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Sample records for high-compression high strain-rate

  1. A high-strain-rate superplastic ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B N; Hiraga, K; Morita, K; Sakka, Y

    2001-09-20

    High-strain-rate superplasticity describes the ability of a material to sustain large plastic deformation in tension at high strain rates of the order of 10-2 to 10-1 s-1 and is of great technological interest for the shape-forming of engineering materials. High-strain-rate superplasticity has been observed in aluminium-based and magnesium-based alloys. But for ceramic materials, superplastic deformation has been restricted to low strain rates of the order of 10-5 to 10-4 s-1 for most oxides and nitrides with the presence of intergranular cavities leading to premature failure. Here we show that a composite ceramic material consisting of tetragonal zirconium oxide, magnesium aluminate spinel and alpha-alumina phases exhibits superplasticity at strain rates up to 1 s-1. The composite also exhibits a large tensile elongation, exceeding 1,050 per cent for a strain rate of 0.4 s-1. The tensile flow behaviour and deformed microstructure of the material indicate that superplasticity is due to a combination of limited grain growth in the constitutive phases and the intervention of dislocation-induced plasticity in the zirconium oxide phase. We suggest that the present results hold promise for the application of shape-forming technologies to ceramic materials.

  2. High Strain Rate Characterisation of Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Rasmus Normann Wilken

    The high strain rate characterisation of FRP materials present the experimenter with a new set of challenges in obtaining valid experimental data. These challenges were addressed in this work with basis in classic wave theory. The stress equilibrium process for linear elastic materials, as fibre...... a linear elastic specimen to reach a state of constant strain rate before fracture. This was in contrast to ductile materials, which are widely tested with for the High-speed servohydraulic test machine. The development of the analysis and the interpretation of the results, were based on the experience...

  3. High strain rate behaviour of polypropylene microfoams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-del Río, T.; Garrido, M. A.; Rodríguez, J.; Arencón, D.; Martínez, A. B.

    2012-08-01

    Microcellular materials such as polypropylene foams are often used in protective applications and passive safety for packaging (electronic components, aeronautical structures, food, etc.) or personal safety (helmets, knee-pads, etc.). In such applications the foams which are used are often designed to absorb the maximum energy and are generally subjected to severe loadings involving high strain rates. The manufacture process to obtain polymeric microcellular foams is based on the polymer saturation with a supercritical gas, at high temperature and pressure. This method presents several advantages over the conventional injection moulding techniques which make it industrially feasible. However, the effect of processing conditions such as blowing agent, concentration and microfoaming time and/or temperature on the microstructure of the resulting microcellular polymer (density, cell size and geometry) is not yet set up. The compressive mechanical behaviour of several microcellular polypropylene foams has been investigated over a wide range of strain rates (0.001 to 3000 s-1) in order to show the effects of the processing parameters and strain rate on the mechanical properties. High strain rate tests were performed using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus (SHPB). Polypropylene and polyethylene-ethylene block copolymer foams of various densities were considered.

  4. High strain rate behaviour of polypropylene microfoams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez A.B.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Microcellular materials such as polypropylene foams are often used in protective applications and passive safety for packaging (electronic components, aeronautical structures, food, etc. or personal safety (helmets, knee-pads, etc.. In such applications the foams which are used are often designed to absorb the maximum energy and are generally subjected to severe loadings involving high strain rates. The manufacture process to obtain polymeric microcellular foams is based on the polymer saturation with a supercritical gas, at high temperature and pressure. This method presents several advantages over the conventional injection moulding techniques which make it industrially feasible. However, the effect of processing conditions such as blowing agent, concentration and microfoaming time and/or temperature on the microstructure of the resulting microcellular polymer (density, cell size and geometry is not yet set up. The compressive mechanical behaviour of several microcellular polypropylene foams has been investigated over a wide range of strain rates (0.001 to 3000 s−1 in order to show the effects of the processing parameters and strain rate on the mechanical properties. High strain rate tests were performed using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus (SHPB. Polypropylene and polyethylene-ethylene block copolymer foams of various densities were considered.

  5. Sieving hydrogen based on its high compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hangyan; Sun, Deyan; Gong, Xingao; Liu, Zhifeng

    2011-03-01

    Based on carbon nanotube intramolecular junction and a C60, a molecular sieve for hydrogen is presented. The small interspace between C60 and junction provides a size changeable channel for the permselectivity of hydrogen while blocking Ne and Ar. The sieving mechanism is due to the high compressibility of hydrogen.

  6. High strain rate characterization of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siviour, Clive R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the response of polymers to high strain rate deformation. The main focus is on the experimental techniques used to characterize this response. The paper includes a small number of examples as well as references to experimental data over a wide range of rates, which illustrate the key features of rate dependence in these materials; however this is by no means an exhaustive list. The aim of the paper is to give the reader unfamiliar with the subject an overview of the techniques available with sufficient references from which further information can be obtained. In addition to the `well established' techniques of the Hopkinson bar, Taylor Impact and Transverse impact, a discussion of the use of time-temperature superposition in interpreting and experimentally replicating high rate response is given, as is a description of new techniques in which mechanical parameters are derived by directly measuring wave propagation in specimens; these are particularly appropriate for polymers with low wave speeds. The vast topic of constitutive modelling is deliberately excluded from this review.

  7. Strain rate effect in high-speed wire drawing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, S.; Van Houtte, P.; Van Bael, A.; Mei, F.; Sarban, A.; Boesman, P.; Galvez, F.; Atienza, J. M.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a study on the strain rate effect during high-speed wire drawing process by means of finite element simulation. Based on the quasistatic stresses obtained by normal tensile tests and dynamic stresses at high strain rates by split Hopkinson pressure bar tests, the wire drawing process was simulated for low carbon steel and high carbon steel. The results show that both the deformation process and the final properties of drawn wires are influenced by the strain rate.

  8. High strain rate loading of polymeric foams and solid plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Richard D.; Chang, Peter C.; Fourney, William L.

    2000-04-01

    The split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) provided a technique to determine the high strain rate response for low density foams and solid ABS and polypropylene plastics. These materials are used in the interior safety panels of automobiles and crash test dummies. Because the foams have a very low impedance, polycarbonate bars were used to acquire the strain rate data in the 100 to 1600 l/s range. An aluminum SPHB setup was used to obtain the solid plastics data which covered strain rates of 1000 to 4000 l/s. The curves for peak strain rate versus peak stress for the foams over the test range studied indicates only a slight strain rate dependence. Peak strain rate versus peak stress curves for polypropylene shows a strain rate dependence up to about 1500 l/s. At that rate the solid poly propylene indicates no strain rate dependence. The ABS plastics are strain rate dependent up to 3500 l/s and then are independent at larger strain rates.

  9. Lightweight, highly compressible, noncrystalline cellulose capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrick, Christopher; Lindström, Stefan B; Larsson, Per Tomas; Wågberg, Lars

    2014-07-08

    We demonstrate how to prepare extraordinarily deformable, gas-filled, spherical capsules from nonmodified cellulose. These capsules have a low nominal density, ranging from 7.6 to 14.2 kg/m(3), and can be deformed elastically to 70% deformation at 50% relative humidity. No compressive strain-at-break could be detected for these dry cellulose capsules, since they did not rupture even when compressed into a disk with pockets of highly compressed air. A quantitative constitutive model for the large deformation compression of these capsules is derived, including their high-frequency mechanical response and their low-frequency force relaxation, where the latter is governed by the gas barrier properties of the dry capsule. Mechanical testing corroborated these models with good accuracy. Force relaxation measurements at a constant compression rendered an estimate for the gas permeability of air through the capsule wall, calculated to 0.4 mL μm/m(2) days kPa at 50% relative humidity. These properties taken together open up a large application area for the capsules, and they could most likely be used for applications in compressible, lightweight materials and also constitute excellent model materials for adsorption and adhesion studies.

  10. High Strain Rate Compressive Tests on Woven Graphite Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allazadeh, Mohammad Reza; Wosu, Sylvanus N.

    2011-08-01

    The behavior of composite materials may be different when they are subjected to high strain rate load. Penetrating split Hopkinson pressure bar (P-SHPB) is a method to impose high strain rate on specimen in the laboratory experiments. This research work studied the response of the thin circular shape specimens, made out of woven graphite epoxy composites, to high strain rate impact load. The stress-strain relationships and behavior of the specimens were investigated during the compressive dynamic tests for strain rates as high as 3200 s-1. One dimensional analysis was deployed for analytical calculations since the experiments fulfilled the ratio of diameter to length of bars condition in impact load experiments. The mechanics of dynamic failure was studied and the results showed the factors which govern the failure mode in high strain deformation via absorbed energy by the specimen. In this paper, the relation of particle velocity with perforation depth was discussed for woven graphite epoxy specimens.

  11. High strain rate deformation of layered nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Veysset, David; Singer, Jonathan P.; Retsch, Markus; Saini, Gagan; Pezeril, Thomas; Nelson, Keith A.; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2012-11-01

    Insight into the mechanical behaviour of nanomaterials under the extreme condition of very high deformation rates and to very large strains is needed to provide improved understanding for the development of new protective materials. Applications include protection against bullets for body armour, micrometeorites for satellites, and high-speed particle impact for jet engine turbine blades. Here we use a microscopic ballistic test to report the responses of periodic glassy-rubbery layered block-copolymer nanostructures to impact from hypervelocity micron-sized silica spheres. Entire deformation fields are experimentally visualized at an exceptionally high resolution (below 10 nm) and we discover how the microstructure dissipates the impact energy via layer kinking, layer compression, extreme chain conformational flattening, domain fragmentation and segmental mixing to form a liquid phase. Orientation-dependent experiments show that the dissipation can be enhanced by 30% by proper orientation of the layers.

  12. Stretching Behavior of Red Blood Cells at High Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this work, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that a simple viscoelastic model captures the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 1000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  13. Study of High Strain Rate Response of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the research was to continue the experimental study of the effect of strain rate on mechanical response (deformation and failure) of epoxy resins and carbon fibers/epoxy matrix composites, and to initiate a study of the effects of temperature by developing an elevated temperature test. The experimental data provide the information needed for NASA scientists for the development of a nonlinear, rate dependent deformation and strength models for composites that can subsequently be used in design. This year effort was directed into testing the epoxy resin. Three types of epoxy resins were tested in tension and shear at various strain rates that ranges from 5 x 10(exp -5), to 1000 per second. Pilot shear experiments were done at high strain rate and an elevated temperature of 80 C. The results show that all, the strain rate, the mode of loading, and temperature significantly affect the response of epoxy.

  14. Recrystallization of High Carbon Steel during High Strain Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The recrystallization of high carbon steel during high temperature and high speed rolling has been studied by analyzing the stress-strain curves and the austenite grain size.Isothermal multi-pass hot compression at high strain rate was carried out by Gleeble-2000. The austenite grain size was measured by IBAS image analysis system. The results show that static recrystallization occurred at interpass time under pre-finish rolling, and at the finish rolling stage, due to the brief interpass time, static recrystallization can not be found.

  15. High-Strain Rate Mechanical Response of Cured Epoxy Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirk, Timothy; Khare, Ketan; Karim, Mir; Lenhart, Joseph; Khare, Rajesh; Andzelm, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Chemically cross-linked polymer networks are increasingly common in high performance composites, adhesives and other applications involving high-impact loading conditions or ballistic collisions. The mechanical behavior of epoxy and other polymer networks exhibit a strong dependence on strain rate near the glass transition temperature (Tg); however, the elastic modulus at strain rates greater than 105 1/s is difficult to capture with experimental techniques. We present computational results of Di-Glycidyl Ether of Bisphenol A (DGEBA) and Jeffamine diamines (D230) from molecular dynamics simulation, which is intrinsically well-suited to model material deformation at high strain rates. Our results show that the experimental Tg can be reproduced from molecular dynamics, and the Williams-Landel-Ferry equation is useful in rationalizing the shift of Tg due to fast annealing and high strain rates. Temperature sweeps of elastic modulus show the glass-rubber transition to occur over a significantly wider temperature range compared with experimental measurements at low strain rates.

  16. High strain rate compression testing of glass fibre reinforced polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cloete T.J.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper details an investigation of the high strain rate compression testing of GFPP with the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB in the through-thickness and in-plane directions. GFPP posed challenges to SHPB testing as it fails at relatively high stresses, while having relatively low moduli and hence mechanical impedance. The modifications to specimen geometry and incident pulse shaping in order to gather valid test results, where specimen equilibrium was achieved for SHPB tests on GFPP are presented. In addition to conventional SHPB tests to failure, SHPB experiments were designed to achieve specimen equilibration at small strains, which permitted the capture of high strain rate elastic modulus data. The strain rate dependency of GFPP’s failure strengths in the in-plane and through-thickness direction is modelled using a logarithmic law.

  17. High Strain Rate Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites Analyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2001-01-01

    Procedures for modeling the high-speed impact of composite materials are needed for designing reliable composite engine cases that are lighter than the metal cases in current use. The types of polymer matrix composites that are likely to be used in such an application have a deformation response that is nonlinear and that varies with strain rate. To characterize and validate material models that could be used in the design of impactresistant engine cases, researchers must obtain material data over a wide variety of strain rates. An experimental program has been carried out through a university grant with the Ohio State University to obtain deformation data for a representative polymer matrix composite for strain rates ranging from quasi-static to high rates of several hundred per second. This information has been used to characterize and validate a constitutive model that was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  18. High strain rate behavior of pure metals at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Gabriel; Bonora, Nicola; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Domenico, Gentile

    2013-06-01

    In many applications and technology processes, such as stamping, forging, hot working etc., metals and alloys are subjected to elevated temperature and high strain rate deformation process. Characterization tests, such as quasistatic and dynamic tension or compression test, and validation tests, such as Taylor impact and DTE - dynamic tensile extrusion -, provide the experimental base of data for constitutive model validation and material parameters identification. Testing material at high strain rate and temperature requires dedicated equipment. In this work, both tensile Hopkinson bar and light gas gun where modified in order to allow material testing under sample controlled temperature conditions. Dynamic tension tests and Taylor impact tests, at different temperatures, on high purity copper (99.98%), tungsten (99.95%) and 316L stainless steel were performed. The accuracy of several constitutive models (Johnson and Cook, Zerilli-Armstrong, etc.) in predicting the observed material response was verified by means of extensive finite element analysis (FEA).

  19. Twinning in copper deformed at high strain rates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Cronje; R E Kroon; W D Roos; J H Neethling

    2013-02-01

    Copper samples having varying microstructures were deformed at high strain rates using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar. Transmission electron microscopy results show deformation twins present in samples that were both annealed and strained, whereas samples that were annealed and left unstrained, as well as samples that were unannealed and strained, are devoid of these twins. These deformation twins occurred at deformation conditions less extreme than previously predicted.

  20. Atomistic simulations of high strain rate loading of nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringa, E. M.; Tramontina, D.; Ruestes, C. J.; Tang, Y.; Meyers, M. A.; Gunkelmann, N.; Urbassek, H. M.

    2013-03-01

    Materials loaded at high strain rates can reach extreme temperature and pressure conditions. Most experiments on loading of simple materials use poly crystals, while most atomistic simulations of shock wave loading deal with single crystals, due to the higher computational cost of running polycrystal samples. Of course, atomistic simulations of polycrystals with micron-sized grains are beyond the capabilities of current supercomputers. On the other hand, nanocrystals (nc) with grain sizes below 50 nm can be obtained experimentally and modeled reasonably well at high strain rates, opening the possibility of nearly direct comparison between atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experiments using high power lasers. We will discuss MD simulations and links to experiments for nc Cu and Ni, as model f.c.c. solids, and nc Ta and Fe, as model b.c.c. solids. In all cases, the microstructure resulting from loading depends strongly on grain size, strain rate and peak applied pressure. We will also discuss effects related to target porosity in nc's. E.M.B. thanks funding from PICT2008-1325.

  1. High pressure, high strain rate material strength studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, B. A.; Arsenlis, A.; Barton, N.; Belof, J.; Cavallo, R.; Maddox, B.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S.; Rudd, R.; Comley, A.; Meyers, M.; Wark, J.

    2011-10-01

    Constitutive models for material strength are currently being tested at high pressures by comparing 2D simulations with experiments measuring the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability evolution in solid-state samples of vanadium (V), tantalum (Ta), and iron (Fe). The multiscale strength models being tested combine molecular dynamics, dislocation dynamics, and continuum simulations. Our analysis for the V experiments suggests that the material deformation at these conditions falls into the phonon drag regime, whereas for Ta, the deformation resides mainly in the thermal activation regime. Recent Fe-RT experiments suggest perturbation growth about the alpha-epsilon (bcc-hcp) phase transition threshold has been observed. Using the LLNL multiscale models, we decompose the strength as a function of strain rate into its dominant components of thermal activation, phonon drag, and work hardening. We have also developed a dynamic diffraction diagnostic technique to measure strength directly from shock compressed single crystal samples. Finally, recovery experiments allow a comparison of residual dislocation density with predictions from the multiscale model. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by LLNL Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. High Strain Rate Compression Testing of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenthal, W. R. (William R.)

    2005-01-01

    The compressive deformation and failure behavior of ceramics and ceramic-metal composites for armor applications has been studied as a function of strain rate at Los Alamos National Laboratory since the late 1980s. High strain rate ({approx}10{sup 3} s{sup -1}) uniaxial compression loading can be achieved using the Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique, but special methods must be used to obtain valid strength results. This paper reviews these methods and the limitations of the Kolsky-SHPB technique for this class of materials. The Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky-SHPB) technique was originally developed to characterize the mechanical behavior of ductile materials such as metals and polymers where the results can be used to develop strain-rate and temperature-dependent constitutive behavior models that empirically describe macroscopic plastic flow. The flow behavior of metals and polymers is generally controlled by thermally-activated and rate-dependent dislocation motion or polymer chain motion in response to shear stresses. Conversely, the macroscopic mechanical behavior of dense, brittle, ceramic-based materials is dominated by elastic deformation terminated by rapid failure associated with the propagation of defects in the material in response to resolved tensile stresses. This behavior is usually characterized by a distribution of macroscopically measured failure strengths and strains. The basis for any strain-rate dependence observed in the failure strength must originate from rate-dependence in the damage and fracture process, since uniform, uniaxial elastic behavior is rate-independent (e.g. inertial effects on crack growth). The study of microscopic damage and fracture processes and their rate-dependence under dynamic loading conditions is a difficult experimental challenge that is not addressed in this paper. The purpose of this paper is to review the methods that have been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to

  3. Measurement of fracture properties of concrete at high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-De-Pedraza, V.; Cendón, D. A.; Sánchez-Gálvez, V.; Gálvez, F.

    2017-01-01

    An analysis of the spalling technique of concrete bars using the modified Hopkinson bar was carried out. A new experimental configuration is proposed adding some variations to previous works. An increased length for concrete specimens was chosen and finite-element analysis was used for designing a conic projectile to obtain a suitable triangular impulse wave. The aim of this initial work is to establish an experimental framework which allows a simple and direct analysis of concrete subjected to high strain rates. The efforts and configuration of these primary tests, as well as the selected geometry and dimensions for the different elements, have been focused to achieve a simple way of identifying the fracture position and so the tensile strength of tested specimens. This dynamic tensile strength can be easily compared with previous values published in literature giving an idea of the accuracy of the method and technique proposed and the possibility to extend it in a near future to obtain other mechanical properties such as the fracture energy. The tests were instrumented with strain gauges, accelerometers and high-speed camera in order to validate the results by different ways. Results of the dynamic tensile strength of the tested concrete are presented. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  4. Measurement of fracture properties of concrete at high strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-De-Pedraza, V; Cendón, D A; Sánchez-Gálvez, V; Gálvez, F

    2017-01-28

    An analysis of the spalling technique of concrete bars using the modified Hopkinson bar was carried out. A new experimental configuration is proposed adding some variations to previous works. An increased length for concrete specimens was chosen and finite-element analysis was used for designing a conic projectile to obtain a suitable triangular impulse wave. The aim of this initial work is to establish an experimental framework which allows a simple and direct analysis of concrete subjected to high strain rates. The efforts and configuration of these primary tests, as well as the selected geometry and dimensions for the different elements, have been focused to achieve a simple way of identifying the fracture position and so the tensile strength of tested specimens. This dynamic tensile strength can be easily compared with previous values published in literature giving an idea of the accuracy of the method and technique proposed and the possibility to extend it in a near future to obtain other mechanical properties such as the fracture energy. The tests were instrumented with strain gauges, accelerometers and high-speed camera in order to validate the results by different ways. Results of the dynamic tensile strength of the tested concrete are presented.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  5. Twin Interactions in Pure Ti Under High Strain Rate Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Xiao, Dawu; Jiang, Chunli; Sang, Ge; Zou, Dongli

    2017-01-01

    Twin interactions associated with {11 overline{2} 1} (E2) twins in titanium deformed by high strain rate ( 2600 s-1) compression were studied using electron backscatter diffraction technique. Three types of twins, {10 overline{1} 2} (E1), {11 overline{2} 2} (C1), and {11 overline{2} 4} (C3), were observed to interact with the preformed E2 twins in four parent grains. The E1 variants nucleated at twin boundaries of some E2 variants. And the C3 twins were originated from the intersection of C1 and E2. The selection of twin variant was investigated by the Schmid factors (SFs) and the twinning shear displacement gradient tensors (DGTs) calculations. The results show that twin variants that did not follow the Schmid law were more frequently observed under high strain rate deformation than quasi-static deformation. Among these low-SF active variants, 73 pct (8 out of 11) can be interpreted by DGT. Besides, 26 variants that have SF values close to or higher than their active counterparts were absent. Factors that may affect the twin variant selections were discussed.

  6. Tensile Properties of TWIP Steel at High Strain Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Rong-gang; FU Ren-yu; SU Yu; LI Qian; WEI Xi-cheng; LI Lin

    2009-01-01

    Tensile tests of TWIP steels of two compositions are performed in the strain rate range of 10-5 -103 s-1.Results indicate that steel 1# does not exhibit TWIP effect but deformation-induced martensitic transformation appears only.There exists TWIP effect in steel 3#.Tensile properties at room temperature are sensitive to strain rate in the studied strain rate ranges.Analysis on the relationship between strain-hardening exponent and strain rates shows that strain-induced martensitic transformation and formation of twins during deformation have significant influence on their strain-hardening behavior.

  7. On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg (University of Texas-Austin)

    2010-02-01

    In this report, we examine the propagation of tensile waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis. Attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional dispersive and shock waves in strips of latex and nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain-rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in the rubber strips. Analysis of the response through the theory of finite waves and quantitative matching between the experimental observations and analytical predictions was used to determine an appropriate instantaneous elastic response for the rubbers. This analysis also yields the tensile shock adiabat for rubber. Dispersive waves as well as shock waves are also observed in free-retraction experiments; these are used to quantify hysteretic effects in rubber.

  8. The high strain-rate behaviour of selected tissue analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby-Thomas, G J; Hazell, P J; Sheldon, R P; Stennett, C; Hameed, A; Wilgeroth, J M

    2014-05-01

    The high strain-rate response of four readily available tissue simulants has been investigated via plate-impact experiments. Comparison of the shock response of gelatin, ballistic soap (both sub-dermal tissue simulants), lard (adipose layers) and Sylgard(®) (a potential brain simulant) allowed interrogation of the applicability of such monolithic tissue surrogates in the ballistic regime. The gelatin and lard exhibited classic linear Hugoniot equations-of-state in the US-uP plane; while for the ballistic soap and Sylgard(®) a polymer-like non-linear response was observed. In the P/σX-v/v0 plane there was evidence of separation of the simulant materials into distinct groups, suggesting that a single tissue simulant is inadequate to ensure a high-fidelity description of the high strain-rate response of complex mammalian tissue. Gelatin appeared to behave broadly hydrodynamically, while soap, lard and Sylgard(®) were observed to strengthen in a material-dependent manner under specific loading conditions at elevated shock loading pressures/stresses. This strengthening behaviour was tentatively attributed to a further polymeric-like response in the form of a re-arrangement of the molecular chains under loading (a steric effect). In addition, investigation of lateral stress data from the literature showed evidence of operation of a material-independent strengthening mechanism when these materials were stressed above 2.5-3.0GPa, tentatively linked to the generically polymeric-like underlying microstructure of the simulants under consideration.

  9. High strain rate superplastic aluminium alloys: the way forward?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, R.; Dashwood, R.J.; Flower, H.M. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials

    2001-07-01

    The technical and commercial barriers to the development and successful exploitation of a high strain rate superplastically deformable aluminium alloy for use in the automotive industry are considered in this paper. Batch processing routes, such as mechanical alloying or equal channel angular extrusion, employed to deliver appropriate chemistry and structure, are inherently costly and unlikely to deliver either the quantity or the size of strip required commercially. There is evidence that there is still scope for development of conventional casting and rolling routes, but a particulate casting route combined with roll consolidation offers the prospect of a commercially viable Al-Mg-Zr product. The use of alloying additions, including zirconium, is also discussed and comparative costs are presented: on this basis the use of scandium appears economically prohibitive. (orig.)

  10. Single chain stochastic polymer modeling at high strain rates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harstad, E. N. (Eric N.); Harlow, Francis Harvey,; Schreyer, H. L.

    2001-01-01

    Our goal is to develop constitutive relations for the behavior of a solid polymer during high-strain-rate deformations. In contrast to the classic thermodynamic techniques for deriving stress-strain response in static (equilibrium) circumstances, we employ a statistical-mechanics approach, in which we evolve a probability distribution function (PDF) for the velocity fluctuations of the repeating units of the chain. We use a Langevin description for the dynamics of a single repeating unit and a Lioville equation to describe the variations of the PDF. Moments of the PDF give the conservation equations for a single polymer chain embedded in other similar chains. To extract single-chain analytical constitutive relations these equations have been solved for representative loading paths. By this process we discover that a measure of nonuniform chain link displacement serves this purpose very well. We then derive an evolution equation for the descriptor function, with the result being a history-dependent constitutive relation.

  11. Determination of Tensile Properties of Polymers at High Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the field of high rate testing of polymers the measured properties are highly dependent on the applied methodology. Hence, the test setup as whole but in particular also the geometrical type of specimen plays a decisive role. The widely used standard for the determination of tensile properties of polymers (ISO527-2 was extended by a novel standard (ISO18872:2007, which is targeted on the determination of tensile properties at high strain rates. In this standard also a novel specimen shape is proposed. Hand in hand with the introduction of new specimen geometry the question of comparability arises. To point out the differences in stress-strain response of the ISO18872 specimen and the ISO527-2 multipurpose specimen tensile tests over a wide loading rate range were conducted in this paper. A digital image correlation system in combination with a high speed camera was used to characterize the local material behaviour. Different parameters like nominal stress, true stress, nominal strain, true strain as well as volumetric strain were determined and used to compare the two specimen geometries.

  12. Highly compressible fluorescent particles for pressure sensing in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, F.; Peterson, S. D.; Porfiri, M.

    2017-05-01

    Pressure sensing in liquids is important for engineering applications ranging from industrial processing to naval architecture. Here, we propose a pressure sensor based on highly compressible polydimethylsiloxane foam particles embedding fluorescent Nile Red molecules. The particles display pressure sensitivities as low as 0.0018 kPa-1, which are on the same order of magnitude of sensitivities reported in commercial pressure-sensitive paints for air flows. We envision the application of the proposed sensor in particle image velocimetry toward an improved understanding of flow kinetics in liquids.

  13. High Strain Rate Testing of Welded DOP-26 Iridium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneibel, J. H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, R. G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carmichael, C. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fox, E. E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The iridium alloy DOP-26 is used to produce Clad Vent Set cups that protect the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) which provide electric power for spacecraft and rovers. In a previous study, the tensile properties of DOP-26 were measured over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures and reported in ORNL/TM-2007/81. While that study established the properties of the base material, the fabrication of the heat sources requires welding, and the mechanical properties of welded DOP-26 have not been extensively characterized in the past. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the mechanical properties of DOP-26 specimens containing a transverse weld in the center of their gage sections. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 750, 900, and 1090°C and engineering strain rates of 1×10-3 and 10 s-1. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1×10-4 Torr. The welded specimens had a significantly higher yield stress, by up to a factor of ~2, than the non-welded base material. The yield stress did not depend on the strain rate except at 1090°C, where it was slightly higher for the faster strain rate. The ultimate tensile stress, on the other hand, was significantly higher for the faster strain rate at temperatures of 750°C and above. At 750°C and above, the specimens deformed at 1×10-3 s-1 showed pronounced necking resulting sometimes in perfect chisel-edge fracture. The specimens deformed at 10 s-1 exhibited this fracture behavior only at the highest test temperature, 1090°C. Fracture occurred usually in the fusion zone of the weld and was, in most cases, primarily intergranular.

  14. High Strain-Rate Testing of Mechanical Couplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    tensile strength equal to or greater than that of the control bar but did not achieve the ductility of the control bar. Specimen UHC 9 failed close to...than the Grade 60 bar, but only slightly so at the rapid rate. Upset head system The upset head coupler ( UHC ) system performed very well under the...average performance of the UHC system under the intermediate strain-rate loading condition produced 99% of the dynamic ultimate strength, 61% of the

  15. The strain-rate sensitivity of high-strength high-toughness steels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilmore, M.F. (AFRL/MNMW, Eglin AFB, FL); Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the strain-rate sensitivity of four high strength, high-toughness alloys at strain rates ranging from 0.0002 s-1 to 200 s-1: Aermet 100, a modified 4340, modified HP9-4-20, and a recently developed Eglin AFB steel alloy, ES-1c. A refined dynamic servohydraulic method was used to perform tensile tests over this entire range. Each of these alloys exhibit only modest strain-rate sensitivity. Specifically, the strain-rate sensitivity exponent m, is found to be in the range of 0.004-0.007 depending on the alloy. This corresponds to a {approx}10% increase in the yield strength over the 7-orders of magnitude change in strain-rate. Interestingly, while three of the alloys showed a concominant {approx}3-10% drop in their ductility with increasing strain-rate, the ES1-c alloy actually exhibited a 25% increase in ductility with increasing strain-rate. Fractography suggests the possibility that at higher strain-rates ES-1c evolves towards a more ductile dimple fracture mode associated with microvoid coalescence.

  16. The Turbulent Dynamo in Highly Compressible Supersonic Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R G

    2014-01-01

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly-compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early Universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024^3 cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = nu/eta = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm >= 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm_crit = 129 (+43, -31), showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present a...

  17. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Environment Simulation Dept.; Nelson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials Dept.; Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Dept.; Bignell, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural and Thermal Analysis Dept.; Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program; George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  18. Effect of strain rate and temperature at high strains on fatigue behavior of SAP alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blucher, J.T.; Knudsen, Per; Grant, N.J.

    1968-01-01

    Fatigue behavior of three SAP alloys of two nominal compositions (7 and 13% Al2O3) was studied in terms of strain rate and temperature at high strains; strain rate had no effect on life at 80 F, but had increasingly greater effect with increasing temperature above 500 F; life decreased with decre......Fatigue behavior of three SAP alloys of two nominal compositions (7 and 13% Al2O3) was studied in terms of strain rate and temperature at high strains; strain rate had no effect on life at 80 F, but had increasingly greater effect with increasing temperature above 500 F; life decreased...

  19. Suppression of dislocations at high strain rate deformation in a twinning-induced plasticity steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Z.Y. [Shenzhen Institute of Research and Innovation, The University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Huang, W., E-mail: whuang@szu.edu.cn [Department of Civil Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen (China); Huang, M.X., E-mail: mxhuang@hku.hk [Shenzhen Institute of Research and Innovation, The University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-03-25

    The increase of strain rate generally enhances dislocation evolution in face-centred cubic (FCC) metals. However, by synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments, the present work demonstrates for the first time that a higher strain rate leads to a lower dislocation density in a twinning-induced plasticity steel with an FCC structure. This unexpected suppression of dislocation evolution has been attributed to the temperature increase due to dissipative heating at high strain rate deformation.

  20. Combined grain size, strain rate and loading condition effects on mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline Cu under high strain rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu-Ming Shen

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanocrystalline Cu with average grain sizes of 3.1 nm,6.2 nm,12.4 nm and 18.6 nm under uniaxial strain and stress tension at strain rates of 108 s-1,109 s-1 and 1010 s-1 are performed to study the combined grain size,strain rate and loading condition effects on mechanical properties. It is found that the strength of nanocrystalline Cu increases as grain size increases regardless of loading condition.Both the strength and ductility of nanocrystalline Cu increase with strain rate except that there is no monotonic relation between the strength and strain rate for specimens under uniaxial strain loading.Moreover,the strength and ductility of specimens under uniaxial strain loading are lower than those under uniaxial stress loading.The nucleation of voids at grain boundaries and their subsequent growth characterize the failure of specimens under uniaxial strain loading,while grain boundary sliding and necking dominate the failure of specimens under uniaxial stress loading.The rate dependent strength is mainly caused by the dynamic wave effect that limits dislocation motion,while combined twinning and slipping mechanism makes the material more ductile at higher strain rates.

  1. THE TURBULENT DYNAMO IN HIGHLY COMPRESSIBLE SUPERSONIC PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federrath, Christoph [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Schober, Jennifer [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R. G., E-mail: christoph.federrath@anu.edu.au [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024{sup 3} cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = ν/η = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm ≥ 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm{sub crit}=129{sub −31}{sup +43}, showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present and early universe, we conclude that magnetic fields need to be taken into account during structure formation from the early to the present cosmic ages, because they suppress gas fragmentation and drive powerful jets and outflows, both greatly affecting the initial mass function of stars.

  2. High Strain Rate Characterization of Shock Absorbing Materials for Landmine Protection Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer McArthur

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modelling of footwear to protect against anti-personnel landmines requires dynamic material properties in the appropriate strain rate regime to accurately simulate material response. Several materials (foamed metals, honeycombs and polymers are used in existing protective boots, however published data at high strain rates is limited.

  3. Effect of strain rate and temperature at high strains on fatigue behavior of SAP alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blucher, J.T.; Knudsen, Per; Grant, N.J.

    1968-01-01

    Fatigue behavior of three SAP alloys of two nominal compositions (7 and 13% Al2O3) was studied in terms of strain rate and temperature at high strains; strain rate had no effect on life at 80 F, but had increasingly greater effect with increasing temperature above 500 F; life decreased...

  4. Statistical Tensile Strength for High Strain Rate of Aramid and UHMWPE Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Bin; XIONG Tao; XIONG Jie

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic tensile impact properties of aramid (Technora(R)) and UHMWPE (DC851) fiber bundles were studied at two high strain rates by means of reflecting type Split Hopkinson Bar, and stress-strain curves of fiber yarns at different strain rates were obtained. Experimental results show that the initial elastic modulus, failure strength and unstable strain of aramid fiber yarns are strain rate insensitive, whereas the initial elastic modulus and unstable strain of UHMWPE fiber yarns are strain rate sensitive. A fiber-bundle statistical constitutive equation was used to describe the tensile behavior of aramid and UHMWPE fiber bundles at high strain rates. The good consistency between the simulated results and experimental data indicates that the modified double Weibull function can represent the tensile strength distribution of aramid and UHMWPE fibers and the method of extracting Weibull parameters from fiber bundles stress-strain data is valid.

  5. Highly compressed nanosolution restricted in cylindrical carbon nanospaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Masayasu; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Tsurusaki, Kazuma; Itadani, Atsushi; Ahmmad, Bashir; Urita, Koki; Moriguchi, Isamu; Kittaka, Shigeharu; Kuroda, Yasushige

    2013-02-01

    We shed light on the specific hydration structure around a zinc ion of nanosolution restricted in a cylindrical micropore of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) by comparison with the structure restricted in a cylindrical mesopore of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) and that of bulk aqueous solution. The average micropore width of open-pore SWNT was 0.87 nm which is equivalent to the size of a hydrated zinc ion having 6-hydrated water molecules. We could impregnate the zinc ions into the micropore of SWNT with negligible amounts of ion-exchanged species on surface functional groups by the appropriate oxidation followed by heat treatment under an inert condition. The results of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra confirmed that the proportion of dissolved species in nanospaces against the total adsorbed amounts of zinc ions on the open-pore SWNT and MWNT were 44 and 61%, respectively, indicating the formation of a dehydrated structure in narrower nanospaces. The structure parameters obtained by the analysis of XAFS spectra also indicate that the dehydrated and highly compressed hydration structure can be stably formed inside the cylindrical micropore of SWNT where the structure is different from that inside the slit-shaped micropore whose pore width is less than 1 nm. Such a unique structure needs not only a narrow micropore geometry which is equivalent to the size of a hydrated ion but also the cylindrical nature of the pore.We shed light on the specific hydration structure around a zinc ion of nanosolution restricted in a cylindrical micropore of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) by comparison with the structure restricted in a cylindrical mesopore of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) and that of bulk aqueous solution. The average micropore width of open-pore SWNT was 0.87 nm which is equivalent to the size of a hydrated zinc ion having 6-hydrated water molecules. We could impregnate the zinc ions into the micropore of SWNT with negligible amounts of

  6. Dynamic tensile behaviour and deformational mechanism of C5191 phosphor bronze under high strain rates deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Dao-chun [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Taizhou Vocational & Technical College, Taizhou 318000 (China); Chen, Ming-he, E-mail: meemhchen@nuaa.edu.cn [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Lei; Cheng, Hu [College of Mechanical Engineering, Taizhou University, Taizhou 318000 (China)

    2016-01-01

    High speed stamping process is used to high strength and high electrical conductivity phosphor bronze with extremely high strain rates more than 10{sup 3} s{sup −1}. This study on the dynamic tensile behaviour and deformational mechanism is to optimise the high speed stamping processes and improve geometrical precision in finished products. Thus, the tensile properties and deformation behaviour of C5191 phosphor bronze under quasi-static tensile condition at a strain rate of 0.001 s{sup −1} by electronic universal testing machine, and dynamic tensile condition at strain rate of 500, 1000 and 1500 s{sup −1} by split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) apparatus were studied. The effects of strain rate and the deformation mechanism were investigated by means of SEM and TEM. The results showed that the yield strength and tensile strength of C5191 phosphor bronze under high strain rates deformation increased by 32.77% and 11.07% respectively compared with quasi-static condition, the strain hardening index increases from 0.075 to 0.251, and the strength of the material strain rates sensitivity index change from 0.005 to 0.022, which presented a clear sensitive to strain rates. Therefore, it is claimed that the dominant deformation mechanism was changed by the dislocation motion under different strain rates, and the ability of plastic deformation of C5191 phosphor bronze increased due to the number of movable dislocations increased significantly, started multi-line slip, and the soft effect of adiabatic temperature rise at the strain rate ranging from 500 to 1500 s{sup −1}.

  7. HIGH STRAIN RATE BEHAVIOUR OF AN AZ31 + 0.5 Ca MAGNESIUM ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Pešička

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports behaviour of magnesium alloy AZ31 (nominal composition 3 % Al - 1 % Zn – balance Mg with an addition of 0.5 wt. % Ca at high strain rates. Samples were prepared by the squeeze cast technology. Dynamic compression Hopkinson tests were performed at room temperature with impact velocities ranging from 11.2 to 21.9 m.s-1. A rapid increase of the flow stress and the strain rate sensitivity was observed at high strain rates. Transmission electron microscopy showed extremely high dislocation density and mechanical twins of two types. Adiabatic shear banding is discussed as the reason for the observed behaviour at high strain rates.

  8. Prediction of flow stress of 7017 aluminium alloy under high strain rate compression at elevated temperatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh; Ramakrishna, B; Madhu, V; Gogia, A.K

    2015-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) constitutive model and Johnson–Cook (J–C) model were developed for 7017 aluminium alloy based on high strain rate data generated from split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB...

  9. STIR: Tailored Interfaces for High Strength Composites Across Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-02

    was requested during our kickoff meeting at ARL APG. High performance fabrics including Kevlar, Twaron, Zylon , and Dyneema are used in developing...Kevlar, and Zylon for various pullout rates. Force– displacement data was recorded, and both warp and fill yarns were pulled from the fabric. Their...results presented that the effect of pullout rate is negligible for Kevlar, whereas the effect is bigger on Spectra, and significant for Zylon

  10. High Strain Rate Experiments of Energetic Material Binder

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel Mendoza, Roberto; Harr, Michael; Chen, Weinong

    2016-01-01

    Energetic materials, in particular HMX, is widely used in many applications as polymer bonded explosives (PBX) and rocket propellant. However, when damaged, HMX is known to be an unstable substance which renders it a hazardous material and in some cases unreliable. Finding critical mechanical conditions at high rates that render various forms of energetic materials as unreliable would be vital to understand the effects that vibrations and compression forces have on energetic materials. A bett...

  11. TRP 9904 - Constitutive Behavior of High Strength Multiphase Sheel Steel Under High Strain Rate Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Matlock; John Speer

    2005-03-31

    The focus of the research project was to systematically assess the strain rate dependence of strengthening mechanisms in new advanced high strength sheet steels. Data were obtained on specially designed and produced Duel Phase and TRIP steels and compared to the properties of automotive steels currently in use.

  12. High-Strain Rate Testing of Gun Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    formulations under high loading rates have been studied previously (see Fong (1985); et al. (1981); Schubert and Schmitt (1973); Greidanus (1976...the transmission of a wave was described by Davies and Hunter (1963) and by Hoge (1970). Impedance is defined as Z = A(pE)h, where A is the area, p is...A = ma, a2u ac a 2U m = p A dx, a = . Assembling these, - p -= at 2 ax at 2 For isotropic elastic materials, a = Ee, where e = au/ax. The partial

  13. Experimentation and Modeling of the Tension Behavior of Polycarbonate at High Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjie Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of the mechanical behavior of polycarbonate (PC under high-rate loadings is essential for better design of PC products. In this work, the mechanical behavior of PC is studied during tensile loading at high strain rates, using a split Hopkinson tension bar (SHTB. A modified experimental technique based on the SHTB is proposed to perform the tension testing on PC at rates exceeding 1000 s−1. The effect of strain rates on the tension stress–strain law of PC is investigated over a wide range of strain rates (0.0005–4500 s−1. Based on the experiments, a physically based constitutive model is developed to describe the strain rate dependent tensile stress–strain law. The high rate tensile deformation mechanics of PC are further studied via finite element simulations using the LSDYNA code together with the developed constitutive model.

  14. Mechanical model for yield strength of nanocrystalline materials under high strain rate loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱荣涛; 周剑秋; 马璐; 张振忠

    2008-01-01

    To understand the high strain rate deformation mechanism and determine the grain size,strain rate and porosity dependent yield strength of nanocrystalline materials,a new mechanical model based on the deformation mechanism of nanocrystalline materials under high strain rate loading was developed.As a first step of the research,the yield behavior of the nanocrystalline materials under high strain rate loading was mainly concerned in the model and uniform deformation was assumed for simplification.Nanocrystalline materials were treated as composites consisting of grain interior phase and grain boundary phase,and grain interior and grain boundary deformation mechanisms under high strain rate loading were analyzed,then Voigt model was applied to coupling grain boundary constitutive relation with mechanical model for grain interior phase to describe the overall yield mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline materials.The predictions by the developed model on the yield strength of nanocrysatlline materials at high strain rates show good agreements with various experimental data.Further discussion was presented for calculation results and relative experimental observations.

  15. Method for obtaining simple shear material properties of the intervertebral disc under high strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Kyle A; Armiger, Robert S; Wickwire, Alexis C; Carneal, Catherine M; Trexler, Morgana M; Lennon, Andrew M; Zhang, Jiangyue; Merkle, Andrew C

    2012-01-01

    Predicting spinal injury under high rates of vertical loading is of interest, but the success of computational models in modeling this type of loading scenario is highly dependent on the material models employed. Understanding the response of these biological materials at high strain rates is critical to accurately model mechanical response of tissue and predict injury. While data exists at lower strain rates, there is a lack of the high strain rate material data that are needed to develop constitutive models. The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) has been used for many years to obtain properties of various materials at high strain rates. However, this apparatus has mainly been used for characterizing metals and ceramics and is difficult to apply to softer materials such as biological tissue. Recently, studies have shown that modifications to the traditional SHPB setup allow for the successful characterization of mechanical properties of biological materials at strain rates and peak strain values that exceed alternate soft tissue testing techniques. In this paper, the previously-reported modified SHPB technique is applied to characterize human intervertebral disc material under simple shear. The strain rates achieved range from 5 to 250 strain s-1. The results demonstrate the sensitivity to the disc composition and structure, with the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus exhibiting different behavior under shear loading. Shear tangent moduli are approximated at varying strain levels from 5 to 20% strain. This data and technique facilitates determination of mechanical properties of intervertebral disc materials under shear loading, for eventual use in constitutive models.

  16. Prediction of flow stress of 7017 aluminium alloy under high strain rate compression at elevated temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravindranadh BOBBILI; B. RAMAKRISHNA; V. MADHU; A.K. GOGIA

    2015-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) constitutive model and JohnsoneCook (JeC) model were developed for 7017 aluminium alloy based on high strain rate data generated from split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments at various temperatures. A neural network configuration consists of both training and validation, which is effectively employed to predict flow stress. Temperature, strain rate and strain are considered as inputs, whereas flow stress is taken as output of the neural network. A comparative study on JohnsoneCook (JeC) model and neural network model was performed. It was observed that the developed neural network model could predict flow stress under various strain rates and tem-peratures. The experimental stressestrain data obtained from high strain rate compression tests using SHPB over a range of temperatures (25?e300 ?C), strains (0.05e0.3) and strain rates (1500e4500 s?1) were employed to formulate JeC model to predict the flow stress behaviour of 7017 aluminium alloy under high strain rate loading. The JeC model and the back-propagation ANN model were developed to predict the flow stress of 7017 aluminium alloy under high strain rates, and their predictability was evaluated in terms of correlation coefficient (R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). R and AARE for the J-C model are found to be 0.8461 and 10.624%, respectively, while R and AARE for the ANN model are 0.9995 and 2.58%, respectively. The predictions of ANN model are observed to be in consistent with the experimental data for all strain rates and temperatures.

  17. High Strain Rate Compression of Martensitic NiTi Shape Memory Alloy at Different Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ying; Young, Marcus L.; Nie, Xu

    2017-02-01

    The compressive response of martensitic NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) rods has been investigated using a modified Kolsky compression bar at various strain rates (400, 800, and 1200 s-1) and temperatures [room temperature and 373 K (100 °C)], i.e., in the martensitic state and in the austenitic state. SEM, DSC, and XRD were performed on NiTi SMA rod samples after high strain rate compression in order to reveal the influence of strain rate and temperature on the microstructural evolution, phase transformation, and crystal structure. It is found that at room temperature, the critical stress increases slightly as strain rate increases, whereas the strain-hardening rate decreases. However, the critical stress under high strain rate compression at 373 K (100 °C) increase first and then decrease due to competing strain hardening and thermal softening effects. After high rate compression, the microstructure of both martensitic and austenitic NiTi SMAs changes as a function of increasing strain rate, while the phase transformation after deformation is independent of the strain rate at room temperature and 373 K (100 °C). The preferred crystal plane of the martensitic NiTi SMA changes from ( 1bar{1}1 )M before compression to (111)M after compression, while the preferred plane remains the same for austenitic NiTi SMA before and after compression. Additionally, dynamic recovery and recrystallization are also observed to occur after deformation of the austenitic NiTi SMA at 373 K (100 °C). The findings presented here extend the basic understanding of the deformation behavior of NiTi SMAs and its relation to microstructure, phase transformation, and crystal structure, especially at high strain rates.

  18. Constitutive equations of basalt filament tows under quasi-static and high strain rate tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Lvtao; Sun Baozhong [College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Hu, Hong [Institute of Textiles and Clothing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom Kowloon (Hong Kong); Gu Bohong, E-mail: gubh@dhu.edu.cn [College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Department of Textile Engineering, Zhongyuan Institute of Technology, Zhengzhou, Henan Province 450007 (China)

    2010-05-25

    The tensile properties of basalt filament tows were tested at quasi-static (0.001 s{sup -1}) and high strain rates (up to 3000 s{sup -1}) with MTS materials tester (MTS 810.23) and split Hopkinson tension bar (SHTB), respectively. Experimental results showed that the mechanical properties of the basalt filament tows were rather sensitive to strain rate. Specifically, the stiffness and failure stress of the basalt filament tows increased distinctly as the strain rate increased, while the failure strain decreased. From scanning electronic microscope (SEM) photographs of the fracture surface, it is indicated that the basalt filament tows failed in a more brittle mode and the fracture surface got more regular as the strain rate increases. The strength distributions of the basalt filament tows have been evaluated by a single Weibull distribution function. The curve predicted from the single Weibull distribution function was in good agreement with the experimental data points.

  19. Highly Compressed Ion Beams for High Energy Density Science

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Alex; Briggs, Richard J; Callahan, Debra; Caporaso, George; Celata, C M; Davidson, Ronald C; Faltens, Andy; Grant-Logan, B; Grisham, Larry; Grote, D P; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Lee, Edward; Lee, Richard; Leitner, Matthaeus; Nelson, Scott D; Olson, Craig; Penn, Gregory; Reginato, Lou; Renk, Tim; Rose, David; Sessler, Andrew M; Staples, John W; Tabak, Max; Thoma, Carsten H; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Wurtele, Jonathan; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL) is developing the intense ion beams needed to drive matter to the High Energy Density (HED) regimes required for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and other applications. An interim goal is a facility for Warm Dense Matter (WDM) studies, wherein a target is heated volumetrically without being shocked, so that well-defined states of matter at 1 to 10 eV are generated within a diagnosable region. In the approach we are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto thin target "foils," which may in fact be foams or "steel wool" with mean densities 1% to 100% of solid. This approach complements that being pursued at GSI, wherein high-energy ion beams deposit a small fraction of their energy in a cylindrical target. We present the requirements for warm dense matter experiments, and describe suitable accelerator concepts, including novel broadband traveling wave pulse-line, drift-tube linac, RF, and single-gap approa...

  20. High strain rate tensile behavior of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh, E-mail: ravindranadh@dmrl.drdo.in; Paman, Ashish; Madhu, V.

    2016-01-10

    The purpose of the current study is to perform quasi static and high strain rate tensile tests on Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy under different strain rates ranging from 0.01–3500/s and also at temperatures of 25,100, 200 and 300 °C. The combined effect of strain rate, temperature and stress triaxiality on the material behavior is studied by testing both smooth and notched specimens. Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive and fracture models are established based on high strain rate tensile data obtained from Split hopkinson tension bar (SHTB) and quasi-static tests. By modifying the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms in the Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive model, a new J–C constitutive model of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy was obtained. The improved Johnson–Cook constitutive model matched the experiment results very well. With the Johnson–Cook constitutive and fracture models, numerical simulations of tensile tests at different conditions for Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy were conducted. Numerical simulations are performed using a non-linear explicit finite element code autodyn. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical simulation results and the experiment results. The fracture surfaces of specimens tested under various strain rates and temperatures were studied under scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  1. Response of Polypmeric Foams and ABS Plastics to High Strain Rate Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Richard; Chang, Peter; Fourney, William

    1999-06-01

    The split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique was utilized to obtain high strain rate response data for low-density foams and solid ABS and polypropylene plastics. General Motors provided the materials for this study. These materials are used in the interior panels of automobiles. Because the foams have a very low impedance, polycarbonate bars were used to acquire the strain rate data in the 100 to 1600 per second range. An aluminum SHPB was used to obtain the solid plastics data that covered strain rates of 1000 to 4000 pre second. The experimental data indicate that the foams over the test range are only slightly strain rate dependent while the polypropylene appears to be strain rate independent above 1000 per second and the ABS plastics are strain rate independent above 3000 per second. The projectile length was varied to provide a wide range of induced strains ranging from 10 to 70 per cent for the foams and up to 20 per cent for the plastic materials.

  2. Mechanical Behavior of MTMoCr under High Temperature and High Strain-rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwei Dong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available MTMoCr is a kind of Mo-Cr alloy cast iron often used to make automobile panel dies. To study high-speed machining process of automobile panel dies, the material’s elastic modulus and rupture critical values of MTMoCr at 20℃-800℃ were studied based on the high temperature elongation test. The material’s stress-strain diagram at various temperatures set-points (20℃-500℃ and various strain-rates (500/s-5000/s were studied and the dynamic tensile yield strength values were obtained by dynamic SHPB (Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar high-speed compression test. The experimental results indicate that MTMoCr has heat resistance and its behavior is between toughness and brittleness materials. Its toughness is enhanced with temperature increasing. The strain-rate strengthening effect prevails over temperature softening effect.

  3. Effects of Adiabatic Heating on the High Strain Rate Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorini, Chris; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2017-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are increasingly being used in aerospace structures that are expected to experience complex dynamic loading conditions throughout their lifetime. As such, a detailed understanding of the high strain rate behavior of the constituents, particularly the strain rate, temperature, and pressure dependent polymer matrix, is paramount. In this paper, preliminary efforts in modeling experimentally observed temperature rises due to plastic deformation in PMCs subjected to dynamic loading are presented. To this end, an existing isothermal viscoplastic polymer constitutive formulation is extended to model adiabatic conditions by incorporating temperature dependent elastic properties and modifying the components of the inelastic strain rate tensor to explicitly depend on temperature. It is demonstrated that the modified polymer constitutive model is capable of capturing strain rate and temperature dependent yield as well as thermal softening associated with the conversion of plastic work to heat at high rates of strain. The modified constitutive model is then embedded within a strength of materials based micromechanics framework to investigate the manifestation of matrix thermal softening, due to the conversion of plastic work to heat, on the high strain rate response of a T700Epon 862 (T700E862) unidirectional composite. Adiabatic model predictions for high strain rate composite longitudinal tensile, transverse tensile, and in-plane shear loading are presented. Results show a substantial deviation from isothermal conditions; significant thermal softening is observed for matrix dominated deformation modes (transverse tension and in-plane shear), highlighting the importance of accounting for the conversion of plastic work to heat in the polymer matrix in the high strain rate analysis of PMC structures.

  4. Strain Rate and Temperature Effects on the Formability and Damage of Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, S.; Thompson, A.; Salisbury, C.; Worswick, M.; van Riemsdijk, I.; Mayer, R.

    2008-06-01

    In order to understand the crashworthiness and formability of advance high-strength steels, the effects of strain rate and temperature on the constitutive response of DP 600 and DP 780 steel tubes were investigated and compared with commercial drawing quality (DQ) and high strength low alloy (HSLA) 350 steel tubes. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at quasi-static (QS) (0.003 and 0.1 s-1), intermediate (30 and 100 s-1), and high (500, 1000, and 1500 s-1) strain rates using an Instron, instrumented falling weight impact tester and tensile split Hopkinson bar (TSHB) apparatus, respectively. Elevated temperature tests at 150 °C and 300 °C were also conducted at high strain rates. Following testing, metallography and microscopy techniques were used for material and damage characterization. The results obtained show that the steels studied exhibit a positive strain rate sensitivity. Compared to DQ and HSLA 350, the DP steels were found to have less formability at QS rates but enhanced formability at higher strain rates. A decrease in strength and ductility was measured with increasing temperature for the DP steels, indicating a reduction in energy adsorption due to adiabatic heating during a crash event.

  5. Analytical Modeling of the High Strain Rate Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The results presented here are part of an ongoing research program to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. State variable constitutive equations originally developed for metals have been modified in order to model the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymeric matrix materials. To account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses, which are significant in polymers, the classical 5 plasticity theory definitions of effective stress and effective plastic strain are modified by applying variations of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion. To verify the revised formulation, the shear and tensile deformation of a representative toughened epoxy is analyzed across a wide range of strain rates (from quasi-static to high strain rates) and the results are compared to experimentally obtained values. For the analyzed polymers, both the tensile and shear stress-strain curves computed using the analytical model correlate well with values obtained through experimental tests. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented within a strength of materials based micromechanics method to predict the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. In the micromechanics, the unit cell is divided up into a number of independently analyzed slices, and laminate theory is then applied to obtain the effective deformation of the unit cell. The composite mechanics are verified by analyzing the deformation of a representative polymer matrix composite (composed using the representative polymer analyzed for the correlation of the polymer constitutive equations) for several fiber orientation angles across a variety of strain rates. The computed values compare favorably to experimentally obtained results.

  6. Characterization of a New Fully Recycled Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Subjected to High Strain Rate Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, H.; Tamboura, S.; Fitoussi, J.; BenDaly, H.; Tcharkhtchi, A.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is the complete physicochemical characterization and strain rate effect multi-scale analysis of a new fully recycled carbon fiber reinforced composites for automotive crash application. Two composites made of 20% wt short recycled carbon fibers (CF) are obtained by injection molding. The morphology and the degree of dispersion of CF in the matrixes were examined using a new ultrasonic method and SEM. High strain tensile behavior up to 100 s-1 is investigated. In order to avoid perturbation due to inertial effect and wave propagation, the specimen geometry was optimized. The elastic properties appear to be insensitive to the strain rate. However, a high strain rate effect on the local visco-plasticity of the matrix and fiber/matrix interface visco-damageable behavior is emphasized. The predominant damage mechanisms evolve from generalized matrix local ductility at low strain rate regime to fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers pull-out at high strain rate regime.

  7. High Strain-Rate Material Model Validation for Laser Peening Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Langer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Finite element modeling can be a powerful tool for predicting residual stresses induced by laser peening; however the sign and magnitude of the stress predictions depend strongly on how the material model captures the high strain rate response. Although a Johnson-Cook formulation is often employed, its suitability for modeling phenomena at very high strain rates has not been rigorously evaluated. In this paper, we address the effectiveness of the Johnson-Cook model, with parameters developed from lower strain rate material data (∼10^3 s^–1, to capture the higher strain rate response (∼10^5–10^6 s^–1 encountered during the laser peening process. Published Johnson-Cook parameters extracted from split Hopkinson bar testing were used to predict the shock response of aluminum samples during high-impact flyer plate tests. Additional quasi-static and split Hopkinson bar tests were also conducted to study the model response in the lower strain rate regime. The overall objective of the research was to ascertain whether a material model based on conventional test data (quasi-static compression testing and split Hopkinson bar measurements can credibly be used in FE simulations to predict laser peen-induced stresses.

  8. Influence of the temperature on the tension behaviour of EUROFER97 alloy at high strain rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadoni Ezio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation on the influence of the temperature on the reduced activation steel Eurofer97 under uniaxial tensile loads at high strain rate. Round undamaged specimens of this material having gauge length 5 mm, diameter 3 mm, were tested in universal machine to obtain its stress-strain relation under quasi-static condition (0.001s−1, and in modified Hopkinson bar to study its mechanical behaviour at high strain rates (300 s−1, 1000 s−1 respectively. The tests at high strain rate were carried out at 450 °C and at nitrogen temperature. Finally, the parameters of the Zerilli-Armstrong constitutive material relationship were obtained.

  9. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erzar, B., E-mail: benjamin.erzar@cea.fr; Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y. [CEA, DAM, GRAMAT, F-46500 Gramat (France)

    2013-12-28

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 10{sup 4} to 4 × 10{sup 4} s{sup −1}. The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading.

  10. A Model for High-Strain-Rate Deformation of Uranium-Niobium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.L.Addessio; Q.H.Zuo; T.A.Mason; L.C.Brinson

    2003-05-01

    A thermodynamic approach is used to develop a framework for modeling uranium-niobium alloys under the conditions of high strain rate. Using this framework, a three-dimensional phenomenological model, which includes nonlinear elasticity (equation of state), phase transformation, crystal reorientation, rate-dependent plasticity, and porosity growth is presented. An implicit numerical technique is used to solve the evolution equations for the material state. Comparisons are made between the model and data for low-strain-rate loading and unloading as well as for heating and cooling experiments. Comparisons of the model and data also are made for low- and high-strain-rate uniaxial stress and uniaxial strain experiments. A uranium-6 weight percent niobium alloy is used in the comparisons of model and experiment.

  11. Energy absorption at high strain rate of glass fiber reinforced mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenu Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of cement mortars reinforced with glass fibers was studied. The influence of the addition of glass fibers on energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate was investigated. Static tests in compression, in tension and in bending were first performed. Dynamic tests by means of a Modified Hopkinson Bar were then carried out in order to investigate how glass fibers affected energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate of the fiber reinforced mortar. The Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF was finally evaluated.

  12. MEASUREMENTS OF HIGH STRAIN RATE PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS USING AN EXPLODING WIRE TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, D; Stewardson, H.; Ahmad, S.

    1988-01-01

    An exploding wire method is used to produce high-pressure blast-wave loading of thick polymer cylinders. The measured outer-surface hoop-strain profiles, at strain rates of about 103 s-1, agree best with prediction for values of Young's modulus which are much higher than those measured under quasistatic conditions (strain rates of about 10-3 s-1). Low density polyethylene shows a six-fold increase in modulus, high density polyethylene more than 100%, nylon 66 about 75%, and nylatron a 25% inc...

  13. LS-DYNA Implementation of Polymer Matrix Composite Model Under High Strain Rate Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xia-Hua; Goldberg, Robert K.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2003-01-01

    A recently developed constitutive model is implemented into LS-DYNA as a user defined material model (UMAT) to characterize the nonlinear strain rate dependent behavior of polymers. By utilizing this model within a micromechanics technique based on a laminate analogy, an algorithm to analyze the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of a fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite is then developed as a UMAT to simulate the response of these composites under high strain rate impact. The models are designed for shell elements in order to ensure computational efficiency. Experimental and numerical stress-strain curves are compared for two representative polymers and a representative polymer matrix composite, with the analytical model predicting the experimental response reasonably well.

  14. Studies on Dynamic Damage Evolution for Pp/pa Polymer Blends Under High Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zi-Jian; Wang, Li-Li

    The dynamic damage evolution for PP/PA blends with different compatibilizers is studied in high strain rates from two different approaches, namely by determining the unloading elastic modulus of specimen experienced impact deformation and by combining the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experimental technique with the back-propagation (BP) neural network. The results obtained by both approaches consistently show that a threshold strain ɛth exists for dynamic damage evolution, and both the damage evolution and ɛth are dependent on strain and strain rate. For non-linear visco-elastic materials, the damage evolution determined by the unloading elastic modulus provides an underestimation of real damage evolution.

  15. Quasi-Static and High Strain Rate Compressive Response of Injection-Molded Cenosphere/HDPE Syntactic Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharath Kumar, B. R.; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Luong, Dung D.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-07-01

    High strain rate compressive properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) matrix syntactic foams containing cenosphere filler are investigated. Thermoplastic matrix syntactic foams have not been studied extensively for high strain rate deformation response despite interest in them for lightweight underwater vehicle structures and consumer products. Quasi-static compression tests are conducted at 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1 and 10-2 s-1 strain rates. Further, a split-Hopkinson pressure bar is utilized for characterizing syntactic foams for high strain rate compression. The compressive strength of syntactic foams is higher than that of HDPE resin at the same strain rate. Yield strength shows an increasing trend with strain rate. The average yield strength values at high strain rates are almost twice the values obtained at 10-4 s-1 for HDPE resin and syntactic foams. Theoretical models are used to estimate the effectiveness of cenospheres in reinforcing syntactic foams.

  16. Experimental Results of High Pressure and High Strain Rate Tantalum Flow Stress on Omega and NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Arsenlis, A.; Barton, N.; Benedetti, L.; Huntington, C.; McNaney, J.; Orlikowski, D.; Prisbrey, S.; Remington, B.; Rudd, R.; Swift, D.; Weber, S.; Wehrenberg, C.; Comley, A.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the high pressure, high strain rate plastic deformation dynamics of materials is an area of research of high interest to planetary formation dynamics, meteor impact dynamics, and inertial confinement fusion designs. Developing predictive theoretical and computational descriptions of such systems, however, has been a difficult undertaking. We have performed many experiments on Omega, LCLS and NIF to test Ta strength models at high pressures (~ up to 4 Mbar), high strain rates (~ 107 s-1) and high strains (>30%) under ramped compression conditions using Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability properties. These experiments use plasma drive to ramp compress the sample to higher pressure without shock-melting. We also studied lattice level strength mechanisms under shocked compression using a diffraction-based technique. Our studies show that the strength mechanisms from macro to micro scales are different from the traditional strength model predictions and that they are loading path dependent. We will report the experimental results. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA273.

  17. Recent Achievements in Developing Low Temperature and High Strain Rate Superplastic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper is to briefly outline our recent activities in developing low temperature or high strain rate superplastic materials, including aircraft-used and general-purpose Al- and Mg-base alloys or composites, as well as Ti3Al base intermetallic alloys. The processing routes applied included the thermomechanical treatment, equal channel angular pressing and other extrusion or forging methods.

  18. High-strain-rate tensile mechanical response of a polyurethane elastomeric material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic tensile mechanical response of a soft polymer material (Clear Flex 75) is investigated using a split Hopkinson tension bar (SHTB). Stress-strain relations are derived to reveal the mechanical properties at moderate and high strain rates. These relations appear to be rate dependent. Under

  19. Dynamic tensile behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy at ultra-high strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Changjian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The samples having {0001} parallel to extruding direction (ED present a typical true stress–true strain curve with concave-down shape under tension at low strain rate. Ultra-rapid tensile tests were conducted at room temperature on a textured AZ31B magnesium alloy. The dynamic tensile behavior was investigated. The results show that at ultra-high strain rates of 1.93 × 102 s−1 and 1.70 × 103 s−1, the alloy behaves with a linear stress–strain response in most strain range and exhibits a brittle fracture. In this case, {10-12}  extension twinning is basic deformation mode. The brittleness is due to the macroscopic viscosity at ultra-high strain rate, for which the external critical shear stress rapidly gets high to result in a cleavage fracture before large amounts of dislocations are activated. Because {10-12} tension twinning, {10-11} compressive twinning, basal slip, prismatic slip and pyramidal slip have different critical shear stresses (CRSS, their contributions to the degree of deformation are very differential. In addition, Schmid factor plays an important role in the activity of various deformation modes and it is the key factor for the samples with different strain rates exhibit various mechanical behavior under dynamic tensile loading.

  20. Experimental study of dynamic mechanical properties of reactive powder concrete under high-strain-rate impacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties of reactive powder concrete subjected to compressive impacts with high strain rates ranging from 10 to 1.1×102 s-1 were investigated by means of SHPB (split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar) tests of the cylindrical specimens with five different steel fiber volumetric fractions.The properties of wave stress transmission,failure,strength,and energy consumption of RPC with varied fiber volumes and impact strain rates were analyzed.The influences of impact strain rates and fiber volumes on those properties were characterized as well.The general forms of the dynamic stress-strain relationships of RPC were modeled based on the experimental data.The investigations indicate that for the plain RPC the stress response is greater than the strain response,showing strong brittle performance.The RPC with a certain volume of fibers sustains higher strain rate impact and exhibits better deformability as compared with the plain RPC.With a constant fiber fraction,the peak compressive strength,corresponding peak strain and the residual strain of the fiber-reinforced RPC rise by varying amounts when the impact strain rate increases,with the residual strain demonstrating the greatest increment.Elevating the fiber content makes trivial contribution to improving the residual deformability of RPC when the impact strain rate is constant.The tests also show that the fiber content affects the peak compressive strength and the peak deformability of RPC in a different manner.With a constant impact strain rate and the fiber fraction less than 1.75%,the peak compressive strength rises with an increasing fiber volume.The peak compressive strength tends to decrease as the fiber volume exceeds 1.75%.The corresponding peak strain,however,incessantly rises with the increasing fiber volume.The total energy Edisp that RPC consumed during the period from the beginning of impacts to the time of residual strains elevates with the fiber volume increment as long as the fiber

  1. High- and low-strain rate compression properties of several energetic material composites as a function of strain rate and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, G.T. III; Idar, D.J.; Blumenthal, W.R.; Cady, C.M.; Peterson, P.D.

    1998-12-31

    High- and low-strain rate compression data were obtained on several different energetic composites: PBX 9501, X0242-92-4-4, PBXN-9, as well as the polymeric binder used in PBX 9501 and X0242-92-4-4 composites. The effects of energetic-to-binder ratios, different binder systems, and different energetic formulations were investigated. All the energetic composites exhibit increasing elastic modulus, E, maximum flow stresses, {sigma}{sub m}, and strain-at-maximum stress, {var_epsilon}{sub m}, with increasing strain rate at ambient temperature. PBX 9501 displays marginally higher ultimate flow strength than X0242-92-4-4, and significantly higher ultimate compressive strength than PBXN-9 at quasi-static and dynamic strain rates. The failure mode of PBX 9501 and X0242-92-4-4 under high-rate loading changes from a mixture of ductile binder tearing and transgranular cleavage and cracking of the HMX when tested at 20 C to transgranular brittle HMX cleavage and glassy fracture of the binder at {minus}40 C.

  2. Temperature effects on high strain rate properties of graphite/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, G.; Daniel, I. M.; Cokeing, S.; Martinez, G. M.

    1991-01-01

    A unidirectional graphite epoxy material (AS4/3501-6) was characterized at strain rates ranging from 5 x 10(exp 6) s(exp -1) to 5(exp -1), at room temperature and at 128 C. Results are presented in the form of stress-strain curves to failure. The longitudinal properties remain nearly unchanged with strain rate and temperature. The transverse modulus increases with strain rate but decreases with temperature. The transverse strength and transverse ultimate tensile strain have a positive rate sensitivity at low rates, which changes to negative at intermediate rates and returns to positive rate sensitivity at the highest rates tested. A temperature-time equivalence principle was applied and master curves were obtained for the transverse mechanical properties. The in-plane shear modulus and in-plane shear strength have a positive rate sensitivity. The ultimate intralaminar shear strain has a positive rate sensitivity at low rates, which changes to negative at high rates. At the elevated temperature of 128 C, the ultimate shear strain is 25 to 30 percent higher than the room temperature value, but its strain rate dependence is moderate.

  3. High strain rate sensitivity of hardness in quinary Ti-Zr-Hf-Cu-Ni high entropy metallic glass thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shaofan; Wang, Haibin; Xiao, Lin; Guo, Nan; Zhao, Delin; Yao, Kefu; Chen, Na

    2017-10-01

    Quinary Ti-Zr-Hf-Cu-Ni high-entropy metallic glass thin films were produced by magnetron sputter deposition. Nanoindentation tests indicate that the deposited film exhibits a relatively large hardness of 10.4±0.6 GPa and a high elastic modulus of 131±11 GPa under the strain rate of 0.5 s-1. Specifically, the strain rate sensitivity of hardness measured for the thin film is 0.05, the highest value reported for metallic glasses so far. Such high strain rate sensitivity of hardness is likely due to the high-entropy effect which stabilizes the amorphous structure with enhanced homogeneity.

  4. Deformation and failure of OFHC copper under high strain rate shear compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Andrew; Testa, Gabriel; Bonora, Nicola; Iannitti, Gianluca; Persechino, Italo; Colliander, Magnus Hörnqvist

    2017-01-01

    Hat-shaped specimen geometries were developed to generate high strain, high-strain-rates deformation under prescribed conditions. These geometries offer also the possibility to investigate the occurrence of ductile rupture under low or negative stress triaxiality, where most failure models fail. In this work, three tophat geometries were designed, by means of extensive numerical simulation, to obtain desired stress triaxiality values within the shear region that develops across the ligament. Material failure was simulated using the Continuum Damage Model (CDM) formulation with a unilateral condition for damage accumulation and validated by comparing with quasi-static and high strain rate compression tests results on OFHC copper. Preliminary results seem to indicate that ductile tearing initiates at the specimen corner location where positive stress triaxiality occurs because of local rotation and eventually propagates along the ligament.

  5. Behavior of steel fiber-reinforced high-strength concrete at medium strain rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chujie JIAO; Wei SUN; Shi HUAN; Guoping JIANG

    2009-01-01

    Impact compression experiments for the steel fiber-reinforced high-strength concrete (SFRHSC) at medium strain rate were conducted using the split Hopkinson press bar (SHPB) testing method. The volume fractions of steel fibers of SFRHSC were between 0 and 3%. The experimental results showed that, when the strain rate increased from threshold value to 90 s-1, the maximum stress of SFRHSC increased about 30%, the elastic modulus of SFRHSC increased about 50%, and the increase in the peak strain of SFRHSC was 2-3 times of that in the matrix specimen. The strength and toughness of the matrix were improved remarkably because of the superposition effect of the aggregate high-strength matrix and steel fiber high-strength matrix. As a result, under impact loading, cracks developed in the SFRHSC specimen, but the overall shape of the specimen remained virtually unchanged. However, under similar impact loading, the matrix specimens were almost broken into small pieces.

  6. The chemical and mechanical behaviors of polymer / reactive metal systems under high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yubin

    As one category of energetic materials, impact-initiated reactive materials are able to release a high amount of stored chemical energy under high strain rate impact loading, and are used extensively in civil and military applications. In general, polymers are introduced as binder materials to trap the reactive metal powders inside, and also act as an oxidizing agent for the metal ingredient. Since critical attention has been paid on the metal / metal reaction, only a few types of polymer / reactive metal interactions have been studied in the literature. With the higher requirement of materials resistant to different thermal and mechanical environments, the understanding and characterization of polymer / reactive metal interactions are in great demand. In this study, PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) 7A / Ti (Titanium) composites were studied under high strain rates by utilizing the Taylor impact and SHPB tests. Taylor impact tests with different impact velocities, sample dimensions and sample configurations were conducted on the composite, equipped with a high-speed camera for tracking transient images during the sudden process. SHPB and Instron tests were carried out to obtain the stress vs. strain curves of the composite under a wide range of strain rates, the result of which were also utilized for fitting the constitutive relations of the composite based on the modified Johnson-Cook strength model. Thermal analyses by DTA tests under different flow rates accompanied with XRD identification were conducted to study the reaction mechanism between PTFE 7A and Ti when only heat was provided. Numerical simulations on Taylor impact tests and microstructural deformations were also performed to validate the constitutive model built for the composite system, and to investigate the possible reaction mechanism between two components. The results obtained from the high strain rate tests, thermal analyses and numerical simulations were combined to provide a systematic study on

  7. Investigation on grain size effect in high strain rate ductility of 1100 pure aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, N.; Bourne, N.; Ruggiero, A.; Iannitti, G.; Testa, G.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the initial grain size on the material ductility at high strain rates in 1100 pure aluminum was investigated. Dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests, at different impact velocities, were performed. Samples have been annealed at 350°C for different exposure times to induce grain growth. Extruded fragments were soft-recovered and the overall length of the extruded jets was used as a measure of material ductility at high strain rates. Numerical simulation of DTE test at different velocity was performed using the modified Rusinek-Klepaczko constitutive model. Results indicates that, as reported for pure copper, the overall ductility of the aluminum increases when grain size decreases. Numerical simulation results were in quite good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Dynamic recrystallization of electroformed copper liners of shaped charges in high-strain-rate plastic deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The microstructures in the electroformed copper liners of shaped charges after high-strain-rate plastic deformation were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Meanwhile, the orientation distribution of the grains in the recovered slug was examined by the electron backscattering Kikuchi pattern (EBSP) technique. EBSP analysis illustrated that unlike the as-formed electroformed copper linersof shaped charges the grain orientations in the recovered slug are distributed along randomly all the directions after undergoing heavily strain deformation at high-strain rate. Optical microscopy shows a typical recrystallization structure, and TEM examination reveals dislocation cells existed in the thin foil specimen. These results indicate that dynamic recovery and recrystallization occur during this plastic deformation process, and the associated deformation temperature is considered to be higher than 0.6 times the melting point of copper.

  9. Design of High Compressive Strength Concrete Mix without Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akasha, N, M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the crashed Basalt and uncrushed granite is used in concrete mixes as coarse aggregate. The selected materials, with high specification using special production techniques, the properties ,the mix design procedure and mix proportion of the high strength concrete (HSC were discussed. Different proportions of Ordinary Portland cement (410,430 and 450 kg/m3 with different crashed Basalt and uncrushed Granite coarse aggregate amount (1120 and 1050 kg/m3 and fine aggregate with fine modulus of 3.65 were used. Eight concrete mixes were prepared: two as control mix for crashed Basalt and uncrushed Granite, three with crashed Basalt and three with uncrushed Granite coarse aggregate with mix amount(410:680:1120,430:610:1050 and 450:550:1050 kg/m3,(cement: fine aggregate: coarse aggregaterespectively. The study showed that the use of granite coarse aggregate in concrete mixes has a clear effect in mix proportion. The compressive strength of concrete was measured at ages of 7, 28 and 56 days and it was found that the granite (Mix3 of (450:550:1050 kg/m3 with w/c of 0.46 give the highest of strength in 28 and 56 days among the abovementioned mixes its 56 and 64 N/mm2 respectively. The paper shows that good results of compressive strength and workability of concrete were obtained when using granite coarse aggregate.

  10. The dynamic Virtual Fields Method on rubbers at medium and high strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Sung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastomeric materials are widely used for energy absorption applications, often experiencing high strain rate deformations. The mechanical characterization of rubbers at high strain rates presents several experimental difficulties, especially associated with achieving adequate signal to noise ratio and static stress equilibrium, when using a conventional technique such as the split Hopkinson pressure bar. In the present study, these problems are avoided by using the dynamic Virtual Fields Method (VFM in which acceleration fields, clearly generated by the non-equilibrium state, are utilized as a force measurement with in the frame work of the principle of virtual work equation. In this paper, two dynamic VFM based techniques are used to characterise an EPDM rubber. These are denoted as the linear and nonlinear VFM and are developed for (respectively medium (drop-weight and high (gas-gun strain-rate experiments. The use of the two VFMs combined with high-speed imaging analysed by digital imaging correlation allows the identification of the parameters of a given rubber mechanical model; in this case the Ogden model is used.

  11. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B; Golobic, Alexandra M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Worsley, Marcus A

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  12. Novel Efficient De-blocking Method for Highly Compressed Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Min; YI Qing-ming; YANG Liang

    2007-01-01

    Due to coarse quantization,block-based discrete cosine transform(BDCT) compression methods usually suffer from visible blocking artifacts at the block boundaries.A novel efficient de-blocking method in DCT domain is proposed.A specific criterion for edge detection is given,one-dimensional DCT is applied on each row of the adjacent blocks and the shifted block in smooth region,and the transform coefficients of the shifted block are modified by weighting the average of three coefficients of the block.Mean square difference of slope criterion is used to judge the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.Simulation results show that the new method not only obtains satisfactory image quality,but also maintains high frequency information.

  13. Dynamic Evaluation of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Subjected to High-Strain-Rate Compressive Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    explores the fused deposition modeling ( FDM ) and the printing orientation as a means to quantify the potential benefits. These benefits include more cost...effective, time-efficient, in-house fabrication of designs, while optimizing the mechanical and structural integrity. In FDM , CAD software is used to...relationship to the stress experienced in a material at high-strain-rate deformation. For polymers such as ABS, the mechanical properties vary

  14. Hardness and phase analysis of IN 718 deformed at high strain rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renhof, L; Guder, S; Werner, E

    2004-06-01

    Specimens of the nickel base alloy IN 718 deformed at high strain rate (approximately 10 s(-1)), as realized in a screw press, have higher strength than parts forged conventionally in a hydraulic press. Microstructure analyses in light and transmission electron microscopes reveal the precipitation of very small Ni(3)Nb particles (gamma"-phase) to be the reason for the increased hardness. Several processing routes are discussed and analyzed in relation to the TTT-diagram of IN 718.

  15. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 2; Composite Micromechanical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this second paper of a two part report, a three-dimensional composite micromechanical model is described which allows for the analysis of the rate dependent, nonlinear deformation response of a polymer matrix composite. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations utilized to model the deformation response of a polymer are implemented within the micromechanics method. The deformation response of two representative laminated carbon fiber reinforced composite materials with varying fiber orientation has been predicted using the described technique. The predicted results compare favorably to both experimental values and the response predicted by the Generalized Method of Cells, a well-established micromechanics analysis method.

  16. The Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Railway Wheel Steel at High Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin; Han, Liangliang; Zhao, Longmao; Zhang, Ying

    2016-11-01

    The dynamic tensile tests on D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates were conducted using a split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) apparatus, compared to quasi-static tests. Three different types of specimens, which were machined from three different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub) of a railway wheel, were prepared and examined. The rim specimens were checked to have a higher yield stress and ultimate tensile strength than those web and hub specimens under both quasi-static and dynamic loadings, and the railway wheel steel was demonstrated to be strain rate dependent in dynamic tension. The dynamic tensile fracture surfaces of all the wheel steel specimens are cup-cone-shaped morphology on a macroscopic scale and with the quasi-ductile fracture features on the microscopic scale.

  17. ON THE TENSILE MECHANICAL PROPERTY OF Si-Mn TRIP STEELS AT HIGH STRAIN RATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.C. Wei; L. Li; R.Y. Fu; W. Shi

    2002-01-01

    Tensile mechanical properties of 1.6Si-1.58Mn-0.195C TRIP (transformation-inducedplasticity) steels under high strain rate and effects of DP (dual-phase) treatments werestudied and compared to the quasi-static tensile behavior. The results show that theincreasing of strain rate leads to increasing in their strengths and decreasing in theuniform elongation remarkably. Because the stable retained austenite in TRIP steelcan transform to martensite during tensile testing and the material exhibits excellentcharacteristic of transformation induced plasticity, the plastic deformation behavior isevidently improved and the combination of strength and elongation is superior to thatof dual-phase steel, although its strength is smaller than that of DP steel. However,DP treated steel shown lower elongation under dynamic tension in spite of higherstrength. A model was proposed to explain the excellent elongation rate of TRIPsteel compared with DP steel on the basis of SEM analysis and the strength of thecomponents in microstructure.

  18. Multi-scale modeling of the impact response of a strain-rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel

    OpenAIRE

    Canadinç, Demircan; Önal, Orkun; Özmenci, Cemre

    2014-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling approach was applied to predict the impact response of a strain rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel. The roles of texture, geometry, and strain rate sensitivity were successfully taken into account all at once by coupling crystal plasticity and finite element (FE) analysis. Specifically, crystal plasticity was utilized to obtain the multi-axial flow rule at different strain rates based on the experimental deformation response under uniaxial ten...

  19. Creep Strain and Strain Rate Response of 2219 Al Alloy at High Stress Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taminger, Karen M. B.; Wagner, John A.; Lisagor, W. Barry

    1998-01-01

    As a result of high localized plastic deformation experienced during proof testing in an International Space Station connecting module, a study was undertaken to determine the deformation response of a 2219-T851 roll forging. After prestraining 2219-T851 Al specimens to simulate strains observed during the proof testing, creep tests were conducted in the temperature range from ambient temperature to 107 C (225 F) at stress levels approaching the ultimate tensile strength of 2219-T851 Al. Strain-time histories and strain rate responses were examined. The strain rate response was extremely high initially, but decayed rapidly, spanning as much as five orders of magnitude during primary creep. Select specimens were subjected to incremental step loading and exhibited initial creep rates of similar magnitude for each load step. Although the creep rates decreased quickly at all loads, the creep rates dropped faster and reached lower strain rate levels for lower applied loads. The initial creep rate and creep rate decay associated with primary creep were similar for specimens with and without prestrain; however, prestraining (strain hardening) the specimens, as in the aforementioned proof test, resulted in significantly longer creep life.

  20. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 1; Matrix Constitutive Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this first paper of a two part report, background information is presented, along with the constitutive equations which will be used to model the rate dependent nonlinear deformation response of the polymer matrix. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive models which were originally developed to model the viscoplastic deformation of metals have been adapted to model the nonlinear viscoelastic deformation of polymers. The modified equations were correlated by analyzing the tensile/ compressive response of both 977-2 toughened epoxy matrix and PEEK thermoplastic matrix over a variety of strain rates. For the cases examined, the modified constitutive equations appear to do an adequate job of modeling the polymer deformation response. A second follow-up paper will describe the implementation of the polymer deformation model into a composite micromechanical model, to allow for the modeling of the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composites.

  1. Strain rate sensitivity of nanoindentation creep in an AlCoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Wu, R. F.; Qiao, J. W.

    2016-09-01

    Creep behaviors of an AlCoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy with the body-centered cubic structure were investigated by nanoindentation. The enhanced strain gradient induced by higher strain rate leads to decreased strain rate sensitivity during creep process. The present alloy exhibits excellent creep resistance, mainly due to its large entropy of mixing and highly distorted lattice structure.

  2. Microstructural Evolution of Ti-6Al-4V during High Strain Rate Conditions of Metal Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Schneider, Judy

    2009-01-01

    The microstructural evolution following metal cutting was investigated within the metal chips of Ti-6Al-4V. Metal cutting was used to impose a high strain rate on the order of approx.10(exp 5)/s within the primary shear zone as the metal was removed from the workpiece. The initial microstructure of the parent material (PM) was composed of a bi-modal microstructure with coarse prior grains and equiaxed primary located at the boundaries. After metal cutting, the microstructure of the metal chips showed coarsening of the equiaxed primary grains and lamellar. These metallographic findings suggest that the metal chips experienced high temperatures which remained below the transus temperature.

  3. Experimental investigation of an aggregate material behavior under confinement at high strain rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biessy M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Low velocity impacts can ignite explosives or energetic materials. Ignition depends on the mechanical behavior of the energetic material which needs to be characterized for both high pressure level and high strain rate. A technique based on the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars system is proposed to reproduce these loading conditions. A cylindrical specimen is placed in a confining ring and is dynamically compressed. The ring prevents the radial extension and confines the specimen. Each ring is designed to plastify and to obtain a constant radial pressure during the test. Some experiments are carried out on an inert aggregate material and show the validity of this experimental device.

  4. Experimental and numerical analysis of high strain rate behavior of aluminum alloys AMg-6 and D-16

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramov, A. V.; Bragov, A. M.; Lomunov, A. K.; Konstantinov, A. Yu.; Kruszka, L.; Sergeichev, I. V.

    2006-01-01

    Results of experimental investigation and numerical modeling of high strain rate behavior of aluminium alloys AMg-6 and D-16 are presented. Using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) parameters of Johnson-Cook's model and other models from LS-DYNA library were determined in strain rate range 10(2)-10

  5. Neural network modeling to evaluate the dynamic flow stress of high strength armor steels under high strain rate compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravindranadh BOBBILI; V. MADHU; A.K. GOGIA

    2014-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) constitutive model is developed for high strength armor steel tempered at 500 ?C, 600 ?C and 650 ?C based on high strain rate data generated from split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments. A new neural network configuration consisting of both training and validation is effectively employed to predict flow stress. Tempering temperature, strain rate and strain are considered as inputs, whereas flow stress is taken as output of the neural network. A comparative study on JohnsoneCook (JeC) model and neural network model is performed. It was observed that the developed neural network model could predict flow stress under various strain rates and tempering temperatures. The experimental stressestrain data obtained from high strain rate compression tests using SHPB, over a range of tempering temperatures (500e650 ?C), strains (0.05e0.2) and strain rates (1000e5500/s) are employed to formulate JeC model to predict the high strain rate deformation behavior of high strength armor steels. The J-C model and the back-propagation ANN model were developed to predict the high strain rate deformation behavior of high strength armor steel and their predictability is evaluated in terms of correlation coefficient (R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). R and AARE for the JeC model are found to be 0.7461 and 27.624%, respectively, while R and AARE for the ANN model are 0.9995 and 2.58%, respectively. It was observed that the predictions by ANN model are in consistence with the experimental data for all tempering temperatures.

  6. Temperature and strain rate effects in high strength high conductivity copper alloys tested in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The tensile properties of the three candidate alloys GlidCop{trademark} Al25, CuCrZr, and CuNiBe are known to be sensitive to the testing conditions such as strain rate and test temperature. This study was conducted on GlidCop Al25 (2 conditions) and Hycon 3HP (3 conditions) to ascertain the effect of test temperature and strain rate when tested in open air. The results show that the yield strength and elongation of the GlidCop Al25 alloys exhibit a strain rate dependence that increases with temperature. Both the GlidCop and the Hycon 3 HP exhibited an increase in strength as the strain rate increased, but the GlidCop alloys proved to be the most strain rate sensitive. The GlidCop failed in a ductile manner irrespective of the test conditions, however, their strength and uniform elongation decreased with increasing test temperature and the uniform elongation also decreased dramatically at the lower strain rates. The Hycon 3 HP alloys proved to be extremely sensitive to test temperature, rapidly losing their strength and ductility when the temperature increased above 250 C. As the test temperature increased and the strain rate decreased the fracture mode shifted from a ductile transgranular failure to a ductile intergranular failure with very localized ductility. This latter observation is based on the presence of dimples on the grain facets, indicating that some ductile deformation occurred near the grain boundaries. The material failed without any reduction in area at 450 C and 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1}, and in several cases failed prematurely.

  7. Multiscale simulations of damage of perfect crystal Cu at high strain rates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Rawat; M Warrier; S Chaturvedi; V R Ikkurthi

    2014-08-01

    We use the molecular dynamics code, large-scale atomic/molecular massively parallel simulator (LAMMPS), to simulate high strain rate triaxial deformation of crystal copper to understand void nucleation and growth (NAG) within the framework of an experimentally fitted macroscopic NAG model for polycrystals (also known as DFRACT model). It is seen that void NAG at the atomistic scales for crystal copper (Cu) has the same qualitative behaviour as the DFRACT model, albeit with a different set of parameters. The effect of material temperature on the nucleation and growth of voids is studied. As the temperature increases, there is a steady decrease in the void NAG thresholds and close to the melting point of Cu, a double-dip in the pressure–time profile is observed. Analysis of this double-dip shows disappearance of the long-range order due to the creation of stacking faults and the system no longer has a face centred cubic (fcc) structure. Molecular dynamics simulation of shock in crystal Cu at strain rates high enough to cause spallation of crystal Cu are then carried out to validate the void NAG parameters. We show that the pre-history of the material affects the void nucleation threshold of the material. We also simulate high-strain-rate triaxial deformation of crystal Cu with defects and obtain void NAG parameters. The parameters are then used in a macroscale hydrodynamic simulation to obtain spallation threshold of realistic crystal Cu. It is seen that our results match experimental results within the limit of 20% error.

  8. High Strain Rate Compressive Behavior of Polyurethane Resin and Polyurethane/Al2O3 Hollow Sphere Syntactic Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dung D. Luong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane resins and foams are finding extensive applications. Seat cushions and covers in automobiles are examples of these materials. In the present work, hollow alumina particles are used as fillers in polyurethane resin to develop closed-cell syntactic foams. The fabricated syntactic foams are tested for compressive properties at quasistatic and high strain rates. Strain rate sensitivity is an important concern for automotive applications due to the possibility of crash at high speeds. Both the polyurethane resin and the syntactic foam show strain rate sensitivity in compressive strength. It is observed that the compressive strength increases with strain rate. The energy absorbed up to 10% strain in the quasistatic regime is 400% higher for the syntactic foam in comparison to that of neat resin at the same strain rate.

  9. Flow and failure of an aluminium alloy from low to high temperature and strain rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sancho Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behaviour of an aluminium alloy is presented in this paper. The study has been carried out to analyse the flow and failure of the aluminium alloy 7075-T73. An experimental study has been planned performing tests of un-notched and notched tensile specimens at low strain rates using a servo-hydraulic machine. High strain rate tests have been carried out using the same geometry in a Hopkinson Split Tensile Bar. The dynamic experiments at low temperature were performed using a cryogenic chamber, and the high temperature ones with a furnace, both incorporated to the Hopkinson bar. Testing temperatures ranged from − 50 ∘C to 100 ∘C and the strain rates from 10−4 s−1 to 600 s−1. The material behaviour was modelled using the Modified Johnson-Cook model and simulated using LS-DYNA. The results show that the Voce type of strain hardening is the most accurate for this material, while the traditional Johnson-Cook is not enough accurate to reproduce the necking of un-notched specimens. The failure criterion was obtained by means of the numerical simulations using the analysis of the stress triaxiality versus the strain to failure. The diameters at the failure time were measured using the images taken with an image camera, and the strain to failure was computed for un-notched and notched specimens. The numerical simulations show that the analysis of the evolution of the stress triaxiality is crucial to achieve accurate results. A material model using the Modified Johnson-Cook for flow and failure is proposed.

  10. High Strain Rate Testing of Rocks using a Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiessler, Ruprecht; Kenkmann, Thomas; Poelchau, Michael; Nau, Siegfried; Hess, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic mechanical testing of rocks is important to define the onset of rate dependency of brittle failure. The strain rate dependency occurs through the propagation velocity limit (Rayleigh wave speed) of cracks and their reduced ability to coalesce, which, in turn, significantly increases the strength of the rock. We use a newly developed pressurized air driven Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar (SHPB), that is specifically designed for the investigation of high strain rate testing of rocks, consisting of several 10 to 50 cm long strikers and bar components of 50 mm in diameter and 2.5 meters in length each. The whole set up, composed of striker, incident- and transmission bar is available in aluminum, titanium and maraging steel to minimize the acoustic impedance contrast, determined by the change of density and speed of sound, to the specific rock of investigation. Dynamic mechanical parameters are obtained in compression as well as in spallation configuration, covering a wide spectrum from intermediate to high strain rates (100-103 s-1). In SHPB experiments [1] one-dimensional longitudinal compressive pulses of diverse shapes and lengths - formed with pulse shapers - are used to generate a variety of loading histories under 1D states of stress in cylindrical rock samples, in order to measure the respective stress-strain response at specific strain rates. Subsequent microstructural analysis of the deformed samples is aimed at quantification fracture orientation, fracture pattern, fracture density, and fracture surface properties as a function of the loading rate. Linking mechanical and microstructural data to natural dynamic deformation processes has relevance for the understanding of earthquakes, landslides, impacts, and has several rock engineering applications. For instance, experiments on dynamic fragmentation help to unravel super-shear rupture events that pervasively pulverize rocks up to several hundred meters from the fault core [2, 3, 4]. The dynamic, strain

  11. Effect of Microstructure in TRIP Steel on Its Tensile Behavior at High Strain Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The relationships between microstructure of 0.195C-1.6Si-1.58Mn TRIP steel and its dynamic mechanical properties at high strain rate were investigated. The effect of microstructures on dynamic properties was discussed and the comparison with its static mechanical properties was also presented. The specimens of TRIP steel via three heat treatment techniques exhibit different morphological structures, responsible for their dynamic mechanical performances. The dynamic tensile testing was performed on self-made pneumatic tensile impact tester. The results showed that the size, volume fraction, morphology and distribution of retained austenite all affect the final mechanical properties at high strain rate. Among them, the second phase (retained austenite+bainite) with net structure severely decreases the elongation of TRIP steel in spite of the fact that it enhances strength because it restrains ferrite deformation. In order to obtain the excellent combination of strength and elongation, rational matching of morphology, size and volume fraction of several phases in TRIP steel can be obtained via proper heat treatment techniques.

  12. Stress-strain characteristics of materials at high strain rates. Part II. Experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripperger, E. A. [Texas. Univ., Austin, TX (US). Structural Mechanics Research Lab.

    1958-08-29

    These two reports were issued separately, but are cataloged as a unit. A photoelectric method for measuring displacements during high-velocity impacts is described. The theory of the system is discussed in detail, and a prototype system which was built and tested is described. The performance of the prototype system is evaluated by comparing the results which it gives with results obtained by other methods of measurement. The system was found capable of a resolution of at least 0.01 inches. static and dynamic stress-strain characteristics of seven high polymers, polyethylene, teflon, nylon, tenite M, tenite H, polystyrene, and saran, plus three metals, lead, copper, and aluminum, are described and compared by means of stress-strain curves and photographs. Data are also presented which show qualitatively the effects produced on stress-strain characteristics by specimen configuration, temperature, and impact velocity. It is shown that there is a definite strain-rate effect for all these materials except polystyrene. The effect is one of an apparent stiffening of the material with increasing strain rate, which is similar to the effect produced by lowering the temperature. The stress-strain measurements are examined critically, inconsistencies are pointed out, and possible sources of error suggested. Values of yield stress, modulus of elasticity and energy absorption for all materials (except copper and aluminum), specimen configurations, temperatures, and impact velocities included in the investigation are tabulated.

  13. Tensile behaviour of geopolymer-based materials under medium and high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menna, Costantino; Asprone, Domenico; Forni, Daniele; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Bozza, Anna; Prota, Andrea; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Geopolymers are a promising class of inorganic materials typically obtained from an alluminosilicate source and an alkaline solution, and characterized by an amorphous 3-D framework structure. These materials are particularly attractive for the construction industry due to mechanical and environmental advantages they exhibit compared to conventional systems. Indeed, geopolymer-based concretes represent a challenge for the large scale uses of such a binder material and many research studies currently focus on this topic. However, the behaviour of geopolymers under high dynamic loads is rarely investigated, even though it is of a fundamental concern for the integrity/vulnerability assessment under extreme dynamic events. The present study aims to investigate the effect of high dynamic loading conditions on the tensile behaviour of different geopolymer formulations. The dynamic tests were performed under different strain rates by using a Hydro-pneumatic machine and a modified Hopkinson bar at the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The results are processed in terms of stress-strain relationships and strength dynamic increase factor at different strain-rate levels. The dynamic increase factor was also compared with CEB recommendations. The experimental outcomes can be used to assess the constitutive laws of geopolymers under dynamic load conditions and implemented into analytical models.

  14. Tensile behaviour of geopolymer-based materials under medium and high strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menna Costantino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are a promising class of inorganic materials typically obtained from an alluminosilicate source and an alkaline solution, and characterized by an amorphous 3-D framework structure. These materials are particularly attractive for the construction industry due to mechanical and environmental advantages they exhibit compared to conventional systems. Indeed, geopolymer-based concretes represent a challenge for the large scale uses of such a binder material and many research studies currently focus on this topic. However, the behaviour of geopolymers under high dynamic loads is rarely investigated, even though it is of a fundamental concern for the integrity/vulnerability assessment under extreme dynamic events. The present study aims to investigate the effect of high dynamic loading conditions on the tensile behaviour of different geopolymer formulations. The dynamic tests were performed under different strain rates by using a Hydro-pneumatic machine and a modified Hopkinson bar at the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The results are processed in terms of stress-strain relationships and strength dynamic increase factor at different strain-rate levels. The dynamic increase factor was also compared with CEB recommendations. The experimental outcomes can be used to assess the constitutive laws of geopolymers under dynamic load conditions and implemented into analytical models.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of the Behavior of Armor Materials Under High Strain Rates and Large Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzois, Ioannis

    For years high strength steels and alloys have been widely used by the military for making armor plates. Advances in technology have led to the development of materials with improved resistance to penetration and deformation. Until recently, the behavior of these materials under high strain rates and large strains has been primarily based on laboratory testing using the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. With the advent of sophisticated computer programs, computer modeling and finite element simulations are being developed to predict the deformation behavior of these metals for a variety of conditions similar to those experienced during combat. In the present investigation, a modified direct impact Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus was modeled using the finite element software ABAQUS 6.8 for the purpose of simulating high strain rate compression of specimens of three armor materials: maraging steel 300, high hardness armor (HHA), and aluminum alloy 5083. These armor materials, provided by the Canadian Department of National Defence, were tested at the University of Manitoba by others. In this study, the empirical Johnson-Cook visco-plastic and damage models were used to simulate the deformation behavior obtained experimentally. A series of stress-time plots at various projectile impact momenta were produced and verified by comparison with experimental data. The impact momentum parameter was chosen rather than projectile velocity to normalize the initial conditions for each simulation. Phenomena such as the formation of adiabatic shear bands caused by deformation at high strains and strain rates were investigated through simulations. It was found that the Johnson-Cook model can accurately simulate the behavior of body-centered cubic (BCC) metals such as steels. The maximum shear stress was calculated for each simulation at various impact momenta. The finite element model showed that shear failure first occurred in the center of the cylindrical specimen and

  16. Inlfuence of Specimen Size on Compression Behavior of Cement Paste and Mortar under High Strain Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xudong; CHEN Chen; QIAN Pingping; XU Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    Static and dynamic compression tests were carried out on mortar and paste specimens of three sizes (f68 mm×32 mm,f59 mm×29.5 mm andf32 mm×16 mm) to study the inlfuence of specimen size on the compression behavior of cement-based materials under high strain rates. The static tests were applied using a universal servo-hydraulic system, and the dynamic tests were applied by a spilt Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. The experimental results show that for mortar and paste specimens, the dynamic compressive strength is greater than the quasi-static one, and the dynamic compressive strength for specimens of large size is lower than those of small size. However, the dynamic increase factors (DIF) has an opposite trend. Obviously, both strain rate and size effect exist in mortar and paste. The test results were then analyzed using Weibull, Carpinteri and Bažant’s size effect laws. A good agreement between these three laws and the test results was reached on the compressive strength. However, for the experimental results of paste and cement mortar, the size effect is not evident for the peak strain and elastic modulus of paste and cement mortar.

  17. Experimental characterization and modelling of UO2 behavior at high temperatures and high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Maxime; Sercombe, Jérôme; Ménard, Jean-Claude; Julien, Jérôme; Helfer, Thomas; Désoyer, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an experimental characterization of uranium dioxide (UO2) in compression under Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) conditions. Pellet samples were tested at four temperatures (1100, 1350, 1550 and 1700 °C) and at a strain rate varying over 4 decades (10-4-10-3-10-2-10-1 /s). The experimental results show that the stress-strain curves cannot be fitted with a unique power law as it is the case at smaller strain rates (10-9-10-5 /s). A strain-hardening also appears in most of the tests. The microstructural observations show a pronounced evolution of the porosity at the pellet center during the tests. A hyperbolic sine model which accounts for volume variations (pore compressibility) was therefore proposed to describe the behavior of UO2 on a large range of temperatures (1100 - 1700 °C) and strain rates (10-9-10-1 /s). The Finite Element simulations of the compression tests lead to results (maximum stress, axial and hoop strain distribution, porosity distribution) in good agreement with the measurements. The model was then assessed on a database of more than two hundred creep tests.

  18. Effect of Temperature on the Void Growth in Pure Aluminium at High Strain-Rate Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Mei-Lan; HE Hong-Liang; YAN Shi-Lin

    2007-01-01

    @@ With the environment temperature varying from 273K to 773K, the dynamic process of void growth in pure aluminium at high strain-rate loading is calculated based on the dynamic growth equation of a void with internal pressure. The result shows that the effect of temperature on the growth of void should be emphasized. Because the initial pressure of void with gas will increase and the viscosity of materials will decrease with the rising of temperature, the growth of void is accelerated. Furthermore, material inertia restrains the growth of void evidently when the diameter exceeds 10μm. The effect of surface tension is very weak in the whole process of void growth.

  19. Numerical analysis of high strain rate failure of electro-magnetically loaded steel sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erice Borja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electro-magnetic forces provide a potentially power full means in designing dynamic experiments with active control of the loading conditions. This article deals with the development of computational models to simulate the thermo-mechanical response of electro-magnetically loaded metallic structures. The model assumes linear electromagnetic constitutive equations and time-independent electric induction to estimate the Joule heating and the Lorentz forces. The latter are then taken into account when evaluating stress equilibrium. A thermo-visco-plastic model with Johnson-Cook type of temperature and strain rate dependence and combined Swift-Voce hardening is used to evaluate the material's thermo-mechanical response. As a first application, the model is used to analyse the effect of electro-magnetic loading on the ductility of advanced high strength steels.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of materials response to high strain-rate loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belak, J

    1999-07-22

    A molecular dynamics (MD) analysis of conservation of momentum through a shock front is presented. The MD model uses a non-traditional boundary condition that allows simulation in the reference frame of the shock front. Higher order terms proportional to gradients in the density are shown to be non-negligible at the shock front. The simulation is used to study the sequence of thermodynamic states during shock loading. Melting is observed in the simulations, though above the thermodynamic melt curve as is common in homogeneous simulations of melting. High strain-rate tensile loading is applied to the growth of nanoscale voids in copper. Void growth is found to occur by plasticity mechanisms with dislocations emerging from the void surface. [molecular dynamics, shock loading, conservation of momentum, shock melting, void growth

  1. Microstructure and nanohardness distribution in a polycrystalline Zn deformed by high strain rate impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirras, G., E-mail: dirras@univ-paris13.fr [LSPM, CNRS, UPR 3407, Universite Paris 13, 99 avenue Jean Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaeuse (France); Ouarem, A. [LSPM, CNRS, UPR 3407, Universite Paris 13, 99 avenue Jean Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaeuse (France); Couque, H. [Nexter-Munitions, 7 route de Guerry, 18023 Bourges Cedex (France); Gubicza, J.; Szommer, P. [Department of Materials Physics, Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest, P.O.B. 32, H-1518 (Hungary); Brinza, O. [LSPM, CNRS, UPR 3407, Universite Paris 13, 99 avenue Jean Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaeuse (France)

    2011-05-15

    Polycrystalline Zn with an average grain size of about 300 {mu}m was deformed by direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar at a velocity of 29 m/s. An inhomogeneous grain structure was found consisting of a center region having large average grain size of 20 {mu}m surrounded by a fine-grained rim with an average grain size of 6 {mu}m. Transmission electron microscopy investigations showed a significant dislocation density in the large-grained area while in the fine-grained rim the dislocation density was negligible. Most probably, the higher strain yielded recrystallization in the outer ring while in the center only recovery occurred. The hardening effect of dislocations overwhelms the smaller grain size strengthening in the center part resulting in higher nanohardness in this region than in the outer ring. - Graphical Abstract: (a): EBSD micrograph showing the initial microstructure of polycrystalline Zn that was subsequently submitted to high strain rate impact. (b): an inhomogeneous grain size refinement was obtained which consists of a central coarse-grained area, surrounded by a fine-grained recrystallized rim. The black arrow points to the disc center. Research Highlights: {yields} A polycrystalline Zn specimen was submitted to high strain rate impact loading. {yields} Inhomogeneous grain refinement occurred due to strain gradient in impacted sample. {yields} A fine-grained recrystallized rim surrounded the coarse-grained center of specimen. {yields} The coarse-grained center exhibited higher hardness than the fine-grained rim. {yields} The higher hardness of the center was caused by the higher dislocation density.

  2. Effect of specimen size on energy dissipation characteristics of red sandstone under high strain rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ming; Mao Xianbiao; Lu Aihong; Tao Jing; Zhang Guanghui; Zhang Lianying; Li Chong

    2014-01-01

    In this experiment, red sandstone specimens, having slenderness ratios of 0.5, 0.7, 0.9 and 1.1 respec-tively, were subjected to blow tests using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system at a pressure of 0.4 atmospheres. In this paper, we have analyzed the effect of slenderness ratio on the mechanical properties and energy dissipation characteristics of red sandstone under high strain rates. The processes of compaction, elastic deformation and stress softening deformation of specimens contract with an increase in slenderness ratio, whilst the nonlinear deformation process extends correspondingly. In addi-tion, degrees of damage of specimens reduced gradually and the type of destruction showed a transfor-mation trend from stretching failure towards shear failure when the slenderness ratio increased. A model of dynamic damage evolution in red sandstone was established and the parameters of the constitutive model at different ratios of length to diameter were determined. By comparison with the experimental curve, the accuracy of the model, which could reflect the stress-strain dynamic characteristics of red sandstone, was verified. From the view of energy dissipation, an increase in slenderness ratio of a specimen decreased the proportion of energy dissipation and caused a gradual fall in the capability of energy dissipation during the specimen failure process. To some extent, the study indicated the effects of slenderness ratios on the mechanical properties and energy dissipation characteristics of red sandstone under the high strain rate, which provides valuable references to related engineering designs and academic researches.

  3. Effect of Strain Rate on Deformation Behavior of AlCoCrFeNi High-Entropy Alloy by Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, L.; Jiao, Z. M.; Yuan, G. Z.; Ma, S. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Zhang, Y.; Qiao, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, nanoindentation tests with continuous stiffness measurement technique were measured to investigate the deformation behavior of a high-entropy alloy AlCoCrFeNi under different indentation strain rates at room temperature. Results suggest that the creep behavior exhibits remarkable strain rate dependence. In-situ scanning images showed a conspicuous pileup around the indents, indicating that an extremely localized plastic deformation occurred during the nanoindentation. Under different strain rates, elastic modulus basically remains unchanged, while the hardness decreases with increasing indentation depth due to the indentation size effect. Furthermore, the modulus and hardness of AlCoCrFeNi HEAs are greater than that of the Al x CoCrFeNi ( x = 0.3,0.5) at the strain rate of 0.2 s-1 due to its higher negative enthalpy of mixing related to the atomic binding force, and the solid solution strengthening induced by the lattice distortion, respectively.

  4. Effect of test temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of wrought GlidCop AL25 (ITER grade zero, IGO) solutionized and aged CuCrZr, and cold-worked and aged and solutionized and aged Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500{degrees}C at strain rates between 4 x 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} and 0.06 s{sup {minus}1}. The measured room temperature electrical conductivity ranged from 64 to 90% IACS for the different alloys. All of the alloys were relatively insensitive to strain rate at room temperature, but the strain rate sensitivity of GlidCop Al25 increased significantly with increasing temperature. The CuNiBe alloys exhibited the best combination of high strength and high conductivity at room temperature. The strength of CuNiBe decreased slowly with increasing temperature. However, the ductility of CuNiBe decreased rapidly with increasing temperature due to localized deformation near grain boundaries, making these alloy heats unsuitable for typical structural applications above 300{degrees}C. The strength and uniform elongation of GlidCop Al25 decreased significantly with increasing temperature at a strain rate of 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}, whereas the total elongation was independent of test temperature. The strength and ductility of CuCrZr decreased slowly with increasing temperature.

  5. Influence of high-strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior of Nl-, Fe-, and Ti- based aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, G.T. III

    1996-09-01

    The majority of the strength characterization studies on ordered intermetallics have concentrated on the assessment of strength and work-hardening at conventional strain rates. Although the influence of strain rate on the structure/property relationships of pure nickel, iron, and titanium and a variety of their alloys have been extensively studied, the effect of strain rate on the stress-strain response of Ni-, Fe-, and Ti-based aluminides remains poorly understood. Dynamic constitutive behavior is however relevant to high speed impact performance of these materials such as during foreign object damage in aerospace applications, high-rate forging, and localized deformation behavior during machining. The influence of strain rate, varied between 0.001 and 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}, and temperatures, between 77 & 800K, on the compressive mechanical behavior of Ni{sub 3}A1, NiAl, Fe{sub 3}Al, Fe-40Al-0.1B, Ti-24Al-11Nb, and Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb will be presented. In this paper the influence of strain rate on the anomalous temperature dependency of the flow stresses in these aluminides will be reviewed and compared between aluminides. The rate sensitivity and work hardening of each aluminide will be discussed as a function of strain rate and temperature and contrasted to each other and to the values typical for their respective disordered base metals. 66 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Experimental characterization and modelling of UO{sub 2} behavior at high temperatures and high strain rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvo, Maxime, E-mail: maxime.salvo@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sercombe, Jérôme [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ménard, Jean-Claude [CEA, DEN, DEC/SPUA, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Julien, Jérôme; Helfer, Thomas [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Désoyer, Thierry [CNRS, LMA, 13402 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • This paper presents an experimental characterization of UO{sub 2} in compression. • The tests are performed at high temperatures (1100–1700 °C) and high strain rates (10{sup -4}–10{sup -1}/s). • With a power law model, the stress exponent n deduced from the tests varies between 16 and 20. • A hyperbolic sine model was therefore developed to describe UO{sub 2} behavior at high strain rates. • Pore compressibility as observed during the tests was introduced in the model. - Abstract: This work presents an experimental characterization of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) in compression under Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) conditions. Pellet samples were tested at four temperatures (1100, 1350, 1550 and 1700°C) and at a strain rate varying over 4 decades (10{sup -4}–10{sup -3}–10{sup -2}–10{sup -1}/s). The experimental results show that the stress–strain curves cannot be fitted with a unique power law as it is the case at smaller strain rates (10{sup -9}–10{sup -5}/s). A strain-hardening also appears in most of the tests. The microstructural observations show a pronounced evolution of the porosity at the pellet center during the tests. A hyperbolic sine model which accounts for volume variations (pore compressibility) was therefore proposed to describe the behavior of UO{sub 2} on a large range of temperatures (1100-1700°C) and strain rates (10{sup -9}–10{sup -1}/s). The Finite Element simulations of the compression tests lead to results (maximum stress, axial and hoop strain distribution, porosity distribution) in good agreement with the measurements. The model was then assessed on a database of more than two hundred creep tests.

  7. Finite element analysis of the high strain rate testing of polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwade, C. V.; Alghamdi, A. S.; Ashcroft, I. A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.; Song, M.

    2012-08-01

    Advanced polymer materials are finding an increasing range of industrial and defence applications. Ultra-high molecular weight polymers (UHMWPE) are already used in lightweight body armour because of their good impact resistance with light weight. However, a broader use of such materials is limited by the complexity of the manufacturing processes and the lack of experimental data on their behaviour and failure evolution under high-strain rate loading conditions. The current study deals with an investigation of the internal heat generation during tensile of UHMWPE. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the tensile test is developed and validated the with experimental work. An elastic-plastic material model is used with adiabatic heat generation. The temperature and stresses obtained with FE analysis are found to be in a good agreement with the experimental results. The model can be used as a simple and cost effective tool to predict the thermo-mechanical behaviour of UHMWPE part under various loading conditions.

  8. Plasticity induced by pre-existing defects during high strain-rate loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringa, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    High strain-rate deformation of metals has been typically studied for perfect monocrystals. Computational advances now allow more realistic simulations of materials including defects, which lower the Hugoniot Elastic Limit, and lead to microstructures differing from the ones from perfect monocrystals. As pre-existing defects one can consider vacancy clusters, dislocation loops, grain boundaries, etc. New analysis tools allow analysis of dislocation densities and twin fractions, for both f.c.c. and b.c.c. metals. Recent results for defective single crystal Ta [Tramontina et al.., High Energy Den. Phys. 10, 9 (2014), and Ruestes et al., Scripta Mat. 68, 818 (2013)], and for polycrystalline b.c.c metals [Tang et al., Mat. Sci. Eng. A 580, 414 (2013), and Gunkelmann et al., Phys. Rev. B 86, 144111 (2012)] will be highlighted, alongside new results for nanocrystalline Cu, Ta, Fe, and Zr [Ruestes et al., Scripta Mat. 71, 9 (2014)]. This work has been carried out in collaboration with D. Tramontina, C. Ruestes, E. Millan, J. Rodriguez-Nieva, M.A. Meyers, Y. Tang, H. Urbassek, N. Gunkelmann, A. Stukowski, M. Ruda, G. Bertolino, D. Farkas, A. Caro, J. Hawreliak, B. Remington, R. Rudd, P. Erhart, R. Ravelo, T. Germann, N. Park, M. Suggit, S. Michalik, A. Higginbotham and J. Wark. Funding by PICT2008-1325 and SeCTyP U.N. Cuyo.

  9. The effect of heat developed during high strain rate deformation on the constitutive modeling of amorphous polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Keivan H.; Zamani, Jamal; Guedes, Rui M.; Ferreira, Fernando J.

    2016-02-01

    An adiabatic constitutive model is proposed for large strain deformation of polycarbonate (PC) at high strain rates. When the strain rate is sufficiently high such that the heat generated does not have time to transfer to the surroundings, temperature of material rises. The high strain rate deformation behavior of polymers is significantly affected by temperature-dependent constants and thermal softening. Based on the isothermal model which first was introduced by Mulliken and Boyce et al. (Int. J. Solids Struct. 43:1331-1356, 2006), an adiabatic model is proposed to predict the yield and post-yield behavior of glassy polymers at high strain rates. When calculating the heat generated and the temperature changes during the step by step simulation of the deformation, temperature-dependent elastic constants are incorporated to the constitutive equations. Moreover, better prediction of softening phenomena is achieved by the new definition for softening parameters of the proposed model. The constitutive model has been implemented numerically into a commercial finite element code through a user material subroutine (VUMAT). The experimental results, obtained using a split Hopkinson pressure bar, are supported by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and Decompose/Shift/Reconstruct (DSR) method. Comparison of adiabatic model predictions with experimental data demonstrates the ability of the model to capture the characteristic features of stress-strain curve of the material at very high strain rates.

  10. Evaluation of Dynamic Deformation Behaviors in Metallic Materials under High Strain-Rates Using Taylor Bar Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyung Oh; Shin, Hyung Seop [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To ensure the reliability and safety of various mechanical systems in accordance with their high-speed usage, it is necessary to evaluate the dynamic deformation behavior of structural materials under impact load. However, it is not easy to understand the dynamic deformation behavior of the structural materials using experimental methods in the high strain-rate range exceeding 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. In this study, the Taylor bar impact test was conducted to investigate the dynamic deformation behavior of metallic materials in the high strain-rate region, using a high-speed photography system. Numerical analysis of the Taylor bar impact test was performed using AUTODYN S/W. The results of the analysis were compared with the experimental results, and the material behavior in the high strain-rate region was discussed.

  11. Correlation Between Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Magnesium Alloys Prepared by High Strain Rate Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jihua; Chen, Guanqing; Yan, Hongge; Su, Bin; Gong, Xiaole; Zhou, Bo

    2017-09-01

    Microstructure and corrosion resistance in Hank's solution of four magnesium alloys (pure Mg, ZK60, Mg-4Zn and Mg-4Zn-0.3Ca) prepared by high strain rate rolling (HSRR) and conventional rolling (CR) are comparatively investigated. The HSRR alloy exhibits better bio-corrosion resistance than the CR alloy. The HSRR ZK60 alloy has finer grains, higher dynamic recrystallization (DRX) extent, lower twin fraction, coarser residual second-phase particles, finer and denser nanometer β 1 precipitates, lower residual compressive stress and stronger basal texture than the CR alloy. The average corrosion rate of the HSRR ZK60 sheet after 90-day immersion in Hank's solution is 0.17 mg cm-2 d-1, about 19% lower than that of the CR sheet. Its corrosion current density is 30.9 μA/cm2, about 45% lower than that of the CR sheet. Bio-corrosion resistance enhancement by HSRR can be mainly ascribe to the reduced grain size, the relatively adequate DRX, non-twinning, the coarser residual second-phase particles, the finer and denser nanometer precipitates and the slightly stronger (0001) texture.

  12. Theoretical and numerical study of strain localization under high strain rate solicitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranc, N.; Raynal, R.; Taravella, L.; Pina, V.; Hervé, P.

    2006-08-01

    Our study deals with the dynamic behavior of metallic materials and in particular of titanium alloy TA6V. For high strain rates, we can notice the occurrence of a phenomenon called adiabatic shearing. This phenomenon is about a plastic instability, which results in the appearance of a strain localization in narrow bands. In this paper we developed a thermo mechanical model to reproduce the formation and the propagation of adiabatic shear bands. A Johnson Cook thermo visco plastic behavior law was chosen for the titanium alloy TA6V. The law parameters were identified from static and dynamic torsion tests at various temperatures between ambient and 350circC. A 2D numerical simulation of torsion test was performed with the explicit finite elements code Abaqus. The thermo mechanical coupling and the heat conduction are taken into account. A roughness defect was inserted in the centre of a torsion specimen. The results showed that the strain of localization and the shear band speed increase when the amplitude and the size of the defect decrease.

  13. Numerical implementation of a crystal plasticity model with dislocation transport for high strain rate applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeur, Jason R.; Mourad, Hashem M.; Luscher, Darby J.; Hunter, Abigail; Kenamond, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    This paper details a numerical implementation of a single crystal plasticity model with dislocation transport for high strain rate applications. Our primary motivation for developing the model is to study the influence of dislocation transport and conservation on the mesoscale response of metallic crystals under extreme thermo-mechanical loading conditions (e.g. shocks). To this end we have developed a single crystal plasticity theory (Luscher et al (2015)) that incorporates finite deformation kinematics, internal stress fields caused by the presence of geometrically necessary dislocation gradients, advection equations to model dislocation density transport and conservation, and constitutive equations appropriate for shock loading (equation of state, drag-limited dislocation velocity, etc). In the following, we outline a coupled finite element-finite volume framework for implementing the model physics, and demonstrate its capabilities in simulating the response of a [1 0 0] copper single crystal during a plate impact test. Additionally, we explore the effect of varying certain model parameters (e.g. mesh density, finite volume update scheme) on the simulation results. Our results demonstrate that the model performs as intended and establishes a baseline of understanding that can be leveraged as we extend the model to incorporate additional and/or refined physics and move toward a multi-dimensional implementation.

  14. Cerebrovascular injury caused by a high strain rate insult in the thorax

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased in documented incidence and public prominence in recent conflicts. Evidence for a thoracic mechanism of blast-induced TBI was recently reviewed and, while the totality is compelling, data from experiments isolating this mechanism is sparse. Notably, one recent study showed pericapillar haemorrhage in brain tissue from victims of single, fatal gunshot wounds to the chest. Here, qualitative results are reported for a small field study that isolated a thoracic mechanism for TBI caused by a high strain rate insult in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus, mass 49-80 kg) in a natural environment. In each of three cases, petechiae were present on the surface of the frontal, occipital and/or left parietal lobes, along with capillary damage in the choroid plexus. The location of the projectile impact to the thorax seemed to affect the degree of damage. This may be due to the proximity to the great vessels. The data reported here provides direct evid...

  15. A constitutive model for particulate-reinforced titanium matrix composites subjected to high strain rates and high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Wei-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quasi-static and dynamic tension tests were conducted to study the mechanical properties of particulate-reinforced titanium matrix composites at strain rates ranging from 0.0001/s to 1000/s and at temperatures ranging from 20 °C to 650 °C Based on the experimental results, a constitutive model, which considers the effects of strain rate and temperature on hot deformation behavior, was proposed for particulate-reinforced titanium matrix composites subjected to high strain rates and high temperatures by using Zener-Hollomon equations including Arrhenius terms. All the material constants used in the model were identified by fitting Zener-Hollomon equations against the experimental results. By comparison of theoretical predictions presented by the model with experimental results, a good agreement was achieved, which indicates that this constitutive model can give an accurate and precise estimate for high temperature flow stress for the studied titanium matrix composites and can be used for numerical simulations of hot deformation behavior of the composites.

  16. Dynamic behaviour and shock-induced martensite transformation in near-beta Ti-5553 alloy under high strain rate loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti-5553 alloy is a near-beta titanium alloy with high strength and high fracture toughness. In this paper, the dynamic behaviour and shock-induced martensite phase transformation of Ti-5553 alloy with alpha/beta phases were investigated. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar was employed to investigate the dynamic properties. Microstructure evolutions were characterized by Scanning Electronic Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscope. The experimental results have demonstrated that Ti-5553 alloy with alpha/beta phases exhibits various strain rate hardening effects, both failure through adiabatic shear band. Ti-5553 alloy with Widmannstatten microstructure exhibit more obvious strain rate hardening effect, lower critical strain rate for ASB nucleation, compared with the alloy with Bimodal microstructures. Under dynamic compression, shock-induced beta to alpha” martensite transformation occurs.

  17. Compressive Strength of Hydrostatic-Stress-Sensitive Materials at High Strain-Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Q M; LU Y B

    2008-01-01

    Many engineering materials demonstrate dynamic enhancement of their compressive strength with the increase of strain-rate.which have been included in material models to improve the reliability of numerical Simulations of the material and structural responses Under impact and biasl tcads,The strain-rate effects on the dynamic Compressive strength of a range of engineering materials which behave in hydrostatic-stress-sensitive manner were investigated.It is concluded that the dynamic enhancement of the compressive strength of a hydrostatic-stress-sensitive material may include inertia-induced lateral confinement effects,which,as a non-strain-rate factor,may greatly enhance the compressive strength of these materials.Some empirical formulae based on the dynamic stress-strain measurements over-predict the strain-rate effects on the compressive strength of these hydrostatic-stress-sensitive materials,and thus may over-estimate the structural resistance to impact and blast lgads.leading fo non-conservative design of protective structures.

  18. Effect of the strain rate on the mechanical properties of a sheet TRIP steel with a high martensite content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, E. A.; Terent'ev, V. F.; Voznesenskaya, N. M.; Slizov, A. K.; Sirotinkin, V. P.; Baikin, A. S.; Seval'nev, G. S.

    2017-04-01

    The laws of changing the mechanical properties of sheet austenitic-martensitic VNS9-Sh (23Kh15N5AM3-Sh) TRIP steel are studied when the static strain rate changes in the range 0.1-20 mm/min (8.3 × 10-5-17 × 10-3 s-1). The 0.35-mm strip under study is characterized by a high martensite content (≈100%) in the surface layer at an average content of 80-85%. The transformation induced plasticity effect is maximal at a strain rate of 0.1 mm/min (8.3 × 10-5 s-1).

  19. A high-compression electron gun for C6+ production: concept, simulations and mechanical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertzig, Robert; Breitenfeldt, M.; Mathot, S.; Pitters, J.; Shornikov, A.; Wenander, F.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we report on simulations and the mechanical design of a high-compression electron gun for an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) dedicated for production of high intensity and high repetition rate pulses of bare carbon ions for injection into linac-based hadron therapy facilities. The gun is presently under construction at CERN to be retrofitted into the TwinEBIS test bench for experimental studies. We describe the design constraints, show results of numeric simulations and report on the mechanical design featuring several novel ideas. The reported design makes use of combined-function units with reduced number of mechanical joints that were carefully controlled and tuned during the manufacturing phase. The simulations addressed a wide range of topics including the influence of thermal effects, focusing optics, symmetry-breaking misalignments and injection into a full 5 T field.

  20. Experimental investigation of the behaviour of tungsten and molybdenum alloys at high strain-rate and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scapin Martina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction in recent years of new, extremely energetic particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC gives impulse to the development and testing of refractory metals and alloys based on molybdenum and tungsten to be used as structural materials. In this perspective, in this work the experimental results of a tests campaign on Inermet®  IT180 and pure Molybdenum (sintered by two different producers are presented. The investigation of the mechanical behaviour was performed in tension varying the strain-rates, the temperatures and both of them. Overall six orders of magnitude in strain-rate (between 10−3 and 103 s−1 were covered, starting from quasi-static up to high dynamic loading conditions. The high strain-rate tests were performed using a direct Hopkinson Bar setup. Both in quasi-static and high strain-rate conditions, the heating of the specimens was obtained with an induction coil system, controlled in feedback loop, based on measurements from thermocouples directly welded on the specimen. The temperature range varied between 25 and 1000°C. The experimental data were, finally, used to extract the parameters of the Zerilli-Armstrong model used to reproduce the mechanical behaviour of the investigated materials.

  1. Experimental investigation of the behaviour of tungsten and molybdenum alloys at high strain-rate and temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Scapin, Martina; Carra, Federico; Peroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The introduction in recent years of new, extremely energetic particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) gives impulse to the development and testing of refractory metals and alloys based on molybdenum and tungsten to be used as structural materials. In this perspective, in this work the experimental results of a tests campaign on Inermet® IT180 and pure Molybdenum (sintered by two different producers) are presented. The investigation of the mechanical behaviour was performed in tension varying the strain-rates, the temperatures and both of them. Overall six orders of magnitude in strain-rate (between 10−3 and 103 s−1) were covered, starting from quasi-static up to high dynamic loading conditions. The high strain-rate tests were performed using a direct Hopkinson Bar setup. Both in quasi-static and high strain-rate conditions, the heating of the specimens was obtained with an induction coil system, controlled in feedback loop, based on measurements from thermocouples directly welded on...

  2. Influence of particle size on the low and high strain rate behavior of dense colloidal dispersions of nanosilica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asija, Neelanchali; Chouhan, Hemant; Gebremeskel, Shishay Amare; Bhatnagar, Naresh

    2017-01-01

    Shear thickening is a non-Newtonian flow behavior characterized by the increase in apparent viscosity with the increase in applied shear rate, particularly when the shear rate exceeds a critical value termed as the critical shear rate (CSR). Due to this remarkable property of shear-thickening fluids (STFs), they are extensively used in hip protection pads, protective gear for athletes, and more recently in body armor. The use of STFs in body armor has led to the development of the concept of liquid body armor. In this study, the effect of particle size is explored on the low and high strain rate behavior of nanosilica dispersions, so as to predict the efficacy of STF-aided personal protection systems (PPS), specifically for ballistic applications. The low strain rate study was conducted on cone and plate rheometer, whereas the high strain rate characterization of STF was conducted on in-house fabricated split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. Spherical nanosilica particles of three different sizes (100, 300, and 500 nm) as well as fumed silica particles of four different specific surface areas (Aerosil A-90, A-130, A-150, and A-200), respectively, were used in this study. The test samples were prepared by dispersing nanosilica particles in polypropylene glycol (PPG) using ultrasonic homogenization method. The low strain rate studies aided in determining the CSR of the synthesized STF dispersions, whereas the high strain rate studies explored the impact-resisting ability of STFs in terms of the impact toughness and the peak stress attained during the impact loading of STF in SHPB testing.

  3. A numerical and experimental study of temperature effects on deformation behavior of carbon steels at high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouya, M.; Winter, S.; Fritsch, S.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2017-03-01

    Both in research and in the light of industrial applications, there is a growing interest in methods to characterize the mechanical behavior of materials at high strain rates. This is particularly true for steels (the most important structural materials), where often the strain rate-dependent material behavior also needs to be characterized in a wide temperature range. In this study, we use the Finite Element Method (FEM), first, to model the compressive deformation behavior of carbon steels under quasi-static loading conditions. The results are then compared to experimental data (for a simple C75 steel) at room temperature, and up to testing temperatures of 1000 °C. Second, an explicit FEM model that captures wave propagation phenomena during dynamic loading is developed to closely reflect the complex loading conditions in a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) – an experimental setup that allows loading of compression samples with strain rates up to 104 s-1 The dynamic simulations provide a useful basis for an accurate analysis of dynamically measured experimental data, which considers reflected elastic waves. By combining numerical and experimental investigations, we derive material parameters that capture the strain rate- and temperature-dependent behavior of the C75 steel from room temperature to 1000 °C, and from quasi-static to dynamic loading.

  4. Multi-scale Modeling of the Impact Response of a Strain Rate Sensitive High-Manganese Austenitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orkun eÖnal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A multi-scale modeling approach was applied to predict the impact response of a strain rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel. The roles of texture, geometry and strain rate sensitivity were successfully taken into account all at once by coupling crystal plasticity and finite element (FE analysis. Specifically, crystal plasticity was utilized to obtain the multi-axial flow rule at different strain rates based on the experimental deformation response under uniaxial tensile loading. The equivalent stress – equivalent strain response was then incorporated into the FE model for the sake of a more representative hardening rule under impact loading. The current results demonstrate that reliable predictions can be obtained by proper coupling of crystal plasticity and FE analysis even if the experimental flow rule of the material is acquired under uniaxial loading and at moderate strain rates that are significantly slower than those attained during impact loading. Furthermore, the current findings also demonstrate the need for an experiment-based multi-scale modeling approach for the sake of reliable predictions of the impact response.

  5. HIGH STRAIN RATE SUPERPLASTICITY OF A AIN PARTICULATE REINFORCED 6061Al COMPOSITE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.H. Han; J.T. Niu; D.M. Jiang; T. Imai

    2001-01-01

    The superplasticity of AlNp/6061Al composite, fabricated by powder metallurgy method and hot-rolled after extrusion, was investigated. The AlNp/6061Al composite exhibits an m-value of 0.49 and a maximum elongation of 438% in the strain rates ranging from 10-2-10°s-1 and at temperatures from 823K to 893K. Differential scanning calorimeter was used to ascertain the possibility of any partial melting in the vicinity of optimum superplastic temperature. These results suggested that liquid phase existed where maximum elongation was obtained.

  6. The development of a high strain rate superplastic Al-Mg-Zr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashwood, R.J.; Grimes, R.; Harrison, A.W.; Flower, H.M. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials

    2001-07-01

    In order for superplastic forming of aluminium to break out of the niche market low cost alloys are required that exhibit higher strain rate capability that are capable of volume production. This paper describes an investigation into the feasibility of producing such an alloy. A series of Al-4Mg alloys with 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1% Zr additions was prepared using a cheap particulate casting route, in an attempt to achieve higher levels of Zr supersaturation than are possible with conventional casting. The particulate was processed into a sheet product via hot extrusion followed by cold rolling and the effect of a number of process variables on the SPF performance of the sheet was investigated. It was found that increasing the Zr content, and manipulation of the thermomechanical processing conditions improved the SPF performance. Ductilities in excess of 600% have been achieved at a strain rate of 0.01 s{sup -1}, together with flow stresses less than 15 MPa. (orig.)

  7. Effects of strain rates on mechanical properties of limestone under high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Furong; Mao Xianbiao; Zhang Lianying; Yin Huiguang; Li Yan

    2011-01-01

    The experimental tests for limestone specimens at 700 ℃ in uniaxial compression were carried out to investigate the mechanical effects of loading rates on limestone by using a MTS810 rock mechanics servocontrolled testing system considering the loading rate as a variable.The mechanical properties of limestone such as the stress-strain curve,variable characteristics of peak strength and the modulus of elasticity of limestone were studied under the strain rates ranging from 1.1 × 10-s to 1.1 × 10-1 s-1.(1) Sharp decreases were shown for the peak strength and elastic modulus of limestone from 1.1 × 10-5 to 1.1 × 10 4 s-1 at 700 C as well as a downward trend was shown from 1.1 × 10 4 to 1.1 × 10-1 s-1with the rise of the strain rate.(2) The peak strain increased from 1.1 × 10-5 to 1.1 × 10-4 s-1,however,there was no obvious changes shown for the peak strain of limestone from 1.1 × 10-4 to 1.1 × 10-1 s-1.These results can nrovide valuable references for the rock blasting effect and design of mine.

  8. Cryogenic ultrahigh strain rate deformation induced hybrid nanotwinned microstructure for high strength and high ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang; Suslov, Sergey; Lin, Dong; Liao, Yiliang; Cheng, Gary J.

    2014-06-01

    Nanocrystalline metallic materials prepared by severe plastic deformation often possess high strength but low ductility due to the low dislocation accumulation capacity of the nanograins. Here, we report a unique process, namely, cryogenic laser shock peening (CLSP), to generate gradient nanotwinned microstructure that leads to high strength while preserving the ductility. It was observed that gradient structure was generated in copper. Near the top surface, nanocrystalline with high dense nanotwins have been observed; with the depth increasing, the fraction of the twin boundaries reduces and more heavily dislocated subgrains are observed. It has been demonstrated that CLSP can significantly improve material strength while preserving the ductility. The mechanism of the formation of gradient microstructure and high dense nanotwins near the surface was discussed. The reason behind the improvement in strength and ductility was investigated.

  9. Development of ultra-lightweight slurries with high compressive strength for use in oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzart, J. Walter P. [Halliburton Company, Houston, TX (United States); Farias, A.C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ribeiro, Danilo; Fernandes, Thiago; Santos, Reened [Halliburton Energy Services Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    Formations with low fracture gradients or depleted reservoirs often lead to difficult oil well cementing operations. Commonly employed cement slurries (14.0 to 15.8 lb/gal), generate an equivalent circulating density (ECD) higher than the fracture gradient and ultimately lead to formation damage, lost circulation and a decreased top of cement. Given the high price of oil, companies are investing in those and other wells that are difficult to explore. Naturally, lightweight cement slurries are used to reduce the ECD (10.0 to 14.0 lb/gal), using additives to trap water and stabilize the slurry. However, when the density reaches 11.0 lb/gal, the increase in water content may cause a change in characteristics. The focus of this study is extreme cases where it is necessary to employ ultra-lightweight cement slurries (5.5 to 10.0 lb/gal). Foamed slurries have been widely used, and the objective is to set an alternative by developing cement slurries containing uncompressible microspheres, aiming for a density of 7.5 lb/gal as well as high compressive strength. Another benefit in contrast to preparing foamed cement slurries is that there is no requirement for special equipment in the field. Routine laboratory tests such as fluid-loss control, sedimentation, thickening time, free water, compressive strength, and rheology (at room and high temperatures) were performed. Thus, it was concluded that the proposed cement slurries can be used in oil wells. (author)

  10. Adaptivity with near-orthogonality constraint for high compression rates in lifting scheme framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Tadeusz; Voisin, Yvon; Diou, Alain

    2004-01-01

    Since few years, Lifting Scheme has proven its utility in compression field. It permits to easily create fast, reversible, separable or no, not necessarily linear, multiresolution analysis for sound, image, video or even 3D graphics. An interesting feature of lifting scheme is the ability to build adaptive transforms for compression, more easily than with other decompositions. Many works have already be done in this subject, especially in lossless or near-lossless compression framework : better compression than with usually used methods can be obtained. However, most of the techniques used in adaptive near-lossless compression can not be extended to higher lossy compression rates, even in the simplest cases. Indeed, this is due to the quantization error introduced before coding, which has not controlled propagation through inverse transform. Authors have put their interest to the classical Lifting Scheme, with linear convolution filters, but they studied criterions to maintain a high level of adaptivity and a good error propagation through inverse transform. This article aims to present relatively simple criterion to obtain filters able to build image and video compression with high compression rate, tested here with the Spiht coder. For this, upgrade and predict filters are simultaneously adapted thanks to a constrained least-square method. The constraint consists in a near-orthogonality inequality, letting sufficiently high level of adaptivity. Some compression results are given, illustrating relevance of this method, even with short filters.

  11. Adiabatic Shear Band Formation in Intermetallic WHA at High Strain Rates and Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprey, K. E.; Clifton, R. J.; Griffo, A.; German, R. M.

    1997-07-01

    A novel tungsten-based composite is being developed at The Pennsylvania State University to enhance shear banding by introducing a strong thermo-plastic instability. This liquid phase sintered composite consists of tungsten grains embedded in an intermetallic alloy matrix which has the property that its flow stress increases with increasing temperature up to a critical temperature at which rapid thermal softening begins. Pressure-shear plate impact experiments are being used to subject thin plates of this composite to shearing at strain rates of 10^5 s-1 to 10^6 s-1 at pressures of 6 - 8 GPa, and temperatures up to 650 ^o C. The experiments, combined with computer simulation, are being conducted to determine the effects of the thermal properties of the matrix on the initiation and propagation of adiabatic shear bands.

  12. High-strain-rate superplasticity in oxide ceramics: a trial of microstructural design based on creep-cavitation mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keijiro HIRAGA; Byung-Nam KIM; Koji MORITA; Hidehiro YOSHIDA; Yoshio SAKKA; Masaaki TABUCHI

    2011-01-01

    From existing knowledge about high-temperature cavitation mechanisms, necessary conditions were discussed for the suppression of cavitation failure during superplastic deformation in ceramic materials. The discussion, where special attention was placed on the relaxation of stress concentrations during grain-boundary sliding and cavity nucleation and growth, leaded to a conclusion that cavitation failure could be retarded by the simultaneous controlling of the initial grain size, the number of residual defects,diffusivity, dynamic grain growth and the homogeneity of microstructure. On the basis of this conclusion, high-strain-rate superplasticity (defined as superplasticity at a strain rate higher than 0.01 s-1) could be intentionally attained in some oxide ceramic materials. This was shown in tetragonal zirconia and composites consisting of zirconia, α-alumina and a spinel phase.

  13. Properties of heterogeneous energetic materials under high strain, high strain rate deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing

    Heterogeneous energetic materials have many applications. Their dynamic behavior and microstructural evolution upon plastic deformation have remained not fully understood. The following heterogeneous materials were investigated in the this study: the pure PTFE (usually a mixture of crystalline and amorphous phases), PTFE-Sn, PTFE-Al, PTFE-Al-W, and carbon fibers filled Al alloy. Sample manufacturing processes involving ball milling and Cold Isostatic Pressing were employed. Quasi-static and Hopkinson bar tests were carried out to obtain the compressive strengths of composites. The Conventional Thick-walled Cylinder (TWC) method and newly developed small-scale Hopkinson bar based TWC experiments were conducted to investigate single shear bands and their assembly. Conventional and "soft" drop-weight tests were performed to examine the mechanical properties and the initiation of chemical reactions. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to detect the details of the microstructures and failure mechanisms of heterogeneous materials. New features in the dynamic behavior of heterogeneous materials were observed. They include the following: (1) Strain softening, instead of thermal softening, is the main mechanism in the initiation of shear bands in explosively driven TWC tests of solid PTFE. (2) Cold isostatically pressed PTFE-Sn samples were more stable with respect to shear localization than solid PTFE. (3) The dynamic collapse of solid PTFE-Al samples with different particle sizes was accomplished with the shear localization bands and cracks. (4) Force chains in the fine W and Al particles were attributed to the high strength of the porous PTFE-Al-W composite containing fine W particles in comparison with composites with coarse W particles. (5) Debonding of metal particles from the PTFE matrix and the fracture of the matrix were identified to be two major mechanisms for the failure of the PTFE-Al-W composites. (6) The formation of PTFE nano-fibers during high strain flow

  14. Modelling and design of high compression electron guns for EBIS/T charge breeders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087190; Zschornack, G.; Lettry, J.; Wenander, F.

    In this thesis the optimization of the REXEBIS charge breeder at the ISOLDE facility is presented. REXEBIS in its current state provides a current density of 200A/cm² inside the trapping region at 2 T and will be optimized to the physical limit of its design. To overcome this limit a new electron gun, the HEC² gun, was designed in collaboration with the BNL and is in commission at TestEBIS. This electron gun promises a current density of >10 kA/cm², which decreases the charge breeding time significantly. This thesis presents novel simulation techniques supporting the commissioning phase by explaining the sources of occurring loss current and, in addition, evaluate the currently installed collector for compatibility with the HEC2 gun operating at its design limit. The experience gained from the commission of the HEC² gun and the established numerical techniques lead to the development of a smaller high-compression electron gun for medical purposes, the MEDeGUN. This electron gun should provide a high-quali...

  15. Comparison of microstructures in electroformed and spin-formed copper liners of shaped charge undergone high-strain-rate deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The as-formed and post-deformed microstructures in both electroformed and spin-formed copper liners of shaped charge were studied by optical microscopy(OM), electron backscattering Kikuchi patterns(EBSP) technique and transmission electron microscopy(TEM). The deformation was carried out at an ultra-high strain rate. OM analysis shows that the initial grains of the electroformed copper liner are finer than those of the spin-formed copper liners. Meanwhile, EBSP analysis reveals that the fiber texture exists in the electroformed copper liners, whereas there is no texture observed in the spin-formed copper liners before deformation. Having undergone high-strain-rate deformation the grains in the recovered slugs, which are transformed from both the electroformed and spin-formed copper liners, all become small. TEM observations of the above two kinds of post-deformed specimens show the existence of cellular structures characterized by tangled dislocations and subgrain boundaries consisting of dislocation arrays. These experimental results indicate that dynamic recovery and recrystallization play an important role in the high-strain-rate deformation process.

  16. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Songjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China); Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Zuogui [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Akiyama, Eiji [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: AKIYAMA.Eiji@nims.go.jp; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Boping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  17. Using Omega and NIF to Advance Theories of High-Pressure, High-Strain-Rate Tantalum Plastic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, R. E.; Arsenlis, A.; Barton, N. R.; Cavallo, R. M.; Huntington, C. M.; McNaney, J. M.; Orlikowski, D. A.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Remington, B. A.; Wehrenberg, C. E.

    2015-11-01

    Precisely controlled plasmas are playing an important role as both pump and probe in experiments to understand the strength of solid metals at high energy density (HED) conditions. In concert with theory, these experiments have enabled a predictive capability to model material strength at Mbar pressures and high strain rates. Here we describe multiscale strength models developed for tantalum and vanadium starting with atomic bonding and extending up through the mobility of individual dislocations, the evolution of dislocation networks and so on up to full scale. High-energy laser platforms such as the NIF and the Omega laser probe ramp-compressed strength to 1-5 Mbar. The predictions of the multiscale model agree well with the 1 Mbar experiments without tuning. The combination of experiment and theory has shown that solid metals can behave significantly differently at HED conditions; for example, the familiar strengthening of metals as the grain size is reduced has been shown not to occur in the high pressure experiments. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Lab under contract DE-AC52-07NA273.

  18. Dynamic reverse phase transformation induced high-strain-rate superplasticity in low carbon low alloy steels with commercial potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenquan; Huang, Chongxiang; Wang, Chang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-08-23

    Superplastic materials are capable of exhibiting large tensile elongation at elevated temperature, which is of great industrial significance because it forms the basis of a fabrication method to produce complex shapes. Superplasticity with elongation larger than 500% has been widely realized in many metals and alloys, but seldomly been succeeded in low carbon low alloy steel, even though it is commercially applied in the largest quantity. Here we report ultrahigh superplastic elongation of 900-1200% in the FeMnAl low carbon steels at high strain rate of 10(-2)-10(-3) s(-1). Such high-strain-rate superplasticity was attributed to dynamic austenite reverse phase transformation from a heavily cold rolled ferrite to fine-grained ferrite/austenite duplex microstructure and subsequent limited dynamic grain coarsening, under which a large fraction of high angle boundaries can be resulted for superplastic deformation. It is believed that this finding of the low carbon low alloy steel with ultrahigh superplasticity and relative low cost would remarkably promote the application of superplastic forming technique in automobile, aeronautical, astronautical and other fields.

  19. A model for plasticity kinetics and its role in simulating the dynamic behavior of Fe at high strain rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, J D; Minich, R W; Kalantar, D H

    2007-03-29

    The recent diagnostic capability of the Omega laser to study solid-solid phase transitions at pressures greater than 10 GPa and at strain rates exceeding 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} has also provided valuable information on the dynamic elastic-plastic behavior of materials. We have found, for example, that plasticity kinetics modifies the effective loading and thermodynamic paths of the material. In this paper we derive a kinetics equation for the time-dependent plastic response of the material to dynamic loading, and describe the model's implementation in a radiation-hydrodynamics computer code. This model for plasticity kinetics incorporates the Gilman model for dislocation multiplication and saturation. We discuss the application of this model to the simulation of experimental velocity interferometry data for experiments on Omega in which Fe was shock compressed to pressures beyond the {alpha}-to-{var_epsilon} phase transition pressure. The kinetics model is shown to fit the data reasonably well in this high strain rate regime and further allows quantification of the relative contributions of dislocation multiplication and drag. The sensitivity of the observed signatures to the kinetics model parameters is presented.

  20. Cerebrovascular Injury Caused by a High Strain Rate Insult in the Thorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    al. Severe lung contusion and death after high-velocity behind-armor blunt trauma: relation to protection level. Mil Med 2007; 172 1110-1116 13...of increasing risk developed by Courtney and Courtney9 and the Bowen curves for risk of blast-induced lung injury.2 Figure 1. Experimental conditions...involvement of nitric oxide. Brain Inj 2001; 15 593-612 6. Cooper GJ. Protection of the lung from blast overpressure by thoracic stress wave decouplers. J

  1. Evaluation of the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of a silicon steel under various strain rate conditions with a servo-hydraulic high speed testing machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Junbeom; Huh, Hoon; Kim, Jae-song

    2017-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the construction of an empirical model of the Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT) for 3.4% silicon steel based on tensile test results at strain rates ranging from 0.001 s‒1 to 100 s‒1. Dynamic tensile tests are conducted using an in-house servo hydraulic tensile test machine at strain rates of 1 s‒1, 10 s‒1, and 100 s‒1 and quasi-static tensile tests are conducted using Instron 4206 at strain rates of 0.001 s‒1 and 0.01 s‒1 with an environmental chamber. Fracture elongations are measured by a DIC method during all tests using the high-speed camera for accurate measurement. The DBTT of 3.4% silicon steel is presented in terms of fracture strain with the variation of the temperature and the strain rate. It is demonstrated from the test results that the DBTT increases as the strain rate increases. An empirical model of the DBTT is constructed in terms of strain rate, temperature and fracture elongation. The parameters of the empirical model are calculated from experimental results obtained at various temperatures and strain rates.

  2. High Strain-Rate Mechanical Behaviour of a Copper Matrix Composite for Nuclear Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Peroni, L

    2012-01-01

    Aim of this work is the investigation of mechanical behaviour of an alumina dispersion strengthened copper, known by the trade name GLIDCOP®, subjected to dynamic loads: it is a composite material with a copper matrix strengthened with aluminium oxide ceramic particles. Since the particle content is quite small the material keeps the OFE copper physical properties, such as thermal and electrical conductivity, but with a higher yield strength, like a mild-carbon steel. Besides, with the addition of aluminium oxide, the good mechanical properties are retained also at high temperatures and the resistance to thermal softening is increased: the second phase blocks the dislocation movement preventing the grain growth. Thanks to these properties GLIDCOP® finds several applications in particle accelerator technologies, where problems of thermal management, combined with structural requirements, play a key role. Currently, it is used for the construction of structural and functional parts of the particle beam collim...

  3. The effect of strain rate on the impact strength of the high-Mn steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Śmiglewicz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, results of impact bending tests of a high-manganese steel of Fe – 30 wt.%, Mn – 9 wt.%, Al – 0,65 wt.%, C grade are presented. The tests were carried out using a flywheel machine, suitable for dynamic stretching and impact bending tests in the range of linear velocity of the forcing element from 5 ÷ 40 m/s. The obtained test results were compared with the results of impact resistance of the studied steel determined using Charpy machine. Structural investigations were carried out using scanning transmission electron microscopy. Surfaces of fractures formed in the break point during bending tests were analyzed, and they indicate a presence of mixed transcrystalline fractures with a predominance of plastic fractures.

  4. High strain rate fracture and C-chain unraveling in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Exceedingly high strength hasbeen anticipated for carbon nanotubes since their discovery, promising novel material applications. The strength of carbon bonds and their perfect arrangement within the walls suggests indeed an extreme stiffness along the axis, combined with resilience in other directions. Both experimental evidence and computer simulations support this notion. Although the nanotubes sustain all kinds of twisting and bending, there should be some way to break them. How strong in tension is a carbon nanotube? It is too small to be pulled apart with one's hands, and too strong for tiny “optical tweezers”, for example? The proper instruments are still to be built, or experimentalists should wait until nanotubes grow longer in chemists' laboratories. In the meantime, some tests are being done in computer modeling.

  5. High strain rate and quasi-static tensile behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V after cyclic damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verleysen P.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is common that energy absorbing structural elements are subjected to a number of loading cycles before a crash event. Several studies have shown that previous fatigue can significantly influence the tensile properties of some materials, and hence the behaviour of structural elements made of them. However, when the capacity of absorbing energy of engineering materials is determined, fresh material without any fatigue damage is most often used. This study investigates the effect of fatigue damage on the dynamic tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V in thin-sheet form. Results are completed with tests at quasi-static strain rates and observations of the fracture surfaces, and compared with results obtained from other alloys and steel grades. The experiments show that the dynamic properties of Ti-6Al-4V are not affected by a number of fatigue loading cycles high enough to significantly reduce the energy absorbing capabilities of EDM machined samples.

  6. A study on the strength of an armour-grade aluminum under high strain-rate loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Hazell, P. J.

    2010-06-01

    The aluminum alloy 5083 in tempers such as H32 and H131 is an established light-weight armour material. While its dynamic response under high strain-rates has been investigated elsewhere, little account of the effect of material orientation has been made. In addition, little information on its strength under such loadings is available in the literature. Here, both the longitudinal and lateral components of stress have been measured using embedded manganin stress gauges during plate-impact experiments on samples with the rolling direction aligned both orthogonal and parallel to the impact axis. The Hugoniot elastic limit, spall, and shear strengths were investigated for incident pressures in the range 1-8 GPa, providing an insight into the response of this alloy under shock loading. Further, the time dependence of lateral stress behind the shock front was investigated to give an indication of material response.

  7. Laser-Driven Ramp Compression to Investigate and Model Dynamic Response of Iron at High Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourou Amadou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficient laser shock processing of materials requires a good characterization of their dynamic response to pulsed compression, and predictive numerical models to simulate the thermomechanical processes governing this response. Due to the extremely high strain rates involved, the kinetics of these processes should be accounted for. In this paper, we present an experimental investigation of the dynamic behavior of iron under laser driven ramp loading, then we compare the results to the predictions of a constitutive model including viscoplasticity and a thermodynamically consistent description of the bcc to hcp phase transformation expected near 13 GPa. Both processes are shown to affect wave propagation and pressure decay, and the influence of the kinetics of the phase transformation on the velocity records is discussed in details.

  8. High strain rate and quasi-static tensile behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V after cyclic damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán López, J.; Verleysen, P.; Degrieck, J.

    2012-08-01

    It is common that energy absorbing structural elements are subjected to a number of loading cycles before a crash event. Several studies have shown that previous fatigue can significantly influence the tensile properties of some materials, and hence the behaviour of structural elements made of them. However, when the capacity of absorbing energy of engineering materials is determined, fresh material without any fatigue damage is most often used. This study investigates the effect of fatigue damage on the dynamic tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V in thin-sheet form. Results are completed with tests at quasi-static strain rates and observations of the fracture surfaces, and compared with results obtained from other alloys and steel grades. The experiments show that the dynamic properties of Ti-6Al-4V are not affected by a number of fatigue loading cycles high enough to significantly reduce the energy absorbing capabilities of EDM machined samples.

  9. Ductile failure of steel HY80 under high strain rates and triaxial stress states, experimental results and damage description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Malek, S.; Halle, Th.; Meyer, L. W.

    2003-09-01

    Ductile fracture investigations are an important part in current research. The simulation of fracture by means of numerical codes needs precise material data that may be reached from accurate mechanical testing. In order to predict failure processes, the stress state history as a function of strain development has to be known. In this work tensile tests on HY80 steel were performed under quasistatic and high strain rate loading conditions at room temperature using smooth and notched specimens. The force-time and displacement-time behaviour was measured during testing. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the fractured surfaces. Furthermore, different models were applied to describe the failure process. FE-calculations were used to receive the stress state in the material in the region of the notch as a function of strain development.

  10. Interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms under the influence of high strain rate impact conditions: Numerical computations of experimental observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoelison, R. N.; Sapanathan, T.; Padayodi, E.; Buiron, N.; Rachik, M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the complex interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms during high speed impact conditions. A robust numerical modelling technique using Eulerian simulations are used to explain the material response of the interface subjected to a high strain rate collision during a magnetic pulse welding. The capability of this model is demonstrated using the predictions of interfacial kinematics and revealing the governing mechanical behaviours. Numerical predictions of wave formation resulted with the upward or downward jetting and complex interfacial mixing governed by wake and vortex instabilities corroborate the experimental observations. Moreover, the prediction of the material ejection during the simulation explains the experimentally observed deposited particles outside the welded region. Formations of internal cavities along the interface is also closely resemble the resulted confined heating at the vicinity of the interface appeared from those wake and vortex instabilities. These results are key features of this simulation that also explains the potential mechanisms in the defects formation at the interface. These results indicate that the Eulerian computation not only has the advantage of predicting the governing mechanisms, but also it offers a non-destructive approach to identify the interfacial defects in an impact welded joint.

  11. Fracto-mechanoluminescent light emission of EuD4TEA-PDMS composites subjected to high strain-rate compressive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Donghyeon; Castaño, Nicolas; Bhakta, Raj; Kimberley, Jamie

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study is to understand light emission characteristics of fracto-mechanoluminescent (FML) europium tetrakis(dibenzoylmethide)-triethylammonium (EuD4TEA) crystals under high strain-rate compressive loading. As a sensing material that can play a pivotal role for the self-powered impact sensor technology, it is important to understand transformative light emission characteristics of the FML EuD4TEA crystals under high strain-rate compressive loading. First, EuD4TEA crystals were synthesized and embedded into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer to fabricate EuD4TEA-PDMS composite test specimens. Second, the prepared EuD4TEA-PDMS composites were tested using the modified Kolsky bar setup equipped with a high-speed camera. Third, FML light emission was captured to yield 12 bit grayscale video footage, which was processed to quantify the FML light emission. Finally, quantitative parameters were generated by taking into account pixel values and population of pixels of the 12 bit grayscale images to represent FML light intensity. The FML light intensity was correlated with high strain-rate compressive strain and strain rate to understand the FML light emission characteristics under high strain-rate compressive loading that can result from impact occurrences.

  12. Microstructural characteristics of adiabatic shear localization in a metastable beta titanium alloy deformed at high strain rate and elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Hongyi, E-mail: h.zhan@uq.edu.au [Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacture, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Zeng, Weidong [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wang, Gui [Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacture, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Defence Material Technology Centre, Level 2, 24 Wakefield St, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Kent, Damon [School of Science and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Queensland 4575 (Australia); Dargusch, Matthew [Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacture, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Defence Material Technology Centre, Level 2, 24 Wakefield St, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    The microstructural evolution and grain refinement within adiabatic shear bands in the Ti6554 alloy deformed at high strain rates and elevated temperatures have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy. No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve, indicating that the initiation of adiabatic shear bands does not lead to the loss of load capacity for the Ti6554 alloy. The outer region of the shear bands mainly consists of cell structures bounded by dislocation clusters. Equiaxed subgrains in the core area of the shear band can be evolved from the subdivision of cell structures or reconstruction and transverse segmentation of dislocation clusters. It is proposed that dislocation activity dominates the grain refinement process. The rotational recrystallization mechanism may operate as the kinetic requirements for it are fulfilled. The coexistence of different substructures across the shear bands implies that the microstructural evolution inside the shear bands is not homogeneous and different grain refinement mechanisms may operate simultaneously to refine the structure. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The microstructure within the adiabatic shear band was characterized by TEM. • No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve. • Dislocation activity dominated the grain refinement process. • The kinetic requirements for rotational recrystallization mechanism were fulfilled. • Different grain refinement mechanisms operated simultaneously to refine the structure.

  13. A comparison of the abilities of natural rubber (NR) and synthetic polyisoprene cis-1,4 rubber (IR) to crystallize under strain at high strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candau, Nicolas; Chazeau, Laurent; Chenal, Jean-Marc; Gauthier, Catherine; Munch, Etienne

    2016-02-07

    Strain induced crystallization (SIC) of a natural rubber (NR) and a synthetic rubber (IR) with a high amount of cis-1,4 units (98.6%) is studied, thanks to in situ wide angle X-ray (WAXS) experiments at room temperature performed in a large range of strain rates. During stretching at a low strain rate (4.2 × 10(-3) s(-1)), SIC in IR occurs at a larger stretching ratio than in NR. As a result, the crystallinity index at a given stretching ratio is lower in IR than in NR, in spite of the similar crosslink densities of the chains involved in the crystallization in both materials. This lower ability for crystallization in IR is attributed to the presence of branching along its backbone and its lower stereoregularity. Conversely, dynamic experiments performed at high strain rates (10(1)/10(2) s(-1)) show for both materials a similar ability to crystallize. This unexpected result is confirmed by monotonic tensile tests performed in a large range of strain rates. The reason is thermodynamic: the chain extension plays a predominant role compared to the role of the microstructure defects when the strain rate is high, i.e. when the kinetics of the crystallite nucleation forces the crystallization to occur at a large stretching ratio. A thermodynamic model enables qualitative reproduction of the experimental results.

  14. Characterization of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polyamide-6 thermoplastic composite under longitudinal compression loading at high strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeckl, Marina; Kuhn, Peter; Koerber, Hannes

    2015-09-01

    In the presented work, an experimental investigation has been performed to characterize the strain rate dependency of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polyamide-6 composite for longitudinal compression loading. An end-loaded compression specimen geometry, suitable for contactless optical strain measurement via digital image correlation and dynamic loading in a split-Hopkinson pressure bar, was developed. For the dynamic experiments at a constant strain rate of 100 s-1 a modified version of the Dynamic Compression Fixture, developed by Koerber and Camanho [Koerber and Camanho, Composites Part A, 42, 462-470, 2011] was used. The results were compared with quasi-static test results at a strain rate of 3 · 10-4 s-1 using the same specimen geometry. It was found that the longitudinal compressive strength increased by 61% compared to the strength value obtained from the quasi-static tests.

  15. Dynamic behavior and microstructural evolution during moderate to high strain rate hot deformation of a Fe-Ni-Cr alloy (alloy 800H)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Di, Hongshuang; Zhang, Jiecen; Yang, Yaohua

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to fundamentally understand the dynamic behavior of alloy 800H at moderate to high strain rate using hot compression tests and propose nucleation mechanism associated with dynamic crystallization (DRX). We firstly investigated the dynamic behavior of alloy 800H with industrial scale strain rates using hot compression tests and adiabatic correction was performed to correct as-measured flow curves. Secondly, a Johnson-Cook model was established by using the corrected data and could give a precise prediction of elevated temperature flow stress for the studied alloy. Finally, the nucleation mechanism of DRX grains at high strain rates was studied. The results showed that the predominant nucleation mechanism for DRX is the formation of "bulge" at parent grain boundary. Additionally, the fragmentation of original grain at low deformation temperatures and the twinning near the bulged regions at high deformation temperatures also accelerate the DRX process.

  16. Influence of free water content on the compressive mechanical behaviour of cement mortar under high strain rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jikai Zhou; Xudong Chen; Longqiang Wu; Xiaowei Kan

    2011-06-01

    The effect of free water content upon the compressive mechanical behaviour of cement mortar under high loading rate was studied. The uniaxial rapid compressive loading testing of a total of 30 specimens, nominally 37 mm in diameter and 18.5 mm in height, with five different saturations (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%, respectively) were executed in this paper. The technique ‘Split Hopkinson pressure bar’ (SHPB) was used. The impact velocity was 10 m/s with the corresponding strain rate as 102/s. Water-cement ratio of 0.5 was used. The compressive behaviour of the materials was measured in terms of the maximum stress, Young’s modulus, critical strain at maximum stress and ultimate strain at failure. The data obtained from test indicates that the similarity exists in the shape of strain–stress curves of cement mortars with different water content, the upward section of the stress–strain curve shows bilinear characteristics, while the descending stage (softening state) is almost linear. The dynamic compressive strength of cement mortar increased with the decreasing of water content, the dynamic compressive strength of the saturated specimens was 23% lower than that of the totally dry specimens. With an increase in water content, the Young’s modulus first increases and then decreases, the Young’s modulus of the saturated specimens was 23% lower than that of the totally dry specimens. No significant changes occurred in the critical and ultimate strain value as the water content is changed.

  17. Spark ignition engine performance and emissions in a high compression engine using biogas and methane mixtures without knock occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez Montoya Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to use biogas in an internal combustion engine with high compression ratio and in order to get a high output thermal efficiency, this investigation used a diesel engine with a maximum output power 8.5 kW, which was converted to spark ignition mode to use it with gaseous fuels. Three fuels were used: Simulated biogas, biogas enriched with 25% and 50% methane by volume. After conversion, the output power of the engine decreased by 17.64% when using only biogas, where 7 kW was the new maximum output power of the engine. The compression ratio was kept at 15.5:1, and knocking did not occur during engine operation. Output thermal efficiency operating the engine in SI mode with biogas enriched with 50% methane was almost the same compared with the engine running in diesel-biogas dual mode at full load and was greater at part loads. The dependence of the diesel pilot was eliminated when biogas was used in the engine converted in SI mode. The optimum condition of experiment for the engine without knocking was using biogas enriched with 50% methane, with 12 degrees of spark timing advance and equivalence ratio of 0.95, larger output powers and higher values of methane concentration lead the engine to knock operation. The presence of CO2 allows operating engines at high compression ratios with normal combustion conditions. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and unburnt methane all in g/kWh decreased when the biogas was enriched with 50% methane.

  18. High creep strain rates observed in nanocrystalline α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles by nanoindentation measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajra, P.; Saha, D.R. [MLS Professor' s Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Mada, M.R. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kensington, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Dutta, S. [Department of Physics, Rammohan College, 102/1 Raja Rammohan Roy Sarani, Kolkata 700009 (India); Brahma, P. [Department of Physics, Gurudas College, Kolkata 700054 (India); Boughton, P.; Bandyopadhyay, S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kensington, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Chakravorty, D., E-mail: mlsdc@iacs.res.in [MLS Professor' s Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-05-01

    Nanocrystalline α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with particle sizes in the range 10–24 nm were produced by mechanical milling of micron-sized α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. Microstructures of sintered pellets of cold compacted powder were investigated by electron microscopy. Nanoindentation studies showed the creep strain rates had values of the order of 10{sup −4} s{sup −1} at room temperature with creep increasing to higher values with increase of particle diameter. This was attributed to grain boundary sliding enhancement due to a piezomagnetic-type effect in the particles. Compressive tests at room temperature carried out on bulk samples with nanosized crystallites also showed large creep strain rate behaviour. The result will be helpful in designing ceramic systems with plastic behaviour at room temperature.

  19. Modeling of High-Strain-Rate Deformation, Fracture, and Impact Behavior of Advanced Gas Turbine Engine Materials at Low and Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Nathenson, David; Prakash, Vikas

    2003-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides have received considerable attention over the last decade. These alloys are known to have low density, good high temperature strength retention, and good oxidation and corrosion resistance. However, poor ductility and low fracture toughness have been the key limiting factors in the full utilization of these alloys. More recently, Gamma-met PX has been developed by GKSS, Germany. These alloys have been observed to have superior strengths at elevated temperatures and quasi-static deformation rates and good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. The present paper discusses results of a study to understand dynamic response of gamma-met PX in uniaxial compression. The experiments were conducted by using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar between room temperature and 900 C and strain rates of up to 3500 per second. The Gamma met PX alloy showed superior strength when compared to nickel based superalloys and other gamma titanium aluminides at all test temperatures. It also showed strain and strain-rate hardening at all levels of strain rates and temperatures and without yield anomaly up to 900 C. After approximately 600 C, thermal softening is observed at all strain rates with the rate of thermal softening increasing dramatically between 800 and 900 C. However, these flow stress levels are comparatively higher in Gamma met PX than those observed for other TiAl alloys.

  20. Mechanical properties at high strain-rate of lead core and brass jacket of a NATO 7.62 mm ball bullet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manes A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations are now an actual option in order to try to reproduce and understand the mechanical response in components subjected to extreme loading conditions, like in a ballistic impact. A correct materials calibration is therefore necessary in order to extract the materials parameters. In this work the simple and widely used Johnson-Cook model was used to analyse the experimental data obtained for the characterization of the bullet materials. The bullet under investigation is a full metal jacket ball, with a lead-antimony alloy core and a brass jacket. The experimental tests cover a wide range in strain-rate, starting from quasi-static tests up to high dynamic tests performed on a standard Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar setup. In general, there is a great lack in strain-rate sensitivity and failure data. Pure lead is very soft and ductile, so antimony is used to give greater hardness and strength. The results of this study show a significant strain-rate influence for this alloy that can be associated with the presence of the lead-antimony phases and their structures. Also in case of the brass the results showed significant strain-rate sensitivity in the material response.

  1. Mechanical properties at high strain-rate of lead core and brass jacket of a NATO 7.62 mm ball bullet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroni, L.; Scapin, M.; Fichera, C.; Manes, A.; Giglio, M.

    2012-08-01

    Numerical simulations are now an actual option in order to try to reproduce and understand the mechanical response in components subjected to extreme loading conditions, like in a ballistic impact. A correct materials calibration is therefore necessary in order to extract the materials parameters. In this work the simple and widely used Johnson-Cook model was used to analyse the experimental data obtained for the characterization of the bullet materials. The bullet under investigation is a full metal jacket ball, with a lead-antimony alloy core and a brass jacket. The experimental tests cover a wide range in strain-rate, starting from quasi-static tests up to high dynamic tests performed on a standard Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar setup. In general, there is a great lack in strain-rate sensitivity and failure data. Pure lead is very soft and ductile, so antimony is used to give greater hardness and strength. The results of this study show a significant strain-rate influence for this alloy that can be associated with the presence of the lead-antimony phases and their structures. Also in case of the brass the results showed significant strain-rate sensitivity in the material response.

  2. Many-Body Contributions to Cohesive Energy of Highly Compressed Solid 4He

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田春玲; 刘福生; 蔡灵仓; 经福谦

    2003-01-01

    A many-body expansion of cohesive energy of solid 4He is made up to five-body term, and short-range two-,three-, four- and five-body contributions have been computed by using the Hartree-Fock self-consistent-field technique and the same atomic basis set (6311G). At high densities the Hartree-Fock part of two- and four-body contributions are repulsive, whereas the three- and five-body ones are attractive. The four-body term increases as much as 15% repulsion of two-body term, and at the same time the five-body term reduces 4% of two-body repulsion at 2.5 cm 3 /mol. The four- and five-body terms are found to be important to describe short-range interatomic interaction correctly and to compute the cohesive energy accurately in a wide compression range from 2.5to 7.5 cm3/mol.

  3. Strain rates at high temporal resolution from curved inclusion trails in garnet, Passo del Sole, Central Swiss Alps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, C. A.; Carlson, W. D.; Connelly, James

    2013-01-01

    in the central Swiss Alps is extraordinarily valuable for calculation of strain rates during Alpine orogenesis, because the unusual zoning patterns clearly define the kinetics of its nucleation and growth. Complex concentric zoning patterns can be correlated from one crystal to another in a hand sample, based...... on compositional and microstructural similarities; the ubiquity of these features demonstrates that all garnet crystals nucleated at nearly the same time. Compositional bands whose radial widths are proportional to crystal size provide evidence for growth governed by the kinetics of intergranular diffusion...

  4. SURCARBUREX the knock-resistant exhaust gas mixer for high compression motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1944-01-01

    This device was designed to be attached to both diesel and gasoline engines which were converted to use either substitute liquid fuels such as alcohols, or gases produced by gas generators. The advantages claimed in the prospectus include change-overs from replacement fuels to normal gasoline in a very short time. Also, increased power in mountainous areas was claimed. The unit's basic function was to strip exhaust gas after it left the manifold, and to re-cycle it through the carburetor to be mixed with new gas. In this way, the unburned hydrocarbons dilute the incoming air-fuel mixture. The prospectus claims that gasolines with low octane ratings, 55-65, run in engines equipped with the SURCARBUREX react as if using higher rated fuels. Power output, according to a chart, is improved with the exhaust mixture, and results in no knocking with 65-octane fuel. On the other hand, the same octane rating without the exhaust addition provides less power and produces a knock. A test conducted at the Technische Hochschule, Muenchen, basically agreed with information in the prospectus which indicates increased power and less engine wear. However, it appears that with use of 70-octane, the device creates little useful assist to an engine with lowered compression ratio, while the lower-octane seems satisfactory with a low compression ratio and exhaust gas mixture. Testing was carried out using a four-cylinder car motor and a heavy-duty diesel truck engine in both bench and on-the-road analysis by the Geneve firm. The technical school used test motors of one cylinder or small displacement. The general result was favorable, since it appeared to be rather economical to install, versatile, and spared using high-grade gasoline when other substitutes were not available. 5 figures, 6 graphs.

  5. High compressive pre-strains reduce the bending fatigue life of nitinol wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Pelton, Alan R; Weaver, Jason D; Gong, Xiao-Yan; Nagaraja, Srinidhi

    2015-04-01

    Prior to implantation, Nitinol-based transcatheter endovascular devices are subject to a complex thermo-mechanical pre-strain associated with constraint onto a delivery catheter, device sterilization, and final deployment. Though such large thermo-mechanical excursions are known to impact the microstructural and mechanical properties of Nitinol, their effect on fatigue properties is still not well understood. The present study investigated the effects of large thermo-mechanical pre-strains on the fatigue of pseudoelastic Nitinol wire using fully reversed rotary bend fatigue (RBF) experiments. Electropolished Nitinol wires were subjected to a 0%, 8% or 10% bending pre-strain and RBF testing at 0.3-1.5% strain amplitudes for up to 10(8) cycles. The imposition of 8% or 10% bending pre-strain resulted in residual set in the wire. Large pre-strains also significantly reduced the fatigue life of Nitinol wires below 0.8% strain amplitude. While 0% and 8% pre-strain wires exhibited distinct low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue regions, reaching run out at 10(8) cycles at 0.6% and 0.4% strain amplitude, respectively, 10% pre-strain wires continued to fracture at less than 10(5) cycles, even at 0.3% strain amplitude. Furthermore, over 70% fatigue cracks were found to initiate on the compressive pre-strain surface in pre-strained wires. In light of the texture-dependent tension-compression asymmetry in Nitinol, this reduction in fatigue life and preferential crack initiation in pre-strained wires is thought to be attributed to compressive pre-strain-induced plasticity and tensile residual stresses as well as the formation of martensite variants. Despite differences in fatigue life, SEM revealed that the size, shape and morphology of the fatigue fracture surfaces were comparable across the pre-strain levels. Further, the mechanisms underlying fatigue were found to be similar; despite large differences in cycles to failure across strain amplitudes and pre-strain levels, cracks

  6. High-Strain Rate Tensile Behavior of Pure Aluminum Single and Multi-Crystalline Materials with a Tensile Split Hopkinson Bar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Sangyul [Samsung Electro-Mechanics, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jin Hee; Yoon, Hyo Jun; Kim, Ki Tae [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, we modified the conventional tensile split Hopkinson bar(TSHB) apparatus typically used for the high strength steel to evaluate the tensile deformation behavior of soft metallic sheet materials under high strain rates. Stress-strain curves of high purity single and multi-crystalline materials were obtained using this experimental procedure. Grain morphology and initial crystallographic orientation were characterized by EBSD(Electron Backscattered Diffraction) method measured in a FE-SEM(Field emission-scanning electron microscopy). The fractured surfaces were observed by using optical microscopy. The relationship between plastic deformation of aluminum crystalline materials under high-strain rates and the initial microstructure and the crystallographic orientations has been addressed.

  7. Reduction of threading dislocation density for AlN epilayer via a highly compressive-stressed buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Niu, Mu Tong; Zhang, Ji Cai; Wang, Wei; wang, Jian Feng; Xu, Ke

    2017-02-01

    Crystalline qualities of three AlN films grown by cold-wall high temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy (CW-HT-HVPE) on c-plane sapphire substrates, with different AlN buffer layers (BLs) deposited either by CW-HT-HVPE or by hot-wall low temperature hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HW-LT-HVPE), have been studied. The best film quality was obtained on a 500-nm-thick AlN BL grown by HW-LT-HVPE at 1000 ℃. In this case,the AlN epilayer has the lowest full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the (0002) and (10-12) x-ray rocking curve peaks of 295 and 306 arcsec, respectively, corresponding to the screw and edge threading dislocation (TD) densities of 1.9×108 cm-2 and 5.2×108 cm-2. This improvement in crystal quality of the AlN film can be attributed to the high compressive-stress of BL grown by HW-LT-HVPE,which facilitate the inclination and annihilation of TDs.

  8. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of a HMX-based pressed explosive: Effects of combined high pressure and strain rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biessy M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study of the combined effects of strain rate and confining pressure on the behaviour and microstructure evolutions of a HMX-based explosive. Hopkinson bar compression experiments are carried-out on samples confined with a brass sleeve. The latter is instrumented in order to determine the confining pressure on the explosive sample, directly function of the sleeve thickness and yield strength. A sample confined at 75 MPa and deformed at 250s−1 is recovered, cross-sectioned and studied using optical microscopy. Distributed microplasticity and microcracking appear similar to those induced by confined quasi-static experiments, indicating that stress triaxiality is the most important loading parameter. The sample also displays a large shear macrocrack, resulting from the formation of an adiabatic shear band. Shear banding seems to proceed by strong plastic strain gradients, followed by dynamic re-crystallization. Further strong thermal effects are observed, resulting in local reactive melting.

  9. Impact Compression Experiment for EPS Foam under Mid-high Strain Rate%中高应变率下EPS泡沫的冲击压缩实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐沛保; 巫绪涛; 李和平

    2012-01-01

    用SHPB装置对三种密度的发泡聚苯乙烯(Expanded Polystyrene,EPS)材料进行了从300/s至1400/s共五个中高应变率下的冲击压缩实验.实验中采用波分离技术有效延长应力-应变曲线的测量范围,并简要介绍了其原理和具体实施办法.所有应变率下均获得了含有弹性段、平台屈服段和压实段完整三阶段的应力-应变曲线.曲线的重复性较好,应变率基本恒定.实验结果表明,相同密度EPS泡沫应力-应变曲线的屈服平台段长度随应变率的增加而增加,且趋于平缓.在相近应变率下,随EPS泡沫的密度增加,屈服应力增加,而变形及吸能能力减弱.%Impact compression experiment was carried by using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) for expanded polystyrene (EPS) foams with three different densities and under five different mid-high strain rates ranging from 300/s to 1400/s. In experiment, wave separation technique was adopted to extend the measuring range of stress-strain curve. Principle and implement of this method is introduced briefly in this paper. Integrated three-stage stress-strain curve including elastic region, plastic collapsing region and densification region was all obtained under different strain rates. Curves have better repeatability and strain rate is basically kept constant. Experimental results show that for EPS foam with the same density, the length of plastic collapsing region in a stress-strain curve increases and the curve form flattens along with strain rate increase. Under similar strain rate, the yield stress increases with the increasing of EPS foam density, but the ability of deformation and energy absorption are weakened.

  10. High strain-rate deformation fabrics characterize a kilometers-thick Paleozoic fault zone in the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, central Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmeyer, Steven J.; Simpson, Carol

    2003-06-01

    High strain rate fabrics that transgress a crustal depth range of ca. 8-22 km occur within a major Paleozoic fault zone along the western margin of the Sierras de Córdoba, central Argentina. The NNW-striking, east-dipping 'Tres Arboles' fault zone extends for at least 250 km and separates two metamorphic terranes that reached peak temperatures in the middle Cambrian and Ordovician, respectively. Exposed fault zone rocks vary from a 16-km-thickness of ultramylonite and mylonite in the southern, deepest exposures to 520 °C. Reaction-enhanced grain size reduction and grain boundary sliding were the predominant deformation mechanisms in these high strain rate rocks. Ultramylonites in the intermediate depth section also contain evidence for grain boundary sliding and diffusional mass transfer, although overprinted by late stage chlorite. In the shallowest exposed section, rocks were deformed at or near to the brittle-ductile transition to produce mylonite, cataclasite, shear bands and pseudotachylyte. The overall structure of the Tres Arboles zone is consistent with existing fault zone models and suggests that below the brittle-ductile transition, strain compatibility may be accommodated through very thick zones of high temperature ultramylonite.

  11. Tensile properties and strengthening mechanisms of a TWIP steel at high strain rate: Hall-Petch relationship; Propiedades mecanicas a traccion y mecanismos de endurecimiento de un acero TWIP a altas velocidades de deformacion: relacion de Hall-Petch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas, F. de las; Ferraiuolo, A.; Pentti Karjalainen, L.; Gil Sevillano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of strain rate and grain size on the mechanical properties of a 22% Mn, 0.6% C (mass %) austenitic TWIP steel has been studied. A typical quasi-linear stress-strain behaviour of TWIP steels that deform by twinning has been observed at strain rates of 9.4 s-1 and 265 s-1 and room temperature. At high strain rates, the constant work - hardening rate region typically observed in TWIP steel clearly shortens. In addition, the Hall-Petch relationship has been obtained for each strain rate. The Hall-Petch slope KHP increases as a function of strain in all cases. The dependence of the KHP on the strain rate could be adiabatic heating. (Author)

  12. Characteristic evaluation of high compression seismic isolator for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Verification test of sub-scaled rubber bearings. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nakahira, Masataka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Yabana, Shuichi; Matsuda, Akihiro; Ohtori, Yasuki [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is designed to withstand the seismic load of 2 m/s{sup 2} at the ground level as a standard seismic condition. In case of severe seismic load over 2 m/s{sup 2}, an application of the seismic isolation to the tokamak building is studied so as to reduce the seismic load below 2 m/s{sup 2}. The seismic isolation with high compressive pressure of 7.35MPa to 14.7MPa is considered as a candidate, because the tokamak weight is large to the building size and the number of seismic isolator (rubber bearing) is limited in the available space of the building. Although many studies were executed in the past in order to apply the seismic isolation to the nuclear plant, the test data can not be applied to the ITER due to low compressive pressure of about 2.45MPa to 4.90MPa. Based on the above, it is therefore necessary to evaluate the various kinds of dynamic and mechanical characteristics of the rubber bearings under the high compressive pressure and to obtain the database for the design of the seismic isolation system of the ITER. The report describes the summary of the test results of the sub-scaled rubber bearings executed under the high compression condition in 1997 to 1999. (author)

  13. High-Cycle Fatigue Resistance of Si-Mo Ductile Cast Iron as Affected by Temperature and Strain Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteis, Paolo; Scavino, Giorgio; Castello, Alessandro; Firrao, Donato

    2015-09-01

    Silicon-molybdenum ductile cast irons are used to fabricate exhaust manifolds of internal combustion engines of large series cars, where the maximum pointwise temperature at full engine load may be higher than 973 K (700 °C). In this application, high-temperature oxidation and thermo-mechanical fatigue (the latter being caused by the engine start and stop and by the variation of its power output) have been the subject of several studies and are well known, whereas little attention has been devoted to the high-cycle fatigue, arising from the engine vibration. Therefore, the mechanical behavior of Si-Mo cast iron is studied here by means of stress-life fatigue tests up to 10 million cycles, at temperatures gradually increasing up to 973 K (700 °C). The mechanical characterization is completed by tensile and compressive tests and ensuing fractographic examinations; the mechanical test results are correlated with the cast iron microstructure and heat treatment.

  14. High Strain Rate Material Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    was positioned in the same vertical plane as the projectile. It 126 Figure 75. Preimpact Photos from Shot 94, 344 rn/s. 127 appears at the bottom of...a. E = 400 s- b. 1 = 1100 s-1 8 8 Hopkinson Bar Results1 1200 s 6 110 400 Bodner- Parto Prediction < 40 s 4 U) w (n :U, :22 0.00 0 .05 0.10 0.15 0.2

  15. Implementation of an Associative Flow Rule Including Hydrostatic Stress Effects Into the High Strain Rate Deformation Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    A previously developed analytical formulation has been modified in order to more accurately account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses on the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. State variable constitutive equations originally developed for metals have been modified in order to model the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymeric materials. To account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses, which are significant in polymers, the classical J2 plasticity theory definitions of effective stress and effective inelastic strain, along with the equations used to compute the components of the inelastic strain rate tensor, are appropriately modified. To verify the revised formulation, the shear and tensile deformation of two representative polymers are computed across a wide range of strain rates. Results computed using the developed constitutive equations correlate well with experimental data. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented within a strength of materials based micromechanics method to predict the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. The composite mechanics are verified by analyzing the deformation of a representative polymer matrix composite for several fiber orientation angles across a variety of strain rates. The computed values compare well to experimentally obtained results.

  16. From the Highly Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations to Fast Diffusion and Porous Media Equations, Existence of Global Weak Solution for the Quasi-Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haspot, Boris

    2016-06-01

    We consider the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for viscous and barotropic fluids with density dependent viscosity. The aim is to investigate mathematical properties of solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations using solutions of the pressureless Navier-Stokes equations, that we call quasi solutions. This regime corresponds to the limit of highly compressible flows. In this paper we are interested in proving the announced result in Haspot (Proceedings of the 14th international conference on hyperbolic problems held in Padova, pp 667-674, 2014) concerning the existence of global weak solution for the quasi-solutions, we also observe that for some choice of initial data (irrotationnal) the quasi solutions verify the porous media, the heat equation or the fast diffusion equations in function of the structure of the viscosity coefficients. In particular it implies that it exists classical quasi-solutions in the sense that they are {C^{∞}} on {(0,T)× {R}N} for any {T > 0}. Finally we show the convergence of the global weak solution of compressible Navier-Stokes equations to the quasi solutions in the case of a vanishing pressure limit process. In particular for highly compressible equations the speed of propagation of the density is quasi finite when the viscosity corresponds to {μ(ρ)=ρ^{α}} with {α > 1}. Furthermore the density is not far from converging asymptotically in time to the Barrenblatt solution of mass the initial density {ρ0}.

  17. Tensile Properties of Fiber Materials under Different Strain Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Jie; GU Bo-hong; WANG Shan-yuan

    2002-01-01

    The quasi-static and dynamic tensile tests of aranid and high strength PVA fiber bundles are carried out under a wider range of strain rate by use of MTS (Materials Testing System) and bar-bar tensile impact apparatus.The influences of strain rate on mechanical properties of aramid and high strength polyvinyl alcohol fibers ar estudied. Micro failure mechanisms of fibers at different strain rates are examined by means of SEM.

  18. The Effect Of Strain Rate On The Mechanical Properties And Microstructure Of The High-Mn Steel After Dynamic Deformation Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabłońska M.B.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of dynamic tensile investigations of high-manganese Fe – 20 wt.% Mn – 3 wt.% Al – 3 wt.% Si – 0.2 wt.% steel. The research was carried out on a flywheel machine, which enables to perform dynamic tensile tests and impact bending with a linear velocity of the enforcing element in the range of 5÷40 m/s. It was found that the studied steel was characterized by very good mechanical properties. Strength of the tested materials was determined in the static tensile test and dynamic deformation test, while its hardness was measured with the Vickers hardness test method. The surface of fractures that were created in the areas where the sample was torn were analyzed. These fractures indicate the presence of transcrystalline ductile fractures. Fractographic tests were performed with the use of a scanning electron microscope. The structure was analyzed by light optical microscopy. Substructure studies revealed occurrence of mechanical twinning induced by high strain rates. A detailed analysis of the structure was performed with the use of a transmission scanning electron microscope STEM.

  19. SCC investigation of low alloy ultra-high strength steel 30CrMnSiNi2A in 3.5wt%NaCl solution by slow strain rate technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jianhua; Guo Qiang; Yu Mei; Li Songmei

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanism of low alloy ultra-high strength steel 30CrMnSiNi2A in environment containing NaCl, SCC behavior of the steel in 3.5wt%NaCl solution is investigated by slow strain rate technique (SSRT) with various strain rates and applied potentials, surface analysis technique, and electrochemical measurements. SCC susceptibility of the steel increases rapidly with strain rate decreasing from 1 · 10?5 s?1 to 5 · 10?7 s?1, and becomes stable when strain rate is lower than 5 · 10?7 s?1. SCC propagation of the steel in the solution at open circuit potential (OCP) needs sufficient hydrogen which is supplied at a certain strain rate. Fracture surface at OCP has similar characteristics with that at cathodic polarization ?1000 mVSCE, which presents characteristic fractography of hydrogen induced cracking (HIC). All of these indicate that SCC behavior of the steel in the solution at OCP is mainly controlled by HIC rather than anodic dissolution (AD).

  20. SCC investigation of low alloy ultra-high strength steel 30CrMnSiNi2A in 3.5wt% NaCl solution by slow strain rate technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jianhua

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate stress corrosion cracking (SCC mechanism of low alloy ultra-high strength steel 30CrMnSiNi2A in environment containing NaCl, SCC behavior of the steel in 3.5wt% NaCl solution is investigated by slow strain rate technique (SSRT with various strain rates and applied potentials, surface analysis technique, and electrochemical measurements. SCC susceptibility of the steel increases rapidly with strain rate decreasing from 1 × 10−5 s−1 to 5 × 10−7 s−1, and becomes stable when strain rate is lower than 5 × 10−7 s−1. SCC propagation of the steel in the solution at open circuit potential (OCP needs sufficient hydrogen which is supplied at a certain strain rate. Fracture surface at OCP has similar characteristics with that at cathodic polarization −1000 mVSCE, which presents characteristic fractography of hydrogen induced cracking (HIC. All of these indicate that SCC behavior of the steel in the solution at OCP is mainly controlled by HIC rather than anodic dissolution (AD.

  1. Dynamic response of Cu4Zr54 metallic glass to high strain rate shock loading: plasticity, spall and atomic-level structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arman, Bedri [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cagin, Tahir [TEXAS A& M UNIV

    2009-01-01

    We investigate dynamic response of Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} metallic glass under adiabatic planar shock wave loading (one-dimensional strain) wjth molecular dynamics simulations, including Hugoniot (shock) states, shock-induced plasticity and spallation. The Hugoniot states are obtained up to 60 CPa along with the von Mises shear flow strengths, and the dynamic spall strength, at different strain rates and temperatures. The spall strengths likely represent the limiting values achievable in experiments such as laser ablation. For the steady shock states, a clear elastic-plastic transition is identified (e.g., in the shock velocity-particle velocity curve), and the shear strength shows strain-softening. However, the elastic-plastic transition across the shock front displays transient stress overshoot (hardening) above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a relatively sluggish relaxation to the steady shock state, and the plastic shock front steepens with increasing shock strength. The local von Mises shear strain analysis is used to characterize local deformation, and the Voronoi tessellation analysis, the corresponding short-range structures at various stages of shock, release, tension and spallation. The plasticity in this glass is manifested as localized shear transformation zones and of local structure rather than thermal origin, and void nucleation occurs preferentially at the highly shear-deformed regions. The Voronoi and shear strain analyses show that the atoms with different local structures are of different shear resistances that lead to shear localization (e.g., the atoms indexed with (0,0,12,0) are most shear-resistant, and those with (0,2,8,1) are highly prone to shear flow). The dynamic changes in local structures are consistent with the observed deformation dynamics.

  2. Deformation, Phase Transformation and Recrystallization in the Shear Bands Induced by High-Strain Rate Loading in Titanium and Its Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongbo XU; Yilong BAI; M.A.Meyers

    2006-01-01

    α-titanium and its alloys with a dual-phase structure (α+β) were deformed dynamically under strain rate of about 104 s-1. The formation and microstructural evolution of the localized shear bands were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results reveal that both the strain and strain rate should be considered simultaneously as the mechanical conditions for shear band formation, and twinning is an important mode of deformation. Both experimental and calculation show that the materials within the bands underwent a superhigh strain rate (9×105 s-1) deformation, which is two magnitudes of that of average strain rate required for shear band formation; the dislocations inthe bands can be constricted and developed into cell structures; the phase transformation from α to α2 within the bands was observed, and the transformation products (α2) had a certain crystallographic orientation relationship with their parent; the equiaxed grains with an average size of 10μm in diameter observed within the bands are proposed to be the results of recrystallization.

  3. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  4. In-Situ Welding Carbon Nanotubes into a Porous Solid with Super-High Compressive Strength and Fatigue Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene-based sponges and aerogels have an isotropic porous structure and their mechanical strength and stability are relatively lower. Here, we present a junction-welding approach to fabricate porous CNT solids in which all CNTs are coated and welded in situ by an amorphous carbon layer, forming an integral three-dimensional scaffold with fixed joints. The resulting CNT solids are robust, yet still highly porous and compressible, with compressive strengths up to 72...

  5. In-Situ Welding Carbon Nanotubes into a Porous Solid with Super-High Compressive Strength and Fatigue Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiqiang; Gui, Xuchun; Gan, Qiming; Chen, Wenjun; Cheng, Xiaoping; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Yuan; Yang, Yanbing; Cao, Anyuan; Tang, Zikang

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene-based sponges and aerogels have an isotropic porous structure and their mechanical strength and stability are relatively lower. Here, we present a junction-welding approach to fabricate porous CNT solids in which all CNTs are coated and welded in situ by an amorphous carbon layer, forming an integral three-dimensional scaffold with fixed joints. The resulting CNT solids are robust, yet still highly porous and compressible, with compressive strengths up to 72 MPa, flexural strengths up to 33 MPa, and fatigue resistance (recovery after 100,000 large-strain compression cycles at high frequency). Significant enhancement of mechanical properties is attributed to the welding-induced interconnection and reinforcement of structural units, and synergistic effects stemming from the core-shell microstructures consisting of a flexible CNT framework and a rigid amorphous carbon shell. Our results provide a simple and effective method to manufacture high-strength porous materials by nanoscale welding.

  6. Ge nanobelts with high compressive strain fabricated by secondary oxidation of self-assembly SiGe rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Li, Cheng; Lin, Guangyang

    2015-01-01

    Curled Ge nanobelts were fabricated by secondary oxidation of self-assembly SiGe rings, which were exfoliated from the SiGe stripes on the insulator. The Ge-rich SiGe stripes on insulator were formed by hololithography and modified Ge condensation processes of Si0.82Ge0.18 on SOI substrate. Ge na...... nanobelts, which extrudes to Ge nanobelts in radial and tangent directions during the cooling process. This technique is promising for application in high-mobility Ge nano-scale transistors...

  7. Hybrid microscaffold-based 3D bioprinting of multi-cellular constructs with high compressive strength: A new biofabrication strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yu Jun; Tan, Xipeng; Yeong, Wai Yee; Tor, Shu Beng

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid 3D bioprinting approach using porous microscaffolds and extrusion-based printing method is presented. Bioink constitutes of cell-laden poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) porous microspheres with thin encapsulation of agarose-collagen composite hydrogel (AC hydrogel). Highly porous microspheres enable cells to adhere and proliferate before printing. Meanwhile, AC hydrogel allows a smooth delivery of cell-laden microspheres (CLMs), with immediate gelation of construct upon printing on cold build platform. Collagen fibrils were formed in the AC hydrogel during culture at body temperature, improving the cell affinity and spreading compared to pure agarose hydrogel. Cells were proven to proliferate in the bioink and the bioprinted construct. High cell viability up to 14 days was observed. The compressive strength of the bioink is more than 100 times superior to those of pure AC hydrogel. A potential alternative in tissue engineering of tissue replacements and biological models is made possible by combining the advantages of the conventional solid scaffolds with the new 3D bioprinting technology. PMID:27966623

  8. Changes in the electronic structure of highly compressed iron revealed by X-ray fluorescence lines and absorption edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S. B.; Harding, E. C.; Knapp, P. F.; Gomez, M. R.; Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.

    2017-09-01

    We present high-resolution spectroscopic data from iron impurities in beryllium liners driven by Sandia's Z machine to temperatures near 10 eV and electron densities near 2 × 1024 cm-3, conditions independently diagnosed from the transmission depth and shape of the iron K-edge. A 12-eV redshift is observed in the Fe Kβ fluorescence line along with few-eV shifts in the Fe Kα lines and Fe K-shell absorption edge. While the measured edge shift disagrees with several common models of ionization potential depression, both line and edge shifts are in good agreement with the predictions of a self-consistent model based on density functional theory.

  9. Novel tricalcium silicate/magnesium phosphate composite bone cement having high compressive strength, in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjuan; Zhai, Dong; Huan, Zhiguang; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Although inorganic bone cements such as calcium phosphate cements have been widely applied in orthopaedic and dental fields because of their self-setting ability, development of high-strength bone cement with bioactivity and biodegradability remains a major challenge. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to prepare a tricalcium silicate/magnesium phosphate (C3S/MPC) composite bone cement, which is intended to combine the excellent bioactivity of C3S with remarkable self-setting properties and mechanical strength of MPC. The self-setting and mechanical properties, in vitro induction of apatite formation and degradation behaviour, and cytocompatibility of the composite cements were investigated. Our results showed that the C3S/MPC composite cement with an optimal composition had compressive strength up to 87 MPa, which was significantly higher than C3S (25 MPa) and MPC (64 MPa). The setting time could be adjusted between 3 min and 29 min with the variation of compositions. The hydraulic reaction products of the C3S/MPC composite cement were composed of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) derived from the hydration of C3S and gel-like amorphous substance. The C3S/MPC composite cements could induce apatite mineralization on its surface in SBF solution and degraded gradually in Tris-HCl solution. Besides, the composite cements showed good cytocompatibility and stimulatory effect on the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. Our results indicated that the C3S/MPC composite bone cement might be a new promising high-strength inorganic bioactive material which may hold the potential for bone repair in load-bearing site.

  10. Strain Rate Effects in CFRP Used For Blast Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah. L. Orton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to gain a better understanding of strain rate effects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP laminates exposed to blast loading. The use of CFRP offers an attractive option for mitigating structures exposed to blasts. However, the effect of high strain rates in CFRP composites commonly used in the civil industry is unknown. This research conducted tensile tests of 21 CFRP coupons using a hydraulically powered dynamic loader. The strain rates ranged from 0.0015 s−1 to 7.86 s−1 and are representative of strain rates that CFRP may see in a blast when used to strengthen reinforced concrete structures. The results of the testing showed no increase in the tensile strength or stiffness of the CFRP at the higher strain rates. In addition, the results showed significant scatter in the tensile strengths possibly due to the rate of loading or manufacture of the coupon.

  11. Linear analysis on the onset of thermal convection of highly compressible fluids: implications for the mantle convection of super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Masanori; Miyagoshi, Takehiro; Ogawa, Masaki

    2015-02-01

    A series of linear analysis was performed on the onset of thermal convection of highly compressible fluids, in order to deepen the fundamental insights into the mantle convection of massive super-Earths in the presence of strong adiabatic compression. We consider the temporal evolution (growth or decay) of an infinitesimal perturbation superimposed to a highly compressible fluid which is in a hydrostatic (motionless) and conductive state in a basally heated horizontal layer. As a model of pressure-dependence in material properties, we employed an exponential decrease in thermal expansivity α and exponential increase in (reference) density ρ with depth. The linearized equations for conservation of mass, momentum and internal (thermal) energy are numerically solved for the critical Rayleigh number as well as the vertical profiles of eigenfunctions for infinitesimal perturbations. The above calculations are repeatedly carried out by systematically varying (i) the dissipation number (Di), (ii) the temperature at the top surface and (iii) the magnitude of pressure-dependence in α and ρ. Our analysis demonstrated that the onset of thermal convection is strongly affected by the adiabatic compression, in response to the changes in the static stability of thermal stratification in the fluid layer. For sufficiently large Di where a thick sublayer of stable stratification develops in the layer, for example, the critical Rayleigh number explosively increases with Di, together with drastic decreases in the length scales of perturbations both in vertical and horizontal directions. In particular, for very large Di, a thick `stratosphere' occurs in the fluid layer where the vertical motion is significantly suppressed, resulting in a shrink of the incipient convection in a thin sublayer of unstable thermal stratification. In addition, when Di exceeds a threshold value above which a thermal stratification becomes stable in the entire layer, no perturbation is allowed to grow

  12. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milovich, J. L., E-mail: milovich1@llnl.gov; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm{sup 2}, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 10{sup 14} and 5.5 × 10{sup 14}) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the “high-foot” experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3–10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm{sup 2}. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  13. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm2, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 1014 and 5.5 × 1014) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the "high-foot" experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3-10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm2. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  14. Optimisation énergétique des chambres de combustion à haut taux de compression Energy Optimization of High-Compression-Ratio Combustion Chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douaud A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Une synthèse des études entreprises à l'institut Français du Pétrole pour la compréhension des phénomènes de combustion, de transferts thermiques, de cliquetis et leur maîtrise pour l'optimisation du rendement de chambre à haut taux de compression conduit à proposer deux thèmes de réalisation : - chambre calme à double allumage; - chambre turbulente à effet de chasse. Les avantages de principe et les contraintes associés à la mise en oeuvre de chaque type de chambre sont examinés. A synthesis of research undertaken at the Institut Français du Pétrole on understanding combustion, heat-transfer and knock phenomena and on mastering them to optimize the efficiency of high-compression-ratio combustion chambers has led to the proposing of two topics of implementation:(a calm chamber with dual ignition;(b turbulent chamber with squish effect. The advantages of the principle and the constraints connected to the implementation of each type of chamber are examined.

  15. Use of the slow-strain-rate technique for the evaluation of structural materials for application in high-temperature gaseous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.E.; Ugiansky, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Types 309, 310, 310S, 347 and 446 stainless steels, Incoloy 800, and Inconel 671 were tested at temperatures from 370 to 1040/sup 0/C at strain rates from 10/sup -4/ to 10/sup -7//s in H/sub 2/S plus water, gaseous mixtures of CO, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/S, and H/sub 2/O, and in nominally inert environments of He and Ar. Type 310 steel showed a marked reduction in mechanical properties at low strain rates (< 10/sup -5//s) in H/sub 2/S/H/sub 2/O at 540/sup 0/C, and this was associated with the occurrence of a large degree of secondary intergranular cracking in addition to the main ductile fracture mode. The occurrence of the secondary cracking was taken as the primary indication of embrittlement in subsequent tests. It occurred to some degree in all alloys tested in the simulated coal-gasification environments at 600/sup 0/C. The mechanism(s) of the embrittlement phenomena remain uncertain; a number of possible causes including creep and several environmentally-induced fracture processes are outlined. It is shown that the overall results of the test program are in good agreement with in-plant experience.

  16. Strain rate effects for spallation of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häussler-Combe Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate triaxial constitutive laws are the key for a realistic simulation of high speed dynamics of concrete. The strain rate effect is still an open issue within this context. In particular the question whether it is a material property – which can be covered by rate dependent stress strain relations – or mainly an effect of inertia is still under discussion. Experimental and theoretical investigations of spallation of concrete specimen in a Hopkinson Bar setup may bring some evidence into this question. For this purpose the paper describes the VERD model, a newly developed constitutive law for concrete based on a damage approach with included strain rate effects [1]. In contrast to other approaches the dynamic strength increase is not directly coupled to strain rate values but related to physical mechanisms like the retarded movement of water in capillary systems and delayed microcracking. The constitutive law is fully triaxial and implemented into explicit finite element codes for the investigation of a wide range of concrete structures exposed to impact and explosions. The current setup models spallation experiments with concrete specimen [2]. The results of such experiments are mainly related to the dynamic tensile strength and the crack energy of concrete which may be derived from, e.g., the velocity of spalled concrete fragments. The experimental results are compared to the VERD model and two further constitutive laws implemented in LS-Dyna. The results indicate that both viscosity and retarded damage are required for a realistic description of the material behaviour of concrete exposed to high strain effects [3].

  17. Tensile Mechanical Properties of HTPB Propellant at Low Temperature and High Strain Rate%低温高应变率条件下HTPB推进剂拉伸力学性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王哲君; 强洪夫; 王广; 刘小川; 黄拳章

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the mechanical properties of solid propellant at low temperature and high strain rate,stress-strain curves and tensile fracture surfaces of HTPB propellant were obtained in a wide range of tem⁃perature (-40~25℃) and strain rates (0.4~14.29s-1), respectively, by means of uniaxial tensile tests and electron microscopy scanning on the fracture cross section. The results indicate that mechanical properties of HT⁃PB propellant were influenced distinctly by temperature and strain rate. With decreasing temperature and increas⁃ing strain rate,the characteristics of stress-strain curves are more complex. At the same time,the dewetting be⁃tween particles and matrix is more difficult to occur in propellant,but the particle brittle fracture is easier. With the coupled effects of low temperature and high strain rate,the damage for HTPB propellant is more serious. Sec⁃ondly,the initial elastic modulus E and maximum tensile stress σm increase gradually with decreasing temper⁃ature and increasing strain rate,and well present linear-log function relation with strain rate. In addition,with the coupled effects of low temperature and high strain rate,the values of the initial elastic modulus E and maxi⁃ mum tensile stress σm at-40℃and 14.29s-1 are 1.6 and 3.2 times of their values at 25℃and 0.4s-1,respective⁃ly. But comparing with them, the relationships of the corresponding strain with temperature and strain rate are more complex. With increasing temperature,this strain increases. At room temperature,this parameter increas⁃es with increasing strain rate, while it decreases with increasing strain rate at low temperature. The results of variance analysis indicate that low temperature and high strain rate have more significant effects on maximum ten⁃sile stress σm . In addition, the low temperature has greater influence on this parameter than high strain rate, but there is an opposite law for the initial elastic modulus E . Finally, mechanical

  18. Revealing Hidden Deformation Sources in New Zealand: a Novel Inversion of GPS Data for Non-Prescriptive Physics-Based Surface Forces and High-Precision Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, L. L.; Haines, A. J.; Wallace, L. M.; Williams, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring strain accumulation in active deformation zones is vital for studying and preparing for earthquake hazards. New Zealand straddles the complicated boundary between the obliquely converging Australian and Pacific plates. The motion is accommodated largely along the Alpine Fault in the south, through the Marlborough fault system and onto the Hikurangi trench in the north. In addition, a significant component of the motion is distributed on smaller, poorly characterized faults. Dimitrova et al. (2012) showed that the vertical derivatives of horizontal stress (VDoHS) rates are a substantially higher resolution expression of subsurface sources of ongoing deformation than the GPS velocities or GPS derived strain rates. We expand this method to solve the horizontal force balance equations for the VDoHS in 2-D to obtain the highest possible resolution picture of the surface deformation pattern in New Zealand. We invert GPS data from campaign GPS observations spanning from 1995 to 2012 for the VDoHS that best fit the GPS velocities, without prescribing sources or zones of deformation, while fully accounting for the physics of the problem. Using the VDoHS rates we identify (1) areas of deformation due to well-known active faults, (2) areas of poorly characterized deformation, e.g. deformation along faults without slip rate information mapped from palaeo-seismicity, (3) areas of previously unknown deformation, potentially on hidden faults, and (4) areas undergoing post-seismic deformation. The VDoHS are integrated to produce the highest resolution to-date maps of strain rates. We identify an area of extensional areal strain between the Alpine fault and the Main Divide of the central Southern Alps indicating possible gravitational collapse of the Southern Alps. Relationships between the VDoHS and strain rates allow us to calculate the variation in fault slip rate and locking depth for the identified faults, and we show selected results for the Alpine Fault and the

  19. Uniaxial tension test on Rubber at constant true strain rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourne H.L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Elastomers are widely used for damping parts in different industrial contexts because of their remarkable dissipation properties. Indeed, they can undergo severe mechanical loading conditions, i.e., high strain rates and large strains. Nevertheless, the mechanical response of these materials can vary from purely rubber-like to glassy depending on the strain rate undergone. Classically, uniaxial tension tests are made in order to find a relation between the stress and the strain in the material at various strain rates. However, even if the strain rate is searched to be constant, it is the nominal strain rate that is considered. Here we develop a test at constant true strain rate, i.e. the strain rate that is experienced by the material. In order to do such a test, the displacement imposed by the machine is an exponential function of time. This test has been performed with a high speed hydraulic machine for strain rates between 0.01/s and 100/s. A specific specimen has been designed, yielding a uniform strain field (and so a uniform stress field. Furthermore, an instrumented aluminum bar has been used to take into account dynamic effects in the measurement of the applied force. A high speed camera enables the determination of strain in the sample using point tracking technique. Using this method, the stress-strain curve of a rubber-like material during a loading-unloading cycle has been determined, up to a stretch ratio λ = 2.5. The influence of the true strain rate both on stiffness and on dissipation of the material is then discussed.

  20. Multiplicative earthquake likelihood models incorporating strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, D. A.; Christophersen, A.; Gerstenberger, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYWe examine the potential for strain-rate variables to improve long-term earthquake likelihood models. We derive a set of multiplicative hybrid earthquake likelihood models in which cell rates in a spatially uniform baseline model are scaled using combinations of covariates derived from earthquake catalogue data, fault data, and strain-rates for the New Zealand region. Three components of the strain rate estimated from GPS data over the period 1991-2011 are considered: the shear, rotational and dilatational strain rates. The hybrid model parameters are optimised for earthquakes of M 5 and greater over the period 1987-2006 and tested on earthquakes from the period 2012-2015, which is independent of the strain rate estimates. The shear strain rate is overall the most informative individual covariate, as indicated by Molchan error diagrams as well as multiplicative modelling. Most models including strain rates are significantly more informative than the best models excluding strain rates in both the fitting and testing period. A hybrid that combines the shear and dilatational strain rates with a smoothed seismicity covariate is the most informative model in the fitting period, and a simpler model without the dilatational strain rate is the most informative in the testing period. These results have implications for probabilistic seismic hazard analysis and can be used to improve the background model component of medium-term and short-term earthquake forecasting models.

  1. Knock-Limited Performance of Triptane and Xylidines Blended with 28-R Aviation Fuel at High Compression Ratios and Maximum-Economy Spark Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Louis F.; Pritchard, Ernest I.

    1946-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the possibilities of utilizing the high-performance characteristics of triptane and xylidines blended with 28-R fuel in order to increase fuel economy by the use of high compression ratios and maximum-economy spark setting. Full-scale single-cylinder knock tests were run with 20 deg B.T.C. and maximum-economy spark settings at compression ratios of 6.9, 8.0, and 10.0, and with two inlet-air temperatures. The fuels tested consisted of triptane, four triptane and one xylidines blend with 28-R, and 28-R fuel alone. Indicated specific fuel consumption at lean mixtures was decreased approximately 17 percent at a compression ratio of 10.0 and maximum-economy spark setting, as compared to that obtained with a compression ratio of 6.9 and normal spark setting. When compression ratio was increased from 6.9 to 10.0 at an inlet-air temperature of 150 F, normal spark setting, and a fuel-air ratio of 0.065, 55-percent triptane was required with 28-R fuel to maintain the knock-limited brake power level obtained with 28-R fuel at a compression ratio of 6.9. Brake specific fuel consumption was decreased 17.5 percent at a compression ratio of 10.0 relative to that obtained at a compression ratio of 6.9. Approximately similar results were noted at an inlet-air temperature of 250 F. For concentrations up through at least 20 percent, triptane can be more efficiently used at normal than at maximum-economy spark setting to maintain a constant knock-limited power output over the range of compression ratios tested.

  2. Modélisation et caractérisation des joints collés à hautes vitesses de déformation Modeling and characterization of bonded joints at high strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourel B.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ce papier traite de la modélisation de joints collés pour les structures soumises à des sollicitations de type crash. Cette nouvelle modélisation basée sur un élément cohésif tient compte du comportement viscoplastique, de l'endommagement ainsi que de la rupture de l'adhésive. Sensible à la vitesse de déformation l'identification du critère de rupture nécessite une base expérimentale allant jusqu'à de très hautes vitesses de déformations. Un nouveau dispositif d'essais a donc été mis en place sur les barres de Hopkinson afin de solliciter des assemblages à haute vitesse et sous différents angles de chargement. This paper deals with the modeling of bonded joints for structures subjected to dynamic crash loading. This new model based on a cohesive element takes into account the viscoelastic behavior, the damage and the failure of the adhesive. Due to the strain rate sensitivity, the identification of failure criterion requires experimental tests, up to very high strain rates. A new testing device has then been set up on the Hopkinson bar in order to load the assemblies with high strain rates and with different angles.

  3. Fragmentation analysis of alumina-nickel cermets subjected to Hopkinson bar tests at high strain rates; Analisis de la fragmentacion de cermets de alumina-niquel ensayados en Barra Hopkinson a altas velocidades de deformacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgaz, F.; Lecue, E.; Sanchez Herencia, A. J.; Gomez del Rio, T.

    2014-07-01

    A comparative study of the influence of the strain rate on the dynamic mechanical behaviour of an alumina matrix with 15 and 50 % of dispersed nickel is presented. The fragmentation under high speed impact compression loads have been studied using a compression split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). Dense alumina and alumina-nickel composites were processed by slip casting of water based slurries on porous moulds. Samples with the metallic phase dispersed were pre-oxidized to achieve an effective joining interface and sintered under flowing inert atmosphere. The strain rate was determined from the impact experiments. The statistics of the SHPB recovered fragments have been determined and analysed according to the exponential models of Weibull and Rosin y Rammler and the effects of the strain rate on the average fragment size are described according to the existing energy models. Finally the rupture mechanisms of the samples and the sources of fracture have been explored and compared to the quasi static mechanical behaviour of these materials. (Author)

  4. Strain Rate Dependent Modeling of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations have been developed to model the polymer matrix, and have been incorporated into a micromechanics approach to analyze polymer matrix composites. The Hashin failure criterion has been implemented within the micromechanics results to predict ply failure strengths. The deformation model has been implemented within LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic finite element code. The deformation response and ply failure stresses for the representative polymer matrix composite AS4/PEEK have been predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  5. A new variant of scaphoid reconstruction: Treatment of scaphoid non-union with avascular bone interponate and high compression screw (Synthes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Scaphoid fractures as frequently overseen injuries often result in scaphoid non-unions, that need to be treated to prevent carpal collapse and secondary cartilage damage. Vital bone tissue and compression of fracture and bone graft ends seem to be crucial in for ossification and final bone healing. In the present study we compare our results using a high compression screw (HCS Synthes to results in the literature using different kinds of internal fixation including compression screws of various types. We present 22 patients with scaphoid non-unions treated with a bone graft and a HCS Synthes. We evaluated our post-operative results. The Manchester-Modified Disability of the Shoulder, Arm and Hand–Score (M-Dash imposed with an average of 29.8 points (MD=29 / SD=9.46 / MIN=18 / MAX=48. None of the re-evaluated patients sorrowed for pain in rest. Five patients stated pain (ranging from 4 to 8 on numeric analogue scale after heavy burden (e.g. boxing, weight lifting.In exploring the range of motion of the operated hand we deliver the following results: dorsal extension: average 72.73° (MD=80° / SD=17.23° / MIN=30° / MAX=85°, flexion: average 73.64° (MD=80° / SD=8.97° / MIN=60° / MAX=80°, ulnar deviation: average 39.09°, (MD=40° / SD=2.02° / MIN=35° / MAX=40°, radial deviation: average 29.09°, (MD=30° / SD=3.01° / MIN=20° / MAX=30°. Additionally a performance testing was conducted: fist clenching sign: complete without pain in 100%, pinch grip: complete in 100%, moderate pain in n=1 (8.33%, opposition digitus manus I–V complete in 100%, moderate pain n=2 (16.67%. Three patients with persisting fracture gap had a scaphoid bone fractured in the proximal third; one patient even with a very small proximal fragment. One persisting non-union was localized in the middle third (period between injury and operation = . In conclusion, our patients showed better healing rates compared to results presented in the literature. Non

  6. Effect of Strain Rate on Compression Behavior of Vinyl Ester Resin Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Tao; YANG Bin; XIONG Jie; XU Xian-jian; ZHOU Kai; MAO Ming-zhong

    2006-01-01

    Quasi-static and high strain rate compressive experiments on vinyl ester casting were carried out by means of MTS (Material Test System) and Hopkinson bar. The behaviors of the compressed unstable and fracture of the resin casting at different strain rates were investigated. The results indicate that the response behavior of the resin casting is controlled by different mechanisms at different strain rate, and some mechanical properties of vinyl ester casting are ratedependent: the casting are destroyed in toughness model under strain rate 3.3 × 10-4 ~ 6.6 × 10-3/s, while the casting are destroyed in brittleness model under strain rate 950~5800/s. The yield stress, yield strain energy density are all increased with the increasing strain rates at quasi-static as well as at high strain rates. What is interesting is that the yield strain decreased with the strain rates increasing at quasi-static while increased at high strain rates. It is considered that the casting occurred forcing high elastic deformation at high strain rates. The damage of the specimens is mainly controlled by axial stress before unstable deformation, while mainly controlled by shear stress after unstable deformation, and then developed to fracture finally. This progress is rate-dependent: the development of the cracks inside the castings increased with the strain rate increasing.

  7. Optimisation and Validation of the ARAMIS Digital Image Correlation System for Use in Large-scale High-strain-rate Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    adhesion . The grit blasting used was approximately 60 microns. The base coating paint used was a white primer undercoat (high performance epoxy... enamel paint. Under extreme plastic deformation, the relative deformation of the coating could cause the coating to separate resulting in loss of...important for high resolution results  For highly dynamic events, paint adhesion is critical  For 180 mm lenses the furthest stand-off distance

  8. Strain rate dependency of laser sintered polyamide 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook J.E.T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parts processed by Additive Manufacturing can now be found across a wide range of applications, such as those in the aerospace and automotive industry in which the mechanical response must be optimised. Many of these applications are subjected to high rate or impact loading, yet it is believed that there is no prior research on the strain rate dependence in these materials. This research investigates the effect of strain rate and laser energy density on laser sintered polyamide 12. In the study presented here, parts produced using four different laser sintered energy densities were exposed to uniaxial compression tests at strain rates ranging from 10−3 to 10+3 s−1 at room temperature, and the dependence on these parameters is presented.

  9. Strain rate orientations near the Coso Geothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasa, N. T.; Kaven, J. O.; Barbour, A. J.; von Huene, R.

    2016-12-01

    Many geothermal reservoirs derive their sustained capacity for heat exchange in large part due to continuous deformation of preexisting faults and fractures that permit permeability to be maintained. Similarly, enhanced geothermal systems rely on the creation of suitable permeability from fracture and faults networks to be viable. Stress measurements from boreholes or earthquake source mechanisms are commonly used to infer the tectonic conditions that drive deformation, but here we show that geodetic data can also be used. Specifically, we quantify variations in the horizontal strain rate tensor in the area surrounding the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF) by analyzing more than two decades of high accuracy differential GPS data from a network of 14 stations from the University of Nevada Reno Geodetic Laboratory. To handle offsets in the data, from equipment changes and coseismic deformation, we segment the data, perform a piecewise linear fit and take the average of each segment's strain rate to determine secular velocities at each station. With respect to North America, all stations tend to travel northwest at velocities ranging from 1 to 10 mm/yr. The nearest station to CGF shows anomalous motion compared to regional stations, which otherwise show a coherent increase in network velocity from the northeast to the southwest. We determine strain rates via linear approximation using GPS velocities in Cartesian reference frame due to the small area of our network. Principal strain rate components derived from this inversion show maximum extensional strain rates of 30 nanostrain/a occur at N87W with compressional strain rates of 37nanostrain/a at N3E. These results generally align with previous stress measurements from borehole breakouts, which indicate the least compressive horizontal principal stress is east-west oriented, and indicative of the basin and range tectonic setting. Our results suggest that the CGF represents an anomaly in the crustal deformation field, which

  10. Investigation of Tensile Deformation Behavior of PC,ABS and PC/ABS Blends From Low to High Strain Rates%不同应变率下PC,ABS和PC/ABS合金拉伸变形行为研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹征南; 王铁军

    2012-01-01

    采用实验方法研究了PC(聚碳酸酯)、ABS(丙烯腈-丁二烯-苯乙烯)和PC/ABS合金(PC与ABS共混率为80∶20,60∶40,50∶50和40∶60),在不同应变率条件下的拉伸变形行为.采用MTS-810万能材料试验机和分离式Hopkinson拉杆实验系统分别进行了PC,ABS和PC/ABS合金室温条件下的准静态和冲击拉伸实验,得到了上述材料在不同应变率条件下的真应力-真应变曲线;通过对其变形特点的详细分析,讨论了应变率和ABS含量对拉伸变形的影响,并且给出了10-4 s-1~103 s-1应变率范围内屈服应力与应变率的线性关系式.%The objective is to experimentally study the tensile deformation behavior of die polycarbonate (PC), acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and PC/ABS blends (with the blending ratio of PC to ABS being 80:20, 60:40, 50:50 and 40:60) from low to high strain rates. Using universal MTS-810 machine and split Hopkinson Tension bar (SHTB) testing system, the quasi-static and impact tension tests were carried out at room temperature. The curves of true stress and true strain were obtained and the deformation behavior of PC, ABS and PC/ABS blends were characterized in detail. And the effects of strain rate on the yield stress from low to high strain rates were described with a linear relationship.

  11. Effect of structural factors on mechanical properties of the magnesium alloy Ma2-1 under quasi-static and high strain rate deformation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garkushin, G. V.; Razorenov, S. V.; Krasnoveikin, V. A.; Kozulin, A. A.; Skripnyak, V. A.

    2015-02-01

    The elastic limit and tensile strength of deformed magnesium alloys Ma2-1 with different structures and textures were measured with the aim of finding a correlation between the spectrum of defects in the material and the resistance to deformation and fracture under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. The studies were performed using specimens in the as-received state after high-temperature annealing and specimens subjected to equal-channel angular pressing at a temperature of 250°C. The anisotropy of strength characteristics of the material after shock compression with respect to the direction of rolling of the original alloy was investigated. It was shown that, in contrast to the quasi-static loading conditions, under the shock wave loading conditions, the elastic limit and tensile strength of the magnesium alloy Ma2-1 after equal-channel angular pressing decrease as compared to the specimens in the as-received state.

  12. PLASTIC DEFORMATION BEHAVIOR OF ELECTROFORMED COPPER LINER OF SHAPED CHARGE AT DIFFERENT STRAIN RATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Y.Gao; Q.Sun

    2003-01-01

    The paper deals with different plastic deformation behavior of electroformed copper liner of shaped charge,depormed at high strain rate(about 1×107s-1) and normal strain rate (4×10-4s-1).The crystallographic orientation distribution of grains in recovered slugs which had undergone high-strain-rate plastic deformation during ex-plosive detonation was investigated by electron backscattering Kikuchi pattern tech-nique.Cellualar structures formed by tangled disocations and sub-grain boundaries consisting of dislocation arrays were detected in the recovered slugs.Some twins and slip dislocations were observed in specimen deformed at normal strain rate.It was found that dynamic recovery and recrystallization take place during high-strain-rate deformation due to the temperature rising,whereas the conventional slip mechanism operates during deformation at normal strain rate.

  13. Strain rate dependency and fragmentation pattern of expanding warheads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John F MOXNES; Anne K PRYTZ; yvind FRYLAND; Stian SKRIUDALEN; Steinar BRVE; Gard DEGRDSTUEN

    2015-01-01

    For the characterization of the behaviors of a metal material in events like expanding warheads, it is necessary to know its strength and ductility at high strain rates, around 104e105/s. The flyer plate impact testing produces the uniform stress and strain rates but the testing is expensive. The Taylor test is relatively inexpensive but produces non-uniform stress and strain fields, and the results are not so easily inferred for material modeling. In the split-Hopkinson bar (SHB), which may be used in compression, tension and torsion testing, the strain rates never exceeds 103/s. In the present work, we use the expanding ring test where the strain rate is 104e105/s. A streak camera is used to examine the expanding ring velocity, and a water tank is used to collect the fragments. The experimental results are compared with the numerical simulations using the hydrocodes AUTODYN, IMPETUS Afea and a regularized smooth particle (RSPH) software. The number of fragments increases with the increase in the expansion velocity of the rings. The number of fragments is similar to the experimental results. The RSPH software shows much the same results as the AUTODYN where the Lagrangian solver is used for the ring. The IMPETUS Afea solver shows a somewhat different fragmentation characteristic due to the node splitting algorithm that induces pronounced tensile splitting.

  14. Strain rate dependency and fragmentation pattern of expanding warheads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Moxnes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available For the characterization of the behaviors of a metal material in events like expanding warheads, it is necessary to know its strength and ductility at high strain rates, around 104–105/s. The flyer plate impact testing produces the uniform stress and strain rates but the testing is expensive. The Taylor test is relatively inexpensive but produces non-uniform stress and strain fields, and the results are not so easily inferred for material modeling. In the split-Hopkinson bar (SHB, which may be used in compression, tension and torsion testing, the strain rates never exceeds 103/s. In the present work, we use the expanding ring test where the strain rate is 104–105/s. A streak camera is used to examine the expanding ring velocity, and a water tank is used to collect the fragments. The experimental results are compared with the numerical simulations using the hydrocodes AUTODYN, IMPETUS Afea and a regularized smooth particle (RSPH software. The number of fragments increases with the increase in the expansion velocity of the rings. The number of fragments is similar to the experimental results. The RSPH software shows much the same results as the AUTODYN where the Lagrangian solver is used for the ring. The IMPETUS Afea solver shows a somewhat different fragmentation characteristic due to the node splitting algorithm that induces pronounced tensile splitting.

  15. Microstructure of Cu60Zr20Ti20 bulk metallic glass rolled at different strain rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The structural evolution of Cu60Zr20Ti20 bulk metallic glass during rolling at different strain rates and cryogenic temperature was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD),differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). It is revealed that the deformation-induced transformation is strongly dependent on the strain rate. At the lowest experimental strain rate of 1.0×10-4 s-1,no phase transformation occurs until the highest deformation degree reaches 95%. In a strain rate range of 5.0×10-4-5.0×10-2 s-1,phase separation oc-curs in a high deformation degree. As the strain rate reaches 5.0×10-1 s-1,phase separation and nanocrystallization concur. The critical deformation degree for oc-currence of phase transformation decreases with the strain rate increasing.

  16. Influence of strain rate on fracture behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵荣国; 陈朝中

    2008-01-01

    The effect of strain rate on fracture behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate) was investigated.The uniaxial tensile rupture tests for the poly(methyl methacrylate) samples were carried out at different strain rates at ambient temperature.It is found that the elastic modulus of the material increases with increasing strain rate,while the elongation is reversal with strain rate.Simultaneously,there exists a critical strain rate within which the stress-strain curves overlap one another,and beyond which the curves depart from each other.The amount of energy added to the system due to work done by the imposed load was calculated,and the strain energy stored in the material at each strain rate was calculated by the current stress integral with respect to strain.The complementary strain energy,which is the difference between the work and the strain energy,was obtained and was considered to supply the surface energy to create a new crack surface in the polymeric material.It is found that the work done by the imposed load,which is needed for the fracture of poly(methyl methacrylate) sample,decreases with increasing strain rate,and the strain energy decreases with strain rate as well,which demonstrates that the polymeric material at high strain rate is easier to fracture than that at low strain rate.As the strain rate increases,the fracture mode changes from ductile,semi-ductile to brittle mode.The complementary strain energy almost sustains a constant at any strain rate.The density of surface energy,which characterizes the energy per unit area needed for creating crack surface,is a strain rate-independent material constant.

  17. Tensile Mechanical Behaviour of Ultra-High Strength Cold Rolled Dual Phase Steel DP1000 at High Strain Rates%超高强冷轧双相钢DP1000高应变速率下的拉伸性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代启锋; 宋仁伯; 蔡恒君; 于三川; 高喆

    2013-01-01

    使用CMT4105型电子万能试验机和霍普金森拉杆(SHTB)装置研究了超高强冷轧双相钢DP1000在室温下的准静态和动态拉伸力学性能.结果表明:应变速率范围在0.0001-2250 s-1,DP1000双相钢具有明显的应变速率敏感性,表现出较强的应变速率增强效应,强度随着应变速率的增加而增加;Johnson-Cook模型能够在一定程度上描述DP1000双相钢在高应变速率下变形行为,但由于应变速率敏感性在高应变速率下吻合程度较差;对Johnson-Cook模型的应变速率效应多项式进行二次化修正后,模型能很好地描述DP1000双相钢在高应变速率下的变形行为,平均可决系数从0.9434提高到0.9850.%Quasi-static and dynamic tensile mechanical behaviour of ultra-high strength cold rolled dual phase steel DP1000 at room temperature and wide strain rates (0.0001-2250 s1) with electronic universal testing machine CMT4105 and split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) apparatus were investigated. The results show that DP1000 steel is a sensitive material to strain rate, and the strength increases with the increase of strain rate; Johnson-Cook model can represent, to some extent, deformational behaviour for DP1000 steel at high strain rates, but owing to strain rate sensitivity, the goodness of fit is poor at high strain rate. The polynomial of strain rate effect was modified based on Johnson-Cook model, and the modified dynamic constitutive model can make a satisfied prediction to the plastic flow stress of DP1000 steel at high strain rates, and the average coefficient of determination can be improved from 0.9434 to 0.9850.

  18. Effect of Temperature and Strain Rate on Dynamic Properties of Low Silicon TRIP Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Rong; LI Lin; B C De Cooman; WEI Xi-chen; SUN Peng

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic tensile test of 0.11C-0.62Si-1.65Mn TRIP steel was carried out at different strain rates and test temperatures. The results show that both temperature and strain rate affect the retained austenite transformation. At high strain rates, the uniform elongation decreases, whereas the total elongation and energy absorption increase. The tensile strength is less strain rate sensitive. With raising test temperature, the tensile strength is reduced and the mechanical properties generally deteriorate, especially at 110 ℃. However, excellent mechanical properties were obtained at 50 ℃ and 75 ℃.

  19. Effect of microstructure on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Lau, Andrew; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Guang; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-05-01

    This study is focused on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel that can be strain-rate insensitive, hardening, softening, or strain-rate insensitive in various ranges of strain rate. BC hydrogel consists of randomly distributed nanofibres and a large content of free water; thanks to its ideal biocompatibility, it is suitable for biomedical applications. Motivated by its potential applications in complex loading conditions of body environment, its time-dependent behaviour was studied by means of in-aqua uniaxial tension tests at constant temperature of 37 °C at various strain rates ranging from 0.000 1s(-1) to 0.3s(-1). Experimental results reflect anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour that was not documented before. Micro-morphological observations allowed identification of deformation mechanisms at low and high strain rates in relation to microstructural changes. Unlike strain-rate softening behaviours in other materials, reorientation of nanofibres and kinematics of free-water flow dominate the softening behaviour of BC hydrogel at high strain rates.

  20. Left ventricular layer function in hypertension assessed by myocardial strain rate using novel one-beat real-time three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography with high volume rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Maki; Sato, Noriaki; Kawasaki, Masanori; Tanaka, Ryuhei; Nagaya, Maki; Watanabe, Takatomo; Ono, Koji; Noda, Toshiyuki; Zile, Michael R; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2015-08-01

    We recently developed novel software to measure phasic strain rate (SR) using automated one-beat real-time three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE) with high volume rates. We tested the hypothesis that left ventricular (LV) systolic function and relaxation analyzed by SR with the novel 3D-STE in hypertension (HTN) with hypertrophy may be impaired in the endocardium before there is LV systolic dysfunction. We measured LV longitudinal, radial and circumferential SR in patients with HTN (n=80, 69±7 years) and age-matched normotensive controls (n= 60, 69±10 years) using 3D-STE. HTN patients were divided into four groups according to LV geometry: normal, concentric remodeling, concentric hypertrophy and eccentric hypertrophy. We measured SR during systole as an index of systolic function, SR during isovolumic relaxation (IVR) as an index of relaxation and E/e' as an index of filling pressure. Endocardial SR during systole in HTN with concentric and eccentric hypertrophy decreased compared with that in controls despite no reduction in ejection fraction or epicardial SR. Endocardial radial SR during IVR decreased even in normal geometry, and it was further reduced in concentric remodeling and hypertrophy despite no reduction in epicardial SR. LV phasic SR assessed by 3D-STE with high volume rates is a useful index to detect early decreases in LV systolic function and to predict subclinical LV layer dysfunction in patients with HTN.

  1. A numerical method for determining the strain rate intensity factor under plane strain conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, S.; Kuo, C.-Y.; Jeng, Y.-R.

    2016-07-01

    Using the classical model of rigid perfectly plastic solids, the strain rate intensity factor has been previously introduced as the coefficient of the leading singular term in a series expansion of the equivalent strain rate in the vicinity of maximum friction surfaces. Since then, many strain rate intensity factors have been determined by means of analytical and semi-analytical solutions. However, no attempt has been made to develop a numerical method for calculating the strain rate intensity factor. This paper presents such a method for planar flow. The method is based on the theory of characteristics. First, the strain rate intensity factor is derived in characteristic coordinates. Then, a standard numerical slip-line technique is supplemented with a procedure to calculate the strain rate intensity factor. The distribution of the strain rate intensity factor along the friction surface in compression of a layer between two parallel plates is determined. A high accuracy of this numerical solution for the strain rate intensity factor is confirmed by comparison with an analytic solution. It is shown that the distribution of the strain rate intensity factor is in general discontinuous.

  2. Strain rate dependence in plasticized and un-plasticized PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siviour C.R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and analytical investigation has been made into the mechanical behaviour of two poly (vinyl chloride (PVC polymers – an un-plasticized PVC and a diisononyl phthalate (DINP-plasticized PVC. Measurements of the compressive stress-strain behaviour of the PVCs at strain rates ranging from 10−3 to 103s−1 and temperatures from − 60 to 100∘C are presented. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis was also performed in order to understand the material transitions observed in compression testing as the strain rate is increased. This investigation develops a better understanding of the interplay between the temperature dependence and rate dependence of polymers, with a focus on locating the temperature and rate-dependent material transitions that occur during high rate testing.

  3. Strain rate dependence in plasticized and un-plasticized PVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, M. J.; Siviour, C. R.

    2012-08-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation has been made into the mechanical behaviour of two poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) polymers - an un-plasticized PVC and a diisononyl phthalate (DINP)-plasticized PVC. Measurements of the compressive stress-strain behaviour of the PVCs at strain rates ranging from 10-3 to 103s-1 and temperatures from - 60 to 100∘C are presented. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis was also performed in order to understand the material transitions observed in compression testing as the strain rate is increased. This investigation develops a better understanding of the interplay between the temperature dependence and rate dependence of polymers, with a focus on locating the temperature and rate-dependent material transitions that occur during high rate testing.

  4. Constitutive Relation of Yunjialing Anthracite Under Medium Strain Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Wen-jiao; SHAN Ren-liang; WANG Gong-cheng; CHENG Rui-qiang

    2007-01-01

    By means of the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing system, this paper presents a dynamic constitutive relation of anthracite at a strain rate of ε =5-85s-1. Generally, the dynamic stress-strain curve for this kind of anthracite under uni-axial compression has the following four stages: a non-linear loading stage, a plastic yielding stage, a strain-strengthening stage and an unloading breakage stage. Correspondingly, the initial elastic modulus Eb, the yielding strength σs and the ultimate strength σb increase along with an increasing strain rate. The time-dependent elasticity was identified when we analyzed the mechanical properties of anthracite. Based on characteristics of measured dynamic stress-strain curves and an analysis of existing rock dynamic constitutive models, as well as a preparatory simulation, a new visco-elastic damage model has been introduced in this paper. A linear spring is put parallel to two Maxwell units with different relaxation times to express two distinct plastic flows. The damage D is equal to [Eb- E(εi)]/Eb, where Eb is the beginning modulus and the E(εi) is the slope of a connected line between the origin point and any other point on a tested stress-strain curve. In the new constitutive model, one Maxwell unit with low relaxation time (ψ)1 is used to describe the response of anthracite to a low strain rate, while the other, with a high relaxation time (ψ)2 describes the response of anthracite to a high strain rate. Simulated stress-strain curves from the new model are consistent with the measured curves.

  5. Strain y strain rate para dummies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastor Olaya, MD

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Desarrollos recientes en el campo de la ecocardiografía han permitido a los cardiólogos cuantificar de manera objetiva la función miocárdica regional y global con base en los conceptos de deformación (strain y velocidad de deformación (strain rate que pueden calcularse de manera no invasiva tanto en el ventrículo izquierdo como en el derecho, y suministrar valiosa información en múltiples escenarios clínicos. Dado que esta técnica novedosa y promisoria se utiliza cada vez más en la clínica y en estudios de investigación, se hace necesario el conocimiento adecuado de sus principios, así como de sus aspectos técnicos, alcances y limitaciones para una mejor implementación. En este artículo se busca dar explicación a los conceptos fundamentales y las potenciales aplicaciones clínicas de la strain y la strain rate derivados por speckle tracking (strain 2D.

  6. Strain rate and temperature dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanjgaokar, Nikhil J.

    by about 50% due to the extended temperature gradient along the specimen gauge section that causes plastic strain localization. On the contrary, the microheater based uniform heating method results in uniform temperature and strain fields during tensile experiments and was more suited for experiments at elevated temperatures. This uniform heating method was applied to annealed Au films with average grain size of 64 nm and for strain rates 10-5-10 s-1 , and temperatures 298-383 K. Activation volume calculations based on the combined temperature and strain rate experimental results pointed to two rate limiting mechanisms of inelastic deformation: Creep-driven and dislocation-mediated plasticity, with the transition occurring at increasing strain rates for increasing temperatures. The activation volume for the creep-dominated regime increased monotonically from 6.4b3 to 29.5b3 between 298 and 383 K, signifying GB diffusion processes and dislocation-mediated creep, respectively. The trends in the dislocationmediated plasticity regime followed an abnormally decreasing trend in the activation volume values with temperature, which was explained by a model for thermally activated dislocation depinning. Furthermore, the experimental data allowed us to evaluate the hardening behavior for Au films and model it using a linear hardening law and exponential relationships for the state variable and the saturation stress. The creep response of nanocrystalline Au films with 40 nm grain size was also obtained experimentally in an effort to assess its contribution to the overall mechanical response under uniaxial tension. Unusually high primary creep rates (3.3 x 10-8 to 2.7 x 10-7 s-1) and steady state creep rates (5.5 x 10-9 - 1.1 x 10-8 s-1) were measured with the primary creep regime lasting up to 5-6 hr for some stress amplitudes. A non-linear model based on the kinetics of thermal activation was applied to model the creep behavior of Au films, which captured very well the effect

  7. Study of mechanical properties, microstructures and corrosion behavior of al 7075 t651 alloy with varying strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A.; Ghosh, M.; Mondal, K.; Venkitanarayanan, P.; Moon, A. P.; Varshney, A.

    2015-02-01

    Compression test of Al 7075 T651 was carried out at high strain rates (1138 - 2534 s-1) using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar and at slow strain rate (10-4s-1) in 100KN Universal Testing machine to understand the improvement in mechanical properties and associated changes in microstructures. Cylindrical specimens of 6 mm height and 6 mm diameter were compressed dynamically. The influence of strain rates on mechanical properties, microstructure evolution and corrosion behavior after immersion test in 3.5% NaCl solution was also investigated. Strain rate, withdrawal stress and yield stress were observed to increase with impact velocity in high strain rate tests, while in slow strain rate tests, n value was observed to increase with increasing total strain. Microstructural observations revealed that after high strain rate test, grains of Al matrix were elongated. It was observed that corrosion resistance decreased with increase in impact velocity.

  8. Strain rate dependency of oceanic intraplate earthquake b-values at extremely low strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasajima, Ryohei; Ito, Takeo

    2016-06-01

    We discovered a clear positive dependence of oceanic intraplate earthquake (OCEQ) b-values on the age of the oceanic lithosphere. OCEQ b-values in the youngest (20 Ma) oceanic lithosphere exceed 1.5, which is significantly higher than the average worldwide earthquake b-value (around 1.0). On the other hand, the b-value of intraplate earthquakes in the Ninety East-Sumatra orogen, where oceanic lithosphere has an anomalously higher strain rate compared with normal oceanic lithosphere, is 0.93, which is significantly lower than the OCEQ b-value (about 1.9) with the same age (50-110 Ma). Thus, the variation in b-values relates to the strain rate of the oceanic lithosphere and is not caused by a difference in thermal structure. We revealed a negative strain rate dependency of the b-value at extremely low strain rates (1.5) in oceanic lithosphere >20 Ma old imply that future improvement in seismic observation will capture many smaller magnitude OCEQs, which will provide valuable information on the evolution of the oceanic lithosphere and the driving mechanism of plate tectonics.

  9. Mechanical behaviour of glass fibre reinforced composite at varying strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Saikat; Mondal, D. K.; Ghosh, K. S.; Mukhopadhyay, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    Here we report the results of compressive split Hopkinson pressure bar experiments (SHPB) conducted on unidirectional glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) in the strain rate regime 5  ×  102–1.3  ×  103 s‑1. The maximum compressive strength of GFRP was found to increase by as much as 55% with increase in strain rate. However, the corresponding relative strain to failure response was measured to increase only marginally with increase in strain rates. Based on the experimental results and photomicrographs obtained from FE-SEM based post mortem examinations, the failure phenomena are suggested to be associated with increase in absorption of energy from low to high strain rates. Attempts have been made to explain these observations in terms of changes in deformation mechanisms primarily as a function of strain rates.

  10. TRIP effect in austenitic-martensitic VNS9-Sh steel at various strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terent'ev, V. F.; Slizov, A. K.; Prosvirnin, D. V.

    2016-10-01

    The mechanical properties of austenitic-martensitic VNS9-Sh (23Kh15N5AM3-Sh) steel are studied at a static strain rate from 4.1 × 10-5 to 17 × 10-3 s-1 (0.05-20 mm/min). It is found that, as the strain rate increases, the ultimate tensile strength decreases and the physical yield strength remains unchanged (≈1400 MPa). As the strain rate increases, the yield plateau remains almost unchanged and the relative elongation decreases continuously. Because of high microplastic deformation, the conventional yield strength is lower than the physical yield strength over the entire strain rate range under study. The influence of the TRIP effect on the changes in the mechanical properties of VNS9-Sh steel at various strain rates is discussed.

  11. Shock Compression and Strain Rate Effect in Composites and Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-20

    Polymers are increasingly being utilized as monolithic materials and composite matrices for structural applications historically reserved for metals. High strain and high strain-rate applications in aerospace, defense, and automotive industries have lead to interest in utilizing the ability of many polymers to withstand extensions to failure of several hundred percent, often without localization or necking and their strong rate dependence. A broad range of characterization techniques will be presented for semi-crystalline polymers and composites including elastic-plastic fracture, split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB), plate impact including soft-recovery and lateral gage measurements and Taylor Impact. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum-trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition to probe subtle changes in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Observed strong anisotropy on the hugoniot and spall behavior of fiber-reinforced composites will be discussed. Polymers are known to exhibit a strong dependence of the yield stress on temperature and strain-rate that are often observed to be linear for temperature and logarithmic for strain-rate. Temperature and strain-rate dependence will be reviewed in terms of classic time-temperature superposition and an empirical mapping function for superposition between temperature and strain-rate. The recent extension of the new Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to probe the dynamic tensile responses of polymers will be discussed, where more irregular deformation and stochastic-based damage and failure mechanisms than the stable plastic elongation and shear instabilities observed that in metals. The opportunity to use of Dyn-Ten-Ext to probe incipient damage at very high strain-rate by linking in situ and post mortem experimental observations with high

  12. Strain y strain rate para dummies Strain and strain rate for dummies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastor Olaya

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Desarrollos recientes en el campo de la ecocardiografía han permitido a los cardiólogos cuantificar de manera objetiva la función miocárdica regional y global con base en los conceptos de deformación (strain y velocidad de deformación (strain rate que pueden calcularse de manera no invasiva tanto en el ventrículo izquierdo como en el derecho, y suministrar valiosa información en múltiples escenarios clínicos. Dado que esta técnica novedosa y promisoria se utiliza cada vez más en la clínica y en estudios de investigación, se hace necesario el conocimiento adecuado de sus principios, así como de sus aspectos técnicos, alcances y limitaciones para una mejor implementación. En este artículo se busca dar explicación a los conceptos fundamentales y las potenciales aplicaciones clínicas de la strain y la strain rate derivados por speckle tracking (strain 2D.Recent developments in the field of echocardiography have allowed cardiologists to objectively quantify regional and global myocardial function based on the deformation (strain and strain rate which can be calculated non-invasively in both the left or right ventricle, and provide valuable information in multiple clinical settings. Since this new technique is promising and is being increasingly used in clinical and research studies, the adequate knowledge of its principles and its technical aspects, scope and limitations are necessary for its better implementation. This article seeks to explain fundamental concepts and potential clinical applications of strain and strain rate derived by speckle tracking (2D strain.

  13. Tantalum strength model incorporating temperature, strain rate and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett; Brown, Justin; Lane, Matt

    Tantalum is a body-centered-cubic (BCC) refractory metal that is widely used in many applications in high temperature, strain rate and pressure environments. In this work, we propose a physically-based strength model for tantalum that incorporates effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. A constitutive model for single crystal tantalum is developed based on dislocation kink-pair theory, and calibrated to measurements on single crystal specimens. The model is then used to predict deformations of single- and polycrystalline tantalum. In addition, the proposed strength model is implemented into Sandia's ALEGRA solid dynamics code to predict plastic deformations of tantalum in engineering-scale applications at extreme conditions, e.g. Taylor impact tests and Z machine's high pressure ramp compression tests, and the results are compared with available experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. PLASTIC DEFORMATION BEHAVIOR OF ELECTROFORMED COPPER LINER OF SHAPED CHARGE AT DIFFERENT STRAIN RATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Y. Gao; W.H. Tian; A.L. Fan; Q. Sun

    2003-01-01

    The paper deals with different plastic deformation behavior of electroformed copperliner of shaped charge, deformed at high strain rate (about 1×107 s-1) and normalstrain rate (4×10-4 s-1). The crystallographic orientation distribution of grains inrecovered slugs which had undergone high-strain-rate plastic deformation during ex-plosive detonation was investigated by electron backscattering Kikuchi pattern tech-nique. Cellular structures formed by tangled dislocations and sub-grain boundariesconsisting of dislocation arrays were detected in the recovered slugs. Some twins andslip dislocations were observed in specimen deformed at normal strain rate. It wasfound that dynamic recovery and recrystallization take place during high-strain-ratedeformation due to the temperature rising, whereas the conventional slip mechanismoperates during deformation at normal strain rate.

  15. Effect of strain rate on microstructure and mechanical properties of a Mg-9Li-2Zn alloy sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A two-phase Mg-9Li-2Zn alloy sheet is made by cold-rolling at room temperature, and the formability of it at room temperature is investigated in this study. Uniaxial tension tests are carried out for various strain rates between 0. 5 mm/min and 250 mm/min, and the microstructural changes during the tests are observed. The sheet has high formability at comparatively low strain rates. Maximum elongation amounts to 40%. However, ductility decreases with the increase of strain rate. Even at room temperature, the stress is also sensitive to the strain rate. There are many large dimples at comparatively low strain rates, and small dimples occur at high strain rates, it shows fine sub-grains come into being.

  16. Dynamic tensile testing for determining the stress-strain curve at different strain rate

    OpenAIRE

    Mansilla, A; Regidor, A.; García, D.; Negro, A

    2001-01-01

    A detailed discussion of high strain-rate tensile testing is presented. A comparative analysis of different ways to measure stress and strain is made. The experimental stress-strain curves have been suitably interpreted to distinguish between the real behaviour of the material and the influence of the testing methodology itself. A special two sections flat specimen design was performed through FEA computer modelling. The mechanical properties as function of strain rate were experimentally obt...

  17. Modeling temperature and strain rate history in effects in OFHU Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Albert Buck

    Accurate material behavior prediction during large deformations is essential. For the U.S. Army, explosively formed projectiles (EFP), penetrators, and vehicle armor are applications which will benefit from a better understanding of and ability to predict material behavior when subjected to high and varying strain rates and temperatures. Linking macro-scale material behavior with the evolution of microstructure has proven effective in obtaining an appropriate mathematical structure for constitutive relationships. Incorporation of strain rate, temperature, and deformation path history effects are especially critical to accurately predict material responses for arbitrary nonisothermal, variable strain rate conditions. Material constitutive equations contain numerous parameters which must be determined experimentally, and often are not fully optimized. The goal of this research was to develop more physically descriptive kinematics and kinetics models for large strain deformation based on internal state variable (ISV) evolution laws which include strain rate and temperature history dependence. A unique and comprehensive set of experiments involving sequences of different strain rates, temperatures, and deformation paths, as well as, constant strain rate, isothermal and experiments characterizing restoration processes, were conducted on OFHC Cu. Microstructural examinations found that recrystallization occurs and has a significant influence on the flow stress. The performance of various models, including state-of-the-art models such as the BCJ (Sandia), MTS (Los Alamos), and McDowell models were correlated and compared to experimental data. A novel hybrid optimization strategy was used to obtain the optimum parameter set possible corresponding to each model form. To account for the observed flow stress softening, an internal state variable representing the "softened" recrystallized state was incorporated into the hardening evolution equations in the BCJ and Mc

  18. Strain Rate Dependent Ductile-to-Brittle Transition of Graphite Platelet Reinforced Vinyl Ester Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmananda Pramanik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, the fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces of vinyl ester based nanocomposites were estimated applying classical method on 3D digital microscopic images. The fracture energy and fracture toughness were obtained from fractal dimensions. A noteworthy observation, the strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of vinyl ester based nanocomposites, is reinvestigated in the current study. The candidate materials of xGnP (exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets reinforced and with additional CTBN (Carboxyl Terminated Butadiene Nitrile toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites that are subjected to both quasi-static and high strain rate indirect tensile load using the traditional Brazilian test method. High-strain rate indirect tensile testing is performed with a modified Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB. Pristine vinyl ester shows ductile deformation under quasi-static loading and brittle failure when subjected to high-strain rate loading. This observation reconfirms the previous research findings on strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of this material system. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Contribution of nanoreinforcement to the tensile properties is reported in this paper.

  19. Effects of Temperature and Strain Rate on Dynamic Properties of Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Bin; TAO Junlin; LI Zhengliang; WANG Ruheng; ZHANG Yu

    2008-01-01

    To study the dynamic properties of the concrete subjected to impulsive loading,stress-time curves of concrete in different velocities were measured using split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB).Effects of temperature and strain rate on the dynamic yield strength and constitutive relation of the concrete were analyzed.The dynamic mechanical properties of the reinforced concrete are subjected to high strain rates when it is at a relatively low temperature.But with temperature increasing,the temperature softening effect makes the strength of the concrete weaken and the impact toughness of the concrete is saliently relative to strain rate effect.So,strain rate effect,strain hardening and temperature softening work together on the dynamic mechanical capability of concrete and the relation between them is relatively corn plex.

  20. Analysis and implementation of electric power waveform data compression method with high compression ratio%高压缩比电力系统波形数据压缩方法的实现与性能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党三磊; 肖勇; 杨劲锋; 申妍华

    2013-01-01

    在对常用数据压缩、编码方法分析的基础上,充分利用电力系统波形数据的周期性、有界性和冗余性等特点,同时分别选用游程编码和EZW编码,在DSP平台上实现了基于DCT变换、提升小波变换的压缩方法.文章对两种压缩方法实现、性能和还原效果方面进行了全面分析,认为基于提升小波与EZW编码的压缩方法可记录数据突变特征,具有压缩比和还原精度可调等特点,更适合于压缩大量电力系统故障波形数据压缩.%Power quality monitor and waveform recorder are very important equipments for security and stability a-nalysis of the electric power system. In those equipments, the core technology is power system waveform data compression method with high compression ratio. In this paper, commonly used data compression and coding method are studied firstly. Taking advantage of characteristics of the power system waveform data such as periodic, bounded and redundancy, compression methods based on DCT transform and lifting wavelet transform are imple-mentated on the DSP platform. Then, implementation, performance and reduction effect of the two compression methods are comprehensively analyzed. It is found that the compression method based on lifting wavelet and EZW coding can record abrupt data changes and has the features of adjustable compression ratio and precision restoration. The method is more suitable for compression of large amounts of power system failure waveform data.

  1. Theoretical and experimental study of high strain, high strain rate materials viscoplastic behaviour. Application to Mars 190 steel and tantalum; Etude theorique et experimentale du comportement viscoplastique des materiaux aux grandes deformations et grandes vitesses de deformations. Application a l'acier mars 190 et au tantale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juanicotena, A

    1998-07-01

    This work enters in the general framework of the study and modelling of metallic materials viscoplastic behaviour in the area of high strain and high strain rate, from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}. We define a methodology allowing to describe the behaviour of armor steel Mars 190 and tantalum in the initial area. In a first time, the study of visco-plasticity physical mechanisms shows the necessity to take into account some fundamental processes of the plastic deformation. Then, the examination of various constitutive relations allows to select the Preston-Tonks-Wallace model, that notably reproduce the physical phenomenon of the flow stress saturation. In a second part, a mechanical characterization integrating loading direction, strain rate and temperature effects is conducted on the two materials. Moreover, these experimental results allow to calculate associated constants to Preston-Tonks-Wallace, Zerilli-Armstrong and Johnson-Cook models for each material. In a third time, in order to evaluate and to validate these constitutive laws, we conceive and develop an experimental device open to reach the area of study: the expanding spherical shell test. It concerns to impose a free radial expanding to a thin spherical shell by means a shock wave generated by an explosive. By the radial expanding velocity measure, we can determine stress, strain rate and strain applied on the spherical shell at each time. In a four and last part, we evaluate constitutive models out of their optimization area's. This validation is undertaken by comparisons 'experimental results/calculations' with the help of global experiences like expanding spherical shell test and Taylor test. (author)

  2. Volume dilatation in a polycarbonate blend at varying strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiermaier, S.; Huberth, F.

    2012-05-01

    Impact loaded polymers show a variety of strain-rate dependent mechanical properties in their elastic, plastic and failure behaviour. In contrast to purely crystalline materials, the volume of polymeric materials can significantly change under irreversible deformations. In this paper, uni-axial tensile tests were performed in order to measure the dilatation in the Polycarbonate-Acrylnitril-Butadien-Styrol (PC-ABS) Bayblend T65. The accumulation of dilatation was measured at deformation speeds of 0.1 and 500 [ mm/ s]. Instrumented with a pair of two high-speed cameras, volume segments in the samples were observed. The change in volume was quantified as relation between the deformed and initial volumes of the segments. It was observed that the measured dilatations are of great significance for the constitutive models. This is specifically demonstrated through comparisons of stress-strain relations derived from the two camera-perspectives with isochoric relations based on single-surface observations of the same experiments.

  3. Material deformation dynamics at ultrahigh pressures and strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, B. A.; Park, H. S.; Maddox, B. R.; May, M. J.; Pollaine, S. M.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Rudd, R. E.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Perry, T. S.; Comley, A. J.; Wark, J. S.; Meyers, M. A.

    2010-11-01

    Solid-state dynamics experiments at extreme pressures, up to 10 Mbar, and strain rates (1.e6 -1.e8 1/s) are being developed for the NIF laser. The experimental methods are being developed on the Omega laser facility. VISAR measurements establish the ramped, high-pressure conditions. Recovery experiments offer a look at the residual microstructure. Dynamic diffraction measurements allow phase, shear stress (strength), and possibly twin volume fraction and dislocation density to be inferred. Constitutive models for material strength at these conditions by comparing 2D simulations with experiments measuring the Rayleigh-Taylor instability evolution in solid-state samples of vanadium and tantalum. The material deformation likely falls into the phonon drag regime. We estimate of the (microscopic) phonon drag coefficient, by relating to the (macroscopic) effective lattice viscosity.

  4. Compressive behavior of bulk metallic glass under different conditions --- Coupled effect of temperature and strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weihua

    Metallic glass was first reported in 1960 by rapid quenching of Au-Si alloys. But, due to the size limitation, this material did not attract remarkable interest until the development of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with specimen sizes in excess of 1 mm. BMGs are considered to be promising engineering materials because of their ultrahigh strength, high elastic limit and wear resistance. However, they usually suer from a strong tendency for localized plastic deformation with catastrophic failure. Many basic questions, such as the origin of shear softening and the strain rate eect remain unclear. In this thesis, the mechanical behavior of the Zr55Al 10Ni5Cu30 bulk metallic glass and a metallic glass composite is investigated. The stress-strain relationship for Zr55Al10Ni 5Cu30 over a wide range of strain rate (5x10 --5 to 2x103 s--1) was investigated in uniaxial compression loading using both MTS servo-hydraulic system (quasi-static) and compression Kolsky bar system (dynamic). The effect of the strain rate on the fracture stress at room temperature was discussed. Based on the experimental results, the strain rate sensitivity of the bulk metallic glass changes from a positive value to a negative value at high strain rate, which is a consequence of the significant adiabatic temperature rise during the dynamic testing. In order to characterize the temperature eect on the mechanical behavior of the metallic glass, a synchronically assembled heating unit was designed to be attached onto the Kolsky bar system to perform high temperature and high strain rate mechanical testing. A transition from inhomogeneous deformation to homogeneous deformation has been observed during the quasi-static compressive experiments at testing temperatures close to the glass transition temperature. However, no transition has been observed at high strain rates at all the testing temperatures. A free volume based model is applied to analyze the stress-strain behavior of the homogeneous

  5. 铝合金7050-T7451高温高应变率本构方程及修正%Research and Revise on Constitutive Equation of 7050-T7451 Aluminum Alloy in High Strain Rate and High Temperature Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滑勇之; 关立文; 刘辛军; 崔海龙

    2012-01-01

    通过分离式霍普金森压杆(SHPB)及准静态压缩实验研究铝合金7050-T7451高温高应变率下流变应力特征,利用准静态实验数据获得本构方程应变强化参数,利用SHPB实验数据获得室温下不同应变率(400~2500s-1)的应变率强化参数,以及应变率为2500s-1不同温度下(250~600℃)的热软化参数.利用不同幂次多项式对Johnson-Cook本构方程的热软化项拟合,最终选择五次多项式作为修正后本构方程热软化项.利用修正后本构方程对不同温度条件下应力应变曲线进行预测,实验数据与预测曲线表现出良好一致性.%The flow stress behavior of 7050-T7451 aluminum alloy at high temperature and high strain rate was investigated by split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) and quasi-static test system. The strain hardening parameters were obtained by the quasi-static test experiment data. The strain rate hardening parameter at various strain rates (400-2500S-1) and room temperature,and the thermal softening parameter at various temperatures where strain rate is 2500s-1 ,were obtained by the split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment data. A new thermal softening equation is proposed to revise the Johnson-Cook constitutive equation , where the a quintic polynomial equation is choosed as the new thermal softening equation. According to the comparison between predict curves and experiment curves of stress-strain at various temperatures, the modified constitutive equation can fit the experiment date well.

  6. Material properties of the heel fat pad across strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriadis, Grigoris; Newell, Nicolas; Carpanen, Diagarajen; Christou, Alexandros; Bull, Anthony M J; Masouros, Spyros D

    2017-01-01

    The complex structural and material behaviour of the human heel fat pad determines the transmission of plantar loading to the lower limb across a wide range of loading scenarios; from locomotion to injurious incidents. The aim of this study was to quantify the hyper-viscoelastic material properties of the human heel fat pad across strains and strain rates. An inverse finite element (FE) optimisation algorithm was developed and used, in conjunction with quasi-static and dynamic tests performed to five cadaveric heel specimens, to derive specimen-specific and mean hyper-viscoelastic material models able to predict accurately the response of the tissue at compressive loading of strain rates up to 150s(-1). The mean behaviour was expressed by the quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) material formulation, combining the Yeoh material model (C10=0.1MPa, C30=7MPa, K=2GPa) and Prony׳s terms (A1=0.06, A2=0.77, A3=0.02 for τ1=1ms, τ2=10ms, τ3=10s). These new data help to understand better the functional anatomy and pathophysiology of the foot and ankle, develop biomimetic materials for tissue reconstruction, design of shoe, insole, and foot and ankle orthoses, and improve the predictive ability of computational models of the foot and ankle used to simulate daily activities or predict injuries at high rate injurious incidents such as road traffic accidents and underbody blast. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of strain rate on the evolution of microstructure in aluminium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczyńska-Madej, B; Richert, M

    2010-03-01

    Intensive deformations influence strongly microstructure. The very well-known phenomenon is the diminishing dimension of grain size by the severe plastic deformation (SPD) methods. The nanometric features of microstructure were discovered after the SPD deformation of various materials, such as aluminium alloys, iron and others. The observed changes depended on the kind of the deformed material, amount of deformation, strain rate, existence of different phases and stacking fault energy. The influence of the strain and strain rate on the microstructure is commonly investigated nowadays. It was found that the high strain rates activate deformation in shear bands, microbands and adiabatic shear bands. It was observed that bands were places of the nucleation of nanograins in the material deformed by SPD methods. In the work, the refinement of microstructure of the aluminium alloys influenced by the high strain rate was investigated. The samples were compressed by a specially designed hammer to the deformation of phi= 0/0.62 with the strain rate in the range of [Formula in text]. The highest reduction of microbands width with the increase of the strain was found in the AlCu4Zr alloy. The influence of the strain rate on the microstructure refinement indicated that the increase of the strain rate caused the reduction of the microbands width in the all investigated materials (Al99.5, AlCu4Zr, AlMg5, AlZn6Mg2.5CuZr). A characteristic feature of the microstructure of the compressed material was large density of the shear bands and microbands. It was found that the microbands show a large misorientation to the surrounds and, except Al99.5, the large density of dislocation.

  8. Mechanical behavior of a lanthanum-doped magnesium alloy at different strain rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 (United States); School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yin, W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 (United States); Kondoh, K. [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaragi, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Jones, Tyrone L.; Kecskes, L.J. [WMRD, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Deer Creek Loop, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Yarmolenko, S.N. [NSF-ERC, Department of Mechanical Engineering, NC A& T State University, 1601 E. Market Street, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Wei, Q., E-mail: qwei@uncc.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 (United States)

    2015-02-25

    The mechanical behavior of a lanthanum doped Mg alloy, AZXE7111, (Mg–7Al–1Zn–1Ca–1La, all in wt%) extruded at different temperatures has been investigated under both quasi-static (strain rate ~1×10{sup −3} s{sup −1}) and dynamic (strain rate ~4×10{sup 3} s{sup −1}) compressive loading. Comparison has been made against the experimental results of two conventional Mg alloys, AZ91E and WE43. It was observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) that the nanoscale intermetallic compounds of Al{sub 2}Ca and Al{sub 11}La{sub 3}, have presumably formed during the hot extrusion process. These compounds are believed to contribute significantly to the strength by reducing the grain size and acting as dislocation barriers. Additionally, twinning has been considered as the main mechanism for the higher strain hardening rate at high strain rates than that at low strain rates. It has been found that the ultimate strength of the alloy is only ~10% higher at dynamic loading rate than at quasi-static loading rate. Localized micro-shear fracture was observed and adiabatic shear mode was suggested by further examination of dynamically loaded specimens. The shear localization is further discussed in detail and it is suggested that reduced strain hardening rate is responsible for shear localization and subsequent fracture at both low and high strain rates.

  9. Strain Rate Dependant Material Model for Orthotropic Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignjevic, Rade

    2016-08-01

    In manufacturing processes anisotropic metals are often exposed to the loading with high strain rates in the range from 102 s-1 to 106 s-1 (e.g. stamping, cold spraying and explosive forming). These types of loading often involve generation and propagation of shock waves within the material. The material behaviour under such a complex loading needs to be accurately modelled, in order to optimise the manufacturing process and achieve appropriate properties of the manufactured component. The presented research is related to development and validation of a thermodynamically consistent physically based constitutive model for metals under high rate loading. The model is capable of modelling damage, failure and formation and propagation of shock waves in anisotropic metals. The model has two main parts: the strength part which defines the material response to shear deformation and an equation of state (EOS) which defines the material response to isotropic volumetric deformation [1]. The constitutive model was implemented into the transient nonlinear finite element code DYNA3D [2] and our in house SPH code. Limited model validation was performed by simulating a number of high velocity material characterisation and validation impact tests. The new damage model was developed in the framework of configurational continuum mechanics and irreversible thermodynamics with internal state variables. The use of the multiplicative decomposition of deformation gradient makes the model applicable to arbitrary plastic and damage deformations. To account for the physical mechanisms of failure, the concept of thermally activated damage initially proposed by Tuller and Bucher [3], Klepaczko [4] was adopted as the basis for the new damage evolution model. This makes the proposed damage/failure model compatible with the Mechanical Threshold Strength (MTS) model Follansbee and Kocks [5], 1988; Chen and Gray [6] which was used to control evolution of flow stress during plastic deformation. In

  10. Strain Rate Sensitivity of Epoxy Resin in Tensile and Shear Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilat, Amos; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical response of E-862 and PR-520 resins is investigated in tensile and shear loadings. At both types of loading the resins are tested at strain rates of about 5x10(exp 5), 2, and 450 to 700 /s. In addition, dynamic shear modulus tests are carried out at various frequencies and temperatures, and tensile stress relaxation tests are conducted at room temperature. The results show that the toughened PR-520 resin can carry higher stresses than the untoughened E-862 resin. Strain rate has a significant effect on the response of both resins. In shear both resins show a ductile response with maximum stress that is increasing with strain rate. In tension a ductile response is observed at low strain rate (approx. 5x10(exp 5) /s), and brittle response is observed at the medium and high strain rates (2, and 700 /s). The hydrostatic component of the stress in the tensile tests causes premature failure in the E-862 resin. Localized deformation develops in the PR-520 resin when loaded in shear. An internal state variable constitutive model is proposed for modeling the response of the resins. The model includes a state variable that accounts for the effect of the hydrostatic component of the stress on the deformation.

  11. The Microstructure Evolution of Dual-Phase Pipeline Steel with Plastic Deformation at Different Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, L. K.; Xu, T.; Zhang, J. M.; Wang, H. T.; Tong, M. X.; Zhu, R. H.; Zhou, G. S.

    2017-07-01

    Tensile properties of the high-deformability dual-phase ferrite-bainite X70 pipeline steel have been investigated at room temperature under the strain rates of 2.5 × 10-5, 1.25 × 10-4, 2.5 × 10-3, and 1.25 × 10-2 s-1. The microstructures at different amount of plastic deformation were examined by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Generally, the ductility of typical body-centered cubic steels is reduced when its stain rate increases. However, we observed a different ductility dependence on strain rates in the dual-phase X70 pipeline steel. The uniform elongation (UEL%) and elongation to fracture (EL%) at the strain rate of 2.5 × 10-3 s-1 increase about 54 and 74%, respectively, compared to those at 2.5 × 10-5 s-1. The UEL% and EL% reach to their maximum at the strain rate of 2.5 × 10-3 s-1. This phenomenon was explained by the observed grain structures and dislocation configurations. Whether or not the ductility can be enhanced with increasing strain rates depends on the competition between the homogenization of plastic deformation among the microconstituents (ultra-fine ferrite grains, relatively coarse ferrite grains as well as bainite) and the progress of cracks formed as a consequence of localized inconsistent plastic deformation.

  12. Constitutive model depending upon temperature and strain rate of carbon constructional quality steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨柳; 罗迎社

    2008-01-01

    The basic factors relating to the rheological stress in the constitutive equations were introduced.Carbon constructional quality steels were regarded as a kind of elastic-viscoplastic materials under high temperature and the elastic-viscoplastic constitutive models were summarized.A series of tension experiments under the same temperature and different strain rates,and the same strain rate and different temperatures were done on 20 steel,35 steel and 45 steel.52 groups of rheological stress-strain curves were obtained.The experimental results were analyzed theoretically.The rheological stress constitutive models of carbon steels were built combining the strong points of the Perzyna model and Johnson-Cook model.Comparing the calculation results conducted from the model with the experiment results,the results proves that the model can reflect the temperature effect and strain rate effect of carbon constructional quality steels better.

  13. Identification of strain-rate and thermal sensitive material model with an inverse method

    CERN Document Server

    Peroni, L; Peroni, M

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical inverse method to extract material strength parameters from the experimental data obtained via mechanical tests at different strain-rates and temperatures. It will be shown that this procedure is particularly useful to analyse experimental results when the stress-strain fields in the specimen cannot be correctly described via analytical models. This commonly happens in specimens with no regular shape, in specimens with a regular shape when some instability phenomena occur (for example the necking phenomena in tensile tests that create a strongly heterogeneous stress-strain fields) or in dynamic tests (where the strain-rate field is not constant due to wave propagation phenomena). Furthermore the developed procedure is useful to take into account thermal phenomena generally affecting high strain-rate tests due to the adiabatic overheating related to the conversion of plastic work. The method presented requires strong effort both from experimental and numerical point of view, an...

  14. How to test brain and brain simulant at ballistic and blast strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Song, Bo; Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Chen, Weinong; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical properties of brain tissue and brain simulant at strain rate in the range of 1000 s-1 are essential for computational simulation of intracranial responses for ballistic and blast traumatic brain injury. Testing these ultra-soft materials at high strain rates is a challenge to most conventional material testing methods. The current study developed a modified split Hopkinson bar techniques using the combination of a few improvements to conventional split Hopkinson bar including: using low impedance aluminum bar, semiconductor strain gauge, pulse shaping technique and annular specimen. Feasibility tests were conducted using a brain stimulant, Sylgard 527. Stress-strain curves of the simulant were successfully obtained at strain rates of 2600 and 2700 s-1 for strain levels up to 60%. This confirmed the applicability of Hopkinson bar for mechanical properties testing of brain tissue in the ballistic and blast domain.

  15. Strain hardening rate sensitivity and strain rate sensitivity in TWIP steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bintu, Alexandra [TEMA, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 (Portugal); Vincze, Gabriela, E-mail: gvincze@ua.pt [TEMA, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 (Portugal); Picu, Catalin R. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Lopes, Augusto B. [CICECO, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 (Portugal); Grácio, Jose J. [TEMA, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 (Portugal); Barlat, Frederic [Materials Mechanics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    TWIP steels are materials with very high strength and exceptional strain hardening capability, parameters leading to large energy absorption before failure. However, TWIP steels also exhibit reduced (often negative) strain rate sensitivity (SRS) which limits the post-necking deformation. In this study we demonstrate for an austenitic TWIP steel with 18% Mn a strong dependence of the twinning rate on the strain rate, which results in negative strain hardening rate sensitivity (SHRS). The instantaneous component of SHRS is large and negative, while its transient is close to zero. The SRS is observed to decrease with strain, becoming negative for larger strains. Direct observations of the strain rate dependence of the twinning rate are made using electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction, which substantiate the proposed mechanism for the observed negative SHRS.

  16. A parametric study on the dynamic behavior of porous bronze at various strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Hu, Jianxing; Lei, Jianyin; Wang, Zhihua; Zhao, Longmao

    2016-10-01

    An experimental investigation on the porous bronze at various strain rates is firstly carried out in this study to explore the effects of relative density and strain rate in the mechanical behavior. Furthermore, a multi-parameter constitutive model of describing the rate-dependent behavior for porous bronze is developed. The parameters in the constitutive model are density dependent, and the specific forms of these parameters as functions of relative density are obtained. It can be concluded from the test results and constitutive model that the high relative density leads to increase in yield strength and energy absorption capacity of the materials and the strain rate also has positive effects on the yield strength and energy absorption capacity of porous bronze.

  17. Strain rate effects on GRP, KRP and CFRP composite laminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hassani, S.T.S.; Kaddour, A.S. [University of Manchester Inst. of Science and Technology (UMIST) (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-05-01

    This paper first reviews published research work on the effect of strain-rate on the in-plane mechanical properties of continuous Kevlar (KRP), glass (GRP) and carbon (CFRP) fibre reinforced plastic materials. A detailed description of techniques employed for testing composite materials at a wide range of strain rates is given. Recent relevant test results are presented showing the variation of mechanical properties with strain rates for unidirectional and multidirectional laminates under in-plane loading. The paper then concentrates on current activities on indirect determination of unidirectional dynamic properties from the behaviour of angle ply laminates by means of an extraction process. Theoretical procedures for extracting the longitudinal, transverse and in-plane shear properties are outlined. An extension to those procedures allowing simultaneous determination of transverse and in-plane shear moduli of a ply is introduced and results using this method are presented for KRP and CFRP under combined strain rate and temperature. Existing theories and mechanisms describing the combined effects of the temperature and the strain-rate on the mechanical response of composite materials are outlined. (orig.) 98 refs.

  18. Strain-rate dependence for Ni/Al hybrid foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Anne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shock absorption often needs stiff but lightweight materials that exhibit a large kinetic energy absorption capability. Open-cell metal foams are artificial structures, which due to their plateau stress, including a strong hysteresis, can in principle absorb large amounts of energy. However, their plateau stress is too low for many applications. In this study, we use highly novel and promising Ni/Al hybrid foams which consist of standard, open-cell aluminium foams, where nanocrystalline nickel is deposited by electrodeposition as coating on the strut surface. The mechanical behaviour of cellular materials, including their behaviour under higher strain-rates, is governed by their microstructure due to the properties of the strut material, pore/strut geometry and mass distribution over the struts. Micro-inertia effects are strongly related to the microstructure. For a conclusive model, the exact real microstructure is needed. In this study a micro-focus computer tomography (μCT system has been used for the analysis of the microstructure of the foam samples and for the development of a microstructural Finite Element (micro-FE mesh. The microstructural FE models have been used to model the mechanical behaviour of the Ni/Al hybrid foams under dynamic loading conditions. The simulations are validated by quasi-static compression tests and dynamic split Hopkinson pressure bar tests.

  19. DP1180双相钢在高应变速率变形条件下应变硬化行为及机制%BEHAVIOUR AND MECHANISM OF STRAIN HARDENING FOR DUAL PHASE STEEL DP1180 UNDER HIGH STRAIN RATE DEFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代启锋; 宋仁伯; 范午言; 郭志飞; 关小霞

    2012-01-01

    Strain hardening behaviour and mechanism of a cold-rolled dual phase steel DP1180 under quasi-static tensile condition at a strain rate of 0.001 s-1 by electronic universal testing machine, and dynamic tensile condition at strain rates of 500 and 1750 s-1 by split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) apparatus were systematically studied. According to the modified Swift true strain-stress model, the experimental data was regressed by using nonlinear fitting method, and strain hardening exponent in the modified Swift model was calculated by a modified Crussard-Jaoul method. The results revealed that there are two stage strain hardening characteristics of DP 1180 steel at the strain rate range of 0.001-1750 s-1, the strain hardening ability of the stage Ⅰ was enhanced with increase of strain rate, while the strain hardening ability of the stage Ⅱ was weakened, and the transition strain was decreased. The ferrite near the martensite regions formed cell blocks with dislocation structures, with a size of 90 nm, due to the limit of deformation compatibility, and the existence of geometrically necessary boundary (GNB) made DP1180 steel not instantly damaged under deformation at high strain rates. In addition, the adiabatic temperature rise of △T= 103 ℃ made martensite easy to have plastic deformation at a strain rate of 1750 s-1.%利用电子万能试验机和分离式Hopkinson拉杆装置对DP1180冷轧双相钢分别进行应变速率为0.001 s-1和500,1750 s-1的准静态和动态拉伸实验,根据修正的Swift真应力 应变模型对实验数据进行了非线性拟合,并用修正的Crussard-Jaoul分析法计算出修正的Swift模型的应变硬化指数.结果表明:在准静态和动态拉伸下,都存在两阶段应变硬化特性,第一阶段随应变速率的增加应变硬化能力增强;第二阶段随应变速率的增加应变硬化能力减弱;转折应变随应变速率的增加从3.12%减小到1.28%.在高应变速率下,马氏体附近的铁

  20. Strain Rate Dependent Behavior of Glass/Nano Clay Filled Epoxy Resin Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Velmurugan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that addition of small amount of nanoclays in the neat epoxy and fiber reinforced epoxy composite system can improve the mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of most of polymer matrix composites are sensitive to testing rate. However, most of the researches were concentrated on the behavior of the polymer matrix composites at high strain rates. The present research work is to investigate the role of clay on neat epoxy and glass–fiber reinforced epoxy composites, at low strain rates. The clay in terms of 1.5 wt%, 3 wt%, and 5 wt% are dispersed in the epoxy resin using mechanical stirring followed by sonication process. The corresponding glass/epoxy nanocomposites are prepared by impregnating the clay epoxy mixture by hand lay-up process. Characterization of the nanoclay is done by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Tensile stress-strain curves are obtained at strain rates of 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1, 10-2 s-1, and 10-1 s-1 by a hydraulic machine reporting that, even at low strain rates, the longitudinal strength and stiffness increase as strain rate increases for all clay loadings. It is observed that the tensile modulus increases as the clay loading increases for both epoxy and glass/epoxy nanocomposites. It is also noticed that the longitudinal tensile strength decreases as the clay loading increases. The failed specimens show marked changes in the fracture surface with increased strain rate. Scanning electron microscopy is used to study the fiber/matrix/clay adhesion in fracture surfaces.

  1. Strain Rate Dependent Behavior of Glass/Nano Clay Filled Epoxy Resin Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Velmurugan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that addition of small amount of nanoclays in the neat epoxy and fiber reinforced epoxy composite system can improve the mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of most of polymer matrix composites are sensitive to testing rate. However, most of the researches were concentrated on the behavior of the polymermatrix composites at high strain rates. The present research work is to investigate the role of clay on neat epoxy and glass–fiber reinforced epoxy composites, at low strain rates. The clay in terms of 1.5 wt%, 3 wt%, and 5 wt% are dispersed in the epoxy resin using mechanical stirring followed by sonication process. The corresponding glass/epoxy nanocomposites are prepared by impregnating the clay epoxy mixture by hand lay-up process. Characterization of the nanoclay is done by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Tensile stress-strain curves are obtained at strain rates of 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1, 10-2 s-1, and 10-1 s-1 by a hydraulic  machine reporting that, even at low strain rates, the longitudinal strength and stiffness increase as strain rate increases for all clay loadings. It is observed that the tensile modulus increases as the clay loading increases for both epoxy and glass/epoxy nanocomposites. It is also noticed that the longitudinal tensile strength decreases as the clay loading increases. The failed specimens show marked changes in the fracture surface with increased strain rate. Scanning electron microscopy is used to study the fiber/matrix/clay adhesion in fracture surfaces.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 64, No. 3, May 2014, pp. 295-302, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.7331

  2. Material dynamics under extreme conditions of pressure and strain rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remington, B A; Allen, P; Bringa, E; Hawreliak, J; Ho, D; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H; Meyers, M A; Pollaine, S W; Rosolankova, K; Sadik, B; Schneider, M S; Swift, D; Wark, J; Yaakobi, B

    2005-09-06

    Solid state experiments at extreme pressures (10-100 GPa) and strain rates ({approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8}s{sup -1}) are being developed on high-energy laser facilities, and offer the possibility for exploring new regimes of materials science. These extreme solid-state conditions can be accessed with either shock loading or with a quasi-isentropic ramped pressure drive. Velocity interferometer measurements establish the high pressure conditions. Constitutive models for solid-state strength under these conditions are tested by comparing 2D continuum simulations with experiments measuring perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid-state samples. Lattice compression, phase, and temperature are deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, from which the shock-induced {alpha}-{omega} phase transition in Ti and the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition in Fe are inferred to occur on sub-nanosec time scales. Time resolved lattice response and phase can also be measured with dynamic x-ray diffraction measurements, where the elastic-plastic (1D-3D) lattice relaxation in shocked Cu is shown to occur promptly (< 1 ns). Subsequent large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidate the microscopic dynamics that underlie the 3D lattice relaxation. Deformation mechanisms are identified by examining the residual microstructure in recovered samples. The slip-twinning threshold in single-crystal Cu shocked along the [001] direction is shown to occur at shock strengths of {approx}20 GPa, whereas the corresponding transition for Cu shocked along the [134] direction occurs at higher shock strengths. This slip-twinning threshold also depends on the stacking fault energy (SFE), being lower for low SFE materials. Designs have been developed for achieving much higher pressures, P > 1000 GPa, in the solid state on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser.

  3. Strain rate dependent deformation and failure behavior of laser welded DP780 steel joint under dynamic tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang, E-mail: liuyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Dong, Danyang, E-mail: dongdanyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Lei, E-mail: wanglei@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Chu, Xi, E-mail: chuxi.ok@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Pengfei, E-mail: wpf1963871400@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Jin, Mengmeng, E-mail: 24401878@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-03-11

    Laser welded DP steel joints are used widely in the automotive industry for weight reduction. Understanding the deformation and fracture behavior of the base metal (BM) and its welded joint (WJ), especially at high strain rates, is critical for the design of vehicle structures. This paper is concerned with the effects of strain rate on the tensile properties, deformation and fracture behavior of the laser welded DP780 steel joint. Quasi-static and dynamic tensile tests were performed on the WJ and BM of the DP780 steel using an electromechanical universal testing machine and a high-speed tensile testing machine over a wide range of strain rate (0.0001–1142 s{sup −1}). The microstructure change and microhardness distribution of the DP780 steel after laser welding were examined. Digital image correlation (DIC) and high-speed photography were employed for the strain measurement of the DP780 WJ during dynamic tensile tests. The DP780 WJ is a heterogeneous structure with hardening in fusion zone (FZ) and inner heat-affected zone (HAZ), and softening in outer HAZ. The DP780 BM and WJ exhibit positive strain rate dependence on the YS and UTS, which is smaller at lower strain rates and becomes larger with increasing strain rate, while ductility in terms of total elongation (TE) tends to increase under dynamic loading. Laser welding leads to an overall reduction in the ductility of the DP780 steel. However, the WJ exhibits a similar changing trend of the ductility to that of the BM with respect to the strain rate over the whole strain rate range. As for the DP780 WJ, the distance of tensile failure location from the weld centerline decreases with increasing strain rate. The typical ductile failure characteristics of the DP780 BM and WJ do not change with increasing strain rate. DIC measurements reveal that the strain localization starts even before the maximum load is attained in the DP780 WJ and gradual transition from uniform strains to severely localized strains

  4. Soft Tissue Strain Rates in Side-Blast Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-02

    for Human Head Impacts. Proceedings ASME Biomechanics of Human Factors Conference. [22] Hannon P, Knapp K. 2006. Forensic Biomechanics. Lawyers...J, Song, B, Pintar, F, Yoganandan N, Chen W, Gennarelli TA. 2008. How to test brain and brain simulant at ballistic and blast strain rates. Rocky

  5. Dynamics of a seismogenic fault subject to variable strain rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dragoni

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of seismogenic faults is generally investigated under the assumption that they are subject to a constant strain rate. We consider the effect of a slowly variable strain rate on the recurrence times of earthquakes generated by a single fault. To this aim a spring-block system is employed as a low-order analog of the fault. Two cases are considered: a sinusoidal oscillation in the driver velocity and a monotonic change from one velocity value to another. In the first case, a study of the orbit of the system in the state space suggests that the seismic activity of the equivalent fault is organized into cycles that include several earthquakes and repeat periodically. Within each cycle the recurrence times oscillate about an average value equal to the recurrence period for constant strain rate. In the second case, the recurrence time changes gradually from the value before the transition to the value following it. Asymptotic solutions are also given, approximating the case when the amplitude of the oscillation or of the monotonic change is much smaller than the average driver velocity and the period of oscillation or the duration of the transition is much longer than the recurrence times of block motions. If the system is not isolated but is subject to perturbations in stress, the perturbation anticipates or delays the subsequent earthquake. The effects of stress perturbations in the two cases of strain rate oscillations and monotonic change are considered.

  6. Effect of strain rate and water-to-cement ratio on compressive mechanical behavior of cement mortar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周继凯; 葛利梅

    2015-01-01

    Effects of strain rate and water-to-cement ratio on the dynamic compressive mechanical behavior of cement mortar are investigated by split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests. 124 specimens are subjected to dynamic uniaxial compressive loadings. Strain rate sensitivity of the materials is measured in terms of failure modes, stress−strain curves, compressive strength, dynamic increase factor (DIF) and critical strain at peak stress. A significant change in the stress−strain response of the materials with each order of magnitude increase in strain rate is clearly seen from test results. The slope of the stress−strain curve after peak value for low water-to-cement ratio is steeper than that of high water-to-cement ratio mortar. The compressive strength increases with increasing strain rate. With increase in strain rate, the dynamic increase factor (DIF) increases. However, this increase in DIF with increase in strain rate does not appear to be a function of the water-to-cement ratio. The critical compressive strain increases with the strain rate.

  7. Determination of the strain rate dependent thermal softening behavior of thermoplastic materials for crash simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmann, Christian; Klein, Jan; Schöngart, Maximilian

    2016-03-01

    Thermoplastic materials are increasingly used as a light weight replacement for metal, especially in automotive applications. Typical examples are frontends and bumpers. The loads on these structures are very often impulsive, for example in a crash situation. A high rate of loading causes a high strain rate in the material which has a major impact on the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials. The stiffness as well as the rigidity of polymers increases to higher strain rates. The increase of the mechanical properties is superimposed at higher rates of loading by another effect which works reducing on stiffness and rigidity, the increase of temperature caused by plastic deformation. The mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials is influenced by temperature opposing to strain rate. The stiffness and rigidity are decreased to higher values of temperature. The effect of thermal softening on thermoplastic materials is investigated at IKV. For this purpose high-speed tensile tests are performed on a blend, consisting of Polybutylenterephthalate (PBT) and Polycarbonate (PC). In preliminary investigations the effects of strain rate on the thermomechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials was studied by different authors. Tensile impact as well as split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests were conducted in combination with high-speed temperature measurement, though, the authors struggled especially with temperature measurement. This paper presents an approach which uses high-speed strain measurement to transpire the link between strain, strain rate and thermal softening as well as the interdependency between strain hardening and thermal softening. The results show a superimposition of strain hardening and thermal softening, which is consistent to preliminary investigations. The advantage of the presented research is that the results can be used to calibrate damage and material models to perform mechanical simulations using Finite Element Analysis.

  8. Stress, strain rate and anisotropy in Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. K.; Aoki, Y.; Unglert, K.; Ohkura, T.; Umakoshi, K.; Shimizu, H.; Iguchi, M.; Tameguri, T.; Ohminato, T.; Mori, J.

    2016-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy, the directional dependence of wave speeds, may be caused by stress-oriented cracks or by strain-oriented minerals, yet few studies have quantitatively compared anisotropy to stress and strain over large regions. Here we compare crustal stress and strain rates on the Island of Kyushu, Japan, as measured from inversions of focal mechanisms, GPS and shear wave splitting. Over 85,000 shear wave splitting measurements from local and regional earthquakes are obtained from the NIED network between 2004 and 2012, and on Aso, Sakurajima, Kirishima and Unzen volcano networks. Strain rate measurements are made from the Japanese Geonet stations. JMA-determined S arrival times processed with the MFAST shear wave splitting code measure fast polarisations (Φ), related to the orientation of the anisotropic medium and time delays (dt), related to the path length and the percent anisotropy. We apply the TESSA 2-D delay time tomography and spatial averaging code to the highest quality events, which have nearly vertical incidence angles, separating the 3455 shallow (depth = 40 km) earthquakes. Using square grids with 30 km sides for all the inversions, the best correlations are observed between splitting from shallow earthquakes and stress. Axes of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) and Φ correlate with a coefficient c of 0.56, significant at the 99% confidence level. Their mean difference is 31.9°. Axes of maximum compressional strain rate and SHmax are also well aligned, with an average difference of 28°, but they do not correlate with each other, meaning that where they differ, the difference is not systematic. Anisotropy strength is negatively correlated with the stress ratio parameter determined from focal mechanism inversion (c = - 0.64; significant at the 99% confidence level). The anisotropy and stress results are consistent with stress-aligned microcracks in the crust in a dominantly strike-slip regime. Eigenvalues of maximum horizontal strain rate

  9. Temporal evolution of strain rates at western Greenland moulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinar, Kristin; Andrews, Lauren; Chu, Vena; Moon, Twila; Nowicki, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Moulins are key sources for subglacial water across western Greenland. The rate and timing at which they deliver surface meltwater to the subglacial system are crucial inputs for ice-sheet hydrology models. Intensive field campaigns coupled to remote sensing efforts have provided, to date, information on the timing of supraglacial lake drainages and water flux through the consequent moulins, but predicting the dates of moulin activation has remained an area of active research. This is vital for the construction of spatially variable basal-input hydrographs for models that will predict the future evolution of Greenland ice flow and sliding. In this study, we combine multiple remote sensing datasets to investigate the degree to which local strain rates can predict moulin activation dates, as indicated by supraglacial lake drainage events. We find that over the period 2009-2011 in the Pâkitsoq region, moulins with more-tensile background (wintertime InSAR-derived) strain rates tend to activate first, followed by moulins in less-tensile background strain regimes. This pattern is relatively consistent across years, although we find that background strain rates are less important in explaining the date of moulin activation than are moulin elevation or cumulative days of runoff. In the Russell Glacier area, we examine the temporal evolution of summertime, Landsat-derived strain rates at moulin locations. Principal component analysis shows that strain rates at moulin locations increased abruptly over June 2012, independent of moulin elevation; strain rates in localities without moulins varied more smoothly in time. We also compare the strain rate time series at each moulin to lake drainage dates derived from MODIS and Landsat imagery from 2012. We hypothesize that the contrasting bedrock topography of the regions (Pâkitsoq is rougher than Russell at the few-km scale) may drive variations in moulin opening patterns across the two regions. Our results will have

  10. The compressive behaviour and constitutive equation of polyimide foam in wide strain rate and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimoto Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available These days, polymer foams, such as polyurethane foam and polystyrene foam, are used in various situations as a thermal insulator or shock absorber. In general, however, their strength is insufficient in high temperature environments because of their low glass transition temperature. Polyimide is a polymer which has a higher glass transition temperature and high strength. Its mechanical properties do not vary greatly, even in low temperature environments. Therefore, polyimide foam is expected to be used in the aerospace industry. Thus, the constitutive equation of polyimide foam that can be applied across a wide range of strain rates and ambient temperature is very useful. In this study, a series of compression tests at various strain rates, from 10−3 to 103 s−1 were carried out in order to examine the effect of strain rate on the compressive properties of polyimide foam. The flow stress of polyimide foam increased rapidly at dynamic strain rates. The effect of ambient temperature on the properties of polyimide foam was also investigated at temperature from − 190 °C to 270°∘C. The flow stress decreased with increasing temperature.

  11. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 103 to 104 s-1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  12. Reaction weakening and emplacement of crystalline thrusts: Diffusion control on reaction rate and strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Kieran

    2007-08-01

    In the southern Appalachians, the Blue Ridge-Piedmont crystalline thrust sheet was emplaced onto low-grade Late Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in the footwall along a basal detachment consisting of phyllosilicate-rich mylonites (phyllonites). The phyllonites developed first by mechanical breakdown of feldspar followed by chemical breakdown to white mica in the presence of a pore fluid. Diffusion of solute in the pore fluid is the rate limiting step in controlling reaction rate and also the strain rate. Assuming solute diffusion follows the Stokes-Einstein equation, the shear strain rate is given by ⅆγ/ⅆt=2ωkT/5ηrx for shear stress ≥20 MPa, where n is a constant, ω is a geometric factor, k is Boltzmann's constant, T is absolute temperature, η is water viscosity, r is the atomic radius of the diffusing species, and x is the diffusion distance. A bulk diffusion coefficient in the range of ˜10 -10 to 10 -12 m 2/s over distances of 10-100 m results in strain rates of 10 -14 to 10 -13 s -1 in the temperature range 200-400 °C. It is concluded that greenschist grade crystalline thrust sheets develop on pre-existing basement faults that become weak during reaction softening and localize into high strain phyllonite zones in which pore fluid diffusion controls reaction rate and strain rate.

  13. Servohydraulic methods for mechanical testing in the Sub-Hopkinson rate regime up to strain rates of 500 1/s.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2005-10-01

    Tensile and compressive stress-strain experiments on metals at strain rates in the range of 1-1000 1/s are relevant to many applications such as gravity-dropped munitions and airplane accidents. While conventional test methods cover strain rates up to {approx}10 s{sup -1} and split-Hopkinson and other techniques cover strain rates in excess of {approx}1000 s{sup -1}, there are no well defined techniques for the intermediate or ''Sub-Hopkinson'' strain-rate regime. The current work outlines many of the challenges in testing in the Sub-Hopkinson regime, and establishes methods for addressing these challenges. The resulting technique for obtaining intermediate rate stress-strain data is demonstrated in tension on a high-strength, high-toughness steel alloy (Hytuf) that could be a candidate alloy for earth penetrating munitions and in compression on a Au-Cu braze alloy.

  14. A fast and accurate method for echocardiography strain rate imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Vahid; Sahba, Nima; Hajebi, Nima; Nambakhsh, Mohammad Saleh

    2009-02-01

    Recently Strain and strain rate imaging have proved their superiority with respect to classical motion estimation methods in myocardial evaluation as a novel technique for quantitative analysis of myocardial function. Here in this paper, we propose a novel strain rate imaging algorithm using a new optical flow technique which is more rapid and accurate than the previous correlation-based methods. The new method presumes a spatiotemporal constancy of intensity and Magnitude of the image. Moreover the method makes use of the spline moment in a multiresolution approach. Moreover cardiac central point is obtained using a combination of center of mass and endocardial tracking. It is proved that the proposed method helps overcome the intensity variations of ultrasound texture while preserving the ability of motion estimation technique for different motions and orientations. Evaluation is performed on simulated, phantom (a contractile rubber balloon) and real sequences and proves that this technique is more accurate and faster than the previous methods.

  15. Modeling Strain Rate Effect for Heterogeneous Brittle Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Guowei; DONG Aiai; LI Jianchun

    2006-01-01

    Rocks are heterogeneous from the point of microstructure which is of significance to their dynamic failure behavior.Both the compressive and tensile strength of rock-like materials is regarded different from the static strength.The present study adopts smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) which is a virtual particle based meshfree method to investigate strain rate effect for heterogeneous brittle materials.The SPH method is capable of simulating rock fracture,free of the mesh constraint of the traditional FEM and FDM models.A pressure dependent J-H constitutive model involving heterogeneity is employed in the numerical modeling.The results show the compressive strength increases with the increase of strain rate as well as the tensile strength,which is important to the engineering design.

  16. Material properties of bovine intervertebral discs across strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Nicolas; Grigoriadis, Grigorios; Christou, Alexandros; Carpanen, Diagarajen; Masouros, Spyros D

    2017-01-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is a complex structure responsible for distributing compressive loading to adjacent vertebrae and allowing the vertebral column to bend and twist. To study the mechanical behaviour of individual components of the IVD, it is common for specimens to be dissected away from their surrounding tissues for mechanical testing. However, disrupting the continuity of the IVD to obtain material properties of each component separately may result in erroneous values. In this study, an inverse finite element (FE) modelling optimisation algorithm has been used to obtain material properties of the IVD across strain rates, therefore bypassing the need to harvest individual samples of each component. Uniaxial compression was applied to ten fresh-frozen bovine intervertebral discs at strain rates of 10(-3)-1/s. The experimental data were fed into the inverse FE optimisation algorithm and each experiment was simulated using the subject specific FE model of the respective specimen. A sensitivity analysis revealed that the IVD's response was most dependent upon the Young's modulus (YM) of the fibre bundles and therefore this was chosen to be the parameter to optimise. Based on the obtained YM values for each test corresponding to a different strain rate (ε̇), the following relationship was derived:YM=35.5lnε̇+527.5. These properties can be used in finite element models of the IVD that aim to simulate spinal biomechanics across loading rates. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Implementation of Improved Transverse Shear Calculations and Higher Order Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Analyses of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin-Fa; Kim, Soo; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to investigate the nonlinear and strain rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composite laminated plates under high strain rate impact loadings. A recently developed strength of materials based micromechanics model, incorporating a set of nonlinear, strain rate dependent constitutive equations for the polymer matrix, is extended to account for the transverse shear effects during impact. Four different assumptions of transverse shear deformation are investigated in order to improve the developed strain rate dependent micromechanics model. The validities of these assumptions are investigated using numerical and theoretical approaches. A method to determine through the thickness strain and transverse Poisson's ratio of the composite is developed. The revised micromechanics model is then implemented into a higher order laminated plate theory which is modified to include the effects of inelastic strains. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the mechanical response of composite plates under high strain rate loadings. Results show the transverse shear stresses cannot be neglected in the impact problem. A significant level of strain rate dependency and material nonlinearity is found in the deformation response of representative composite specimens.

  18. Strain rate effects on the mechanical behavior of two Dual Phase steels in tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoni, E.; Singh, N. K.; Forni, D.; Singha, M. K.; Gupta, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the strain rate sensitivity of Dual Phase steel 1200 (DP1200) and Dual Phase steel 1400 (DP1400) under uni-axial tensile loads in the strain rate range from 0.001 s-1 to 600 s-1. These materials are advanced high strength steels (AHSS) having high strength, high capacity to dissipate crash energy and high formability. Flat sheet specimens of the materials having gauge length 10 mm, width 4 mm and thickness 2 mm (DP1200) and 1.25 mm (DP1400), are tested at room temperature (20∘C) on electromechanical universal testing machine to obtain their stress-strain relation under quasi-static condition (0.001 s-1), and on Hydro-Pneumatic machine and modified Hopkinson bar to study their mechanical behavior at medium (3 s-1, and 18 s-1) and high strain rates (200 s-1, 400 s-1, and 600 s-1) respectively. Tests under quasi-static condition are performed at high temperature (200∘C) also, and found that tensile flow stress is a increasing function of temperature. The stress-strain data has been analysed to determine the material parameters of the Cowper-Symonds and the Johnson-Cook models. A simple modification of the Johnson-Cook model has been proposed in order to obtain a better fit of tests at high temperatures. Finally, the fractographs of the broken specimens are taken by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the fracture mechanism of these advanced high strength steels at different strain rates.

  19. Finite Strain Behavior of Polyurea for a Wide Range of Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    influence of a surface coating on the high-rate fragmentation of a ductile material ," International Journal of Fracture , 137:89-108. [40] Haupt, P. and Lion...of localization and fragmentation - III. Effect of cladding with a polymer," International Journal of Fracture , 155:101-118. [107] Zhao, H. and Gary... toughness -to-density ratio and high strain rate-sensitivity, so its application is recently extended to structural purpose to form sandwich-type or multi

  20. Behavior of Unsaturated Clayey Soils at High Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    DISTRIBUTION .............................. 89 4.4 SOIL PLASTICITY CHARACTERISTICS ...................... 93 4.5 CATION EXCHANGE CAPACITY...that the results on the soil stock are more reliable and, thus, give a more representative percentage of clay sizes in the soil stock. 4.4 SOIL ... PLASTICITY CHARACTERISTICS Two specimen of the cleaned soil stock were used to perform a two series of Atterberg Limits determinations. For this purpose

  1. High Strain, Strain Rate Behavior of PTFE/Al/W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addiss, John; Cai, Jing; Walley, Steve; Proud, William; Nesterenko, Vitali

    2007-06-01

    Conventional dropweight technique was modified to accommodate low amplitude signals from low strength, cold isostatically pressed energetic ``heavy'' composites of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)/AL/W. The fracture strength, strain and post-critical behaviour of fractured samples were measured for samples of different porosity and W grain size (the masses of each component being the same in each case). Unusual phenomenon of significantly higher strength (55 MPa) of porous composites (density 5.9 g/cc) with small tungsten particles (1 micron) in comparison with strength (32 MPa) of dense composites (7.1 g/cc) with larger tungsten particles (20 micron) was observed. This is attributed to force chains created by a network of small tungsten particles. Interrupted tests at the different level of strains revealed mechanism of fracture under dynamic compression.

  2. High-Strain-Rate behavior of Hydrated Cement Paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-29

    sample response under stress. It is now properly calibrated and fully operational. -24- VII. REFERENCES 1. S. Mindess and S.P. Shah (Eds.), "Cement-Based...Cem. Concr. Res., 3, 497 (1973). 8. B. Marchese, Cem. Concr. Res., 7, 9 (1977). 9. S. Mindess , in Proc. Eng. Sci. Found. Conf. 1979, Rindge, NH, p. 175, Eng. Foundation, New York (1980). -25- 51 I.M U Z &M__aw_./

  3. Understanding the deformation of ceramic materials at high strain rates.

    OpenAIRE

    Hallam, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic hardness and plasticity have been highlighted as important characteristics in ballistic performance; both of which can be measured and semi-quantified from indentation experiments, respectively. However, relatively little work has investigated the accompanying type, on-set and evolution of indentation-induced damage that may also be contributing an influential role. Pressureless sintered SiC and spark plasma sintered B4C, SiC-AlN-C and range of SiC-B4C composite samples were invest...

  4. High Strain Rate Tensile and Compressive Effects in Glassy Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    Cheng, Polymer Testing, 21, 113 (2002). 11. D.R. Mears, K.D. Pae , and J.A. Sauer, Journal of Applied Physics, 40 [11], 4229 (1969). 12. J.A. Sauer...D.R. Mears, and K.D. Pae , European Polymer Journal, 6, 1015 (1970). 13. C. Bauwens-Crowet, J-C. Bauwens, and G. Homes, Journal of Materials Science, 7

  5. Nanostructural materials: production, structure, high strain rate superplasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Myshlyaev; M.; M.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of rods subjected to the equal-channel angular (ECA) pressing has been studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, back electron scattering diffraction and orientation image microscopy.……

  6. Nanostructural materials: production, structure, high strain rate superplasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The structure of rods subjected to the equal-channel angular (ECA) pressing has been studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, back electron scattering diffraction and orientation image microscopy.

  7. Effect of strain rate on shear properties and fracture characteristics of DP600 and AA5182-O sheet metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmaan Taamjeed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear tests were performed at strain rates ranging from quasi-static (.01 s−1 to 600 s−1 for DP600 steel and AA5182-O sheet metal alloys at room temperature. A miniature sized shear specimen was modified and validated in this work to perform high strain rate shear testing. Digital image correlation (DIC techniques were employed to measure the strains in the experiments, and a criterion to detect the onset of fracture based on the hardening rate of the materials is proposed. At equivalent strains greater than 20%, the DP600 and AA5182 alloys demonstrated a reduced work hardening rate at elevated strain rates. At lower strains, the DP600 shows positive rate sensitivity while the AA5182 was not sensitive to strain rate. For both alloys, the equivalent fracture strain and elongation to failure decreased with strain rate. A conversion of the shear stress to an equivalent stress using the von Mises yield criterion provided excellent agreement with the results from tensile tests at elevated strain rates. Unlike the tensile test, the shear test is not limited by the onset of necking so the equivalent stress can be determined over a larger range of strain.

  8. Strain-rate and temperature dependence of yield stress of amorphous solids via self-learning metabasin escape algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Penghui; Park, Harold S

    2014-01-01

    A general self-learning metabasin escape (SLME) algorithm~\\citep{caoPRE2012} is coupled in this work with continuous shear deformations to probe the yield stress as a function of strain rate and temperature for a binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) amorphous solid. The approach is shown to match the results of classical molecular dynamics (MD) at high strain rates where the MD results are valid, but, importantly, is able to access experimental strain rates that are about ten orders of magnitude slower than MD. In doing so, we find in agreement with previous experimental studies that a substantial decrease in yield stress is observed with decreasing strain rate. At room temperature and laboratory strain rates, the activation volume associated with yield is found to contain about 10 LJ particles, while the yield stress is as sensitive to a $1.5\\%T_{\\rm g}$ increase in temperature as it is to a one order of magnitude decrease in strain rate. Moreover, our SLME results suggest the SLME and extrapolated results from MD simu...

  9. Effects of strain rate and confining pressure on the deformation and failure of shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.M. (Schlumberger Cambridge Research (GB)); Sheppard, M.C. (Anadrill/Schlumberger (US)); Houwen, O.H. (Sedco Forex (FR))

    1991-06-01

    Previous work on shale mechanical properties has focused on the slow deformation rates appropriate to wellbore deformation. Deformation of shale under a drill bit occurs at a very high rate, and the failure properties of the rock under these conditions are crucial in determining bit performance and in extracting lithology and pore-pressure information from drilling parameters. Triaxial tests were performed on two nonswelling shales under a wide range of strain rates and confining and pore pressures. At low strain rates, when fluid is relatively free to move within the shale, shale deformation and failure are governed by effective stress or pressure (i.e., total confining pressure minus pore pressure), as is the case for ordinary rock. If the pore pressure in the shale is high, increasing the strain rate beyond about 0.1%/sec causes large increases in the strength and ductility of the shale. Total pressure begins to influence the strength. At high stain rates, the influence of effective pressure decreases, except when it is very low (i.e., when pore pressure is very high); ductility then rises rapidly. This behavior is opposite that expected in ordinary rocks. This paper briefly discusses the reasons for these phenomena and their impact on wellbore and drilling problems.

  10. A Comparison of Geodetic Strain Rates With Earthquake Moment Tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Holt, W. E.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we compare the global model from interpolation of GPS data with the global model inferred from earthquake moment tensors. We use the Harvard CMT catalog to calculate moment rates based on 3 assumptions: a. we assume earthquakes are self-similar; b. we assume a uniform Beta value of the Gutenberg-Richter distribution; c. we assume that all of the long-term strain is accommodated seismically. If these assumptions are correct then the seismicity rate is proportional to the tectonic moment rate. We then inferred a long-term moment rate tensor field estimate for all plate boundary zones from which we inferred a long-term seismic strain rate estimate. Using this estimate we solved for a self-consistent kinematic global solution (motions of rigid spherical caps and motions within plate boundary zones) using bi-cubic spline interpolation of the inferred strain rates. We tested the above assumptions by comparing the global kinematic model obtained from earthquake data with a global model inferred from interpolation of space geodetic data [Kreemer et al., 2003]. A comparison between the two models shows good agreement for motion directions of the North American, and Eurasian plates and for the plate boundary zones within these regions (e.g., Tibet). Problems arise, and our assumptions break down, for plates adjacent to fast spreading ridges where divergence of plates appears to be accommodated aseismically. We next investigated the correlation of strain rate tensor inferred from the interpolation of GPS observations within deforming Asia with the earthquake moment tensors, using both elastic and viscous rheologies. Our solutions satisfy the force balance equations for a given rheology. Our goal for this exercise is to investigate whether the interseismic signal, inferred from GPS, correlates better with moment tensor style for an elastic rheology as opposed to a viscous rheology. Results to date suggest that the viscous models only provide a better agreement

  11. Rheology of arc dacite lavas: experimental determination at low strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avard, Geoffroy; Whittington, Alan G.

    2012-07-01

    Andesitic-dacitic volcanoes exhibit a large variety of eruption styles, including explosive eruptions, endogenous and exogenous dome growth, and kilometer-long lava flows. The rheology of these lavas can be investigated through field observations of flow and dome morphology, but this approach integrates the properties of lava over a wide range of temperatures. Another approach is through laboratory experiments; however, previous studies have used higher shear stresses and strain rates than are appropriate to lava flows. We measured the apparent viscosity of several lavas from Santiaguito and Bezymianny volcanoes by uniaxial compression, between 1,109 and 1,315 K, at low shear stress (0.085 to 0.42 MPa), low strain rate (between 1.1 × 10-8 and 1.9 × 10-5 s-1), and up to 43.7 % total deformation. The results show a strong variability of the apparent viscosity between different samples, which can be ascribed to differences in initial porosity and crystallinity. Deformation occurs primarily by compaction, with some cracking and/or vesicle coalescence. Our experiments yield apparent viscosities more than 1 order of magnitude lower than predicted by models based on experiments at higher strain rates. At lava flow conditions, no evidence of a yield strength is observed, and the apparent viscosity is best approached by a strain rate- and temperature-dependent power law equation. The best fit for Santiaguito lava, for temperatures between 1,164 and 1,226 K and strain rates lower than 1.8 × 10-4 s-1, is log {η_{{app}}} = - 0.738 + 9.24 × {10^3}{/}T(K) - 0.654 \\cdot log dot{\\varepsilon } where η app is apparent viscosity and dot{\\varepsilon } is strain rate. This equation also reproduced 45 data for a sample from Bezymianny with a root mean square deviation of 0.19 log unit Pa s. Applying the rheological model to lava flow conditions at Santiaguito yields calculated apparent viscosities that are in reasonable agreement with field observations and suggests that

  12. Identification of strain-rate and thermal sensitive material model with an inverse method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peroni M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a numerical inverse method to extract material strength parameters from the experimental data obtained via mechanical tests at different strainrates and temperatures. It will be shown that this procedure is particularly useful to analyse experimental results when the stress-strain fields in the specimen cannot be correctly described via analytical models. This commonly happens in specimens with no regular shape, in specimens with a regular shape when some instability phenomena occur (for example the necking phenomena in tensile tests that create a strongly heterogeneous stress-strain fields or in dynamic tests (where the strain-rate field is not constant due to wave propagation phenomena. Furthermore the developed procedure is useful to take into account thermal phenomena generally affecting high strain-rate tests due to the adiabatic overheating related to the conversion of plastic work. The method presented requires strong effort both from experimental and numerical point of view, anyway it allows to precisely identify the parameters of different material models. This could provide great advantages when high reliability of the material behaviour is necessary. Applicability of this method is particularly indicated for special applications in the field of aerospace engineering, ballistic, crashworthiness studies or particle accelerator technologies, where materials could be submitted to strong plastic deformations at high-strain rate in a wide range of temperature. Thermal softening effect has been investigated in a temperature range between 20°C and 1000°C.

  13. Mechanical characterization of particulate aluminum foams. Strain-rate, density and matrix alloy versus adhesive effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmhus, Dirk [ISIS Sensorial Materials Scientific Centre, University of Bremen (Germany); Baumeister, Joachim; Stutz, Lennart; Stoebener, Karsten [Fraunhofer IFAM Bremen (Germany); Schneider, Eduard [University of Bremen (Germany); Avalle, Massimiliano; Peroni, Lorenzo; Peroni, Marco [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Politecnico di Torino Vercelli (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    The study evaluates mechanical properties of APM particulate aluminum foams built up from adhesively bonded Al foam spheres. Foams of matrix alloy AlSi10 are compared, with PM AlSi7 foams used as reference. The influence of density is studied both for quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading in a range from {proportional_to}0.35 to 0.71 g cm{sup -3}. The effect of varying the bonding agent is evaluated for a single density and both strain rate levels by replacing the standard, high-strength epoxy-based adhesive with a polyamide of greatly increased ductility. The result is a clear shift of fracture events to higher strain levels, as well as the introduction of a strain-rate dependency of strength. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of temperature and strain rate effects on the elastic properties of bimetallic Pd-Pt nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R.; Joseph, Babu

    2007-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to investigate the mechanical properties of infinitely long, cylindrical bimetallic Pd-Pt nanowires, with an approximate diameter of 1.4nm and two different compositions (25% and 50% Pt). The nanowires are subjected to uniaxial tensile strain along the [001] axis with varying strain rates of 0.05%ps-1 , and 5.0%ps-1 , at simulation temperatures of 50 and 300K , to study the effects of strain rates and thermal conditions on the deformation characteristics and mechanical properties of the nanowire. The deformation and rupture mechanism of these nanowires is explored in detail. Comparisons to the behavior exhibited by pure Pd and Pt nanowires of similar diameter are also made. The effect of lattice mismatch on the observed deformation modes in bimetallic nanowires is also discussed. Our simulations indicate that Pd-Pt alloy nanowires of various compositions, with little lattice mismatch between Pd and Pt atoms, undergo similar deformation and rupture upon uniaxial stretching. It is found that yielding and fracture mechanisms depend on the applied strain rate as well as atomic arrangement and temperature. At low temperature and strain rate, where crystal order and stability are highly preserved, the calculated stress-strain response of pure Pt and Pd as well as Pd-Pt alloy nanowires showed clear periodic, stepwise dislocation-relaxation behavior. Crystalline to amorphous transformation takes place at high strain rates (5%ps-1) , with amorphous melting detected at 300K . Deformation of nanowires at higher strain rates and low temperature, where the superplasticity characteristic is significantly enhanced, results in the development of a multishell helical structure. Mechanical properties of the alloy nanowires are significantly different from those of bulk phase and are dictated by the applied strain rate, temperature, alloy composition, as well as the structural rearrangement associated with nanowire elongation. We find that Young

  15. Grain-size-independent plastic flow at ultrahigh pressures and strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H-S; Rudd, R E; Cavallo, R M; Barton, N R; Arsenlis, A; Belof, J L; Blobaum, K J M; El-dasher, B S; Florando, J N; Huntington, C M; Maddox, B R; May, M J; Plechaty, C; Prisbrey, S T; Remington, B A; Wallace, R J; Wehrenberg, C E; Wilson, M J; Comley, A J; Giraldez, E; Nikroo, A; Farrell, M; Randall, G; Gray, G T

    2015-02-13

    A basic tenet of material science is that the flow stress of a metal increases as its grain size decreases, an effect described by the Hall-Petch relation. This relation is used extensively in material design to optimize the hardness, durability, survivability, and ductility of structural metals. This Letter reports experimental results in a new regime of high pressures and strain rates that challenge this basic tenet of mechanical metallurgy. We report measurements of the plastic flow of the model body-centered-cubic metal tantalum made under conditions of high pressure (>100  GPa) and strain rate (∼10(7)  s(-1)) achieved by using the Omega laser. Under these unique plastic deformation ("flow") conditions, the effect of grain size is found to be negligible for grain sizes >0.25  μm sizes. A multiscale model of the plastic flow suggests that pressure and strain rate hardening dominate over the grain-size effects. Theoretical estimates, based on grain compatibility and geometrically necessary dislocations, corroborate this conclusion.

  16. Effect of strain rate and stress triaxiality on tensile behavior of Titanium alloy Ti-10-2-3 at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh, E-mail: ravindranadh@dmrl.drdo.in; Madhu, Vemuri

    2016-06-14

    In this study, Split hopkinson tension bar (SHTB) has been employed to investigate the dynamic tensile flow behavior of Ti-10-2-3 alloy at high strain rates and elevated temperatures. The combined effect of stress triaxiality, strain rate and temperature and on the tensile behavior of the alloy was evaluated. Johnson-Cook (J-C) constitutive and fracture models were developed based on high strain rate tensile data. A modified Johnson–Cook model was established and proved to have high accuracy. A comparative assessment has been done to confirm the accuracy of modified J–C model based on finite element method (FEM). The improved model provides better description on the influence of equivalent plastic strain rate and temperature on the plastic flow. The simulation results proved to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The fracture surfaces of specimens tested under various strain rates and temperatures were studied under scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  17. Effect of Pre-treatment on the Microstructural Homogeneity and Mechanical Properties of Magnesium Alloy Sheets Produced by High Strain Rate Rolling%预处理对高应变速率轧制镁合金板材组织均匀性和力学性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严红革; 田津; 朱素琴; 陈吉华; 苏斌; 吴远志

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium sheets prepared by traditional plastic processing technologies always exhibit undesirable mechanical properties, which is inefficient and costly for commercial application. High strain rate rolling (HSRR) was operated on AZ31 magnesium alloy. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the HSRRed sheets pre-treated in two different ways were investigated. The results indicated that HSRR was an effective method to produce magnesium alloy sheets characteristic of fine grains and high comprehensive mechanical properties. The pre-strain plus homogenization pre-treatment could significantly improve the microstructural homogeneity of the high strain rate rolled sheet, in which the fine grains were distributed very homogeneously and the average grain size was 2. 3 μm. The ductility of the sheet was enhanced due to the improved microstructural homogeneity, and the elongation at room temperature was up to 28%.%传统的镁合金板材加工技术存在生产效率低、成本偏高和成形性能不够理想等局限.本论文采用高应变速率轧制对AZ31镁合金进行轧制,对比研究了两种预处理方法对板材组织性能的影响.结果表明,高应变速率轧制是获得具有细小晶粒组织和良好综合力学性能的镁合金板材的有效手段.经过预变形+均匀化的预处理,高应变速率轧制板材的组织均匀性得到很大的提高,终轧板材内分布着极均匀的细小晶粒组织,其平均晶粒尺寸为2.3μm.由于组织均匀性的提高,板材塑性得到进一步提高,其室温伸长率可达28%.

  18. Strain Rate and Anisotropic Microstructure Dependent Mechanical Behaviors of Silkworm Cocoon Shells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xu

    Full Text Available Silkworm cocoons are multi-layered composite structures comprised of high strength silk fiber and sericin, and their mechanical properties have been naturally selected to protect pupas during metamorphosis from various types of external attacks. The present study attempts to gain a comprehensive understanding of the mechanical properties of cocoon shell materials from wild silkworm species Antheraea pernyi under dynamic loading rates. Five dynamic strain rates from 0.00625 s-1 to 12.5 s-1 are tested to show the strain rate sensitivity of the cocoon shell material. In the meantime, the anisotropy of the cocoon shell is considered and the cocoon shell specimens are cut along 0°, 45° and 90° orientation to the short axis of cocoons. Typical mechanical properties including Young's modulus, yield strength, ultimate strength and ultimate strain are extracted and analyzed from the stress-strain curves. Furthermore, the fracture morphologies of the cocoon shell specimens are observed under scanning electron microscopy to help understand the relationship between the mechanical properties and the microstructures of the cocoon material. A discussion on the dynamic strain rate effect on the mechanical properties of cocoon shell material is followed by fitting our experimental results to two previous models, and the effect could be well explained. We also compare natural and dried cocoon materials for the dynamic strain rate effect and interestingly the dried cocoon shells show better overall mechanical properties. This study provides a different perspective on the mechanical properties of cocoon material as a composite material, and provides some insight for bio-inspired engineering materials.

  19. Doppler-derived myocardial systolic strain rate is a strong index of left ventricular contractility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Neil L.; Firstenberg, Michael S.; Castro, Peter L.; Main, Michael; Travaglini, Agnese; Odabashian, Jill A.; Drinko, Jeanne K.; Rodriguez, L. Leonardo; Thomas, James D.; Garcia, Mario J.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myocardial fiber strain is directly related to left ventricular (LV) contractility. Strain rate can be estimated as the spatial derivative of velocities (dV/ds) obtained by tissue Doppler echocardiography (TDE). The purposes of the study were (1) to determine whether TDE-derived strain rate may be used as a noninvasive, quantitative index of contractility and (2) to compare the relative accuracy of systolic strain rate against TDE velocities alone. METHODS AND RESULTS: TDE color M-mode images of the interventricular septum were recorded from the apical 4-chamber view in 7 closed-chest anesthetized mongrel dogs during 5 different inotropic stages. Simultaneous LV volume and pressure were obtained with a combined conductance-high-fidelity pressure catheter. Peak elastance (Emax) was determined as the slope of end-systolic pressure-volume relationships during caval occlusion and was used as the gold standard of LV contractility. Peak systolic TDE myocardial velocities (Sm) and peak (epsilon'(p)) and mean (epsilon'(m)) strain rates obtained at the basal septum were compared against Emax by linear regression. Emax as well as TDE systolic indices increased during inotropic stimulation with dobutamine and decreased with the infusion of esmolol. A stronger association was found between Emax and epsilon'(p) (r=0.94, P<0.01, y=0.29x+0.46) and epsilon'(m) (r=0.88, P<0.01) than for Sm (r=0.75, P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: TDE-derived epsilon'(p) and epsilon'(m) are strong noninvasive indices of LV contractility. These indices appear to be more reliable than S(m), perhaps by eliminating translational artifact.

  20. Strain rate and temperature effects on crack initiation of direct aged 718 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrais Maxime

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During mechanical tests at high temperature in an oxidizing atmosphere, the effects of strain rate on crack initiation are noticeable. This effect is due to a coupling between local mechanical loading and oxidation. Samples were machined in a turbine disk made of direct aged alloy 718. Tests were performed to understand the effect of these couplings on crack initiation and to ensure lifetime is optimized. This study compared the cracking resistance of two different specimen geometries at a given plastic strain and performed quantitative measurement of the mechanical loading conditions inducing crack initiation between 600 ∘C and 650 ∘C. Sample geometries consisted in tensile flat specimens and V-shaped samples. This specific geometry was used to localize strain and damage in the apex of the V and to reach strain rates lower than those possible on standard specimens. Digital image correlation technique was used to provide strain measurements. For each temperature and strain rate, finite element calculations using the identified constitutive law were performed to get a refined level of strain in different areas at the V apex. Tests were stopped after an imposed displacement corresponding to a given plastic strain distribution. SEM observations of the surface of the flat tensile samples revealed no crack initiation. On the contrary, SEM observations at the apex of V specimens for which the level of cumulative strain was close to the level of cumulative strain of flat samples reveal the presence of intergranular damage when the strain rate used was below a given level.

  1. Inelastic strain rate in the seismogenic layer of Kyushu Island, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi; Nishimura, Takuya; Ohkura, Takahiro

    2016-12-01

    Seismic activity is associated with crustal stress relaxation, creating inelastic strain in a medium due to faulting. Inelastic strain affects the stress field around a weak body and causes stress concentration around the body, because the body itself has already released stress. Therefore, the understanding of inelastic deformation is important as it generates earthquakes. We investigated average inelastic strain in a spatial bin of Kyushu Island, Japan, and obtained the inelastic strain rate distribution associated with crustal earthquakes, based on the analysis of fault plane solutions and seismic moments. Large inelastic strains (>10-7 year-1) were found in the Beppu-Shimabara area, located in the center of Kyushu Island. The strain rate tensor was similar to that of the stress tensor except the absolute value in the area, implying that the inelastic strain was controlled by the stress field. The 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence (maximum magnitude 7.3) occurred in the Beppu-Shimabara area, with the major earthquakes located around the high inelastic strain rate area. Inelastic strain in the volume released the stress. In addition, the inelastic strain created an increment of stress around the volume. This indicates that the spatial heterogeneity of inelastic strain might concentrate stress.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Strength and strain rate sensitivity for hcp and fcc nanopolycrystal metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Rodriguez; R W Armstrong

    2006-12-01

    While there is overwhelming evidence that strengthening from grain size refinement persists into the nanocrystalline grain size regime consistent with extrapolation of classical Hall–Petch (H–P) behaviour, there are indications of a transition to an inverse H–P dependence, i.e. grain boundary weakening behaviour, occurring below a grain size of ∼ 10–20 nm. When Hall–Petch strengthening predominates, and the stress intensity, i.e. H–P slope value, , is thermally-activated (as is the case for pure fcc and the easy basal slip hcp metals), the strain rate sensitivity, defined as [/ ln(d/d], also is predicted to follow an H–P type dependence, thus, increasing with decrease in grain size. As a consequence, the activation volume that is inversely proportional to the strain rate sensitivity, is found to decrease by an order of magnitude, from around 1000 b3 in conventional grain size fcc Cu and Ni materials to 10–100 b3, for nanomaterials. At the smallest grain sizes, the transition to an inverse H–P dependence has been proposed to occur because of onset of effective high temperature grain boundary weakening behaviour that is well known in limiting creep property descriptions. If the inverse H–P effect (grain boundary weakening) is genuine, we predict that the strain rate sensitivity and corresponding inverse activation volume dependence on grain size should also have to show a reversal.

  3. Behaviour and modelling of aluminium alloy AA6060 subjected to a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilamosa Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-mechanical behaviour in tension of an as-cast and homogenized AA6060 alloy was investigated at a wide range of strains (the entire deformation process up to fracture, strain rates (0.01–750 s−1 and temperatures (20–350 ∘C. The tests at strain rates up to 1 s−1 were performed in a universal testing machine, while a split-Hopkinson tension bar (SHTB system was used for strain rates from 350 to 750 s−1. The samples were heated with an induction-based heating system. A typical feature of aluminium alloys at high temperatures is that necking occurs at a rather early stage of the deformation process. In order to determine the true stress-strain curve also after the onset of necking, all tests were instrumented with a digital camera. The experimental tests reveal that the AA6060 material has negligible strain-rate sensitivity (SRS for temperatures lower than 200 ∘C, while both yielding and work hardening exhibit a strong positive SRS at higher temperatures. The coupled strain-rate and temperature sensitivity is challenging to capture with most existing constitutive models. The paper presents an outline of a new semi-physical model that expresses the flow stress in terms of plastic strain, plastic strain rate and temperature. The parameters of the model were determined from the tests, and the stress-strain curves from the tests were compared with the predictions of the model. Good agreement was obtained over the entire strain rate and temperature range.

  4. A Modified Eyring Equation for Modeling Yield and Flow Stresses of Metals at Strain Rates Ranging from 10−5 to 5 × 104 s−1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzi Othman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In several industrial applications, metallic structures are facing impact loads. Therefore, there is an important need for developing constitutive equations which take into account the strain rate sensitivity of their mechanical properties. The Johnson-Cook equation was widely used to model the strain rate sensitivity of metals. However, it implies that the yield and flow stresses are linearly increasing in terms of the logarithm of strain rate. This is only true up to a threshold strain rate. In this work, a three-constant constitutive equation, assuming an apparent activation volume which decreases as the strain rate increases, is applied here for some metals. It is shown that this equation fits well the experimental yield and flow stresses for a very wide range of strain rates, including quasi-static, high, and very high strain rates (from 10−5 to 5 × 104 s−1. This is the first time that a constitutive equation is showed to be able to fit the yield stress over a so large strain rate range while using only three material constants.

  5. Potential pitfalls of strain rate imaging: angle dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, P. L.; Greenberg, N. L.; Drinko, J.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Strain Rate Imaging (SRI) is a new echocardiographic technique that allows for the real-time determination of myocardial SR, which may be used for the early and accurate detection of coronary artery disease. We sought to study whether SR is affected by scan line alignment in a computer simulation and an in vivo experiment. Through the computer simulation and the in vivo experiment we generated and validated safe scanning sectors within the ultrasound scan sector and showed that while SRI will be an extremely valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease there are potential pitfalls for the unwary clinician. Only after accounting for these affects due to angle dependency, can clinicians utilize SRI's potential as a valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease.

  6. DILATANCY BEHAVIOR IN CONSTANT STRAIN RATE CONSOLIDATION TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berty Sompie

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjected to remolded young clay, this paper shows that a lot of time dependent behavior in the standard consolidation (SC and constant strain rate consolidation (CSRC tests is represented systematically by a simple assumption concerning the time dependency of dilatancy. In the SC test, at the first stage of each loading step little dilatancy takes place and dilatancy begins to occur several minutes after step loading. In CSRC test, some time period after the stress state has entered the normally consolidated region, dilatancy tends to occur rapidly with the increase in stress ratio. Since most of dilatancy has taken place at the earlier stage of consolidation, little dilatancy occurs at the latter stage of CSRC process. This tendency makes the specimen stiffer with the passage of time, and makes the vertical pressure and pore pressure increase substantially at the last stage of CSRC process. Consideration to such behavior may be effective to correctly interpret the result of CSRC test.

  7. Deviatoric constitutive model: domain of strain rate validity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zocher, Marvin A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    A case is made for using an enhanced methodology in determining the parameters that appear in a deviatoric constitutive model. Predictability rests on our ability to solve a properly posed initial boundary value problem (IBVP), which incorporates an accurate reflection of material constitutive behavior. That reflection is provided through the constitutive model. Moreover, the constitutive model is required for mathematical closure of the IBVP. Common practice in the shock physics community is to divide the Cauchy tensor into spherical and deviatoric parts, and to develop separate models for spherical and deviatoric constitutive response. Our focus shall be on the Cauchy deviator and deviatoric constitutive behavior. Discussions related to the spherical part of the Cauchy tensor are reserved for another time. A number of deviatoric constitutive models have been developed for utilization in the solution of IBVPs that are of interest to those working in the field of shock physics, e.g. All of these models are phenomenological and contain a number of parameters that must be determined in light of experimental data. The methodology employed in determining these parameters dictates the loading regime over which the model can be expected to be accurate. The focus of this paper is the methodology employed in determining model parameters and the consequences of that methodology as it relates to the domain of strain rate validity. We shall begin by describing the methodology that is typically employed. We shall discuss limitations imposed upon predictive capability by the typically employed methodology. We shall propose a modification to the typically employed methodology that significantly extends the domain of strain rate validity.

  8. Grain boundary sliding associated with low strain rate at 1000°C in recrystallized ODS ferritic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kamikawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The high-temperature deformation process of the recrystallized 16CrODS ferritic steel was investigated at 1000°C for the stress loading perpendicular to the elongated grain structure. The strain rate was varied in the range from 1.0×10−2 to 1.0×10−5s−1. At the strain rate over 1.0×10−4s−1, deformation is dominated by the conventional dislocation creep. Decreasing strain rate from 1.0×10−4s−1, grain boundary sliding becomes prominent. Accommodation process for the localized stress induced by grain boundary sliding could be dislocation creep at 1.0×10−4s−1, and by diffusional creep at 1.0×10−5s−1 or less. These were verified through the observation of void formation and localized strain accumulation by KAM map.

  9. Interaction of heat production, strain rate and stress power in a plastically deforming body under tensile test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglietti, A.

    1982-01-01

    At high strain rates the heat produced by plastic deformation can give rise to a rate dependent response even if the material has rate independent constitutive equations. This effect has to be evaluated when interpreting a material test, or else it could erroneously be ascribed to viscosity. A general thermodynamic theory of tensile testing of elastic-plastic materials is given in this paper; it is valid for large strain at finite strain rates. It enables discovery of the parameters governing the thermodynamic strain rate effect, provides a method for proper interpretation of the results of the tests of dynamic plasticity, and suggests a way of planning experiments in order to detect the real contribution of viscosity.

  10. Interaction of heat production, strain rate and stress power in a plastically deforming body under tensile test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglietti, A.

    1982-01-01

    At high strain rates the heat produced by plastic deformation can give rise to a rate dependent response even if the material has rate independent constitutive equations. This effect has to be evaluated when interpreting a material test, or else it could erroneously be ascribed to viscosity. A general thermodynamic theory of tensile testing of elastic-plastic materials is given in this paper; it is valid for large strain at finite strain rates. It enables discovery of the parameters governing the thermodynamic strain rate effect, provides a method for proper interpretation of the results of the tests of dynamic plasticity, and suggests a way of planning experiments in order to detect the real contribution of viscosity.

  11. Reliability Assessment of Impact Tensile Testing Apparatus using a Drop-bar Striker for Intermediate Strain-rate Range and Evaluation of Dynamic Deformation Behaviors for a Carbon Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyung Oh; Kim, Dae Woong; Shin, Hyung Seop [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of); Park, Lee Ju; Kim, Hyung Won [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Studies on the deformation behavior of materials subjected to impact loads have been carried out in various fields of engineering and industry. The deformation and fracture of members for these machines/structures are known to correspond to the intermediate strain-rate region. Therefore, for the structural design, it is necessary to consider the dynamic deformation behavior in these intermediate strain-rate ranges. However, there have been few reports with useful data about the deformation and fracture behavior at intermediate strain-rate ranges. Because the intermediate strain-rate region is located between quasi-static and high strain-rate regions, it is difficult to obtain the intermediate strain-rate using conventional reasonable test equipment. To solve this problem, in this study, the measurement reliability of the constructed drop-bar impact tensile test apparatus was established and the dynamic behavior at the intermediate strain-rate range of carbon steels was evaluated by utilizing the apparatus.

  12. Atomistic modeling at experimental strain rates and timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Cao, Penghui; Tao, Weiwei; Sharma, Pradeep; Park, Harold S.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling physical phenomena with atomistic fidelity and at laboratory timescales is one of the holy grails of computational materials science. Conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations enable the elucidation of an astonishing array of phenomena inherent in the mechanical and chemical behavior of materials. However, conventional MD, with our current computational modalities, is incapable of resolving timescales longer than microseconds (at best). In this short review article, we briefly review a recently proposed approach—the so-called autonomous basin climbing (ABC) method—that in certain instances can provide valuable information on slow timescale processes. We provide a general summary of the principles underlying the ABC approach, with emphasis on recent methodological developments enabling the study of mechanically-driven processes at slow (experimental) strain rates and timescales. Specifically, we show that by combining a strong physical understanding of the underlying phenomena, kinetic Monte Carlo, transition state theory and minimum energy pathway methods, the ABC method has been found to be useful in a variety of mechanically-driven problems ranging from the prediction of creep-behavior in metals, constitutive laws for grain boundary sliding, void nucleation rates, diffusion in amorphous materials to protein unfolding. Aside from reviewing the basic ideas underlying this approach, we emphasize some of the key challenges encountered in our own personal research work and suggest future research avenues for exploration.

  13. Rotation and strain rate of Sulawesi from geometrical velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsito, D. A.; Susilo, Simons, W. J. F.; Abidin, H. Z.; Sapiie, B.; Triyoso, W.; Andreas, H.

    2017-07-01

    One of methods that can be used to determine the tectonic deformation status is rate estimation from geometric rotation and strain using quantitative velocity data from GPS observations. Microplate Sulawesi region located in the zone of triple junction (Eurasia, Australia and Philippine Sea Plates) has very complex tectonic and seismic condition, which is why become very important to know its recent deformation status in order to study neo-tectonic and disaster mitigation. Deformation rate quantification is estimated in two parameters: rotation and geodetic strain rate of each GPS station Delaunay triangle in the study area. The analysis in this study is not done using the grids since there is no rheological information at location that can be used as the interpolation-extrapolation constraints. Our analysis reveals that Sulawesi is characterized by rapid rotation in several different domains and compression-strain pattern that varies depending on the type and boundary conditions of microplate. This information is useful for studying neo tectonic deformation status and earthquake disaster mitigation.

  14. Theoretical and metrical standardization of strain rate sensitivity index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; YuQuan; GUAN; ZhiPing; LI; ZhiGang; WANG; MingHui

    2007-01-01

    Strain rate sensitivity index m is one of the vital mechanical parameters for determining material superplasticity. In this paper, the existing formulae for measuring m value are reviewed, and it is found that the m values can be classified into three classes: mi under constant length, mv under constant velocity, and mp under constant load. The constraint equation of the generalized m value is established according to the tensile constitutive equation and the basis theory for plastic mechanics. Based on three typical deformation paths, the m value is redefined. Furthermore, from the formula of generalized m value, the formulae for measuring mi, mv and mp are theoretically deduced. The precise methods with numerical simulation are presented. The results prove that the m value is a non-constant and its dependence on (ε) changes with the deformation path. Under different deformation paths, the m values calculated from the same formula are different. Using different formulae, the m values under the same deformation path are also different. Therefore, deformation path and corresponding formula should be given during the measurement of the m value. Moreover, it is explained theoretically and experimentally that why the mv value under constant velocity is sometimes negative but the mp value under constant load is sometimes lager than 1. The aim of the analysis and measurement of the m value is to facilitate the study on the relationship between macroscopical mechanical laws and microscopic physical mechanisms during superplastic deformation.

  15. Strain-rate sensitivity of foam materials: A numerical study using 3D image-based finite element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongle; Li, Q. M.; Withers, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    Realistic simulations are increasingly demanded to clarify the dynamic behaviour of foam materials, because, on one hand, the significant variability (e.g. 20% scatter band) of foam properties and the lack of reliable dynamic test methods for foams bring particular difficulty to accurately evaluate the strain-rate sensitivity in experiments; while on the other hand numerical models based on idealised cell structures (e.g. Kelvin and Voronoi) may not be sufficiently representative to capture the actual structural effect. To overcome these limitations, the strain-rate sensitivity of the compressive and tensile properties of closed-cell aluminium Alporas foam is investigated in this study by means of meso-scale realistic finite element (FE) simulations. The FE modelling method based on X-ray computed tomography (CT) image is introduced first, as well as its applications to foam materials. Then the compression and tension of Alporas foam at a wide variety of applied nominal strain-rates are simulated using FE model constructed from the actual cell geometry obtained from the CT image. The stain-rate sensitivity of compressive strength (collapse stress) and tensile strength (0.2% offset yield point) are evaluated when considering different cell-wall material properties. The numerical results show that the rate dependence of cell-wall material is the main cause of the strain-rate hardening of the compressive and tensile strengths at low and intermediate strain-rates. When the strain-rate is sufficiently high, shock compression is initiated, which significantly enhances the stress at the loading end and has complicated effect on the stress at the supporting end. The plastic tensile wave effect is evident at high strain-rates, but shock tension cannot develop in Alporas foam due to the softening associated with single fracture process zone occurring in tensile response. In all cases the micro inertia of individual cell walls subjected to localised deformation is found to

  16. 高压缩比甲醇发动机的性能和排放研究%Performance and Emissions Research of the High Compression Ratio Methanol Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晋; 朱建军; 王勇; 刘磊; 高聪慧

    2014-01-01

    用一辆农用拖拉机的柴油机进行台架试验。在一台1115单缸柴油机上,经过加装电热塞、增大压缩比和喷油泵直径的改装后燃用M100甲醇燃料,并对改装后的甲醇发动机与原柴油机进行对比试验。试验结果表明:甲醇发动机的动力性比原柴油机高,经济性得到改善;尾气排放中甲醇发动机 NOx平均降低45%,尽管 HC和CO的排放整体比柴油机高,但在大负荷时可以平均降低70%;并且在尾气进行三元催化处理后,可以使 HC和CO排放降低到与柴油机一样。通过试验对比,对甲醇替代柴油的可能提供了理论依据,对柴油机节能减排具有重大意义。%The experiment uses an farm tractor diesel engine to conduct an bench test .To make it burns M100 methanol fuel ,we add a glow plug , enlarge the compression ratio and the diameter of fuel injection pump on a 1115 single cylinder diesel engine , and combine the test research between the methanol engine and the original diesel engine .Results shows that the methanol engine can improve dynamic and economy;The methanol engine can reduce 45%averagely on NO x e-missions;Although HC and CO emissions are higher than the original diesel engine , but the methanol engine also can re-duce by 70%on average in high loads .emissions decreace the same as the original engine's after the tail gas is treated by three-way catalytic converter .According to the research , it provides a theoretical basis that methanol could replace diesel and makes great significance for energy save and emission reduction .

  17. High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when

  18. Scale dependence of the alignment between strain rate and rotation in turbulent shear flow

    KAUST Repository

    Fiscaletti, D.

    2016-10-24

    The scale dependence of the statistical alignment tendencies of the eigenvectors of the strain-rate tensor e(i), with the vorticity vector omega, is examined in the self-preserving region of a planar turbulent mixing layer. Data from a direct numerical simulation are filtered at various length scales and the probability density functions of the magnitude of the alignment cosines between the two unit vectors vertical bar e(i) . (omega) over cap vertical bar are examined. It is observed that the alignment tendencies are insensitive to the concurrent large-scale velocity fluctuations, but are quantitatively affected by the nature of the concurrent large-scale velocity-gradient fluctuations. It is confirmed that the small-scale (local) vorticity vector is preferentially aligned in parallel with the large-scale (background) extensive strain-rate eigenvector e(1), in contrast to the global tendency for omega to be aligned in parallelwith the intermediate strain-rate eigenvector [Hamlington et al., Phys. Fluids 20, 111703 (2008)]. When only data from regions of the flow that exhibit strong swirling are included, the so-called high-enstrophy worms, the alignment tendencies are exaggerated with respect to the global picture. These findings support the notion that the production of enstrophy, responsible for a net cascade of turbulent kinetic energy from large scales to small scales, is driven by vorticity stretching due to the preferential parallel alignment between omega and nonlocal e(1) and that the strongly swirling worms are kinematically significant to this process.

  19. Strain Rate Dependency of Bronze Metal Matrix Composite Mechanical Properties as a Function of Casting Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lloyd; Joyce, Peter; Radice, Joshua; Gregorian, Dro; Gobble, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Strain rate dependency of mechanical properties of tungsten carbide (WC)-filled bronze castings fabricated by centrifugal and sedimentation-casting techniques are examined, in this study. Both casting techniques are an attempt to produce a functionally graded material with high wear resistance at a chosen surface. Potential applications of such materials include shaft bushings, electrical contact surfaces, and brake rotors. Knowledge of strain rate-dependent mechanical properties is recommended for predicting component response due to dynamic loading or impact events. A brief overview of the casting techniques for the materials considered in this study is followed by an explanation of the test matrix and testing techniques. Hardness testing, density measurement, and determination of the volume fraction of WC particles are performed throughout the castings using both image analysis and optical microscopy. The effects of particle filling on mechanical properties are first evaluated through a microhardness survey of the castings. The volume fraction of WC particles is validated using a thorough density survey and a rule-of-mixtures model. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) testing of various volume fraction specimens is conducted to determine strain dependence of mechanical properties and to compare the process-property relationships between the two casting techniques. The baseline performances of C95400 bronze are provided for comparison. The results show that the addition of WC particles improves microhardness significantly for the centrifugally cast specimens, and, to a lesser extent, in the sedimentation-cast specimens, largely because the WC particles are more concentrated as a result of the centrifugal-casting process. Both metal matrix composites (MMCs) demonstrate strain rate dependency, with sedimentation casting having a greater, but variable, effects on material response. This difference is attributed to legacy effects from the casting process, namely

  20. The influence of strain rate on the interfacial fracture toughness between PVB and laminated glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, R.; Sato, C.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of high speed tests using laminated safety glass to determine the interfacial fracture toughness between PVB (polyvinyl butyral) sheets and glass plates. Low-speed tensile test of PVB was carried out firstly. PVB shows a non-linear visco-elastic property. The property was described using a non-linear visco-elastic model. The visco-elastic parameters were calculated to compare the experimentally obtained stress-strain curves and the results of simulation. A simple fracture-mechanical model for PVB laminated glass was conducted to determine the energy release rate G. The fracture toughness Gc of the PVB laminated glass specimens were calculated from both the results of low-speed tensile tests and the equation for the energy release rate. The strain-stress curves of PVB under high strain rates are totally different from those of the low speed tests. The phenomenon can be explained from the phase transition due to the difference of strain rates because the mechanical properties of PVB changes from visco-elastic to glassy behavior. The fracture toughness of PVB laminated glass was calculated from the experimental results of high speed tests. Fracture energy was defined and also compared to the fracture toughness.

  1. Analysis of Thermal Efficiency Improvement Implemented with Miller Cycle for High Compression Ratio Gasoline Engine at High Load%高负荷下应用米勒循环提升高压比汽油机热效率机理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑斌; 李铁; 尹涛

    2015-01-01

    对高负荷工况下应用进气阀早关(EIVC)或者迟关(LIVC)技术实现的米勒循环进行仿真计算 ,基于热力学第一定律比较分析两者改善高压缩比增压直喷汽油机热效率的机理.结果表明 :几何压缩比的增加提高了发动机的理论热效率 ,但由于高负荷时的爆震限制使油耗恶化了1.9% ;米勒循环的应用可以有效降低爆震倾向 ,与原发动机相比 ,采用EIVC与LIVC策略燃油经济性的分别提升2 .4% 和3 .0% ;对比分析EIVC与LIVC对汽油机热效率的影响发现 ,LIVC策略能使燃烧相位更加优化、缸内燃烧更为充分 ,使得其燃油改善效果好于EIVC策略.%For a highly boosted ,high compression ratio and direct injection gasoline engine ,the Miller cycle realized by the early intake-valve closing (EIVC) or the late intake-valve closing (LIVC) strategy at high load was simulated and the improve-ment mechanisms of thermal efficiency for both strategies were compared based on the first law of thermodynamics .The results show that a higher geometric compression ratio can increase the theoretical thermal efficiency ,but lead to the fuel consumption increase by 1 .9% due to knock limit at high load .The application of Miller cycle can suppress knock tendency effectively and the fuel economy for EIVC and LIVC strategy improves by 2 .4% and 3 .0% respectively compared with the original engine . Compared with EIVC ,LIVC can bring about a better combustion phase and more thorough in-cylinder combustion .

  2. The Effect of Strain-rate and Temperature on the Mechanical Properties of a Metal/Polymer Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Diana L.; Pritchard, Rob; Davis, Jeffrey J.

    1999-06-01

    Research has been going on in materials that are energetic yet have mechanical properties suitable in structural components. A series of experiments have been performed to determine the mechanical properties of a metal/polymer composite. The high strain-rate mechanical properties were determined using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar at strain rates of 10^3. The high strain-rate work was complemented by investigating the effect of slow strain on the order of .02 inches/minute to 200 inches/minute obtained using an Instron machine. The effect of temperature upon the stress strain curves was also observed. This paper will discuss one of the mixtures investigated containing titanium (35 μm) and Teflon (35μm) in a 80/20 ratio by weight. The low rate strain curves will be compared to the data achieved at higher strain-rates. The mechanical properties obtained in this study as well as others determined in prior work are being used in a modeling effort of this material under deformation.

  3. The Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Zr-Based Metallic Glass under Different Strain Rate Compressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Hsing Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the high strain rate deformation behavior and the microstructure evolution of Zr-Cu-Al-Ni metallic glasses under various strain rates were investigated. The influence of strain and strain rate on the mechanical properties and fracture behavior, as well as microstructural properties was also investigated. Before mechanical testing, the structure and thermal stability of the Zr-Cu-Al-Ni metallic glasses were studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD and differential scanning calorimeter. The mechanical property experiments and microstructural observations of Zr-Cu-Al-Ni metallic glasses under different strain rates ranging from 10−3 to 5.1 × 103 s−1 and at temperatures of 25 °C were investigated using compressive split-Hopkinson bar (SHPB and an MTS tester. An in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM nanoindenter was used to carry out compression tests and investigate the deformation behavior arising at nanopillars of the Zr-based metallic glass. The formation and interaction of shear band during the plastic deformation were investigated. Moreover, it was clearly apparent that the mechanical strength and ductility could be enhanced by impeding the penetration of shear bands with reinforced particles.

  4. The influence of strain rate and hydrogen on the plane-strain ductility of Zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, T.M.; Motta, A.T.; Koss, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The authors studied the ductility of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding under loading conditions prototypical of those found in reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), i.e.: near plane-strain deformation in the hoop direction (transverse to the cladding axis) at room temperature and 300 C and high strain rates. To conduct these studies, they developed a specimen configuration in which near plane-strain deformation is achieved in the gage section, and a testing methodology that allows one to determine both the limit strain at the onset of localized necking and the fracture strain. The experiments indicate that there is little effect of strain rate (10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) on the ductility of unhydrided Zircaloy tubing deformed under near plane-strain conditions at either room temperature or 300 C. Preliminary experiments on cladding containing 190 ppm hydrogen show only a small loss of fracture strain but no clear effect on limit strain. The experiments also indicate that there is a significant loss of Zircaloy ductility when surface flaws are present in the form of thickness imperfections.

  5. Strain and strain rate: An emerging technology in the perioperative period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Vishwas; Subramaniam, Arun; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Newer noninvasive parameters are being used for perioperative detection of myocardial ischaemia. TDI and global strain rate are some of these parameters. TDI signal is a modification of the routine Doppler flow signal. It is obtained by using thresholding and filtering algorithms that reject echoes originating from the blood pool (by-passing the high pass filter). Set-Up of the machine by activating the TDI function allows decreasing the system gain using a low pass filter and eliminates the signal produced by blood flow. Doppler shift obtained from myocardial tissue motion are of higher amplitudes (reflectivity 40 dB higher) and move about 10 times slower than blood (velocity range: 0.06 to 0.24 m/s). Speckle tracking echocardiography (tissue tracking, 2D strain) utilizes routine gray-scale 2D echo images to calculate myocardial strain. Interactions of ultrasound with myocardium result in reflection and scattering. These interactions generate a finely gray-shaded, speckled pattern (acoustic marker). This speckled pattern is unique for each myocardial region and relatively stable throughout the cardiac cycle. Spatial and temporal image processing of acoustic speckles in both 2D and 3D allows for the calculation of myocardial velocity, strain, and Strain rate.

  6. Nonlinearity and Strain-Rate Dependence in the Deformation Response of Polymer Matrix Composites Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    There has been no accurate procedure for modeling the high-speed impact of composite materials, but such an analytical capability will be required in designing reliable lightweight engine-containment systems. The majority of the models in use assume a linear elastic material response that does not vary with strain rate. However, for containment systems, polymer matrix composites incorporating ductile polymers are likely to be used. For such a material, the deformation response is likely to be nonlinear and to vary with strain rate. An analytical model has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field that incorporates both of these features. A set of constitutive equations that was originally developed to analyze the viscoplastic deformation of metals (Ramaswamy-Stouffer equations) was modified to simulate the nonlinear, rate-dependent deformation of polymers. Specifically, the effects of hydrostatic stresses on the inelastic response, which can be significant in polymers, were accounted for by a modification of the definition of the effective stress. The constitutive equations were then incorporated into a composite micromechanics model based on the mechanics of materials theory. This theory predicts the deformation response of a composite material from the properties and behavior of the individual constituents. In this manner, the nonlinear, rate-dependent deformation response of a polymer matrix composite can be predicted.

  7. Strain rate effect on sooting characteristics in laminar counterflow diffusion flames

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2016-01-20

    The effects of strain rate, oxygen enrichment and fuel type on the sooting characteristics of counterflow diffusion flames were studied. The sooting structures and relative PAH concentrations were measured with laser diagnostics. Detailed soot modeling using recently developed PAH chemistry and surface reaction mechanism was performed and the results were compared with experimental data for ethylene flames, focusing on the effects of strain rates. The results showed that increase in strain rate reduced soot volume fraction, average size and peak number density. Increase in oxygen mole fraction increased soot loading and decreased its sensitivity on strain rate. The soot volume fractions of ethane, propene and propane flames were also measured as a function of global strain rate. The sensitivity of soot volume fraction to strain rate was observed to be fuel dependent at a fixed oxygen mole fraction, with the sensitivity being higher for more sooting fuels. However, when the soot loadings were matched at a reference strain rate for different fuels by adjusting oxygen mole fraction, the dependence of soot loading on strain rate became comparable among the tested fuels. PAH concentrations were shown to decrease with increase in strain rate and the dependence on strain rate is more pronounced for larger PAHs. Soot modeling was performed using detailed PAH growth chemistry with molecular growth up to coronene. A qualitative agreement was obtained between experimental and simulation results, which was then used to explain the experimentally observed strain rate effect on soot growth. However, quantitatively, the simulation result exhibits higher sensitivity to strain rate, especially for large PAHs and soot volume fractions.

  8. Atrial strain rate is a sensitive measure of alterations in atrial phasic function in healthy ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Anita C; Richards, David A B; Marwick, Thomas; Thomas, Liza

    2011-09-01

    Strain and strain rate measure local deformation of the myocardium and have been used to evaluate phasic atrial function in various disease states. The aim of this study was to define normal values for tissue Doppler-derived atrial strain measurements and examine age-related changes by decade in healthy individuals. Transthoracic echocardiograms were performed on 188 healthy subjects. Tissue Doppler-derived strain and strain rate were measured from the apical four and two-chamber views of the left atrium, and global values were calculated as the mean of all segments. Measurements included peak systolic strain, systolic strain rate, early and late diastolic strain rate. Phasic left atrial volumes and fractions were calculated. Mitral inflow and tissue Doppler imaging were employed to estimate left ventricular diastolic function. A significant reduction in global systolic strain was observed from decade 6. Alterations in atrial strain rate were apparent from decade 5; systolic strain rate and early diastolic strain rate decreased, while late diastolic strain rate increased significantly. Changes in phasic atrial volume and function occurred in conjunction with age-related changes in left ventricular diastolic function. Importantly, age-related changes in global atrial systolic strain rate and early diastolic strain rate occurred a decade before corresponding changes in atrial phasic volume parameters. Atrial strain and strain rate can be used to quantify atrial phasic function and appear to be altered before traditional parameters with ageing. Strain analysis may therefore be more sensitive in detecting subclinical atrial dysfunction with alterations in strain rate parameters observed before traditional parameters.

  9. Development of a strain rate dependent material model of human cortical bone for computer-aided reconstruction of injury mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharpour, Zahra; Zioupos, Peter; Graw, Matthias; Peldschus, Steffen

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided methods such as finite-element simulation offer a great potential in the forensic reconstruction of injury mechanisms. Numerous studies have been performed on understanding and analysing the mechanical properties of bone and the mechanism of its fracture. Determination of the mechanical properties of bones is made on the same basis used for other structural materials. The mechanical behaviour of bones is affected by the mechanical properties of the bone material, the geometry, the loading direction and mode and of course the loading rate. Strain rate dependency of mechanical properties of cortical bone has been well demonstrated in literature studies, but as many of these were performed on animal bones and at non-physiological strain rates it is questionable how these will apply in the human situations. High strain-rates dominate in a lot of forensic applications in automotive crashes and assault scenarios. There is an overwhelming need to a model which can describe the complex behaviour of bone at lower strain rates as well as higher ones. Some attempts have been made to model the viscoelastic and viscoplastic properties of the bone at high strain rates using constitutive mathematical models with little demonstrated success. The main objective of the present study is to model the rate dependent behaviour of the bones based on experimental data. An isotropic material model of human cortical bone with strain rate dependency effects is implemented using the LS-DYNA material library. We employed a human finite element model called THUMS (Total Human Model for Safety), developed by Toyota R&D Labs and the Wayne State University, USA. The finite element model of the human femur is extracted from the THUMS model. Different methods have been employed to develop a strain rate dependent material model for the femur bone. Results of one the recent experimental studies on human femur have been employed to obtain the numerical model for cortical femur. A

  10. Microtwin formation in the {alpha} phase of duplex titanium alloys affected by strain rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Hsiang; Wu, Shu-Ming [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, No. 2 Pei Ning Road, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China); Kao, Fang-Hsin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shing-Hoa, E-mail: shwang@ntou.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, No. 2 Pei Ning Road, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China); Yang, Jer-Ren [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chia-Chih [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, No. 2 Pei Ning Road, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Chuan-Sheng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 32003, Taiwan (China)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The long and dense twins in {alpha} phase of SP700 alloy occurring at lower strain rates promote a good ductility. {yields} The deformation in SP700 alloy changed to micro twins-controlled mechanism in {alpha} as the strain rate decreases. {yields} The material has time to redistribute the deformed strain between {alpha} and {beta} as the strain rate decreases. - Abstract: The effect of tensile strain rate on deformation microstructure was investigated in Ti-6-4 (Ti-6Al-4V) and SP700 (Ti-4.5Al-3V-2Mo-2Fe) of the duplex titanium alloys. Below a strain rate of 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, Ti-6-4 alloy had a higher ultimate tensile strength than SP700 alloy. However, the yield strength of SP700 was consistently greater than Ti-6-4 at different strain rates. The ductility of SP700 alloy associated with twin formation (especially at the slow strain rate of 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}), always exceeded that of Ti-6-4 alloy at different strain rates. It is caused by a large quantity of deformation twins took place in the {alpha} phase of SP700 due to the lower stacking fault energy by the {beta} stabilizer of molybdenum alloying. In addition, the local deformation more was imposed on the {alpha} grains from the surrounding {beta}-rich grains by redistributing strain as the strain rate decreased in SP700 duplex alloy.

  11. Analysis of a strain rate field in cold formed material using the visioplasticity method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gusel

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the visioplasticity method is used to find the complete velocity and strain rate distributions from the experimental data, using the finite-difference method. The data about values of strain rates in plastic region of the material is very important for calculating stresses and the prediction of product quality. Specimens of copper alloy were extruded with different lubricants and different coefficients of friction and then the strain rate distributions were analysed and compared. Significant differences in velocity and strain rate distributions were obtained in some regions at the exit of the deformed zone.

  12. The effect of temperature and strain rate on elongation to failure in nanostructured Al-0.2wt% Zr alloy fabricated by ARB process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanieh Solouki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A nano/ultra-fine grain Al-0.2wt% Zr alloy was produced by accumulated roll bonding (ARB processafter 10 cycles. The fraction of high angle grain boundaries increased from 8% to 65.4% during 10passes during ARB process. This alloy was subjected to tensile test at different temperatures (523,573and 623 K and strain rates (0.1 and 0.01 s-1. The optimum condition of temperature and strain rate of623k and 0.01s-1 was achieved for maximum elongation to failure, leading to 100% elongation,although maximum elongation was achieved at higher strain rate and maximum chosen temperature.In fracture surfaces after the test, dimples in higher temperature were deeper, bigger, and longer thanlow temperature. Because of presenting the superplasticity character at elevated temperature andhigher strain rate, there was no evidence of necking after failure.

  13. Temperature increase of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes due to plastic heat dissipation during tensile tests at 0.1-10 s-1 strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellouin de Menibus, Arthur; Auzoux, Quentin; Besson, Jacques; Crépin, Jérôme

    2014-11-01

    This study is focused on the impact of rapid Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) representative strain rates (about 1 s-1 NEA, 2010) on the behavior and fracture of unirradiated cold work stress relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes. Uniaxial ring tests (HT) and plane strain ring tensile tests (PST) were performed in the 0.1-10 s-1 strain rate range, at 25 °C. The local temperature increase due to plastic dissipation was measured with a high-speed infrared camera. Limited temperature increases were measured at 0.1 s-1 strain rate. Limited but not strongly localized temperature increases were measured at 1 s-1. Large temperature increase were measured at 5 and 10 s-1 (142 °C at 5 s-1 strain rate in HT tests). The local temperature increase induced heterogeneous temperature fields, which enhanced strain localization and resulted in a reduction of the plastic elongation at fracture.

  14. Effect of the strain rate on the properties of electrical copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginov, Yu. N.; Demakov, S. L.; Illarionov, A. G.; Popov, A. A.

    2011-03-01

    The effect of the strain rate on the texture and strength characteristics of electrical copper is analyzed using an industrial experiment on low- and high-speed wire drawing. The mechanical properties of the product are determined. The strength of the wire drawn at a high speed is found to be about 20 MPa higher than that of the wire drawn at a low speed. Metallographic analysis shows no differences in the wire structures, and texture analysis reveals differences in the behavior of dominant texture components. The directions of the dominant texture components are found to rotate near the periphery of the workpiece (i.e., at the workpiece surface). The solution of the drawing problem by the finite element method demonstrates an analogous rotation of the principal elongation directions.

  15. PRINCIPAL COMPONENT DECOMPOSITION BASED FINITE ELEMENT MODEL UPDATING FOR STRAIN-RATE-DEPENDENCE NONLINEAR DYNAMIC PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qintao; ZHANG Lingmi; TAO Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Thin wall component is utilized to absorb impact energy of a structure. However, the dynamic behavior of such thin-walled structure is highly non-linear with material, geometry and boundary non-linearity. A model updating and validation procedure is proposed to build accurate finite element model of a frame structure with a non-linear thin-walled component for dynamic analysis. Design of experiments (DOE) and principal component decomposition (PCD) approach are applied to extract dynamic feature from nonlinear impact response for correlation of impact test result and FE model of the non-linear structure. A strain-rate-dependent non-linear model updating method is then developed to build accurate FE model of the structure. Computer simulation and a real frame structure with a highly non-linear thin-walled component are employed to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. The Effect of Strain Rate on Tensile Properties of Cotton Yarns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石风俊; 崔世忠

    2003-01-01

    The effect of strain rate on tensile properties of cotton yarns is analyzed using the standard linear solid model. The tensile curve, breaking strength and work of rupture of the yarns under different strain rate are calculated. A good correlation exists between the experiment results and theoretical anticipations.

  17. Inverse strain rate effect on cyclic stress response in annealed Zircaloy-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudhakar Rao, G.; Verma, Preeti [Center of Advanced Study, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Chakravartty, J.K. [Mechanical Metallurgy Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay 400 085, Mumbai (India); Nudurupati, Saibaba [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad 500 062 (India); Mahobia, G.S.; Santhi Srinivas, N.C. [Center of Advanced Study, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Singh, Vakil, E-mail: vsingh.met@itbhu.ac.in [Center of Advanced Study, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2015-02-15

    Low cycle fatigue behavior of annealed Zircaloy-2 was investigated at 300 and 400 °C at different strain amplitudes and strain rates of 10{sup −2}, 10{sup −3}, and 10{sup −4} s{sup −1}. Cyclic stress response showed initial hardening with decreasing rate of hardening, followed by linear cyclic hardening and finally secondary hardening with increasing rate of hardening for low strain amplitudes at both the temperatures. The rate as well the degree of linear hardening and secondary hardening decreased with decrease in strain rate at 300 °C, however, there was inverse effect of strain rate on cyclic stress response at 400 °C and cyclic stress was increased with decrease in strain rate. The fatigue life decreased with decrease in strain rate at both the temperatures. The occurrence of linear cyclic hardening, inverse effect of strain rate on cyclic stress response and deterioration in fatigue life with decrease in strain rate may be attributed to dynamic strain aging phenomena resulting from enhanced interaction of dislocations with solutes. Fracture surfaces revealed distinct striations, secondary cracking, and oxidation with decrease in strain rate. Deformation substructure showed parallel dislocation lines and dislocation band structure at 300 °C. Persistent slip band wall structure and development of fine Corduroy structure was observed at 400 °C.

  18. Dependence of the brittle ductile transition on strain-rate-dependent critical homologous temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2017-05-01

    Earthquakes mainly occur in crust or mantle that is below a critical temperature for the tectonic strain-rate, \\dot{e}_t, such that stress builds up to the breaking point before it can relax due to creep. Then long-range stress correlation gives rise to power law seismicity including large events. The limiting temperature depends on pressure, which is taken into account by finding a critical homologous temperature THc = T/TM above which earthquakes are rarely observed (where T, TM are temperature and average melting temperature of constituent minerals). We find that THc for ocean plates is ∼0.55. For California earthquakes, it is also close to 0.55. The uppermost mantle layer of oceanic plates of thickness ∼50 km is composed of harzburgite and depleted peridotite from which basalt has been removed to form ocean crust. Thus it has a higher melting temperature than the peridotite of the surrounding mantle, or the lower halves of plates. Thicknesses of seismicity in deep subduction zones, determined from 2-D polynomial fits to a relocated catalogue, are ∼50 km, which suggests that the earthquake channel is confined to this layer. We construct models to find homologous temperatures in slabs, and find that seismicity thicknesses are also, on average, confined to TH ≤ 0.55 ± 0.05. The associated rheology is compared with that obtained from flexure models of ocean lithosphere. The brittle-ductile transition occurs where viscosity drops from high values in the cold cores of slabs to values of 1022-1023 Pa s, that is, where creep strain-rates become comparable to tectonic rates. The cut-off for deep earthquakes is not sharp. However they appear unlikely to occur if homologous temperature is high TH > 0.55. Exceptions to the rule are anomalously deep earthquakes such as those beneath the Iceland and the Hawaiian hotspots, and the Newport Inglewood Fault. These are smaller events with short-range stress correlation, and can be explained if strain-rates are two to

  19. Strain rate sensitivity of Al-based composites reinforced with MnO{sub 2} additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaz, L.; Lobry, P.; Zygmunt-Kiper, M.; Koziel, J.; Wloch, G. [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, Cracow (Poland); Dymek, S. [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Metals Engineering and Industrial Informatics, Cracow (Poland)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Fine-grained Al–MnO{sub 2} and Al–MnO{sub 2}–Mg composites were processed and studied. • Powder metallurgy (PM) and mechanical alloying (MA) methods were used. • Increase of strain rate sensitivity (SRS) vs. temperature was observed at 300–600 K. • Efficiency of the SRS increase was reduced above ∼600 K for PM composites. • Decrease of SRS above ∼600 K was observed for MA Al–MnO{sub 2} composite. - Abstract: Fine-grained Al-based composites reinforced with MnO{sub 2} particles were manufactured by means of powder metallurgy (PM) and mechanical alloying (MA) methods. It was found that the applied powder consolidation methods, including KOBO extrusion, did not induce any chemical reaction between thermodynamically unstable components. However, it was shown that addition of magnesium to the Al-matrix initiated a reaction in the vicinity of MnO{sub 2} particles that resulted in the nucleation and growth of nano-sized aluminum–magnesium oxides. This led to a local refining of structural components. The most intense refining of structural components was observed for the MA Al–MnO{sub 2} composite. Strain rate sensitivity (SRS) of as-extruded materials was tested in compression in the range 293–773 K. SRS was determined by making a rapid change in the basic true strain rate from ε-dot=1.2·10{sup -3} to ε-dot=1.2·10{sup -2}. It is found that SRS did not practically depend on strain. The highest value of SRS was observed for the PM Al–MnO{sub 2}–Mg composite. SRS of PM materials evidently increases with deformation temperature; however, it becomes smaller above a temperature of ∼600 K. For the MA Al–MnO{sub 2} composite, tested at high temperatures, primary mechanical alloying resulted in relatively low increase of SRS with temperature that also becomes smaller above ∼600 K. Suppression of the increase in SRS at high temperatures can be attributed to the specific features of grain boundaries created by the adhesive

  20. Prognostic value of strain and strain rate in the prediction of postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Bigdelu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF is a common dysrhythmia postoperatively after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Myocardial strain and strain-rate imaging is used for the assessment of postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF as a new echocardiographic method. Methods: PubMed and Scopus were searched thoroughly using the following search terms: (strain and strain rate AND (atrial fibrillation OR AF on March 2015 to find English articles in which the strain and strain-rate echocardiographic imaging had been used for the evaluation of AF in patients undergone CABG. Full text of the relevant papers was fully reviewed for data extraction.Result: Of overall 6 articles found in PubMed, 10 records found in Scopus and 4 articles found through reference list search, only 6 papers fully met the inclusion criteria for further assessment and data extraction. The results of strain and strain-rate assessment showed that in total of 542 patients undergoing CABG, POAF occurred in 106 patients. Studies showed that the reduction of left atrial (LA strain rate is correlated with AF. Consistently, the results of present review showed that LA strain and strain-rate in patients who developed AF postoperatively after CABG are significantly reduced, suggesting that strain and strain-rate could be a predictor of POAF.Conclusion: Based on the obtained results, strain and strain-rate is a suitable and accurate echocardiographic technique in the assessment of left atrial function , and it might be helpful to detect the patients who are at high risk of POAF.

  1. Effect of transient change in strain rate on plastic flow behaviour of low carbon steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Ray; P Barat; P Mukherjee; A Sarkar; S K Bandyopadhyay

    2007-02-01

    Plastic flow behaviour of low carbon steel has been studied at room temperature during tensile deformation by varying the initial strain rate of 3.3 × 10-4 s-1 to a final strain rate ranging from 1.33 × 10-3 s-1 to 2 × 10-3 s-1 at a fixed engineering strain of 12%. Haasen plot revealed that the mobile dislocation density remained almost invariant at the juncture where there was a sudden increase in stress with a change in strain rate and the plastic flow was solely dependent on the velocity of mobile dislocations. In that critical regime, the variation of stress with time was fitted with a Boltzmann type Sigmoid function. The increase in stress was found to increase with final strain rate and the time elapsed in attaining these stress values showed a decreasing trend. Both of these parameters saturated asymptotically at a higher final strain rate.

  2. Characterization of a Strain Rate Transient Along the San Andreas and San Jacinto Faults Following the October 1999 Hector Mine Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, D.; Holt, W. E.; Bennett, R. A.; Dimitrova, L.; Haines, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    We are continuing work on developing and refining a tool for recognizing strain rate transients as well as for quantifying the magnitude and style of their temporal and spatial variations. We determined time-averaged velocity values in 0.05 year epochs using time-varying velocity estimates for continuous GPS station data from the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) for the time period between October 1999 and February 2004 [Li et al., 2005]. A self-consistent model velocity gradient tensor field solution is determined for each epoch by fitting bi-cubic Bessel interpolation to the GPS velocity vectors and we determine model dilatation strain rates, shear strain rates, and the rotation rates. Departures of the time dependent model strain rate and velocity fields from a master solution, obtained from a time-averaged solution for the period 1999-2004, with imposed plate motion constraints and Quaternary fault data, are evaluated in order to best characterize the time dependent strain rate field. A particular problem in determining the transient strain rate fields is the level of smoothing or damping that is applied. Our current approach is to choose a damping that both maximizes the departure of the transient strain rate field from the long-term master solution and achieves a reduced chi-squared value between model and observed GPS velocities of around 1.0 for all time epochs. We observe several noteworthy time-dependent changes. First, in the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) region, immediately following the October 1999 Hector Mine earthquake, there occurs a significant spatial increase of relatively high shear strain rate, which encompasses a significant portion of the ECSZ. Second, also following the Hector Mine event, there is a strain rate corridor that extends through the Pinto Mt. fault connecting the ECSZ to the San Andreas fault segment in the Salton Trough region. As this signal slowly decays, shear strain rates on segments of the San

  3. Uniaxial Compressive Strength and Fracture Mode of Lake Ice at Moderate Strain Rates Based on a Digital Speckle Correlation Method for Deformation Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijian Lian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Better understanding of the complex mechanical properties of ice is the foundation to predict the ice fail process and avoid potential ice threats. In the present study, uniaxial compressive strength and fracture mode of natural lake ice are investigated over moderate strain-rate range of 0.4–10 s−1 at −5 °C and −10 °C. The digital speckle correlation method (DSCM is used for deformation measurement through constructing artificial speckle on ice sample surface in advance, and two dynamic load cells are employed to measure the dynamic load for monitoring the equilibrium of two ends’ forces under high-speed loading. The relationships between uniaxial compressive strength and strain-rate, temperature, loading direction, and air porosity are investigated, and the fracture mode of ice at moderate rates is also discussed. The experimental results show that there exists a significant difference between true strain-rate and nominal strain-rate derived from actuator displacement under dynamic loading conditions. Over the employed strain-rate range, the dynamic uniaxial compressive strength of lake ice shows positive strain-rate sensitivity and decreases with increasing temperature. Ice obtains greater strength values when it is with lower air porosity and loaded vertically. The fracture mode of ice seems to be a combination of splitting failure and crushing failure.

  4. Modeling of failure mode in knee ligaments depending on the strain rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman William

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The failure mechanism of the knee ligament (bone-ligament-bone complex at different strain rates is an important subject in the biomechanics of the knee. This study reviews and summarizes the literature describing ligament injury as a function of stain rate, which has been published during the last 30 years. Methods Three modes of injury are presented as a function of strain rate, and they are used to analyze the published cases. The number of avulsions is larger than that of ligament tearing in mode I. There is no significant difference between the number of avulsions and ligament tearing in mode II. Ligament tearing happens more frequently than avulsion in mode III. Results When the strain rate increases, the order of mode is mode I, II, III, I, and II. Analytical models of ligament behavior as a function of strain rate are also presented and used to provide an integrated framework for describing all of the failure regimes. In addition, this study showed the failure mechanisms with different specimens, ages, and strain rates. Conclusion There have been several a numbers of studies of ligament failure under various conditions including widely varying strain rates. One issue in these studies is whether ligament failure occurs mid-ligament or at the bone attachment point, with assertions that this is a function of the strain rate. However, over the range of strain rates and other conditions reported, there has appeared to be discrepancies in the conclusions on the effect of strain rate. The analysis and model presented here provides a unifying assessment of the previous disparities, emphasizing the differential effect of strain rate on the relative strengths of the ligament and the attachment.

  5. Effects of strain rate, test temperature and test environment on tensile properties of vandium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbi, A.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Eatherly, W.S.; Gibson, L.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile testing was carried out on SS-3 tensile specimens punched from 0.762-mm-thick sheets of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and small heats of V-3Cr-3Ti and V-6Cr-6Ti. The tensile specimens were annealed at 1000{degrees} for 2 h to obtain a fully recrystallized, fine grain microstructure with a grain size in the range of 10-19 {mu}m. Room temperature tests at strain rates ranging from 10{sup {minus}3} to 5 x 10{sup {minus}1}/s were carried out in air; elevated temperature testing up to 700{degrees}C was conducted in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} torr (<10{sup {minus}3} Pa). To study the effect of atomic hydrogen on ductility, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in an ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) with a hydrogen leak system.

  6. Slow Strain Rate Testing of Alloy 22 in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, K J; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2003-10-29

    The proposed engineering barriers for the high-level nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain include a double walled container and a detached drip shield. The candidate material for the external wall of the container is Alloy 22 (N06022). One of the anticipated degradation modes for the containers could be environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the current research was to characterize the effect of applied potential and temperature on the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to EAC in simulated concentrated water (SCW) and other environments using the slow strain rate technique (SSRT). Results show that the temperature and applied potential have a strong influence on the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to suffer EAC in SCW solution. Limited results show that sodium fluoride solution is more detrimental than sodium chloride solution.

  7. Seismic hazard assessment of Sub-Saharan Africa using geodetic strain rate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Valerio; Pagani, Marco; Weatherill, Graeme; Garcia, Julio; Durrheim, Raymond J.; Mavonga Tuluka, Georges

    2016-04-01

    The East African Rift System (EARS) is the major active tectonic feature of the Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region. Although the seismicity level of such a divergent plate boundary can be described as moderate, several earthquakes have been reported in historical times causing a non-negligible level of damage, albeit mostly due to the high vulnerability of the local buildings and structures. Formulation and enforcement of national seismic codes is therefore an essential future risk mitigation strategy. Nonetheless, a reliable risk assessment cannot be done without the calibration of an updated seismic hazard model for the region. Unfortunately, the major issue in assessing seismic hazard in Sub-Saharan Africa is the lack of basic information needed to construct source and ground motion models. The historical earthquake record is largely incomplete, while instrumental catalogue is complete down to sufficient magnitude only for a relatively short time span. In addition, mapping of seimogenically active faults is still an on-going program. Recent studies have identified major seismogenic lineaments, but there is substantial lack of kinematic information for intermediate-to-small scale tectonic features, information that is essential for the proper calibration of earthquake recurrence models. To compensate this lack of information, we experiment the use of a strain rate model recently developed by Stamps et al. (2015) in the framework of a earthquake hazard and risk project along the EARS supported by USAID and jointly carried out by GEM and AfricaArray. We use the inferred geodetic strain rates to derive estimates of total scalar moment release, subsequently used to constrain earthquake recurrence relationships for both area (as distributed seismicity) and fault source models. The rates obtained indirectly from strain rates and more classically derived from the available seismic catalogues are then compared and combined into a unique mixed earthquake recurrence model

  8. Strain rate and shear stress at the grain scale generated during near equilibrium antigorite dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Tommasi, Andréa; Garrido, Carlos J.; Mainprice, David; Clément, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Dehydration reactions are an outstanding case of mineral replacement reactions because they produce a significant transient fluid-filled porosity. Because fluids are present, these reactions occur by interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation. Under poorly drained conditions corresponding to foliated metamorphic rocks, they generate fluid pressure gradients that evolve in time and space eventually controlling fluid migration [1]. Despite the general agreement on this fact, we still lack of a precise knowledge of the complex coupling between the stresses generated during the reaction and the timescales for mineral growth and how they ultimate control the rate of fluid migration. Constraining these rates is challenge because the timescales of the feedback between fluid flow and mineral growth rates at near equilibrium are beyond the current experimental capabilities. For instance, numerical simulations suggest that the draining times of a dehydration front by compaction are in the order of 10-100 ky [1] difficult to translate into experimental strain rates. On the other hand, the natural record of dehydration reaction might potentially provide unique constrains on this feedback, but we need to identify microstructures related to compaction and quantify them. Features interpreted as due to compaction have been identified in a microstructural study [2] of the first stages of the antigorite dehydration at high-pressure conditions in Cerro del Almirez, Spain (ca. 1.6-1.9 GPa and 630-710 ° C). Compaction features can be mostly observed in the metamorphic enstatite in the form of (1) gradual crystallographic misorientation (up to 16°) of prismatic crystals due to buckling, (3) localized orthoenstatite(Pbca)/low clinoenstatite (P21/c) inversion (confirmed optically and by means of Electron Backscattered Diffraction) and (4) brittle fracturing of prismatic enstatite wrapped by plastically deformed chlorite. The coexistence of enstatite buckling and clinoenstatite lamellae

  9. Experimental study of the compression properties of Al/W/PTFE granular composites under elevated strain rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.F., E-mail: lynx@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Zhang, J.; Qiao, L.; Shi, A.S.; Zhang, Y.G.; He, Y. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Guan, Z.W. [School of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    Granular composites consisting of aluminium (Al), tungsten (W) and polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE) are typical energetic materials, which possess high density and strength along with other advantageous properties. To investigate the mechanical behaviour of Al/W/PTFE granular composites, compression tests of three Al/W/PTFE mixtures under quasi-static loading and high strain rate conditions were conducted on a CSS-44100 Materials Testing System and a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB), respectively. By employing Al bars, the amplitude of the transmitted signal was significantly enhanced and a high signal-to-noise ratio was obtained. This enhancement was due to the decreased Young's modulus of the bars, which led to increased signal amplitude from the strain gauges. The Al/W/PTFE granular composites were processed using a cold isostatic pressing and vacuum sintering approach. In this work, the fracture modes and stress-strain relationships of Al/W/PTFE composites with mass ratios of Al:W:PTFE of 24:0:76, 12:50:38 and 5.5:77:17.5 were studied. A detailed discussion is provided to cover the effect that tungsten addition, strain rate and mass ratio have on the deformation behaviour of the composites. The results show that the mass ratio plays a significant role in determining the dynamic behaviour and failure modes of the composites. Both the Al/W/PTFE (24:0:76) and the Al/W/PTFE (12:50:38) composites are strain rate dependent, elasto-plastic materials characterised by increased yield stress with increased strain rate. However, the Al/W/PTFE (5.5:77:17.5) composite is a brittle material, which shows brittle fracture at a relatively low strain.

  10. Effect of strain rate on bake hardening response of BH220 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Anindya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at understanding the bake hardening ability of ultra low carbon BH220 steel at different strain rates. The as-received material has been pre-strained to four different levels and then deformed in tension under (a as pre-strained state and (b after baking at 170 ∘C for 20 minutes, at three different strain rates of 0.001, 0.1 and 100/s. In both the conditions, yield stress increased with pre-strain and strain rate, but bake hardening ability was found to decrease when strain rate was increased. The strain rate sensitivity of the material was also found to decrease with bake hardening. Generation of dislocation forests and their subsequent immobility during baking treatment enables them to act as long range obstacles during further deformation. At higher strain rates, less amount of dislocations are produced which can interact with themselves and produce hardening, because of which bake hardening ability and the strain rate drops. A dislocation based strengthening model, as proposed by Larour et al. 2011 [7], was used to predict the yield stress values obtained at different conditions. The equation produced excellent co-relation with the experimental data.

  11. Dynamic Mechanical Response of Biomedical 316L Stainless Steel as Function of Strain Rate and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woei-Shyan; Chen, Tao-Hsing; Lin, Chi-Feng; Luo, Wen-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    A split Hopkinson pressure bar is used to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of biomedical 316L stainless steel under strain rates ranging from 1 × 10(3) s(-1) to 5 × 10(3) s(-1) and temperatures between 25°C and 800°C. The results indicate that the flow stress, work-hardening rate, strain rate sensitivity, and thermal activation energy are all significantly dependent on the strain, strain rate, and temperature. For a constant temperature, the flow stress, work-hardening rate, and strain rate sensitivity increase with increasing strain rate, while the thermal activation energy decreases. Catastrophic failure occurs only for the specimens deformed at a strain rate of 5 × 10(3) s(-1) and temperatures of 25°C or 200°C. Scanning electron microscopy observations show that the specimens fracture in a ductile shear mode. Optical microscopy analyses reveal that the number of slip bands within the grains increases with an increasing strain rate. Moreover, a dynamic recrystallisation of the deformed microstructure is observed in the specimens tested at the highest temperature of 800°C.

  12. Strain rates of opening-mode fractures in deep basinal settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhubl, Peter; Hooker John, N.; Andras, Fall; Laubach Stephen, E.

    2010-05-01

    Long-term strain rates for geologic processes are characteristically in the range of 10-13 to 10-17 s-1 as measured by a variety of techniques, including geodetic techniques, radiometric dating of tectonic and structural processes, and through stratigraphic correlations. Here, we present strain rates for populations of opening-mode fractures in sandstone in deep basinal settings. Fracture strain is obtained by collecting aperture-frequency data for microfractures along scanlines in weakly deformed sandstone. Opening durations of individual macrofractures in the same population are then obtained through detailed microthermometry of fluid inclusions in crack-seal fracture cement, combined with textural reconstructions of the fracture opening history. Temperature data are then correlated with known burial history models to obtain the duration of fracture opening and the fracture opening strain rate. Individual fractures in deeply buried sandstone of the East Texas basin, a passive margin setting, opened over 48 m.y. with a strain rate of 2x10-18 s-1to 5x10-19 s-1. Similar strain rates are obtained for fractures in the Piceance intermontane basin of Colorado. These ultraslow strain rates compare well to longterm intraplate seismic strain rates suggesting that rates of fracture opening are controlled by intraplate tectonic deformation processes.

  13. Environmental and strain rate effects on graphite/epoxy composites. Final Report; M.S. Thesis, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peimandis, Konstantinos

    1991-01-01

    The hygrothermal characterization of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites over a range of strain rates was investigated. Special techniques developed for such hygrothermal characterization are also described. The mechanical properties of the composite material were obtained and analyzed by means of a time-temperature-moisture superposition principle. The results show the following: (1) the embedded gage technique was thoroughly examined and found to be appropriate for both hygrothermal expansion and mechanical strain measurements; (2) all transverse properties were found to decrease with increasing temperature and moisture content; and (3) ultimate transverse properties were found to increase with strain rate at low temperatures but follow an opposite trend at high temperatures compared to dry specimens.

  14. Strain Rate Effect on the Tensile Behavior of Fibers and Its Application to Ballistic Perforation of Multi-layered Fabrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Bo-hong; PAN Xiong-qi

    2002-01-01

    Rate-dependent property of material is very important in analysis of ballistic impact. The tensile property of Twaron(R) filaments at strain rate range from 0.01/s to1 000/s was obtained by MTS materials testing and split Hopkinson tension bar. Rate sensitivity of Twaron(R) filaments is discussed. Application of high strain rate property to ballistic perforation of multi- layered fabrics conforms to the actual situation than that of quasi-static property. The revised analytical model can be used to calculate the process of ballistic penetration and perforation on soft armour, such as fabric target plate,at intuitive approach and simple algorithm with a little computer process time. Predictions of the residual velocities and energy absorbed by the multi- layered fabric show good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Effects of Strain Rate and Plastic Work on Martensitic Transformation Kinetics of Austenitic Stainless Steel 304

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang PENG; Xiang-huai DONG; Kai LIU; Huan-yang XIE

    2015-01-01

    The martensitic transformation behavior and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel 304 were studied by both experiments and numerical simulation. Room temperature tensile tests were carried out at various strain rates to investigate the effect on volume fraction of martensite, temperature increase and flow stress. The results show that with increasing strain rate, the local temperature increases, which suppresses the transformation of martensite. To take into account the dependence on strain level, strain rate sensitivity and thermal effects, a kinetic model of martensitic transformation was proposed and constitutive modeling on stress-strain response was conducted. The validity of the proposed model has been proved by comparisons between simulation results and experimental ones.

  16. Evaluation of thermal effects and strain-rate sensitivity in frozen soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Zhi-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature variation is one important factor that affects the dynamic mechanical properties of frozen soil under impact loading. Thermal damage is a collective phenomenon that can be caused by temperature variation. This paper investigates the effects of thermal damage on strain course. A split Hopkinson pressure bar was employed to investigate the dynamic mechanical characteristics of frozen soil at different temperatures and different strain rates. The stress-strain curves were obtained under impact loading. The compressive strength of frozen soil showed a negative temperature sensitivity and positive strain-rate trend. Specifically, the strength of frozen soil increased with decreasing temperatures and increasing strain rates.

  17. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Raha, S.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  18. The mechanical properties of skeletally mature rabbit anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon over a range of strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danto, M I; Woo, S L

    1993-01-01

    The effect of strain rate on the mechanical properties of the rabbit anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and patellar tendon (PT) was evaluated. The medial portion of the ACL was loaded to tensile failure at rates of 0.003, 0.3, and 113 mm/s, and the middle third of the PT was loaded at rates of 0.008, 0.8, and 113 mm/s. The load was recorded with a high-speed measurement plotting system, and each test was videotaped for strain analysis. The nonlinear portion of the stress-strain curve was curve-fit to an exponential function having two nonlinear constants, representing the initial modulus and rate of change of the modulus. The modulus of the rabbit PT was found to be 89% higher than that of the ACL. The initial modulus and rate of change of the modulus also were greater for the PT than for the ACL. The modulus of the PT was shown to be more sensitive to strain rate than that of the ACL; a 94% increase was observed for the PT, and a 31% increase was observed for the ACL. There was no effect of strain rate on the mode of failure of either the ACL or the PT; all but three of the specimens failed at the insertion site.

  19. Effects of strain rate and elevated temperature on compressive flow stress and absorbed energy of polyimide foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horikawa K.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, at first, the effect of strain rate on the strength and the absorbed energy of polyimide foam was experimentally examined by carrying out a series of compression tests at various strain rates, from 10−3 to 103 s−1. This polyimide foam has open cell structure with small cell size of 0.3 ∼ 0.6 mm. In the measurement of impact load, a special load cell with a small part for sensing load was adopted. For the measurement of the displacement, a high-speed camera was used. It was found that the flow stress of polyimide foam and the absorbed energy up to a strain of 0.4 increased with the increase of the strain rates. Secondly, the effect of ambient temperature on the strength and absorbed energy of polyimide foam was also investigated by using a sprit Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus and testing at elevated temperatures of 100 and 200 ∘C. With the increase of temperature, the strength and absorbed energy decreased and the effect is smaller in dynamic tests than static tests.

  20. Strain rate measurement by Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry: A new look at the strain localization onset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guelorget, Bruno [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS, CNRS FRE 2719), 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)]. E-mail: bruno.guelorget@utt.fr; Francois, Manuel [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS, CNRS FRE 2719), 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France); Vial-Edwards, Cristian [Departemento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Metalurgica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Vicuna Mackenna 4860, 6904411 Santiago (Chile); Montay, Guillaume [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS, CNRS FRE 2719), 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France); Daniel, Laurent [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS, CNRS FRE 2719), 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France); Lu, Jian [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS, CNRS FRE 2719), 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)

    2006-01-15

    In-plane Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry has been successfully used during tensile testing of semi-hard copper sheets in order to measure the strain rate. On one hand, heterogeneity in strain rate field has been found before the maximum of the tensile force ({epsilon} {sup t} {approx_equal} 19.4 and 25.4%, respectively). Thus, a localization phenomenon occurs before the classic Considere's criterion (dF = 0) for the diffuse neck initiation. On the other hand, strain rate measurement before fracture shows the moment where one of the two slip band systems becomes predominant, then strain concentrates in a small area, the shear band. Uncertainty evaluation has been carried out, which shows a very good accuracy of the total strain and the strain rate measurements.

  1. Physical mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of kangaroo shoulder cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibbotuwawa, Namal; Oloyede, Adekunle; Li, Tong; Singh, Sanjleena; Senadeera, Wijitha; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-09-01

    Due to anatomical and biomechanical similarities to human shoulder, kangaroo was chosen as a model to study shoulder cartilage. Comprehensive enzymatic degradation and indentation tests were applied on kangaroo shoulder cartilage to study mechanisms underlying its strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior. We report that superficial collagen plays a more significant role than proteoglycans in facilitating strain-rate-dependent behavior of the kangaroo shoulder cartilage. By comparing the mechanical properties of degraded and normal cartilages, it was noted that proteoglycan and collagen degradation significantly compromised strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of the cartilage. Superficial collagen contributed equally to the tissue behavior at all strain-rates. This is different to the studies reported on knee cartilage and confirms the importance of superficial collagen on shoulder cartilage mechanical behavior. A porohyperelastic numerical model also indicated that collagen disruption would lead to faster damage of the shoulder cartilage than when proteoglycans are depleted.

  2. Strain rate effects on tensile strength of iron green bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact tensile strength of iron green bodies with densities of 7.2 and 7.4 g/cm3 was examined by Brazilian test using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky bar method. The powder material used for the experiments was a press-ready premix containing Distaloy AE, graphite, and lubricant. During dynamic compression, the failure behavior of specimens was observed using a high-speed video camera. The failure stress and failure behavior of dynamic compressive tests were compared with those of static compressive tests.

  3. Strain rate effects on tensile strength of iron green bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Kuroyanagi, Yuki; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Gustafsson, Gustaf

    2015-09-01

    Impact tensile strength of iron green bodies with densities of 7.2 and 7.4 g/cm3 was examined by Brazilian test using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky bar) method. The powder material used for the experiments was a press-ready premix containing Distaloy AE, graphite, and lubricant. During dynamic compression, the failure behavior of specimens was observed using a high-speed video camera. The failure stress and failure behavior of dynamic compressive tests were compared with those of static compressive tests.

  4. Strain rate sensitivity index's theoretical formulae expressed by experimental parameters and its measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A group of formulae for measuring strain rate sensitivity index is established under the conditions of constant strain rate, constant velocity and constant load. And measuring methods are given corresponding to each kind of experimental curves. Furthermore the experimental results are measured and compared on Zn-wt5%Al alloy at room temperature (18 ℃), which shows that this kind of alloy is structural sensitive even at room temperature.

  5. The Effect Analysis of Strain Rate on Power Transmission Tower-Line System under Seismic Excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Li Tian; Wenming Wang; Hui Qian

    2014-01-01

    The effect analysis of strain rate on power transmission tower-line system under seismic excitation is studied in this paper. A three-dimensional finite element model of a transmission tower-line system is created based on a real project. Using theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, incremental dynamic analysis of the power transmission tower-line system is conducted to investigate the effect of strain rate on the nonlinear responses of the transmission tower and line. The results sho...

  6. Crash simulation of hybrid structures considering the stress and strain rate dependent material behavior of thermoplastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Schöngart, M.; Weber, M.; Klein, J.

    2015-05-01

    Thermoplastic materials are more and more used as a light weight replacement for metal, especially in the automotive industry. Since these materials do not provide the mechanical properties, which are required to manufacture supporting elements like an auto body or a cross bearer, plastics are combined with metals in so called hybrid structures. Normally, the plastics components are joined to the metal structures using different technologies like welding or screwing. Very often, the hybrid structures are made of flat metal parts, which are stiffened by a reinforcement structure made of thermoplastic materials. The loads on these structures are very often impulsive, for example in the crash situation of an automobile. Due to the large stiffness variation of metal and thermoplastic materials, complex states of stress and very high local strain rates occur in the contact zone under impact conditions. Since the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials is highly dependent on these types of load, the crash failure of metal plastic hybrid parts is very complex. The problem is that the normally used strain rate dependent elastic/plastic material models are not capable to simulate the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials depended on the state of stress. As part of a research project, a method to simulate the mechanical behavior of hybrid structures under impact conditions is developed at the IKV. For this purpose, a specimen for the measurement of mechanical properties dependet on the state of stress and a method for the strain rate depended characterization of thermoplastic materials were developed. In the second step impact testing is performed. A hybrid structure made from a metal sheet and a reinforcement structure of a Polybutylenterephthalat Polycarbonate blend is tested under impact conditions. The measured stress and strain rate depended material data are used to simulate the mechanical behavior of the hybrid structure under highly dynamic load with

  7. The effect analysis of strain rate on power transmission tower-line system under seismic excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li; Wang, Wenming; Qian, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The effect analysis of strain rate on power transmission tower-line system under seismic excitation is studied in this paper. A three-dimensional finite element model of a transmission tower-line system is created based on a real project. Using theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, incremental dynamic analysis of the power transmission tower-line system is conducted to investigate the effect of strain rate on the nonlinear responses of the transmission tower and line. The results show that the effect of strain rate on the transmission tower generally decreases the maximum top displacements, but it would increase the maximum base shear forces, and thus it is necessary to consider the effect of strain rate on the seismic analysis of the transmission tower. The effect of strain rate could be ignored for the seismic analysis of the conductors and ground lines, but the responses of the ground lines considering strain rate effect are larger than those of the conductors. The results could provide a reference for the seismic design of the transmission tower-line system.

  8. Strain rate dependence of impact properties of sintered 316L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woei-Shyan; Lin, Chi-Feng; Liu, Tsung-Ju

    2006-12-01

    This paper uses a material testing system (MTS) and a compressive split-Hopkinson bar to investigate the impact behaviour of sintered 316L stainless steel at strain rates ranging from 10 -3 s -1 to 7.5 × 10 3 s -1. It is found that the true stress, the rate of work hardening and the strain rate sensitivity vary significantly as the strain rate increases. The flow behaviour of the sintered 316L stainless steel can be accurately predicted using a constitutive law based on Gurson's yield criterion and the flow rule proposed by Khan, Huang and Liang (KHL). Microstructural observations reveal that the degree of localized grain deformation increases, but the pore density and the grain size decrease, with increasing strain rate. Adiabatic shear bands associated with cracking are developed at strain rates higher than 5.6 × 10 3 s -1. The fracture surfaces exhibit ductile dimples. The depth and density of these dimples decrease with increasing strain rate.

  9. Strain rate dependence of impact properties of sintered 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.-S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: wslee@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Lin, C.-F. [National Center for High-Performance Computing, Hsin-Shi Tainan County 744, Taiwan (China); Liu, T.-J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2006-12-15

    This paper uses a material testing system (MTS) and a compressive split-Hopkinson bar to investigate the impact behaviour of sintered 316L stainless steel at strain rates ranging from 10{sup -3} s{sup -1} to 7.5 x 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. It is found that the true stress, the rate of work hardening and the strain rate sensitivity vary significantly as the strain rate increases. The flow behaviour of the sintered 316L stainless steel can be accurately predicted using a constitutive law based on Gurson's yield criterion and the flow rule proposed by Khan, Huang and Liang (KHL). Microstructural observations reveal that the degree of localized grain deformation increases, but the pore density and the grain size decrease, with increasing strain rate. Adiabatic shear bands associated with cracking are developed at strain rates higher than 5.6 x 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. The fracture surfaces exhibit ductile dimples. The depth and density of these dimples decrease with increasing strain rate.

  10. Characteristic systolic waveform of left ventricular longitudinal strain rate in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kazunori; Kaga, Sanae; Mikami, Taisei; Masauzi, Nobuo; Abe, Ayumu; Nakabachi, Masahiro; Yokoyama, Shinobu; Nishino, Hisao; Ichikawa, Ayako; Nishida, Mutsumi; Murai, Daisuke; Hayashi, Taichi; Shimizu, Chikara; Iwano, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-18

    We analyzed the waveform of systolic strain and strain-rate curves to find a characteristic left ventricular (LV) myocardial contraction pattern in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and evaluated the utility of these parameters for the differentiation of HCM and LV hypertrophy secondary to hypertension (HT). From global strain and strain-rate curves in the longitudinal and circumferential directions, the time from mitral valve closure to the peak strains (T-LS and T-CS, respectively) and the peak systolic strain rates (T-LSSR and T-CSSR, respectively) were measured in 34 patients with HCM, 30 patients with HT, and 25 control subjects. The systolic strain-rate waveform was classified into 3 patterns ("V", "W", and "√" pattern). In the HCM group, T-LS was prolonged, but T-LSSR was shortened; consequently, T-LSSR/T-LS ratio was distinctly lower than in the HT and control groups. The "√" pattern of longitudinal strain-rate waveform was more frequently seen in the HCM group (74 %) than in the control (4 %) and HT (20 %) groups. Similar but less distinct results were obtained in the circumferential direction. To differentiate HCM from HT, the sensitivity and specificity of the T-LSSR/T-LS ratio waveform were 85 and 63 %, and 74 and 80 %, respectively. In conclusion, in patients with HCM, a reduced T-LSSR/T-LS ratio and a characteristic "√"-shaped waveform of LV systolic strain rate was seen, especially in the longitudinal direction. The timing and waveform analyses of systolic strain rate may be useful to distinguish between HCM and HT.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulischeck, T. S.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-01-01

    The most recent corrosion problems experienced in nuclear steam generators tubed with Inconel alloy 600 is a phenomenon labeled ''denting''. Denting has been found in various degrees of severity in many operating pressurized water reactors. Laboratory investigations have shown that Inconel 600 exhibits intergranular SCC when subjected to high stresses and exposed to deoxygenated water at elevated temperatures. A research project was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in an attempt to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of factors influencing SCC in high temperature service-related environments. An effort is also being made to develop an accelerated test method which could be used to predict the service life of tubes which have been deformed or are actively denting. Several heats of commercial Inconel 600 tubing were procured for testing in deaerated pure and primary water at temperatures from 290 to 365/sup 0/C. U-bend type specimens were used to determine crack initiation times which may be expected for tubes where denting has occurred but is arrested and provide baseline data for judging the accelerating effects of the slow strain rate method. Constant extension rate tests were employed to determine the crack velocities experienced in the crack propagation stage and predict failure times of tubes which are actively denting. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Effects of strain rate on the mechanical properties of tricalcium phosphate/poly(L: -lactide) composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamadi, Shusaku; Kobayashi, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Bioactive ceramic/bioresorbable plastic composites have been expected as materials for the bone fracture fixations which have more biocompatibility than monolithic bioresorbable plastics. Many studies have been conducted on these materials. Most studies, however, focused on the mechanical properties under static loading. In the actual usage, these materials are loaded dynamically. In this study, effects of strain rate on the mechanical properties of tricalcium phosphate/poly(L: -lactide) (TCP/PLLA) composites were investigated experimentally and analytically. The TCP/PLLA composites containing three different TCP contents (5, 10 and 15 wt.%) were prepared by injection molding. In order to characterize the mechanical properties, tensile and compressive tests were conducted. The results of tensile tests indicated that the Young's moduli of composites increased with increasing TCP contents. For each TCP contents, tensile Young's modulus kept constant up to strain rate of 10(-1)/s. On the other hand, tensile strength increased with increasing strain rate. The effect of strain rate became larger with decreasing TCP contents, which means the strain rate dependency of the PLLA is more effective than that of TCP. From the results of compressive tests, similar results with tensile tests were obtained. That is, compressive Young's modulus kept constant up to strain rate of 10(-1)/s and the 0.2% proof stress increased with increasing strain rate. In order to predict the mechanical behavior of TCP/PLLA composites, the micro-damage mechanics was proposed. In this analysis, 3-phases particle reinforced composites, which include the intact particles, damaged particles and matrix, are assumed. The elastic constants are calculated with micromechanics based on the analyses by Eshelby and Mori and Tanaka. Only the debonding between particle and matrix are assumed as the damage. The nonlinearity in the stress-strain behavior of matrix PLLA is also considered. The debonding particles

  13. Thermomechanical Response of the Rotary Forged Wha Over a Wide Range of Strain Rates and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, W. G.; Qu, C.; Liu, F. L.

    This paper is to understand and model the thermomechanical response of the rotary forged WHA, uniaxial compression and tension tests are performed on cylindrical samples, using a material testing machines and the split Hopkinson bar technique. True strains exceeding 40% are achieved in these tests over the range of strain rates from 0.001/s to about 7,000/s, and at initial temperatures from 77K to 1,073K. The results show: 1) the WHA displays a pronounced changing orientation due to mechanical processing, that is, the material is inhomogeneous along the section; 2) the dynamic strain aging occurs at temperatures over 700K and in a strain rate of 10-3 1/s; 3) failure strains decrease with increasing strain rate under uniaxial tension, it is about 1.2% at a strain rate of 1,000 1/s; and 4) flow stress of WHA strongly depends on temperatures and strain rates. Finally, based on the mechanism of dislocation motion, the parameters of a physically-based model are estimated by the experimental results. A good agreement between the modeling prediction and experiments was obtained.

  14. Study of creep behaviour in P-doped copper with slow strain rate tensile tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xuexing Yao; Sandstroem, Rolf [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2000-08-01

    Pure copper with addition of phosphorous is planned to be used to construct the canisters for spent nuclear fuel. The copper canisters can be exposed to a creep deformation up to 2-4% at temperatures in services. The ordinary creep strain tests with dead weight loading are generally employed to study the creep behaviour; however, it is reported that an initial plastic deformation of 5-15% takes place when loading the creep specimens at lower temperatures. The slow strain rate tensile test is an alternative to study creep deformation behaviour of materials. Ordinary creep test and slow strain rate tensile test can give the same information in the secondary creep stage. The advantage of the tensile test is that the starting phase is much more controlled than in a creep test. In a tensile test the initial deformation behaviour can be determined and the initial strain of less than 5% can be modelled. In this study slow strain rate tensile tests at strain rate of 10{sup -4}, 10{sup -5}, 10{sup -6}, and 10{sup -7}/s at 75, 125 and 175 degrees C have been performed on P-doped pure Cu to supplement creep data from conventional creep tests. The deformation behaviour has successfully been modelled. It is shown that the slow strain rate tensile tests can be implemented to study the creep deformation behaviours of pure Cu.

  15. Strain Rate Dependence of Compressive Yield and Relaxation in DGEBA Epoxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechederra, Gabriel K.; Reprogle, Riley C.; Clarkson, Caitlyn M.; McCoy, John D.; Kropka, Jamie M.; Long, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-03-01

    The mechanical response in uniaxial compression of two diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxies were studied. These were 828DEA (Epon 828 cured with diethanolamine (DEA)) and 828T403 (Epon 828 cured with Jeffamine T-403). Two types of uniaxial compression tests were performed: A) constant strain rate compression and B) constant strain rate compression followed by a constant strain relaxation. The peak (yield) stress was analyzed as a function of strain rate from Eyring theory for activation volume. Runs at different temperatures permitted the construction of a mastercurve, and the resulting shift factors resulted in an activation energy. Strain and hold tests were performed for a low strain rate where a peak stress was lacking and for a higher strain rate where the peak stress was apparent. Relaxation from strains at different places along the stress-strain curve was tracked and compared. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Strain rate dependence of the flow stress and work hardening of single crystals of Ni{sub 3}(Al,Hf)B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezz, S.S.; Sun, Y.Q.; Hirsch, P.B. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials

    1995-07-01

    The strain rate sensitivity {beta} of the flow stress {tau} is associated with work hardening and {beta} = ({delta}{tau}/{delta}ln {dot {var_epsilon}}) is proportional to the work hardening increment {tau}{sub h} = {tau} {minus} {tau}{sub y}, where {tau}{sub y} is the strain rate independent yield stress. The temperature dependence of {beta}/{tau}{sub h} reflects changes in the rate controlling mechanism. At intermediate and high temperatures, the hardening correlates with the density of [{bar 1}01] dislocations on (010). The nature of the local obstacles at room temperature is not established.

  17. Measurement of strain and strain rate in embryonic chick heart using spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Shidan; Suo, Yanyan; Liang, Chengbo; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Yuqian; Liu, Jian; Xu, Tao; Wang, Ruikang; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-03-01

    It is important to measure embryonic heart myocardial wall strain and strain rate for understanding the mechanisms of embryonic heart development. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can provide depth resolved images with high spatial and temporal resolution, which makes it have the potential to reveal the complex myocardial activity in the early stage embryonic heart. We develop a novel method to measure strain in embryonic chick heart based on spectral domain OCT images and subsequent image processing. We perform 4D(x,y,z,t) scanning on the outflow tract (OFT) of chick embryonic hearts in HH18 stage (~3 days of incubation). Only one image sequence acquired at the special position is selected based on the Doppler blood flow information where the probe beam penetrates through the OFT perpendicularly. For each image of the selected sequence, the cross-section of the myocardial wall can be approximated as an annulus. The OFT is segmented with a semi-automatic boundary detection algorithm, thus the area and mean circumference of the annular myocardial wall can be achieved. The myocardial wall thickness was calculated using the area divided by the mean circumference, and then the strain was obtained. The results demonstrate that OCT can be a useful tool to describe the biomechanical characteristics of the embryonic heart.

  18. Slow Strain Rate Testing for Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of Alloy 718 in Substitute Ocean Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCoursiere, M. P.; Aidun, D. K.; Morrison, D. J.

    2017-05-01

    The hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of near-peak-aged UNS N07718 (Alloy 718) was evaluated by performing slow strain rate tests at room temperature in air and substitute ocean water. Tests in substitute ocean water were accomplished in an environmental cell that enabled in situ cathodic charging under an applied potential of -1.1 V versus SCE. Some specimens were cathodically precharged for 4 or 16 weeks at the same potential in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl-distilled water solution at 50 °C. Unprecharged specimens tested in substitute ocean water exhibited only moderate embrittlement with plastic strain to failure decreasing by about 20% compared to unprecharged specimens tested in air. However, precharged specimens exhibited significant embrittlement with plastic strain to failure decreasing by about 70%. Test environment (air or substitute ocean water with in situ charging) and precharge time (4 or 16 weeks) had little effect on the results of the precharged specimens. Fracture surfaces of precharged specimens were typical of hydrogen embrittlement and consisted of an outer brittle ring related to the region in which hydrogen infused during precharging, a finely dimpled transition zone probably related to the region where hydrogen was drawn in by dislocation transport, and a central highly dimpled ductile region. Fracture surfaces of unprecharged specimens tested in substitute ocean water consisted of a finely dimpled outer ring and heavily dimpled central region typical of ductile fracture.

  19. The significance of grain morphology, moisture, and strain rate on the rapid compaction of silica sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. I.; Braithwaite, C. H.; Taylor, N. E.; Pullen, A. D.; Jardine, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    There is considerable interest in the high-rate compaction of brittle granular materials such as sand. However, the vast majority of studies focus on a single granular system, limiting our ability to make comparisons between materials to discern how granular structure manifests as bulk material response. Here, three different silica sands with similar grain size and shape are studied: we compare a rough quarry sand, a smoother-grained sand, and a sandy loam. Quasi-static compaction and planar shock loading responses are compared, and recovered samples analyzed. The combination provides information regarding the interplay between granular properties, loading conditions, and material response. We show that the fundamental grain-scale behaviour depends on loading conditions: At low strain rates compaction behaviour is dominated by grain morphology, and in particular, smoothness and particle size distribution. Under shock loading, grain rearrangement and force chain effects are suppressed, and the nature of inter-granular contact points, modified by the presence of moisture or fines, is most important. Furthermore, grain fracture under shock loading is substantially reduced with increasing moisture content.

  20. The role of reactant unmixedness, strain rate, and length scale on premixed combustor performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, S.; LaRue, J.; Vilayanur, S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Lean premixed combustion provides a means to reduce pollutant formation and increase combustion efficiency. However, fuel-air mixing is rarely uniform in space and time. This nonuniformity in concentration will lead to relative increases in pollutant formation and decreases in combustion efficiency. The nonuniformity of the concentration at the exit of the premixer has been defined by Lyons (1981) as the {open_quotes}unmixedness.{close_quotes} Although turbulence properties such as length scales and strain rate are known to effect unmixedness, the exact relationship is unknown. Evaluating this relationship and the effect of unmixedness in premixed combustion on pollutant formation and combustion efficiency are an important part of the overall goal of US Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program and are among the goals of the program described herein. The information obtained from ATS is intended to help to develop and commercialize gas turbines which have (1) a wide range of operation/stability, (2) a minimal amount of pollutant formation, and (3) high combustion efficiency. Specifically, with regard to pollutants, the goals are to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions by at least 10%, obtain less than 20 PPM of both CO and UHC, and increase the combustion efficiency by 5%.

  1. Slow strain rate corrosion and fracture characteristics of X-52 and X-70 pipeline steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Ductos, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, C.P. 07730, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: acontrer@imp.mx; Albiter, A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Ductos, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, C.P. 07730, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Salazar, M. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Ductos, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, C.P. 07730, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Perez, R. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Ductos, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, C.P. 07730, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-10-25

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a NACE solution saturated with H{sub 2}S, of the X-52 and X-70 steels was studied using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) and electrochemical evaluations. SCC tests were performed in samples which include the longitudinal weld bead of the pipeline steels and were carried out in the NACE solution at both room temperature and 50 deg. C. After failure, the fracture surfaces were observed in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the chemical analysis were obtained using X-rays energy dispersive (EDXs) techniques. The specimens tested in air, exhibited a ductile type of failure, and whereas, those tested in the corrosive solution showed a brittle fracture. Specimens tested in the NACE solution saturated with H{sub 2}S presented high susceptibility to SCC. Corrosion was found to be an important factor in the initiation of some cracks. In addition, the effect of the temperature on the corrosion attack was explored. The susceptibility to SCC was manifested as a decrease in the mechanical properties. Potentiodynamic polarization curves and hydrogen permeation measurements were made. The diffusion of atomic hydrogen was related to this fracture forms. The hydrogen permeation flux increased with the increasing of temperature.

  2. Calculation of the Distribution Rule of Equivalent Strain Rate near Explosive Welding Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓杰; 闫鸿浩; 李瑞勇; 王金相

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to analyze the distribution of equivalent strain rate near the stagnation point and probe into the effects of colliding angle on strain rate. An ideal fluid model of symmetrically colliding was used to research them. Calculations showed the equivalent strain rate and the colliding half angle are closely related to each other with the material geometrical size and explosive velocity selected, the equivalent strain has large gradient within several jet thicknesses near the stagnation point, the maximal strain points are lined up along a beeline, but a curve near the stagnation point. With different colliding angles, they can be fitted by using exponential curve. That is, the exponential curve can be regarded as the token curve in explosive welding.

  3. Modelling plastic deformation of metals over a wide range of strain rates using irreversible thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Mingxin; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, Pedro E J; Zwaag, Sybrand van der [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands); Bouaziz, Olivier, E-mail: mingxin.huang@arcelormittal.com [ArcelorMittal Maizieres, Research and Development, Voie Romaine-BP30320, 57283 Maizieres-les-Metz Cedex (France)

    2009-07-15

    Based on the theory of irreversible thermodynamics, the present work proposes a dislocation-based model to describe the plastic deformation of FCC metals over wide ranges of strain rates. The stress-strain behaviour and the evolution of the average dislocation density are derived. It is found that there is a transitional strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) over which the phonon drag effects appear, resulting in a significant increase in the flow stress and the average dislocation density. The model is applied to pure Cu deformed at room temperature and at strain rates ranging from 10{sup -5} to 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} showing good agreement with experimental results.

  4. Refinement of the wedge bar technique for compression tests at intermediate strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stander M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A refined development of the wedge-bar technique [1] for compression tests at intermediate strain rates is presented. The concept uses a wedge mechanism to compress small cylindrical specimens at strain rates in the order of 10s−1 to strains of up to 0.3. Co-linear elastic impact principles are used to accelerate the actuation mechanism from rest to test speed in under 300μs while maintaining near uniform strain rates for up to 30 ms, i.e. the transient phase of the test is less than 1% of the total test duration. In particular, a new load frame, load cell and sliding anvil designs are presented and shown to significantly reduce the noise generated during testing. Typical dynamic test results for a selection of metals and polymers are reported and compared with quasistatic and split Hopkinson pressure bar results.

  5. Exploration of mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of single chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Gu, YuanTong, E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-05-05

    Based on the characterization by Atomic Force Microscopy, we report that the mechanical property of single chondrocytes has dependency on the strain-rates. By comparing the mechanical deformation responses and the Young's moduli of living and fixed chondrocytes at four different strain-rates, we explore the deformation mechanisms underlying this dependency property. We found that the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of living cells is governed by both of the cellular cytoskeleton and the intracellular fluid when the fixed chondrocytes are mainly governed by their intracellular fluid, which is called the consolidation-dependent deformation behavior. Finally, we report that the porohyperelastic constitutive material model which can capture the consolidation-dependent behavior of both living and fixed chondrocytes is a potential candidature to study living cell biomechanics.

  6. Nucleation mechanisms of dynamic recrystallization in Inconel 625 superalloy deformed with different strain rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The effects of strain rates on the hot working characteristics and nucleation mechanisms of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) were studied by optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. Hot compression tests were conducted using a Gleeble-1500 simulator at a true strain of 0.7 in the temperature range of 1000 to 1150 °C and strain rate range of 0.01 to 10.00 s-1. It is found that the size and volume fraction of the DRX grains in hot-deformed Inconel 625 superalloy firstly decreas...

  7. Elastocaloric cooling processes: The influence of material strain and strain rate on efficiency and temperature span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marvin; Schütze, Andreas; Seelecke, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    This paper discusses the influence of material strain and strain rate on efficiency and temperature span of elastocaloric cooling processes. The elastocaloric material, a newly developed quaternary Ni-Ti-Cu-V alloy, is characterized at different maximum strains and strain rates. The experiments are performed with a specially designed test setup, which enables the measurement of mechanical and thermal process parameters. The material efficiency is compared to the efficiency of the Carnot process at equivalent thermal operation conditions. This method allows for a direct comparison of the investigated material with other caloric materials.

  8. Elastocaloric cooling processes: The influence of material strain and strain rate on efficiency and temperature span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the influence of material strain and strain rate on efficiency and temperature span of elastocaloric cooling processes. The elastocaloric material, a newly developed quaternary Ni-Ti-Cu-V alloy, is characterized at different maximum strains and strain rates. The experiments are performed with a specially designed test setup, which enables the measurement of mechanical and thermal process parameters. The material efficiency is compared to the efficiency of the Carnot process at equivalent thermal operation conditions. This method allows for a direct comparison of the investigated material with other caloric materials.

  9. Flow propagation velocity is not a simple index of diastolic function in early filling. A comparative study of early diastolic strain rate and strain rate propagation, flow and flow propagation in normal and reduced diastolic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skjaerpe Terje

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strain Rate Imaging shows the filling phases of the left ventricle to consist of a wave of myocardial stretching, propagating from base to apex. The propagation velocity of the strain rate wave is reduced in delayed relaxation. This study examined the relation between the propagation velocity of strain rate in the myocardium and the propagation velocity of flow during early filling. Methods 12 normal subjects and 13 patients with treated hypertension and normal systolic function were studied. Patients and controls differed significantly in diastolic early mitral flow measurements, peak early diastolic tissue velocity and peak early diastolic strain rate, showing delayed relaxation in the patient group. There were no significant differences in EF or diastolic diameter. Results Strain rate propagation velocity was reduced in the patient group while flow propagation velocity was increased. There was a negative correlation (R = -0.57 between strain rate propagation and deceleration time of the mitral flow E-wave (R = -0.51 and between strain rate propagation and flow propagation velocity and there was a positive correlation (R = 0.67 between the ratio between peak mitral flow velocity / strain rate propagation velocity and flow propagation velocity. Conclusion The present study shows strain rate propagation to be a measure of filling time, but flow propagation to be a function of both flow velocity and strain rate propagation. Thus flow propagation is not a simple index of diastolic function in delayed relaxation.

  10. Some influences of rock strength and strain rate on propagation of rock avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Elisabeth; Rait, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Rock avalanches are extreme and destructive mass movements in which large volumes of rock (typically >1 million cubic metres) travel at high speeds, covering large distances, and the occurrence of which is highly unpredictable. The "size effect" in rock avalanches, whereby those with larger volumes produce greater spreading efficiency (as defined by an increase in normalised runout) or lower farboschung angle (defined as the tangent of the ratio of fall height to runout length), is well known. Studies have shown that rock strength is a controlling factor in the mobility of rock avalanches - that is, mass movements involving lower strength rock are generally found to produce greater mobility as evidenced by the spread of deposits or low farboschung angle. However, there are conflicting ideas as to how and why this influence is manifested. This paper discusses different theories of rock comminution in light of numerical simulations of rock clasts undergoing normal and shear induced loading, experimental work on rock avalanche behaviour, and dynamic fracture mechanics. In doing so, we introduce the idea of thresholds of strain rate for the production of dynamic fragmentation (as opposed to pseudo-static clast crushing) that are based, inter alia, on static rock strength. To do this, we refer to data from physical models using rock analogue materials, field data on chalk cliff collapses, and field statistics from documented rock avalanches. The roles of normal and shear loading and loading rate within a rock avalanche are examined numerically using 3D Discrete Element Method models of rock clasts loaded to failure. Results may help to reconcile the observations that large rock avalanches in stronger materials tend not to fragment as much as those in weaker materials and also possess lower mobility, while small cliff collapses (typically > 1000 cubic metres) in weak chalk can exhibit rock avalanche-like behaviour at much smaller volumes.

  11. Modelling plastic deformation of metals over a wide range of strain rates using irreversible thermodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, M.; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.; Bouaziz, O.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the theory of irreversible thermodynamics, the present work proposes a dislocation-based model to describe the plastic deformation of FCC metals over wide ranges of strain rates. The stress-strain behaviour and the evolution of the average dislocation density are derived. It is found that t

  12. A Constitutive Model for Superelastic Shape Memory Alloys Considering the Influence of Strain Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Qian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs are a relatively new class of functional materials, exhibiting special thermomechanical behaviors, such as shape memory effect and superelasticity, which enable their applications in seismic engineering as energy dissipation devices. This paper investigates the properties of superelastic NiTi shape memory alloys, emphasizing the influence of strain rate on superelastic behavior under various strain amplitudes by cyclic tensile tests. A novel constitutive equation based on Graesser and Cozzarelli’s model is proposed to describe the strain-rate-dependent hysteretic behavior of superelastic SMAs at different strain levels. A stress variable including the influence of strain rate is introduced into Graesser and Cozzarelli’s model. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed constitutive equation, experiments on superelastic NiTi wires with different strain rates and strain levels are conducted. Numerical simulation results based on the proposed constitutive equation and experimental results are in good agreement. The findings in this paper will assist the future design of superelastic SMA-based energy dissipation devices for seismic protection of structures.

  13. Measurements of Creep Internal Stress Based on Constant Strain Rate and Its Application to Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Wen-liang; WEI Tao

    2006-01-01

    This research is carried out on the basis of Constant Strain Rate(CSR) to measure creep internal stress. Measurements of creep internal stress are conducted on the material test machine by using the CSR method. A mathematical model of creep internal stress is also proposed and its application is presented in this paper.

  14. Motor unit recruitment patterns 2: the influence of myoelectric intensity and muscle fascicle strain rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson-Tole, Emma F; Wakeling, James M

    2008-06-01

    To effectively meet the force requirements of a given movement an appropriate number and combination of motor units must be recruited between and within muscles. Orderly recruitment of motor units has been shown to occur in a wide range of skeletal muscles, however, alternative strategies do occur. Faster motor units are better suited to developing force rapidly, and produce higher mechanical power with greater efficiency at faster shortening strain rates than slower motor units. As the frequency content of the myoelectric signal is related to the fibre type of the active motor units, we hypothesised that, in addition to an association between myoelectric frequency and intensity, there would be a significant association between muscle fascicle shortening strain rate and myoelectric frequency content. Myoelectric and sonomicrometric data were collected from the three ankle extensor muscles of the rat hind limb during walking and running. Myoelectric signals were analysed using wavelet transformation and principal component analysis to give a measure of the signal frequency content. Sonomicrometric signals were analysed to give measures of muscle fascicle strain and strain rate. The relationship between myoelectric frequency and both intensity and muscle fascicle strain rate was found to change across the time course of a stride, with differences also occurring in the strength of the associations between and within muscles. In addition to the orderly recruitment of motor units, a mechanical strategy of motor unit recruitment was therefore identified. Motor unit recruitment is therefore a multifactorial phenomenon, which is more complex than typically thought.

  15. Assessment of myocardial strain and strain rate by tissue doppler echocar-diography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekimova N.A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the article is to review the current data on the method of quantitative evaluation of cardiac mechanics — assessment of myocardial strain and strain rate according to the results of the tissue Doppler echocardiography and prospects of its clinical application.

  16. Strain localization band width evolution by electronic speckle pattern interferometry strain rate measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guelorget, Bruno [Institut Charles Delaunay-LASMIS, Universite de technologie de Troyes, FRE CNRS 2848, 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)], E-mail: bruno.guelorget@utt.fr; Francois, Manuel; Montay, Guillaume [Institut Charles Delaunay-LASMIS, Universite de technologie de Troyes, FRE CNRS 2848, 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)

    2009-04-15

    In this paper, electronic speckle pattern interferometry strain rate measurements are used to quantify the width of the strain localization band, which occurs when a sheet specimen is submitted to tension. It is shown that the width of this band decreases with increasing strain. Just before fracture, this measured width is about five times wider than the shear band and the initial sheet thickness.

  17. Heart wall motion analysis by dynamic 3D strain rate imaging from tissue Doppler echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastenteufel, Mark; Wolf, Ivo; de Simone, Raffaele; Mottl-Link, Sibylle; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2002-04-01

    The knowledge about the complex three-dimensional (3D) heart wall motion pattern, particular in the left ventricle, provides valuable information about potential malfunctions, e.g., myocardial ischemia. Nowadays, echocardiography (cardiac ultrasound) is the predominant technique for evaluation of cardiac function. Beside morphology, tissue velocities can be obtained by Doppler techniques (tissue Doppler imaging, TDI). Strain rate imaging (SRI) is a new technique to diagnose heart vitality. It provides information about the contraction ability of the myocardium. Two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography is still the most important clinical method for estimation of morphology and function. Two-dimensional methods leads to a lack of information due to the three-dimensional overall nature of the heart movement. Due to this complex three-dimensional motion pattern of the heart, the knowledge about velocity and strain rate distribution over the whole ventricle can provide more valuable diagnostic information about motion disorders. For the assessment of intracardiac blood flow three-dimensional color Doppler has already shown its clinical utility. We have developed methods to produce strain rate images by means of 3D tissue Doppler echocardiography. The tissue Doppler and strain rate images can be visualized and quantified by different methods. The methods are integrated into an interactively usable software environment, making them available in clinical everyday life. Our software provides the physician with a valuable tool for diagnosis of heart wall motion.

  18. Effects of temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of potassium-doped tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Kenta, E-mail: k.sasaki@jupiter.qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro, E-mail: kiyohiro.yabuuchi@qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Nogami, Shuhei, E-mail: shuhei.nogami@qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Hasegawa, Akira, E-mail: akira.hasegawa@qse.tohoku.ac.jp

    2015-06-15

    Tensile tests were performed on pure and K-doped tungsten at temperatures from 25 to 700 °C and strain rates between 10{sup −5} and 10{sup −1} s{sup −1} in vacuum. The yield strength of both materials increased with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. The amount of change in the yield strength decreased with increasing temperature. The determination of activation volumes for plastic deformation highlighted that the rate-controlling process of the deformation behavior at lower temperatures was the same for both materials, namely, kink-pair formation on screw dislocations, and the process was not affected by potassium addition. The fracture strain of both materials increased with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature, in the temperature range where the materials showed measurable ductility. K-doped W showed higher yield strength and a lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperature than pure W. No negative effect of K addition on strain rate- and temperature-induced changes in tensile properties was found. The analysis also highlighted the effectiveness of K addition, and of the grain refinement induced by it, for improving the mechanical properties of tungsten.

  19. Fracture and strain rate behavior of airplane fuselage materials under blast loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mediavilla Varas, J.; Soetens, F.; Kroon, E.; Aanhold, J.E. van; Meulen, O.R. van der; Sagimon, M.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of three commonly used airplane fuselage materials is investigated, namely of Al2024-T3, Glare-3 and CFRP. Dynamic tensile tests using a servo-hydraulic and a light weight shock testing machine (LSM) have been performed. The results showed no strain rate effect on Al2024-T3 and a

  20. Effects of temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of potassium-doped tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kenta; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei; Hasegawa, Akira

    2015-06-01

    Tensile tests were performed on pure and K-doped tungsten at temperatures from 25 to 700 °C and strain rates between 10-5 and 10-1 s-1 in vacuum. The yield strength of both materials increased with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. The amount of change in the yield strength decreased with increasing temperature. The determination of activation volumes for plastic deformation highlighted that the rate-controlling process of the deformation behavior at lower temperatures was the same for both materials, namely, kink-pair formation on screw dislocations, and the process was not affected by potassium addition. The fracture strain of both materials increased with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature, in the temperature range where the materials showed measurable ductility. K-doped W showed higher yield strength and a lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperature than pure W. No negative effect of K addition on strain rate- and temperature-induced changes in tensile properties was found. The analysis also highlighted the effectiveness of K addition, and of the grain refinement induced by it, for improving the mechanical properties of tungsten.

  1. The role of partial melting and extensional strain rates in the development of metamorphic core complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, P. F.; Teyssier, C.; Whitney, D. L.

    2009-11-01

    geothermal gradient (35 to 65 °C km - 1 ); material remains partially molten in the dome during ascent. At low strain rate (mm yr - 1 in the core complex region), the partially molten crust crystallizes at high pressure; this material is subsequently deformed in the solid-state along a cooler geothermal gradient (20 to 35 °C km - 1 ) during ascent. Therefore, the models predict distinct crystallization versus exhumation histories of migmatite cores as a function of extensional strain rates. The Shuswap metamorphic core complex (British Columbia, Canada) exemplifies a metamorphic core complex in which an asymmetric, detachment-controlled migmatite dome records rapid exhumation and cooling likely related to faster rates of extension. In contrast the Ruby Mountain-East Humboldt Ranges (Nevada, U.S.A.) exhibits characteristics associated with slower metamorphic core complexes.

  2. Thermomechanical response of 3D laser-deposited Ti–6Al–4V alloy over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng-Hui [School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Guo, Wei-Guo, E-mail: weiguo@nwpu.edu.cn [School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Huang, Wei-Dong [The State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Su, Yu [Department of Mechanics, School of Aerospace Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Lin, Xin [The State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yuan, Kang-Bo [School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China)

    2015-10-28

    To understand and evaluate the thermomechanical property of Ti–6Al–4V alloy prepared by the 3D laser deposition technology, an uniaxial compression test was performed on cylindrical samples using an electronic universal testing machine and enhanced Hopkinson technique, over the range of strain rate from 0.001/s to 5000/s, and at initial temperatures from the room temperature to 1173 K. The microstructure of the undeformed and deformed samples was examined through optical microscopy and the use of scanning electron microscope (SEM). The experimental results show the followings: (1) the anisotropy of the mechanical property of this alloy is not significant despite the visible stratification at the exterior surfaces; (2) initial defects, such as the initial voids and lack of fusion, are found in the microstructure and in the crack surfaces of the deformed samples, and they are considered as a major source of crack initiation and propagation; (3) adiabatic shear bands and shearing can easily develop at all selected temperatures for samples under compression; (4) the yield and ultimate strengths of this laser-deposited Ti–6Al–4V alloy are both lower than those of the Ti–6Al–4V alloy prepared by forging and electron beam melting, whereas both of its strengths are higher than those of a conventional grade Ti–6Al–4V alloy at high strain rate only. In addition to compression tests we also conducted tensile loading tests on the laser-deposited alloy at both low and high strain rates (0.1/s and 1000/s). There is significant tension/compression asymmetry in the mechanical response under high-strain-rate loading. It was found that the quasi-static tensile fracturing exhibits typical composite fracture characteristic with quasi-cleavages and dimples, while the high-strain-rate fracturing is characterized by ductile fracture behavior.

  3. Using Google Earth to Explore Strain Rate Models of Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, G. A.; Bell, E. A.; Holt, W. E.

    2007-12-01

    A series of strain rate models for the Transverse Ranges of southern California were developed based on Quaternary fault slip data and geodetic data from high precision GPS stations in southern California. Pacific-North America velocity boundary conditions are applied for all models. Topography changes are calculated using the model dilatation rates, which predict crustal thickness changes under the assumption of Airy isostasy and a specified rate of crustal volume loss through erosion. The models were designed to produce graphical and numerical output representing the configuration of the region from 3 million years ago to 3 million years into the future at intervals of 50 thousand years. Using a North American reference frame, graphical output for the topography and faults and numerical output for locations of faults and points on the crust marked by the locations on cities were used to create data in KML format that can be used in Google Earth to represent time intervals of 50 thousand years. As markers familiar to students, the cities provide a geographic context that can be used to quantify crustal movement, using the Google Earth ruler tool. By comparing distances that markers for selected cities have moved in various parts of the region, students discover that the greatest amount of crustal deformation has occurred in the vicinity of the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Students can also identify areas of compression or extension by finding pairs of city markers that have converged or diverged, respectively, over time. The Google Earth layers also reveal that faults that are not parallel to the plate boundary have tended to rotate clockwise due to the right lateral motion along the plate boundary zone. KML TimeSpan markup was added to two versions of the model, enabling the layers to be displayed in an automatic sequenced loop for a movie effect. The data is also available as QuickTime (.mov) and Graphics Interchange Format (.gif

  4. Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Superalloys to Resist Environment-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720, ATI 718Plus alloy, Haynes 282, and Inconel 740. Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  5. Simulation of the strain rate sensitive flow behavior of SiC-particulate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Tirtom, İsmail; Güden, Mustafa; Yıldız, Hasan

    2008-01-01

    Strain rate dependent compression mechanical behavior of an SiC-particulate reinforced Al (2024-O) metal matrix composite (MMC) with different particle volume fractions was numerically investigated at various strain rates. Calculations were performed using axisymmetric finite element unit cell model, in which an elastic SiC particle was embedded inside a strain rate sensitive viscoplastic Al matrix. Stress–strain curves of Al matrix material were derived from Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar expe...

  6. Effects of strain rate on the hot deformation behavior and dynamic recrystallization in China low activation martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yuanyuan [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Chen, Xizhang, E-mail: kernel.chen@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Madigan, Bruce [Montana Tech, Butte, MT (United States); Cao, Hongyan [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Konovalov, Sergey [Center for Collective Use Material Science, Siberian State Industrial University, Novokuznetsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Average grain sizes of 1.8 μm are observed at strain rate of 10 s{sup −1}. • Peak stress value increased, but strain decreased with increasing of strain rate. • A catenuliform recrystallized occurred at a strain rate of 5 s{sup −1}. • DRX effect improved with increasing of deformation amounts. - Abstract: To investigate the effects of strain rate on dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behavior on China low activation martensitic steel, hot uniaxial compression tests with strain rates ranging from 0.1 s{sup −1} to 10 s{sup −1} and deformations amounts of 40% and 70% where conducted. The true stress–true strain curves were analyzed for the occurrence of DRX under the different strain rates and compressive deformation amounts. The steel microstructures were examined and linked to the observed stress-strain diagrams to study DRX. Results show that DRX was responsible for refining the grain structure over a wide range of strain rates under 70% deformation. However, significant DRX occurred only at the relatively low strain rate of 0.1 s{sup −1} under 40% deformation. The original elongated microstructure of the rolled plate from which the specimens were taken was replaced by dynamic recrystallization grains. At 70% deformation, the average grain size was 4.2 μm at a strain rate of 0.1 s{sup −1}, 2.5 μm at a strain rate of 5 s{sup −1}, 1.8 μm at a strain rate of 10 s{sup −1}. In conclusion, with increasing strain rate, the recrystallized grain size decreased and the peak stress increased.

  7. An Evaluation of Constitutive Laws and their Ability to Predict Flow Stress over Large Variations in Temperature, Strain, and Strain Rate Characteristic of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    3004 were determined with the traditional Kocks and Mecking model; however, constants for Inconel 600 could not be determined without modification to the model. The temperature and strain rate combinations for Inconel 600 fell into two hardening domains: low temperatures and high strain rates exhibited twinning while high temperatures and low strain rates exhibited slip. An additional master curve was added to the Kocks and Mecking model to account for two hardening mechanisms. The errors for the Kocks and Mecking model predictions are generally within 10% for all materials analyzed.

  8. Temperature and strain rate effects on the piezoelectric charge production of PZT 95/5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amnah S.; Proud, William G.

    2017-01-01

    To develop a better understanding of the piezoelectric ceramic lead zirconate titanate (PZT) 95/5, parameters including varying temperatures, porosities and strain rates have been studied. The effects on the charge output and fracture of poled PZT samples of different porosities have been investigated with compressive strain rates (10-4 - 10+3 s-1) using quasi-static loading equipment, drop-weight towers and Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars (SHPBs). The cylindrical specimens were of 4.4 mm diameter, thickness 0.8 - 4.4 mm, and density 7.3 - 8.3 g cm-3. The temperature range of -20 °C to +80 °C was achieved using purpose-built environmental chambers. The resulting stress-strain relationships are compared; all the samples ultimately displayed a brittle response at failure [1].

  9. Inner-product of strain rate vector through direction cosine in coordinates for disk forging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO De-wen; JIN Wen-zhong; WANG Lei; LIU Xiang-hua

    2006-01-01

    A new linear integration for plastic power was proposed. The effective strain rate for disk forging with bulge was expressed in terms of two-dimensional strain rate vector, and then its direction cosines were determined by the ratio of coordinate increments. Furthermore, inner-product of the vector for plastic power was term integrated by term and summed. Thereafter, through a formula for determination of bulge an analytical solution of stress effective factor was obtained. Finally, through compression tests, the calculated results of above formula were compared with those of Avitzur's approximate solution and total indicator readings of the testing machine. It is indicated that the calculated compression forces are basically in agreement with the measured ones if the pass reduction is less than 13.35%.However, when the reduction gets up to 25.34% and 33.12%, the corresponding errors between the calculated and measured results also get up to 6% and 13.5%, respectively.

  10. Horizontal strain rate estimation using discrete geodetic data and its application to Southern California (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z.; Zeng, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We present an algorithm to calculate horizontal strain rates through interpolation of a geodetically derived velocity field. To derive a smoothly distributed strain rate field using discrete geodetic observations is an under-determined inverse problem. Therefore a priori information, in the form of weighted smoothing, is required to facilitate the solution. Our method is revised from the previous approaches of Shen et al. (1996, 2007). At a given location, the velocity field in its vicinity is approximated by a linear function of positions and can be represented by two velocity components, three strain rate components, and a rotation rate at that point. The velocity data in the neighborhood, after re-weighting, are used to estimate the field parameters through a least-squares procedure. Data weighting is done with following considerations: (a) Data are weighted according to either the Voronoi cell area of each neighboring site, or the station azimuthal span of two azimuthally adjacent neighboring sites. (b) A distance weighting factor is assigned according to site-to-station distances, in the form of either a Gaussian or quadratic decay function. (c) The distance decay coefficient is determined from setting a minimum total weighting threshold which is defined as the sum of the weighting coefficients for all the data input. We also developed an algorithm to exclude contributions of the non-elastic strain associated with fault creep such as creeping along the Central California Creeping segment of the San Andres fault system. We apply this method to derive the strain rate field for southern California using the SCEC CMM4 velocity field.

  11. On the influence of strain rate sensitivity on wear in the Archard regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brechet, Y. (Domaine Univ. de Grenoble, Saint Martin d' Heres (France). Lab. de Thermodynamique et Physico-Chimie Metallurgique); Estrin, Y. (Univ. of Western Australia, Nedlands (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Relating wear characteristics of a metallic material to its mechanical properties (yield strength, strain hardening coefficient) and its microstructural features (size and volume fraction of inclusions) is a long-standing problem. The diversity of mechanisms which are involved during wear processes makes it practically impossible to have a general theory which would encompass all thinkable situations corresponding to various loads and various regimes of sliding. Different regimes and the conditions for their occurrence have been systematized in wear mechanism maps. In this communication the authors are going to restrict their consideration to plasticity dominated wear which is expected to occur in the low velocity range where surface heating is negligible. In this regime, the prevalent wear mechanism is the removal of slivers of metal by plastic failure due to shearing of contact asperities. The classic works by Rabinowicz have demonstrated clearly that solid friction is a rate dependent problem and that the velocity dependence of dynamic solid friction is nothing else than a consequence of the increase of static solid friction with time during which normal load was applied prior to the commencement of sliding. Creep under normal compression stress leads to flattening of the junctions causing their strength to increase with time. Like solid friction, wear appears to be a rate dependent phenomenon, and the strain rate sensitivity of the flow stress can be expected to be relevant for wear resistance. The strain rate sensitivity is known to play an important role in other damage related properties, such as ductility and fracture toughness. The authors felt that it would be of interest to evaluate the effect of strain rate sensitivity on the wear rate as part of an attempt to relate the wear properties to a bulk constitutive equation, and as a guideline for assessing the influence of alloying elements known to affect the strain rate sensitivity.

  12. Left ventricular dysfunction measured by tissue Doppler imaging and strain rate imaging in hypertensive adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Mi Ahn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Left ventricular (LV hypertrophy and impaired diastolic function may occur early in systemic hypertension. Diastolic dysfunction is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI-derived tissue velocity and strain rate are new parameters for assessing diastolic dysfunction. The aim of this study is to determine whether TDI and strain rate imaging (SRI would improve the ability to recognize early impaired diastolic and systolic functions compared with conventional echocardiography in hypertensive adolescents. Methods : We included 38 hypertensive patients with systolic blood pressure above 140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure above 90 mmHg. Ejection fraction and myocardial performance index (MPI were estimated by conventional echocardiography. Peak systolic myocardial velocity, early diastolic myocardial velocity (Em, and peak late diastolic myocardial velocity (Am were obtained by using TDI and SRI. Results : In the hypertensive group, interventricular septal thickness was significantly increased on M-mode echocardiography. Em/Am was significantly decreased at the mitral valve annulus. Among hypertensive subjects, the E strain rate at basal, mid, and apex was significantly decreased. Systolic strain was significantly decreased at the septum in the hypertensive group. Conclusion : Strain rate might be a useful new parameter for the quantification of both regional and global LV functions and could be used in long-term follow up in hypertensive patients. Early identification by SRI of subjects at risk for hypertensive and ventricular dysfunction may help to stratify risk and guide therapy. Further studies, including serial assessment of LV structure and function in a larger number of adolescents with hypertension, is necessary.

  13. Strain-Rate Dependency of Strength of Soft Marine Deposits of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    abstract number: 090612-057 Strain-rate dependency of strength of soft marine deposits of the Gulf of Mexico Andrei Abelev and Philip Valent...from the Gulf of Mexico . The vane test may not always be the most accurate method of describing the undrained shear strength, mainly because it...deposits of the Gulf of Mexico 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  14. Correlation of fracture features with mechanical properties as a function of strain rate in zirconium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Arpan; Chakravartty, Jayanta Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (Department of Atomic Energy), Trombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India). Mechanical Metallurgy Div.

    2016-02-15

    Two dimensional fracture features (i. e., dimple diameter, extent of tearing ridges etc.) quantified from the tensile fractographs are investigated to predict the nature of variation in mechanical properties with strain rates in zirconium alloys tested under ambient temperature where the initial inclusion or other second phase particle contents were kept unaltered. It has been possible to reasonably estimate the strength and ductility properties of an alloy from a systematic analysis of fractographic features.

  15. Identification of neutron irradiation induced strain rate sensitivity change using inverse FEM analysis of Charpy test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haušild, Petr; Materna, Aleš; Kytka, Miloš

    2015-04-01

    A simple methodology how to obtain additional information about the mechanical behaviour of neutron-irradiated WWER 440 reactor pressure vessel steel was developed. Using inverse identification, the instrumented Charpy test data records were compared with the finite element computations in order to estimate the strain rate sensitivity of 15Ch2MFA steel irradiated with different neutron fluences. The results are interpreted in terms of activation volume change.

  16. Influence of Strain Rate on Tensile Strength of Woven Geotextile in the Selected Range of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stępień Sylwia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of geosynthetics behaviour has been carried out for many years. Before using geosynthetics in practice, the standard laboratory tests had been carried out to determine basic mechanical parameters. In order to examine the tensile strength of the sample which extends at a constant strain rate, one should measure the value of the tensile force and strain. Note that geosynthetics work under different conditions of stretching and temperatures, which significantly reduce the strength of these materials. The paper presents results of the tensile test of geotextile at different strain rates and temperatures from 20 °C to 100 °C. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of temperature and strain rate on tensile strength and strain of the woven geotextile. The article presents the method of investigation and the results. The data obtained allowed us to assess the parameters of material which should be considered in the design of the load-bearing structures that work at temperatures up to 100 °C.

  17. Mechanical Characterization of Brain Tissue in Compression at Dynamic Strain Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2012.01.022

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when local mechanical load exceeds certain tolerance levels for brain tissue. Extensive research has been done previously for brain matter experiencing compression at quasistatic loading; however, limited data is available to model TBI under dynamic impact conditions. In this research, an experimental setup was developed to perform unconfined compression tests and stress relaxation tests at strain rates < 90/s. The brain tissue showed a stiffer response with increasing strain rates, showing that hyperelastic models are not adequate. Specifically, the compressive nominal stress at 30% strain was 8.83 +/- 1.94, 12.8 +/- 3.10 and 16.0 +/- 1.41 kPa (mean +/- SD) at strain rates of 30, 60 and 90/s, respectively. Relaxation tests were also conducted at 10%-50% strain with the average rise time of 10 ms, which can be used to derive time dependent parameters. Numerical simulations were performed using one-term Ogden model with initial shear modulus mu_0 = 6.06 +/- 1.44, 9.44 +/-...

  18. Numerical Derivation of Strain Rate Effects on Material Properties of Masonry with Solid Clay Bricks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xueying; HAO Hong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,numerical method is used to study the strain rate effect on masonry materials.A typical unit of masonry is selected to serve as a representative volume element (RVE).Numerical model of RVE is established with detailed distinctive modeling of brick and mortar with their respective dynamic material properties obtained from laboratory tests.The behavior of brick and mortar are characterized by a dynamic damage model that accounts for rate-sensitive and pressuredependent properties of masonry materials.Dynamic loads of different loading rates are applied to RVE.The equivalent homogenized uniaxial compressive strength,threshold strain and elastic modulus in three directions of the masonry are derived from the simulated responses of the RVE.The strain rate effect on the masonry material with clay brick and mortar,such as the dynamic increase factor (DIF) of the ultimate strength and elastic modulus as a function of strain rate are derived from the numerical results.

  19. Influence of Strain Rate on Tensile Strength of Woven Geotextile in the Selected Range of Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępień, Sylwia; Szymański, Alojzy

    2015-06-01

    Investigation of geosynthetics behaviour has been carried out for many years. Before using geosynthetics in practice, the standard laboratory tests had been carried out to determine basic mechanical parameters. In order to examine the tensile strength of the sample which extends at a constant strain rate, one should measure the value of the tensile force and strain. Note that geosynthetics work under different conditions of stretching and temperatures, which significantly reduce the strength of these materials. The paper presents results of the tensile test of geotextile at different strain rates and temperatures from 20 °C to 100 °C. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of temperature and strain rate on tensile strength and strain of the woven geotextile. The article presents the method of investigation and the results. The data obtained allowed us to assess the parameters of material which should be considered in the design of the load-bearing structures that work at temperatures up to 100 °C.

  20. Myocardial strain and strain rate in monitoring subclinical heart failure in asymptomatic long-term survivors of childhood cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mavinkurve-Groothuis, A.M.C.; Groot-Loonen, J.J.; Marcus, K.A.; Bellersen, L.; Feuth, T.; Bokkerink, J.P.M.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Korte, C.L. de; Kapusta, L.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the role of global myocardial strain and strain rate in monitoring subclinical heart failure in a large group of asymptomatic long-term survivors of childhood cancer. Global strain (rate) parameters of survivors were compared with those in healthy controls and were related to conventional

  1. Multi-Layer Strain Rate Field Controlled by Netlike Plastic-Flow in the Lithosphere in Central-Eastern Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Sheng-zu

    2006-01-01

    According to the "Netlike Plastic-Flow (NPF)" continental dynamics model, the transition of the deformation regime from brittle in shallow layers to ductile in deep layers in the lithosphere, and the controlling effect of NPF in the lower lithosphere result in intraplate multilayer tectonic deformation. NPF is a viscous (plastic) flow accompanied by shear strain localization, forming a plastic-flow network in the lower lithosphere. The strain rates in the seismogenic layer can be estimated using the "earthquake-recurrence-interval" method, in which the strain rate is calculated in terms of the recurrence interval of two sequential carthquakes and the seismic probability of the second earthquake. The strains in the lower lithosphere are estimated using the "conjugate-angle" method, which takes the relationship between the conjugate angles and the compressive strains of the network, and calculates the characteristic strain rates in this layer from the strains and the durations of deformation inferred. The contour map of characteristic maximum principal compressive strain rates in the lower lithosphere in central-eastern Asia given in the paper shows strain rates with magnitudes on the order of 10-15 ~ 10-14/s in this region. The strain rates within the plastic-flow belts,which control seismic activities in the seismogenic layer, are greater than the characteristic strain rates of the network and, in addition, the strain rates and seismic activities in the seismogenic layer are also influenced by other factors, including the directive action of driving boundary along the upper crust, the effects of plastic-flow waves and the existence of the transitional weak layer distributed discontinuously between the upper and lower layers. The comparison between the strain rates in the seismogenic layer and the characteristic strain rates in the lower lithosphere for 11 potential hypocenter areas in the region from the Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) plateau to the North China plain

  2. Determining the Mechanical Constitutive Properties of Metals as Function of Strain Rate and temperature: A Combined Experimental and Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian Robertson

    2007-04-28

    Development and validation of constitutive models for polycrystalline materials subjected to high strain-rate loading over a range of temperatures are needed to predict the response of engineering materials to in-service type conditions. To account accurately for the complex effects that can occur during extreme and variable loading conditions, requires significant and detailed computational and modeling efforts. These efforts must be integrated fully with precise and targeted experimental measurements that not only verify the predictions of the models, but also provide input about the fundamental processes responsible for the macroscopic response. Achieving this coupling between modeling and experiment is the guiding principle of this program. Specifically, this program seeks to bridge the length scale between discrete dislocation interactions with grain boundaries and continuum models for polycrystalline plasticity. Achieving this goal requires incorporating these complex dislocation-interface interactions into the well-defined behavior of single crystals. Despite the widespread study of metal plasticity, this aspect is not well understood for simple loading conditions, let alone extreme ones. Our experimental approach includes determining the high-strain rate response as a function of strain and temperature with post-mortem characterization of the microstructure, quasi-static testing of pre-deformed material, and direct observation of the dislocation behavior during reloading by using the in situ transmission electron microscope deformation technique. These experiments will provide the basis for development and validation of physically-based constitutive models. One aspect of the program involves the direct observation of specific mechanisms of micro-plasticity, as these indicate the boundary value problem that should be addressed. This focus on the pre-yield region in the quasi-static effort (the elasto-plastic transition) is also a tractable one from an

  3. Strain and strain rate by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography in a maned wolf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus M. Mantovani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of cardiovascular features of wild animals is important, as is the measurement in pets, for the assessment of myocardial function and the early detection of cardiac abnormalities, which could progress to heart failure. Speckle tracking echocardiography (2D STE is a new tool that has been used in veterinary medicine, which demonstrates several advantages, such as angle independence and the possibility to provide the early diagnosis of myocardial alterations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the left myocardial function in a maned wolf by 2D STE. Thus, the longitudinal, circumferential and radial strain and strain rate were obtained, as well as, the radial and longitudinal velocity and displacement values, from the right parasternal long axis four-chamber view, the left parasternal apical four chamber view and the parasternal short axis at the level of the papillary muscles. The results of the longitudinal variables were -13.52±7.88, -1.60±1.05, 4.34±2.52 and 3.86±3.04 for strain (%, strain rate (1/s, displacement (mm and velocity (cm/s, respectively. In addition, the radial and circumferential Strain and Strain rate were 24.39±14.23, 1.86±0.95 and -13.69±6.53, -1.01±0.48, respectively. Thus, the present study provides the first data regarding the use of this tool in maned wolves, allowing a more complete quantification of myocardial function in this species.

  4. QUANTIFICATION OF RIGHT VENTRICULAR FUNCTION IN ATRIAL SEPTAL DEFECT USING ULTRASOUND-BASED STRAIN RATE IMAGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xiang-chun; SUN Kun; ZHANG Yu-qi; HUANG Mei-rong; GAO Wei; ZHANG Zhi-fang; SHEN Rong; CHEN Shu-bao

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the validation of ultrasound-based strain rate imaging in the quantitative assessment of right ventricular (RV) function in atrial septal defect (ASD). Methods Tissue Doppler images (TDI) of RV longitudinal and short axes were recorded from the apical 4-chamber view and the subcostal short-axis view in 18 normal controls, 28 children with ASD and 14 children after Amplazter closure of ASD respectively. Peak systolic velocities (V), peak systolic strain rates (SR), peak systolic strains (S) at the basal segment, middle segment of RV lateral wall and the basal septum from the longitudinal axis, the middle segment of RV free wall from the short axis were quantitatively measured using QLAB TM tissue velocity quantification software system respectively. Peak dp/dt from the RV isovolumic contraction determined during the right cardiac catheterization in 28 ASD patients was used as the gold standard of RV contractility. Peak systolic indices were compared against max dp/dt by linear correlation. Results Peak systolic indices at the basal and middle segments of RV lateral wall from the longitudinal axis increased significantly in 28 ASD patients.Peak systolic indices at the basal septum also increased in patient group, but not significantly. Significant decreases in peak systolic indices at the basal and middle segments of RV lateral wall were observed after the Amplatzer closure in 14 ASD patients. There was no significant difference at the middle segment of RV free wall from the short axis between patient group and normal control. A strong correlation was found between max dp/dt and peak systolic indices at the basal and middle segments of RV lateral wall (P<0.05). Conclusion Ultrasound-based strain rate imaging can assess quantitatively RV function in CHD. Peak systolic strains determined at the basal and middle segments of RV lateral wall are strong noninvasive indices of RV contractility.

  5. Strain rate effects on the mechanical properties and fracture mode of skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Michael; Tovar, Nick; Yoo, Daniel [Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry (United States); Sobieraj, Micheal [Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital for Joint Diseases (United States); Gupta, Nikhil [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, NYU-Poly (United States); Branski, Ryan C. [Dept of Otolaryngology, New York University School of Medicine (United States); Coelho, Paulo G., E-mail: pc92@nyu.edu [Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to characterize the mechanical response of beagle sartorius muscle fibers under strain rates that increase logarithmically (0.1 mm/min, 1 mm/min and 10 mm/min), and provide an analysis of the fracture patterns of these tissues via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Muscle tissue from dogs' sartorius was excised and test specimens were sectioned with a lancet into sections with nominal length, width, and thickness of 7, 2.5 and 0.6 mm, respectively. Trimming of the tissue was done so that the loading would be parallel to the direction of the muscle fiber. Samples were immediately tested following excision and failures were observed under the SEM. No statistically significant difference was observed in strength between the 0.1 mm/min (2.560 ± 0.37 MPa) and the 1 mm/min (2.702 ± 0.55 MPa) groups. However, the 10 mm/min group (1.545 ± 0.50 MPa) had a statistically significant lower strength than both the 1 mm/min group and the 0.1 mm/min group with p < 0.01 in both cases. At the 0.1 mm/min rate the primary fracture mechanism was that of a shear mode failure of the endomysium with a significant relative motion between fibers. At 1 mm/min this continues to be the predominant failure mode. At the 10 mm/min strain rate there is a significant change in the fracture pattern relative to other strain rates, where little to no evidence of endomysial shear failure nor of significant motion between fibers was detected.

  6. Recent advances in echocardiography: strain and strain rate imaging [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Mirea

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Deformation imaging by echocardiography is a well-established research tool which has been gaining interest from clinical cardiologists since the introduction of speckle tracking. Post-processing of echo images to analyze deformation has become readily available at the fingertips of the user. New parameters such as global longitudinal strain have been shown to provide added diagnostic value, and ongoing efforts of the imaging societies and industry aimed at harmonizing methods will improve the technique further. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of echocardiographic strain and strain rate imaging, and provides an overview on its current and potential future clinical applications.

  7. Stress and strain rate analysis of the FT4 Powder Rheometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hare Colin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Freeman FT4 Powder Rheometer has been reported to describe well the powder flow behaviour in instances where other techniques fail. We use DEM to simulate the FT4 operation for slightly cohesive large glass beads at a range of strain rates. The curved impeller is shown to be beneficial in comparison to a flat blade as the variation of shear stress across the blade is reduced. The shear stress in front of the blade correlates well with flow energy (which the device measures for a range of tip speeds and is shown to increase approximately linearly with tip speed when operating beyond the quasi-static regime.

  8. DYNAMIC STRENGTH AND STRAIN RATE EFFECTS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF TUNGSTEN AND TUNGSTEN ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Zurek, A; G. Gray

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the stress-strain response as a function of strain rate, spall strength, and dynamic fracture behavior of pure W, W-26Re, W-Ni- Fe and W-Ni-Fe-Co has been performed. Spall strength measurements, obtained in symmetric-impact tests, showed an increase in spall strength from 0.4 GPa for pure tungsten to 3.8 GPa for 90W-7Ni-3Fe. Concurrent with the increase in spall strength was a change in fracture mode from cleavage (for pure W) to a mixture of transgranular and intergranula...

  9. A QUASI-FLOW CONSTITUTIVE MODEL WITH STRAIN-RATE DEPENDENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ping; SHEN Guozhe; YANG Guang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the proposed is a quasi-flow constitutive model with strain-rate sensitivity for elastic plastic large deformation. The model is based on the Quasi-flow Corner theory,and is suitable for the sheet metal forming process simulation with a variable punch machine velocity.Uniaxial tensile tests and deep-drawing tests of a circular blank with square punch are carried out and numerically simulated. The consistency between the experimental and the numerically simulated results shows the validity of the present new constitutive model.

  10. Parametric Study of Strain Rate Effects on Nanoparticle-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Soltannia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Crashworthiness, energy absorption capacity, and safety are important factors in the design of lightweight vehicles made of fiber-reinforced polymer composite (FRP components. The relatively recent emergence of the nanotechnology industry has presented a novel means to augment the mechanical properties of various materials. As a result, recent attempts have contemplated the use of nanoparticles to further improve the resiliency of resins, especially when resins are used for mating FRP components. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the response of nanoreinforced polymer composites, subjected to various rates of loading, is of paramount importance for developing reliable structures. In this paper, the effects of nanoreinforcement on the mechanical response of a commonly used epoxy resin subjected to four different strain rates, are systematically investigated. The results are then compared to those of the neat resin. To characterize the mechanical properties of the nanocomposite, a combination of the strain rate-dependent mechanical (SRDM model of Goldberg and his coworkers and Halpin-Tsai’s micromechanical approach is employed. Subsequently, a parametric study is conducted to ascertain the influences of particle type and their weight percentage. Finally, the numerical results are compared to the experimental data obtained from testing of the neat and the nanoreinforced epoxy resin.

  11. Size and strain rate effects in tensile strength of penta-twinned Ag nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Xiaoyan; Gao, Huajian

    2017-08-01

    Penta-twinned Ag nanowires (pt-AgNWs) have recently attracted much attention due to their interesting mechanical and physical properties. Here we perform large-scale atomistic simulations to investigate the influence of sample size and strain rate on the tensile strength of pt-AgNWs. The simulation results show an apparent size effect in that the nanowire strength (defined as the critical stress for dislocation nucleation) increases with decreasing wire diameter. To account for such size effect, a theoretical model involving the interaction between an emerging dislocation and the twin boundary has been developed for the surface nucleation of dislocations. It is shown that the model predictions are in quantitative agreement with the results from atomistic simulations and previous experimental studies in the literatures. The simulations also reveal that nanowire strength is strain-rate dependent, which predicts an activation volume for dislocation nucleation in the range of 1-10b3, where b is the magnitude of the Burgers vector for a full dislocation.

  12. On the influence of strain rate in acousto-elasticity : experimental results for Berea sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviere, J. V.; Candela, T.; Scuderi, M.; Marone, C.; Guyer, R. A.; Johnson, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Elastic nonlinear effects are pervasive in the Earth, including during strong ground motion, tidal forcing and earthquake slip processes. We study elastic nonlinear effects in the laboratory with the goal of developing new methods to probe elastic changes in the Earth, and to characterize and understand their origins. Here we report on nonlinear, frequency dispersion effects by applying a method termed dynamic acousto-elasticity (DAE), analogous to quasi-static acousto-elasticity. DAE allows one to obtain the elastic behavior over the entire dynamic cycle, detailing the full nonlinear behavior under tension and compression, including hysteresis and memory effects. We perform DAE on samples of Berea sandstone subject to 0.5 MPa uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions with oscillating loads at frequencies from 0.001 to 10 Hz and amplitudes of a few 100 kPa. We compare results to DAE measurements made in the kHz range. We observe that the average decrease in modulus due to nonlinear material softening increases with frequency, suggesting a frequency and/or a strain rate dependence. Previous quasi-static measurements (Claytor et al., GRL 2009) show that stress-strain nonlinear hysteretic behavior disappears when the experiment is performed at a very low strain-rate, implying that a rate dependent nonlinear elastic model would be useful (Gusev et al., PRB 2004). Our results also suggest that when elastic nonlinear Earth processes are studied, stress forcing frequency is an important consideration, and may lead to unexpected behaviors.

  13. Radial and longitudinal strain and strain rate assessed by speckle-tracking echocardiography in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Tidholm, A.; Nägga, K.M.;

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of left ventricular (LV) function using conventional echocardiographic methods is difficult in mitral regurgitation (MR) owing to altered hemodynamic loading conditions. Newer methods such as speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) provide assessment of LV strain (St) and strain rates ...

  14. Early detection of left ventricular dysfunction in asymptomatic diabetic patient using strain and strain rate echocardiographic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Gaber

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Type 2 diabetes mellitus deteriorate both LV systolic and diastolic performance. Strain and strain rate by tissue Doppler Imaging is superior to conventional Doppler in early detection and evaluation of systolic and diastolic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients.

  15. Atrial Strain and Strain Rate: A Novel Method for the Evaluation of Atrial Stunning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Hakan; Binici, Suleyman; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Ari, Hasan; Bozat, Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia seen in adults. Atrial stunning is defined as the temporary mechanical dysfunction of the atrial appendage developing after AF has returned to sinus rhythm (SR). Objectives We aimed to evaluate atrial contractile functions by strain and strain rate in patients with AF, following pharmacological and electrical cardioversion and to compare it with conventional methods. Methods This study included 41 patients with persistent AF and 35 age-matched control cases with SR. All the AF patients included in the study had transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography performed before and after. Septum (SEPsSR), left atrium (LAsSR) and right atrium peak systolic strain rate (RAsSR) were defined as the maximum negative value during atrial contraction and septum (SEPε), left atrium (LAε) and right atrium peak systolic strain (RAε) was defined as the percentage of change. Parameters of two groups were compared. Results In the AF group, 1st hour and 24th hour LAε, RAε, SEPε, LAsSR, RAsSR, SEPsSR found to be significantly lower than in the control group (LAε: 2.61%±0.13, 3.06%±0.19 vs 6.45%±0.27, p<0.0001; RAε: 4.03%±0.38, 4.50%±0.47 vs 10.12%±0.64, p<0.0001; SEPε: 3.0%±0.22, 3.19%±0.15 vs 6.23%±0.49, p<0.0001; LAsSR: 0.61±0.04s-1, 0.75±0.04s-1 vs 1.35±0.04s-1, p<0.0001; RAsSR: 1.13±0.06s-1, 1.23±0.07s-1 vs 2.10±0.08s- 1, p<0.0001; SEPsSR: 0.76±0.04s- 1, 0.78±0.04s- 1 vs 1.42±0.06 s- 1, p<0.0001). Conclusion Atrial strain and strain rate parameters are superior to conventional echocardiographic parameters for the evaluation of atrial stunning in AF cases where SR has been achieved. PMID:27627221

  16. Mechanical deformation model of the western United States instantaneous strain-rate field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, Fred F.; Vergnolle, Mathilde

    2006-10-01

    We present a relationship between the long-term fault slip rates and instantaneous velocities as measured by Global Positioning System (GPS) or other geodetic measurements over a short time span. The main elements are the secularly increasing forces imposed by the bounding Pacific and Juan de Fuca (JdF) plates on the North American plate, viscoelastic relaxation following selected large earthquakes occurring on faults that are locked during their respective interseismic periods, and steady slip along creeping portions of faults in the context of a thin-plate system. In detail, the physical model allows separate treatments of faults with known geometry and slip history, faults with incomplete characterization (i.e. fault geometry but not necessarily slip history is available), creeping faults, and dislocation sources distributed between the faults. We model the western United States strain-rate field, derived from 746 GPS velocity vectors, in order to test the importance of the relaxation from historic events and characterize the tectonic forces imposed by the bounding Pacific and JdF plates. Relaxation following major earthquakes (M γ 8.0) strongly shapes the present strain-rate field over most of the plate boundary zone. Equally important are lateral shear transmitted across the Pacific-North America plate boundary along ~1000 km of the continental shelf, downdip forces distributed along the Cascadia subduction interface, and distributed slip in the lower lithosphere. Post-earthquake relaxation and tectonic forcing, combined with distributed deep slip, constructively interfere near the western margin of the plate boundary zone, producing locally large strain accumulation along the San Andreas fault (SAF) system. However, they destructively interfere further into the plate interior, resulting in smaller and more variable strain accumulation patterns in the eastern part of the plate boundary zone. Much of the right-lateral strain accumulation along the SAF system

  17. Mechanical deformation model of the western United States instantaneous strain-rate field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.; Vergnolle, M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a relationship between the long-term fault slip rates and instantaneous velocities as measured by Global Positioning System (GPS) or other geodetic measurements over a short time span. The main elements are the secularly increasing forces imposed by the bounding Pacific and Juan de Fuca (JdF) plates on the North American plate, viscoelastic relaxation following selected large earthquakes occurring on faults that are locked during their respective interseismic periods, and steady slip along creeping portions of faults in the context of a thin-plate system. In detail, the physical model allows separate treatments of faults with known geometry and slip history, faults with incomplete characterization (i.e. fault geometry but not necessarily slip history is available), creeping faults, and dislocation sources distributed between the faults. We model the western United States strain-rate field, derived from 746 GPS velocity vectors, in order to test the importance of the relaxation from historic events and characterize the tectonic forces imposed by the bounding Pacific and JdF plates. Relaxation following major earthquakes (M ??? 8.0) strongly shapes the present strain-rate field over most of the plate boundary zone. Equally important are lateral shear transmitted across the Pacific-North America plate boundary along ???1000 km of the continental shelf, downdip forces distributed along the Cascadia subduction interface, and distributed slip in the lower lithosphere. Post-earthquake relaxation and tectonic forcing, combined with distributed deep slip, constructively interfere near the western margin of the plate boundary zone, producing locally large strain accumulation along the San Andreas fault (SAF) system. However, they destructively interfere further into the plate interior, resulting in smaller and more variable strain accumulation patterns in the eastern part of the plate boundary zone. Much of the right-lateral strain accumulation along the SAF

  18. High Strain and Strain-Rate Behaviour of Ptfe/aluminuim/tungsten Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addiss, John; Cai, Jing; Walley, Stephen; Proud, William; Nesterenko, Vitali

    2007-12-01

    Conventional drop-weight techniques were modified to accommodate low-amplitude force transducer signals from low-strength, cold isostatically pressed `heavy' composites of polytetrafluoroethylene, aluminum and tungsten (W). The failure strength, strain and the post-critical behavior of failed samples were measured for samples of different porosity and tungsten grain size. Unusual phenomenon of significantly higher strength (55 MPa) of porous composites (density 5.9 g/cm3) with small W particles (compression.

  19. Modeling anisotropic plasticity: Eulerian hydrocode applications of high strain-rate deformation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clancy, S.P.; Burkett, M.W.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1997-05-01

    Previously developed constitutive models and solution algorithms for anisotropic elastoplastic material strength are implemented in the two-dimensional MESA hydrodynamics code. Quadratic yield functions fitted from polycrystal simulations for a metallic hexagonal-close-packed structure are utilized. An associative flow strength formulation incorporating these yield functions is solved using a geometric normal return method. A stretching rod problem is selected to investigate the effects of material anisotropy on a tensile plastic instability (necking). The rod necking rate and topology are compared for MESA simulations performed for both isotropic and anisotropic cases utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress flow stress model.

  20. High Strain Rate Mechanical Properties of Epoxy and Epoxy-Based Particulate Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    steel or 6061 -T6 aluminum. The striker is 305 mm long and made of the same material as the other bars. The samples, which were nominally 8 mm...Correlation in Discontinuously-Reinforced Aluminium Matrix Composites as a Function of Relative Particle Size Ratio. Mat. Sci. Eng., 2002. A337: p

  1. High Strain Rate Mechanical Properties of Epoxy and Epoxy-Based Particulate Composites (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    stainless steel or 6061 -T6 aluminum. The striker is 305 mm long and made of the same material as the other bars. The samples, which were nominally 8 mm...Property Correlation in Discontinuously-Reinforced Aluminium Matrix Composites as a Function of Relative Particle Size Ratio. Mat. Sci. Eng., 2002. A337: p

  2. High-Strain-Rate Constitutive Characterization and Modeling of Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-07

    impact fracture of carbon fiber reinforced 7075 -T6 aluminum matrix composite , Materials Transactions, Japan Institute of Metals, 41, 1055-1063...MODELING OF METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES Report Title The mechanical response of three different types of materials are examined: unidirectionally...conditions. This report also documents some of the highlights of the material response of Saffil filled aluminum matrix composite and a Nextel satin

  3. Deformation Mechanisms and High Strain Rate Properties of Magnesium (Mg) and Mg Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    matrix. The two interfaces are marked with bold white lines. The twinning plane can be identified as (1011) . Steps on the twin boundaries can...observed at the TBs (indicated by the arrows). The plot was made such that the atoms at the twin boundaries are highlighted in red, while other...pyramidal slip is on neither of the two twinning planes. pyramidal slip and the interfacial dynamics at the twin boundaries (TBs) (the results obtained

  4. Deformation and Shear Band Development in an Ultrahigh Carbon Steel During High Strain Rate Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D R; Syn, C K; Sherby, O D

    2004-07-06

    The mechanical response of a pearlitic UHCS-1.3C steel deformed at approximately 4000 s{sup -1} to large strains ({var_epsilon} = -0.9) has been studied. Failure, at both the macroscopic and the microscopic levels has been evaluated, and the ability of the material to absorb energy in compression has been examined. Failure occurred by the development of a shear band. However before failure, extensive buckling of the carbide plates was observed and the UHCS-1.3C material exhibited significant potential for compressive ductility and energy absorption due to the distributed buckling of these plates. Strain localization during adiabatic shear band development resulted in the formation of austenite. Subsequent cooling produced a divorced-eutectoid transformation with associated deformation, which resulted in a microstructure consisting of 50 to 100 nm sized grains. The stress-strain behavior within the shear band has also been determined. The results are used to critically evaluate the maximum shear stress criterion of shear band development. New criteria for the development of shear bands are developed based on a strain energy concept.

  5. On acquiring data for large-scale crack bridging at high strain rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard-Larsen, Christian; Massabò, R.; Cox, B.N.

    2012-01-01

    regimes of hammering and multiple cracking, which should be avoided when maximum information is sought. Information content is addressed by focusing on regimes within the full computed solution space where crack growth is approximately steady state and the information content of experiments can be most...... easily assessed. Numerical results show that the hypothetical rate dependence in the cohesive law causes strong and measurable changes in the regime of steady-state behavior, if the tests are properly selected to vary the crack sliding speed. The estimates of information content are conservative, because...... the information available from all possible tests of specimens designed by analysis of the steady-state regime will necessarily exceed the information deduced by analyzing the steady-state regime alone....

  6. High Strain-Rate and Quasi-Static Ductile Failure Mechanisms in Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    detailed understanding of the interrelated physical mechanisms that can result in ductile material failure in rate-dependent porous crystalline materials subjected...strains and slip-rates, and hydrostatic stresses on failure paths and ligament damage in face centered cubic (f.c.c.) crystalline materials have been

  7. The influence of acute unloading on left ventricular strain and strain rate by speckle tracking echocardiography in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, Geir Olav; Stangeland, Lodve; Moen, Christian Arvei; Salminen, Pirjo-Riitta; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil

    2016-05-15

    Noninvasive measurements of myocardial strain and strain rate by speckle tracking echocardiography correlate to cardiac contractile state but also to load, which may weaken their value as indices of inotropy. In a porcine model, we investigated the influence of acute dynamic preload reductions on left ventricular strain and strain rate and their relation to the pressure-conductance catheter-derived preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW) and peak positive first derivative of left ventricular pressure (LV-dP/dtmax). Speckle tracking strain and strain rate in the longitudinal, circumferential, and radial directions were measured during acute dynamic reductions of end-diastolic volume during three different myocardial inotropic states. Both strain and strain rate were sensitive to unloading of the left ventricle (P speckle tracking echocardiography-derived strain rate is more robust to dynamic ventricular unloading than strain. Longitudinal and circumferential strain could not predict load-independent contractility. Strain rates, and especially in the radial direction, are good predictors of preload-independent inotropic markers derived from conductance catheter. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Steady thermal stress and strain rates in a rotating circular cylinder under steady state temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Thakur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal stress and strain rates in a thick walled rotating cylinder under steady state temperature has been derived by using Seth’s transition theory. For elastic-plastic stage, it is seen that with the increase of temperature, the cylinder having smaller radii ratios requires lesser angular velocity to become fully plastic as compared to cylinder having higher radii ratios The circumferential stress becomes larger and larger with the increase in temperature. With increase in thickness ratio stresses must be decrease. For the creep stage, it is seen that circumferential stresses for incompressible materials maximum at the internal surface as compared to compressible material, which increase with the increase in temperature and measure n.

  9. On the Strain Rate Sensitivity of Abs and Abs Plus Fused Deposition Modeling Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairis, A.; Petousis, M.; Vidakis, N.; Savvakis, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this work the effect of strain rate on the tensile strength of fused deposition modeling parts built with Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and ABS plus material is presented. ASTM D638-02a specimens were built with ABS and ABS plus and they were tested on a Schenck Trebel Co. tensile test machine at three different test speeds, equal, lower, and higher to the test speed required by the ASTM D638-02a standard. The experimental tensile strength results were compared and evaluated. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope, to determine failure mode of the filament strands. It was found that, as the test speed increases, specimens develop higher tensile strength and have higher elastic modulus. Specimens tested in the highest speed of the experiment had on average about 10% higher elastic modulus and developed on average about 11% higher tensile strength.

  10. Thixoforming of Steel: New Tools Conception to Analyse Thermal Exchanges and Strain Rate Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezard, P.; Bigot, R.; Becker, E.; Mathieu, S.; Pierret, J. C.; Rassili, A.

    2007-04-01

    Through different papers, authors shown that the influence of thermal exchanges was a first order parameter on the semi-solid steel behaviour, and certainly for every semi-solid metallic materials. These thermal exchanges hide other parameters effect like, for example, the strain rate influence. This paper tries to determine the influence of these two parameters by using a new extrusion device on a hydraulic press. This new tools conception annihilated the influence of the decrease of the punch speed before stopping and permitted to have a constant speed during the experiment. This work also deals with the homogeneous flow during thixoforming of steel and shows the importance to couple initial temperature of the slug with punch speed. This paper presents different conditions which permitted to have a homogeneous flow by keeping a low load.

  11. Gurson-type elastic-plastic damage model based on strain-rate plastic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Tudor; Cazacu, Oana

    2013-12-01

    Ductile damage is generally described by stress-space analytical potentials. In this contribution, it is shown that strain rate potentials, which are exact conjugate of the stress-based potentials, can be equally used to describe the dilatational response of porous metals. This framework is particularly appropriate for porous materials with matrix described by complex yield criteria for which a closed-form expression of the stress-based potential is not available. Illustration of the new approach is done for porous metals containing randomly distributed spherical voids in a von Mises elasto-plastic matrix. Furthermore, a general time integration algorithm for simulation of the mechanical response using this new formulation is developed and implemented in Abaqus/Standard. The proposed model and algorithm are validated with respect to the Abaqus built-in GTN model, which is based on a stress potential, through the simulation of a tensile test on a round bar.

  12. Hydrogen embrittlement of duplex steel tested using slow strain rate test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vaňova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dealing with hydrogen embrittlement of austenitic-ferritic 2205 duplex steel using the slow strain rate test (SSRT. The original material was subjected to heat treatment under 700 °C during 5 hours and following aircooling with the aim of provoking sigma phase precipitation and embrittlement of the material. The samples of both states were electrolytic saturation with hydrogen in 0,1N solution of sulfuric acid (H2SO4 with addition KSCN during 24 hours. The hydrogen embrittlement appeared on fracture surfaces of tested tensile bars as a quasi-cleavage damage on their perimeter. From the established depth of hydrogen charging the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in duplex steel with ferritic-austenitic structure and with the structure containing the sigma phase as well were estimated.

  13. Transform method for laser speckle strain-rate measurements in biological tissues and biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Sean J.

    1999-03-01

    Laser speckle strain measurements in biological tissues and some synthetic biomaterials, such as translucent dental composites and ceramics, are often complicated by the physical properties of the materials. For example, speckles generated by illuminating soft biological tissue with laser light are subject to rapid decorrelation due to the Brownian movement of water and scattering particles in the tissues and to cellular motions. In addition, the penetration of the laser beam into the tissue or translucent biomaterial results in multiple scattering and a complete depolarization of the speckle field. This may complicate the evaluation of the strain field when a force is applied to the material because the speckle pattern shift is providing information from the surface of the material as well as from the bulk sample, where the strains may or may not be the same as on the surface. This paper presents a variation of a speckle processing scheme originally called the `Transform Method' for evaluating both surface and bulk strain rates and total strains in biological tissues and translucent biomaterials. The method is not a correlation-based technique, but instead relies upon 2D frequency transforms of time series of 1D speckle pattern records stacked into 2D arrays. The method is insensitive to speckle field depolarization and, compared to correlation-based techniques, is relatively insensitive to speckle decorrelation. Strain rates and total in-plane strains were measured in both hard (cortical bone) and soft (artery segments) biological tissues and in translucent biomaterials (dental ceramics). Potential applications to medical diagnostics and biomaterials science are also discussed.

  14. Associative Flow Rule Used to Include Hydrostatic Stress Effects in Analysis of Strain-Rate-Dependent Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2004-01-01

    experimental program carried out through a university grant with the Ohio State University, wherein tensile and shear deformation data were obtained for a representative polymer for strain rates ranging from quasi-static to high rates of several hundred per second. Tensile deformation data also were obtained over a variety of strain rates and fiber orientation angles for a representative polymer matrix composite composed using the polymer.

  15. Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Dialysis Patients Assessed by Novel Speckle Tracking Strain Rate Analysis: Prevalence and Determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihály K. de Bie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diastolic dysfunction is common among dialysis patients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Novel echocardiographic speckle tracking strain analysis permits accurate assessment of left ventricular diastolic function, independent of loading conditions and taking all myocardial segments into account. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of diastolic dysfunction in chronic dialysis patients using this novel technique, and to identify its determinants among clinical and echocardiographic variables. Methods. Patients currently enrolled in the ICD2 study protocol were included for this analysis. Next to conventional echo measurements diastolic function was also assessed by global diastolic strain rate during isovolumic relaxation (SRIVR. Results. A total of 77 patients were included (age 67±8 years, 74% male. When defined as E/SRIVR ≥236, the prevalence of diastolic dysfunction was higher compared to more conventional measurements (48% versus 39%. Left ventricular mass (OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00–1.04, P=0.014 and pulse wave velocity (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.07–1.68, P=0.01 were independent determinants of diastolic dysfunction. Conclusion. Diastolic dysfunction is highly prevalent among dialysis patients and might be underestimated using conventional measurements. Left ventricular mass and pulse wave velocity were the only determinants of diastolic dysfunction in these patients.

  16. Constitutive modeling of polycarbonate over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Zhou, Huamin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Yun; Zhao, Xiaoxuan

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of polycarbonate was experimentally investigated over a wide range of strain rates ( 10^{-4} to 5× 103 s^{-1}) and temperatures (293 to 353 K). Compression tests under these conditions were performed using a SHIMADZU universal testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar. Falling weight impact testing was carried out on an Instron Dynatup 9200 drop tower system. The rate- and temperature-dependent deformation behavior of polycarbonate was discussed in detail. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) tests were utilized to observe the glass ( α ) transition and the secondary ( β ) transition of polycarbonate. The DMA results indicate that the α and β transitions have a dramatic influence on the mechanical behavior of polycarbonate. The decompose/shift/reconstruct (DSR) method was utilized to decompose the storage modulus into the α and β components and extrapolate the entire modulus, the α-component modulus and the β-component modulus. Based on three previous models, namely, Mulliken-Boyce, G'Sell-Jonas and DSGZ, an adiabatic model is proposed to predict the mechanical behavior of polycarbonate. The model considers the contributions of both the α and β transitions to the mechanical behavior, and it has been implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit through a user material subroutine VUMAT. The model predictions are proven to essentially coincide with the experimental results during compression testing and falling weight impact testing.

  17. The effect of an acute bout of resistance exercise on carotid artery strain and strain rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jane M; Stöhr, Eric J; Stone, Keeron; Pugh, Christopher J A; Stembridge, Mike; Shave, Rob; Esformes, Joseph I

    2016-09-01

    Arterial wall mechanics likely play an integral role in arterial responses to acute physiological stress. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the impact of low and moderate intensity double-leg press exercise on common carotid artery (CCA) wall mechanics using 2D vascular strain imaging. Short-axis CCA ultrasound images were collected in 15 healthy men (age: 21 ± 3 years; stature: 176.5 ± 6.2 cm; body mass; 80.6 ± 15.3 kg) before, during, and immediately after short-duration isometric double-leg press exercise at 30% and 60% of participants' one-repetition maximum (1RM: 317 ± 72 kg). Images were analyzed for peak circumferential strain (PCS), peak systolic and diastolic strain rate (S-SR and D-SR), and arterial diameter. Heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) were simultaneously assessed and arterial stiffness indices were calculated post hoc. A two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed that during isometric contraction, PCS and S-SR decreased significantly (P exercise (P exercise is therefore associated with similar transient changes in CCA wall mechanics at low and moderate intensities. CCA wall mechanics likely provide additional insight into localized intrinsic vascular wall properties beyond current measures of arterial stiffness.

  18. Constitutive modeling of polycarbonate over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Zhou, Huamin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Yun; Zhao, Xiaoxuan

    2017-02-01

    The mechanical behavior of polycarbonate was experimentally investigated over a wide range of strain rates (10^{-4} to 5× 103 s^{-1}) and temperatures (293 to 353 K). Compression tests under these conditions were performed using a SHIMADZU universal testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar. Falling weight impact testing was carried out on an Instron Dynatup 9200 drop tower system. The rate- and temperature-dependent deformation behavior of polycarbonate was discussed in detail. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) tests were utilized to observe the glass (α ) transition and the secondary (β ) transition of polycarbonate. The DMA results indicate that the α and β transitions have a dramatic influence on the mechanical behavior of polycarbonate. The decompose/shift/reconstruct (DSR) method was utilized to decompose the storage modulus into the α and β components and extrapolate the entire modulus, the α-component modulus and the β-component modulus. Based on three previous models, namely, Mulliken-Boyce, G'Sell-Jonas and DSGZ, an adiabatic model is proposed to predict the mechanical behavior of polycarbonate. The model considers the contributions of both the α and β transitions to the mechanical behavior, and it has been implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit through a user material subroutine VUMAT. The model predictions are proven to essentially coincide with the experimental results during compression testing and falling weight impact testing.

  19. Accuracy of heart strain rate calculation derived from Doppler tissue velocity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Andres; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.; Malpica, Norberto; Desco, Manuel; Antoranz, Jose C.; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel A.

    2001-05-01

    Strain Rate (SR) Imaging is a recent imaging technique that provides information about regional myocardial deformation by measuring local compression and expansion rates. SR can be obtained by calculating the local in-plane velocity gradients along the ultrasound beam from Doppler Tissue velocity data. However, SR calculations are very dependent on the image noise and artifacts, and different calculation algorithms may provide inconsistent results. This paper compares techniques to calculate SR. 2D Doppler Tissue Images (DTI) are acquired with an Acuson Sequoia scanner. Noise was measured with the aid of a rotating phantom. Processing is performed on polar coordinates. For each image, after removal of black spot artifacts by a selective median filter, two different SR calculation methods have been implemented. In the first one, SR is computed as the discrete velocity derivative, and noise is reduced with a variable-width gaussian filter. In the second method a smoothing cubic spine is calculated for every scan line according to the noise level and the derivative is obtained from an analytical expression. Both methods have been tested with DTI data from synthetic phantoms and normal volunteers. Results show that noise characteristics, border effects and the adequate scale are critical to obtain meaningful results.

  20. Electrical properties of nanoscale metallic thin films on dielectric elastomer at various strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Md. Shahnewaz Sabit; Ye, Zhihang; Chen, Zheng; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have significant applications in artificial muscle and other biomedical equipment and device fabrications. Metallic thin films by thin film transfer and sputter coating techniques can provide conductive surfaces on the DE samples, and can be used as electrodes for the actuators and other biomedical sensing devices. In the present study, 3M VHB 4910 tape was used as a DE for the coating and electrical characterization tests. A 150 nm thickness of gold was coated on the DE surfaces by sputter coating under vacuum with different pre-strains, ranging from 0 to 100%. Some of the thin films were transferred to the surface of the DEs. Sputter coating, and direct transferring gold leaf coating methods were studied and the results were analyzed in detail in terms of the strain rates and electrical resistivity changes. Initial studies indicated that the metallic surfaces remain conductive even though the DE films were considerably elongated. The coated DEs can be used as artificial muscle by applying electrical stimulation through the conductive surfaces. This study may provide great benefits to the readers, researchers, as well as companies involved in manufacturing of artificial muscles and actuators using smart materials.

  1. Influence of strain rate on the twin and slip activity of a magnesium alloy containing neodymium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudamell, N.V. [IMDEA Materials Institute, C/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Hidalgo-Manrique, P., E-mail: paloma.hidalgo@imdea.org [IMDEA Materials Institute, C/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Chakkedath, A.; Chen, Z.; Boehlert, C.J. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1226 (United States); Gálvez, F. [ETS Ingenieros de Caminos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Yi, S.; Bohlen, J.; Letzig, D. [Magnesium Innovation Centre, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Pérez-Prado, M.T. [IMDEA Materials Institute, C/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-20

    The mechanical behavior of an extruded magnesium–manganese alloy containing 1 wt% of neodymium (MN11) has been investigated at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 400 °C at both quasi-static and dynamic rates. Conventional ex-situ tests, carried out in compression along the extrusion axis (EA), have been combined with in-situ tests in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to elucidate the effect of a rare earth (RE) addition on the dominant deformation mechanisms. An unusually large activity of twinning was observed at room temperature in a wide range of quasi-static rates. Furthermore, the twinning activity has been found to increase at temperatures around 250 °C, where clear signs of dynamic strain aging (DSA) are also apparent. The enhanced twinning activity compared to conventional Mg alloys, not containing RE elements, is attributed to an increase in the critical resolved shear stress of basal slip (CRSS{sub basal}) due to the presence of intermetallic RE-containing particles and to the Nd atoms in solid solution. The surprising decrease of the twinning activity at dynamic rates (∼10{sup 3} s{sup −1}) may be explained by a decrease in the CRSS{sub basal} as the intermetallic RE-containg particles and the Nd solid solution strengthening become less effective with increasing strain rate.

  2. Strain rate dependence of the flow stress and work hardening of {gamma}`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezz, S.S. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Sun, Y.Q. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Hirsch, P.B. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    1995-02-15

    The strain rate ({epsilon}) sensitivity of the flow stress ({tau}), {beta}=({delta}{tau}/{delta} ln{epsilon}), of crystals of {gamma}` in the temperature (T) range of the yield stress anomaly obeys a Cottrell-Stokes law when plotted against {tau}{sub h}={tau}-{tau}{sub y}, where {tau}{sub y} is the yield stress at 0.01% strain. The slopes are approximately 1%, decrease with increasing T and are approximately independent of orientation. {tau}{sub h} is due to work hardening and depends on the prestrain {epsilon}, {epsilon} and T. Transmission electron microscopy observations suggest that at 2% strain at 600 K and 720 K, {tau}{sub h} and {beta} are mainly controlled by forest obstacles. At 600 K, the forest consists largely of [101] dislocations on the (010) cross slip plane threading the (111) planes and generated by bowing of the [101] primary screws (Kear-Wilsdorf locks). At 720 K, the forest is