondrial lipid hydroperoxide production in N1E-115 cells. The fluorescence emissions of Fluo-4 AM and MitoPeDPP were detected in the cell soma and neurite regions in ionomycin-treated N1E-115 cells. However, the emissions of neurites were much lower than those of the cell soma. TBARS values of ionomycin-treated cells significantly increased compared to the control. These results indicate that ionomycin induces calcium influx into the intracellular region and reactive oxygen species production in N1E-115 cells. Lipid hydroperoxide production was induced in ionomycin-treated N1E-115 cells. Calcium influx into the intracellular region is a possible activator of neurite degeneration.

  14. Application of a genetically encoded biosensor for live cell imaging of L-valine production in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient Corynebacterium glutamicum strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafi, Nurije; Grünberger, Alexander; Mahr, Regina; Helfrich, Stefan; Nöh, Katharina; Blombach, Bastian; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Frunzke, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biotechnologically relevant metabolites do not impart a conspicuous phenotype to the producing cell. Consequently, the analysis of microbial metabolite production is still dominated by bulk techniques, which may obscure significant variation at the single-cell level. In this study, we have applied the recently developed Lrp-biosensor for monitoring of amino acid production in single cells of gradually engineered L-valine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum strains based on the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient (PDHC) strain C. glutamicum ΔaceE. Online monitoring of the sensor output (eYFP fluorescence) during batch cultivation proved the sensor's suitability for visualizing different production levels. In the following, we conducted live cell imaging studies on C. glutamicum sensor strains using microfluidic chip devices. As expected, the sensor output was higher in microcolonies of high-yield producers in comparison to the basic strain C. glutamicum ΔaceE. Microfluidic cultivation in minimal medium revealed a typical Gaussian distribution of single cell fluorescence during the production phase. Remarkably, low amounts of complex nutrients completely changed the observed phenotypic pattern of all strains, resulting in a phenotypic split of the population. Whereas some cells stopped growing and initiated L-valine production, others continued to grow or showed a delayed transition to production. Depending on the cultivation conditions, a considerable fraction of non-fluorescent cells was observed, suggesting a loss of metabolic activity. These studies demonstrate that genetically encoded biosensors are a valuable tool for monitoring single cell productivity and to study the phenotypic pattern of microbial production strains.

  15. A novel upconversion@polydopamine core@shell nanoparticle based aptameric biosensor for biosensing and imaging of cytochrome c inside living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lina; Liu, Fuyao; Lei, Zhen; Wang, Zhenxin

    2017-01-15

    Herein, a novel upconversion@polydopamine core@shell nanoparticle (termed as UCNP@PDA NP) -based aptameric biosensor has been fabricated for the quantitative analysis of cytochrome c (Cyt c) inside living cells, which comprises an UCNP@PDA NP, acting as an internal reference and fluorescence quenching agent, and Cy3 modified aptamer enabling ratiometric quantitative Cyt c measurement. After the hybridization of Cy3 labeled aptamer with amino-terminated single DNA on the UCNP@PDA NP surface (termed as UCNP@PDA@AP), the fluorescence of Cy3 can be efficiently quenched by the PDA shell. With the spontaneous cellular uptake of UCNP@PDA@AP, the Cyt c aptamer dissociates from UCNP@PDA NP surface through formation of aptamer-Cyt c complex, resulting in concomitant activation of the Cy3 fluorescence. High amount of Cyt c leads to high fluorescence emission, enabling direct visualization/measurement of the Cyt c by fluorescence microscopy/spectroscopy. The steady upconversion luminescent (UCL) signals can be employed not only for intracellular imaging, but also as an internal reference for evaluating intracellular Cyt c amount using the ratio of fluorescence intensity of Cy3 with the UCL intensity of UCNP. The UCNP@PDA@AP shows a reasonable detection limit (20nM) and large dynamic range (50nM to 10μM, which covers the literature reported values (1-10μM) for cytosolic Cyt c in apoptotic cells) for detecting Cyt c in buffer with excellent selectivity. In addition, the UCNP@PDA@AP has been successfully used to monitor etoposide induced intracellular releasing of Cyt c, providing the possibility for cell-based screening of apoptosis-inducing drugs.

  16. A Novel High Content Imaging-Based Screen Identifies the Anti-Helminthic Niclosamide as an Inhibitor of Lysosome Anterograde Trafficking and Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena L Circu

    Full Text Available Lysosome trafficking plays a significant role in tumor invasion, a key event for the development of metastasis. Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that the anterograde (outward movement of lysosomes to the cell surface in response to certain tumor microenvironment stimulus, such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF or acidic extracellular pH (pHe, increases cathepsin B secretion and tumor cell invasion. Anterograde lysosome trafficking depends on sodium-proton exchanger activity and can be reversed by blocking these ion pumps with Troglitazone or EIPA. Since these drugs cannot be advanced into the clinic due to toxicity, we have designed a high-content assay to discover drugs that block peripheral lysosome trafficking with the goal of identifying novel drugs that inhibit tumor cell invasion. An automated high-content imaging system (Cellomics was used to measure the position of lysosomes relative to the nucleus. Among a total of 2210 repurposed and natural product drugs screened, 18 "hits" were identified. One of the compounds identified as an anterograde lysosome trafficking inhibitor was niclosamide, a marketed human anti-helminthic drug. Further studies revealed that niclosamide blocked acidic pHe, HGF, and epidermal growth factor (EGF-induced anterograde lysosome redistribution, protease secretion, motility, and invasion of DU145 castrate resistant prostate cancer cells at clinically relevant concentrations. In an effort to identify the mechanism by which niclosamide prevented anterograde lysosome movement, we found that this drug exhibited no significant effect on the level of ATP, microtubules or actin filaments, and had minimal effect on the PI3K and MAPK pathways. Niclosamide collapsed intralysosomal pH without disruption of the lysosome membrane, while bafilomycin, an agent that impairs lysosome acidification, was also found to induce JLA in our model. Taken together, these data suggest that niclosamide promotes

  17. High-content image informatics of the structural nuclear protein NuMA parses trajectories for stem/progenitor cell lineages and oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Sebastián L; Liu, Er; Arvind, Varun; Bushman, Jared; Sung, Hak-Joon; Becker, Matthew L; Lelièvre, Sophie; Kohn, Joachim; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2017-02-01

    Stem and progenitor cells that exhibit significant regenerative potential and critical roles in cancer initiation and progression remain difficult to characterize. Cell fates are determined by reciprocal signaling between the cell microenvironment and the nucleus; hence parameters derived from nuclear remodeling are ideal candidates for stem/progenitor cell characterization. Here we applied high-content, single cell analysis of nuclear shape and organization to examine stem and progenitor cells destined to distinct differentiation endpoints, yet undistinguishable by conventional methods. Nuclear descriptors defined through image informatics classified mesenchymal stem cells poised to either adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation, and oligodendrocyte precursors isolated from different regions of the brain and destined to distinct astrocyte subtypes. Nuclear descriptors also revealed early changes in stem cells after chemical oncogenesis, allowing the identification of a class of cancer-mitigating biomaterials. To capture the metrology of nuclear changes, we developed a simple and quantitative "imaging-derived" parsing index, which reflects the dynamic evolution of the high-dimensional space of nuclear organizational features. A comparative analysis of parsing outcomes via either nuclear shape or textural metrics of the nuclear structural protein NuMA indicates the nuclear shape alone is a weak phenotypic predictor. In contrast, variations in the NuMA organization parsed emergent cell phenotypes and discerned emergent stages of stem cell transformation, supporting a prognosticating role for this protein in the outcomes of nuclear functions.

  18. Detecting and Tracking Nonfluorescent Nanoparticles Probes in Live Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning

    2012-01-17

    Precisely imaging and tracking dynamic biological processes in live cells are crucial for both fundamental research in life sciences and biomedical applications. Nonfluorescent nanoparticles are emerging as important optical probes in live-cell imaging because of their excellent photostability, large optical cross sections, and low cytotoxicity. Here, we provide a review of recent development in optical imaging of nonfluorescent nanoparticle probes and their applications in dynamic tracking and biosensing in live cells. A brief discussion on cytotoxicity of nanoparticle probes is also provided.

  19. Molecular fluctuation in living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐孝威

    1997-01-01

    The concept of molecular fluctuation in living cells is introduced. Many apparently different experi-mental facts in living cells, including the velocity non-uniformity of organelle movement, the saltatory movement of transport vesicles in axoplasmic transport, the chromosome oscillation during metaphase in mitosis and the pauses in the chromosome movement during anaphase are explained using a unified viewpoint. A method of determination of average number of the attached motor protein molecules from the experimental data is also proposed.

  20. Low molecular weight fluorescent probes with good photostability for imaging RNA-rich nucleolus and RNA in cytoplasm in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guofen; Sun, Yuming; Liu, Yong; Wang, Xiankun; Chen, Meiling; Miao, Fang; Zhang, Weijia; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Jin, Jianling

    2014-02-01

    We have synthesized two low molecular weight organic molecules, PY and IN successfully, which selectively stain nucleolus and cytoplasm of living cells in 30 min, with a much lower uptake in the nucleus. Nucleic acids electrophoresis and digest test of ribonuclease indicate their markedly higher affinity for RNA, especially PY. Moreover their RNA localization in cells is further supported by digest test of ribonuclease, namely, the nucleolar fluorescence signal is distinctly lost upon treatment with RNase. And, the fact that live cells stained by PY and IN still possess physiological function can be confirmed: 1) MTT assay demonstrates that the mitochondria of cells stained remains its electron mediating ability, 2) Double assay of PY/IN and propidium iodide as well as trypan blue testing show that the membrane of cells stained still is intact. Importantly, compared with the only commercial RNA probe, SYTO RNA-Select, PY and IN exhibit much better photostability when continuously illuminated with 488 nm laser and mercury lamp. These results prove that PY and IN are very attractive staining reagents for visualizing RNA in living cells.

  1. Electronic Interfacing with Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James T.

    The direct interfacing of living cells with inorganic electronic materials, components or systems has led to the development of two broad categories of devices that can (1) transduce biochemical signals generated by biological components into electrical signals and (2) transduce electronically generated signals into biochemical signals. The first category of devices permits the monitoring of living cells, the second, enables control of cellular processes. This review will survey this exciting area with emphasis on the fundamental issues and obstacles faced by researchers. Devices and applications that use both prokaryotic (microbial) and eukaryotic (mammalian) cells will be covered. Individual devices described include microbial biofuel cells that produce electricity, bioelectrical reactors that enable electronic control of cellular metabolism, living cell biosensors for the detection of chemicals and devices that permit monitoring and control of mammalian physiology.

  2. A phosphorescent silver(I)-gold (I) cluster complex that specifically lights up the nucleolus of living cells with FLIM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Lei, Zhen; Feng, Wei; Li, Chunyan; Wang, Quan-Ming; Li, Fuyou

    2013-06-01

    The phosphorescent silver(I)-gold(I) cluster complex [CAu6Ag2(dppy)6](BF4)4 (N1) selectively stains the nucleolus, with a much lower uptake in the nucleus and cytoplasm, and exhibits excellent photostability. This Ag-Au cluster, which has a photoluminescent lifetime of microseconds, is particularly attractive as a probe in applications of time-gated microscopy. Investigation of the pathway of cellular entry indicated that N1 permeates the outer membrane and nuclear membrane of living cells through an energy-dependent and non-endocytic route within 10 min. High concentrations of N1 in the nucleolus have been quantified by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDXA), which also helped to elucidate the mechanism of the specific staining. Intracellular selective staining may be correlated with the microenvironment of the nucleolus, which is consistent with experiments conducted at different phases of the cell cycle. These results prove that N1 is a very attractive phosphorescent staining reagent for visualizing the nucleolus of living cells.

  3. A rapid SNAP-tag fluorogenic probe based on an environment-sensitive fluorophore for no-wash live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao-Kai; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Zhuang, Yu-De; Hsia, Chi-Yang; Huang, Chi-Ling; Lai, Hsiu-Ping; Lin, Hung-Sheung; Chen, I-Chia; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Tan, Kui-Thong

    2014-10-17

    One major limitation of labeling proteins with synthetic fluorophores is the high fluorescence background, which necessitates extensive washing steps to remove unreacted fluorophores. In this paper, we describe a novel fluorogenic probe based on an environment-sensitive fluorophore for labeling with SNAP-tag proteins. The probe exhibits dramatic fluorescence turn-on of 280-fold upon being labeled to SNAP-tag. The major advantages of our fluorogenic probe are the dramatic fluorescence turn-on, ease of synthesis, high selectivity, and rapid labeling with SNAP-tag. No-wash labeling of both intracellular and cell surface proteins was successfully achieved in living cells, and the localization of these proteins was specifically visualized.

  4. The use of a near-infrared RNA fluorescent probe with a large Stokes shift for imaging living cells assisted by the macrocyclic molecule CB7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyong; Sun, Shiguo; Yang, Zhigang; Zhang, Si; Zhang, Hua; Hu, Mingming; Cao, Jianfang; Wang, Jingyun; Liu, Fengyu; Song, Fengling; Fan, Jiangli; Peng, Xiaojun

    2013-09-01

    A near-infrared fluorescent dye Hsd was designed and synthesized, which absorbed as hemicyane and emitted as Cy7 and therefore produced a Stokes shift as large as 224 nm. Quantum chemistry calculation demonstrated that the large Stokes shift was produced by the combination of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and internal conversion. Significantly, Hsd showed selectively response to RNA in aqueous solution and fixed cells. Moreover, Hsd could be uptaken into the cells under the assistance of cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) and selectively stain RNA in living cells. The introducing of CB7 provides a platform to amplify the application of some cell-impermeant fluorescent stains through the supramolecular chemistry methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structurally tuned benzo[h]chromene derivative as Pb{sup 2+} selective ‘turn-on’ fluorescence sensor for living cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Sougata; Rani Koner, Rik; Kumar, Sunil [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi-175001, H.P (India); Mathew, Jomon [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry and the Lise Meitner Minerva Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Roy, Anindita [Department of Microbiology, MUC Women’s College, Burdwan, West Bengal (India); Kanti Mukhopadhyay, Subhra [Department of Microbiology, Burdwan University, Burdwan, West Bengal (India); Nandi, Chayan K., E-mail: chayan@iitmandi.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi-175001, H.P (India); Ghosh, Subrata, E-mail: subrata@iitmandi.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi-175001, H.P (India)

    2013-11-15

    A benzo[h]chromene derivative, 2-amino-4-phenyl-4H-benzo[h]chromene-3-carbonitrile 1, has been utilized as ‘Turn On’ fluorescence chemosensor for the selective detection of Pb{sup 2+}. The title compound 1 was synthesized in one step using a multicomponent condensation reaction (MCR), and characterized using various spectroscopic techniques. The selectivity was tested over a range of 17 different metal and non-metal ions. Compound 1 was found to be weak fluorescent (Φ{sub 1}=0.06) because of photoinduced electron transfer (PET). The presence of 2 equiv of Pb{sup 2+} showed a significant increase in fluorescence quantum yield (Φ{sub 1−Pb{sup 2}{sup +}}=0.132). A change in weak blue emission of 1 to a glowing green emission along with a prominent red shift (26 nm) in emission band was observed upon addition of Pb{sup 2+} to a methanolic solution of 1. The complexation of 1 with Pb{sup 2+} was proved by mass spectroscopy and NMR studies. Some of our experimental findings have been supported by theoretical studies. Compound 1 was found to be easily permeable to living cells without causing any harm and ultimately was used to detect effectively Pb{sup 2+} in living system. -- Highlights: • Benzo[h]chromene derivative (1) as fluorogenic chemosensor for Pb{sup 2+}. • One-step synthesis of the sensor using multicomponent condensation reaction. • The sensor follows a ‘turn-on’ mechanism through CHEF. • 1–Pb{sup 2+} complex was characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. • The probe can detect Pb{sup 2+} in living cells.

  6. Toward high-content screening of mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iannetti, E.F.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Pellegrini, M.; Beyrath, J.D.; Smeitink, J.; Blanchet, L.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are double membrane organelles involved in various key cellular processes. Governed by dedicated protein machinery, mitochondria move and continuously fuse and divide. These "mitochondrial dynamics" are bi-directionally linked to mitochondrial and cell functional state in space and time

  7. Nuclear choreography: interpretations from living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Susan M; Spector, David L

    2003-04-01

    The advent of green fluorescent protein technology, its use in photobleaching experiments and the development of methods to rapidly acquire images and analyze complex datasets have opened the door to unraveling the mechanisms of nuclear functions in living cells. Studies over the past few years have characterized the movement of chromatin, nuclear proteins and nuclear bodies and, in some cases, correlated their dynamics with energy dependence, cell cycle progression, developmental changes, factor targeting and nuclear position. The mechanisms by which nuclear components move or are restrained have important implications for understanding not only the efficacy of nuclear functions but also the regulation of developmental programs and cellular growth.

  8. Transcription Dynamics in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenstra, Tineke L; Rodriguez, Joseph; Chen, Huimin; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-07-01

    The transcription cycle can be roughly divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Understanding the molecular events that regulate all these stages requires a dynamic view of the underlying processes. The development of techniques to visualize and quantify transcription in single living cells has been essential in revealing the transcription kinetics. They have revealed that (a) transcription is heterogeneous between cells and (b) transcription can be discontinuous within a cell. In this review, we discuss the progress in our quantitative understanding of transcription dynamics in living cells, focusing on all parts of the transcription cycle. We present the techniques allowing for single-cell transcription measurements, review evidence from different organisms, and discuss how these experiments have broadened our mechanistic understanding of transcription regulation.

  9. Quantification of nanowire uptake by live cells

    KAUST Repository

    Margineanu, Michael B.

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructures fabricated by different methods have become increasingly important for various applications at the cellular level. In order to understand how these nanostructures “behave” and for studying their internalization kinetics, several attempts have been made at tagging and investigating their interaction with living cells. In this study, magnetic iron nanowires with an iron oxide layer are coated with (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), and subsequently labeled with a fluorogenic pH-dependent dye pHrodo™ Red, covalently bound to the aminosilane surface. Time-lapse live imaging of human colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells interacting with the labeled iron nanowires is performed for 24 hours. As the pHrodo™ Red conjugated nanowires are non-fluorescent outside the cells but fluoresce brightly inside, internalized nanowires are distinguished from non-internalized ones and their behavior inside the cells can be tracked for the respective time length. A machine learning-based computational framework dedicated to automatic analysis of live cell imaging data, Cell Cognition, is adapted and used to classify cells with internalized and non-internalized nanowires and subsequently determine the uptake percentage by cells at different time points. An uptake of 85 % by HCT 116 cells is observed after 24 hours incubation at NW-to-cell ratios of 200. While the approach of using pHrodo™ Red for internalization studies is not novel in the literature, this study reports for the first time the utilization of a machine-learning based time-resolved automatic analysis pipeline for quantification of nanowire uptake by cells. This pipeline has also been used for comparison studies with nickel nanowires coated with APTES and labeled with pHrodo™ Red, and another cell line derived from the cervix carcinoma, HeLa. It has thus the potential to be used for studying the interaction of different types of nanostructures with potentially any live cell types.

  10. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A.L.N., E-mail: arao@ucr.edu

    2014-09-15

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER.

  11. Carbon-dot-based fluorescent turn-on sensor for selectively detecting sulfide anions in totally aqueous media and imaging inside live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xianfeng; Zeng, Fang; Du, Fangkai; Wu, Shuizhu

    2013-08-01

    Sulfide anions are generated not only as a byproduct from industrial processes but also in biosystems. Hence, robust fluorescent sensors for detecting sulfide anions which are fast-responding, water soluble and biocompatible are highly desirable. Herein, we report a carbon-dot-based fluorescent sensor, which features excellent water solubility, low cytotoxicity and a short response time. This sensor is based on the ligand/Cu(II) approach so as to achieve fast sensing of sulfide anions. The carbon dot (CD) serves as the fluorophore as well as the anchoring site for the ligands which bind with copper ions. For this CD-based system, as copper ions bind with the ligands which reside on the surface of the CD, the paramagnetic copper ions efficiently quench the fluorescence of the CD, affording the system a turn-off sensor for copper ions. More importantly, the subsequently added sulfide anions can extract Cu2+ from the system and form very stable CuS with Cu2+, resulting in fluorescence enhancement and affording the system a turn-on sensor for sulfide anions. This fast-responding and selective sensor can operate in totally aqueous solution or in physiological milieu with a low detection limit of 0.78 μM. It displays good biocompatibility, and excellent cell membrane permeability, and can be used to monitor S2- levels in running water and living cells.

  12. Multifunctional phenylboronic acid-tagged fluorescent silica nanoparticles via thiol-ene click reaction for imaging sialic acid expressed on living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liwei; Zhang, Xianxia; Zhang, Zhengyong; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Song; Kong, Jilie

    2013-10-15

    Multifunctional fluorescent silica nanoparticles with phenylboronic acid tags were developed for labeling sialic acid on the surface of living cancer cells. In this paper, fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) with strong and stable emission at 515 nm were firstly prepared through a reverse microemulsion process, and then modified with highly selective phenylboronic acid (PBA) tags on their surface via an aqueous 'thiol-ene' click reaction. These nanoparticles had a hydrodynamic diameter of 92.6 ± 9.1 nm, and a bright fluorescence signal, which is 366 times higher than that of a single dye molecule. Meanwhile, these PBA-tagged FSNPs were found very stable in aqueous solution as well as in cell culture medium, verified by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and zeta potential analysis. The over-expressed sialic acid (SA) on the membrane of living HeLa cells was visualized in situ by a confocal laser scanning microscopy, ascribed to the specific interaction between PBA and SA. Thus, the PBA-FSBPs showed a great potential in probing SA expressed on living cells with high selectivity and sensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Aminoquinoline based highly sensitive fluorescent sensor for lead(II) and aluminum(III) and its application in live cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, Thangaraj; Sivaraman, Gandhi [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India); Mahesh, Ayyavu, E-mail: mahesh.a06@gmail.com [School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India); Chellappa, Duraisamy, E-mail: dcmku123@gmail.com [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aminoquinoline derivative was synthesized and used to recognize Pb{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+}. • ANQ was high sensitive, selective and turn-on sensor for Pb{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+}. • The Pb{sup 2+} detection limit (2.08 × 10{sup −9} mol L{sup −1}) is reported. • This fluorescence change was further supported by DFT/TD-DFT calculations. • The probe is applied successfully for recognizing intracellular Pb{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+} within living cells. - Abstract: We have synthesized a new probe 5-((anthracen-9-ylmethylene) amino)quinolin-10-ol (ANQ) based on anthracene platform. The probe was tested for its sensing behavior toward heavy metal ions Hg{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, light metal Al{sup 3+} ion, alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal ions by UV–visible and fluorescent techniques in ACN/H{sub 2}O mixture buffered with HEPES (pH 7.4). It shows high selectivity toward sensing Pb{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+} metal ions. Importantly, 10-fold and 5- fold fluorescence enhancement at 429 nm was observed for probe upon complexation with Pb{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} ions, respectively. This fluorescence enhancement is attributable to the prevention of photoinduced electron transfer. The photonic studies indicate that the probe can be adopted as a sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for Pb{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} ions.

  14. Live-Cell Imaging of Dual-Labeled Golgi Stacks in Tobacco BY-2 Cells Reveals Similar Behaviors for Different Cisternae during Movement and Brefeldin A Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephanie L. Madison; Andreas Nebenführ

    2011-01-01

    In plant cells,the Golgi apparatus consists of numerous stacks that,in turn,are composed of several flattened cisternae with a clear cis-to-trans polarity.During normal functioning within living cells,this unusual organelle displays a wide range of dynamic behaviors such as whole stack motility,constant membrane flux through the cisternae,and Golgi enzyme recycling through the ER.In order to further investigate various aspects of Golgi stack dynamics and integrity,we co-expressed pairs of established Golgi markers in tobacco BY-2 cells to distinguish sub-compartments of the Golgi during monensin treatments,movement,and brefeldin A (BFA)-induced disassembly.A combination of cis and trans markers revealed that Golgi stacks remain intact as they move through the cytoplasm.The Golgi stack orientation during these movements showed a slight preference for the cis side moving ahead,but trans cisternae were also found at the leading edge.During BFA treatments,the different sub-compartments of about half of the observed stacks fused with the ER sequentially; however,no consistent order could be detected.In contrast,the ionophore monensin resulted in swelling of trans cisternae while medial and particularly cis cisternae were mostly unaffected.Our results thus demonstrate a remarkable equivalence of the different cisternae with respect to movement and BFA-induced fusion with the ER.In addition,we propose that a combination of dual-label fluorescence microscopy and drug treatments can provide a simple alternative approach to the determination of protein localization to specific Golgi sub-compartments.

  15. Characterization of SPAD Array for Multifocal High-Content Screening Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Tsikouras

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Current instruments used to detect specific protein-protein interactions in live cells for applications in high-content screening (HCS are limited by the time required to measure the lifetime. Here, a 32 × 1 single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD array was explored as a detector for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM in HCS. Device parameters and characterization results were interpreted in the context of the application to determine if the SPAD array could satisfy the requirements of HCS-FLIM. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were performed using a known fluorescence standard; and the recovered fluorescence lifetime matched literature reported values. The design of a theoretical 32 × 32 SPAD array was also considered as a detector for a multi-point confocal scanning microscope.

  16. Motion as a phenotype: the use of live-cell imaging and machine visual screening to characterize transcription-dependent chromosome dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silver Pamela A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transcriptional activity is well correlated with intra-nuclear position, especially relative to the nuclear periphery, which is a region classically associated with gene silencing. Recently however, actively transcribed genes have also been found localized to the nuclear periphery in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When genes are activated, they become associated with the nuclear pore complex (NPC at the nuclear envelope. Furthermore, chromosomes are not static structures, but exhibit constrained diffusion in real-time, live-cell studies of particular loci. The relationship of chromosome motion with transcriptional activation and active-gene recruitment to the nuclear periphery has not yet been investigated. Results We have generated a yeast strain that enables us to observe the motion of the galactose-inducible GAL gene locus relative to the nuclear periphery in real-time under transcriptionally active and repressed conditions. Using segmented geometric particle tracking, we show that the repressed GAL locus undergoes constrained diffusive movement, and that transcriptional induction with galactose is associated with an enrichment in cells with GAL loci that are both associated with the nuclear periphery and much more constrained in their movement. Furthermore, we report that the mRNA export factor Sac3 is involved in this galactose-induced enrichment of GAL loci at the nuclear periphery. In parallel, using a novel machine visual screening technique, we find that the motion of constrained GAL loci correlates with the motion of the cognate nuclei in galactose-induced cells. Conclusion Transcriptional activation of the GAL genes is associated with their tethering and motion constraint at the nuclear periphery. We describe a model of gene recruitment to the nuclear periphery involving gene diffusion and the mRNA export factor Sac3 that can be used as a framework for further experimentation. In addition, we applied to

  17. Biocomputing system of living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia Profir

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper1 is to show that the process of gene transcription can be represented as a finite automaton illustrating the processing of input/output signals in living cells at DNA level. It is proved that the expression regulation process of λ-phage genes cI and cro represents a molecular-genetic trigger (MGT which is a self-organizing structure with two stable states. It is shown that MGT can be described as a finite automaton fulfilling logical function NOT AND. A living cell can be represented as DNA-based molecular-genetic machine which has the following characteristics: input, output, transition states, language of computation, predetermined genetic program, memory and energy source. We propose a formal model of biocomputing system (having depth two that consists of three E.coli bacterium cell cultures. This model corresponding to an elementary logical scheme can solve a class of formula in the conjunctive normal form (like formula (1.

  18. Characterization of HTT inclusion size, location, and timing in the zQ175 mouse model of Huntington's disease: an in vivo high-content imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikisha Carty

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. Major pathological hallmarks of HD include inclusions of mutant huntingtin (mHTT protein, loss of neurons predominantly in the caudate nucleus, and atrophy of multiple brain regions. However, the early sequence of histological events that manifest in region- and cell-specific manner has not been well characterized. Here we use a high-content histological approach to precisely monitor changes in HTT expression and characterize deposition dynamics of mHTT protein inclusion bodies in the recently characterized zQ175 knock-in mouse line. We carried out an automated multi-parameter quantitative analysis of individual cortical and striatal cells in tissue slices from mice aged 2-12 months and confirmed biochemical reports of an age-associated increase in mHTT inclusions in this model. We also found distinct regional and subregional dynamics for inclusion number, size and distribution with subcellular resolution. We used viral-mediated suppression of total HTT in the striatum of zQ175 mice as an example of a therapeutically-relevant but heterogeneously transducing strategy to demonstrate successful application of this platform to quantitatively assess target engagement and outcome on a cellular basis.

  19. Quantum Process in Living Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Finkel, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Quantum effects have been confirmed in photosynthesis and other biological phenomena. Here we explore the idea of a cooperative quantum process in cells and introduce a model based on coherent waves of established ultrafast energy transfers in water. We compute wave speed, ~156 km/s, and wavelength, ~9.3 nm, and determine that the waves retain local coherence. Diverse numerical applications lend support to the hypothesis that rapid energy transfers in water are characteristic of living cells. Close agreements are found for the dipole moment of water dimers, microwave radiation on yeast, and the Kleiber law of metabolic rates. We find a sphere with diameter ~20 nm is a lower bound for life in this theory. The quantum properties of the model suggest that cellular chemistry favors reactions that support perpetuation of the energy waves

  20. PALM and STORM: unlocking live-cell super-resolution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Henriques, R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Live-cell fluorescence light microscopy has emerged as an important tool in the study of cellular biology. The development of fluorescent markers in parallel with super-resolution imaging systems has pushed light microscopy into the realm...

  1. Computer vision for high content screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Oren Z; Frey, Brendan J

    2016-01-01

    High Content Screening (HCS) technologies that combine automated fluorescence microscopy with high throughput biotechnology have become powerful systems for studying cell biology and drug screening. These systems can produce more than 100 000 images per day, making their success dependent on automated image analysis. In this review, we describe the steps involved in quantifying microscopy images and different approaches for each step. Typically, individual cells are segmented from the background using a segmentation algorithm. Each cell is then quantified by extracting numerical features, such as area and intensity measurements. As these feature representations are typically high dimensional (>500), modern machine learning algorithms are used to classify, cluster and visualize cells in HCS experiments. Machine learning algorithms that learn feature representations, in addition to the classification or clustering task, have recently advanced the state of the art on several benchmarking tasks in the computer vision community. These techniques have also recently been applied to HCS image analysis.

  2. Nanocapsules: coating for living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Silke; Diaspro, Alberto; Magrassi, Raffaella; Ballario, Paola; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Filetici, Patrizia; Ornaghi, Prisca; Ramoino, Paola; Gliozzi, Alessandra

    2004-03-01

    One of the most promising tools for future applications in science and medicine is the use of nanotechnologies. Especially self-assembly systems, e.g., polyelectrolyte (PE) capsules prepared by means of the layer-by-layer technique with tailored properties, fulfill the requirements for nano-organized systems in a satisfactory manner. The nano-organized shells are suitable as coating for living cells or artificial tissue to prevent immune response. With these shells, material can be delivered to predefined organs. In this paper, some preliminary results are presented, giving a broad overview over the possibilities to use nano-organized capsules. Based on the observations that the cells while duplicating break the capsule a mutant yeast strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which express GFP-tubulin under galactose promotion, was investigated by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy. The measurements reveal an increased surface charge in the region of buds developed prior encapsulation. In order to test the used PE pair for cytotoxicity, germinating conidia of the fungi Neurospora crassa were coated. The investigation with fluorescence microscopy shows a variation in the surface charge for the growing region and the conidium poles. The capsules exhibit interesting properties as valuable tool in science and a promising candidate for application in the field of medicine.

  3. A computational platform for robotized fluorescence microscopy (II): DNA damage, replication, checkpoint activation, and cell cycle progression by high-content high-resolution multiparameter image-cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furia, Laura; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Dissection of complex molecular-networks in rare cell populations is limited by current technologies that do not allow simultaneous quantification, high-resolution localization, and statistically robust analysis of multiple parameters. We have developed a novel computational platform (Automated Microscopy for Image CytOmetry, A.M.I.CO) for quantitative image-analysis of data from confocal or widefield robotized microscopes. We have applied this image-cytometry technology to the study of checkpoint activation in response to spontaneous DNA damage in nontransformed mammary cells. Cell-cycle profile and active DNA-replication were correlated to (i) Ki67, to monitor proliferation; (ii) phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX) and 53BP1, as markers of DNA-damage response (DDR); and (iii) p53 and p21, as checkpoint-activation markers. Our data suggest the existence of cell-cycle modulated mechanisms involving different functions of γH2AX and 53BP1 in DDR, and of p53 and p21 in checkpoint activation and quiescence regulation during the cell-cycle. Quantitative analysis, event selection, and physical relocalization have been then employed to correlate protein expression at the population level with interactions between molecules, measured with Proximity Ligation Analysis, with unprecedented statistical relevance. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  4. Recombinant differential anchorage probes that tower over the spatial dimension of intracellular signals for high content screening and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembri, Laura; Zanese, Marion; Depierre-Plinet, Gaelle; Petit, Muriel; Elkaoukabi-Chaibi, Assia; Tauzin, Loic; Florean, Cristina; Lartigue, Lydia; Medina, Chantal; Rey, Christophe; Belloc, Francis; Reiffers, Josy; Ichas, François; De Giorgi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Recombinant fluorescent probes allow the detection of molecular events inside living cells. Many of them exploit the intracellular space to provide positional signals and, thus, require detection by single cell imaging. We describe here a novel strategy based on probes capable of encoding the spatial dimension of intracellular signals into "all-or-none" fluorescence intensity changes (differential anchorage probes, DAPs). The resulting signals can be acquired in single cells at high throughput by automated flow cytometry, (i) bypassing image acquisition and analysis, (ii) providing a direct quantitative readout, and (iii) allowing the exploration of large experimental series. We illustrate our purpose with DAPs for Bax and the effector caspases 3 and 7, which are keys players in apoptotic cell death, and show applications in basic research, high content multiplexed library screening, compound characterization, and drug profiling.

  5. Live-cell and super-resolution imaging reveal that the distribution of wall-associated protein A is correlated with the cell chain integrity of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Liu, Z; Zhang, Y; Su, Q P; Xue, B; Shao, S; Zhu, Y; Xu, X; Wei, S; Sun, Y

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a primary pathogen responsible for dental caries. It has an outstanding ability to form biofilm, which is vital for virulence. Previous studies have shown that knockout of Wall-associated protein A (WapA) affects cell chain and biofilm formation of S. mutans. As a surface protein, the distribution of WapA remains unknown, but it is important to understand the mechanism underlying the function of WapA. This study applied the fluorescence protein mCherry as a reporter gene to characterize the dynamic distribution of WapA in S. mutans via time-lapse and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The results revealed interesting subcellular distribution patterns of WapA in single, dividing and long chains of S. mutans cells. It appears at the middle of the cell and moves to the poles as the cell grows and divides. In a cell chain, after each round of cell division, such dynamic relocation results in WapA distribution at the previous cell division sites, resulting in a pattern where WapA is located at the boundary of two adjacent cell pairs. This WapA distribution pattern corresponds to the breaking segmentation of wapA deletion cell chains. The dynamic relocation of WapA through the cell cycle increases our understanding of the mechanism of WapA in maintaining cell chain integrity and biofilm formation.

  6. Exploring 1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone as long-range emissive ratiometric fluorescent probe for signaling Zn(2+)/PO4(3-): Ensemble utilization for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sougata; Gaur, Pankaj; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Mukhopadhyay, Subhrakanti; Ghosh, Subrata

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescent 1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone 1 was found to demonstrate its ratiometric signaling property upon interaction with divalent zinc (Zn(2+)). While the probe itself exhibited fluorescence emission in the yellow region (λem=544 nm and 567 nm), binding with Zn(2+) induced strong emission in the orange region (λem=600 nm) which was mainly due to a combination of CHEF and ICT mechanism. The probe was found to be highly sensitive toward the detection of zinc and the limit of detection (LOD) was calculated to be 9×10(-7) M. The possibility of using this probe for real-time analysis was strongly supported by the striking stability of fluorescence signal for more than five days with similar fluorescence intensity as observed during instant signaling. The present probe works within physiological pH range and is devoid of any interference caused by the same group elements such as Cd(2+)/Hg(2+). The probe possesses excellent excitation/emission wavelength profile and can penetrate cell membrane to image low concentration of zing inside living system. The in situ formed zinc-probe ensemble was further explored as ratiometric sensing platform for detecting another bio-relevant analyte phosphate anion through a zinc-displacement approach.

  7. Strain Promoted Click Chemistry of 2- or 8-Azidopurine and 5-Azidopyrimidine Nucleosides and 8-Azidoadenosine Triphosphate with Cyclooctynes. Application to Living Cell Fluorescent Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas, Jessica; Annoual, Marie; Das, Jayanta Kumar; Felty, Quentin; Gonzalez, Walter G; Miksovska, Jaroslava; Sharifai, Nima; Chiba, Akira; Wnuk, Stanislaw F

    2015-08-19

    Strain-promoted click chemistry of nucleosides and nucleotides with an azido group directly attached to the purine and pyrimidine rings with various cyclooctynes in aqueous solution at ambient temperature resulted in efficient formation (3 min to 3 h) of fluorescent, light-up, triazole products. The 2- and 8-azidoadenine nucleosides reacted with fused cyclopropyl cyclooctyne, dibenzylcyclooctyne, or monofluorocyclooctyne to produce click products functionalized with hydroxyl, amino, N-hydroxysuccinimide, or biotin moieties. The 5-azidouridine and 5-azido-2'-deoxyuridine were similarly converted to the analogous triazole products in quantitative yields in less than 5 min. The 8-azido-ATP quantitatively afforded the triazole product with fused cyclopropyl cyclooctyne in aqueous acetonitrile (3 h). The novel triazole adducts at the 2- or 8-position of adenine or 5-position of uracil rings induce fluorescence properties which were used for direct imaging in MCF-7 cancer cells without the need for traditional fluorogenic reporters. FLIM of the triazole click adducts demonstrated their potential utility for dynamic measuring and tracking of signaling events inside single living cancer cells.

  8. Using a 3-D multicellular simulation of spinal cord injury with live cell imaging to study the neural immune barrier to nanoparticle uptake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan P.Weightman; Stuart I.Jenkins; Divya M.Chari

    2016-01-01

    Development of nanoparticle (NP) based therapies to promote regeneration in sites of central nervous system (CNS;i.e.brain and spinal cord) pathology relies critically on the availability of experimental models that offer biologically valid predictions of NP fate in vivo.However,there is a major lack of biological models that mimic the pathological complexity of target neural sites in vivo,particularly the responses of resident neural immune cells to NPs.Here,we have utilised a previously developed in vitro model of traumatic spinal cord injury (based on 3-D organotypic slice arrays) with dynamic time lapse imaging to reveal in real-time the acute cellular fate of NPs within injury foci.We demonstrate the utility of our model in revealing the well documented phenomenon of avid NP sequestration by the intrinsic immune cells of the CNS (the microglia).Such immune sequestration is a known translational barrier to the use of NP-based therapeutics for neurological injury.Accordingly,we suggest that the utility of our model in mimicking microglial sequestration behaviours offers a valuable investigative tool to evaluate strategies to overcome this cellular response within a simple and biologically relevant experimental system,whilst reducing the use of live animal neurological injury models for such studies.

  9. Difference in trafficking of brain-derived neurotrophic factor between axons and dendrites of cortical neurons, revealed by live-cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohara Keigo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which is sorted into a regulated secretory pathway of neurons, is supposed to act retrogradely through dendrites on presynaptic neurons or anterogradely through axons on postsynaptic neurons. Depending on which is the case, the pattern and direction of trafficking of BDNF in dendrites and axons are expected to be different. To address this issue, we analyzed movements of green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged BDNF in axons and dendrites of living cortical neurons by time-lapse imaging. In part of the experiments, the expression of BDNF tagged with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was compared with that of nerve growth factor (NGF tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, to see whether fluorescent protein-tagged BDNF is expressed in a manner specific to this neurotrophin. Results We found that BDNF tagged with GFP or CFP was expressed in a punctated manner in dendrites and axons in about two-thirds of neurons into which plasmid cDNAs had been injected, while NGF tagged with GFP or YFP was diffusely expressed even in dendrites in about 70% of the plasmid-injected neurons. In neurons in which BDNF-GFP was expressed as vesicular puncta in axons, 59 and 23% of the puncta were moving rapidly in the anterograde and retrograde directions, respectively. On the other hand, 64% of BDNF-GFP puncta in dendrites did not move at all or fluttered back and forth within a short distance. The rest of the puncta in dendrites were moving relatively smoothly in either direction, but their mean velocity of transport, 0.47 ± 0.23 (SD μm/s, was slower than that of the moving puncta in axons (0.73 ± 0.26 μm/s. Conclusion The present results show that the pattern and velocity of the trafficking of fluorescence protein-tagged BDNF are different between axons and dendrites, and suggest that the anterograde transport in axons may be the dominant stream of BDNF to release sites.

  10. Ethylene glycol modified 2-(2‧-aminophenyl)benzothiazoles at the amino site: the excited-state N-H proton transfer reactions in aqueous solution, micelles and potential application in live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo-Qing; Chen, Yi-Ting; Chen, Yu-Wei; Chung, Kun-You; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Li, Yi-Jhen; Chao, Chi-Min; Liu, Kuan-Miao; Tseng, Huan-Wei; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-03-01

    Triethylene glycol monomethyl ether and poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether modified 2-(2‧-aminophenyl)benzothiazoles, namely ABT-P3EG, ABT-P7EG and ABT-P12EG varied by different chain length of poly(ethylene glycol) at the amino site, were synthesized to probe their photophysical and bio-imaging properties. In polar, aprotic solvents such as CH2Cl2 ultrafast excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) takes place, resulting in a large Stokes shifted tautomer emission in the green-yellow (550 nm) region. In neutral water, ABT-P12EG forms micelles with diameters of 15  ±  3 nm under a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of ~80 μM, in which the tautomer emission is greatly enhanced free from water perturbation. Cytotoxicity experiments showed that all ABT-PnEGs have negligible cytotoxicity against HeLa cells even at doses as high as 1 mM. Live-cell imaging experiments were also performed, the results indicate that all ABT-PnEGs are able to enter HeLa cells. While the two-photon excitation emission of ABT-P3EG in cells cytoplasm shows concentration independence and is dominated by the anion blue fluorescence, ABT-P7EG and ABT-P12EG exhibit prominent green tautomer emission at  >  CMC and in part penetrate to the nuclei, adding an additional advantage for the cell imaging.

  11. Comparison of three cell fixation methods for high content analysis assays utilizing quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Y; Byrne, S; Bashir, M; Davies, A; Whelan, A; Gun'ko, Y; Kelleher, D; Volkov, Y

    2008-10-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles or quantum dots are being increasingly utilized as fluorescent probes in cell biology both in live and fixed cell assays. Quantum dots possess an immense potential for use in multiplexing assays that can be run on high content screening analysers. Depending on the nature of the biological target under investigation, experiments are frequently required on cells retaining an intact cell membrane or also on those that have been fixed and permeabilized to expose intracellular antigens. Fixation of cell lines before or after the addition of quantum dots may affect their localization, emission properties and stability. Using a high content analysis platform we perform a quantitative comparative analysis of three common fixation techniques in two different cell lines exposed to carboxylic acid stabilized CdTe quantum dots. Our study demonstrates that in prefixed and permeabilized cells, quantum dots are readily internalized regardless of cell type, and their intracellular location is primarily determined by the properties of the quantum dots themselves. However, if the fixation procedures are preformed on live cells previously incubated with quantum dots, other important factors have to be considered. The choice of the fixative significantly influences the fluorescent characteristics of the quantum dots. Fixatives, regardless of their chemical nature, negatively affected quantum dots fluorescence intensity. Comparative analysis of gluteraldehyde, methanol and paraformaldehyde demonstrated that 2% paraformaldehyde was the fixative of choice. The presence of protein in the media did not significantly alter the quantum dot fluorescence. This study indicates that multiplexing assays utilizing quantum dots, despite being a cutting edge tool for high content cell imaging, still require careful consideration of the basic steps in biological sample processing.

  12. Interactions between semiconductor nanowires and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Christelle N

    2015-06-17

    Semiconductor nanowires are increasingly used for biological applications and their small dimensions make them a promising tool for sensing and manipulating cells with minimal perturbation. In order to interface cells with nanowires in a controlled fashion, it is essential to understand the interactions between nanowires and living cells. The present paper reviews current progress in the understanding of these interactions, with knowledge gathered from studies where living cells were interfaced with vertical nanowire arrays. The effect of nanowires on cells is reported in terms of viability, cell-nanowire interface morphology, cell behavior, changes in gene expression as well as cellular stress markers. Unexplored issues and unanswered questions are discussed.

  13. Synchrotron IR spectromicroscopy: chemistry of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N; Bechtel, Hans A; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C

    2010-11-01

    Advanced analytical capabilities of synchrotron IR spectromicroscopy meet the demands of modern biological research for studying molecular reactions in individual living cells. (To listen to a podcast about this article, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html.).

  14. High content analysis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Federica; Motti, Dario; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Kaspar, Brian K

    2017-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disease characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons. Neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglial cells all undergo pathological modifications in the onset and progression of ALS. A number of genes involved in the etiopathology of the disease have been identified, but a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ALS has yet to be determined. Currently, people affected by ALS have a life expectancy of only two to five years from diagnosis. The search for a treatment has been slow and mostly unsuccessful, leaving patients in desperate need of better therapies. Until recently, most pre-clinical studies utilized the available ALS animal models. In the past years, the development of new protocols for isolation of patient cells and differentiation into relevant cell types has provided new tools to model ALS, potentially more relevant to the disease itself as they directly come from patients. The use of stem cells is showing promise to facilitate ALS research by expanding our understanding of the disease and help to identify potential new therapeutic targets and therapies to help patients. Advancements in high content analysis (HCA) have the power to contribute to move ALS research forward by combining automated image acquisition along with digital image analysis. With modern HCA machines it is possible, in a period of just a few hours, to observe changes in morphology and survival of cells, under the stimulation of hundreds, if not thousands of drugs and compounds. In this article, we will summarize the major molecular and cellular hallmarks of ALS, describe the advancements provided by the in vitro models developed in the last few years, and review the studies that have applied HCA to the ALS field to date. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies.

  16. Live-cell tracking using SIFT features in DIC microscopic videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Richard M; Crookes, Danny; Luo, Nie; Davidson, Michael W

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, a novel motion-tracking scheme using scale-invariant features is proposed for automatic cell motility analysis in gray-scale microscopic videos, particularly for the live-cell tracking in low-contrast differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. In the proposed approach, scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) points around live cells in the microscopic image are detected, and a structure locality preservation (SLP) scheme using Laplacian Eigenmap is proposed to track the SIFT feature points along successive frames of low-contrast DIC videos. Experiments on low-contrast DIC microscopic videos of various live-cell lines shows that in comparison with principal component analysis (PCA) based SIFT tracking, the proposed Laplacian-SIFT can significantly reduce the error rate of SIFT feature tracking. With this enhancement, further experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme is a robust and accurate approach to tackling the challenge of live-cell tracking in DIC microscopy.

  17. Multifunctional Prenylated Peptides for Live Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, James W.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Mullen, Daniel G.; Amundson, Gregg; Geier, Suzanne; Falkum, Stacy; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Barany, George; Distefano, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a common post-translational modification present in eukaryotic cells. Many key proteins involved in signal transduction pathways are prenylated and inhibition of prenylation can be useful as a therapeutic intervention. While significant progress has been made in understanding protein prenylation in vitro, we have been interested in studying this process in living cells, including the question of where prenylated molecules localize. Here, we describe the synthesis and live cell analysis of a series of fluorescently labeled multifunctional peptides, based on the C-terminus of the naturally prenylated protein CDC42. A synthetic route was developed that features a key Acm to Scm protecting group conversion. This strategy was compatible with acid-sensitive isoprenoid moieties, and allowed incorporation of an appropriate fluorophore as well as a cell-penetrating sequence (penetratin). These peptides are able to enter cells through different mechanisms, depending on the presence or absence of the penetratin vehicle and the nature of the prenyl group attached. Interestingly, prenylated peptides lacking penetratin are able to enter cells freely through an energy-independent process, and localize in a perinuclear fashion. This effect extends to a prenylated peptide that includes a full “CAAX box” sequence (specifically, CVLL). Hence, these peptides open the door for studies of protein prenylation in living cells, including enzymatic processing and intracellular peptide trafficking. Moreover, the synthetic strategy developed here should be useful for the assembly of other types of peptides that contain acid sensitive functionalities. PMID:19425596

  18. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Jonczyk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays.

  19. Imaging protein complex formation in the autophagy pathway: analysis of the interaction of LC3 and Atg4BC74A in live cells using Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Lewis J.; Kenworthy, Anne K.

    2012-01-01

    The protein microtubule-associated protein 1, light chain 3 (LC3) functions in autophagosome formation and plays a central role in the autophagy pathway. Previously, we found LC3 diffuses more slowly in cells than is expected for a freely diffusing monomer, suggesting it may constitutively associate with a macromolecular complex containing other protein components of the pathway. In the current study, we used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to investigate the interactions of LC3 with Atg4BC74A, a catalytically inactive mutant of the cysteine protease involved in lipidation and de-lipidation of LC3, as a model system to probe protein complex formation in the autophagy pathway. We show Atg4BC74A is in FRET proximity with LC3 in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of living cells, consistent with previous biochemical evidence that suggests these proteins directly interact. In addition, overexpressed Atg4BC74A diffuses significantly more slowly than predicted based on its molecular weight, and its translational diffusion coefficient is significantly slowed upon coexpression with LC3 to match that of LC3 itself. Taken together, these results suggest Atg4BC74A and LC3 are contained within the same multiprotein complex and that this complex exists in both the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of living cells.

  20. Developmental toxicity assay using high content screening of zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz-McPeak, Susan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Cuevas, Elvis; Dumas, Melanie; Newport, Glenn D; Ali, Syed F; Paule, Merle G; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2015-03-01

    Typically, time-consuming standard toxicological assays using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model evaluate mortality and teratogenicity after exposure during the first 2 days post-fertilization. Here we describe an automated image-based high content screening (HCS) assay to identify the teratogenic/embryotoxic potential of compounds in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Automated image acquisition was performed using a high content microscope system. Further automated analysis of embryo length, as a statistically quantifiable endpoint of toxicity, was performed on images post-acquisition. The biological effects of ethanol, nicotine, ketamine, caffeine, dimethyl sulfoxide and temperature on zebrafish embryos were assessed. This automated developmental toxicity assay, based on a growth-retardation endpoint should be suitable for evaluating the effects of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants in a high throughput manner. This approach can significantly expedite the screening of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants, thereby improving the current risk assessment process by decreasing analysis time and required resources.

  1. Tracking single mRNA molecules in live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyungseok C.; Lee, Byung Hun; Lim, Kiseong; Son, Jae Seok; Song, Minho S.; Park, Hye Yoon

    2016-06-01

    mRNAs inside cells interact with numerous RNA-binding proteins, microRNAs, and ribosomes that together compose a highly heterogeneous population of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particles. Perhaps one of the best ways to investigate the complex regulation of mRNA is to observe individual molecules. Single molecule imaging allows the collection of quantitative and statistical data on subpopulations and transient states that are otherwise obscured by ensemble averaging. In addition, single particle tracking reveals the sequence of events that occur in the formation and remodeling of mRNPs in real time. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art techniques in tagging, delivery, and imaging to track single mRNAs in live cells. We also discuss how these techniques are applied to extract dynamic information on the transcription, transport, localization, and translation of mRNAs. These studies demonstrate how single molecule tracking is transforming the understanding of mRNA regulation in live cells.

  2. Semi-automated quantification of living cells with internalized nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Margineanu, Michael B.

    2016-01-15

    Background Nanostructures fabricated by different methods have become increasingly important for various applications in biology and medicine, such as agents for medical imaging or cancer therapy. In order to understand their interaction with living cells and their internalization kinetics, several attempts have been made in tagging them. Although methods have been developed to measure the number of nanostructures internalized by the cells, there are only few approaches aimed to measure the number of cells that internalize the nanostructures, and they are usually limited to fixed-cell studies. Flow cytometry can be used for live-cell assays on large populations of cells, however it is a single time point measurement, and does not include any information about cell morphology. To date many of the observations made on internalization events are limited to few time points and cells. Results In this study, we present a method for quantifying cells with internalized magnetic nanowires (NWs). A machine learning-based computational framework, CellCognition, is adapted and used to classify cells with internalized and no internalized NWs, labeled with the fluorogenic pH-dependent dye pHrodo™ Red, and subsequently to determine the percentage of cells with internalized NWs at different time points. In a “proof-of-concept”, we performed a study on human colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells and human epithelial cervical cancer HeLa cells interacting with iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) NWs. Conclusions This study reports a novel method for the quantification of cells that internalize a specific type of nanostructures. This approach is suitable for high-throughput and real-time data analysis and has the potential to be used to study the interaction of different types of nanostructures in live-cell assays.

  3. mRNA analysis of single living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikai Atsushi

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysis of specific gene expression in single living cells may become an important technique for cell biology. So far, no method has been available to detect mRNA in living cells without killing or destroying them. We have developed here a novel method to examine gene expression of living cells using an atomic force microscope (AFM. AFM tip was inserted into living cells to extract mRNAs. The obtained mRNAs were analyzed with RT-PCR, nested PCR, and quantitative PCR. This method enabled us to examine time-dependent gene expression of single living cells without serious damage to the cells.

  4. Adaptation of a Cell-Based High Content Screening System for the In-Depth Analysis of Celiac Biopsy Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sarah E J; Mohamed, Bashir M; Elliott, Louise; Davies, Anthony Mitchell; Feighery, Conleth F; Kelly, Jacinta; Dunne, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The IN Cell Analyzer 1000 possesses several distinguishing features that make it a valuable tool in research today. This fully automated high content screening (HCS) system introduced quantitative fluorescent microscopy with computerized image analysis for use in cell-based analysis. Previous studies have focused on live cell assays, where it has proven to be a powerful and robust method capable of providing reproducible, quantitative data. Using HCS as a tool to investigate antigen expression in duodenal biopsies, we developed a novel approach to tissue positioning and mapping. We adapted IN Cell Analyzer 1000's image acquisition and analysis software for the investigation of tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and smooth muscle alpha-actin (SM α-actin) staining in paraffin-embedded duodenal tissue sections from celiac patients and healthy controls. These innovations allowed a quantitative analysis of cellular structure and protein expression. The results from routine biopsy material indicated the intensity of protein expression was altered in celiac disease compared to normal biopsy material.

  5. Thermodynamics of protein destabilization in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Jens; Mu, Xin; Lang, Lisa; Wang, Huabing; Binolfi, Andres; Theillet, François-Xavier; Bekei, Beata; Logan, Derek T; Selenko, Philipp; Wennerström, Håkan; Oliveberg, Mikael

    2015-10-06

    Although protein folding and stability have been well explored under simplified conditions in vitro, it is yet unclear how these basic self-organization events are modulated by the crowded interior of live cells. To find out, we use here in-cell NMR to follow at atomic resolution the thermal unfolding of a β-barrel protein inside mammalian and bacterial cells. Challenging the view from in vitro crowding effects, we find that the cells destabilize the protein at 37 °C but with a conspicuous twist: While the melting temperature goes down the cold unfolding moves into the physiological regime, coupled to an augmented heat-capacity change. The effect seems induced by transient, sequence-specific, interactions with the cellular components, acting preferentially on the unfolded ensemble. This points to a model where the in vivo influence on protein behavior is case specific, determined by the individual protein's interplay with the functionally optimized "interaction landscape" of the cellular interior.

  6. Creep Function of a Single Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desprat, Nicolas; Richert, Alain; Simeon, Jacqueline; Asnacios, Atef

    2005-01-01

    We used a novel uniaxial stretching rheometer to measure the creep function J(t) of an isolated living cell. We show, for the first time at the scale of the whole cell, that J(t) behaves as a power-law J(t) = Atα. For N = 43 mice myoblasts (C2-7), we find α = 0.24 ± 0.01 and A = (2.4 ± 0.3) 10−3 Pa−1 s−α. Using Laplace Transforms, we compare A and α to the parameters G0 and β of the complex modulus G*(ω) = G0ωβ measured by other authors using magnetic twisting cytometry and atomic force microscopy. Excellent agreement between A and G0 on the one hand, and between α and β on the other hand, indicated that the power-law is an intrinsic feature of cell mechanics and not the signature of a particular technique. Moreover, the agreement between measurements at very different size scales, going from a few tens of nanometers to the scale of the whole cell, suggests that self-similarity could be a central feature of cell mechanical structure. Finally, we show that the power-law behavior could explain previous results first interpreted as instantaneous elasticity. Thus, we think that the living cell must definitely be thought of as a material with a large and continuous distribution of relaxation time constants which cannot be described by models with a finite number of springs and dash-pots. PMID:15596508

  7. Gold nanoparticles delivery in mammalian live cells: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Lévy

    2010-02-01

    the University of Liverpool as a Post-doctoral Marie Curie Research Fellow. In 2006, he obtained a prestigious David Phillips Fellowship, to develop single particle-based imaging in living cells (photothermal microscopy. His research interests include the design and characterization of nanomaterials and their interactions with living cells. Umbreen Shaheen completed her Master in Zoology and then lectured at the University of Balochistan. She studied biotechnology at the National Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE, Pakistan and is currently doing her PhD at the University of Liverpool, on intracellular delivery of peptide-capped gold nanoparticles. Yann Cesbron is a PhD student at the University of Liverpool, developing photothermal microscopy for biological imaging. He graduated at the University Louis Pasteur (Strasbourg, France with a Master of Science in Condensed Matter Physics and a second Master of Science in Polymer Materials. He moved to Liverpool in 2006 to start his PhD. Violaine Sée is a BBSRC David Phillips Research Fellow at the University of Liverpool. She graduated in Chemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg (France. After a Master in Pharmacology, in 2001 she obtained her PhD in Pharmacology and Neurobiology at the University Louis Pasteur. She was then assistant lecturer and subsequently moved to the University of Liverpool as a Post-doctoral Research Fellow. In 2005, she obtained a prestigious David Phillips Fellowship, to develop her work on intracellular signaling dynamics. She is focusing on the imaging of single living cells in order to understand regulation of gene transcription and cell fate. She has recently been interested in using new techniques for single molecule imaging in live cells based on the use of gold nanoparticles.

  8. Planar patch-clamp force microscopy on living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamir, Evren [Center for Nano Science, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Amalienstr 54, 80799 Munich (Germany); George, Michael; Fertig, Niels [Nanion Technologies GmbH, Erzgiessereistr. 4, 80335 Munich (Germany); Benoit, Martin [Center for Nano Science, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Amalienstr 54, 80799 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: martin.benoit@physik.uni-muenchen.de

    2008-05-15

    Here we report a new combination of the patch-clamp technique with the atomic force microscope (AFM). A planar patch-clamp chip microstructured from borosilicate glass was used as a support for mechanical probing of living cells. The setup not only allows for immobilizing even a non-adherent cell for measurements of its mechanical properties, but also for simultaneously measuring the electrophysiological properties of a single cell. As a proof of principle experiment we measured the voltage-induced membrane movement of HEK293 and Jurkat cells in the whole-cell voltage clamp configuration. The results of these measurements are in good agreement with previous studies. By using the planar patch-clamp chip for immobilization, the AFM not only can image non-adhering cells, but also gets easily access to an electrophysiologically controlled cellular probe at low vibrational noise.

  9. Quantification of plant cell coupling with live-cell microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    cell wall interface. Transport through plasmodesmata, the cell wall channels that directly connect plant cells, is regulated not only by a fixed size exclusion limit, but also by physiological and pathological adaptation. The noninvasive approach described here offers the possibility of precisely......Movement of nutrients and signaling compounds from cell to cell is an essential process for plant growth and development. To understand processes such as carbon allocation, cell communication, and reaction to pathogen attack it is important to know a specific molecule’s capacity to pass a specific...... determining the plasmodesmata-mediated cell wall permeability for small molecules in living cells. The method is based on photoactivation of the fluorescent tracer caged fluorescein. Non-fluorescent caged fluorescein is applied to a target tissue, where it is taken up passively into all cells. Imaged...

  10. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, an

  11. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking,

  12. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, an

  13. mRNA detection in living cell using phosphorothioate-modified molecular beacon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG HongXing; YANG XiaoHai; WANG KeMin; TAN WeiHong; LI Wei

    2009-01-01

    In this study, GFP mRNA in COS-7 cell and GFP-transfected COS-7 cell was detected in real time using phosphorothioate-modified molecular beacon based on living cell imaging method. Results showed that phosphorothioate-modified molecular beacon still kept the advantages of molecular beacon, such as, excellent selectivity, high sensitivity, and no separation detection. In addition, this modification could significantly increase the nuclease resistance of molecular beacon. Phosphorothioate-modified molecular beacon can efficiently reduce the false positive signal and improve the accuracy of living cell mRNA detection.

  14. Biophysical Techniques for Detection of cAMP and cGMP in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav O. Nikolaev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are ubiquitous second messengers which regulate myriads of functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. Their intracellular effects are often mediated via discrete subcellular signaling microdomains. In this review, we will discuss state-of-the-art techniques to measure cAMP and cGMP in biological samples with a particular focus on live cell imaging approaches, which allow their detection with high temporal and spatial resolution in living cells and tissues. Finally, we will describe how these techniques can be applied to the analysis of second messenger dynamics in subcellular signaling microdomains.

  15. Nanoscale bio-platforms for living cell interrogation: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lingqian; Hu, Jiaming; Chen, Feng; Chen, Zhou; Shi, Junfeng; Yang, Zhaogang; Li, Yiwen; Lee, Ly James

    2016-02-14

    The living cell is a complex entity that dynamically responds to both intracellular and extracellular environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the understanding intracellular functions orchestrated with mRNAs and proteins in investigation of the fate of a single-cell, including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, differentiation and mutations. The rapid development of modern cellular analysis techniques (e.g. PCR, western blotting, immunochemistry, etc.) offers new opportunities in quantitative analysis of RNA/protein expression up to a single cell level. The recent entries of nanoscale platforms that include kinds of methodologies with high spatial and temporal resolution have been widely employed to probe the living cells. In this tutorial review paper, we give insight into background introduction and technical innovation of currently reported nanoscale platforms for living cell interrogation. These highlighted technologies are documented in details within four categories, including nano-biosensors for label-free detection of living cells, nanodevices for living cell probing by intracellular marker delivery, high-throughput platforms towards clinical current, and the progress of microscopic imaging platforms for cell/tissue tracking in vitro and in vivo. Perspectives for system improvement were also discussed to solve the limitations remains in current techniques, for the purpose of clinical use in future.

  16. Nanoscale bio-platforms for living cell interrogation: current status and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lingqian; Hu, Jiaming; Chen, Feng; Chen, Zhou; Shi, Junfeng; Yang, Zhaogang; Li, Yiwen; Lee, Ly James

    2016-02-01

    The living cell is a complex entity that dynamically responds to both intracellular and extracellular environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the understanding intracellular functions orchestrated with mRNAs and proteins in investigation of the fate of a single-cell, including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, differentiation and mutations. The rapid development of modern cellular analysis techniques (e.g. PCR, western blotting, immunochemistry, etc.) offers new opportunities in quantitative analysis of RNA/protein expression up to a single cell level. The recent entries of nanoscale platforms that include kinds of methodologies with high spatial and temporal resolution have been widely employed to probe the living cells. In this tutorial review paper, we give insight into background introduction and technical innovation of currently reported nanoscale platforms for living cell interrogation. These highlighted technologies are documented in details within four categories, including nano-biosensors for label-free detection of living cells, nanodevices for living cell probing by intracellular marker delivery, high-throughput platforms towards clinical current, and the progress of microscopic imaging platforms for cell/tissue tracking in vitro and in vivo. Perspectives for system improvement were also discussed to solve the limitations remains in current techniques, for the purpose of clinical use in future.

  17. A microfluidic platform for correlative live-cell and super-resolution microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Tam

    Full Text Available Recently, super-resolution microscopy methods such as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM have enabled visualization of subcellular structures below the optical resolution limit. Due to the poor temporal resolution, however, these methods have mostly been used to image fixed cells or dynamic processes that evolve on slow time-scales. In particular, fast dynamic processes and their relationship to the underlying ultrastructure or nanoscale protein organization cannot be discerned. To overcome this limitation, we have recently developed a correlative and sequential imaging method that combines live-cell and super-resolution microscopy. This approach adds dynamic background to ultrastructural images providing a new dimension to the interpretation of super-resolution data. However, currently, it suffers from the need to carry out tedious steps of sample preparation manually. To alleviate this problem, we implemented a simple and versatile microfluidic platform that streamlines the sample preparation steps in between live-cell and super-resolution imaging. The platform is based on a microfluidic chip with parallel, miniaturized imaging chambers and an automated fluid-injection device, which delivers a precise amount of a specified reagent to the selected imaging chamber at a specific time within the experiment. We demonstrate that this system can be used for live-cell imaging, automated fixation, and immunostaining of adherent mammalian cells in situ followed by STORM imaging. We further demonstrate an application by correlating mitochondrial dynamics, morphology, and nanoscale mitochondrial protein distribution in live and super-resolution images.

  18. A microfluidic platform for correlative live-cell and super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Johnny; Cordier, Guillaume Alan; Bálint, Štefan; Sandoval Álvarez, Ángel; Borbely, Joseph Steven; Lakadamyali, Melike

    2014-01-01

    Recently, super-resolution microscopy methods such as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) have enabled visualization of subcellular structures below the optical resolution limit. Due to the poor temporal resolution, however, these methods have mostly been used to image fixed cells or dynamic processes that evolve on slow time-scales. In particular, fast dynamic processes and their relationship to the underlying ultrastructure or nanoscale protein organization cannot be discerned. To overcome this limitation, we have recently developed a correlative and sequential imaging method that combines live-cell and super-resolution microscopy. This approach adds dynamic background to ultrastructural images providing a new dimension to the interpretation of super-resolution data. However, currently, it suffers from the need to carry out tedious steps of sample preparation manually. To alleviate this problem, we implemented a simple and versatile microfluidic platform that streamlines the sample preparation steps in between live-cell and super-resolution imaging. The platform is based on a microfluidic chip with parallel, miniaturized imaging chambers and an automated fluid-injection device, which delivers a precise amount of a specified reagent to the selected imaging chamber at a specific time within the experiment. We demonstrate that this system can be used for live-cell imaging, automated fixation, and immunostaining of adherent mammalian cells in situ followed by STORM imaging. We further demonstrate an application by correlating mitochondrial dynamics, morphology, and nanoscale mitochondrial protein distribution in live and super-resolution images.

  19. Synthetic Glycosphingolipids for Live-Cell Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauner, Martin; Batroff, Ellen; Bachmann, Verena; Hauck, Christof R; Wittmann, Valentin

    2016-07-20

    Glycosphingolipids are an important component of cell membranes that are involved in many biological processes. Fluorescently labeled glycosphingolipids are frequently used to gain insight into their localization. However, the attachment of a fluorophore to the glycan part or-more commonly-to the lipid part of glycosphingolipids is known to alter the biophysical properties and can perturb the biological function of the probe. Presented here is the synthesis of novel glycosphingolipid probes with mono- and disaccharide head groups and ceramide moieties containing fatty acids of varying chain length (C4 to C20). These glycosphingolipids bear an azide or an alkyne group as chemical reporter to which a fluorophore can be attached through a bioorthogonal ligation reaction. The fluorescent tag and any linker connected to it can be chosen in a flexible manner. We demonstrate the suitability of the probes by selective visualization of the plasma membrane of living cells by confocal microscopy techniques. Whereas the derivatives with the shorter fatty acids can be directly applied to HEK 293T cells, the hydrophobic glycosphingolipids with longer fatty acids can be delivered to cells using fusogenic liposomes.

  20. Biomimetic silica encapsultation of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroch, David Benjamin

    Living cells perform complex chemical processes on size and time scales that artificial systems cannot match. Cells respond dynamically to their environment, acting as biological sensors, factories, and drug delivery devices. To facilitate the use of living systems in engineered constructs, we have developed several new approaches to create stable protective microenvironments by forming bioinspired cell-membrane-specific silica-based encapsulants. These include vapor phase deposition of silica gels, use of endogenous membrane proteins and polysaccharides as a site for silica nucleation and polycondensation in a saturated environment, and protein templated ordered silica shell formation. We demonstrate silica layer formation at the surface of pluripotent stem-like cells, bacterial biofilms, and primary murine and human pancreatic islets. Materials are characterized by AFM, SEM and EDS. Viability assays confirm cell survival, and metabolite flux measurements demonstrate normal function and no major diffusion limitations. Real time PCR mRNA analysis indicates encapsulated islets express normal levels of genetic markers for β-cells and insulin production. The silica glass encapsulant produces a secondary bone like calcium phosphate mineral layer upon exposure to media. Such bioactive materials can improve device integration with surrounding tissue upon implantation. Given the favorable insulin response, bioactivity, and long-term viability observed in silica-coated islets, we are currently testing the encapsulant's ability to prevent immune system recognition of foreign transplants for the treatment of diabetes. Such hybrid silica-cellular constructs have a wide range of industrial, environmental, and medical applications.

  1. Detection of intracellular phosphatidylserine in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Frances; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2008-03-01

    To demonstrate the intracellular phosphatidylserine (PS) distribution in neuronal cells, neuroblastoma cells and hippocampal neurons expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP)-AnnexinV were stimulated with a calcium ionophore and localization of GFP-AnnexinV was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Initially, GFP-AnnexinV distributed evenly in the cytosol and nucleus. Raising the intracellular calcium level with ionomycin-induced translocation of cytoplasmic GFP-AnnexinV to the plasma membrane but not to the nuclear membrane, indicating that PS distributes in the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane. Nuclear GFP-AnnexinV subsequently translocated to the nuclear membrane, indicating PS localization in the nuclear envelope. GFP-AnnexinV also localized in a juxtanuclear organelle that was identified as the recycling endosome. However, minimal fluorescence was detected in any other subcellular organelles including mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, and lysosomes, strongly suggesting that PS distribution in the cytoplasmic face in these organelles is negligible. Similarly, in hippocampal primary neurons PS distributed in the inner leaflet of plasma membranes of cell body and dendrites, and in the nuclear envelope. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of intracellular PS localization in living cells, providing an insight for specific sites of PS interaction with soluble proteins involved in signaling processes.

  2. Dissecting the Factors Affecting the Fluorescence Stability of Quantum Dots in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Shu-Lin; Hu, Yuan-Jun; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Hu, Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2016-04-06

    Labeling and imaging of live cells with quantum dots (QDs) has attracted great attention in the biomedical field over the past two decades. Maintenance of the fluorescence of QDs in a biological environment is crucial for performing long-term cell tracking to investigate the proliferation and functional evolution of cells. The cell-penetrating peptide transactivator of transcription (TAT) is a well-studied peptide to efficiently enhance the transmembrane delivery. Here, we used TAT peptide-conjugated QDs (TAT-QDs) as a model system to examine the fluorescence stability of QDs in live cells. By confocal microscopy, we found that TAT-QDs were internalized into cells by endocytosis, and transported into the cytoplasm via the mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and lysosomes. More importantly, the fluorescence of TAT-QDs in live cells was decreased mainly by cell proliferation, and the low pH value in the lysosomes could also lower the fluorescence intensity of intracellular QDs. Quantitative analysis of the amount of QDs in the extracellular region and whole cells indicated that the exocytosis was not the primary cause of fluorescence decay of intracellular QDs. This work facilitates a better understanding of the fluorescence stability of QDs for cell imaging and long-term tracking in live cells. Also, it provides insights into the utility of TAT for transmembrane transportation, and the preparation and modification of QDs for cell imaging and tracking.

  3. Programmable DNA triple-helix molecular switch in biosensing applications: from in homogenous solutions to in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Pinting; Zheng, Jing; Tang, Jianru; Ma, Dandan; Xu, Weijian; Li, Jishan; Cao, Zhong; Yang, Ronghua

    2017-02-21

    Herein, we demonstrated a new gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-integrated programmable triple-helix molecular switch (THMS) to realize the biosensing of multiple targets from in homogenous solution to in living cells. The results demonstrated that this proposed programmable THMS could be successfully used for imaging multiple messenger RNA (mRNA) in living cells and it significantly extends the scope of the THMS sensing platform.

  4. Traceless affinity labeling of endogenous proteins for functional analysis in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Hamachi, Itaru

    2012-09-18

    Protein labeling and imaging techniques have provided tremendous opportunities to study the structure, function, dynamics, and localization of individual proteins in the complex environment of living cells. Molecular biology-based approaches, such as GFP-fusion tags and monoclonal antibodies, have served as important tools for the visualization of individual proteins in cells. Although these techniques continue to be valuable for live cell imaging, they have a number of limitations that have only been addressed by recent progress in chemistry-based approaches. These chemical approaches benefit greatly from the smaller probe sizes that should result in fewer perturbations to proteins and to biological systems as a whole. Despite the research in this area, so far none of these labeling techniques permit labeling and imaging of selected endogenous proteins in living cells. Researchers have widely used affinity labeling, in which the protein of interest is labeled by a reactive group attached to a ligand, to identify and characterize proteins. Since the first report of affinity labeling in the early 1960s, efforts to fine-tune the chemical structures of both the reactive group and ligand have led to protein labeling with excellent target selectivity in the whole proteome of living cells. Although the chemical probes used for affinity labeling generally inactivate target proteins, this strategy holds promise as a valuable tool for the labeling and imaging of endogenous proteins in living cells and by extension in living animals. In this Account, we summarize traceless affinity labeling, a technique explored mainly in our laboratory. In our overview of the different labeling techniques, we emphasize the challenge of designing chemical probes that allow for dissociation of the affinity module (often a ligand) after the labeling reaction so that the labeled protein retains its native function. This feature distinguishes the traceless labeling approach from the traditional

  5. Photothermal modification of optical microscope for noninvasive living cell monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapotko, Dmitry; Romanovskaya, Tat'yana; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2001-06-01

    Photothermal method was applied to improve sensing and imaging capabilities of a light microscope in cell studies. We describe the methods, technical details and testing results of cytometric application of Laser Photothermal Phase Microscope (LPPM). The merits of the proposed approach include living single cell monitoring capability, quantitative measurement of cell functional features through the use of cell natural chromophores as the sensors. Such intracellular sensors are activated by the laser pulse and transform an absorbed energy into the heat. The latter causes thermal and mechanical loads to a cell and its components. The second stage of the process includes the reaction of the cell as integral system or of its components to such loads. This reaction is caused by the changes of cell functional and structural state and includes alterations of cell optical properties. Both processes are monitored for a single cell non-invasively with probe laser beam. Pulsed phase contrast dual beam illumination scheme with acquisition of several laser images at different stages of cell-laser interaction was introduced. An acquired cell image is considered as spatially and temporally resolved cell response to non-specific load that is induced in a cell with a pump laser. This method eliminates any cell staining and allows to monitor cell viability and cell reaction to the environmental factors. Also LPPM offers further improvement of spatial and temporal resolution of optical microscope: with pulsed probe laser monitoring we can detect components with the size down to 50 nm and temporal resolution of 10 ns. In our set up the cell is pumped by pulsed laser at 532 nm, 10 ns , 0.01-0.4 mJ. The source of probe beam is a pulsed dye laser (630 nm, 10 nJ, 10 ns) which forms cell phase image. The results obtained with living cells such as drug impact control, single cell dosimetry, immune action of light on a cell demonstrate basic features of LPPM as the tool for the study of the

  6. Kinase Activity Studied in Living Cells Using an Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavec, Aljos?a

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates the use of an immunoassay for studying kinase enzyme activity in living cells. The advantage over the classical method, in which students have to isolate the enzyme from cell material and measure its activity in vitro, is that enzyme activity is modulated and measured in living cells, providing a more…

  7. On strain and stress in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brian N.; Smith, David W.

    2014-11-01

    Recent theoretical simulations of amelogenesis and network formation and new, simple analyses of the basic multicellular unit (BMU) allow estimation of the order of magnitude of the strain energy density in populations of living cells in their natural environment. A similar simple calculation translates recent measurements of the force-displacement relation for contacting cells (cell-cell adhesion energy) into equivalent volume energy densities, which are formed by averaging the changes in contact energy caused by a cell's migration over the cell's volume. The rates of change of these mechanical energy densities (energy density rates) are then compared to the order of magnitude of the metabolic activity of a cell, expressed as a rate of production of metabolic energy per unit volume. The mechanical energy density rates are 4-5 orders of magnitude smaller than the metabolic energy density rate in amelogenesis or bone remodeling in the BMU, which involve modest cell migration velocities, and 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller for innervation of the gut or angiogenesis, where migration rates are among the highest for all cell types. For representative cell-cell adhesion gradients, the mechanical energy density rate is 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the metabolic energy density rate. The results call into question the validity of using simple constitutive laws to represent living cells. They also imply that cells need not migrate as inanimate objects of gradients in an energy field, but are better regarded as self-powered automata that may elect to be guided by such gradients or move otherwise. Thus Ġel=d/dt 1/2 >[(C11+C12)ɛ02+2μγ02]=(C11+C12)ɛ0ɛ˙0+2μγ0γ˙0 or Ġel=ηEɛ0ɛ˙0+η‧Eγ0γ˙0 with 1.4≤η≤3.4 and 0.7≤η‧≤0.8 for Poisson's ratio in the range 0.2≤ν≤0.4 and η=1.95 and η‧=0.75 for ν=0.3. The spatial distribution of shear strains arising within an individual cell as cells slide past one another during amelogenesis is not known

  8. Mechanoporation of living cells for delivery of macromolecules using nanoneedle array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Daisuke; Yamagishi, Ayana; Saito, Megumi; Sathuluri, Ramachandra Rao; Silberberg, Yaron R; Iwata, Futoshi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2016-12-01

    Efficient and rapid delivery of macromolecule probes, such as quenchbodies and other large biomarkers that cannot readily pass through the plasma membrane, is necessary for live-cell imaging and other intracellular analyses. We present here an alternative, simple method for delivery of macromolecules into live cells. In this method, which we term here mechanoporation, a nanoneedle array is used for making transient pores in the plasma membrane to allow access of desired macromolecules into thousands of live cells, simultaneously. This rapid, 3-step method facilitates an efficient delivery by adding macromolecules into the medium, inserting nanoneedles into the cells and oscillating the nanoneedle array, a process that takes no more than 5 min in total. In addition, we demonstrate here how this method can repeatedly and reproducibly deliver molecules into specifically-selected locations on a given cell culture dish. The results presented here show how this unique mechanoporation method enables rapid and high-throughput bio-macromolecule delivery and live-cell imaging. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enlightening intracellular complexity of living cells with quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Torres, C.; Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Boyer Provera, E.; Elezgaray, J.; Nicolini, F. E.; Maguer-Satta, V.; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-03-01

    The internal distribution of refractive indices (RIs) of a living cell is much more complex than usually admitted in multi-shell models. The reconstruction of RI maps from single phase images has rarely been achieved for several reasons: (i) we still have very little knowledge of the impact of internal macromolecular complexes on the local RI and (ii) phase changes produced by light propagation through the sample are mixed with diffraction effects by internal cell bodies. We propose the implementation a 2D wavelet-based contour chain detection method to distinguish internal boundaries thanks to their greatest optical path difference gradients. These contour chains correspond to the highest image phase contrast and follow the local RI inhomogeneities linked to the intracellular structural intricacy. Their statistics and spatial distribution are morphological indicators for distinguishing cells of different origins and to follow their transformation in pathologic situations. We use this method to compare non adherent blood cells from primary and laboratory culture origins, in healthy and pathological situations (chronic myelogenous leukaemia). In a second part of this presentation, we concentrate on the temporal dynamics of the phase contour chains and we discuss the spectral decomposition of their dynamics in both health and disease.

  10. Fluorescent Probes for Nucleic Acid Visualization in Fixed and Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre S. Boutorine

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This review analyses the literature concerning non-fluorescent and fluorescent probes for nucleic acid imaging in fixed and living cells from the point of view of their suitability for imaging intracellular native RNA and DNA. Attention is mainly paid to fluorescent probes for fluorescence microscopy imaging. Requirements for the target-binding part and the fluorophore making up the probe are formulated. In the case of native double-stranded DNA, structure-specific and sequence-specific probes are discussed. Among the latest, three classes of dsDNA-targeting molecules are described: (i sequence-specific peptides and proteins; (ii triplex-forming oligonucleotides and (iii polyamide oligo(N-methylpyrrole/N-methylimidazole minor groove binders. Polyamides seem to be the most promising targeting agents for fluorescent probe design, however, some technical problems remain to be solved, such as the relatively low sequence specificity and the high background fluorescence inside the cells. Several examples of fluorescent probe applications for DNA imaging in fixed and living cells are cited. In the case of intracellular RNA, only modified oligonucleotides can provide such sequence-specific imaging. Several approaches for designing fluorescent probes are considered: linear fluorescent probes based on modified oligonucleotide analogs, molecular beacons, binary fluorescent probes and template-directed reactions with fluorescence probe formation, FRET donor-acceptor pairs, pyrene excimers, aptamers and others. The suitability of all these methods for living cell applications is discussed.

  11. High-Content Screening for Quantitative Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiazzi Usaj, Mojca; Styles, Erin B; Verster, Adrian J; Friesen, Helena; Boone, Charles; Andrews, Brenda J

    2016-08-01

    High-content screening (HCS), which combines automated fluorescence microscopy with quantitative image analysis, allows the acquisition of unbiased multiparametric data at the single cell level. This approach has been used to address diverse biological questions and identify a plethora of quantitative phenotypes of varying complexity in numerous different model systems. Here, we describe some recent applications of HCS, ranging from the identification of genes required for specific biological processes to the characterization of genetic interactions. We review the steps involved in the design of useful biological assays and automated image analysis, and describe major challenges associated with each. Additionally, we highlight emerging technologies and future challenges, and discuss how the field of HCS might be enhanced in the future.

  12. High content screening in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Raymond; Paliwal, Saurabh; Levchenko, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Miniaturization is key to advancing the state-of-the-art in high content screening (HCS), in order to enable dramatic cost savings through reduced usage of expensive biochemical reagents and to enable large-scale screening on primary cells. Microfluidic technology offers the potential to enable HCS to be performed with an unprecedented degree of miniaturization. Areas covered in this review This perspective highlights a real-world example from the authors’ work of HCS assays implemented in a highly miniaturized microfluidic format. Advantages of this technology are discussed, including cost savings, high throughput screening on primary cells, improved accuracy, the ability to study complex time-varying stimuli, and ease of automation, integration, and scaling. What the reader will gain The reader will understand the capabilities of a new microfluidics-based platform for HCS, and the advantages it provides over conventional plate-based HCS. Take home message Microfluidics technology will drive significant advancements and broader usage and applicability of HCS in drug discovery. PMID:21852997

  13. Nanomembrane-Based, Thermal-Transport Biosensor for Living Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami T.

    2016-11-23

    Knowledge of materials\\' thermal-transport properties, conductivity and diffusivity, is crucial for several applications within areas of biology, material science and engineering. Specifically, a microsized, flexible, biologically integrated thermal transport sensor is beneficial to a plethora of applications, ranging across plants physiological ecology and thermal imaging and treatment of cancerous cells, to thermal dissipation in flexible semiconductors and thermoelectrics. Living cells pose extra challenges, due to their small volumes and irregular curvilinear shapes. Here a novel approach of simultaneously measuring thermal conductivity and diffusivity of different materials and its applicability to single cells is demonstrated. This technique is based on increasing phonon-boundary-scattering rate in nanomembranes, having extremely low flexural rigidities, to induce a considerable spectral dependence of the bandgap-emission over excitation-laser intensity. It is demonstrated that once in contact with organic or inorganic materials, the nanomembranes\\' emission spectrally shift based on the material\\'s thermal diffusivity and conductivity. This NM-based technique is further applied to differentiate between different types and subtypes of cancer cells, based on their thermal-transport properties. It is anticipated that this novel technique to enable an efficient single-cell thermal targeting, allow better modeling of cellular thermal distribution and enable novel diagnostic techniques based on variations of single-cell thermal-transport properties.

  14. Nanomembrane-Based, Thermal-Transport Biosensor for Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElAfandy, Rami T; AbuElela, Ayman F; Mishra, Pawan; Janjua, Bilal; Oubei, Hassan M; Büttner, Ulrich; Majid, Mohammed A; Ng, Tien Khee; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Ooi, Boon S

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge of materials' thermal-transport properties, conductivity and diffusivity, is crucial for several applications within areas of biology, material science and engineering. Specifically, a microsized, flexible, biologically integrated thermal transport sensor is beneficial to a plethora of applications, ranging across plants physiological ecology and thermal imaging and treatment of cancerous cells, to thermal dissipation in flexible semiconductors and thermoelectrics. Living cells pose extra challenges, due to their small volumes and irregular curvilinear shapes. Here a novel approach of simultaneously measuring thermal conductivity and diffusivity of different materials and its applicability to single cells is demonstrated. This technique is based on increasing phonon-boundary-scattering rate in nanomembranes, having extremely low flexural rigidities, to induce a considerable spectral dependence of the bandgap-emission over excitation-laser intensity. It is demonstrated that once in contact with organic or inorganic materials, the nanomembranes' emission spectrally shift based on the material's thermal diffusivity and conductivity. This NM-based technique is further applied to differentiate between different types and subtypes of cancer cells, based on their thermal-transport properties. It is anticipated that this novel technique to enable an efficient single-cell thermal targeting, allow better modeling of cellular thermal distribution and enable novel diagnostic techniques based on variations of single-cell thermal-transport properties.

  15. Mechanodelivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Nyssa T.; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U.; Yang, Haw

    2014-04-01

    Nanotechnology has opened up the opportunity to probe, sense, and manipulate the chemical environment of biological systems with an unprecedented level of spatiotemporal control. A major obstacle to the full realization of these novel technologies is the lack of a general, robust, and simple method for the delivery of arbitrary nanostructures to the cytoplasm of intact live cells. Here, we identify a new delivery modality, based on mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane, which efficiently mediates the delivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. We use two distinct execution modes, two adherent cell lines, and three sizes of semiconducting nanocrystals, or quantum dots, to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. As the underlying mechanism is purely physical, we anticipate that such ``mechanodelivery'' can be generalized to other modes of execution as well as to the cytoplasmic introduction of a structurally diverse array of functional nanomaterials.Nanotechnology has opened up the opportunity to probe, sense, and manipulate the chemical environment of biological systems with an unprecedented level of spatiotemporal control. A major obstacle to the full realization of these novel technologies is the lack of a general, robust, and simple method for the delivery of arbitrary nanostructures to the cytoplasm of intact live cells. Here, we identify a new delivery modality, based on mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane, which efficiently mediates the delivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. We use two distinct execution modes, two adherent cell lines, and three sizes of semiconducting nanocrystals, or quantum dots, to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. As the underlying mechanism is purely physical, we anticipate that such ``mechanodelivery'' can be generalized to other modes of execution as well as to the cytoplasmic introduction of a structurally diverse array of functional nanomaterials

  16. Visual detection of Akt mRNA in living cell using gold nanoparticle beacon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Tian, Caiping; Li, Siwen; Wang, Zhaohui; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    PI3K-Akt signaling pathway plays the key role in cell apoptosis and survival, and the components of PI3K /Akt signaling pathway are often abnormally expressed in human tumors. Therefore, determination of the Akt (protein kinase B, PKB) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression is significantly important in understanding the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) functionalized with gold nanoparticles and fluorescein isothiocyanate(FITC) as a beacon for detecting human Akt mRNA. Spectrofluorometer was used to detect the fluorescence quenching and recovery of the beacons, and laser confocal scanning microscopy was adopted to image Akt mRNA in cells. The results showed that this beacon could sensitively and quantitatively measure the Akt mRNA in living cells . This strategy is potentially useful for the cellular imaging of RNA or protein expression in living cells.

  17. 活细胞实时成像技术研究抗坏血酸(AA)协同砷剂抗人骨肉瘤MG-63的体外疗效%The synergistic effect of MG-63 cells treated with ascorbic acid (AA) and arsenic trioxide in vitro by using continuous live cell imaging and analysis platform (cell IQ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓春; 李泽兵; 陈增淦; 陈统一; 王玲燕

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the synergistic effect of human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 treated with ascorbic acid (AA) and arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in vitro. Methods We used continuous live cell imaging and analysis platform (cell IQ) to observe cell proliferation and morphologic change of MG-63 cells which were treated with AA (62. 5 /nmol/L) and As2O3 (1 jumol/L) alone or together . Results MG-63 cell proliferation was depressed observed when treated by A A (62. 5 fimol/L) and As2O3 (1 jumol/L) independently. The effect of AA (62. 5 μmol/L) plus As2O3 (1 /imol/L) was synergistic, which further inhibits MG-63 cell proliferation. Conclusions The treatment of AA combined with As2O3 can induce synergistic effect on the depression of MG-63 cell proliferation. This result provides a new pathway and basic reaserch data of treating osteosarcoma in clinical practice.%目的 研究抗坏血酸(ascorbic acid,AA)和三氧化二砷(arsenic trioxide,As2O3)抗人骨肉瘤细胞MG-63的体外疗效.方法 以MG-63细胞为体外模型,用62.5 μmol/L AA与1μmol/L As2O3单独或联合处理细胞,利用新型连续活细胞图像采集和分析平台(continuous live cell imaging and analysis platform,Cell IQ)实时观察细胞的生长情况和形态学的变化.结果 1 μmol/L As2O3和62.5 μmol/L AA单独处理都可抑制MG-63细胞的生长并诱导细胞死亡.1 μmol/L As2O3和62.5 μmol/L AA联合处理细胞较单独处理组细胞抑制效果更明显.结论 AA和AS2O3抗人骨肉瘤细胞Mg-63可起到协同作用,这一结果为临床治疗骨肉瘤提供了新的思路和实验依据.

  18. Dynamical change of mitochondrial DNA induced in the living cell by perturbing the electrochemical gradient.

    OpenAIRE

    Coppey-Moisan, M; Brunet, A C; Morais, R.; Coppey, J

    1996-01-01

    Digital-imaging microscopy was used in conditions that allowed the native state to be preserved and hence fluorescence variations of specific probes to be followed in the real time of living mammalian cells. Ethidium bromide was shown to enter into living cells and to intercalate stably into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), giving rise to high fluorescence. When the membrane potential or the pH gradient across the inner membrane was abolished by specific inhibitors or ionophores, the ethidium fluor...

  19. N-way FRET microscopy of multiple protein-protein interactions in live cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Hoppe

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to visualize nanoscale protein-protein interactions while capturing their microscale organization and millisecond dynamics. Recently, FRET microscopy was extended to imaging of multiple donor-acceptor pairs, thereby enabling visualization of multiple biochemical events within a single living cell. These methods require numerous equations that must be defined on a case-by-case basis. Here, we present a universal multispectral microscopy method (N-Way FRET to enable quantitative imaging for any number of interacting and non-interacting FRET pairs. This approach redefines linear unmixing to incorporate the excitation and emission couplings created by FRET, which cannot be accounted for in conventional linear unmixing. Experiments on a three-fluorophore system using blue, yellow and red fluorescent proteins validate the method in living cells. In addition, we propose a simple linear algebra scheme for error propagation from input data to estimate the uncertainty in the computed FRET images. We demonstrate the strength of this approach by monitoring the oligomerization of three FP-tagged HIV Gag proteins whose tight association in the viral capsid is readily observed. Replacement of one FP-Gag molecule with a lipid raft-targeted FP allowed direct observation of Gag oligomerization with no association between FP-Gag and raft-targeted FP. The N-Way FRET method provides a new toolbox for capturing multiple molecular processes with high spatial and temporal resolution in living cells.

  20. High-content screening of functional genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rines, Daniel R; Tu, Buu; Miraglia, Loren; Welch, Genevieve L; Zhang, Jia; Hull, Mitchell V; Orth, Anthony P; Chanda, Sumit K

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in functional genomics have enabled genome-wide genetic studies in mammalian cells. These include the establishment of high-throughput transfection and viral propagation methodologies, the production of large-scale cDNA and siRNA libraries, and the development of sensitive assay detection processes and instrumentation. The latter has been significantly facilitated by the implementation of automated microscopy and quantitative image analysis, collectively referred to as high-content screening (HCS), toward cell-based functional genomics application. This technology can be applied to whole genome analysis of discrete molecular and phenotypic events at the level of individual cells and promises to significantly expand the scope of functional genomic analyses in mammalian cells. This chapter provides a comprehensive guide for curating and preparing function genomics libraries and performing HCS at the level of the genome.

  1. Atomic force microscopy as a tool for the investigation of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morkvėnaitė-Vilkončienė, Inga; Ramanavičienė, Almira; Ramanavičius, Arūnas

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy is a valuable and useful tool for the imaging and investigation of living cells in their natural environment at high resolution. Procedures applied to living cell preparation before measurements should be adapted individually for different kinds of cells and for the desired measurement technique. Different ways of cell immobilization, such as chemical fixation on the surface, entrapment in the pores of a membrane, or growing them directly on glass cover slips or on plastic substrates, result in the distortion or appearance of artifacts in atomic force microscopy images. Cell fixation allows the multiple use of samples and storage for a prolonged period; it also increases the resolution of imaging. Different atomic force microscopy modes are used for the imaging and analysis of living cells. The contact mode is the best for cell imaging because of high resolution, but it is usually based on the following: (i) image formation at low interaction force, (ii) low scanning speed, and (iii) usage of "soft," low resolution cantilevers. The tapping mode allows a cell to behave like a very solid material, and destructive shear forces are minimized, but imaging in liquid is difficult. The force spectroscopy mode is used for measuring the mechanical properties of cells; however, obtained results strongly depend on the cell fixation method. In this paper, the application of 3 atomic force microscopy modes including (i) contact, (ii) tapping, and (iii) force spectroscopy for the investigation of cells is described. The possibilities of cell preparation for the measurements, imaging, and determination of mechanical properties of cells are provided. The applicability of atomic force microscopy to diagnostics and other biomedical purposes is discussed.

  2. 荧光蛋白在植物活细胞液泡成像中的应用研究进展%Recent Progress in Living Cell Imaging of Plant Vacuole Using Fluorescent-protein Transgenic Lines and Three-dimensional Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶庆亮; 曹建华

    2011-01-01

    高等植物细胞中,液泡在各种细胞信号转导事件和形态建成中起着重要的作用.这一细胞内部结构在分裂和分化期间其功能和形状不断地变化着.为分析这些连续的变化,绿色荧光蛋白(green fluorescent protein,GFP)及其他荧光蛋白活体标记技术普遍用来跟踪特异蛋白的定位及变动.为使液泡可视成像,有几种途径可用来选择适当的荧光蛋白融合伴侣,如液泡膜内在蛋白和构造蛋白相关蛋白等就非常适合应用于液泡成像.此外,三维重建法在定位细胞内广为分布的细胞器时也不可或缺.同时,等值面表面模化过程对液泡膜成像也非常有用.本文综述液泡的结构、种类和功能,并概括各种融合的绿色荧光蛋白在植物活细胞液泡成像中的应用及其三维成像技术的研究进展.%In high plant cells, vacuoles play important roles in a variety of cellular events, including cell division,morphogenesis, and signal transduction.These intracellular structures undergo dynamic changes in their shapes and functions during cell division and differentiation, and to analyze these sequential structural changes, the vital labeling technique, using the green-fluorescent protein or other fluorescent proteins, has commonly been used to follow the localization and translocation of specific proteins.To visualize vacuoles, the tonoplast-intrinsic proteins and syntaxin-related proteins are available for selecting the appropriate fluorescent-protein fusion partner for vacuolar imaging.In addition, three-dimensional reconstruction methods are indispensable for localizing the widely distributed organelles within the cell.The maximum intensity projection method is suitable for cytoskeletal structures, while contour-based surface modeling possesses many advantages for vacuolar membranes.In this article, we summarize the plant vacuoles and the recent progress in living cell imaging of the plant vacuoles using various fusions

  3. A fluorescent carbon-dots-based mitochondria-targetable nanoprobe for peroxynitrite sensing in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxue; Sun, Shan; Wang, Yuhui; Zhu, Jiali; Jiang, Kai; Leng, Yumin; Shu, Qinghai; Lin, Hengwei

    2017-04-15

    Mitochondria, the power generators in cell, are a primary organelle of oxygen consumption and a main source of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). Peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), known as a kind of RNS, has been considered to be a significant factor in many cell-related biological processes, and there is great desire to develop fluorescent probes that can sensitively and selectively detect peroxynitrite in living cells. Herein, we developed a fluorescent carbon-dots (C-dots) based mitochondria-targetable nanoprobe with high sensitivity and selectivity for peroxynitrite sensing in living cells. The C-dots with its surface rich in amino groups was synthesized using o-phenylenediamine as carbon precursor, and it could be covalently conjugated with a mitochondria-targeting moiety, i.e. triphenylphosphonium (TPP). In the presence of peroxynitrite, the fluorescence of the constructed nanoprobe (C-dots-TPP) was efficiently quenched via a mechanism of photoinduced electron transfer (PET). The nanoprobe exhibited relatively high sensitivity (limit of detection: 13.5nM) and selectivity towards peroxynitrite in aqueous buffer. The performance of the nanoprobe for fluorescence imaging of peroxynitrite in mitochondria was investigated. The results demonstrated that the nanoprobe showed fine mitochondria-targeting ability and imaging contrast towards peroxynitrite in living cells. We anticipate that the proposed nanoprobe will provide a facile tool to explore the role played by peroxynitrite in cytobiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of cell growth conditions and medium composition on EGFP photostability in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamontova, Anastasia V; Bogdanov, Alexey M; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2015-05-01

    Photostability is a key characteristic of fluorescent proteins. It was recently demonstrated that green fluorescent protein (GFP) photobleaching in live cells can be suppressed by changes in medium composition. Here we show that Ham's F12 medium provides very high enhanced GFP (EGFP) photostability during fluorescence microscopy of live cells. This property of Ham's F12 medium is associated with decreased concentrations of riboflavin and pyridoxine, and increased concentrations of FeSO4, cyanocobalamine, lipoic acid, hypoxanthine, and thymidine compared with DMEM. We also found that the rate of EGFP photobleaching strongly depends on cell growth conditions such as cell density and the concentration of serum. We conclude that both imaging medium composition and the physiological state of the cells can strongly affect the photostability of fluorescent proteins. Thus, accurate comparison of the photostabilities of fluorescent proteins should be performed only in side-by-side analysis in identical cell growth conditions and media.

  5. Trafficking of α1B-adrenergic receptor mediated by inverse agonist in living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MingXU; Ying-huaGUAN; NingXU; Zhang-yiLIANG; Shu-yiWang; YaoSONG; Chi-deHAN; Xin-shengZHAO; You-yiZHANG

    2005-01-01

    AIM The project is aimed at understanding the action of inverse agonist at single molecule level and capturing the real time picture of molecular behavior of α1B-adrenergic receptor (AR) mediated by inverse agonist in living cells by single molecule detection (SMD). METHODS The location and distribution of α1B-AR was detected by laser confocal and whole cell 3H-prazosin binding assay. Dynamic imaging of BODIPY-FL-labeled prazosin (Praz), specific antagonist of (1-AR, was observed in α1B-AR stably expressed human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) living cells. The detection of real-time dynamic behaviors of AR was achieved by using fluorescence-labeled AR and its ligand combined with SMD techniques. RESULTS α1B-AR was predominantly distributed on the cell surface and 8.2% of the total receptors were located in cytosol.

  6. An automated tool for 3D tracking of single molecules in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, L.; Capitanio, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, tremendous improvements have been achieved in the precision of localization of single fluorescent molecules, allowing localization and tracking of biomolecules at the nm level. Since the behaviour of proteins and biological molecules is tightly influenced by the cell's environment, a growing number of microscopy techniques are moving from in vitro to live cell experiments. Looking at both diffusion and active transportation processes inside a cell requires three-dimensional localization over a few microns range, high SNR images and high temporal resolution (ms order of magnitude). To satisfy these requirements we developed an automated routine that allow 3D tracking of single fluorescent molecules in living cells with nanometer accuracy, by exploiting the properties of the point-spread-function of out-of-focus Quantum Dots bound to the protein of interest.

  7. Functional live cell imaging of the pulmonary neuroepithelial body microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Proost, Ian; Pintelon, Isabel; Brouns, Inge; Kroese, A; Riccardi, Daniela; Kemp, Paul J.; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs) are densely innervated groups of neuroendocrine cells invariably accompanied by Clara-like cells. Together with NEBs, Clara-like cells form the so-called "NEB microenvironment," which recently has been assigned a potential pulmonary stem cell niche. Conclusive

  8. Functional live cell imaging of the pulmonary neuroepithelial body microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Proost, Ian; Pintelon, Isabel; Brouns, Inge; Kroese, A; Riccardi, Daniela; Kemp, Paul J.; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    Pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs) are densely innervated groups of neuroendocrine cells invariably accompanied by Clara-like cells. Together with NEBs, Clara-like cells form the so-called "NEB microenvironment," which recently has been assigned a potential pulmonary stem cell niche. Conclusive

  9. Live-Cell Imaging of Vaccinia Virus Recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Paszkowski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recombination between co-infecting poxviruses provides an important mechanism for generating the genetic diversity that underpins evolution. However, poxviruses replicate in membrane-bound cytoplasmic structures known as factories or virosomes. These are enclosed structures that could impede DNA mixing between co-infecting viruses, and mixing would seem to be essential for this process. We hypothesize that virosome fusion events would be a prerequisite for recombination between co-infecting poxviruses, and this requirement could delay or limit viral recombination. We have engineered vaccinia virus (VACV to express overlapping portions of mCherry fluorescent protein fused to a cro DNA-binding element. In cells also expressing an EGFP-cro fusion protein, this permits live tracking of virus DNA and genetic recombination using confocal microscopy. Our studies show that different types of recombination events exhibit different timing patterns, depending upon the relative locations of the recombining elements. Recombination between partly duplicated sequences is detected soon after post-replicative genes are expressed, as long as the reporter gene sequences are located in cis within an infecting genome. The same kinetics are also observed when the recombining elements are divided between VACV and transfected DNA. In contrast, recombination is delayed when the recombining sequences are located on different co-infecting viruses, and mature recombinants aren't detected until well after late gene expression is well established. The delay supports the hypothesis that factories impede inter-viral recombination, but even after factories merge there remain further constraints limiting virus DNA mixing and recombinant gene assembly. This delay could be related to the continued presence of ER-derived membranes within the fused virosomes, membranes that may once have wrapped individual factories.

  10. Measuring Molecular Forces Using Calibrated Optical Tweezers in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Adam G; Goldman, Yale E

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been instrumental in uncovering the mechanisms motor proteins use to generate and react to force. While optical traps have primarily been applied to purified, in vitro systems, emerging methods enable measurements in living cells where the actively fluctuating, viscoelastic environment and varying refractive index complicate calibration of the instrument. Here, we describe techniques to calibrate optical traps in living cells using the forced response to sinusoidal oscillations and spontaneous fluctuations, and to measure the forces exerted by endogenous ensembles of kinesin and dynein motor proteins as they transport cargoes in the cell.

  11. Integrated nanoscale tools for interrogating living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgolli, Marsela

    The development of next-generation, nanoscale technologies that interface biological systems will pave the way towards new understanding of such complex systems. Nanowires -- one-dimensional nanoscale structures -- have shown unique potential as an ideal physical interface to biological systems. Herein, we focus on the development of nanowire-based devices that can enable a wide variety of biological studies. First, we built upon standard nanofabrication techniques to optimize nanowire devices, resulting in perfectly ordered arrays of both opaque (Silicon) and transparent (Silicon dioxide) nanowires with user defined structural profile, densities, and overall patterns, as well as high sample consistency and large scale production. The high-precision and well-controlled fabrication method in conjunction with additional technologies laid the foundation for the generation of highly specialized platforms for imaging, electrochemical interrogation, and molecular biology. Next, we utilized nanowires as the fundamental structure in the development of integrated nanoelectronic platforms to directly interrogate the electrical activity of biological systems. Initially, we generated a scalable intracellular electrode platform based on vertical nanowires that allows for parallel electrical interfacing to multiple mammalian neurons. Our prototype device consisted of 16 individually addressable stimulation/recording sites, each containing an array of 9 electrically active silicon nanowires. We showed that these vertical nanowire electrode arrays could intracellularly record and stimulate neuronal activity in dissociated cultures of rat cortical neurons similar to patch clamp electrodes. In addition, we used our intracellular electrode platform to measure multiple individual synaptic connections, which enables the reconstruction of the functional connectivity maps of neuronal circuits. In order to expand and improve the capability of this functional prototype device we designed

  12. Assembly of BODIPY-carbazole dyes with liposomes to fabricate fluorescent nanoparticles for lysosomal bioimaging in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hai-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Tai; Wang, Shu; Xing, Guo-Wen

    2017-01-31

    Two BODIPY-carbazole dye based fluorescent probes BCA and BCAS were designed, synthesized and encapsulated by liposomes to obtain fluorescent nanoparticles BCA-FNP and BCAS-FNP. The fluorescence imaging showed that BCA-FNP was membrane-permeable and capable of localizing lysosomes in living cells.

  13. Real-time, noninvasive optical coherence tomography of cross-sectional living cell-sheets in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Mari; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Mizuuchi, Kiminori; Iseki, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Cell sheet technology has a history of application in regenerating various tissues, having successfully completed several clinical trials using autologous cell sheets. Tomographic analysis of living cell sheets is an important tool in the field of cell sheet-based regenerative medicine and tissue engineering to analyze the inner structure of layered living cells. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used in ophthalmology to noninvasively analyze cross-sections of target tissues at high resolution. This study used OCT to conduct real-time, noninvasive analysis of living cell sheet cross sections. OCT showed the internal structure of cell sheets in tomographic images synthesized with backscatter signals from inside the living cell sheet without invasion or damage. OCT observations were used to analyze the static and dynamic behaviors of living cell sheets in vitro and in vivo including (1) the harvesting process of a C2C12 mouse skeletal myoblast sheet from a temperature-responsive culture surface; (2) cell-sheet adhesion onto various surfaces including a culture surface, a synthetic rubber glove, and the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of rats; and (3) the real-time propagation of beating rat cardiac cells within cardiac cell sheets. This study showed that OCT technology is a powerful tool in the field of cell sheet-based regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  14. Characterizing the interactions between prolyl isomerase pin1 and phosphatase inhibitor-2 in living cells with FRET and FCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Wang, Lifu; Jyothikumar, Vinod; Brautigan, David L.; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2012-03-01

    Phosphatase inhibitor-2 (I2) was discovered as a regulator of protein Ser/Thr phosphatase-1 and is conserved from yeast to human. Binding between purified recombinant I2 from different species and the prolyl isomerase Pin1 has been demonstrated with pull-down assays, size exclusion chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Despite this, questions persist as to whether these proteins associate together in living cells. In this study, we prepared fluorescent protein (FP) fusions of I2 and Pin1 and employed both Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) imaging techniques to characterize their interactions in living cells. In both intensity-based and time-resolved FRET studies, we observed FRET uniformly across whole cells co-expressing I2-Cerulean and Pin1-Venus that was significantly higher than in negative controls expressing Cerulean FP (without fusing to I2) as the FRET donor and Pin1-Venus, showing a specific interaction between I2-Cerulean and Pin1-Venus in living cells. We also observed the co-diffusion of I2-Cerulean and Pin1-mCherry in Fluorescence Cross Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS) measurements. We further showed that I2 itself as well as I2-Pin1 formed complexes in living cells (predicted from in vitro studies) via a quantitative FRET assay, and demonstrated from FCS measurements that both I2 and Pin1 (fused to Cerulean) are highly mobile in living cells.

  15. From surface to intracellular non-invasive nanoscale study of living cells impairments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewald, Dr. Maxime [University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon, France.; Tetard, Laurene [ORNL; Elie-Caille, Dr. Cecile [Institut FEMTO-ST UMR CNRS 6174, University Franche-Comté, 25044 Besancon, France; Nicod, Laurence [University of Franche-Comte, Laboratoire de Biologie Cellulaire; Passian, Ali [ORNL; Bourillot, Dr. Eric [University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon, France.; Lesniewska, Prof. Eric [University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon, France.

    2014-01-01

    Among the enduring challenges in nanoscience, subsurface characterization of live cells holds major stakes. Developments in nanometrology for soft matter thriving on the sensitivity and high resolution benefits of atomic force microscopy have enabled detection of subsurface structures at the nanoscale (1,2,3). However, measurements in liquid environments remain complex (4,5,6,7), in particular in the subsurface domain. Here we introduce liquid-Mode Synthesizing Atomic Force Microscopy (l-MSAFM) to study both the inner structures and the chemically induced intracellular impairments of living cells. Specifically, we visualize the intracellular stress effects of glyphosate on living keratinocytes skin cells. This new approach for living cell nanoscale imaging, l-MSAFM, in their physiological environment or in presence of a chemical stress agent confirmed the loss of inner structures induced by glyphosate. The ability to monitor the cell's inner response to external stimuli, non-destructively and in real time, has the potential to unveil critical nanoscale mechanisms of life science.

  16. Micro magnetic tweezers for nanomanipulation inside live cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. de Vries; G.E. Krenn; R. van Driel; J.S. Kanger

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the design, realization, and characterization of a multi-pole magnetic tweezers that enables us to maneuver small magnetic probes inside living cells. So far, magnetic tweezers can be divided into two categories: I), tweezers that allow the exertion of high forces but consist of o

  17. Micro Magnetic Tweezers for Nanomanipulation Inside Live Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Anthony H.B.; Krenn, Bea E.; Driel, van Roel; Kanger, Johannes S.

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the design, realization, and characterization of a multi-pole magnetic tweezers that enables us to maneuver small magnetic probes inside living cells. So far, magnetic tweezers can be divided into two categories: I), tweezers that allow the exertion of high forces but consist of o

  18. High force magnetic tweezers for molecular manipulation inside living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A.H.B.

    2004-01-01

    The problem however, is that there are no suitable methods for doing spatially resolved measurements with molecular resolution that are fit to study these molecular interactions directly within a living cell. This thesis takes a first step towards the development of methods and instrumentation to st

  19. Energy, control and DNA structure in the living cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijker, J.E.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Gomes, A. Vaz

    1995-01-01

    Maintenance (let alone growth) of the highly ordered living cell is only possible through the continuous input of free energy. Coupling of energetically downhill processes (such as catabolic reactions) to uphill processes is essential to provide this free energy and is catalyzed by enzymes either...

  20. A device for real-time live-cell microscopy during dynamic dual-modal mechanostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, D.; Nikolov, H. N.; Chmiel, T.; Beach, R. J.; Sims, S. M.; Dixon, S. J.; Holdsworth, D. W.

    2017-03-01

    Mechanotransduction - the process by which cells sense and respond to mechanical stimuli - is essential for several physiological processes including skeletal homeostasis. Mammalian cells are thought to be sensitive to different modes of mechanical stimuli, including vibration and fluid shear. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the early stages of mechanotransduction, we describe the development of devices for mechanostimulation (by vibration and fluid shear) of live cells that can be integrated with real-time optical microscopy. The integrated system can deliver up to 3 Pa of fluid shear simultaneous with high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations up to 1 g. Stimuli can be applied simultaneously or independently to cells during real-time microscopic imaging. A custom microfluidic chamber was prepared from polydimethylsiloxane on a glass-bottom cell culture dish. Fluid flow was applied with a syringe pump to induce shear stress. This device is compatible with a custom-designed motion control vibration system. A voice coil actuates the system that is suspended on linear air bushings. Accelerations produced by the system were monitored with an on-board accelerometer. Displacement was validated optically using particle tracking digital high-speed imaging (1200 frames per second). During operation at nominally 45 Hz and 0.3 g, displacements were observed to be within 3.56% of the expected value. MC3T3-E1 osteoblast like cells were seeded into the microfluidic device and loaded with the calcium sensitive fluorescent probe fura-2, then mounted onto the dual-modal mechanostimulation platform. Cells were then imaged and monitored for fluorescence emission. In summary, we have developed a system to deliver physiologically relevant vibrations and fluid shear to live cells during real-time imaging and photometry. Monitoring the behavior of live cells loaded with appropriate fluorescent probes will enable characterization of the signals activated during the initial

  1. BioSig3D: High Content Screening of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Models: e0148379

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cemal Cagatay Bilgin; Gerald Fontenay; Qingsu Cheng; Hang Chang; Ju Han; Bahram Parvin

    2016-01-01

    ...) cell culture models that are imaged in full 3D volume. It provides an end-to-end solution for designing high content screening assays, based on colony organization that is derived from segmentation of nuclei in each colony...

  2. High Content Analysis of Compositional Heterogeneities to Study GPCR Oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Samuel McEwen

    In this thesis I demonstrate how the natural compositional heterogeneities of synthetic and living cell model systems can be used to quantitate the mechanics of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The thesis is structured around three a...

  3. High Content Analysis of Compositional Heterogeneities to Study GPCR Oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Samuel McEwen

    In this thesis I demonstrate how the natural compositional heterogeneities of synthetic and living cell model systems can be used to quantitate the mechanics of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The thesis is structured around three a...

  4. Non-invasive monitoring for living cell culture with lensless Fourier transform digital holography microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunxin; Wang, Dayong; Zhao, Jie; Li, Yan; Meng, Puhui; Wan, Yuhong; Jiang, Zhuqing

    2010-08-01

    The number of cells is commonly employed to describe the cell viability and the status of cell culture in a certain extent. An automatic and non-invasive detecting method for the status analysis of cell culture is developed based on digital holography microscopy (DHM) technology. Digital holographic imaging can retrieve quantitative information of object wavefront by the numerical reconstruction from a single digital hologram recorded by a detector such as CCD or CMOS camera, which is especially suitable for the morphology detection of the transparent or semi-transparent cells. In this contribution, the lensless Fourier transform (LFT) based holography configuration is designed for cell imaging without prestaining, and the amplitude and phase of living cells can be reconstructed by digital reconstruction and phase unwrapped algorithms. Then the image filtering and segmentation are combined for the automatic evaluation of the level of confluency. In imaging experiments, the culture status of the cervical cancer cell TZMbl is detected, and the results demonstrate that digital holography microscopy provides a feasible non-invasive method for monitoring the living cell culture.

  5. Fluorescent Rhodamines and Fluorogenic Carbopyronines for Super-Resolution STED Microscopy in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkevich, Alexey N; Mitronova, Gyuzel Yu; Sidenstein, Sven C; Klocke, Jessica L; Kamin, Dirk; Meineke, Dirk N H; D'Este, Elisa; Kraemer, Philip-Tobias; Danzl, Johann G; Belov, Vladimir N; Hell, Stefan W

    2016-03-01

    A range of bright and photostable rhodamines and carbopyronines with absorption maxima in the range of λ=500-630 nm were prepared, and enabled the specific labeling of cytoskeletal filaments using HaloTag technology followed by staining with 1 μm solutions of the dye-ligand conjugates. The synthesis, photophysical parameters, fluorogenic behavior, and structure-property relationships of the new dyes are discussed. Light microscopy with stimulated emission depletion (STED) provided one- and two-color images of living cells with an optical resolution of 40-60 nm.

  6. A simple and stable auto focusing protocol for long multidimensional live cell microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, F; Geley, S

    2006-01-01

    Focus maintenance is a challenging problem in multidimensional wide-field microscopy. Most automated microscopes use software algorithms, which are applied to z-sections of the object, to select for the plane with the best signal to noise ratio. When applied automatically in multidimensional imaging applications, auto focus routines significantly increase light exposure and can become cytotoxic if applied too frequently. In addition, automated focusing procedures can readily focus on unwanted high contrast objects. By labelling a defined position with a fluorescent marker, we were able to separate the focusing procedure from the actual image acquisition positions and therefore overcome some of the major drawbacks of routine auto focus procedures. To implement this method in a multidimensional acquisition experiment, we created a visual basic-based program, which is run prior to each image acquisition. This technique allows tight control of focus whilst keeping light toxicity in live cell imaging experiments to a minimum.

  7. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantini, Lindsey M. [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Irvin, Susan C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Kennedy, Steven C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Guo, Feng [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Snapp, Erik L., E-mail: erik-lee.snapp@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells.

  8. High-content single-cell analysis on-chip using a laser microarray scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Wu, Yu; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Fan, Rong

    2012-12-07

    High-content cellomic analysis is a powerful tool for rapid screening of cellular responses to extracellular cues and examination of intracellular signal transduction pathways at the single-cell level. In conjunction with microfluidics technology that provides unique advantages in sample processing and precise control of fluid delivery, it holds great potential to transform lab-on-a-chip systems for high-throughput cellular analysis. However, high-content imaging instruments are expensive, sophisticated, and not readily accessible. Herein, we report on a laser scanning cytometry approach that exploits a bench-top microarray scanner as an end-point reader to perform rapid and automated fluorescence imaging of cells cultured on a chip. Using high-content imaging analysis algorithms, we demonstrated multiplexed measurements of morphometric and proteomic parameters from all single cells. Our approach shows the improvement of both sensitivity and dynamic range by two orders of magnitude as compared to conventional epifluorescence microscopy. We applied this technology to high-throughput analysis of mesenchymal stem cells on an extracellular matrix protein array and characterization of heterotypic cell populations. This work demonstrates the feasibility of a laser microarray scanner for high-content cellomic analysis and opens up new opportunities to conduct informative cellular analysis and cell-based screening in the lab-on-a-chip systems.

  9. Optical manipulation of single molecules in the living cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Jauffred, Liselotte; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine;

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers are the only nano-tools capable of manipulating and performing force-measurements on individual molecules and organelles within the living cell without performing destructive penetration through the cell wall and without the need for inserting a non-endogenous probe. Here, we...... describe how optical tweezers are used to manipulate individual molecules and perform accurate force and distance measurements within the complex cytoplasm of the living cell. Optical tweezers can grab individual molecules or organelles, if their optical contrast to the medium is large enough......, as is the case, e. g., for lipid granules or chromosomes. However, often the molecule of interest is specifically attached to a handle manipulated by the optical trap. The most commonly used handles, their insertion into the cytoplasm, and the relevant micro-rheology of the cell are discussed here and we also...

  10. Detecting stoichiometry of macromolecular complexes in live cells using FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Yue, Daniel N.; Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    The stoichiometry of macromolecular interactions is fundamental to cellular signalling yet challenging to detect from living cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful phenomenon for characterizing close-range interactions whereby a donor fluorophore transfers energy to a closely juxtaposed acceptor. Recognizing that FRET measured from the acceptor's perspective reports a related but distinct quantity versus the donor, we utilize the ratiometric comparison of the two to obtain the stoichiometry of a complex. Applying this principle to the long-standing controversy of calmodulin binding to ion channels, we find a surprising Ca2+-induced switch in calmodulin stoichiometry with Ca2+ channels—one calmodulin binds at basal cytosolic Ca2+ levels while two calmodulins interact following Ca2+ elevation. This feature is curiously absent for the related Na channels, also potently regulated by calmodulin. Overall, our assay adds to a burgeoning toolkit to pursue quantitative biochemistry of dynamic signalling complexes in living cells. PMID:27922011

  11. Live-cell thermometry with nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Harishankar; Fedder, Helmut; Chen, Andrew; Yang, Liudi; Li, Chenghai; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Wang, Sihong; Meriles, Carlos

    The ability to measure temperature is typically affected by a tradeoff between sensitivity and spatial resolution. Good thermometers tend to be bulky systems and hence are ill-suited for thermal sensing with high spatial localization. Conversely, the signal resulting from nanoscale temperature probes is often impacted by noise to a level where the measurement precision becomes poor. Adding to the microscopist toolbox, the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond has recently emerged as a promising platform for high-sensitivity nanoscale thermometry. Of particular interest are applications in living cells because diamond nanocrystals are biocompatible and can be chemically functionalized to target specific organelles. Here we report progress on the ability to probe and compare temperature within and between living cells using nanodiamond-hosted NV thermometry. We focus our study on cancerous cells, where atypical metabolic pathways arguably lead to changes in the way a cell generates heat, and thus on its temperature profile.

  12. Glycoarray Technologies: Deciphering Interactions from Proteins to Live Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania M. Puvirajesinghe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technologies inspired the development of carbohydrate arrays. Initially, carbohydrate array technology was hindered by the complex structures of glycans and their structural variability. The first designs of glycoarrays focused on the HTP (high throughput study of protein–glycan binding events, and subsequently more in-depth kinetic analysis of carbohydrate–protein interactions. However, the applications have rapidly expanded and now achieve successful discrimination of selective interactions between carbohydrates and, not only proteins, but also viruses, bacteria and eukaryotic cells, and most recently even live cell responses to immobilized glycans. Combining array technology with other HTP technologies such as mass spectrometry is expected to allow even more accurate and sensitive analysis. This review provides a broad overview of established glycoarray technologies (with a special focus on glycosaminoglycan applications and their emerging applications to the study of complex interactions between glycans and whole living cells.

  13. Local viscoelasticity of living cells measured by rotational magnetic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berret, J-F

    2016-01-05

    When submitted to a magnetic field, micron-size wires with superparamagnetic properties behave as embedded rheometers and represent interesting sensors for microrheology. Here we use rotational magnetic spectroscopy to measure the shear viscosity of the cytoplasm of living cells. We address the question of whether the cytoplasm is a viscoelastic liquid or an elastic gel. The main result of the study is the observation of a rotational instability between a synchronous and an asynchronous regime of rotation, found for murine fibroblasts and human cancer cells. For wires of susceptibility 3.6, the transition occurs in the range 0.01-1 rad s(-1). The determination of the shear viscosity (10-100 Pa s) and elastic modulus (5-20 Pa) confirms the viscoelastic character of the cytoplasm. In contrast to earlier studies, it is concluded that the interior of living cells can be described as a viscoelastic liquid, and not as an elastic gel.

  14. Live Cell Surface Labeling with Fluorescent Ag Nanocluster Conjugates†

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Junhua; Choi, Sungmoon; Richards, Chris I.; Antoku, Yasuko; Dickson, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    DNA-encapsulated silver clusters are readily conjugated to proteins and serve as alternatives to organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots. Stable and bright on the bulk and single molecule levels, Ag nanocluster fluorescence is readily observed when staining live cell surfaces. Being significantly brighter and more photostable than organics and much smaller than quantum dots with a single point of attachment, these nanomaterials offer promising new approaches for bulk and single molecule b...

  15. Chapter 15: Live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Panorchan, Porntula; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method to measure the kinetics and micromechanical properties of individual receptor-ligand bonds formed between two living cells. Using living cells rather than recombinant proteins ensures that the orientation, surface density, and posttranslational modifications of the probed receptors are physiological and that their regulated attachment to the cytoskeleton can occur. A cell is tethered to a flexible cantilever and brought into contact with cells adherent to a substratum before being pulled at a controlled retraction velocity. Measurements of bond rupture forces and associated bond loading rates over an extended range of retraction velocities allow us to compute precisely the tensile strength, reactive compliance, lifetime, and dissociation rate of individual intercellular receptor-ligand bonds. We also describe tests of specificity and Monte Carlo simulations, which ensure that measurements obtained by this method correspond to a single type of intercellular adhesion bond. We illustrate this live-cell single molecule force spectroscopy assay by characterizing homotypic bonds composed of vascular endothelial -cadherin pairs formed between living endothelial cells. This versatile assay could be used to establish the molecular principles that drive a wide range of important physiological processes involving receptor-mediated intercellular adhesion, such as the immunological synapse between a lymphocyte and an antigen-presenting cell and synaptic interactions between neuron cells, and pathological processes resulting in altered intercellular adhesion.

  16. Recognition and transmembrane delivery of bioconjugated Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles with living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Linlin; Wang, Jine; Wang, Zhenxin

    2010-02-01

    Here, we describe the synthesis of peptide- and/or protein-functionalized Fe2O3 core-Au shell (Fe2O3@Au) nanoparticles for imaging and targeting of living cells. When functionalized with the transmembrane peptide RRRRRRRR (R8), the Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles (R8-Fe2O3@Au) are able to serve as cellular trafficking agents with excellent biocompatibility. The internalization mechanism and delivery efficiency of the R8-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles have been characterized with dark-field microscopy and fluorescence confocal scanning laser microcopy. Experimental result suggests that the R8-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles are internalized initially by binding with the membrane-associated proteoglycans on cell surfaces, especially heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), following an energy-dependent endocytosis process to enter into living cells. After conjugation with the epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (anti-EGFR), these nanoparticles can also be used for the recognition of cell membrane antigens to specifically label tumor cells.Here, we describe the synthesis of peptide- and/or protein-functionalized Fe2O3 core-Au shell (Fe2O3@Au) nanoparticles for imaging and targeting of living cells. When functionalized with the transmembrane peptide RRRRRRRR (R8), the Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles (R8-Fe2O3@Au) are able to serve as cellular trafficking agents with excellent biocompatibility. The internalization mechanism and delivery efficiency of the R8-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles have been characterized with dark-field microscopy and fluorescence confocal scanning laser microcopy. Experimental result suggests that the R8-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles are internalized initially by binding with the membrane-associated proteoglycans on cell surfaces, especially heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), following an energy-dependent endocytosis process to enter into living cells. After conjugation with the epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (anti-EGFR), these nanoparticles can also be used for the

  17. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiaofei [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036 (China); Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); Wang, Aiming, E-mail: aiming.wang@agr.gc.ca [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  18. Ultrafast nanolaser device for detecting cancer in a single live cell.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, Paul Lee; McDonald, Anthony Eugene

    2007-11-01

    Emerging BioMicroNanotechnologies have the potential to provide accurate, realtime, high throughput screening of live tumor cells without invasive chemical reagents when coupled with ultrafast laser methods. These optically based methods are critical to advancing early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. The first year goals of this project are to develop a laser-based imaging system integrated with an in- vitro, live-cell, micro-culture to study mammalian cells under controlled conditions. In the second year, the system will be used to elucidate the morphology and distribution of mitochondria in the normal cell respiration state and in the disease state for normal and disease states of the cell. In this work we designed and built an in-vitro, live-cell culture microsystem to study mammalian cells under controlled conditions of pH, temp, CO2, Ox, humidity, on engineered material surfaces. We demonstrated viability of cell culture in the microsystem by showing that cells retain healthy growth rates, exhibit normal morphology, and grow to confluence without blebbing or other adverse influences of the material surfaces. We also demonstrated the feasibility of integrating the culture microsystem with laser-imaging and performed nanolaser flow spectrocytometry to carry out analysis of the cells isolated mitochondria.

  19. A high-content small molecule screen identifies sensitivity of glioblastoma stem cells to inhibition of polo-like kinase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Danovi

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain cancer in adults and there are few effective treatments. GBMs contain cells with molecular and cellular characteristics of neural stem cells that drive tumour growth. Here we compare responses of human glioblastoma-derived neural stem (GNS cells and genetically normal neural stem (NS cells to a panel of 160 small molecule kinase inhibitors. We used live-cell imaging and high content image analysis tools and identified JNJ-10198409 (J101 as an agent that induces mitotic arrest at prometaphase in GNS cells but not NS cells. Antibody microarrays and kinase profiling suggested that J101 responses are triggered by suppression of the active phosphorylated form of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1 (phospho T210, with resultant spindle defects and arrest at prometaphase. We found that potent and specific Plk1 inhibitors already in clinical development (BI 2536, BI 6727 and GSK 461364 phenocopied J101 and were selective against GNS cells. Using a porcine brain endothelial cell blood-brain barrier model we also observed that these compounds exhibited greater blood-brain barrier permeability in vitro than J101. Our analysis of mouse mutant NS cells (INK4a/ARF(-/-, or p53(-/-, as well as the acute genetic deletion of p53 from a conditional p53 floxed NS cell line, suggests that the sensitivity of GNS cells to BI 2536 or J101 may be explained by the lack of a p53-mediated compensatory pathway. Together these data indicate that GBM stem cells are acutely susceptible to proliferative disruption by Plk1 inhibitors and that such agents may have immediate therapeutic value.

  20. APOBEC3G impairs the multimerization of the HIV-1 Vif protein in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batisse, Julien; Guerrero, Santiago Xavier; Bernacchi, Serena; Richert, Ludovic; Godet, Julien; Goldschmidt, Valérie; Mély, Yves; Marquet, Roland; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2013-06-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) is a small basic protein essential for viral fitness and pathogenicity. Vif allows productive infection in nonpermissive cells, including most natural HIV-1 target cells, by counteracting the cellular cytosine deaminases APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G [A3G]) and A3F. Vif is also associated with the viral assembly complex and packaged into viral particles through interactions with the viral genomic RNA and the nucleocapsid domain of Pr55(Gag). Recently, we showed that oligomerization of Vif into high-molecular-mass complexes induces Vif folding and influences its binding to high-affinity RNA binding sites present in the HIV genomic RNA. To get further insight into the role of Vif multimerization in viral assembly and A3G repression, we used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM)- and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assays to investigate Vif-Vif interactions in living cells. By using two N-terminally tagged Vif proteins, we show that Vif-Vif interactions occur in living cells. This oligomerization is strongly reduced when the putative Vif multimerization domain ((161)PPLP(164)) is mutated, indicating that this domain is crucial, but that regions outside this motif also participate in Vif oligomerization. When coexpressed together with Pr55(Gag), Vif is largely relocated to the cell membrane, where Vif oligomerization also occurs. Interestingly, wild-type A3G strongly interferes with Vif multimerization, contrary to an A3G mutant that does not bind to Vif. These findings confirm that Vif oligomerization occurs in living cells partly through its C-terminal motif and suggest that A3G may target and perturb the Vif oligomerization state to limit its functions in the cell.

  1. 78 FR 49528 - Consolidation of Wound Care Products Containing Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Consolidation of Wound Care Products Containing Live Cells...) is transferring oversight responsibilities for certain wound care products containing live cells from... containing live cells are developed such consolidation is necessary for both efficient and consistent Agency...

  2. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  3. Shape regulation generates elastic interaction between living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkov, Roman; Shokef, Yair

    2017-06-01

    The organization of live cells to tissues is associated with the mechanical interaction between cells, which is mediated through their elastic environment. We model cells as spherical active force dipoles surrounded by an infinite elastic matrix, and analytically evaluate the interaction energy for different scenarios of their regulatory behavior. We obtain attraction for homeostatic (set point) forces and repulsion for homeostatic displacements. When the translational motion of the cells is regulated, the interaction energy decays with distance as 1/{d}4, while when it is not regulated the energy decays as 1/{d}6. This arises from the same reasons as the van der Waals interaction between induced electric dipoles.

  4. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diff...... embryo fibroblasts results in an unhindered, intra-compartment, diffusion coefficient of ≈0.7-1.0 μm2 s-1, and a compartment size of about 100-150 nm....

  5. Visualizing the endocytosis of phenylephrine in living cells by quantum dot-based tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Wu, Lina; Hou, Zhun; Song, Yao; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    To study the intracellular receptor-drug transportation, a fluorescent probe consisting of phenylephrine-polyethylene glycol-quantum dots conjugate was employed to track endocytosis process of phenylephrine in living cells. This type of movement was studied by continuously filming fluorescent images in the same cell. We also calculated the movement parameters, and divided the endocytosis process into 6 stages. Furthermore, the movement parameters of this probe in different organelles were determined by co-localization of the probe fluorescent images and different cellular organelles. After comparing the parameters in cellular organelles with these in 6 stages, the whole endocytosis pathway was demonstrated. These results verified that this probe successfully tracked the whole intracellular dynamic endocytosis process of phenylephrine. Our method realized the visual tracking the whole receptor-mediated endocytosis, which is a new approach on investigating the molecular mechanisms and kinetic properties of intracellular receptor-drug transportation.

  6. Possible temperature effects computed for acoustic microscopy used for living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawska, T; Wójcik, J; Filipczyński, L

    2004-01-01

    Imaging of living cells or tissues at a microscopic resolution, where GHz frequencies are used, provides a foundation for many new biological applications. The possible temperature increase causing a destructive influence on the living cells should be then avoided. However, there is no information on possible local temperature increases at these very high frequencies where, due to strongly focused ultrasonic beams, nonlinear propagation effects occur. Acoustic parameters of living cells were assumed to be close to those of water; therefore, the power density of heat sources in a water medium was determined as a basic quantity. Hence, the numerical solution of temperature distributions at the frequency of 1 GHz was computed for high and low powers generated by the transducer equal to 0.32 W and 0.002 W. In the first case, typical nonlinear propagation effects were demonstrated and, in the second one, propagation was almost linear. The focal temperature increase obtained in water equaled 14 degrees C for the highest possible theoretical repetition frequency of fr = 10 MHz and for the thermal insulation at the sapphire lens-water boundary. Simultaneously, the scanning velocity of the tested object was assumed to be incomparably low in respect to the acoustic beam velocity. The maximum temperature increase in water occurred exactly at this boundary, being equal there to 20 degrees C. It was shown that, first of all, the very high absorption of water was significant for the temperature distribution in the investigated region, suppressing the focal temperature peaks. Because the temperature increases are proportional to the repetition frequency, so for example, at its practical value of fr = 0.1 MHz, all temperature increases will be 100 times lower than listed above. For the low transducer power of 0.002 W, the corresponding temperature increases were about 140 times lower than those for the high power of 0.32 W. The presented solutions are devoted mainly to the

  7. Carotenoid distribution in living cells of Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M Collins

    Full Text Available Haematococcus pluvialis is a freshwater unicellular green microalga belonging to the class Chlorophyceae and is of commercial interest for its ability to accumulate massive amounts of the red ketocarotenoid astaxanthin (3,3'-dihydroxy-β,β-carotene-4,4'-dione. Using confocal Raman microscopy and multivariate analysis, we demonstrate the ability to spectrally resolve resonance-enhanced Raman signatures associated with astaxanthin and β-carotene along with chlorophyll fluorescence. By mathematically isolating these spectral signatures, in turn, it is possible to locate these species independent of each other in living cells of H. pluvialis in various stages of the life cycle. Chlorophyll emission was found only in the chloroplast whereas astaxanthin was identified within globular and punctate regions of the cytoplasmic space. Moreover, we found evidence for β-carotene to be co-located with both the chloroplast and astaxanthin in the cytosol. These observations imply that β-carotene is a precursor for astaxanthin and the synthesis of astaxanthin occurs outside the chloroplast. Our work demonstrates the broad utility of confocal Raman microscopy to resolve spectral signatures of highly similar chromophores in living cells.

  8. Carotenoid Distribution in Living Cells of Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Aaron M.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Han, Danxiang; Hu, Qiang; Beechem, Thomas E.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Evens, Terence

    2011-09-06

    Haematococcus pluvialis is a freshwater unicellular green microalga belonging to the class Chlorophyceae and is of commercial interest for its ability to accumulate massive amounts of the red ketocarotenoid astaxanthin (3,3'-dihydroxy-β,β-carotene-4,4'-dione). Using confocal Raman microscopy and multivariate analysis, we demonstrate the ability to spectrally resolve resonance–enhanced Raman signatures associated with astaxanthin and β-carotene along with chlorophyll fluorescence. By mathematically isolating these spectral signatures, in turn, it is possible to locate these species independent of each other in living cells of H. pluvialis in various stages of the life cycle. Chlorophyll emission was found only in the chloroplast whereas astaxanthin was identified within globular and punctate regions of the cytoplasmic space. Moreover, we found evidence for β-carotene to be co-located with both the chloroplast and astaxanthin in the cytosol. These observations imply that β-carotene is a precursor for astaxanthin and the synthesis of astaxanthin occurs outside the chloroplast. Finally, our work demonstrates the broad utility of confocal Raman microscopy to resolve spectral signatures of highly similar chromophores in living cells.

  9. Mapping eGFP oligomer mobility in living cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dross, Nicolas; Spriet, Corentin; Zwerger, Monika; Müller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Langowski, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific artifacts encountered in live cell studies as well as strategies to prevent them, in particular those arising from the choice of the fluorophore used for calibration of the focal volume, as well as temperature and acquisition conditions used for fluorescence fluctuation measurements. After defining the best acquisition conditions, we show for various human cell lines that the mobility of GFP varies significantly within the cell nucleus, but does not correlate with chromatin density. The intranuclear diffusional mobility strongly depends on protein size: in a series of GFP-oligomers, used as free inert fluorescent tracers, the diffusion coefficient decreased from the monomer to the tetramer much more than expected for molecules free in aqueous solution. Still, the entire intranuclear chromatin network is freely accessible for small proteins up to the size of eGFP-tetramers, regardless of the chromatin density or cell line. Even the densest chromatin regions do not exclude free eGFP-monomers or multimers.

  10. Mapping eGFP oligomer mobility in living cell nuclei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Dross

    Full Text Available Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific artifacts encountered in live cell studies as well as strategies to prevent them, in particular those arising from the choice of the fluorophore used for calibration of the focal volume, as well as temperature and acquisition conditions used for fluorescence fluctuation measurements. After defining the best acquisition conditions, we show for various human cell lines that the mobility of GFP varies significantly within the cell nucleus, but does not correlate with chromatin density. The intranuclear diffusional mobility strongly depends on protein size: in a series of GFP-oligomers, used as free inert fluorescent tracers, the diffusion coefficient decreased from the monomer to the tetramer much more than expected for molecules free in aqueous solution. Still, the entire intranuclear chromatin network is freely accessible for small proteins up to the size of eGFP-tetramers, regardless of the chromatin density or cell line. Even the densest chromatin regions do not exclude free eGFP-monomers or multimers.

  11. An improved procedure for subcellular spatial alignment during live-cell CLEM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin S Padman

    Full Text Available Live-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM offers unique insights into the ultrastructure of dynamic cellular processes. A critical and technically challenging part of CLEM is the 3-dimensional relocation of the intracellular region of interest during sample processing. We have developed a simple CLEM procedure that uses toner particles from a laser printer as orientation marks. This facilitates easy tracking of a region of interest even by eye throughout the whole procedure. Combined with subcellular fluorescence markers for the plasma membrane and nucleus, the toner particles allow for precise subcellular spatial alignment of the optical and electron microscopy data sets. The toner-based reference grid is printed and transferred onto a polymer film using a standard office printer and laminator. We have also designed a polymer film holder that is compatible with most inverted microscopes, and have validated our strategy by following the ultrastructure of mitochondria that were selectively photo-irradiated during live-cell microscopy. In summary, our inexpensive and robust CLEM procedure simplifies optical imaging, without limiting the choice of optical microscope.

  12. A new live-cell reporter strategy to simultaneously monitor mitochondrial biogenesis and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodneland Nilsson, Linn Iren; Nitschke Pettersen, Ina Katrine; Nikolaisen, Julie; Micklem, David; Avsnes Dale, Hege; Vatne Røsland, Gro; Lorens, James; Tronstad, Karl Johan

    2015-11-24

    Changes in mitochondrial amount and shape are intimately linked to maintenance of cell homeostasis via adaptation of vital functions. Here, we developed a new live-cell reporter strategy to simultaneously monitor mitochondrial biogenesis and morphology. This was achieved by making a genetic reporter construct where a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), controls expression of mitochondria targeted green fluorescent protein (mitoGFP). HeLa cells with the reporter construct demonstrated inducible expression of mitoGFP upon activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) with AICAR. We established stable reporter cells where the mitoGFP reporter activity corresponded with mitochondrial biogenesis both in magnitude and kinetics, as confirmed by biochemical markers and confocal microscopy. Quantitative 3D image analysis confirmed accordant increase in mitochondrial biomass, in addition to filament/network promoting and protecting effects on mitochondrial morphology, after treatment with AICAR. The level of mitoGFP reversed upon removal of AICAR, in parallel with decrease in mtDNA. In summary, we here present a new GFP-based genetic reporter strategy to study mitochondrial regulation and dynamics in living cells. This combinatorial reporter concept can readily be transferred to other cell models and contexts to address specific physiological mechanisms.

  13. Reversible, Temperature-Dependent Supramolecular Assembly of Aquaporin-4 Orthogonal Arrays in Live Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Jonathan M.; Verkman, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The shorter “M23” isoform of the glial cell water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) assembles into orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs) in cell plasma membranes, whereas the full-length “M1” isoform does not. N-terminal residues are responsible for OAP formation by AQP4-M23 and for blocking of OAP formation in AQP4-M1. In investigating differences in OAP formation by certain N-terminus mutants of AQP4, as measured by freeze-fracture electron microscopy versus live-cell imaging, we discovered reversible, temperature-dependent OAP assembly of certain weakly associating AQP4 mutants. Single-particle tracking of quantum-dot-labeled AQP4 in live cells and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed >80% of M23 in OAPs at 10–50°C compared to 70% at 10°C for the double mutant M1-C13A/C17A. OAP assembly by this mutant, but not by native M23, could also be modulated by reducing its membrane density. Exposure of native M1 and single cysteine mutants to 2-bromopalmitate confirmed the presence of regulated OAP assembly by S-palmitoylation. Kinetic studies showed rapid and reversible OAP formation during cooling and OAP disassembly during heating. Our results provide what to our knowledge is the first information on the energetics of AQP4 OAP assembly in plasma membranes. PMID:19948131

  14. Aptamer/Polydopamine Nanospheres Nanocomplex for in Situ Molecular Sensing in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Weibing; Hu, Hongting; Sun, Liang; Li, Hui; Xu, Danke

    2015-12-15

    A nanocomplex was developed for molecular sensing in living cells, based on the fluorophore-labeled aptamer and the polydopamine nanospheres (PDANS). Due to the interaction between ssDNA and PDANS, the aptamer was adsorbed onto the surface of PDANS forming the aptamer/PDANS nanocomplex, and the fluorescence was quenched by PDANS through Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). In vitro assay, the introduction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) led to the dissociation of the aptamer from the PDANS and the recovery of the fluorescence. The retained fluorescence of the nanocomplex was found to be linear with the concentration of ATP in the range of 0.01-2 mM, and the nanocomplex was highly selective toward ATP. For the strong protecting capability to nucleic acids from enzymatic cleavage and the excellent biocompatibility of PDANS, the nanocomplex was transported into cells and successfully realized "signal on" sensing of ATP in living cells; moreover, the nanocomplex could be employed for ATP semiquantification. This design provides a strategy to develop biosensors based on the polydopamine nanomaterials for intracellular molecules analysis. For the advantages of polydopamine, it would be an excellent candidate for many biological applications, such as gene and drug delivery, intracellular imaging, and in vivo monitoring.

  15. Identification of fluorescent compounds with non-specific binding property via high throughput live cell microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Nath

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Compounds exhibiting low non-specific intracellular binding or non-stickiness are concomitant with rapid clearing and in high demand for live-cell imaging assays because they allow for intracellular receptor localization with a high signal/noise ratio. The non-stickiness property is particularly important for imaging intracellular receptors due to the equilibria involved. METHOD: Three mammalian cell lines with diverse genetic backgrounds were used to screen a combinatorial fluorescence library via high throughput live cell microscopy for potential ligands with high in- and out-flux properties. The binding properties of ligands identified from the first screen were subsequently validated on plant root hair. A correlative analysis was then performed between each ligand and its corresponding physiochemical and structural properties. RESULTS: The non-stickiness property of each ligand was quantified as a function of the temporal uptake and retention on a cell-by-cell basis. Our data shows that (i mammalian systems can serve as a pre-screening tool for complex plant species that are not amenable to high-throughput imaging; (ii retention and spatial localization of chemical compounds vary within and between each cell line; and (iii the structural similarities of compounds can infer their non-specific binding properties. CONCLUSION: We have validated a protocol for identifying chemical compounds with non-specific binding properties that is testable across diverse species. Further analysis reveals an overlap between the non-stickiness property and the structural similarity of compounds. The net result is a more robust screening assay for identifying desirable ligands that can be used to monitor intracellular localization. Several new applications of the screening protocol and results are also presented.

  16. Quantitative assessment of sterol traffic in living cells by dual labeling with dehydroergosterol and BODIPY-cholesterol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wustner, D.; Solanko, L.; Sokol, Olena;

    2011-01-01

    and followed a stretched exponential decay, while the fluorescence lifetime of BCh2 was comparable in various cellular regions. Our results indicate that BCh2 is suitable for analyzing sterol uptake pathways and inter-organelle sterol flux in living cells. The BODIPY-moiety affects lipid phase preference...... simultaneous imaging of both sterols in model membranes and living cells. BCh2 had a lower affinity than DHE for the biologically relevant liquid-ordered phase in model membranes. Still, DHE and BCh2 trafficked from the plasma membrane to the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) of BHK cells with identical...... kinetics. This transport pathway was strongly reduced after energy depletion of cells or expression of the dominant-negative clathrin heavy chain. The partitioning into lipid droplets of BHK and HeLa cells was higher for BCh2 than for DHE. Within droplets, the photodegradation of BCh2 was enhanced...

  17. Effects of high hydrostatic pressures on living cells: a consequence of the properties of macromolecules and macromolecule-associated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentré, P; Hui Bon Hoa, G

    2001-01-01

    Sixty percent of the Earth's biomass is found in the sea, at depths greater than 1000 m, i.e., at hydrostatic pressures higher than 100 atm. Still more surprising is the fact that living cells can reversibly withstand pressure shifts of 1000 atm. One explanation lies in the properties of cellular water. Water forms a very thin film around macromolecules, with a heterogeneous structure that is an image of the heterogeneity of the macromolecular surface. The density of water in contact with macromolecules reflects the physical properties of their different domains. Therefore, any macromolecular shape variations involving the reorganization of water and concomitant density changes are sensitive to pressure (Le Chatelier's principle). Most of the pressure-induced changes to macromolecules are reversible up to 2000 atm. Both the effects of pressure shifts on living cells and the characteristics of pressure-adapted species are opening new perspectives on fundamental problems such as regulation and adaptation.

  18. Bioluminescence microscopy: application to ATP measurements in single living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brau, Frederic; Helle, Pierre; Bernengo, Jean C.

    1997-12-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy can be used to measure intracellular cofactors and ionic concentrations (Ca2+, K+, ATP, NADH), as an alternative to micro- spectrophotometry and micro-fluorimetry, due to the development of sensitive detectors (cooled photomultipliers tubes and CCD). The main limitation comes from the very small and brief intensity of the emitted light. Our instrumentation based on an inverted microscope, equipped with high aperture immersion lenses is presented. Light intensity measurements are carried out through a photomultiplier sorted for low dark current and cooled at -5 degree(s)C to reduce thermal noise. Our first aim is to quantify ATP on single living cells using the firefly luciferin-luciferase couple. Experimental and kinetic aspects are presented to emphasize the potentialities of the technique.

  19. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-09-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential.

  20. Detecting Nanodomains in Living Cell Membrane by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hai-Tao; Marguet, Didier

    2011-05-01

    Cell membranes actively participate in numerous cellular functions. Inasmuch as bioactivities of cell membranes are known to depend crucially on their lateral organization, much effort has been focused on deciphering this organization on different length scales. Within this context, the concept of lipid rafts has been intensively discussed over recent years. In line with its ability to measure diffusion parameters with great precision, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements have been made in association with innovative experimental strategies to monitor modes of molecular lateral diffusion within the plasma membrane of living cells. These investigations have allowed significant progress in the characterization of the cell membrane lateral organization at the suboptical level and have provided compelling evidence for the in vivo existence of raft nanodomains. We review these FCS-based studies and the characteristic structural features of raft nanodomains. We also discuss the findings in regards to the current view of lipid rafts as a general membrane-organizing principle.

  1. Spectroscopic investigation of local mechanical impedance of living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luca; Benseny-Cases, Núria; Mayeaux, Véronique; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of PC12 living cells have been studied at the nanoscale with a Force Feedback Microscope using two experimental approaches. Firstly, the local mechanical impedance of the cell membrane has been mapped simultaneously to the cell morphology at constant force. As the force of the interaction is gradually increased, we observed the appearance of the sub-membrane cytoskeleton. We shall compare the results obtained with this method with the measurement of other existing techniques. Secondly, a spectroscopic investigation has been performed varying the indentation of the tip in the cell membrane and consequently the force applied on it. In contrast with conventional dynamic atomic force microscopy techniques, here the small oscillation amplitude of the tip is not necessarily imposed at the cantilever first eigenmode. This allows the user to arbitrarily choose the excitation frequency in developing spectroscopic AFM techniques. The mechanical response of the PC12 cell membrane is found to be...

  2. Diffusion Controlled Reactions, Fluctuation Dominated Kinetics, and Living Cell Biochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Konkoli, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    In recent years considerable portion of the computer science community has focused its attention on understanding living cell biochemistry and efforts to understand such complication reaction environment have spread over wide front, ranging from systems biology approaches, through network analysis (motif identification) towards developing language and simulators for low level biochemical processes. Apart from simulation work, much of the efforts are directed to using mean field equations (equivalent to the equations of classical chemical kinetics) to address various problems (stability, robustness, sensitivity analysis, etc.). Rarely is the use of mean field equations questioned. This review will provide a brief overview of the situations when mean field equations fail and should not be used. These equations can be derived from the theory of diffusion controlled reactions, and emerge when assumption of perfect mixing is used.

  3. Detecting protein-protein interactions in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Marie; Bach, Anders; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2009-01-01

    The PDZ domain mediated interaction between the NMDA receptor and its intracellular scaffolding protein, PSD-95, is a potential target for treatment of ischemic brain diseases. We have recently developed a number of peptide analogues with improved affinity for the PDZ domains of PSD-95 compared......-terminal of the NMDA receptor and PDZ2 of PSD-95 were fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) and expressed in COS7 cells. A robust and specific BRET signal was obtained by expression of the appropriate partner proteins and subsequently, the assay was used to evaluate a Tat......-conjugated peptide for its ability to disrupt the PSD-95/NMDA receptor interaction in living cells....

  4. Internalization of ferromagnetic nanowires by different living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coey John

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability of living cells, either adherent or suspended, to internalize nickel nanowires is demonstrated for MC3T3-E1, UMR106-tumour and Marrow-Stromal cells. Nanowires were produced by electrodeposition, 20 μm long and 200 nm in diameter. Cell separation and manipulation was achieved for the three cell types. Applied magnetic field successfully oriented the internalized nanowires but no clear anisotropy is induced on the adherent cells. Nanowires tend to bind to cytoplasm metalloproteins and trigger lysosome reorganization around the nucleus. This work demonstrates the applications of nanowires in adherent and suspended cells for cell separation and manipulation, and further explore into their role in nanobiotechnology.

  5. Cyborg cells: functionalisation of living cells with polymers and nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhrullin, Rawil F; Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Minullina, Renata T; Konnova, Svetlana A; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2012-06-07

    Living cells interfaced with a range of polyelectrolyte coatings, magnetic and noble metal nanoparticles, hard mineral shells and other complex nanomaterials can perform functions often completely different from their original specialisation. Such "cyborg cells" are already finding a range of novel applications in areas like whole cell biosensors, bioelectronics, toxicity microscreening, tissue engineering, cell implant protection and bioanalytical chemistry. In this tutorial review, we describe the development of novel methods for functionalisation of cells with polymers and nanoparticles and comment on future advances in this technology in the light of other literature approaches. We review recent studies on the cell viability and function upon direct deposition of nanoparticles, coating with polyelectrolytes, polymer assisted assembly of nanomaterials and hard shells on the cell surface. The cell toxicity issues are considered for many practical applications in terms of possible adverse effects of the deposited polymers, polyelectrolytes and nanoparticles on the cell surface.

  6. Microencapsulating and Banking Living Cells for Cell-Based Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wujie Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge to the eventual success of the emerging cell-based medicine such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and cell transplantation is the limited availability of the desired cell sources. This challenge can be addressed by cell microencapsulation to overcome the undesired immune response (i.e., to achieve immunoisolation so that non-autologous cells can be used to treat human diseases, and by cell/tissue preservation to bank living cells for wide distribution to end users so that they are readily available when needed in the future. This review summarizes the status quo of research in both cell microencapsulation and banking the microencapsulated cells. It is concluded with a brief outlook of future research directions in this important field.

  7. Copper-Catalyzed Click Reaction on/in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siheng; Wang, Lin; Yu, Fei; Zhu, Zhiling; Shobaki, Dema; Chen, Haoqing; Wang, Mu; Wang, Jun; Qin, Guoting; Erasquin, Uriel J; Ren, Li; Wang, Yingjun; Cai, Chengzhi

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrated that copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction could be performed inside live mammalian cells without using a chelating azide. Under optimized conditions, the reaction was performed in human ovary cancer cell line OVCAR5 in which newly synthesized proteins were metabolically modified with homopropargylglycine (HPG). This model system allowed us to estimate the efficiency of the reaction on the cell membranes and in the cytosol using mass spectrometry. We found that the reaction was greatly promoted by a tris(triazolylmethyl)amine Cu(I) ligand tethering a cell-penetrating peptide. Uptake of the ligand, copper, and a biotin-tagged azide in the cells was determined to be 69 ± 2, 163 ± 3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 µM, respectively. After 10 minutes of reaction, the product yields on the membrane and cytosolic proteins were higher than 18% and 0.8%, respectively, while 75% cells remained viable. By reducing the biothiols in the system by scraping or treatment with N-ethylmalemide, the reaction yield on the cytosolic proteins was greatly improved to ~9% and ~14%, respectively, while the yield on the membrane proteins remained unchanged. The results indicate that out of many possibilities, deactivation of the current copper catalysts by biothiols is the major reason for the low yield of CuAAC reaction in the cytosol. Overall, we have improved the efficiency for CuAAC reaction on live cells by 3-fold. Despite the low yielding inside live cells, the products that strongly bind to the intracellular targets can be detected by mass spectrometry. Hence, the in situ CuAAC reaction can be potentially used for screening of cell-specific enzyme inhibitors or biomarkers containing 1,4-substituted 1,2,3-triazoles.

  8. Functional genomic and high-content screening for target discovery and deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Pache, Lars; Chanda, Sumit K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Functional genomic screens apply knowledge gained from the sequencing of the human genome toward rapid methods of identifying genes involved in cellular function based on a specific phenotype. This approach has been made possible through the use of advances in both molecular biology and automation. The utility of this approach has been further enhanced through the application of image-based high content screening, an automated microscopy and quantitative image analysis platform. These approaches can significantly enhance acquisition of novel targets for drug discovery. Areas covered Both the utility and potential issues associated with functional genomic screening approaches are discussed along with examples that illustrate both. The considerations for high content screening applied to functional genomics are also presented. Expert opinion Functional genomic and high content screening are extremely useful in the identification of new drug targets. However, the technical, experimental, and computational parameters have an enormous influence on the results. Thus, although new targets are identified, caution should be applied toward interpretation of screening data in isolation. Genomic screens should be viewed as an integral component of a target identification campaign that requires both the acquisition of orthogonal data, as well as a rigorous validation strategy. PMID:22860749

  9. Dissecting the cell entry pathway of dengue virus by single-particle tracking in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde M van der Schaar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, and fusion behavior of DENV. Simultaneous tracking of DENV particles and various endocytic markers revealed that DENV enters cells exclusively via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The virus particles move along the cell surface in a diffusive manner before being captured by a pre-existing clathrin-coated pit. Upon clathrin-mediated entry, DENV particles are transported to Rab5-positive endosomes, which subsequently mature into late endosomes through acquisition of Rab7 and loss of Rab5. Fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane was primarily detected in late endosomal compartments.

  10. A novel fluorescent probe for rapid and sensitive detection of hydrogen sulfide in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jian; Xu, Junchao; Zhang, Youlai; Wang, Liang; Qin, Caiqin; Zeng, Lintao; Zhang, Yue

    2016-11-01

    A novel fluorescent probe for H2S was developed based on a far-red emitting indole-BODIPY, which was decorated with morpholine and 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl (DNBS) group. This probe showed rapid response (t1/2 = 3 min), high selectivity and sensitivity for H2S with significant colorimetric and fluorescence OFF-ON signals, which was triggered by cleavage of 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl group. This probe could quantitatively detect the concentrations of H2S ranging from 0 to 60 μM, and the detection of limit was found to be as low as 26 nM. Cell imaging results indicated that the probe could detect and visualize H2S in the living cells.

  11. Fluorescent coumarin-based probe for cysteine and homocysteine with live cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ling-Fang; Thirumalaivasan, Natesan; Liao, Yu-Cheng; Wu, Shu-Pao

    2017-08-01

    Cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy) are two of important biological thiols and function as important roles in several biological processes. The development of Cys and Hcy probes will help to explore the functions of biothiols in biological systems. In this work, a new coumarin-based probe AC, containing an acryloyl moiety, was developed for Cys and Hcy detection in cells. Cys and Hcy undergo a nucleophilic addition and subsequent cyclization reaction to remove to the acryloyl group and yield a fluorescent product, 7-hydroxylcomuarin. The probe AC showed good selectivity for cysteine and homocysteine over glutathione and other amino acids and had low detection limits of 65 nM for Cys and 79 nM for Hcy, respectively. Additionally, confocal imaging experiments demonstrated that the probe AC can be applied to visualize Cys and Hcy in living cells.

  12. CRISPR-Cas9 nuclear dynamics and target recognition in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hanhui; Tu, Li-Chun; Naseri, Ardalan; Huisman, Maximiliaan; Zhang, Shaojie; Grunwald, David; Pederson, Thoru

    2016-08-29

    The bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system has been repurposed for genome engineering, transcription modulation, and chromosome imaging in eukaryotic cells. However, the nuclear dynamics of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein 9 (Cas9) guide RNAs and target interrogation are not well defined in living cells. Here, we deployed a dual-color CRISPR system to directly measure the stability of both Cas9 and guide RNA. We found that Cas9 is essential for guide RNA stability and that the nuclear Cas9-guide RNA complex levels limit the targeting efficiency. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measurements revealed that single mismatches in the guide RNA seed sequence reduce the target residence time from >3 h to as low as CRISPR discriminates between genuine versus mismatched targets for genome editing via radical alterations in residence time.

  13. Mapping interactions between mRNA export factors in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Fang Teng

    Full Text Available The TREX complex couples nuclear mRNA processing events with subsequent export to the cytoplasm. TREX also acts as a binding platform for the mRNA export receptor Nxf1. The sites of mRNA transcription and processing within the nucleus have been studied extensively. However, little is known about where TREX assembly takes place and where Nxf1 is recruited to TREX to form the export competent mRNP. Here we have used sensitized emission Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM-FRET, to produce a spatial map in living cells of the sites for the interaction of two TREX subunits, Alyref and Chtop, with Nxf1. Prominent assembly sites for export factors are found in the vicinity of nuclear speckles in regions known to be involved in transcription, splicing and exon junction complex formation highlighting the close coupling of mRNA export with mRNP biogenesis.

  14. Automated analysis of high-content microscopy data with deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Oren Z; Grys, Ben T; Ba, Jimmy; Chong, Yolanda; Frey, Brendan J; Boone, Charles; Andrews, Brenda J

    2017-04-18

    Existing computational pipelines for quantitative analysis of high-content microscopy data rely on traditional machine learning approaches that fail to accurately classify more than a single dataset without substantial tuning and training, requiring extensive analysis. Here, we demonstrate that the application of deep learning to biological image data can overcome the pitfalls associated with conventional machine learning classifiers. Using a deep convolutional neural network (DeepLoc) to analyze yeast cell images, we show improved performance over traditional approaches in the automated classification of protein subcellular localization. We also demonstrate the ability of DeepLoc to classify highly divergent image sets, including images of pheromone-arrested cells with abnormal cellular morphology, as well as images generated in different genetic backgrounds and in different laboratories. We offer an open-source implementation that enables updating DeepLoc on new microscopy datasets. This study highlights deep learning as an important tool for the expedited analysis of high-content microscopy data. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  15. A Molecular Probe for the Detection of Polar Lipids in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Christie A; Shandala, Tetyana; Carter, Elizabeth A; Ivask, Angela; Guinan, Taryn; Hickey, Shane M; Werrett, Melissa V; Wright, Phillip J; Simpson, Peter V; Stagni, Stefano; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Lay, Peter A; Massi, Massimiliano; Plush, Sally E; Brooks, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Lipids have an important role in many aspects of cell biology, including membrane architecture/compartment formation, intracellular traffic, signalling, hormone regulation, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism. Lipid biology is therefore integrally involved in major human diseases, including metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, heart disease, immune disorders and cancers, which commonly display altered lipid transport and metabolism. However, the investigation of these important cellular processes has been limited by the availability of specific tools to visualise lipids in live cells. Here we describe the potential for ReZolve-L1™ to localise to intracellular compartments containing polar lipids, such as for example sphingomyelin and phosphatidylethanolamine. In live Drosophila fat body tissue from third instar larvae, ReZolve-L1™ interacted mainly with lipid droplets, including the core region of these organelles. The presence of polar lipids in the core of these lipid droplets was confirmed by Raman mapping and while this was consistent with the distribution of ReZolve-L1™ it did not exclude that the molecular probe might be detecting other lipid species. In response to complete starvation conditions, ReZolve-L1™ was detected mainly in Atg8-GFP autophagic compartments, and showed reduced staining in the lipid droplets of fat body cells. The induction of autophagy by Tor inhibition also increased ReZolve-L1™ detection in autophagic compartments, whereas Atg9 knock down impaired autophagosome formation and altered the distribution of ReZolve-L1™. Finally, during Drosophila metamorphosis fat body tissues showed increased ReZolve-L1™ staining in autophagic compartments at two hours post puparium formation, when compared to earlier developmental time points. We concluded that ReZolve-L1™ is a new live cell imaging tool, which can be used as an imaging reagent for the detection of polar lipids in different intracellular

  16. A Molecular Probe for the Detection of Polar Lipids in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Christie A.; Shandala, Tetyana; Carter, Elizabeth A.; Ivask, Angela; Guinan, Taryn; Hickey, Shane M.; Werrett, Melissa V.; Wright, Phillip J.; Simpson, Peter V.; Stagni, Stefano; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Lay, Peter A.; Massi, Massimiliano; Brooks, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    Lipids have an important role in many aspects of cell biology, including membrane architecture/compartment formation, intracellular traffic, signalling, hormone regulation, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism. Lipid biology is therefore integrally involved in major human diseases, including metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, heart disease, immune disorders and cancers, which commonly display altered lipid transport and metabolism. However, the investigation of these important cellular processes has been limited by the availability of specific tools to visualise lipids in live cells. Here we describe the potential for ReZolve-L1™ to localise to intracellular compartments containing polar lipids, such as for example sphingomyelin and phosphatidylethanolamine. In live Drosophila fat body tissue from third instar larvae, ReZolve-L1™ interacted mainly with lipid droplets, including the core region of these organelles. The presence of polar lipids in the core of these lipid droplets was confirmed by Raman mapping and while this was consistent with the distribution of ReZolve-L1™ it did not exclude that the molecular probe might be detecting other lipid species. In response to complete starvation conditions, ReZolve-L1™ was detected mainly in Atg8-GFP autophagic compartments, and showed reduced staining in the lipid droplets of fat body cells. The induction of autophagy by Tor inhibition also increased ReZolve-L1™ detection in autophagic compartments, whereas Atg9 knock down impaired autophagosome formation and altered the distribution of ReZolve-L1™. Finally, during Drosophila metamorphosis fat body tissues showed increased ReZolve-L1™ staining in autophagic compartments at two hours post puparium formation, when compared to earlier developmental time points. We concluded that ReZolve-L1™ is a new live cell imaging tool, which can be used as an imaging reagent for the detection of polar lipids in different intracellular

  17. Exploring Transduction Mechanisms of Protein Transduction Domains (PTDs in Living Cells Utilizing Single-Quantum Dot Tracking (SQT Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific protein domains known as protein transduction domains (PTDs can permeate cell membranes and deliver proteins or bioactive materials into living cells. Various approaches have been applied for improving their transduction efficacy. It is, therefore, crucial to clarify the entry mechanisms and to identify the rate-limiting steps. Because of technical limitations for imaging PTD behavior on cells with conventional fluorescent-dyes, how PTDs enter the cells has been a topic of much debate. Utilizing quantum dots (QDs, we recently tracked the behavior of PTD that was derived from HIV-1 Tat (TatP in living cells at the single-molecule level with 7-nm special precision. In this review article, we initially summarize the controversy on TatP entry mechanisms; thereafter, we will focus on our recent findings on single-TatP-QD tracking (SQT, to identify the major sequential steps of intracellular delivery in living cells and to discuss how SQT can easily provide direct information on TatP entry mechanisms. As a primer for SQT study, we also discuss the latest findings on single particle tracking of various molecules on the plasma membrane. Finally, we discuss the problems of QDs and the challenges for the future in utilizing currently available QD probes for SQT. In conclusion, direct identification of the rate-limiting steps of PTD entry with SQT should dramatically improve the methods for enhancing transduction efficiency.

  18. FRET ratiometric probes reveal the chiral-sensitive cysteine-dependent H2S production and regulation in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lv; Yi, Long; Song, Fanbo; Wei, Chao; Wang, Bai-Fan; Xi, Zhen

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gaseous signalling molecule with multiple biological functions. In order to visualize and quantify the endogenous in situ production of H2S in living cells, here we developed two new sulphide ratiometric probes (SR400 and SR550) based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) strategy for live capture of H2S. The FRET-based probes show excellent selectivity toward H2S in a high thiol background under physiological buffer. The probe can be used to in situ visualize cysteine-dependent H2S production in a chiral-sensitive manner in living cells. The ratiometric imaging studies indicated that D-Cys induces more H2S production than that of L-Cys in mitochondria of human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293). The cysteine mimics propargylglycine (PPG) has also been found to inhibit the cysteine-dependent endogenous H2S production in a chiral-sensitive manner in living cells. D-PPG inhibited D-Cys-dependent H2S production more efficiently than L-PPG, while, L-PPG inhibited L-Cys-dependent H2S production more efficiently than D-PPG. Our bioimaging studies support Kimura's discovery of H2S production from D-cysteine in mammalian cells and further highlight the potential of D-cysteine and its derivatives as an alternative strategy for classical H2S-releasing drugs.

  19. Colorimetric detection of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yong Jin; Lee, Young Ju; Lee, Jaemyeon; Lee, Doyeon; Park, Hun-Kuk; Lee, Gi-Ja

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has received great attention as a third gaseous signal transmitter, following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. In particular, H2S plays an important role in the regulation of cancer cell biology. Therefore, the detection of endogenous H2S concentrations within biological systems can be helpful to understand the role of gasotransmitters in pathophysiology. Although a simple and inexpensive method for the detection of H2S has been developed, its direct and precise measurement in living cells remains a challenge. In this study, we introduced a simple, facile, and inexpensive colorimetric system for selective H2S detection in living cells using a silver-embedded Nafion/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) membrane. This membrane could be easily applied onto a polystyrene microplate cover. First, we optimized the composition of the coating membrane, such as the PVP/Nafion mixing ratio and AgNO3 concentration, as well as the pH of the Na2S (H2S donor) solution and the reaction time. Next, the in vitro performance of a colorimetric detection assay utilizing the silver/Nafion/PVP membrane was evaluated utilizing a known concentration of Na2S standard solution both at room temperature and at 37 °C in a 5% CO2 incubator. As a result, the sensitivity of the colorimetric assay for H2S at 37 °C in the incubator (0.0056 Abs./μM Na2S, R2 = 0.9948) was similar to that at room temperature (0.0055 Abs./μM Na2S, R2 = 0.9967). Moreover, these assays were less sensitive to interference from compounds such as glutathione, L-cysteine (Cys), and dithiothreitol than to the H2S from Na2S. This assay based on the silver/Nafion/PVP membrane also showed excellent reproducibility (2.8% RSD). Finally, we successfully measured the endogenous H2S concentrations in live C6 glioma cells by s-(5‧-adenosyl)-L-methionine stimulation with and without Cys and L-homocysteine, utilizing the silver/Nafion/PVP membrane. In summary, colorimetric assays using silver

  20. Thermally Controlling the Polymeric Cytoskeleton in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Leduc, Philip

    2006-03-01

    Cell structure is controlled to a large degree by the cytoskeleton, which is an intracellular polymer network. This cytoskeleton is critical as it strongly influences many cellular functions such as motility, organelle transport, mechanotransduction and mitosis. In our studies, we controlled the thermal environment of living cells and after applying an increase in temperature of only 5 ^oC, we observed a change in the polymer network as the actin filaments depolymerized. Interestingly, when we then lowered the temperature, the actin repolymerized indicating a reversible phase that is controlled by the thermal environment. We characterized the presence of F-actin and G-actin for these phases through analyzing the intensity from immunofluorescent studies for these proteins. The F-actin concentration decreased when increasing the temperature from the initial state and then increased when decreasing the temperature. Although the cell is known to be affected by heat shock responses, this is not a function of just the polymers as they do not exhibit these polymerization characteristics when we probed them as single filaments in vitro. These studies suggest that the cell has distinct phases or patterns while maintaining a reversible equilibrium due to the thermal environment for these networked polymers.

  1. Following the Dyamics of DNA in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, Joshua; Raghunathan, Krishnan; Chu, Mike; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2012-02-01

    Cells are brimming with molecular activity, but the cellular interior is much more than a test tube for biochemical reactions. The intracellular environment imposes a variety of mechanical constraints and engenders interactions from molecular crowding to a range of motor-driven activity responsible for transcription, replication, cargo transport, cytoskeletal rearrangement, chromosomal remodeling, and so on. We have developed a two-color correlational microscopy technique to follow the dynamics of DNA interacting with the in vivo cellular environment. Substantial differences between live cells and dead, yet structurally intact, cells point to a strong coupling of active, motor-driven fluctuations in the cell. This suggests that the motion of native, cellular DNA may similarly be driven by active processes, instead of relying on purely thermal, passive fluctuations. We also note that the correlations provide a sensitive measure for the effective length of the DNA probe on a length scale around one persistence length (˜ 50 nm). This paves the way for experiments with more complex DNA probes that can bind transcription factors to form protein-mediated DNA loops, the dynamics of which could be observed through this method.

  2. Direct Visualization of De novo Lipogenesis in Single Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Increased de novo lipogenesis is being increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Despite recent advances in fluorescence microscopy, autoradiography and mass spectrometry, direct observation of de novo lipogenesis in living systems remains to be challenging. Here, by coupling stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy with isotope labeled glucose, we were able to trace the dynamic metabolism of glucose in single living cells with high spatial-temporal resolution. As the first direct visualization, we observed that glucose was largely utilized for lipid synthesis in pancreatic cancer cells, which occurs at a much lower rate in immortalized normal pancreatic epithelial cells. By inhibition of glycolysis and fatty acid synthase (FAS), the key enzyme for fatty acid synthesis, we confirmed the deuterium labeled lipids in cancer cells were from de novo lipid synthesis. Interestingly, we also found that prostate cancer cells exhibit relatively lower level of de novo lipogenesis, but higher fatty acid uptake compared to pancreatic cancer cells. Together, our results demonstrate a valuable tool to study dynamic lipid metabolism in cancer and other disorders.

  3. A Fluorimetric Sensor for Detection of One Living Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, studies of metabolic pathways and processes in living organisms cannot be easily done at the cellular level. That is why the development of a new analytical methods and approaches is needed, to allow detection of different biologically important species at very low concentrations levels and sample volumes, especially in individual cells. In the present work, we suggested a sensor to detect units of living cells by means determination of plant esterases (PE based on fluorimetric detection of the products of the enzymatic hydrolysis of fluorescein diacetate in plant cell cultures (BY-2 tobacco cells and early somatic embryos of Norway spruce, clone 2/32. We standardized the sensor using a readily available esterase from pig liver. The detection limits were approximately 17 to 50 amol in 2 ml (8.5 to 25 femtomolar concentrations of esterases of the enzyme contained in BY-2 tobacco cells and spruce early somatic embryos, respectively, after re-computation on the amounts of pig liver esterases. We assumed that the optimised sensor for the determination of PE in cell extracts accomplishes all requirements for a sensitive analysis which could be usable for single cell analysis. The detection limit was 1.5 in case of analysing BY-2 tobacco cells and 0.5 in early somatic embryos. Moreover, we were able to detect single protoplasts.

  4. Fractal Characterization of Chromatin Decompaction in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ji; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Blaha, Catherine S; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2015-12-01

    Chromatin organization has a fundamental impact on the whole spectrum of genomic functions. Quantitative characterization of the chromatin structure, particularly at submicron length scales where chromatin fractal globules are formed, is critical to understanding this structure-function relationship. Such analysis is currently challenging due to the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. We herein present an optical approach termed inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography to characterize the mass density fractality of chromatin, and we apply the technique to observe chromatin decompaction in live cells. The technique makes it possible for the first time, to our knowledge, to sense intracellular morphology with length-scale sensitivity from ∼30 to 450 nm, thus primarily probing the higher-order chromatin structure, without resolving the actual structures. We used chromatin decompaction due to inhibition of histone deacytelases and measured the subsequent changes in the fractal dimension of the intracellular structure. The results were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  5. Synthetic recombinase-based state machines in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquet, Nathaniel; Soleimany, Ava P; Ferris, Alyssa C; Aaronson, Scott; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-07-22

    State machines underlie the sophisticated functionality behind human-made and natural computing systems that perform order-dependent information processing. We developed a recombinase-based framework for building state machines in living cells by leveraging chemically controlled DNA excision and inversion operations to encode states in DNA sequences. This strategy enables convenient readout of states (by sequencing and/or polymerase chain reaction) as well as complex regulation of gene expression. We validated our framework by engineering state machines in Escherichia coli that used one, two, or three chemical inputs to control up to 16 DNA states. These state machines were capable of recording the temporal order of all inputs and performing multi-input, multi-output control of gene expression. We also developed a computational tool for the automated design of gene regulation programs using recombinase-based state machines. Our scalable framework should enable new strategies for recording and studying how combinational and temporal events regulate complex cell functions and for programming sophisticated cell behaviors.

  6. Optogenetics: optical control of a photoactivatable Rac in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in optogenetics have extended optical control of signaling to intracellular proteins, including Rac, a small G protein in the Rho family. A blue light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) domain derived from Avena sativa (oat) phototropin was fused to the N-terminus of a constitutively active mutant of Rac, via an α-helix (Jα) that is conserved among plant phototropins. The fused LOV domain occluded binding of downstream effectors to Rac in the dark. Exposure to blue light caused a conformational change of the LOV domain and unwinding of the Jα helix, relieving steric inhibition. The LOV domain incorporates a flavin as the photon-absorbing cofactor and can be activated by light in a reversible and repeatable fashion. In cultured cells, global illumination with blue light rapidly activated Rac and led to cell spreading and membrane ruffling. Localized and pulsed illumination generated a gradient of Rac activity and induced directional migration. In this chapter, we will describe the techniques in detail and present some examples of applications of using photoactivatable Rac (PA-Rac) in living cells.

  7. A phase unwrapping algorithm based on Branch cuts for living cell's interference pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Xia, Wang; Schmidt, Greg; Moore, Duncan T.; McGrath, James L.

    2011-06-01

    Fibroblast is the main part in the loose connective tissue and differentiates from the mesenchymal cell when it is in embryo. It exhibits highly reproducible growth kinetics and reproducible healing dynamics in the scratch-wound assay and the height of it could show this prediction. In order to measure the height of these cells, we construct an interferometer measuration system. As we all know, the interference pattern should be unwrapped first, there are plenty of methods that are under research. In this paper we want to find out a typical methods that could be used in living cell's interference pattern during image processing, and also we can get the conclusion that how to use the method and why it is fit to unwrap the phase of cells. There are mainly three parts in this paper: Firstly, we have designed an Interference system which can be used to get the interference pattern, here we used multiphase interference microscope to measure the cell height. Secondly, a typical method which is based on Goldstein's branch cuts algorithm were used to guide the way that how the phase is unwrapped, this method is the most efficient way to phase unwrapping, and it could induct the unwrapping path through using the branch cut method which could get rid of the residues as much as it could be. As a comparison, we also used some other methods to find different results. Such as the quality-guided path following phase unwrapping; and the Costantini phase unwrapping. Finally, we analyzed the results of the three-dimensional model of the cell surface topography, as a result of the various noises during the experiment, all these unwrapping methods above can't eliminate all the residues and noises, but compared with the other results, the Goldstein's branch cut method has the fittest advantages, it gives the most fluent topography of the living cells.

  8. Characterization of hybridization between synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides and RNA in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politz, J C; Taneja, K L; Singer, R H

    1995-01-01

    Cells internalized synthetic oligonucleotides (oligos) in culture. The hybridization of these molecules to target RNA in the living cell was subsequently detected and characterized after fixation of the cells, with or without previous detergent extraction. Hybridized oligo was distinguished from free oligo in the cell using an in situ reverse transcription technique. This assay exploited the ability of the hybridized oligo to prime synthesis of a specific cDNA strand; unhybridized oligo present in the cell could not act as a primer for reverse transcription. Phosphorothioate and fluorochrome-labeled phosphodiester oligo dT were found to enter cells rapidly and hybridize to poly (A) RNA within 30 min. Hybrids containing phosphorothioate oligo dT were detectable in cells after up to 4 h of efflux time. Phosphodiester bonded oligo dT containing covalently-linked fluorochromes appeared more stable in the cell than unmodified phosphodiester oligo dT; hybrids containing these oligos could be detected in cells as long as 18h after efflux began. The in situ transcription assay was also sensitive enough to detect hybridization of anti-actin oligos to actin mRNA in the cell. It is probable, therefore, that this assay can be used to help assess the efficacy of antisense oligos by their hybridization to a target mRNA in cells or tissues; hybridized oligos are more likely to induce a specific antisense effect. Additionally, this assay will help to identify probes that would be useful as stable hybridization tags to follow RNA movement in living cells. Images PMID:8559650

  9. The Gray Institute 'open' high-content, fluorescence lifetime microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, P R; Tullis, I D C; Pierce, G P; Newman, R G; Prentice, J; Rowley, M I; Matthews, D R; Ameer-Beg, S M; Vojnovic, B

    2013-08-01

    We describe a microscopy design methodology and details of microscopes built to this 'open' design approach. These demonstrate the first implementation of time-domain fluorescence microscopy in a flexible automated platform with the ability to ease the transition of this and other advanced microscopy techniques from development to use in routine biology applications. This approach allows easy expansion and modification of the platform capabilities, as it moves away from the use of a commercial, monolithic, microscope body to small, commercial off-the-shelf and custom made modular components. Drawings and diagrams of our microscopes have been made available under an open license for noncommercial use at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~atdgroup. Several automated high-content fluorescence microscope implementations have been constructed with this design framework and optimized for specific applications with multiwell plates and tissue microarrays. In particular, three platforms incorporate time-domain FLIM via time-correlated single photon counting in an automated fashion. We also present data from experiments performed on these platforms highlighting their automated wide-field and laser scanning capabilities designed for high-content microscopy. Devices using these designs also form radiation-beam 'end-stations' at Oxford and Surrey Universities, showing the versatility and extendibility of this approach. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. Predicting In Vivo Anti-Hepatofibrotic Drug Efficacy Based on In Vitro High-Content Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Many anti-fibrotic drugs with high in vitro efficacies fail to produce significant effects in vivo. The aim of this work is to use a statistical approach to design a numerical predictor that correlates better with in vivo outcomes. METHODS: High-content analysis (HCA) was performed with 49 drugs on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) LX-2 stained with 10 fibrotic markers. ~0.3 billion feature values from all cells in >150,000 images were quantified to reflect the drug effects. A sy...

  11. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as tool for high-content-screening in yeast (HCS-FCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christopher; Huff, Joseph; Marshall, Will; Yu, Elden Qingfeng; Unruh, Jay; Slaughter, Brian; Wiegraebe, Winfried

    2011-03-01

    To measure protein interactions, diffusion properties, and local concentrations in single cells, Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established and widely accepted method. However, measurements can take a long time and are laborious. Therefore investigations are typically limited to tens or a few hundred cells. We developed an automated system to overcome these limitations and make FCS available for High Content Screening (HCS). We acquired data in an auto-correlation screen of more than 4000 of the 6000 proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tagged with eGFP and expanded the HCS to use cross-correlation between eGFP and mCherry tagged proteins to screen for molecular interactions. We performed all high-content FCS screens (HCS-FCS) in a 96 well plate format. The system is based on an extended Carl Zeiss fluorescence correlation spectrometer ConfoCor 3 attached to a confocal microscope LSM 510. We developed image-processing software to control these hardware components. The confocal microscope obtained overview images and we developed an algorithm to search for and detect single cells. At each cell, we positioned a laser beam at a well-defined point and recorded the fluctuation signal. We used automatic scoring of the signal for quality control. All data was stored and organized in a database based on the open source Open Microscopy Environment (OME) platform. To analyze the data we used the image processing language IDL and the open source statistical software package R.

  12. Development of high-content assays for kidney progenitor cell expansion in transgenic zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanker, Subramaniam; Cirio, Maria Cecilia; Vollmer, Laura L; Goldberg, Natasha D; McDermott, Lee A; Hukriede, Neil A; Vogt, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    Reactivation of genes normally expressed during organogenesis is a characteristic of kidney regeneration. Enhancing this reactivation could potentially be a therapeutic target to augment kidney regeneration. The inductive events that drive kidney organogenesis in zebrafish are similar to the initial steps in mammalian kidney organogenesis. Therefore, quantifying embryonic signals that drive zebrafish kidney development is an attractive strategy for the discovery of potential novel therapeutic modalities that accelerate kidney regeneration. The Lim1 homeobox protein, Lhx1, is a marker of kidney development that is also expressed in the regenerating kidneys after injury. Using a fluorescent Lhx1a-EGFP transgene whose phenotype faithfully recapitulates that of the endogenous protein, we developed a high-content assay for Lhx1a-EGFP expression in transgenic zebrafish embryos employing an artificial intelligence-based image analysis method termed cognition network technology (CNT). Implementation of the CNT assay on high-content readers enabled automated real-time in vivo time-course, dose-response, and variability studies in the developing embryo. The Lhx1a assay was complemented with a kidney-specific secondary CNT assay that enables direct measurements of the embryonic renal tubule cell population. The integration of fluorescent transgenic zebrafish embryos with automated imaging and artificial intelligence-based image analysis provides an in vivo analysis system for structure-activity relationship studies and de novo discovery of novel agents that augment innate regenerative processes.

  13. Optical High Content Nanoscopy of Epigenetic Marks Decodes Phenotypic Divergence in Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joseph J.; Bennett, Neal K.; Devita, Mitchel S.; Chahar, Sanjay; Viswanath, Satish; Lee, Eunjee A.; Jung, Giyoung; Shao, Paul P.; Childers, Erin P.; Liu, Shichong; Kulesa, Anthony; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Becker, Matthew L.; Hwang, Nathaniel S.; Madabhushi, Anant; Verzi, Michael P.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2017-01-01

    While distinct stem cell phenotypes follow global changes in chromatin marks, single-cell chromatin technologies are unable to resolve or predict stem cell fates. We propose the first such use of optical high content nanoscopy of histone epigenetic marks (epi-marks) in stem cells to classify emergent cell states. By combining nanoscopy with epi-mark textural image informatics, we developed a novel approach, termed EDICTS (Epi-mark Descriptor Imaging of Cell Transitional States), to discern chromatin organizational changes, demarcate lineage gradations across a range of stem cell types and robustly track lineage restriction kinetics. We demonstrate the utility of EDICTS by predicting the lineage progression of stem cells cultured on biomaterial substrates with graded nanotopographies and mechanical stiffness, thus parsing the role of specific biophysical cues as sensitive epigenetic drivers. We also demonstrate the unique power of EDICTS to resolve cellular states based on epi-marks that cannot be detected via mass spectrometry based methods for quantifying the abundance of histone post-translational modifications. Overall, EDICTS represents a powerful new methodology to predict single cell lineage decisions by integrating high content super-resolution nanoscopy and imaging informatics of the nuclear organization of epi-marks. PMID:28051095

  14. STED microscopy of living cells--new frontiers in membrane and neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggeling, Christian; Willig, Katrin I; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2013-07-01

    Recent developments in fluorescence far-field microscopy such as STED microscopy have accomplished observation of the living cell with a spatial resolution far below the diffraction limit. Here, we briefly review the current approaches to super-resolution optical microscopy and present the implementation of STED microscopy for novel insights into live cell mechanisms, with a focus on neurobiology and plasma membrane dynamics.

  15. Mapping Cd²⁺-induced membrane permeability changes of single live cells by means of scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filice, Fraser P; Li, Michelle S M; Henderson, Jeffrey D; Ding, Zhifeng

    2016-02-18

    Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) is a powerful, non-invasive, analytical methodology that can be used to investigate live cell membrane permeability. Depth scan SECM imaging allowed for the generation of 2D current maps of live cells relative to electrode position in the x-z or y-z plane. Depending on resolution, one depth scan image can contain hundreds of probe approach curves (PACs). Individual PACs were obtained by simply extracting vertical cross-sections from the 2D image. These experimental PACs were overlaid onto theoretically generated PACs simulated at specific geometry conditions. Simulations were carried out using 3D models in COMSOL Multiphysics to determine the cell membrane permeability coefficients at different locations on the surface of the cells. Common in literature, theoretical PACs are generated using a 2D axially symmetric geometry. This saves on both compute time and memory utilization. However, due to symmetry limitations of the model, only one experimental PAC right above the cell can be matched with simulated PAC data. Full 3D models in this article were developed for the SECM system of live cells, allowing all experimental PACs over the entire cell to become usable. Cd(2+)-induced membrane permeability changes of single human bladder (T24) cells were investigated at several positions above the cell, displaced from the central axis. The experimental T24 cells under study were incubated with Cd(2+) in varying concentrations. It is experimentally observed that 50 and 100 μM Cd(2+) caused a decrease in membrane permeability, which was uniform across all locations over the cell regardless of Cd(2+) concentration. The Cd(2+) was found to have detrimental effects on the cell, with cells shrinking in size and volume, and the membrane permeability decreasing. A mapping technique for the analysis of the cell membrane permeability under the Cd(2+) stress is realized by the methodology presented.

  16. Nonmuscle myosin II isoforms coassemble in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jordan R; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-19

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB, and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique as well as redundant cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear whether NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments or whether filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB, and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms coassemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly spread cells, arguing for the existence of a sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while coassembled with other NM II isoforms.

  17. Optical Control of Living Cells Electrical Activity by Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Nicola; Bossio, Caterina; Vaquero Morata, Susana; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-28

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications. In particular, conjugated polymers display several optimal properties as substrates for biological systems, such as good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties, cheap and easy processing technology, and possibility of deposition on light, thin and flexible substrates. These materials have been employed for cellular interfaces like neural probes, transistors for excitation and recording of neural activity, biosensors and actuators for drug release. Recent experiments have also demonstrated the possibility to use conjugated polymers for all-optical modulation of the electrical activity of cells. Several in-vitro study cases have been reported, including primary neuronal networks, astrocytes and secondary line cells. Moreover, signal photo-transduction mediated by organic polymers has been shown to restore light sensitivity in degenerated retinas, suggesting that these devices may be used for artificial retinal prosthesis in the future. All in all, light sensitive conjugated polymers represent a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work, all the steps required to fabricate a bio-polymer interface for optical excitation of living cells are described. The function of the active interface is to transduce the light stimulus into a modulation of the cell membrane potential. As a study case, useful for in-vitro studies, a polythiophene thin film is used as the functional, light absorbing layer, and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells are employed as the biological component of the interface. Practical examples of successful control of the cell membrane potential upon stimulation with light pulses of different duration are provided. In particular, it is shown that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing effects on the cell membrane can be achieved depending on the duration of the light stimulus. The reported

  18. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Ann

    Understanding the structure and functionality of biological systems on a nanometer-resolution and short temporal scales is important for solving complex biological problems, developing innovative treatment, and advancing the design of highly functionalized biomimetic materials. For example, adhesion of cells to an underlying substrate plays a c