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Sample records for high-chlorophyll autotrophic merrimack

  1. 2012 FEMA Risk Map Lidar: Merrimack River Watershed (Massachusetts, New Hampshire)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are the lidar points collected for FEMA Risk Mapping, Assessment, and Planning (Risk MAP) for the Merrimack River Watershed. This area falls in portions...

  2. Scoping of Flood Hazard Mapping Needs for Merrimack County, New Hampshire

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flynn, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    This report was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New Hampshire/VermontWater Science Center for scoping of flood-hazard mapping needs for Merrimack County, New Hampshire, under Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA...

  3. Freshwater autotrophic picoplankton: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. STOCKNER

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Autotrophic picoplankton (APP are distributed worldwide and are ubiquitous in all types of lakes of varying trophic state. APP are major players in carbon production in all aquatic ecosystems, including extreme environments such as cold ice-covered and/or warm tropical lakes and thermal springs. They often form the base of complex microbial food webs, becoming prey for a multitude of protozoan and micro-invertebrate grazers, that effectively channel APP carbon to higher trophic levels including fish. In this review we examine the existing literature on freshwater autotrophic picoplankton, setting recent findings and current ecological issues within an historic framework, and include a description of the occurrence and distribution of both single-cell and colonial APP (picocyanobacteria in different types of lakes. In this review we place considerable emphasis on methodology and ecology, including sampling, counting, preservation, molecular techniques, measurement of photosynthesis, and include extensive comment on their important role in microbial food webs. The model outlined by Stockner of an increase of APP abundance and biomass and a decrease of its relative importance with the increase of phosphorus concentration in lakes has been widely accepted, and only recently confirmed in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Nevertheless the relationship which drives the APP presence and importance in lakes of differing trophic status appears with considerable variation so we must conclude that the success of APP in oligotrophic lakes worldwide is not a certainty but highly probable.

  4. Culture of a high-chlorophyll-producing and halotolerant Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Koichi; Deuchi, Keiji

    2014-05-01

    In order to increase the value of freshwater algae as raw ingredients for health foods and feed for seawater-based farmed fish, we sought to breed high-chlorophyll halotolerant Chlorella with the objective of generating strains with both high chlorophyll concentrations (≥ 5%) and halotolerance (up to 1% NaCl). We used the Chlorella vulgaris K strain in our research institute culture collection and induced mutations with UV irradiation and acriflavine which is known to effect mutations of mitochondrial DNA that are associated with chlorophyll production. Screenings were conducted on seawater-based "For Chlorella spp." (FC) agar medium, and dark-green-colored colonies were visually selected by macroscopic inspection. We obtained a high-chlorophyll halotolerant strain (designated C. vulgaris M-207A7) that had a chlorophyll concentration of 6.7% (d.m.), a level at least three-fold higher than that of K strain. This isolate also exhibited a greater survival rate in seawater that of K strain. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Availability of ground water in the middle Merrimack River basin, central and southern New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Sufficient amounts of water to supply single family homes are available from the bedrock aquifer nearly everywhere in the middle Merrimack River basin in central and southern New Hampshire. Relatively this and narrow, unconsolidated aquifers of sand or sand and gravel commonly capable of yielding more than 200 gallons per minute to properly located and constructed wells are found only in major stream valleys. The map provides a preliminary assessment of the availability of ground water in the basin, as determined by estimating the capability of the aquifers to store and transmit water. On the map, aquifers are rated as having high, medium, or low potential to yield water. Ground water in the middle Merrimack River basin is generally of good chemical quality. Most of it is clear and colorless, contains no suspended matter and practically no bacteria, water may be affected by land-use practices. Degradation of water quality may occur in unsewered residential and village areas, near solid-waste-disposal sites, agricultural land, and major highways. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Clostridium difficile is an autotrophic bacterial pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Köpke

    Full Text Available During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile.

  7. Pharmaceutical compounds in Merrimack River water used for public supply, Lowell, Massachusetts, 2008-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Andrew J.; Waldron, Marcus C.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents results of a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, to determine the occurrence of 14 commonly used human-health pharmaceutical compounds and fecal-indicator bacteria in Merrimack River water used as a drinking-water source by 135,000 residents in eastern Massachusetts. The study was designed to complement the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program's Source Water-Quality Assessment, which identifies patterns of occurrence of 280 primarily unregulated organic wastewater contaminants in source water used by community water systems and determines whether these patterns also occur in treated drinking water prior to distribution. The study involved periodic collection and analysis of raw Merrimack River water and treated drinking water over the course of 1 year. Water samples were collected periodically without regard to flow regime or antecedent weather conditions at the Lowell Regional Water Utility's Merrimack River intake upstream from Lowell, Mass. The same parcel of water was then sampled as finished water following treatment. Despite the presence of many potential sources of contamination in the drinking-water source area, only 2 of the 14 pharmaceutical analytes were detected at reportable concentrations in the source-water samples, and these occurred in only one set of periodic samples. Acetaminophen, a nonprescription analgesic, and caffeine were detected in the September source-water samples at concentrations of 0.084 and 0.068 micrograms per liter, respectively. Three other compounds-carbamazepine, an antiepileptic; cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine; and diphenhydramine, a nonprescription antihistamine-were detected in source-water samples, but at concentrations too low to be reliably quantified. None of the 14 pharmaceuticals was found in the finished water at a reportable concentration, defined as two times the long-term detection

  8. Extracellular Electron Uptake: Among Autotrophs and Mediated by Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Angenent, Largus T.; Zhang, Tian

    2017-01-01

    Autotrophic microbes can acquire electrons from solid donors such as steel, other microbial cells, or electrodes. Based on this feature, bioprocesses are being developed for the microbial electrosynthesis (MES) of useful products from the greenhouse gas CO2. Extracellular electron-transfer mechan......Autotrophic microbes can acquire electrons from solid donors such as steel, other microbial cells, or electrodes. Based on this feature, bioprocesses are being developed for the microbial electrosynthesis (MES) of useful products from the greenhouse gas CO2. Extracellular electron......; or (iii) mediator-generating enzymes detached from cells. This review explores the interactions of autotrophs with solid electron donors and their importance in nature and for biosustainable technologies....

  9. An Adaptive Laboratory Evolution Method to Accelerate Autotrophic Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Tian; Tremblay, Pier-Luc

    2018-01-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) is an approach enabling the development of novel characteristics in microbial strains via the application of a constant selection pressure. This method is also an efficient tool to acquire insights on molecular mechanisms responsible for specific phenotypes. ALE...... autotrophically and reducing CO2 into acetate more efficiently. Strains developed via this ALE method were also used to gain knowledge on the autotrophic metabolism of S. ovata as well as other acetogenic bacteria....

  10. Estimating autotrophic respiration in streams using daily metabolism data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the fraction of gross primary production (GPP) that is immediately respired by autotrophs and their closely associated heterotrophs (ARf) is necessary to understand the trophic base and carbon spiraling in streams. We show a means to estimate ARf from daily metabolism da...

  11. Integrating anammox with the autotrophic denitrification process via electrochemistry technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Sen; Yin, Xin; Zhou, Jiti; Wei, Li'e; Zhong, Jiayou

    2018-03-01

    In this study, an autotrophic denitrification process was successfully coupled with anammox to remove the nitrate by-product via electrochemical technology. When the voltage applied to the combined electrode reactor was 1.5 V, the electrode reaction removed nitrate by using the autotrophic denitrification biomass without affecting the anammox biomass. The nitrogen removal efficiency of the combined electrode reactor reached 99.1% without detectable nitrate at an influent NO 2 - -N/NH 4 + -N ratio of 1.5. On day 223, using the model calculations based on reaction equations, 19.7% of total nitrogen was removed via the autotrophic denitrification process, while the majority of nitrogen removal (approximately 79.4%) was attributed to the anammox reaction. Small variations of the population numbers and community structure of artificial bacteria according to electron microscopy predicted that the anammox and autotrophic denitrifying biomasses could coexist in the electrode reactor. Then, 16S rRNA analysis determined that the anammox biomass group was always dominant in mixed flora during continuous cultivation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Autotrophic acetyl coenzyme A biosynthesis in Methanococcus maripaludis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, J.; Whitman, W.B.

    1988-01-01

    To detect autotrophic CO 2 assimilation in cell extracts of Methanococcus maripaludis, lactate dehydrogenase and NADH were added to convert pyruvate formed from autotropically synthesized acetyl coenzyme A to lactate. The lactate produced was determined spectrophotometrically. When CO 2 fixation was pulled in the direction of lactate synthesis, CO 2 reduction to methane was inhibited. Bromoethanesulfonate (BES), a potent inhibitor of methanogenesis, enhanced lactate synthesis, and methyl coenzyme M inhibited it in the absence of BES. Lactate synthesis was dependent on CO 2 and H 2 , but H 2 + CO 2 -independent synthesis was also observed. In cell extracts, the rate of lactate synthesis was about 1.2 nmol min -1 mg of protein -1 . When BES was added, the rate of lactate synthesis increased to 2.1 nmol min -1 mg of protein -1 . Because acetyl coenzyme A did not stimulate lactate synthesis, pyruvate synthase may have been the limiting activity in these assays. Radiolabel from 14 CO 2 was incorporated into lactate. The percentages of radiolabel in the C-1, C-2, and C-3 positions of lactate were 73, 33, and 11%, respectively. Both carbon monoxide and formaldehyde stimulated lactate synthesis. 14 CH 2 O was specifically incorporated into the C-3 of lactate, and 14 CO was incorporated into the C-1 and C-2 positions. Low concentrations of cyanide also inhibited autotrophic growth, CO dehydrogenase activity, and autotrophic lactate synthesis. These observations are in agreement with the acetogenic pathway of autotrophic CO 2 assimilation

  13. Autotrophic stoichiometry emerging from optimality and variable co-limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai W Wirtz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Autotrophic organisms reveal an astounding flexibility in their elemental stoichiometry, with potentially major implications on biogeochemical cycles and ecological functioning. Notwithstanding, stoichiometric regulation and co-limitation by multiple resources in autotrophs revt were in the past often described by heuristic formulations.In this study, we present a mechanistic model of autotroph growth, which features two major improvements over the existing schemes. First, we introduce the concept of metabolic network independence that defines the degree of phase-locking between accessory machines. Network independence is in particular suggested to be proportional to protein synthesis capability as quantified by variable intracellular N:C. Consequently, the degree of co-limitation becomes variable, contrasting with the dichotomous debate on the use of Liebig's law or the product rule, standing for constantly low and high co-limitation, respectively. Second, we resolve dynamic protein partitioning to light harvesting, carboxylation processes, and to an arbitrary number of nutrient acquisition machineries, as well as instantaneous activity regulation of nutrient uptake. For all regulatory processes we assume growth rate optimality, here extended by an explicit consideration of indirect feed-back effects.The combination of network independence and optimal regulation displays unprecedented skill in reproducing rich stoichiometric patterns collected from a large number of published chemostat experiments. This high skill indicates (1 that the current paradigm of fixed co-limitation is a critical short-coming of conventional models, and (2 that stoichiometric flexibility in autotrophs possibly reflects an optimality strategy. Numerical experiments furthermore show that regulatory mechanisms homogenize the effect of multiple stressors. Extended optimality alleviates the effect of the most limiting resource(s while down-regulating machineries for the

  14. Partitioning autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration at Howland Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Mariah; Hollinger, Dave; Davidson, Eric; Savage, Kathleen; Hughes, Holly

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem respiration is the combined flux of CO2 to the atmosphere from above- and below-ground, plant (autotrophic) and microbial (heterotrophic) sources. Flux measurements alone (e.g., from eddy covariance towers or soil chambers) cannot distinguish the contributions from these sources, which may change seasonally and respond differently to temperature and moisture. The development of improved process-based models that can predict how plants and microbes respond to changing environmental conditions (on seasonal, interannual, or decadal timescales) requires data from field observations and experiments to distinguish among these respiration sources. We tested the viability of partitioning of soil and ecosystem respiration into autotrophic and heterotrophic components with different approaches at the Howland Forest in central Maine, USA. These include an experimental manipulation using the classic root trenching approach and targeted ∆14CO2 measurements. For the isotopic measurements, we used a two-end member mass balance approach to determine the fraction of soil respiration from autotrophic and heterotrophic sources. When summed over the course of the growing season, the trenched chamber flux (heterotrophic) accounted for 53 ± 2% of the total control chamber flux. Over the four different 14C sampling periods, the heterotrophic component ranged from 35-55% and the autotrophic component ranges 45-65% of the total flux. Next steps will include assessing the value of the flux partitioning for constraining a simple ecosystem model using a model-data fusion approach to reduce uncertainties in estimates of NPP and simulation of future soil C stocks and fluxes.

  15. Estimated sand and gravel resources of the South Merrimack, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, 7.5-minute quadrangle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutphin, D.M.; Drew, L.J.; Fowler, B.K.

    2006-01-01

    A computer methodology is presented that allows natural aggregate producers, local governmental, and nongovernmental planners to define specific locations that may have sand and gravel deposits meeting user-specified minimum size, thickness, and geographic and geologic criteria, in areas where the surficial geology has been mapped. As an example, the surficial geologic map of the South Merrimack quadrangle was digitized and several digital geographic information system databases were downloaded from the internet and used to estimate the sand and gravel resources in the quadrangle. More than 41 percent of the South Merrimack quadrangle has been mapped as having sand and (or) gravel deposited by glacial meltwaters. These glaciofluvial areas are estimated to contain a total of 10 million m3 of material mapped as gravel, 60 million m3 of material mapped as mixed sand and gravel, and another 50 million m3 of material mapped as sand with minor silt. The mean thickness of these areas is about 1.95 meters. Twenty tracts were selected, each having individual areas of more than about 14 acres4 (5.67 hectares) of stratified glacial-meltwater sand and gravel deposits, at least 10-feet (3.0 m) of material above the watertable, and not sterilized by the proximity of buildings, roads, streams and other bodies of water, or railroads. The 20 tracts are estimated to contain between about 4 and 10 million short tons (st) of gravel and 20 and 30 million st of sand. The five most gravel-rich tracts contain about 71 to 82 percent of the gravel resources in all 20 tracts and about 54-56 percent of the sand. Using this methodology, and the above criteria, a group of four tracts, divided by narrow areas sterilized by a small stream and secondary roads, may have the highest potential in the quadrangle for sand and gravel resources. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006.

  16. Identification of the autotrophic denitrifying community in nitrate removal reactors by DNA-stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Li, Jinlong; Cong, Yuan; Gao, Wei; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Desheng

    2017-04-01

    Autotrophic denitrification has attracted increasing attention for wastewater with insufficient organic carbon sources. Nevertheless, in situ identification of autotrophic denitrifying communities in reactors remains challenging. Here, a process combining micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification with high nitrate removal efficiency was presented. Two batch reactors were fed organic-free nitrate influent, with H 13 CO 3 - and H 12 CO 3 - as inorganic carbon sources. DNA-based stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used to obtain molecular evidence for autotrophic denitrifying communities. The results showed that the nirS gene was strongly labeled by H 13 CO 3 - , demonstrating that the inorganic carbon source was assimilated by autotrophic denitrifiers. High-throughput sequencing and clone library analysis identified Thiobacillus-like bacteria as the most dominant autotrophic denitrifiers. However, 88% of nirS genes cloned from the 13 C-labeled "heavy" DNA fraction showed low similarity with all culturable denitrifiers. These findings provided functional and taxonomical identification of autotrophic denitrifying communities, facilitating application of autotrophic denitrification process for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lipid-based liquid biofuels from autotrophic microalgae: energetic and environmental performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, L.

    2013-01-01

    Commercial cultivation of autotrophic microalgae for food production dates back to the 1950s. Autotrophic microalgae have also been proposed as a source for lipid-based liquid biofuels. As yet, there is no commercial production of such biofuels and estimated near-term prices are far in excess of

  18. Modeling how soluble microbial products (SMP) support heterotrophic bacteria in autotroph-based biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkey, Brian; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Chopp, David L.

    2009-01-01

    . In this paper, we develop and use a mathematical model to describe a model biofilm system that includes autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria and the key products produced by the bacteria. The model combines the methods of earlier multi-species models with a multi-component biofilm model in order to explore...... the interaction between species via exchange of soluble microbial products (SMP). We show that multiple parameter sets are able to describe the findings of experimental studies, and that heterotrophs growing on autotrophically produced SMP may pursue either r- or K-strategies to sustain themselves when SMP...... is their only substrate. We also show that heterotrophs can colonize some distance from the autotrophs and still be sustained by autotrophically produced SMP. This work defines the feasible range of parameters for utilization of SMP by heterotrophs and the nature of the interactions between autotrophs...

  19. Microbial diversity and autotrophic activity in Kamchatka hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Alexander Yu; Pimenov, Nikolay V; Rusanov, Igor I; Slobodkin, Alexander I; Slobodkina, Galina B; Tarnovetckii, Ivan Yu; Frolov, Evgeny N; Dubin, Arseny V; Perevalova, Anna A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2017-03-01

    Microbial communities of Kamchatka Peninsula terrestrial hot springs were studied using molecular, radioisotopic and cultural approaches. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments performed by means of high-throughput sequencing revealed that aerobic autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium (phylum Aquificae) dominated in a majority of streamers. Another widely distributed and abundant group was that of anaerobic bacteria of the genus Caldimicrobium (phylum Thermodesulfobacteria). Archaea of the genus Vulcanisaeta were abundant in a high-temperature, slightly acidic hot spring, where they were accompanied by numerous Nanoarchaeota, while the domination of uncultured Thermoplasmataceae A10 was characteristic for moderately thermophilic acidic habitats. The highest rates of inorganic carbon assimilation determined by the in situ incubation of samples in the presence of 14 C-labeled bicarbonate were found in oxygen-dependent streamers; in two sediment samples taken from the hottest springs this process, though much weaker, was found to be not dependent on oxygen. The isolation of anaerobic lithoautotrophic prokaryotes from Kamchatka hot springs revealed a wide distribution of the ability for sulfur disproportionation, a new lithoautotrophic process capable to fuel autonomous anaerobic ecosystems.

  20. Investigation of mixotrophic, heterotrophic, and autotrophic growth of Chlorella vulgaris under agricultural waste medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Mirzaie, M A; Kalbasi, M; Mousavi, S M; Ghobadian, B

    2016-01-01

    Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and its lipid production were investigated under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic conditions. Cheap agricultural waste molasses and corn steep liquor from industries were used as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Chlorella vulgaris grew remarkably under this agricultural waste medium, which resulted in a reduction in the final cost of the biodiesel production. Maximum dry weight of 2.62 g L(-1) was obtained in mixotrophic growth with the highest lipid concentration of 0.86 g L(-1). These biomass and lipid concentrations were, respectively, 140% and 170% higher than autotrophic growth and 300% and 1200% higher than heterotrophic growth. In mixotrophic growth, independent or simultaneous occurrence of autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms was investigated. The growth of the microalgae was observed to take place first heterotrophically to a minimum substrate concentration with a little fraction in growth under autotrophic metabolism, and then the cells grew more autotrophically. It was found that mixotrophic growth was not a simple combination of heterotrophic and autotrophic growth.

  1. A review of the global relationship among freshwater fish, autotrophic activity, and regional climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deines, Andrew M.; Bunnell, David B.; Rogers, Mark W.; Beard, T. Douglas; Taylor, William W.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between autotrophic activity and freshwater fish populations is an important consideration for ecologists describing trophic structure in aquatic communities, fisheries managers tasked with increasing sustainable fisheries development, and fish farmers seeking to maximize production. Previous studies of the empirical relationships of autotrophic activity and freshwater fish yield have found positive relationships but were limited by small sample sizes, small geographic scopes, and the inability to compare patterns among many types of measurement techniques. Individual studies and reviews have also lacked consistent consideration of regional climate factors which may inform relationships between fisheries and autotrophic activity. We compiled data from over 700 freshwater systems worldwide and used meta-analysis and linear models to develop a comprehensive global synthesis between multiple metrics of autotrophic activity, fisheries, and climate indicators. Our results demonstrate that multiple metrics of fish (i.e., catch per unit effort, yield, and production) increase with autotrophic activity across a variety of fisheries. At the global scale additional variation in this positive relationship can be ascribed to regional climate differences (i.e., temperature and precipitation) across systems. Our results provide a method and proof-of-concept for assessing inland fisheries production at the global scale, where current estimates are highly uncertain, and may therefore inform the continued sustainable use of global inland fishery resources.

  2. Isolation and characterization of autotrophic, hydrogen-utilizing, perchlorate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrout, Joshua D; Scheetz, Todd E; Casavant, Thomas L; Parkin, Gene F

    2005-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that perchlorate (ClO(4) (-)) can be degraded by some pure-culture and mixed-culture bacteria with the addition of hydrogen. This paper describes the isolation of two hydrogen-utilizing perchlorate-degrading bacteria capable of using inorganic carbon for growth. These autotrophic bacteria are within the genus Dechloromonas and are the first Dechloromonas species that are microaerophilic and incapable of growth at atmospheric oxygen concentrations. Dechloromonas sp. JDS5 and Dechloromonas sp. JDS6 are the first perchlorate-degrading autotrophs isolated from a perchlorate-contaminated site. Measured hydrogen thresholds were higher than for other environmentally significant, hydrogen-utilizing, anaerobic bacteria (e.g., halorespirers). The chlorite dismutase activity of these bacteria was greater for autotrophically grown cells than for cells grown heterotrophically on lactate. These bacteria used fumarate as an alternate electron acceptor, which is the first report of growth on an organic electron acceptor by perchlorate-reducing bacteria.

  3. Redox stratified biofilms to support completely autotrophic nitrogen removal: Principles and results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Smets, Barth F.

    liquid. If operated properly, MABRs yield compact and homogeneous redox-stratified biofilms capable of hosting side-by-side aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities. We have recently demonstrated that completely autotrophic nitrogen removal is feasible in MABRs at nitrogen removal rates as high as 5......After 10 years of pilot and full-scale studies, completely autotrophic nitrogen via coupled aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidation is now firmly established in the wastewater treatment community. The reasons for the popularization of the technology are numerous, but the most attractive....... The continuous and sustained inoculation of metabolically active anaerobic oxidizing bacteria from a biofilm reactor placed in the recirculation line of our MABRs showed to shorten considerably the onset of autotrophic nitrogen removal. However, the main hurdle keeping MABRs from attaining high removal...

  4. Diversity and distribution of autotrophic microbial community along environmental gradients in grassland soils on the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guangxia; Kong, Weidong; Liu, Jinbo; Zhao, Jingxue; Du, Haodong; Zhang, Xianzhou; Xia, Pinhua

    2015-10-01

    Soil microbial autotrophs play a significant role in CO2 fixation in terrestrial ecosystem, particularly in vegetation-constrained ecosystems with environmental stresses, such as the Tibetan Plateau characterized by low temperature and high UV. However, soil microbial autotrophic communities and their driving factors remain less appreciated. We investigated the structure and shift of microbial autotrophic communities and their driving factors along an elevation gradient (4400-5100 m above sea level) in alpine grassland soils on the Tibetan Plateau. The autotrophic microbial communities were characterized by quantitative PCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and cloning/sequencing of cbbL genes, encoding the large subunit for the CO2 fixation protein ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). High cbbL gene abundance and high RubisCO enzyme activity were observed and both significantly increased with increasing elevations. Path analysis identified that soil RubisCO enzyme causally originated from microbial autotrophs, and its activity was indirectly driven by soil water content, temperature, and NH4 (+) content. Soil autotrophic microbial community structure dramatically shifted along the elevation and was jointly driven by soil temperature, water content, nutrients, and plant types. The autotrophic microbial communities were dominated by bacterial autotrophs, which were affiliated with Rhizobiales, Burkholderiales, and Actinomycetales. These autotrophs have been well documented to degrade organic matters; thus, metabolic versatility could be a key strategy for microbial autotrophs to survive in the harsh environments. Our results demonstrated high abundance of microbial autotrophs and high CO2 fixation potential in alpine grassland soils and provided a novel model to identify dominant drivers of soil microbial communities and their ecological functions.

  5. Dynamics of autotrophic marine planktonic thaumarchaeota in the East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Anyi; Yang, Zao; Yu, Chang-Ping; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitous and abundant distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota in marine environments is now well documented, and their crucial role in the global nitrogen cycle has been highlighted. However, the potential contribution of Thaumarchaeota in the carbon cycle remains poorly understood. Here we present for the first time a seasonal investigation on the shelf region (bathymetry≤200 m) of the East China Sea (ECS) involving analysis of both thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA and autotrophy-related genes (acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene, accA). Quantitative PCR results clearly showed a higher abundance of thaumarchaeal 16S and accA genes in late-autumn (November) than summer (August), whereas the diversity and community structure of autotrophic Thaumarchaeota showed no statistically significant difference between different seasons as revealed by thaumarchaeal accA gene clone libraries. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that shallow ecotypes dominated the autotrophic Thaumarchaeota in the ECS shelf (86.3% of total sequences), while a novel non-marine thaumarchaeal accA lineage was identified in the Changjiang estuary in summer (when freshwater plumes become larger) but not in autumn, implying that Changjiang freshwater discharge played a certain role in transporting terrestrial microorganisms to the ECS. Multivariate statistical analysis indicated that the biogeography of the autotrophic Thaumarchaeota in the shelf water of the ECS was influenced by complex hydrographic conditions. However, an in silico comparative analysis suggested that the diversity and abundance of the autotrophic Thaumarchaeota might be biased by the 'universal' thaumarchaeal accA gene primers Cren529F/Cren981R since this primer set is likely to miss some members within particular phylogenetic groups. Collectively, this study improved our understanding of the biogeographic patterns of the autotrophic Thaumarchaeota in temperate coastal waters, and suggested that new accA primers with improved coverage

  6. Combined removal of sulfur compounds and nitrate by autotrophic denitrication in bioaugmented activated sludge system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manconi, I.; Carucci, A.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2007-01-01

    An autotrophic denitrification process using reduced sulfur compounds (thiosulfate and sulfide) as electron donor in an activated sludge system is proposed as an efficient and cost effective alternative to conventional heterotrophic denitrification for inorganic (or with low C/N ratio) wastewaters

  7. Control of SHARON reactor for autotrophic nitrogen removal in two-reactor configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valverde Perez, Borja; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    With the perspective of investigating a suitable control design for autotrophic nitrogen removal, this work explores the control design for a SHARON reactor. With this aim, a full model is developed, including the pH dependency, in order to simulate the reactor and determine the optimal operating...

  8. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    in plastic bags with subsequent melting and measurements of changes in total O2 concentrations. The standard incubations showed that the annual succession followed a distinctive pattern, with a low, almost balancing heterotrophic and autotrophic activity during February and March. This period was followed...

  9. Start-up strategies of membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) for completely autotrophic nitrogen removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Sheng-Peng; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Terada, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    Completely autotrophic nitrogen removal, coupling aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidation, can be achieved via redox stratified biofilms growing on gas-permeable membranes. These sequential reactions are mediated by aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB and AnAOB). The major...

  10. Performance of an autotrophic nitrogen removing reactor: Diagnosis through fuzzy logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Mutlu, Ayten Gizem

    Autotrophic nitrogen removal through nitritation-anammox in one stage SBRs is an energy and cost efficient alternative to conventional treatment methods. Intensification of an already complex biological system challenges our ability to observe, understand, diagnose, and control the system. A fuzzy...

  11. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stephanie; Gülay, Arda

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration...

  12. Incremental design of control system of SHARON-Anammox process for autotrophic nitrogen removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Valverde Perez, Borja; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    With the perspective of investigating a suitable control design for autotrophic nitrogen removal, this work explores the control design for a SHARON-Anammox reactor sequence. With this aim, a full model is developed, including the pH dependency, in order to simulate the reactor and determine...

  13. A fuzzy-logic based diagnosis and control of a reactor performing complete autotrophic nitrogen removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Gernaey, Krist

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis and control modules based on fuzzy set theory were tested for novel bioreactor monitoring and control. Two independent modules were used jointly to carry out first the diagnosis of the state of the system and then use transfer this information to control the reactor. The separation in d...... autotrophic nitrogen removal process. The whole module is evaluated by dynamic simulation....

  14. Regulation of carbon dioxide fixation in facultatively autotrophic bacteria. A phisiological and genetical study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Wilhelmus Gerhardus

    1990-01-01

    Autotrophic bactcria are capable of CO2 fixation via the Calvin cycle, emplofng energy derived from the oxidation of anorganic substrates (e.g. Hz), simple organic substrates (one-carbon compounds, e.g. methanol, formate), or from light. Ribulose-1,5-bisphospbate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisC/O),

  15. Separating Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Respiration in Streams and the Importance for Carbon Cycling: a Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, M.; Raymond, P.

    2005-05-01

    Autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms confer different effects on nutrient cycling, especially on carbon (C). In stream ecosystems, net ecosystem production determines the amount and form of C exported; however any transformation due to different respiratory (R) mechanisms are not separated. These mechanisms highly influence the form and lability of the C transported. To understand the current state of knowledge and estimate the importance of autotrophic versus heterotrophic R, we obtained a range of respiratory rates from the literature and modeled effects of different balances of rates on bulk dissolved inorganic and organic C chemistry. Preliminary results show that a wide range of estimates of autotrophic R exist and that these can effect bulk properties of exported C. While specific effects are highly dependent upon physical structure of the study watershed, we offer that separating R mechanisms provides further insight into ecosystem C cycling. We also propose a method to measure autotrophic and heterotrophic R at the ecosystem scale and obtain watershed-level estimates of the importance of these processes on C cycling.

  16. Uptake, Accumulation and Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticle in Autotrophic Plants, and Heterotrophic Microbes: A Concentric Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Durgesh K.; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Shweta; Singh, Swati; Singh, Yashwant; Vishwakarma, Kanchan; Yadav, Gaurav; Sharma, Shivesh; Singh, Vivek K.; Mishra, Rohit K.; Upadhyay, R. G.; Dubey, Nawal K.; Lee, Yonghoon; Chauhan, Devendra K.

    2017-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a cutting-edge field of science with the potential to revolutionize today’s technological advances including industrial applications. It is being utilized for the welfare of mankind; but at the same time, the unprecedented use and uncontrolled release of nanomaterials into the environment poses enormous threat to living organisms. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used in several industries and its continuous release may hamper many physiological and biochemical processes in the living organisms including autotrophs and heterotrophs. The present review gives a concentric know-how of the effects of AgNPs on the lower and higher autotrophic plants as well as on heterotrophic microbes so as to have better understanding of the differences in effects among these two groups. It also focuses on the mechanism of uptake, translocation, accumulation in the plants and microbes, and resulting toxicity as well as tolerance mechanisms by which these microorganisms are able to survive and reduce the effects of AgNPs. This review differentiates the impact of silver nanoparticles at various levels between autotrophs and heterotrophs and signifies the prevailing tolerance mechanisms. With this background, a comprehensive idea can be made with respect to the influence of AgNPs on lower and higher autotrophic plants together with heterotrophic microbes and new insights can be generated for the researchers to understand the toxicity and tolerance mechanisms of AgNPs in plants and microbes. PMID:28184215

  17. Compared microbiology of granular sludge under autotrophic, mixotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, N; Sierra-Alvarez, R; Amils, R; Field, J A; Sanz, J L

    2009-01-01

    Water contamination by nitrate is a wideworld extended phenomena. Biological autotrophic denitrification has a real potential to face this problem and presents less drawbacks than the most extended heterotrophic denitrification. Three bench-scale UASB reactors were operated under autotrophic (R1, H2S as electron donor), mixotrophic (R2, H2S plus p-cresol as electron donors) and heterotrophic (R3, p-cresol as electron donor) conditions using nitrate as terminal electron acceptor. 16S rDNA genetic libraries were built up to compare their microbial biodiversity. Six different bacteria phyla and three archaeal classes were observed. Proteobacteria was the main phyla in all reactors standing out the presence of denitrifiers. Microorganisms similar to Thiobacillus denitrificans and Acidovorax sp. performed the autotrophic denitification. These OTUs were displaced by chemoheterotrophic denitrifiers, especially by Limnobacter-like and Ottowia-like OTUs. Other phyla were Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria that--as well as Archaea members--were implicated in the degradation of organic matter, as substrate added as coming from endogenous sludge decay under autotrophic conditions. Archaea diversity remained low in all the reactors being Methanosaeta concilii the most abundant one.

  18. Model-based optimization biofilm based systems performing autotrophic nitrogen removal using the comprehensive NDHA model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valverde Pérez, Borja; Ma, Yunjie; Morset, Martin

    Completely autotrophic nitrogen removal (CANR) can be obtained in single stage biofilm-based bioreactors. However, their environmental footprint is compromised due to elevated N2O emissions. We developed novel spatially explicit biochemical process model of biofilm based CANR systems that predicts...

  19. Autotrophic nitrogen removal from low strength waste water at low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Wang, Y.; Kampman, C.; Zeeman, G.; Temmink, B.G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2012-01-01

    Direct anaerobic treatment of municipal waste waters allows for energy recovery in the form of biogas. A further decrease in the energy requirement for waste water treatment can be achieved by removing the ammonium in the anaerobic effluent with an autotrophic process, such as anammox. Until now,

  20. Development of biological platform for the autotrophic production of biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nymul

    of the current status of metabolic engineering of chemolithoautotrophs is carried out in order to identify the challenges and likely routes to overcome them. This is presented in Chapter 3 of this dissertation. The initial metabolic engineering and bioreactor studies was carried out using a number of gene-constructs on R. capsulatus and R. eutropha. The gene-constructs consisted of Plac promoter followed by the triterpene synthase genes (SS or BS) and other upstream genes. A comparison of the production of triterpenes were done in the different growth modes that R. capsulatus was capable of growing---aerobic heterotrophic, anaerobic photoheterotrophic and aerobic chemoautotrophic. Autotrophic productivity could likely be improved much further by increasing the available mass-transfer of the reactor. These efforts are presented in Chapter 4 of this dissertation. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  1. Detection of autotrophic verrucomicrobial methanotrophs in a geothermal environment using stable isotope probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eSharp

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Genomic analysis of the methanotrophic verrucomicrobium Methylacidiphilum infernorum strain V4 has shown that most pathways conferring its methanotrophic lifestyle are similar to those found in proteobacterial methanotrophs. However, due to the large sequence divergence of its methane monooxygenase-encoding genes (pmo, ‘universal’ pmoA polymerase chain reaction (PCR primers do not target these bacteria. Unlike proteobacterial methanotrophs, Methylacidiphilum fixes carbon autotrophically, and uses methane only for energy generation. As a result, techniques used to detect methanotrophs in the environment such as 13CH4-stable isotope probing (SIP and pmoA-targeted PCR do not detect verrucomicrobial methanotrophs, and they may have been overlooked in previous environmental studies. We developed a modified SIP technique to identify active methanotrophic verrucomicrobia in the environment by labelling with 13CO2 and 13CH4, individually and in combination. Testing the protocol in M. infernorum strain V4 resulted in assimilation of 13CO2 but not 13CH4, verifying its autotrophic lifestyle. To specifically detect methanotrophs (as opposed to other autotrophs via 13CO2-SIP, a quantitative PCR (qPCR assay specific for verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes was developed and used in combination with SIP. Incubation of an acidic, high-temperature geothermal soil with 13CH4 + 12CO2 caused little shift in the density distribution of verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes relative to controls. However, labelling with 13CO2 in combination with 12CH4 or 13CH4 induced a strong shift in the distribution of verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes towards the heavy DNA fractions. The modified SIP technique demonstrated that the primary methanotrophs active in the soil were autotrophs and belonged to the Verrucomicrobia. This is the first demonstration of autotrophic, non-proteobacterial methanotrophy in situ, and provides a tool to detect verrucomicrobial methanotrophs in other ecosystems.

  2. Detection of autotrophic verrucomicrobial methanotrophs in a geothermal environment using stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Christine E; Stott, Matthew B; Dunfield, Peter F

    2012-01-01

    Genomic analysis of the methanotrophic verrucomicrobium "Methylacidiphilum infernorum" strain V4 has shown that most pathways conferring its methanotrophic lifestyle are similar to those found in proteobacterial methanotrophs. However, due to the large sequence divergence of its methane monooxygenase-encoding genes (pmo), "universal" pmoA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers do not target these bacteria. Unlike proteobacterial methanotrophs, "Methylacidiphilum" fixes carbon autotrophically, and uses methane only for energy generation. As a result, techniques used to detect methanotrophs in the environment such as (13)CH(4)-stable isotope probing (SIP) and pmoA-targeted PCR do not detect verrucomicrobial methanotrophs, and they may have been overlooked in previous environmental studies. We developed a modified SIP technique to identify active methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia in the environment by labeling with (13)CO(2) and (13)CH(4), individually and in combination. Testing the protocol in "M. infernorum" strain V4 resulted in assimilation of (13)CO(2) but not (13)CH(4), verifying its autotrophic lifestyle. To specifically detect methanotrophs (as opposed to other autotrophs) via (13)CO(2)-SIP, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay specific for verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes was developed and used in combination with SIP. Incubation of an acidic, high-temperature geothermal soil with (13)CH(4) + (12)CO(2) caused little shift in the density distribution of verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes relative to controls. However, labeling with (13)CO(2) in combination with (12)CH(4) or (13)CH(4) induced a strong shift in the distribution of verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes towards the heavy DNA fractions. The modified SIP technique demonstrated that the primary methanotrophs active in the soil were autotrophs and belonged to the Verrucomicrobia. This is the first demonstration of autotrophic, non-proteobacterial methanotrophy in situ, and provides a tool to detect verrucomicrobial methanotrophs

  3. Sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic and mixotrophic denitrification processes for drinking water treatment: elimination of excess sulfate production and alkalinity requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Dursun, Nesrin

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated the elimination of alkalinity need and excess sulfate generation of sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification process by stimulating simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic (mixotrophic) denitrification process in a column bioreactor by methanol supplementation. Also, denitrification performances of sulfur-based autotrophic and mixotrophic processes were compared. In autotrophic process, acidity produced by denitrifying sulfur-oxidizing bacteria was neutralized by the external NaHCO(3) supplementation. After stimulating mixotrophic denitrification process, the alkalinity need of the autotrophic process was satisfied by the alkalinity produced by heterotrophic denitrifiers. Decreasing and lastly eliminating the external alkalinity supplementation did not adversely affect the process performance. Complete denitrification of 75 mg L(-1) NO(3)-N under mixotrophic conditions at 4 h hydraulic retention time was achieved without external alkalinity supplementation and with effluent sulfate concentration lower than the drinking water guideline value of 250 mg L(-1). The denitrification rate of mixotrophic process (0.45 g NO(3)-N L(-1) d(-1)) was higher than that of autotrophic one (0.3 g NO(3)-N L(-1) d(-1)). Batch studies showed that the sulfur-based autotrophic nitrate reduction rate increased with increasing initial nitrate concentration and transient accumulation of nitrite was observed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Geohydrology and water quality of stratified-drift aquifers in the lower Merrimack and coastal river basins, southeastern New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stekl, Peter J.; Flanagan, Sarah M.

    1992-01-01

    Communities in the lower Merrimack River basin and coastal river basins of southeastern New Hampshire are experiencing increased demands for water because of a rapid increase in population. The population in 1987 was 225,495 and is expected to increase by 30 percent during the next decade. As of 1987, five towns used the stratified-drift aquifers for municipal supply and withdrew an estimated 6 million gallons per day. Four towns used the bedrock aquifer for municipal supply and withdrew an average of 1 .6 million gallons per day. Stratified-drift deposits cover 78 of the 327 square miles of the study area. These deposits are generally less than 10 square miles in areal extent, and their saturated thickness ranges front less than 20 feet to as much as 100 feet . Transinissivity exceeds 4,000 square feet per day in several locations. Stratified-drift aquifers in the eastern part are predominantly small ice-contact deposits surrounded by marine sediments or till of low hydraulic conductivity. Stratified-drift aquifers in the western part consist of ice-contact and proglacial deposits that are large in areal extent and are commonly in contact with surface-water bodies. Five stratified-drift aquifers, in the towns of Derry, Windham, Kingston, North Hampton, and Greenland, have the greatest potential to supply additional amounts of water. Potential yields and contributing areas of hypothetical supply wells were estimated for an aquifer in Windham near Cobbetts Pond and for an aquifer in Kingston along the Powwow River by use of a method analogous to superposition in conjunction with a numerical ground-waterflow model. The potential yield is estimated to be 0 .6 million gallons per day for the Windham-Cobbetts Pond aquifer and 4 .0 million gallons per day for the Kingston-Powwow River aquifer. Contributing recharge area for supply wells is estimated to be 1.6 square miles in the Windham-Cobbetts Pond aquifer and 4.9 square miles in the Kingston-Powwow River aquifer

  5. Dynamics of autotrophic marine planktonic thaumarchaeota in the East China Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anyi Hu

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous and abundant distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota in marine environments is now well documented, and their crucial role in the global nitrogen cycle has been highlighted. However, the potential contribution of Thaumarchaeota in the carbon cycle remains poorly understood. Here we present for the first time a seasonal investigation on the shelf region (bathymetry≤200 m of the East China Sea (ECS involving analysis of both thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA and autotrophy-related genes (acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene, accA. Quantitative PCR results clearly showed a higher abundance of thaumarchaeal 16S and accA genes in late-autumn (November than summer (August, whereas the diversity and community structure of autotrophic Thaumarchaeota showed no statistically significant difference between different seasons as revealed by thaumarchaeal accA gene clone libraries. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that shallow ecotypes dominated the autotrophic Thaumarchaeota in the ECS shelf (86.3% of total sequences, while a novel non-marine thaumarchaeal accA lineage was identified in the Changjiang estuary in summer (when freshwater plumes become larger but not in autumn, implying that Changjiang freshwater discharge played a certain role in transporting terrestrial microorganisms to the ECS. Multivariate statistical analysis indicated that the biogeography of the autotrophic Thaumarchaeota in the shelf water of the ECS was influenced by complex hydrographic conditions. However, an in silico comparative analysis suggested that the diversity and abundance of the autotrophic Thaumarchaeota might be biased by the 'universal' thaumarchaeal accA gene primers Cren529F/Cren981R since this primer set is likely to miss some members within particular phylogenetic groups. Collectively, this study improved our understanding of the biogeographic patterns of the autotrophic Thaumarchaeota in temperate coastal waters, and suggested that new accA primers with

  6. A soil infiltration system incorporated with sulfur-utilizing autotrophic denitrification (SISSAD) for domestic wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhe; Feng, Chuanping; Chen, Nan; Tong, Shuang; Zhang, Baogang; Hao, Chunbo; Chen, Kun

    2014-05-01

    To enhance the denitrification performance of soil infiltration, a soil infiltration system incorporated with sulfur-utilizing autotrophic denitrification (SISSAD) for domestic wastewater treatment was developed, and the SISSAD performance was evaluated using synthetic domestic wastewater in this study. The aerobic respiration and nitrification were mainly taken place in the upper aerobic stage (AES), removed 88.44% COD and 89.99% NH4(+)-N. Moreover, autotrophic denitrification occurred in the bottom anaerobic stage (ANS), using the CO2 produced from AES as inorganic carbon source. Results demonstrated that the SISSAD showed a remarkable performance on COD removal efficiency of 95.09%, 84.86% for NO3(-)-N, 95.25% for NH4(+)-N and 93.15% for TP. This research revealed the developed system exhibits a promising application prospect for domestic wastewater in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Autotrophic microbe metagenomes and metabolic pathways differentiate adjacent red sea brine pools

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2013-04-29

    In the Red Sea, two neighboring deep-sea brine pools, Atlantis II and Discovery, have been studied extensively, and the results have shown that the temperature and concentrations of metal and methane in Atlantis II have increased over the past decades. Therefore, we investigated changes in the microbial community and metabolic pathways. Here, we compared the metagenomes of the two pools to each other and to those of deep-sea water samples. Archaea were generally absent in the Atlantis II metagenome; Bacteria in the metagenome were typically heterotrophic and depended on aromatic compounds and other extracellular organic carbon compounds as indicated by enrichment of the related metabolic pathways. In contrast, autotrophic Archaea capable of CO2 fixation and methane oxidation were identified in Discovery but not in Atlantis II. Our results suggest that hydrothermal conditions and metal precipitation in the Atlantis II pool have resulted in elimination of the autotrophic community and methanogens.

  8. Competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial plankton for inorganic nutrients induced by variability in estuarine biophysicochemical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A.; Quigg, A.

    2016-02-01

    Competition for inorganic nutrients between autotrophic and heterotrophic fractions of microbial plankton (0.2-20μm) was investigated at two stations in a sub-tropical estuary, Galveston Bay, Texas. Competition potential between these groups is enhanced because individuals are similar in size, reducing variability among their nutrient uptake efficiencies. Further, in estuaries, allochthonous supplements to autochthonous carbon may satisfy heterotrophic requirements, allowing alternative factors to limit abundance. The relative abundance of autotrophs and heterotrophs stained with SYBR Green I and enumerated on a Beckman Coulter Gallios flow cytometer were evaluated monthly during a year-long study. Shifts in the relative in situ abundance were significantly related to temperature, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), phosphorous (Pi), and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations revealing opposing gradients of limitation by different abiotic factors. In corresponding in vitro nutrient enrichment bioassays the relative contribution of autotrophic or heterotrophic microbial plankton to significant enrichment responses varied. Only during macro- (>20μm) phytoplankton blooms do autotrophic microbial plankton respond to nutrient enrichment. Contrastingly, the heterotrophic microbial plankton responded to nutrient enrichment primarily when temperature limitation was alleviated. Therefore, the potential for autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial plankton competition for limiting nutrients is highest when autotrophic microbial plankton are also competing with larger phytoplankton during bloom events. Based on this evidence, we hypothesize that the autotrophic microbial fraction has a competitive advantage over the heterotrophs for inorganic nutrients in Galveston Bay. The observed microbial competition during estuarine phytoplankton blooms may have important consequences on biogeochemical processes including carbon and nutrient cycling.

  9. Enhanced start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems

    KAUST Repository

    Zaybak, Zehra; Pisciotta, John M.; Tokash, Justin C.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) can be used to convert CO2 into diverse organic compounds through a process called microbial electrosynthesis. Unfortunately, start-up of anaerobic biocathodes in BESs is a difficult and time consuming process. Here, a pre-enrichment method was developed to improve start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes capable of using cathodes as the electron donor (electrotrophs) and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic enrichment of bacteria from freshwater bog sediment samples was first performed in batch cultures fed with glucose and then used to inoculate BES cathode chambers set at -0.4V (versus a standard hydrogen electrode; SHE). After two weeks of heterotrophic operation of BESs, CO2 was provided as the sole electron acceptor and carbon source. Consumption of electrons from cathodes increased gradually and was sustained for about two months in concert with a significant decrease in cathode chamber headspace CO2. The maximum current density consumed was -34±4mA/m2. Biosynthesis resulted in organic compounds that included butanol, ethanol, acetate, propionate, butyrate, and hydrogen gas. Bacterial community analyses based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed Trichococcus palustris DSM 9172 (99% sequence identity) as the prevailing species in biocathode communities, followed by Oscillibacter sp. and Clostridium sp. Isolates from autotrophic cultivation were most closely related to Clostridium propionicum (99% sequence identity; ZZ16), Clostridium celerecrescens (98-99%; ZZ22, ZZ23), Desulfotomaculum sp. (97%; ZZ21), and Tissierella sp. (98%; ZZ25). This pre-enrichment procedure enables simplified start-up of anaerobic biocathodes for applications such as electrofuel production by facultatively autotrophic electrotrophs. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Enhanced start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems

    KAUST Repository

    Zaybak, Zehra

    2013-12-01

    Biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) can be used to convert CO2 into diverse organic compounds through a process called microbial electrosynthesis. Unfortunately, start-up of anaerobic biocathodes in BESs is a difficult and time consuming process. Here, a pre-enrichment method was developed to improve start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes capable of using cathodes as the electron donor (electrotrophs) and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic enrichment of bacteria from freshwater bog sediment samples was first performed in batch cultures fed with glucose and then used to inoculate BES cathode chambers set at -0.4V (versus a standard hydrogen electrode; SHE). After two weeks of heterotrophic operation of BESs, CO2 was provided as the sole electron acceptor and carbon source. Consumption of electrons from cathodes increased gradually and was sustained for about two months in concert with a significant decrease in cathode chamber headspace CO2. The maximum current density consumed was -34±4mA/m2. Biosynthesis resulted in organic compounds that included butanol, ethanol, acetate, propionate, butyrate, and hydrogen gas. Bacterial community analyses based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed Trichococcus palustris DSM 9172 (99% sequence identity) as the prevailing species in biocathode communities, followed by Oscillibacter sp. and Clostridium sp. Isolates from autotrophic cultivation were most closely related to Clostridium propionicum (99% sequence identity; ZZ16), Clostridium celerecrescens (98-99%; ZZ22, ZZ23), Desulfotomaculum sp. (97%; ZZ21), and Tissierella sp. (98%; ZZ25). This pre-enrichment procedure enables simplified start-up of anaerobic biocathodes for applications such as electrofuel production by facultatively autotrophic electrotrophs. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Nitrate removal from groundwater by cooperating heterotrophic with autotrophic denitrification in a biofilm-electrode reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yingxin [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 3058572 (Japan); Feng, Chuanping, E-mail: fengchuangping@gmail.com [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Qinghong; Yang, Yingnan; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 3058572 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Intensified biofilm-electrode reactor using cooperative denitrification is developed. {yields} IBER combines heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification. {yields} CO{sub 2} formed by heterotrophic denitrification is used by autotrophic bacteria. {yields} Optimum running conditions are C/N = 0.75, HRT = 8 h, and I = 40 mA. {yields} A novel degradation mechanism for cooperating denitrification process is proposed. - Abstract: An intensified biofilm-electrode reactor (IBER) combining heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification was developed for treatment of nitrate contaminated groundwater. The reactor was evaluated with synthetic groundwater (NO{sub 3}{sup -}N50 mg L{sup -1}) under different hydraulic retention times (HRTs), carbon to nitrogen ratios (C/N) and electric currents (I). The experimental results demonstrate that high nitrate and nitrite removal efficiency (100%) were achieved at C/N = 1, HRT = 8 h, and I = 10 mA. C/N ratios were reduced from 1 to 0.5 and the applied electric current was changed from 10 to 100 mA, showing that the optimum running condition was C/N = 0.75 and I = 40 mA, under which over 97% of NO{sub 3}{sup -}N was removed and organic carbon (methanol) was completely consumed in treated water. Simultaneously, the denitrification mechanism in this system was analyzed through pH variation in effluent. The CO{sub 2} produced from the anode acted as a good pH buffer, automatically controlling pH in the reaction zone. The intensified biofilm-electrode reactor developed in the study was effective for the treatment of groundwater polluted by nitrate.

  12. The effect of hydroxylamine on the activity and aggregate structure of autotrophic nitrifying bioreactor cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harper, W.F.; Terada, Akihiko; Poly, F.

    2009-01-01

    Addition of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) to autotrophic biomass in nitrifying bioreactors affected the activity, physical structure, and microbial ecology of nitrifying aggregates. When NH2OH is added to nitrifying cultures in 6-h batch experiments, the initial NH3-N uptake rates were physiologically...... accelerated by a factor of 1.4-13. NH2OH addition caused a 20-40% decrease in the median aggregate size, broadened the shape of the aggregate size distribution by up to 230%, and caused some of the microcolonies to appear slightly more dispersed. Longer term NH2OH addition in fed batch bioreactors decreased...

  13. Heterotrophic denitrification vs. autotrophic anammox – quantifying collateral effects on the oceanic carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Koeve

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of fixed nitrogen to N2 in suboxic waters is estimated to contribute roughly a third to total oceanic losses of fixed nitrogen and is hence understood to be of major importance to global oceanic production and, therefore, to the role of the ocean as a sink of atmospheric CO2. At present heterotrophic denitrification and autotrophic anammox are considered the dominant sinks of fixed nitrogen. Recently, it has been suggested that the trophic nature of pelagic N2-production may have additional, "collateral" effects on the carbon cycle, where heterotrophic denitrification provides a shallow source of CO2 and autotrophic anammox a shallow sink. Here, we analyse the stoichiometries of nitrogen and associated carbon conversions in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZ focusing on heterotrophic denitrification, autotrophic anammox, and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrite and ammonium in order to test this hypothesis quantitatively. For open ocean OMZs the combined effects of these processes turn out to be clearly heterotrophic, even with high shares of the autotrophic anammox reaction in total N2-production and including various combinations of dissimilatory processes which provide the substrates to anammox. In such systems, the degree of heterotrophy (ΔCO2:ΔN2, varying between 1.7 and 6.5, is a function of the efficiency of nitrogen conversion. On the contrary, in systems like the Black Sea, where suboxic N-conversions are supported by diffusive fluxes of NH4+ originating from neighbouring waters with sulphate reduction, much lower values of ΔCO2:ΔN2 can be found. However, accounting for concomitant diffusive fluxes of CO2, the ratio approaches higher values similar to those computed for open ocean OMZs. Based on this analysis, we question the significance of collateral effects concerning the trophic

  14. Control of SHARON reactor for autotrophic nitrogen removal in two-reactor configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valverde Perez, Borja; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    With the perspective of investigating a suitable control design for autotrophic nitrogen removal, this work explores the control design for a SHARON reactor. With this aim, a full model is developed, including the pH dependency, in order to simulate the reactor and determine the optimal operating...... conditions. Then, the screening of controlled variables and pairing is carried out by an assessment of the effect of the disturbances based on the closed loop disturbance gain plots. Two controlled structures are obtained and benchmarked by their capacity to reject the disturbances before the Anammox reactor....

  15. Bio-electrochemical synthesis of commodity chemicals by autotrophic acetogens utilizing CO2 for environmental remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Gugan; Farooq, Robina

    2016-09-01

    Bio-electrochemical synthesis (BES) is a technique in which electro-autotrophic bacteria such as Clostridium ljungdahlii utilize electric currents as an electron source from the cathode to reduce CO2 to extracellular, multicarbon, exquisite products through autotrophic conversion. The BES of volatile fatty acids and alcohols directly from CO2 is a sustainable alternative for non-renewable, petroleum-based polymer production. This conversion of CO2 implies reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The synthesis of heptanoic acid, heptanol, hexanoic acid and hexanol, for the first time, by Clostridium ljungdahlii was a remarkable achievement of BES. In our study, these microorganisms were cultivated on the cathode of a bio-electrochemical cell at -400 mV by a DC power supply at 37 degree Centrigrade, pH 6.8, and was studied for both batch and continuous systems. Pre-enrichment of bio-cathode enhanced the electroactivity of cells and resulted in maximizing extracellular products in less time. The main aim of the research was to investigate the impact of low-cost substrate CO2, and the longer cathode recovery range was due to bacterial reduction of CO2 to multicarbon chemical commodities with electrons driven from the cathode. Reactor design was simplified for cost-effectiveness and to enhance energy efficiencies. The Columbic recovery of ethanoic acid, ethanol, ethyl butyrate, hexanoic acid, heptanoic acid and hexanol being in excess of 80 percent proved that BES was a remarkable technology.

  16. Particulate Pyrite Autotrophic Denitrification (PPAD) for Remediation of Nitrate-contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, S.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, L. C.; Henderson, M.; Feng, C.; Ergas, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid movement of human civilization towards urbanization, industrialization, and increased agricultural activities has introduced a large amount of nitrate into groundwater. Nitrate is a toxic substance discharged from groundwater to rivers and leads to decreased dissolved oxygen and eutrophication. For this experiment, an electron donor is needed to convert nitrate into non-toxic nitrogen gas. Pyrite is one of the most abundant minerals in the earth's crust making it an ideal candidate as an electron donor. The overall goal of this research was to investigate the potential for pyrite to be utilized as an electron donor for autotrophic denitrification of nitrate-contaminated groundwater. Batch studies of particulate pyrite autotrophic denitrification (PPAD) of synthetic groundwater (100 mg NO3--N L-1) were set up with varying biomass concentration, pyrite dose, and pyrite particle size. Reactors were seeded with mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (VSS) from a biological nitrogen removal wastewater treatment facility. PPAD using small pyrite particles (exhibited substantial nitrate removal rate, lower sulfate accumulation (5.46 mg SO42-/mg NO3--N) and lower alkalinity consumption (1.70 mg CaCO3/mg NO3--N) when compared to SOD (7.54 mg SO42-/mg NO3--N, 4.57 mg CaCO3/mg NO3--N based on stoichiometric calculation). This research revealed that the PPAD process is a promising technique for nitrate-contaminated groundwater treatment and promoted the utilization of pyrite in the field of environmental remediation.

  17. Perchlorate reduction by hydrogen autotrophic bacteria and microbial community analysis using high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Dongjin; Liu, Yongde; Niu, Zhenhua; Xiao, Shuhu; Li, Daorong

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen autotrophic reduction of perchlorate have advantages of high removal efficiency and harmless to drinking water. But so far the reported information about the microbial community structure was comparatively limited, changes in the biodiversity and the dominant bacteria during acclimation process required detailed study. In this study, perchlorate-reducing hydrogen autotrophic bacteria were acclimated by hydrogen aeration from activated sludge. For the first time, high-throughput sequencing was applied to analyze changes in biodiversity and the dominant bacteria during acclimation process. The Michaelis-Menten model described the perchlorate reduction kinetics well. Model parameters q(max) and K(s) were 2.521-3.245 (mg ClO4(-)/gVSS h) and 5.44-8.23 (mg/l), respectively. Microbial perchlorate reduction occurred across at pH range 5.0-11.0; removal was highest at pH 9.0. The enriched mixed bacteria could use perchlorate, nitrate and sulfate as electron accepter, and the sequence of preference was: NO3(-) > ClO4(-) > SO4(2-). Compared to the feed culture, biodiversity decreased greatly during acclimation process, the microbial community structure gradually stabilized after 9 acclimation cycles. The Thauera genus related to Rhodocyclales was the dominated perchlorate reducing bacteria (PRB) in the mixed culture.

  18. Freshwater mineral nitrogen and essential elements in autotrophs in James Ross Island, West Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coufalík Pavel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The lakes and watercourses are habitats for various communities of cyanobacteria and algae, which are among the few primary producers in Antarctica. The amount of nutrients in the mineral-poor Antarctic environment is a limiting factor for the growth of freshwater autotrophs in most cases. In this study, the main aim was to assess the availability of mineral nitrogen for microorganisms in cyanobacterial mats in James Ross Island. The nitrate and ammonium ions in water environment were determined as well as the contents of major elements (C, N, P, S, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn in cyanobacterial mats. The molar ratios of C:N, C:P and N:P in mats were in focus. The growth of freshwater autotrophs seems not to be limited by the level of nitrogen, according to the content of available mineral nitrogen in water and the biogeochemical stoichiometry of C:N:P. The source of nutrients in the Ulu Peninsula is not obvious. The nitrogen fixation could enhance the nitrogen content in mats, which was observed in some samples containing the Nostoc sp.

  19. Reaction engineering analysis of the autotrophic energy metabolism of Clostridium aceticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alexander; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2017-12-01

    Acetogenesis with CO2:H2 or CO via the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway does not provide any net ATP formation in homoacetogenic bacteria. Autotrophic energy conservation is coupled to the generation of chemiosmotic H+ or Na+ gradients across the cytoplasm membrane using either a ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase (Rnf), a ferredoxin:H+ oxidoreductase (Ech) or substrate-level phosphorylation via cytochromes. The first isolated acetogenic bacterium Clostridium aceticum shows both cytochromes and Rnf complex, putting it into an outstanding position. Autotrophic batch processes with continuous gas supply were performed in fully controlled stirred-tank bioreactors to elucidate energy metabolism of C. aceticum. Varying the initial Na+ concentration in the medium showed sodium-dependent growth of C. aceticum with a growth optimum between 60 and 90 mM Na+. The addition of the Na+-selective ionophore ETH2120 or the protonophore CCCP or the H+/cation-antiporter monensin revealed that an H+ gradient is used as primary energy conservation mechanism, which strengthens the exceptional position of C. aceticum as acetogenic bacterium showing an H+-dependent energy conservation mechanism as well as Na+-dependent growth. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Comparison of mixotrophic to cyclic autotrophic/heterotrophic growth strategies to optimize productivity of Chlorella sorokiniana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Wagenen, Jonathan Myerson; De Francisci, Davide; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    In addition to providing cheap or free mineral nutrients, wastewaters may contain organic carbon compounds that could increase productivity of algal cultures. This study defined a strategy for the addition of organic carbon to photobioreactors in order to improve their productivity compared...... for acetate addition. Acetate was added during the light period for the mixotrophic strategy and during the dark one for the cyclic autotrophic/heterotrophic strategy. Autotrophic productivity of up to 0.99 g L−1 day−1 was obtained using the optimal tested dilution rate of 0.031 h−1. The highest mixotrophic...... productivity was 1.04 g L−1 day−1. When a constant dilution rate was applied throughout the day, cyclic heterotrophy/autotrophy (1.2 g L−1 day−1) showed higher productivity than during mixotrophic growth, while using only half as much acetate. By diluting and adding acetate only during the eight dark hours...

  1. Adaptation of the autotrophic acetogen Sporomusa ovata to methanol accelerates the conversion of CO2 to organic products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Höglund, Daniel; Koza, Anna

    2015-01-01

    , and biochemical studies revealed that the molecular mechanisms responsible for the novel characteristics of the adapted strain were associated with the methanol oxidation pathway and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of acetogens along with biosynthetic pathways, cell wall components, and protein chaperones. The results...... to grow quicker autotrophically with methanol, a toxic C1 compound, as the sole substrate. Better growth on different concentrations of methanol and with H2-CO2 indicated the adapted strain had a more efficient autotrophic metabolism and a higher tolerance to solvent. The growth rate on methanol...

  2. THE CALVIN CYCLE ENZYME PHOSPHOGLYCERATE KINASE OF XANTHOBACTER-FLAVUS REQUIRED FOR AUTOTROPHIC CO2 FIXATION IS NOT ENCODED BY THE CBB OPERON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEIJER, WG

    1994-01-01

    During autotrophic growth of Xanthobacter flavus, energy derived from the oxidation of hydrogen methanol or formate is used to drive the assimilation of CO2 via the Calvin cycle. The genes encoding the Calvin cycle enzymes are organized in the cbb operon, which is expressed only during autotrophic

  3. 454-Pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial communities from autotrophic nitrogen removal bioreactors utilizing universal primers : Effect of annealing temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, A.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A.; Rodelas, B.; Abbas, B.A.; Martinez-Toledo, M.V.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Osorio, F.; Gonzalez-Lopez, J.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria by molecular tools aimed at the evaluation of bacterial diversity in autotrophic nitrogen removal systems is limited by the difficulty to design universal primers for the Bacteria domain able to amplify the anammox 16S

  4. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea-ice: Seasonal study from Marlene Bight, SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    in situ in plastic bags with subsequent melting and measurements of changes in total O-2 concentrations. The standard incubations showed that the annual succession followed a distinctive pattern, with a low, almost balancing heterotrophic and autotrophic activity during February and March. This period...

  5. Decadal warming causes a consistent and persistent shift from heterotrophic to autotrophic respiration in contrasting permafrost ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks Pries, Caitlin E; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Schuur, Edward A G; Natali, Susan M; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Aerts, Rien; Dorrepaal, Ellen

    2015-12-01

    Soil carbon in permafrost ecosystems has the potential to become a major positive feedback to climate change if permafrost thaw increases heterotrophic decomposition. However, warming can also stimulate autotrophic production leading to increased ecosystem carbon storage-a negative climate change feedback. Few studies partitioning ecosystem respiration examine decadal warming effects or compare responses among ecosystems. Here, we first examined how 11 years of warming during different seasons affected autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration in a bryophyte-dominated peatland in Abisko, Sweden. We used natural abundance radiocarbon to partition ecosystem respiration into autotrophic respiration, associated with production, and heterotrophic decomposition. Summertime warming decreased the age of carbon respired by the ecosystem due to increased proportional contributions from autotrophic and young soil respiration and decreased proportional contributions from old soil. Summertime warming's large effect was due to not only warmer air temperatures during the growing season, but also to warmer deep soils year-round. Second, we compared ecosystem respiration responses between two contrasting ecosystems, the Abisko peatland and a tussock-dominated tundra in Healy, Alaska. Each ecosystem had two different timescales of warming (permafrost ecosystems. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Selection of controlled variables in bioprocesses. Application to a SHARON-Anammox process for autotrophic nitrogen removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Valverde Perez, Borja; Sin, Gürkan

    Selecting the right controlled variables in a bioprocess is challenging since the objectives of the process (yields, product or substrate concentration) are difficult to relate with a given actuator. We apply here process control tools that can be used to assist in the selection of controlled var...... variables to the case of the SHARON-Anammox process for autotrophic nitrogen removal....

  7. Micro-electrolysis/retinervus luffae-based simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification for low C/N wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlong; Li, Desheng; Cui, Yuwei; Xing, Wei; Deng, Shihai

    2017-07-01

    Nitrogen bioremediation in organic insufficient wastewater generally requires an extra carbon source. In this study, nitrate-contaminated wastewater was treated effectively through simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification based on micro-electrolysis carriers (MECs) and retinervus luffae fructus (RLF), respectively. The average nitrate and total nitrogen removal rates reached 96.3 and 94.0% in the MECs/RLF-based autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification (MRAHD) system without ammonia and nitrite accumulation. The performance of MRAHD was better than that of MEC-based autotrophic denitrification for the wastewater treatment with low carbon nitrogen (COD/N) ratio. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed that the relative abundance of nirS-type denitrifiers attached to MECs (4.9%) and RLF (5.0%) was similar. Illumina sequencing suggested that the dominant genera were Thiobacillus (7.0%) and Denitratisoma (5.7%), which attached to MECs and RLF, respectively. Sulfuritalea was discovered as the dominant genus in the middle of the reactor. The synergistic interaction between autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers played a vital role in the mixotrophic substrate environment.

  8. An operation protocol for facilitating start-up of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removing reactors based on process stoichiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutlu, A. Gizem; Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    Start-up and operation of single-stage nitritation/anammox reactor employing complete autotrophic nitrogen can be difficult. Keeping the performance criteria and monitoring the microbial community composition may not be easy or fast enough to take action on time. In this study, a control strategy...

  9. Decadal warming causes a consistent and persistent shift from heterotrophic to autotrophic respiration in contrasting permafrost ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hicks Pries, C.E.; van Logtestijn, R.S.P; Schuur, E.A.G.; Natali, S.M.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Aerts, R.; Dorrepaal, E.

    2015-01-01

    Soil carbon in permafrost ecosystems has the potential to become a major positive feedback to climate change if permafrost thaw increases heterotrophic decomposition. However, warming can also stimulate autotrophic production leading to increased ecosystem carbon storage-a negative climate change

  10. Simultaneous heterotrophic and sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification process for drinking water treatment: control of sulfate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Dursun, Nesrin; Kilic, Adem; Demirel, Sevgi; Uyanik, Sinan; Cinar, Ozer

    2011-12-15

    A long-term performance of a packed-bed bioreactor containing sulfur and limestone was evaluated for the denitrification of drinking water. Autotrophic denitrification rate was limited by the slow dissolution rate of sulfur and limestone. Dissolution of limestone for alkalinity supplementation increased hardness due to release of Ca(2+). Sulfate production is the main disadvantage of the sulfur autotrophic denitrification process. The effluent sulfate concentration was reduced to values below drinking water guidelines by stimulating the simultaneous heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification with methanol supplementation. Complete removal of 75 mg/L NO(3)-N with effluent sulfate concentration of around 225 mg/L was achieved when methanol was supplemented at methanol/NO(3)-N ratio of 1.67 (mg/mg), which was much lower than the theoretical value of 2.47 for heterotrophic denitrification. Batch studies showed that sulfur-based autotrophic NO(2)-N reduction rate was around three times lower than the reduction rate of NO(3)-N, which led to NO(2)-N accumulation at high loadings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of novel control strategies for single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal: A process oriented approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Gernaey, Krist

    2014-01-01

    operation and rejection of disturbances. Three novel control strategies were developed, evaluated, and benchmarked against each other: a feedforward control (control structure 1 – CS#1), a rule-based feedback control (CS#2), and a feedforward–feedback controller, in which the feedback loop updates the set......The autotrophic nitrogen removing granular sludge process is a novel and intensified process. However, its stable operation and control remain a challenging issue. In this contribution, a process oriented approach was used to develop, evaluate and benchmark novel control strategies to ensure stable...... point of the feedforward loop (CS#3). The CS#1 gave the best performance against disturbances in the ammonium concentration, whereas the CS#2 provided the best performance against disturbances in the organic carbon concentration and dynamic influent conditions. The CS#3 rejected both disturbances...

  12. A novel control strategy for single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal in SBR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Gernaey, Krist

    2015-01-01

    A novel feedforward–feedback control strategy was developed for complete autotrophic nitrogen removal in a sequencing batch reactor. The aim of the control system was to carry out the regulation of the process while keeping the system close to the optimal operation. The controller was designed...... based on a process model and then tested experimentally. The resulting batch-to-batch control strategy had the total nitrogen removal efficiency as controlled variable and the setting of the aeration mass flow controller as manipulated variable. Compared to manual operation mode (constant air supply......), the controller resulted in a significant performance improvement: removal efficiency was kept at a stable high level in the presence of influent ammonium concentration disturbances, and the absolute deviation on removal efficiency was reduced by 40%. The successful validation of the controller in a lab...

  13. Nitrite accumulation in continuous-flow partial autotrophic denitrification reactor using sulfide as electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunshuang; Li, Wenfei; Li, Xuechen; Zhao, Dongfeng; Ma, Bin; Wang, Yongqiang; Liu, Fang; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2017-11-01

    The nitrite accumulation in handling nitrate and sulfide-laden wastewater in a continuous-flow upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor was studied. At sulfide/nitrate-nitrogen ratio of 1:0.76 and loading rates of 1.2kg-Sm -3 d -1 and 0.4kg-Nm -3 d -1 , the elemental sulfur and nitrite accumulation rates peaked at 90% and 70%, respectively, with Acrobacter, Azoarcus and Thauera presenting the functional strains in the studied reactor. The accumulated nitrite was proposed a promising feedstock for anaerobic ammonia oxidation process. An integrated partial autotrophic denitrification-anaerobic ammonia oxidation-aeration process for handling the ammonia and sulfide-laden wastewaters is proposed for further studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence oFe3+ Ions on Nitrate Removal by Autotrophic Denitrification Using Thiobacillus denitrificans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Blažková

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available he sulphur-based autotrophic denitrification process utilizing Thiobacillus denitrificans was studied experimentally as an alternative method of removing nitrates from industrial wastewater. The objective of the work was to examine the effect of ferric iron addition to the reaction mixture and determine optimal dosage for specific conditions. All experiments were carried out in anoxic batch bioreactor, and elemental sulphur was used as an electron donor. Compared to the control operation without ferric iron addition, significant increases in nitrates removal were demonstrated for the concentration of ferric iron equal to 0.1 mg L–1. However, under these conditions, increased nitrite content was detected in the reaction mixture which exceeds the limits for drinking water.

  15. Microbial community stratification in Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors for Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Ruscalleda, Maël; Terada, Akihiko

    of bacterial granules or biofilms. In this sense, completely autotrophic nitrogen removal from high ammonium strength wastewater was achieved in a Membrane-Aereated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) in a single step. Here, a biofilm containing nitrifiers (Aerobic Ammonium and Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria, AOB and NOB......, respectively) and Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AnAOB) is grown on bubbleless aeration membranes to remove ammonium. Since oxygen permeates through the membrane-biofilm interface while ammonium diffuses into the biofilm from the biofilm-liquid interface, oxygen gradients can be established across...... the biofilm, allowing nitrogen removal in a single reactor by simultaneous activity of the mentioned biocatalysts. This work consists on the analysis of the microbial community existing in two laboratory-scale reactors operated for more than 300 days, which removed up to 5.5 g-N/m2/day. The system contained...

  16. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stephanie; Gülay, Arda

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration...... (rich in oxygen) and AnAOB in regions neighbouring the liquid phase. Both communities were separated by a transition region potentially populated by denitrifying heterotrophic bacteria. AOB and AnAOB bacterial groups were more abundant and diverse than NOB, and dominated by the r......-strategists Nitrosomonas europaea and Ca. Brocadia anammoxidans, respectively. Taken together, the present work presents tools to better engineer, monitor and control the microbial communities that support robust, sustainable and efficient nitrogen removal....

  17. Anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor for the removal of sulphide by autotrophic denitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinamarca, Carlos [Department of Process, Energy and Environment, Faculty of Technology, Telemark University College Kjolnes ring 56, 3918 Porsgrunn (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    The Removal efficiency, load and N/S molar ratio, of an EGSB reactor for autotrophic sulphide denitrification operated for 96 days, were studied. The reactor was operated at high inlet sulphide concentrations between 0.25 to 3.00 g HS--S/L equivalents to loads between 5 to 250 g HS--S/m3-h. Sulphide removals higher than 99 % were achieved. At a N/S molar ratio of 0.3 and 12 hours HRT the process was stable even during transition periods of influent sulphide concentration and pH (9.0-12.1). At N/S molar ratio of 1.3, granules lost some of their sedimentation properties and appeared to disintegrate. On average 94 ± 4 % of the equivalent inlet sulphur ended as elemental sulphur.

  18. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, Viktoria; Oshurkova, Viktoria; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-09-09

    The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2(T) M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth's subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars.

  19. Membrane biofouling in a wastewater nitrification reactor: Microbial succession from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huijie; Xue, Zheng; Saikaly, Pascal; Nunes, Suzana P; Bluver, Ted R; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-01-01

    Membrane biofouling is a complex process that involves bacterial adhesion, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excretion and utilization, and species interactions. To obtain a better understanding of the microbial ecology of biofouling process, this study conducted rigorous, time-course analyses on the structure, EPS and microbial composition of the fouling layer developed on ultrafiltration membranes in a nitrification bioreactor. During a 14-day fouling event, three phases were determined according to the flux decline and microbial succession patterns. In Phase I (0-2 days), small sludge flocs in the bulk liquid were selectively attached on membrane surfaces, leading to the formation of similar EPS and microbial community composition as the early biofilms. Dominant populations in small flocs, e.g., Nitrosomonas, Nitrobacter, and Acinetobacter spp., were also the major initial colonizers on membranes. In Phase II (2-4 d), fouling layer structure, EPS composition, and bacterial community went through significant changes. Initial colonizers were replaced by fast-growing and metabolically versatile heterotrophs (e.g., unclassified Sphingobacteria). The declining EPS polysaccharide to protein (PS:PN) ratios could be correlated well with the increase in microbial community diversity. In Phase III (5-14 d), heterotrophs comprised over 90% of the community, whereas biofilm structure and EPS composition remained relatively stable. In all phases, AOB and NOB were constantly found within the top 40% of the fouling layer, with the maximum concentrations around 15% from the top. The overall microbial succession pattern from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination implied that MBR biofouling could be alleviated by forming larger bacterial flocs in bioreactor suspension (reducing autotrophic colonization), and by designing more specific cleaning procedures targeting dominant heterotrophs during typical filtration cycles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  20. Membrane biofouling in a wastewater nitrification reactor: microbial succession from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Huijie

    2015-10-22

    Membrane biofouling is a complex process that involves bacterial adhesion, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excretion and utilization, and species interactions. To obtain a better understanding of the microbial ecology of biofouling process, this study conducted rigorous, time-course analyses on the structure, EPS and microbial composition of the fouling layer developed on ultrafiltration membranes in a nitrification bioreactor. During a 14-day fouling event, three phases were determined according to the flux decline and microbial succession patterns. In Phase I (0-2 days), small sludge flocs in the bulk liquid were selectively attached on membrane surfaces, leading to the formation of similar EPS and microbial community composition as the early biofilms. Dominant populations in small flocs, e.g., Nitrosomonas, Nitrobacter, and Acinetobacter spp., were also the major initial colonizers on membranes. In Phase II (2-4 d), fouling layer structure, EPS composition, and bacterial community went through significant changes. Initial colonizers were replaced by fast-growing and metabolically versatile heterotrophs (e.g., unclassified Sphingobacteria). The declining EPS polysaccharide to protein (PS:PN) ratios could be correlated well with the increase in microbial community diversity. In Phase III (5-14 d), heterotrophs comprised over 90% of the community, whereas biofilm structure and EPS composition remained relatively stable. In all phases, AOB and NOB were constantly found within the top 40% of the fouling layer, with the maximum concentrations around 15% from the top. The overall microbial succession pattern from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination implied that MBR biofouling could be alleviated by forming larger bacterial flocs in bioreactor suspension (reducing autotrophic colonization), and by designing more specific cleaning procedures targeting dominant heterotrophs during typical filtration cycles.

  1. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Shcherbakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2T M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth’s subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars.

  2. Can we distinguish autotrophic respiration from heterotrophic respiration in a field site using high temporal resolution CO2 flux measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Beatrice; Berger, Sina; Praetzel, Leandra; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The processes behind C-cycling in peatlands are important to understand for assessing the vulnerability of peatlands as carbon sinks under changing climate conditions. Especially boreal peatlands are likely to underlie strong alterations in the future. It is expected that C-pools that are directly influenced by vegetation and water table fluctuations can be easily destabilized. The CO2 efflux through respiration underlies autotrophic and heterotrophic processes that show different feedbacks on changing environmental conditions. In order to understand the respiration fluxes better for more accurate modelling and prognoses, the determination of the relative importance of different respiration sources is necessary. Earlier studies used e.g. exfoliation experiments, incubation experiments or modelling approaches to estimate the different respiration sources for the total ecosystem respiration (Reco). To further the understanding in this topic, I want to distinguish autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration using high temporal resolution measurements. The study site was selected along a hydrological gradient in a peatland in southern Ontario (Canada) and measurements were conducted from May to September 2015 once per month. Environmental controls (water table, soil temperature and soil moisture) that effect the respiration sources were recorded. In my study I used a Li-COR 6400XT and a Los Gatos greenhouse gas analyzer (GGA). Reco was determined by chamber flux measurements with the GGA, while simultaneously CO2 respiration measurements on different vegetation compartments like roots, leaves and mosses were conducted using the Li-COR 6400XT. The difference between Reco and autotrophic respiration equals heterotrophic respiration. After the measurements, the vegetation plots were harvested and separated for all compartments (leaves, roots, mosses, soil organic matter), dried and weighed. The weighted respiration rates from all vegetation compartments sum up to

  3. Targeting Autotrophic and Lithotrophic Microorganisms from Fumarolic Ice Caves of Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitori, R.; Davis, R.; Connell, L.; Kelley, M.; Staudigel, H.; Tebo, B. M.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial and aquatic volcanic oligotrophic environments can host microorganisms that obtain their energy from reduced inorganic chemicals present in volcanic rocks and soils. We sampled basaltic rock from terrestrial Dark Oligotrophic Volcanic Ecosystems (DOVEs) located in two fumarole ice caves, Warren and Warren West, located near the summit of Mt. Erebus, Antarctica. For reference, we sampled a similar cave, Harry's Dream, which receives continuous light during the Austral summer. We report here culturing data for bacterial and eukaryotic microbes from rocky soils in these caves when targeting lithotrophic organisms using media containing reduced inorganic compounds (Mn2+, Fe2+, NH4+). In addition, to test for the possible presence of inorganic carbon fixation, we screened samples for the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) gene. Culturing of soil samples on media targeting both autotrophs and heterotrophs yielded a diverse collection of generally slow-growing colonies of bacteria (majority), fungi and non-fungal eukaryotes. Manganese(II)-oxidizing colonies were identified in Warren and Harry's Dream, and these exhibited two colony morphotypes upon subculturing. Sequencing of the PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene identified a bacterium distantly related to Pseudonocardia sp., a genus with known manganese oxidizers. Other bacteria enriched included members of the Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. There was a low diversity in cultured eukaryotes representing several potential undescribed species (Geomyces sp., Penicillium sp.) and isolates that may represent alternate, previously undescribed habitats and forms (Psilolechia leprosa, Alternaria alternata). One Warren isolate was a 99% 16S rRNA match to the N2 fixer Bradyrhizobium sp.; when inoculated into liquid medium specific for N2 fixers, growth was maintained upon subculture. Putative iron oxidizers were also enriched from the two DOVE caves, using slush agar iron

  4. Sequential Aeration of Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors for High-Rate Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal: Experimental Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Sun, Sheng-Peng; Lackner, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    One-stage autotrophic nitrogen (N) removal, requiring the simultaneous activity of aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB and AnAOB), can be obtained in spatially redox-stratified biofilms. However, previous experience with Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors (MABRs) has revealed...... a difficulty in reducing the abundance and activity of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB), which drastically lowers process efficiency. Here we show how sequential aeration is an effective strategy to attain autotrophic N removal in MABRs: Two separate MABRs, which displayed limited or no N removal under...... continuous aeration, could remove more than 5.5 g N/m2/day (at loads up to 8 g N/m2/day) by controlled variation of sequential aeration regimes. Daily averaged ratios of the surficial loads of O2 (oxygen) to NH4+ (ammonium) (LO2/LNH4) were close to 1.73 at this optimum. Real-time quantitative PCR based on 16...

  5. Production of betalaines by Myrtillocactus cell cultures. Passage from heterotrophic state to autotrophic state with Asparagus cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulard, C; Mary, J; Chaumont, D; Gudin, C

    1982-11-01

    Myrtillocactus tissue cultures are grown from the epicotyl of young plantlets. With an appropriate growing medium it is possible, after transfer of fragments of these cultures to a liquid environment, to obtain dissociation and proliferation of cells. The production of betalaic pigments is induced in solid surroundings by adjustement of the growing medium composition and can be maintained in a liquid environment. The multiplication of pigmented cells in suspension may thus be obtained. The conversion of Asparagus cell suspensions from the heterotrophic state (use of lactose as source of carbon) to the autotrophic state (carbon supplied by CO/sub 2/) is obtained by a gradual reduction in the sugar concentration of the medium combined with a rise in the CO/sub 2/ content of the gas mixture atmosphere injected into the cultivator. The passage to the autotrophic state of a Myrtillocactus suspension would enable the production conditions of a metabolite (Betalaine) to be studied by micro-algae culture techniques.

  6. Irrigation management and phosphorus addition alter the abundance of carbon dioxide-fixing autotrophs in phosphorus-limited paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohong; Ge, Tida; Yan, Wende; Zhou, Juan; Wei, Xiaomeng; Chen, Liang; Chen, Xiangbi; Nannipieri, Paolo; Wu, Jinshui

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we assessed the interactive effects of phosphorus (P) application and irrigation methods on the abundances of marker genes (cbbL, cbbM, accA and aclB) of CO2-fixing autotrophs. We conducted rice-microcosm experiments using a P-limited paddy soil, with and without the addition of P fertiliser (P-treated-pot (P) versus control pot (CK)), and using two irrigation methods, namely alternate wetting and drying (AWD) and continuous flooding (CF). The abundances of bacterial 16S rRNA, archaeal 16S rRNA, cbbL, cbbM, accA and aclB genes in the rhizosphere soil (RS) and bulk soil (BS) were quantified. The application of P significantly altered the soil properties and stimulated the abundances of Bacteria, Archaea and CO2-fixation genes under CF treatment, but negatively influenced the abundances of Bacteria and marker genes of CO2-fixing autotrophs in BS soils under AWD treatment. The response of CO2-fixing autotrophs to P fertiliser depended on the irrigation management method. The redundancy analysis revealed that 54% of the variation in the functional marker gene abundances could be explained by the irrigation method, P fertiliser and the Olsen-P content; however, the rhizosphere effect did not have any significant influence. P fertiliser application under CF was more beneficial in improving the abundance of CO2-fixing autotrophs compared to the AWD treatment; thus, it is an ideal irrigation management method to increase soil carbon fixation. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Bacterial diversity of autotrophic enriched cultures from remote, glacial Antarctic, Alpine and Andean aerosol, snow and soil samples

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Toril , E.; Amils , R.; J. Delmas , Robert; Petit , Jean-Robert; Komarek , J.; Elster , J.

    2009-01-01

    Four different communities and one culture of autotrophic microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area) and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia), from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville) and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas), in a minimal mineral (oligotrophic) media. Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed...

  8. Denitrification of groundwater using a sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying anaerobic fluidized-bed MBR: performance and bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates a novel sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (AnFB-MBR) that has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification systems. The AnFB-MBR produced consistent high-quality product water when fed by a synthetic groundwater with NO3 (-)-N ranging 25-80 mg/L and operated at hydraulic retention times of 0.5-5.0 h. A nitrate removal rate of up to 4.0 g NO3 (-)-N/Lreactord was attained by the bioreactor, which exceeded any reported removal capacity. The flux of AnFB-MBR was maintained in the range of 1.5-15 L m(-2) h(-1). Successful membrane cleaning was practiced with cleaning cycles of 35-81 days, which had no obvious effect on the AnFB-MBR performance. The (15) N-tracer analyses elucidated that nitrogen was converted into (15) N2-N and (15) N-biomass accounting for 88.1-93.1 % and 6.4-11.6 % of the total nitrogen produced, respectively. Only 0.3-0.5 % of removed nitrogen was in form of (15)N2O-N in sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification process, reducing potential risks of a significant amount of N2O emissions. The sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying bacterial consortium was composed mainly of bacteria from Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, and Chloroflexi phyla, with genera Thiobacillus, Sulfurimonas, and Ignavibacteriales dominating the consortium. The pyrosequencing assays also suggested that the stable microbial communities corresponded to the elevated performance of the AnFB-MBR. Overall, this research described relatively high nitrate removal, acceptable flux, indicating future potential for the technology in practice.

  9. Startup and oxygen concentration effects in a continuous granular mixed flow autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas, Rodrigo; Guzmán-Fierro, Víctor; Giustinianovich, Elisa; Behar, Jack; Fernández, Katherina; Roeckel, Marlene

    2015-08-01

    The startup and performance of the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process was tested in a continuously fed granular bubble column reactor (BCR) with two different aeration strategies: controlling the oxygen volumetric flow and oxygen concentration. During the startup with the control of oxygen volumetric flow, the air volume was adjusted to 60mL/h and the CANON reactor had volumetric N loadings ranging from 7.35 to 100.90mgN/Ld with 36-71% total nitrogen removal and high instability. In the second stage, the reactor was operated at oxygen concentrations of 0.6, 0.4 and 0.2mg/L. The best condition was 0.2 mgO2/L with a total nitrogen removal of 75.36% with a CANON reactor activity of 0.1149gN/gVVSd and high stability. The feasibility and effectiveness of CANON processes with oxygen control was demonstrated, showing an alternative design tool for efficiently removing nitrogen species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modeling of nitrous oxide production by autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with multiple production pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Peng, Lai; Law, Yingyu; Guo, Jianhua; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-04-01

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been recognized as a major contributor to N2O production in wastewater treatment systems. However, so far N2O models have been proposed based on a single N2O production pathway by AOB, and there is still a lack of effective approach for the integration of these models. In this work, an integrated mathematical model that considers multiple production pathways is developed to describe N2O production by AOB. The pathways considered include the nitrifier denitrification pathway (N2O as the final product of AOB denitrification with NO2(-) as the terminal electron acceptor) and the hydroxylamine (NH2OH) pathway (N2O as a byproduct of incomplete oxidation of NH2OH to NO2(-)). In this model, the oxidation and reduction processes are modeled separately, with intracellular electron carriers introduced to link the two types of processes. The model is calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained with two independent nitrifying cultures. The model satisfactorily describes the N2O data from both systems. The model also predicts shifts of the dominating pathway at various dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrite levels, consistent with previous hypotheses. This unified model is expected to enhance our ability to predict N2O production by AOB in wastewater treatment systems under varying operational conditions.

  11. Ecosystem warming does not affect photosynthesis or aboveground autotrophic respiration for boreal black spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, D.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Renewable Resources; Gower, S.T. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Forest Ecology and Management

    2010-04-15

    Substantial increases in climatic temperatures may cause boreal forests to become a carbon source. An improved understanding of the effect of climatic warming on photosynthesis and autotrophic respiration is needed in order to determine the impact of temperature increases on net carbon balances. This study measured the light-saturated photosynthesis foliage respiration and stem respiration of black spruce in heated and control plots during a 3-year period at a site located in Thompson, Manitoba. Greenhouses and soil-heating cables were used to maintain air and soil temperatures at 5 degrees C above ambient air and soil temperatures. Studies were conducted to determine the influence of soil and air warming; soil-only warming; and greenhouses maintained at ambient temperatures. The study showed that treatment differences for photosynthesis, foliage respiration, and stem respiration were not significant over the 3-year period. Results suggested that black spruce may not have significant changes in photosynthesis or respiration rates in warmer climates. 38 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  12. Nitrate removal and microbial analysis by combined micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Li, Desheng; Li, Jinlong; Hu, Qianyi; Deng, Shihai

    2016-07-01

    A process combining micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification (CEAD) with iron-carbon micro-electrolysis carriers was developed for nitrate removal. The process was performed using organic-free influent with a NO3(-)-N concentration of 40.0±3.0mg/L and provided an average nitrate removal efficiency of 95% in stable stages. The total nitrogen removal efficiency reached 75%, with 21% of NO3(-)-N converted into NH4(+)-N. The corresponding hydraulic retention time was 8-10h, and the optimal pH ranged from 8.5 to 9.5. Microbial analysis with high-throughput sequencing revealed that dominant microorganisms in the reactor belonged to the classes of β-, γ-, and α-Proteobacteria. The abundance of the genera Thermomonas significantly increased during the operation, comprising 21.4% and 24.1% in sludge attached to the carriers in the middle and at the bottom of the reactor, respectively. The developed CEAD achieved efficient nitrate removal from water without organics, which is suitable for practical application. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Study of a combined heterotrophic and sulfur autotrophic denitrification technology for removal of nitrate in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huijuan; Jiang Wei; Wan Dongjin; Qu Jiuhui

    2009-01-01

    A combined two-step process of heterotrophic denitrification in a fluidized reactor and sulfur autotrophic denitrification processes (CHSAD) was developed for the removal of nitrate in drinking water. In this process, the advantage of high efficiency of heterotrophic denitrification with non-excessive methanol and the advantage of non-pollution of sulfur autotriphic denitrification were integrated in this CHSAD process. And, this CHSAD process had the capacity of pH balance and could control the concentration of SO 4 2- in effluent by adjusting the operation condition. When the influent nitrate was 30 mg NO 3 - -N/L, the reactor could be operated efficiently at the hydraulic retention time (HRT) ranging from 20 to 40 min with C:N ratio (mg CH 3 OH:mg NO 3 - -N) of 2.0 (methanol as carbon source). The nitrate removal was nearly 100% and there was no accumulated nitrite or residual methanol in the effluent. The effluent pH was about 7.5 and the sulfate concentration was lower than 130 mg/L. The maximum volume-loading rate of the reactor was 2.16 kg NO 3 - -N/(m 3 d). The biomass and scanning electron microscopy graphs of biofilm were also analyzed.

  14. Treatment of Nitrate-contaminated Drinking Water Using Autotrophic Denitrification in a Hydrogenised Biofilter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Vagheei

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a system was designed and constructed that included an efficient, economically feasible method for adjustable, in-situ generation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide coupled with a packed bed bioreactor. The system was subsequently tested for its ability to remove nitrate from drinking water. The major objective was to develop an economical technology with a high selectivity for nitrate ions but causing minimum changes in other drinking water quality parameters. Hydrogen (as the electron donor and carbon dioxide (as the carbon source for autotrophic denitrifier bacteria were generated in a cost-effective way by applying a very low DC voltage (5-10 volts in an electrochemical reactor using methanol electrolysis. The gases were injected into a denitrification bioreactor inoculated with denitrifier bacteria which are naturally present in water. Finally, the system was put to a pilot operation to remove nitrate from a nitrate-contaminated well (a typical contamination range of 120 mg/L as NO3- in Tehran aquifer for a period of 160 days. The results showed that the system was capable of achieving a nitrate removal efficiency of 95% with an HRT of 2-5 hr while its power consumption was minimal and only required the two harmless gases, hydrogen and carbon dioxide, to be injected without any chemical additions.

  15. Comparison of heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification processes for nitrate removal from phosphorus-limited surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; He, Shengbing; Huang, Jungchen; Zhou, Weili; Chen, Wanning

    2018-03-29

    Phosphorus (P) limitation has been demonstrated for micro-polluted surface water denitrification treatment in previous study. In this paper, a lab-scale comparative study of autotrophic denitrification (ADN) and heterotrophic denitrification (HDN) in phosphorus-limited surface water was investigated, aiming to find out the optimal nitrogen/phosphorus (N/P) ratio and the mechanism of the effect of P limitation on ADN and HDN. Furthermore, the optimal denitrification process was applied to the West Lake denitrification project, aiming to improve the water quality of the West Lake from worse than grade V to grade IV (GB3838-2006). The lab-scale study showed that the lack of P indeed inhibited HDN more greatly than ADN. The optimal N/P ratio for ADN and HDN was 25 and a 0.15 mg PO 4 3- -P L -1 of microbial available phosphorus (MAP) was observed. P additions could greatly enhance the resistance of ADN and HDN to hydraulic loading shock. Besides, The P addition could effectively stimulate the HDN performance via enriching the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the denitrifying phosphate-accumulating organisms (DNPAOs). Additionally, HDN was more effective and cost-effective than ADN for treating P-limited surface water. The study of the full-scale HDBF (heterotrophic denitrification biofilter) indicated that the denitrification performance was periodically impacted by P limitation, particularly at low water temperatures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal interactions of mycoheterotrophic Thismia are more specialized than in autotrophic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Sofia I F; Aguirre-Gutiérrez, Jesús; Bidartondo, Martin I; Merckx, Vincent S F T

    2017-02-01

    In general, plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi exchange photosynthetically fixed carbon for soil nutrients, but occasionally nonphotosynthetic plants obtain carbon from AM fungi. The interactions of these mycoheterotrophic plants with AM fungi are suggested to be more specialized than those of green plants, although direct comparisons are lacking. We investigated the mycorrhizal interactions of both green and mycoheterotrophic plants. We used next-generation DNA sequencing to compare the AM communities from roots of five closely related mycoheterotrophic species of Thismia (Thismiaceae), roots of surrounding green plants, and soil, sampled over the entire temperate distribution of Thismia in Australia and New Zealand. We observed that the fungal communities of mycoheterotrophic and green plants are phylogenetically more similar within than between these groups of plants, suggesting a specific association pattern according to plant trophic mode. Moreover, mycoheterotrophic plants follow a more restricted association with their fungal partners in terms of phylogenetic diversity when compared with green plants, targeting more clustered lineages of fungi, independent of geographic origin. Our findings demonstrate that these mycoheterotrophic plants target more narrow lineages of fungi than green plants, despite the larger fungal pool available in the soil, and thus they are more specialized towards mycorrhizal fungi than autotrophic plants. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Start-Up and Aeration Strategies for a Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal Process in an SBR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The start-up and performance of the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal via nitrite (CANON process were examined in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR with intermittent aeration. Initially, partial nitrification was established, and then the DO concentration was lowered further, surplus water in the SBR with high nitrite was replaced with tap water, and continuous aeration mode was turned into intermittent aeration mode, while the removal of total nitrogen was still weak. However, the total nitrogen (TN removal efficiency and nitrogen removal loading reached 83.07% and 0.422 kgN/(m3·d, respectively, 14 days after inoculating 0.15 g of CANON biofilm biomass into the SBR. The aggregates formed in SBR were the mixture of activated sludge and granular sludge; the volume ratio of floc and granular sludge was 7 : 3. DNA analysis showed that Planctomycetes-like anammox bacteria and Nitrosomonas-like aerobic ammonium oxidization bacteria were dominant bacteria in the reactor. The influence of aeration strategies on CANON process was investigated using batch tests. The result showed that the strategy of alternating aeration (1 h and nonaeration (1 h was optimum, which can obtain almost the same TN removal efficiency as continuous aeration while reducing the energy consumption, inhibiting the activity of NOB, and enhancing the activity of AAOB.

  18. Nitrate removal from groundwater by cooperating heterotrophic with autotrophic denitrification in a biofilm-electrode reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingxin; Feng, Chuanping; Wang, Qinghong; Yang, Yingnan; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio

    2011-09-15

    An intensified biofilm-electrode reactor (IBER) combining heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification was developed for treatment of nitrate contaminated groundwater. The reactor was evaluated with synthetic groundwater (NO(3)(-)-N50 mg L(-1)) under different hydraulic retention times (HRTs), carbon to nitrogen ratios (C/N) and electric currents (I). The experimental results demonstrate that high nitrate and nitrite removal efficiency (100%) were achieved at C/N = 1, HRT = 8h, and I = 10 mA. C/N ratios were reduced from 1 to 0.5 and the applied electric current was changed from 10 to 100 mA, showing that the optimum running condition was C/N = 0.75 and I = 40 mA, under which over 97% of NO(3)(-)-N was removed and organic carbon (methanol) was completely consumed in treated water. Simultaneously, the denitrification mechanism in this system was analyzed through pH variation in effluent. The CO(2) produced from the anode acted as a good pH buffer, automatically controlling pH in the reaction zone. The intensified biofilm-electrode reactor developed in the study was effective for the treatment of groundwater polluted by nitrate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Endogenous influences on anammox and sulfocompound-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification coupling system (A/SAD) and dynamic operating strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xinbo; Du, Lingfeng; Hou, Yuqian; Cheng, Shaoju; Zhang, Xuxiang; Liu, Bo

    2018-02-21

    The anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) and sulfocompound-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification coupling system (A/SAD) was initiated in an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor for nitrogen removal from high-strength wastewater. Owing to cooperation between anammox and partial sulfocompound-oxidation autotrophic denitrification coupling system (PSAD), the highest nitrogen removal efficiency (NRE) of 98.1% ± 0.4% achieved at the optimal influent conditions of conversion efficiency of ammonium (CEA) of 55% and S 2 O 3 2- -S/NO 3 - -N (S/N) of 1.4 mol mol -1 . The activity of the short-cut sulfocompound-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification (SSAD) was also regulated to cope with dynamic CEA in the influent by changing the S/N, which was demonstrated to be effective in alleviating nitrite accumulation when the CEA was between 57% and 61%. Both the anammox and SAD bacteria enriched in the reactor after long-term incubation. Candidatus Brocadia and Candidatus Jettenia might be potentially contributing the most to anammox, while the Thiobacillus was the dominant taxa related to SAD. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Diurnal Patterns of Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Soil Respiration in Maize and Switchgrass Bioenergy Cropping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Haden, A.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Jackson, R. D.; Kucharik, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    A high proportion of carbon lost from terrestrial ecosystems occurs via soil CO2 respiration. Soil respiration is comprised of two contrasting sources: heterotrophic respiration (RH) from the decomposition of organic matter and autotrophic respiration (RA) from plant root metabolism. Since the two sources of soil respiration vary widely in their origin, the controls of each source are also likely to differ. However, the challenge of partitioning soil respiration sources in situ has limited our mechanistic understanding of RH and RA. Our objective was to evaluate the in situ diurnal controls of RH and RA in maize (Zea mays L.) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) bioenergy cropping systems. We hypothesized that both RH and RA would follow diurnal soil temperature trends, but that RA would also respond to diel patterns of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). We also expected that diurnal soil respiration patterns would vary significantly within the growing season. We evaluated our hypothesis with six diurnal soil respiration campaigns during the 2015 and 2016 growing seasons at Arlington, WI, USA. RH showed clear oscillating diel trends, typically peaking in the mid-afternoon when near-surface soil temperatures were highest. Diurnal RA patterns were more nuanced than RH, but were generally highest in the late afternoon and showed the most pronounced diel trends during peak growing season in July. RA also tended to spike in concert with PAR, but this effect was much more prominent in maize than switchgrass. Continuing efforts will attempt to quantitatively separate the effects of soil temperature and PAR on RA.

  1. Incidence of plant cover over the autotrophic nitrifying bacteria population in a fragment of Andean forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Xiomara; Gonzalez, L; Varela, A; Ahumada, J A

    1999-01-01

    It was determined the incidence of plant cover (forest vs. pasture), on the autotrophy nitrifying bacteria, through the effect of biotic factors (radical exudate) and abiotic factors (temperature, ph and humidity), in a high mountain cloud forest fragment. The site of study was located near La Mesa (Cundinamarca) municipality. The temperature of soil was measured in situ, and soil samples were collected and carried to the laboratory for pH and humidity percentage measurements. Serial soil dilution method was used for plating samples on a selective culture medium with ammonium sulphate as nitrogen source, in order to estimate the autotrophic nitrifying bacteria population levels. Grown colonies were examined macro and microscopically. The quantity of nitrates produced by bacteria cultured in vitro was determined spectra-photometrical. In relation to the abiotic factors, there was no significant differences of pH between both plant covers, but there were significant for soil humidity and temperature (p<0.05). There were highly significant differences with respect to the bacteria population levels (p<0.0001) and with respect to nitrate production. This suggests a higher bacterial activity in the under forest cover. The radical exudate from both types of plant cover reduced the viability of bacteria in vitro, from 1:1 to 1:30 exudate bacteria proportions. In the soils physical and chemical analysis, it was found a higher P and Al concentrations, and a higher CIC and organic matter content under the forest cover. It is suggested the importance of this functional group in this ecosystem

  2. Mutualism between autotrophic and heterophic bacteria in leaching of low grade ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, Z.M.; Naeveke, R.

    1991-01-01

    During solubilization processes of low grade sulphidic ores, the auto trophic bacteria oxidize reduced sulphur compounds and ferrous iron to sulphates and ferric iron respectively. The ore leaching bio topes are not only colonized by auto trophic bacteria (Thiobacillus spp., Leptospirillum ferro oxidans and sulfolobus sp.) but the heterotrophic microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi of various species are also found in these habitats. The autotrophs, in addition to energy metabolism, also produce organic compounds which in excess amount inhibit their growth. Through the utilization of such compounds and also through the production of carbon dioxide and ammonia, these heterotorphs can help bio leaching processes. Effect of one of the heterotrophs; methylobacterium sp., a nitrogen scavenger, found in as association with the thio bacilli in one of the leaching bio tope in Germany was studied in leaching of a carbonate bearing complex (containing copper, iron, zinc and lead) sulphidic ore, in shake flask studies. T. ferro oxidans (Strain F-40) reported to be non nitrogen fixer and strain F-41, a nitrogen fixing thiobacillus were studied for leachability behaviour alone and in combination with T. thio oxidans (lacking nitrogen fixing ability) using media with and without added ammonium nitrogen. In addition the effect of methylobacterium sp. (alt-25) was also tested with the afore mentioned combinations. Nitrogen fixation by T. ferro oxidans did not suffice the nitrogen requirement and the leaching system in laboratory needed addition of nitrogen. The heterotrophic nitrogen scavenger also did not have a positive influence in nitrogen limited system. In case where ammonium nitrogen was also provided in the media, this heterotroph had a negative in own growth and leaving lesser amount available for thio bacilli. This high amount of acid is a limiting factor in bio leaching of high carbonate uranium ores. Uranium ore ecosystems have also been found to contain

  3. Autotrophic antimonate bio-reduction using hydrogen as the electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun-Yu; Wen, Li-Lian; Zhang, Yin; Luo, Shan-Shan; Wang, Qing-Ying; Luo, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ran; Yang, Xiaoe; Rittmann, Bruce E; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Antimony (Sb), a toxic metalloid, is soluble as antimonate (Sb(V)). While bio-reduction of Sb(V) is an effective Sb-removal approach, its bio-reduction has been coupled to oxidation of only organic electron donors. In this study, we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of autotrophic microbial Sb(V) reduction using hydrogen gas (H2) as the electron donor without extra organic carbon source. SEM and EDS analysis confirmed the production of the mineral precipitate Sb2O3. When H2 was utilized as the electron donor, the consortium was able to fully reduce 650 μM of Sb(V) to Sb(III) in 10 days, a rate comparable to the culture using lactate as the electron donor. The H2-fed culture directed a much larger fraction of it donor electrons to Sb(V) reduction than did the lactate-fed culture. While 98% of the electrons from H2 were used to reduce Sb(V) by the H2-fed culture, only 12% of the electrons from lactate was used to reduce Sb(V) by the lactate-fed culture. The rest of the electrons from lactate went to acetate and propionate through fermentation, to methane through methanogenesis, and to biomass synthesis. High-throughput sequencing confirmed that the microbial community for the lactate-fed culture was much more diverse than that for the H2-fed culture, which was dominated by a short rod-shaped phylotype of Rhizobium (α-Protobacteria) that may have been active in Sb(V) reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-term Trends in Particulate Organic Carbon from a Low-Gradient Autotrophic Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J.; Ford, W. I., III

    2014-12-01

    Recent insights from low-gradient streams dominated by fine surficial sediments have shown fluvial organic matter dynamics are governed by coupled hydrologic and biotic controls at event to seasonal timescales. Notwithstanding the importance of shorter timescales, quantity and quality of carbon in stream ecosystems at annual and decadal scales is of increased interest in order to understand if stream ecosystems are net stores or sinks of carbon and how stream carbon behaves under dynamic climate conditions. As part of an ongoing study in a low-gradient, agricultural watershed in the Bluegrass Region of Central Kentucky, an eight year dataset of transported particulate organic carbon (POC) was analyzed for the present study. The objective was to investigate if POC dynamics at multi-year timescales are governed by biotic or hydrologic processes. A statistical analysis using Empirical Mode Decomposition was performed on an 8 year dataset of transported sediment carbon, temperature, and log-transformed flowrates at the watershed outlet. Simulations from a previously validated, process-based, organic carbon model were utilized as further verification of drivers. Results from the analysis suggest that a 4 degree Celsius mean annual temperature shift corresponds to a 63% increase in organic carbon content at the main-stem, third order outlet and a 33% increase in organic carbon content at the main-stem inlet. Model and stable isotope results for the 8 year study support that long-term increases in organic carbon concentration are governed by biotic growth and humification of algal biomass in which increasing annual temperatures promote increased organic carbon production, relative to ecosystem respiration. This result contradicts conventional wisdom, suggesting projected warming trends will shift autotrophic freshwater systems to net heterotrophic, which has significant implications for the role of benthic stream ecosystems under changing climate conditions. Future work

  5. Implementing a Nitrogen-Based Model for Autotrophic Respiration Using Satellite and Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The rate of carbon accumulation by terrestrial plant communities in a process-level, mechanistic modeling is the difference of the rate of gross photosynthesis by a canopy (A(sub g)) and autotrophic respiration (R) of the stand. Observations for different biomes often show that R to be a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), ca. 35% to 75%, although other studies suggest the ratio of R and A(sub g) to be less variable. Here, R has been calculated according to the two compartment model as being the sum of maintenance and growth components. The maintenance respiration of foliage and living fine roots for different biomes has been determined objectively from observed nitrogen content of these organs. The sapwood maintenance respiration is based on pipe theory, and checked against an independently derived equation considering sapwood biomass and its maintenance coefficient. The growth respiration has been calculated from the difference of A(sub g) and maintenance respiration. The A(sub g) is obtained as the product of biome-specific radiation use efficiency for gross photosynthesis under unstressed conditions and intercepted photosynthetically active radiation, and adjusted for stress. Calculations have been done using satellite and ground observations for 36 consecutive months (1987-1989) over large contiguous areas (ca. 10(exp 5) sq km) of boreal forests, crop land, temperate deciduous forest, temperate grassland, tropical deciduous forest, tropical evergreen forest, tropical savanna, and tundra. The ratio of annual respiration and gross photosynthesis, (R/A(sub g)), is found to be 0.5-0.6 for temperate and cold adopted biome areas, but somewhat higher for tropical biome areas (0.6-0.7). Interannual variation of the fluxes is found to be generally less than 15%. Calculated fluxes are compared with observations and several previous estimates. Results of sensitivity analysis are presented for uncertainties in parameterization and input data. It is found that

  6. Autotrophic fixation of geogenic CO2 by microorganisms contributes to soil organic matter formation and alters isotope signatures in a wetland mofette

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beulig, Felix

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the contribution of autotrophic microorganisms to organic matter (OM) formation in soils, we investigated natural CO2 vents (mofettes) situated in a wetland in northwest Bohemia (Czech Republic). Mofette soils had higher soil organic matter (SOM) concentrations than reference soils due...... of radiocarbon and enriched in 13C compared to atmospheric CO2. Together, these isotopic signals allow us to distinguish C fixed by plants from C fixed by autotrophic microorganisms using their differences in 13C discrimination. We can then estimate that up to 27 % of soil organic matter in the 0–10 cm layer...... ranged up to 1.59 ± 0.16 μg gdw−1 d−1. We inferred that the negative δ13C shift was caused by the activity of autotrophic microorganisms using the Calvin–Benson–Bassham (CBB) cycle, as indicated from quantification of cbbL/cbbM marker genes encoding for RubisCO by quantitative polymerase chain reaction...

  7. Aeration control by monitoring the microbiological activity using fuzzy logic diagnosis and control. Application to a complete autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiocchi, Riccardo; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine

    2015-01-01

    Complete Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal (CANR) is a novel process where ammonia is converted to nitrogen gas by different microbial groups. The performance of the process can be compromised by an unbalanced activity of the biomass caused by disturbances or non-optimal operational conditions...... microbial groups on the other hand, the diagnosis provides information on: nitritation, nitratation, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and overall autotrophic nitrogen removal. These four results give insight into the state of the process and are used as inputs for the controller that manipulates the aeration...... to the reactor.The diagnosis tool was first evaluated using 100 days of real process operation data obtained from a lab-scale single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removing reactor. This evaluation revealed that the fuzzy logic diagnosis is able to provide a realistic description of the microbiological state...

  8. 454-Pyrosequencing Analysis of Bacterial Communities from Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal Bioreactors Utilizing Universal Primers: Effect of Annealing Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Rodelas, Belén; Abbas, Ben A; Martinez-Toledo, Maria Victoria; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Osorio, F; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Identification of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria by molecular tools aimed at the evaluation of bacterial diversity in autotrophic nitrogen removal systems is limited by the difficulty to design universal primers for the Bacteria domain able to amplify the anammox 16S rRNA genes. A metagenomic analysis (pyrosequencing) of total bacterial diversity including anammox population in five autotrophic nitrogen removal technologies, two bench-scale models (MBR and Low Temperature CANON) and three full-scale bioreactors (anammox, CANON, and DEMON), was successfully carried out by optimization of primer selection and PCR conditions (annealing temperature). The universal primer 530F was identified as the best candidate for total bacteria and anammox bacteria diversity coverage. Salt-adjusted optimum annealing temperature of primer 530F was calculated (47°C) and hence a range of annealing temperatures of 44-49°C was tested. Pyrosequencing data showed that annealing temperature of 45°C yielded the best results in terms of species richness and diversity for all bioreactors analyzed.

  9. Bioleaching mechanism of Zn, Pb, In, Ag, Cd and As from Pb/Zn smelting slag by autotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Huang, Qifei; Li, Ting; Xin, Baoping; Chen, Shi; Guo, Xingming; Liu, Changhao; Li, Yuping

    2015-08-15

    A few studies have focused on release of valuable/toxic metals from Pb/Zn smelting slag by heterotrophic bioleaching using expensive yeast extract as an energy source. The high leaching cost greatly limits the practical potential of the method. In this work, autotrophic bioleaching using cheap sulfur or/and pyrite as energy matter was firstly applied to tackle the smelting slag and the bioleaching mechanisms were explained. The results indicated autotrophic bioleaching can solubilize valuable/toxic metals from slag, yielding maximum extraction efficiencies of 90% for Zn, 86% for Cd and 71% for In, although the extraction efficiencies of Pb, As and Ag were poor. The bioleaching performance of Zn, Cd and Pb was independent of leaching system, and leaching mechanism was acid dissolution. A maximum efficiency of 25% for As was achieved by acid dissolution in sulfursulfur oxidizing bacteria (S-SOB), but the formation of FeAsO4 reduced extraction efficiency in mixed energy source - mixed culture (MS-MC). Combined works of acid dissolution and Fe(3+) oxidation in MS-MC was responsible for the highest extraction efficiency of 71% for In. Ag was present in the slag as refractory AgPb4(AsO4)3 and AgFe2S3, so extraction did not occur. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of process operating conditions on the autotrophic denitrification of nitrate-contaminated groundwater using bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconet, D; Devecseri, M; Callegari, A; Capodaglio, A G

    2018-02-01

    Nitrates have been detected in groundwater worldwide, and their presence can lead to serious groundwater use limitations, especially because of potential health problems. Amongst different options for their removal, bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) have achieved promising results; in particular, attention has raised on BES-driven autotrophic denitrification processes. In this work, the performance of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) for groundwater autotrophic denitrification, is assessed in different conditions of nitrate load, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and process configuration. The system obtained almost complete nitrate removal under all conditions, while nitrite accumulation was recorded at nitrate loads higher than 100mgNO 3 - L -1 . The MEC system achieved, in different tests, a maximum nitrate removal rate of 62.15±3.04gNO 3 - -Nm -3 d -1 , while the highest TN removal rate observed was 35.37±1.18gTNm -3 d -1 . Characteristic of this process is a particularly low (in comparison with other reported works) energy consumption: 3.17·10 -3 ±2.26·10 -3 kWh/gNO 3 - N removed and 7.52·10 -2 ±3.58·10 -2 kWhm -3 treated. The anolyte configuration in closed loop allowed the process to use less clean water, while guaranteeing identical performances as in other conventional configurations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. 454-Pyrosequencing Analysis of Bacterial Communities from Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal Bioreactors Utilizing Universal Primers: Effect of Annealing Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Gonzalez-Martinez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox bacteria by molecular tools aimed at the evaluation of bacterial diversity in autotrophic nitrogen removal systems is limited by the difficulty to design universal primers for the Bacteria domain able to amplify the anammox 16S rRNA genes. A metagenomic analysis (pyrosequencing of total bacterial diversity including anammox population in five autotrophic nitrogen removal technologies, two bench-scale models (MBR and Low Temperature CANON and three full-scale bioreactors (anammox, CANON, and DEMON, was successfully carried out by optimization of primer selection and PCR conditions (annealing temperature. The universal primer 530F was identified as the best candidate for total bacteria and anammox bacteria diversity coverage. Salt-adjusted optimum annealing temperature of primer 530F was calculated (47°C and hence a range of annealing temperatures of 44–49°C was tested. Pyrosequencing data showed that annealing temperature of 45°C yielded the best results in terms of species richness and diversity for all bioreactors analyzed.

  12. Potential autotrophic metabolisms in ultra-basic reducing springs associated with present-day continental serpentinization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, P. L.; Miles, S.; Kohl, L.; Kavanagh, H.; Ziegler, S. E.; Brazelton, W. J.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Ultra-basic reducing springs at continental sites of serpentinization act as windows into the biogeochemistry of this subsurface exothermic environment rich in H2 and CH4 gases. Biogeochemical carbon transformations in these systems are of interest because serpentinization creates conditions that are amenable to abiotic and biotic reduction of carbon. However, little is known about the metabolic capabilities of the microorganisms that live in this environment. To determine the potential for autotrophic metabolisms, bicarbonate and CO substrate addition microcosm experiments were performed using water and sediment from an ultra-basic reducing spring in the Tablelands, Newfoundland, Canada, a site of present-day continental serpentinization. CO was consistently observed to be utilized in the Live but not the Killed controlled replicates amended with 10% 13C labelled CO and non-labelled (natural C isotope abundance) CO. In the Live CO microcosms with natural C isotope abundance, the residual CO became enriched in 13C (~10 ‰) consistent with a decrease in the fraction of CO remaining. In the Killed CO controlled replicates with natural C isotope abundance the CO showed little 13C enrichment (~1.3 ‰). The data from the Live CO microcosms were well described by a Rayleigh isotopic distillation model, yielding an isotopic enrichment factor for microbial CO uptake of 15.7 ×0.5 ‰ n=2. These data suggest that there was microbial CO utilization in these experiments. The sediment and water from the 13C-labelled and non-labelled, Live and Killed microcosms were extracted for phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) to determine changes in community composition between treatments as well as to determine the microbial uptake of CO. The difference in community composition between the Live and Killed microcosms was not readily resolvable based on PLFA distributions. Additionally, the microbial uptake of 13CO had minimal to no affect on the δ13C of the cellular biomarkers, with the

  13. An operational protocol for facilitating start-up of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen-removing reactors based on process stoichiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutlu, Ayten Gizem; Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-01-01

    Start-up and operation of single-stage nitritation–anammox sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) for completely autotrophic nitrogen removal can be challenging and far from trivial. In this study, a step-wise procedure is developed based on stoichiometric analysis of the process performance from...

  14. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator CbbR controlling autotrophic CO2 fixation by Xanthobacter flavus is an NADPH sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, G; Girbal, L; van den Bergh, E.R E; Dijkhuizen, L.; Meijer, W.G

    Autotrophic growth of Xanthobacter flavus is dependent on the fixation of carbon dioxide via the Calvin cycle and on the oxidation of simple organic and inorganic compounds to provide the cell with energy. Maximal induction of the cbb and gap-pgk operons encoding enzymes of the Calvin cycle occurs

  15. Regulation of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Metabolism in Pseudomonas oxalaticus OX1. Growth on Fructose and on Mixtures of Fructose and Formate in Batch and Continuous Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, L.; Harder, W.

    1984-01-01

    In Pseudomonas oxalaticus the synthesis of enzymes involved in autotrophic CO2 fixation via the Calvin cycle is regulated by repression/derepression. During growth of the organism on fructose alone, the synthesis of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) remained fully repressed, both in batch

  16. Formaldehyde as a carbon and electron shuttle between autotroph and heterotroph populations in acidic hydrothermal vents of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, James J.; Whitmore, Laura M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Romine, Margaret F.; Riha, Krystin M.; Inskeep, William P.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2016-03-19

    The Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park contains a large number of hydrothermal systems, which host microbial populations supported by primary productivity associated with a suite of chemolithotrophic metabolisms. We demonstrate that Metallosphaera yellowstonesis MK1, a facultative autotrophic archaeon isolated from a hyperthermal acidic hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) spring in Norris Geyser Basin, excretes formaldehyde during autotrophic growth. To determine the fate of formaldehyde in this low organic carbon environment, we incubated native microbial mat (containing M. yellowstonensis) from a HFO spring with 13C-formaldehyde. Isotopic analysis of incubation-derived CO2 and biomass showed that formaldehyde was both oxidized and assimilated by members of the community. Autotrophy, formaldehyde oxidation, and formaldehyde assimilation displayed different sensitivities to chemical inhibitors, suggesting that distinct sub-populations in the mat selectively perform these functions. Our results demonstrate that electrons originally resulting from iron oxidation can energetically fuel autotrophic carbon fixation and associated formaldehyde excretion, and that formaldehyde is both oxidized and assimilated by different organisms within the native microbial community. Thus, formaldehyde can effectively act as a carbon and electron shuttle connecting the autotrophic, iron oxidizing members with associated heterotrophic members in the HFO community.

  17. Oxygen and carbon dioxide mass transfer and the aerobic, autotrophic cultivation of moderate and extreme thermophiles : a case study related to the microbial desulfurization of coal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogerd, F C; Bos, P; Kuenen, J.G.; Heijnen, J.; van der Lans, R G

    Mass transfers of O(2), CO(2), and water vapor are among the key processes in the aerobic, autotrophic cultivation of moderate and extreme thermophiles. The dynamics and kinetics of these processes are, in addition to the obvious microbial kinetics, of crucial importance for the industrial

  18. Effects of dissolved oxygen and pH on nitrous oxide production rates in autotrophic partial nitrification granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnayake, Rathnayake M L D; Oshiki, Mamoru; Ishii, Satoshi; Segawa, Takahiro; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    The effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH on nitrous oxide (N2O) production rates and pathways in autotrophic partial nitrification (PN) granules were investigated at the granular level. N2O was primarily produced by betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, mainly Nitrosomonas europaea, in the oxic surface layer (production increased with increasing bulk DO concentration owing to activation of the ammonia (i.e., hydroxylamine) oxidation in this layer. The highest N2O emissions were observed at pH 7.5, although the ammonia oxidation rate was unchanged between pH 6.5 and 8.5. Overall, the results of this study suggest that in situ analyses of PN granules are essential to gaining insight into N2O emission mechanisms in a granule. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Seasonal dynamics of autotrophic and heterotrophic plankton metabolism and PCO2 in a subarctic Greenland fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejr, Mikael K.; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Dalsgaard, Tage

    2014-01-01

    of POC. The planktonic community was net heterotrophic in the photic zone in September (NCP = −21 ± 45 mmol O2 m−2 d−1) and February (NCP = −17 mmol O2 m−2 d−1) but net autotrophic during a developing spring bloom in May (NCP = 129 ± 102 mmol O2 m−2 d−1). In September, higher temperatures, shorter day......) and in the range of open ocean values, indicating that allochtonous carbon did not stimulate CR. The in the surface water was below atmospheric levels (September average 25.0 ± 0.71 Pa, February 35.4 ± 0.40 Pa, and May 19.8 ± 1.21 Pa), rendering the ecosystem a sink of atmospheric CO2. NCP was identified...

  20. Autotrophic nitrogen removal process in a potable water treatment biofilter that simultaneously removes Mn and NH4(+)-N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan'an; Li, Dong; Liang, Yuhai; Zeng, Huiping; Zhang, Jie

    2014-11-01

    Ammonia (NH4(+)-N) removal pathways were investigated in a potable water treatment biofilter that simultaneously removes manganese (Mn) and NH4(+)-N. The results indicated a significant loss of nitrogen in the biofilter. Both the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process and nitrification were more likely to contribute to NH4(+)-N removal. Moreover, the model calculation results demonstrated that the CANON process contributed significantly to the removal of NH4(+)-N. For influent NH4(+)-N levels of 1.030 and 1.749mg/L, the CANON process contribution was about 48.5% and 46.6%, respectively. The most important finding was that anaerobic ammonia oxidation (ANAMMOX) bacteria were detectable in the biofilter. It is interesting that the CANON process was effective even for such low NH4(+)-N concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Temporal variations in metabolic and autotrophic indices for Acropora digitifera and Acropora spicifera--implications for monitoring projects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Hinrichs

    Full Text Available Coral health indices are important components of the management assessments of coral reefs, providing insight into local variation in reef condition, as well as tools for comparisons between reefs and across various time scales. Understanding how such health indices vary in space and time is critical to their successful implementation as management tools. Here we compare autotrophic and heterotrophic coral health indices, examining specifically the temporal variation driven by the local environmental variation, at three scales (diel, daily and seasonal. We compared metabolic indices (RNA/DNA ratio, protein concentration and autotrophic indices (Chlorophyll a (Chl a, zooxanthellae density, effective quantum yield (yield and relative electron transport rate (rETR for two dominant Acropora species, A. digitifera and A. spicifera at Ningaloo Reef (north-western Australia in August 2010 (austral winter and February 2011 (austral summer. Clear seasonal patterns were documented for metabolic indices, zooxanthellae density and rETR, while cyclic diel patterns only occurred for yield and rETR, and RNA/DNA ratio. Significant daily variation was observed for RNA/DNA ratio, Chl a concentration, yield and rETR. Results suggest that zooxanthellae density and protein concentrations are good long-term indicators of coral health whose variance is largely seasonal, while RNA/DNA ratio and rETR can be used for both long-term (seasonal and short-term (diel coral monitoring. Chl a can be used to describe changes between days and yield for both diel and daily variations. Correlations between health indices and light history showed that short-term changes in irradiance had the strongest impact on all health indices except zooxanthellae density for A. digitifera; for A. spicifera no correlation was observed at all. However, cumulative irradiance over the several days before sampling showed significant correlations with most health indices suggesting that a time

  2. Temporal variations in metabolic and autotrophic indices for Acropora digitifera and Acropora spicifera--implications for monitoring projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Saskia; Patten, Nicole L; Waite, Anya M

    2013-01-01

    Coral health indices are important components of the management assessments of coral reefs, providing insight into local variation in reef condition, as well as tools for comparisons between reefs and across various time scales. Understanding how such health indices vary in space and time is critical to their successful implementation as management tools. Here we compare autotrophic and heterotrophic coral health indices, examining specifically the temporal variation driven by the local environmental variation, at three scales (diel, daily and seasonal). We compared metabolic indices (RNA/DNA ratio, protein concentration) and autotrophic indices (Chlorophyll a (Chl a), zooxanthellae density, effective quantum yield (yield) and relative electron transport rate (rETR)) for two dominant Acropora species, A. digitifera and A. spicifera at Ningaloo Reef (north-western Australia) in August 2010 (austral winter) and February 2011 (austral summer). Clear seasonal patterns were documented for metabolic indices, zooxanthellae density and rETR, while cyclic diel patterns only occurred for yield and rETR, and RNA/DNA ratio. Significant daily variation was observed for RNA/DNA ratio, Chl a concentration, yield and rETR. Results suggest that zooxanthellae density and protein concentrations are good long-term indicators of coral health whose variance is largely seasonal, while RNA/DNA ratio and rETR can be used for both long-term (seasonal) and short-term (diel) coral monitoring. Chl a can be used to describe changes between days and yield for both diel and daily variations. Correlations between health indices and light history showed that short-term changes in irradiance had the strongest impact on all health indices except zooxanthellae density for A. digitifera; for A. spicifera no correlation was observed at all. However, cumulative irradiance over the several days before sampling showed significant correlations with most health indices suggesting that a time-lag effect has

  3. Temporal Variations in Metabolic and Autotrophic Indices for Acropora digitifera and Acropora spicifera – Implications for Monitoring Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Saskia; Patten, Nicole L.; Waite, Anya M.

    2013-01-01

    Coral health indices are important components of the management assessments of coral reefs, providing insight into local variation in reef condition, as well as tools for comparisons between reefs and across various time scales. Understanding how such health indices vary in space and time is critical to their successful implementation as management tools. Here we compare autotrophic and heterotrophic coral health indices, examining specifically the temporal variation driven by the local environmental variation, at three scales (diel, daily and seasonal). We compared metabolic indices (RNA/DNA ratio, protein concentration) and autotrophic indices (Chlorophyll a (Chl a), zooxanthellae density, effective quantum yield (yield) and relative electron transport rate (rETR)) for two dominant Acropora species, A. digitifera and A. spicifera at Ningaloo Reef (north-western Australia) in August 2010 (austral winter) and February 2011 (austral summer). Clear seasonal patterns were documented for metabolic indices, zooxanthellae density and rETR, while cyclic diel patterns only occurred for yield and rETR, and RNA/DNA ratio. Significant daily variation was observed for RNA/DNA ratio, Chl a concentration, yield and rETR. Results suggest that zooxanthellae density and protein concentrations are good long-term indicators of coral health whose variance is largely seasonal, while RNA/DNA ratio and rETR can be used for both long-term (seasonal) and short-term (diel) coral monitoring. Chl a can be used to describe changes between days and yield for both diel and daily variations. Correlations between health indices and light history showed that short-term changes in irradiance had the strongest impact on all health indices except zooxanthellae density for A. digitifera; for A. spicifera no correlation was observed at all. However, cumulative irradiance over the several days before sampling showed significant correlations with most health indices suggesting that a time-lag effect has

  4. The Robin, Erithacus Rubecula (Passeriformes, Turdidae, As a Component of Autotrophic Consortia of Forest Cenoses, Northeast Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaplygina A. B.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the robin, Erithacus rubecula Linnaeus, 1758 as a consort of autotrophic consortia is considered. It has been found that representatives of 9 higher taxa of animals (Mammalia, Aves, Gastropoda, Insecta, Arachnida, Acarina, Malacostraca, Diplopoda, Clitellata have trophic and topical links with the robin. At the same time, the robin is a consort of determinants of autotrophic consortia, which core is represented mostly by dominating species of deciduous trees (Quercus robur Linnaeus, 1753 (24.6 %, Tilia cordata Miller, 1768 (17.5 %, Acer platanoides Linnaeus, 1753 (22.8 %, Acer campestre Linnaeus, 1753, and also by sedges (Carex sp. and grasses (Poaceae. The robin also belongs to the concentre of the second and higher orders as a component of forest biogeocenoses and forms a complex trophic system. In the diet of its nestlings, there have been found 717 objects from 32 invertebrate taxa, belonging to the phylums Arthropoda (99.2 %, 31 species and Annelida (0.8 %, 1 species. The phylum Arthropoda was represented by the most numerous class Insecta (76.9 %, in which 10 orders (Lepidoptera (46.8 % dominates and 20 families were recorded, and also by the classes Arachnida (15.0 %, Malacostraca (5.3 % and Diplopoda (1.9 %. The invertebrate species composition was dominated by representatives of a trophic group of zoophages (14 species; 43.8 %; the portion of phytophages (7 species; 21.9 %, saprophages (18.7 %, and necrophages (15.6 % was the less. The highest number of food items was represented by phytophages (N = 717; 51 %, followed by zoophages (34 %, saprophages (12 %, and necrophages (3 %. The difference among study areas according to the number of food items and the number of species in the robin nestling diet is shown. In NNP “HF”, the highest number of food items was represented by phytophages - 47 % (N = 443, whereas zoophages were the most species-rich group (43.3 %, 13 species. In NNP “H”, phytophages also prevailed in

  5. Performance of nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidizing (NAFO) process: a novel prospective technology for autotrophic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Zheng, Ping; Li, Wei; Wang, Ru; Ding, Shuang; Abbas, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    Nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidizing (NAFO) is a valuable biological process, which utilizes ferrous iron to convert nitrate into nitrogen gas, removing nitrogen from wastewater. In this work, the performance of NAFO process was investigated as a nitrate removal technology. The results showed that NAFO system was feasible for autotrophic denitrification. The volumetric loading rate (VLR) and volumetric removal rate (VRR) under steady state were 0.159±0.01 kg-N/(m(3) d) and 0.073±0.01 kg-N/(m(3) d), respectively. In NAFO system, the effluent pH was suggested as an indicator which demonstrated a good correlation with nitrogen removal. The nitrate concentration was preferred to be less than 130 mg-N/L. Organic matters had little influence on NAFO performance. Abundant iron compounds were revealed to accumulate in NAFO sludge with peak value of 51.73% (wt), and they could be recycled for phosphorus removal, with capacity of 16.57 mg-P/g VS and removal rate of 94.77±2.97%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Autotrophic and heterotrophic acquisition of carbon and nitrogen by a mixotrophic chrysophyte established through stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrado, Ramon; Pasulka, Alexis L; Lie, Alle A-Y; Orphan, Victoria J; Heidelberg, Karla B; Caron, David A

    2017-01-01

    Collectively, phagotrophic algae (mixotrophs) form a functional continuum of nutritional modes between autotrophy and heterotrophy, but the specific physiological benefits of mixotrophic nutrition differ among taxa. Ochromonas spp. are ubiquitous chrysophytes that exhibit high nutritional flexibility, although most species generally fall towards the heterotrophic end of the mixotrophy spectrum. We assessed the sources of carbon and nitrogen in Ochromonas sp. strain BG-1 growing mixotrophically via short-term stable isotope probing. An axenic culture was grown in the presence of either heat-killed bacteria enriched with 15N and 13C, or unlabeled heat-killed bacteria and labeled inorganic substrates (13C-bicarbonate and 15N-ammonium). The alga exhibited high growth rates (up to 2 divisions per day) only until heat-killed bacteria were depleted. NanoSIMS and bulk IRMS isotope analyses revealed that Ochromonas obtained 84–99% of its carbon and 88–95% of its nitrogen from consumed bacteria. The chrysophyte assimilated inorganic 13C-carbon and 15N-nitrogen when bacterial abundances were very low, but autotrophic (photosynthetic) activity was insufficient to support net population growth of the alga. Our use of nanoSIMS represents its first application towards the study of a mixotrophic alga, enabling a better understanding and quantitative assessment of carbon and nutrient acquisition by this species. PMID:28524870

  7. Bacterial diversity of autotrophic enriched cultures from remote, glacial Antarctic, Alpine and Andean aerosol, snow and soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Toril, E.; Amils, R.; Delmas, R. J.; Petit, J.-R.; Komárek, J.; Elster, J.

    2009-01-01

    Four different communities and one culture of autotrophic microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area) and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia), from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville) and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas), in a minimal mineral (oligotrophic) media. Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. Phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed sequences belonging to Proteobacteria Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria), Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla to be identified. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified) and the marine Antarctic soil the poorest (only one). Snow samples from Col du Midi (Alps) and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones). These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteriaclone). The only microorganism identified in the Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp.) was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. Most of the identified microorganisms had been detected previously in cold environments, marine sediments soils and rocks. Air current dispersal is the best model to explain the presence of very specific microorganisms, like those identified in this work, in environments very distant and very different from each other.

  8. Autotrophic and heterotrophic acquisition of carbon and nitrogen by a mixotrophic chrysophyte established through stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrado, Ramon; Pasulka, Alexis L; Lie, Alle A-Y; Orphan, Victoria J; Heidelberg, Karla B; Caron, David A

    2017-09-01

    Collectively, phagotrophic algae (mixotrophs) form a functional continuum of nutritional modes between autotrophy and heterotrophy, but the specific physiological benefits of mixotrophic nutrition differ among taxa. Ochromonas spp. are ubiquitous chrysophytes that exhibit high nutritional flexibility, although most species generally fall towards the heterotrophic end of the mixotrophy spectrum. We assessed the sources of carbon and nitrogen in Ochromonas sp. strain BG-1 growing mixotrophically via short-term stable isotope probing. An axenic culture was grown in the presence of either heat-killed bacteria enriched with 15 N and 13 C, or unlabeled heat-killed bacteria and labeled inorganic substrates ( 13 C-bicarbonate and 15 N-ammonium). The alga exhibited high growth rates (up to 2 divisions per day) only until heat-killed bacteria were depleted. NanoSIMS and bulk IRMS isotope analyses revealed that Ochromonas obtained 84-99% of its carbon and 88-95% of its nitrogen from consumed bacteria. The chrysophyte assimilated inorganic 13 C-carbon and 15 N-nitrogen when bacterial abundances were very low, but autotrophic (photosynthetic) activity was insufficient to support net population growth of the alga. Our use of nanoSIMS represents its first application towards the study of a mixotrophic alga, enabling a better understanding and quantitative assessment of carbon and nutrient acquisition by this species.

  9. Concurrent and lagged impacts of an anomalously warm year on autotrophic and heterotrophic components of soil respiration: a deconvolution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuhui; Luo, Yiqi; Gao, Chao; Verburg, Paul S J; Arnone, John A; Darrouzet-Nardi, Anthony; Schimel, David S

    2010-07-01

    *Partitioning soil respiration into autotrophic (R(A)) and heterotrophic (R(H)) components is critical for understanding their differential responses to climate warming. *Here, we used a deconvolution analysis to partition soil respiration in a pulse warming experiment. We first conducted a sensitivity analysis to determine which parameters can be identified by soil respiration data. A Markov chain Monte Carlo technique was then used to optimize those identifiable parameters in a terrestrial ecosystem model. Finally, the optimized parameters were employed to quantify R(A) and R(H) in a forward analysis. *Our results displayed that more than one-half of parameters were constrained by daily soil respiration data. The optimized model simulation showed that warming stimulated R(H) and had little effect on R(A) in the first 2 months, but decreased both R(H) and R(A) during the remainder of the treatment and post-treatment years. Clipping of above-ground biomass stimulated the warming effect on R(H) but not on R(A). Overall, warming decreased R(A) and R(H) significantly, by 28.9% and 24.9%, respectively, during the treatment year and by 27.3% and 33.3%, respectively, during the post-treatment year, largely as a result of decreased canopy greenness and biomass. *Lagged effects of climate anomalies on soil respiration and its components are important in assessing terrestrial carbon cycle feedbacks to climate warming.

  10. Enhanced accumulation of starch and total carbohydrates in alginate-immobilized Chlorella spp. induced by Azospirillum brasilense: I. Autotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choix, Francisco J; de-Bashan, Luz E; Bashan, Yoav

    2012-10-10

    The effect of the microalgae-growth promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense on accumulation of total carbohydrates and starch in two species of Chlorella (Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella sorokiniana), when the bacterium and each microalga were jointly immobilized in alginate beads was studied under autotrophic conditions for 144 h in synthetic medium. The interaction of the bacterium with the microalgae enhanced accumulation of total carbohydrate and starch. Cells of Chlorella accumulated the highest amounts of carbohydrate after incubation for 24h. Yet, this did not coincide with the highest affinity and volumetric productivity measured in these cultures. However, after incubation for 72 h, mainly in jointly immobilized treatments of both microalgae species, the cultures reached their highest total carbohydrate content (mainly as starch) and also the highest affinity and volumetric productivity. These results demonstrate the potential of A. brasilense to affect carbohydrates and starch accumulation in Chlorella spp. when both microorganisms are co-cultured, which can be an important tool for applications of microalgae. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Simultaneous biological nutrient removal: evaluation of autotrophic denitrification, heterotrophic nitrification, and biological phosphorus removal in full-scale systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Helen X; Daigger, Glen T; Strom, Peter F; Cowan, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    Simultaneous biological nutrient removal (SBNR) is the biological removal of nitrogen and phosphorus in excess of that required for biomass synthesis in a biological wastewater treatment system without defined anaerobic or anoxic zones. Evidence is growing that significant SBNR can occur in many systems, including the aerobic zone of systems already configured for biological nutrient removal. Although SBNR systems offer several potential advantages, they cannot be fully realized until the mechanisms responsible for SBNR are better understood. Consequently, a research program was initiated with the basic hypothesis that three mechanisms might be responsible for SBNR: the reactor macroenvironment, the floc microenvironment, and novel microorganisms. Previously, the nutrient removal capabilities of seven full-scale, staged, closed-loop bioreactors known as Orbal oxidation ditches were evaluated. Chemical analysis and microbiological observations suggested that SBNR occurred in these systems. Three of these plants were further examined in this research to evaluate the importance of novel microorganisms, especially for nitrogen removal. A screening tool was developed to determine the relative significance of the activities of microorganisms capable of autotrophic denitrification and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification in biological nutrient removal systems. The results indicated that novel microorganisms were not substantial contributors to SBNR in the plants studied. Phosphorus metabolism (anaerobic release, aerobic uptake) was also tested in one of the plants. Activity within the mixed liquor that was consistent with current theories for phosphorus-accumulating organisms (PAOs) was observed. Along with other observations, this suggests the presence of PAOs in the facilities studied.

  12. Flow enhances photosynthesis in marine benthic autotrophs by increasing the efflux of oxygen from the organism to the water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass, Tali; Genin, Amatzia; Shavit, Uri; Grinstein, Mor; Tchernov, Dan

    2010-02-09

    Worldwide, many marine coastal habitats are facing rapid deterioration due in part to human-driven changes in habitat characteristics, including changes in flow patterns, a factor known to greatly affect primary production in corals, algae, and seagrasses. The effect of flow traditionally is attributed to enhanced influx of nutrients and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) across the benthic boundary layer from the water to the organism however, here we report that the organism's photosynthetic response to changes in the flow is nearly instantaneous, and that neither nutrients nor DIC limits this rapid response. Using microelectrodes, dual-pulse amplitude-modulated fluorometry, particle image velocimetry, and real time mass-spectrometry with the common scleractinian coral Favia veroni, the alga Gracilaria cornea, and the seagrass Halophila stipulacea, we show that this augmented photosynthesis is due to flow-driven enhancement of oxygen efflux from the organism to the water, which increases the affinity of the RuBisCO to CO(2). No augmentation of photosynthesis was found in the absence of flow or when flow occurred, but the ambient concentration of oxygen was artificially elevated. We suggest that water motion should be considered a fundamental factor, equivalent to light and nutrients, in determining photosynthesis rates in marine benthic autotrophs.

  13. Evaluation of autotrophic growth of ammonia-oxidizers associated with granular activated carbon used for drinking water purification by DNA-stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jia; Kasuga, Ikuro; Kurisu, Futoshi; Furumai, Hiroaki; Shigeeda, Takaaki

    2013-12-01

    Nitrification is an important biological function of granular activated carbon (GAC) used in advanced drinking water purification processes. Newly discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) have challenged the traditional understanding of ammonia oxidation, which considered ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) as the sole ammonia-oxidizers. Previous studies demonstrated the predominance of AOA on GAC, but the contributions of AOA and AOB to ammonia oxidation remain unclear. In the present study, DNA-stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used to investigate the autotrophic growth of AOA and AOB associated with GAC at two different ammonium concentrations (0.14 mg N/L and 1.4 mg N/L). GAC samples collected from three full-scale drinking water purification plants in Tokyo, Japan, had different abundance of AOA and AOB. These samples were fed continuously with ammonium and (13)C-bicarbonate for 14 days. The DNA-SIP analysis demonstrated that only AOA assimilated (13)C-bicarbonate at low ammonium concentration, whereas AOA and AOB exhibited autotrophic growth at high ammonium concentration. This indicates that a lower ammonium concentration is preferable for AOA growth. Since AOA could not grow without ammonium, their autotrophic growth was coupled with ammonia oxidation. Overall, our results point towards an important role of AOA in nitrification in GAC filters treating low concentration of ammonium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effect of Aluminium on Antibacterial Properties and the Content of Some Fatty Acids in Microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris Beijernick, under Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Abbaspour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are a group of organisms, which have a significant potential for industrial applications. These algae contain large amounts of lipids compounds that are beneficial to health, have antibacterial properties, and their extracted oil can be used for biofuel. In this study, microalgae Chlorella vulgaris Beijernick was grown in the culture medium BG-11 containing aluminium (AlCl3 under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. In each case, survival and growth, dry weight, internal aluminium content of the sample, antibacterial properties, the content of fatty acids accumulated in the algae and secreted into the culture medium in the logarithmic growth phase were studied. Aluminium significantly increased (P < .05 growth and dry weight in autotrophic treatment compared to the heterotrophic one. Most antibacterial properties were observed in methanol extracts of heterotrophic treatments containing 0.05% glucose. Aluminium also decreased fatty acids accumulation in the algae and increased fatty acids excretion into the culture medium in heterotrophic treatment compared to the autotrophic treatment. Survival of the sample was maintained in heterotrophic conditions and showed growth without lag phase, which is indicative of rapid acclimation of organisms in heterotrophic conditions. It seems that the mentioned characteristics make the single-celled green algae Chlorella vulgaris more efficient in different ways.

  15. A Genetic System for Clostridium ljungdahlii: a Chassis for Autotrophic Production of Biocommodities and a Model Homoacetogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2013-02-04

    Methods for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii are of interest because of the potential for production of fuels and other biocommodities from carbon dioxide via microbial electrosynthesis or more traditional modes of autotrophy with hydrogen or carbon monoxide as the electron donor. Furthermore, acetogenesis plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. Gene deletion strategies required for physiological studies of C. ljungdahlii have not previously been demonstrated. An electroporation procedure for introducing plasmids was optimized, and four different replicative origins for plasmid propagation in C. ljungdahlii were identified. Chromosomal gene deletion via double-crossover homologous recombination with a suicide vector was demonstrated initially with deletion of the gene for FliA, a putative sigma factor involved in flagellar biogenesis and motility in C. ljungdahlii. Deletion of fliA yielded a strain that lacked flagella and was not motile. To evaluate the potential utility of gene deletions for functional genomic studies and to redirect carbon and electron flow, the genes for the putative bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases, adhE1 and adhE2, were deleted individually or together. Deletion of adhE1, but not adhE2, diminished ethanol production with a corresponding carbon recovery in acetate. The double deletion mutant had a phenotype similar to that of the adhE1-deficient strain. Expression of adhE1 in trans partially restored the capacity for ethanol production. These results demonstrate the feasibility of genetic investigations of acetogen physiology and the potential for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii to optimize autotrophic biocommodity production.

  16. Bacterial diversity of autotrophic enriched cultures from remote, glacial Antarctic, Alpine and Andean aerosol, snow and soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. González-Toril

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Four different communities and one culture of autotrophic microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia, from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas, in a minimal mineral (oligotrophic media. Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. Phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed sequences belonging to Proteobacteria Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla to be identified. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified and the marine Antarctic soil the poorest (only one. Snow samples from Col du Midi (Alps and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones. These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteriaclone. The only microorganism identified in the Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp. was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. Most of the identified microorganisms had been detected previously in cold environments, marine sediments soils and rocks. Air current dispersal is the best model to explain the presence of very specific microorganisms, like those identified in this work, in environments very distant and very different from each other.

  17. Contrasting Inherent Optical Properties and Carbon Metabolism Between Five Northeastern (USA) Estuary-plume Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemark, Doug; Salisbury, Joe; Hunt, Chris; McGillis, Wade R.

    2004-01-01

    We have recently developed the ability to rapidly assess Surface inherent optical properties (IOP), oxygen concentration and pCO2 in estuarine-plume systems using flow-through instrumentation. During the summer of 2004, several estuarine-plume systems were surveyed which include the Pleasant (ME), Penobscot (ME), Kennebec-Androscoggin (ME), Merrimack (NH-MA) and Hudson (NY). Continuous measurements of surface chlorophyll and colored dissolved organic carbon (CDOM) fluorescence, beam attenuation, temperature, salinity, oxygen and pC02 were taken at each system along a salinity gradient from fresh water to near oceanic endmembers. CTD and IOP profiles were also taken at predetermined surface salinity intervals. These were accompanied by discrete determinations of chlorophyll (HPLC and fluorometric), total suspended solids (TSS), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and alkalinity. IOP data were calibrated using chlorophyll, DOC and TSS data to enable the retrieval of these constituents from IOP data. Considerable differences in the data sets were observed between systems. These ranged from the DOC-enriched, strongly heterotrophic Pleasant River System to the high-chlorophyll autotrophic Merrimack River System. Using pCO2 and oxygen saturation measurements as proxies for water column metabolism, distinct relationships were found between trophic status and inherent optical properties. The nature of these relationships varies between systems and is likely a function of watershed and estuarine attributes including carbon and nutrient loading, in-situ production and related autochthonous inputs of DOC and alkalinity. Our results suggest that IOP data may contain significant information about the trophic status of estuarine and plume systems.

  18. Sequential dark-photo fermentation and autotrophic microalgal growth for high-yield and CO{sub 2}-free biohydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Yung-Chung [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701 (China); Chen, Chun-Yen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701 (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Lee, Chi-Mei [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701 (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Center for Biosciences and Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China)

    2010-10-15

    Dark fermentation, photo fermentation, and autotrophic microalgae cultivation were integrated to establish a high-yield and CO{sub 2}-free biohydrogen production system by using different feedstock. Among the four carbon sources examined, sucrose was the most effective for the sequential dark (with Clostridium butyricum CGS5) and photo (with Rhodopseudomonas palutris WP3-5) fermentation process. The sequential dark-photo fermentation was stably operated for nearly 80 days, giving a maximum H{sub 2} yield of 11.61 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose and a H{sub 2} production rate of 673.93 ml/h/l. The biogas produced from the sequential dark-photo fermentation (containing ca. 40.0% CO{sub 2}) was directly fed into a microalga culture (Chlorella vulgaris C-C) cultivated at 30 C under 60 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}/s illumination. The CO{sub 2} produced from the fermentation processes was completely consumed during the autotrophic growth of C. vulgaris C-C, resulting in a microalgal biomass concentration of 1999 mg/l composed mainly of 48.0% protein, 23.0% carbohydrate and 12.3% lipid. (author)

  19. Enhancement of the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite process in a modified single-stage subsurface vertical flow constructed wetland: Effect of saturated zone depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Menglu; Wang, Zhen; Qi, Ran

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to explore enhancement of the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process in a modified single-stage subsurface vertical flow constructed wetland (VSSF) with saturated zone, and nitrogen transformation pathways in the VSSF treating digested swine wastewater were investigated at four different saturated zone depths (SZDs). SZD significantly affected nitrogen transformation pathways in the VSSF throughout the experiment. As the SZD was 45cm, the CANON process was enhanced most effectively in the system owing to the notable enhancement of anammox. Correspondingly, the VSSF had the best TN removal performance [(76.74±7.30)%] and lower N 2 O emission flux [(3.50±0.22)mg·(m 2 ·h) - 1 ]. It could be concluded that autotrophic nitrogen removal via CANON process could become a primary route for nitrogen removal in the VSSF with optimized microenvironment that developed as a result of the appropriate SZD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigations on photosynthetic pigments of Lemnaceae, pt. 14: The effect of UV-B radiation on deetiolating and autotrophically growing plants of Lemna gibba L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wejnar, R.; Döhler, D.

    1992-01-01

    In deetiolating plants of Lemma gibba L., the biosynthesis of photosynthetically active pigments (chlorophyll a and b, beta-carotene, lutein, violaxanthin and neoxanthin) was reduced by UV-B radiation (2,5 W cnt * m -2 ) in dependence on the exposure time (8-96-h). The biosynthesis of chlorophyll b was more inhibited than that of chlorophyll a, that of the chlorophylls more than that of the carotenoids and that of beta-carotene more than that of the xanthophylls notably lutein. In autotrophic plants. UV-B radiation (42, 72 and 120 h) causes a strong reduction of the pigment content. The alteration of the ratios between the pigments was the same as in deetiolating plants. In deetiolating as well as in autotropically cultivated plants of Lemma gibba, the termination of the UV-B radiation is followed by an approach to the original ratios

  1. Autotrophic fixation of geogenic CO2 by microorganisms contributes to soil organic matter formation and alters isotope signatures in a wetland mofette

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beulig, Felix

    2015-01-01

    of radiocarbon and enriched in 13C compared to atmospheric CO2. Together, these isotopic signals allow us to distinguish C fixed by plants from C fixed by autotrophic microorganisms using their differences in 13C discrimination. We can then estimate that up to 27 % of soil organic matter in the 0–10 cm layer...... geogenic CO2 was fixed by plants or by CO2 assimilating microorganisms, we first used the proportional differences in radiocarbon and δ13C values to indicate the magnitude of discrimination of the stable isotopes in living plants. Deviation from this relationship was taken to indicate the presence...... can recycle significant amounts of carbon in wetland soils and might contribute to observed radiocarbon reservoir effects influencing Δ14C signatures in peat deposits....

  2. Autotrophic denitrification of synthetic nitrate-contaminated groundwater in up-flow fixed-bed bioreactor by pumice as porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Tourang1

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Background: Increasing nitrate concentrations in groundwater resources is considered a common environmental and public health problem worldwide. In this research, an autotrophic up-flow bioreactor with pumice as media was used to study the effects of the sulfur-to-nitrogen (S/N ratio and empty bed contact time (EBCT on nitrate removal efficiency and byproducts. Methods: Experiments were carried out in a 3.47 L up-flow, fixed-bed reactor with 3 sampling ports. To evaluate the overall impact of S/N ratio and EBCT on the performance of the bioreactor, several phases with different S/N ratios and EBCTs were applied. Results: At a constant S/N ratio of 3.85 g/g, as EBCT decreased from 24 hours to 2 hours, the nitrate removal efficiency decreased from 98% to 64%. On the other hand, at the desired EBCT of 4 hr, as S/N ratio decreased from 3.85 to 1.51 g/g, nitrate removal efficiency was reduced from 85% to 32%. Changing the EBCT and S/N ratio also affected the effluent nitrite and sulfate concentrations as byproducts. At the S/N ratio of 3.85 g/g and EBCT of 24 hours, effluent nitrite and sulfate concentrations were 0.1 mg NO2--N/L and 463 mg SO4 2-/L, respectively. Decreasing the S/N ratio to 1.51 g/g and the EBCT to 4 hours caused drastic changes in effluent nitrite and sulfate concentrations. Conclusion: The results indicated that the autotrophic denitrification with thiosulfate as electron donor and pumice as media was feasible and applicable for nitrate contaminated groundwater.

  3. Analysis of Microbial Communities in Biofilms from CSTR-Type Hollow Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Autotrophic Nitrification and Hydrogenotrophic Denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Hun; Kim, Byung-Chun; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Hyunook; Sang, Byoung-In

    2015-10-01

    Two hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactors (HF-MBfRs) were operated for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification for over 300 days. Oxygen and hydrogen were supplied through the hollow fiber membrane for nitrification and denitrification, respectively. During the period, the nitrogen was removed with the efficiency of 82-97% for ammonium and 87-97% for nitrate and with the nitrogen removal load of 0.09-0.26 kg NH4(+)-N/m(3)/d and 0.10-0.21 kg NO3(-)-N/m(3)/d, depending on hydraulic retention time variation by the two HF-MBfRs for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification, respectively. Biofilms were collected from diverse topological positions in the reactors, each at different nitrogen loading rates, and the microbial communities were analyzed with partial 16S rRNA gene sequences in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Detected DGGE band sequences in the reactors were correlated with nitrification or denitrification. The profile of the DGGE bands depended on the NH4(+) or NO3(-) loading rate, but it was hard to find a major strain affecting the nitrogen removal efficiency. Nitrospira-related phylum was detected in all biofilm samples from the nitrification reactors. Paracoccus sp. and Aquaspirillum sp., which are an autohydrogenotrophic bacterium and an oligotrophic denitrifier, respectively, were observed in the denitrification reactors. The distribution of microbial communities was relatively stable at different nitrogen loading rates, and DGGE analysis based on 16S rRNA (341f /534r) could successfully detect nitrate-oxidizing and hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria but not ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the HF-MBfRs.

  4. Removal of highly elevated nitrate from drinking water by pH-heterogenized heterotrophic denitrification facilitated with ferrous sulfide-based autotrophic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Chi, Guangyu; Chen, Xin; Shi, Yi

    2011-11-01

    The performance of acetic acid-supported pH-heterogenized heterotrophic denitrification (HD) facilitated with ferrous sulfide-based autotrophic denitrification (AD) was investigated in upflow activated carbon-packed column reactors for reliable removal of highly elevated nitrate (42 mg NO(3)-Nl(-1)) in drinking water. The use of acetic acid as substrate provided sufficient internal carbon dioxide to completely eliminate the need of external pH adjustment for HD, but simultaneously created vertically heterogenized pH varying from 4.8 to 7.8 in the HD reactor. After 5-week acclimation, the HD reactor developed a moderate nitrate removal capacity with about one third of nitrate removal occurring in the acidic zone (pH 4.8-6.2). To increase the treatment reliability, acetic acid-supported HD was operated under 10% carbon limitation to remove >85% of nitrate, and ferrous sulfide-based AD was supplementally operated to remove residual nitrate and formed nitrite without excess of soluble organic carbon, nitrite or sulfate in the final effluent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. An isotope approach based on C-13 pulse-chase labelling vs. the root trenching method to separate heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration in cultivated peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, C.; Pitkamaki, A. S.; Tavi, N. M.; Koponen, H. T.; Martikainen, P. J. [Univ.of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Science], e-mail: christina.biasi@uef.fi

    2012-11-01

    We tested an isotope method based on C-13 pulse-chase labelling for determining the fractional contribution of soil microbial respiration to overall soil respiration in an organic soil (cutaway peatland, eastern Finland), cultivated with the bioenergy crop, reed canary grass. The plants were exposed to CO{sub 2}-13 for five hours and the label was thereafter determined in CO{sub 2} derived from the soil-root system. A two-pool isotope mixing model was used to separate sources of respiration. The isotopic approach showed that a minimum of 50% of the total CO{sub 2} originated from soil-microbial respiration. Even though the method uses undisturbed soil-plant systems, it has limitations concerning the experimental determination of the true isotopic signal of all components contributing to autotrophic respiration. A trenching experiment which was comparatively conducted resulted in a 71% fractional contribution of soil-microbial respiration. This value was likely overestimated. Further studies are needed to evaluate critically the output from these two partitioning approaches. (orig.)

  6. Predominant Non-additive Effects of Multiple Stressors on Autotroph C:N:P Ratios Propagate in Freshwater and Marine Food Webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Argaiz, Manuel; Medina-Sánchez, Juan M.; Biddanda, Bopaiah A.; Carrillo, Presentación

    2018-01-01

    A continuing challenge for scientists is to understand how multiple interactive stressor factors affect biological interactions, and subsequently, ecosystems–in ways not easily predicted by single factor studies. In this review, we have compiled and analyzed available research on how multiple stressor pairs composed of temperature (T), light (L), ultraviolet radiation (UVR), nutrients (Nut), carbon dioxide (CO2), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and salinity (S) impact the stoichiometry of autotrophs which in turn shapes the nature of their ecological interactions within lower trophic levels in streams, lakes and oceans. Our analysis from 66 studies with 320 observations of 11 stressor pairs, demonstrated that non-additive responses predominate across aquatic ecosystems and their net interactive effect depends on the stressor pair at play. Across systems, there was a prevalence of antagonism in freshwater (60–67% vs. 47% in marine systems) compared to marine systems where synergism was more common (49% vs. 33–40% in freshwaters). While the lack of data impeded comparisons among all of the paired stressors, we found pronounced system differences for the L × Nut interactions. For this interaction, our data for C:P and N:P is consistent with the initial hypothesis that the interaction was primarily synergistic in the oceans, but not for C:N. Our study found a wide range of variability in the net effects of the interactions in freshwater systems, with some observations supporting antagonism, and others synergism. Our results suggest that the nature of the stressor pairs interactions on C:N:P ratios regulates the “continuum” commensalistic-competitive-predatory relationship between algae and bacteria and the food chain efficiency at the algae-herbivore interface. Overall, the scarce number of studies with even more fewer replications in each study that are available for freshwater systems have prevented a more detailed, insightful analysis. Our findings

  7. Predominant Non-additive Effects of Multiple Stressors on Autotroph C:N:P Ratios Propagate in Freshwater and Marine Food Webs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Villar-Argaiz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A continuing challenge for scientists is to understand how multiple interactive stressor factors affect biological interactions, and subsequently, ecosystems–in ways not easily predicted by single factor studies. In this review, we have compiled and analyzed available research on how multiple stressor pairs composed of temperature (T, light (L, ultraviolet radiation (UVR, nutrients (Nut, carbon dioxide (CO2, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, and salinity (S impact the stoichiometry of autotrophs which in turn shapes the nature of their ecological interactions within lower trophic levels in streams, lakes and oceans. Our analysis from 66 studies with 320 observations of 11 stressor pairs, demonstrated that non-additive responses predominate across aquatic ecosystems and their net interactive effect depends on the stressor pair at play. Across systems, there was a prevalence of antagonism in freshwater (60–67% vs. 47% in marine systems compared to marine systems where synergism was more common (49% vs. 33–40% in freshwaters. While the lack of data impeded comparisons among all of the paired stressors, we found pronounced system differences for the L × Nut interactions. For this interaction, our data for C:P and N:P is consistent with the initial hypothesis that the interaction was primarily synergistic in the oceans, but not for C:N. Our study found a wide range of variability in the net effects of the interactions in freshwater systems, with some observations supporting antagonism, and others synergism. Our results suggest that the nature of the stressor pairs interactions on C:N:P ratios regulates the “continuum” commensalistic-competitive-predatory relationship between algae and bacteria and the food chain efficiency at the algae-herbivore interface. Overall, the scarce number of studies with even more fewer replications in each study that are available for freshwater systems have prevented a more detailed, insightful analysis. Our

  8. Full scale application of the autotrophic denitrification in trickling filters for treatment of rejection water with high ammonia concentrations from sludge dewatering. Final report; Untersuchungen zur autotrophen Stickstoffentfernung aus ammoniumreichem Filtratwasser der Schlammentwaesserung mit grosstechnischer Realisierung in Tropfkoerpern. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumueller, B.; Metzger, J.W.; Pinnekamp, J.

    2003-07-01

    At many municipal wastewater treatment plants a considerable fraction of nitrogen is recirculated from the anaerobic sludge dewatering. This amounts up to 20% of the total influent nitrogen load of the wastewater treatment plant. The separate treatment of this sludge liquor creates new capacities for the treatment plant and improves effluent quality. A new process for treatment of this sludge liquor with ammonium-nitrogen concentrations above 600 mg/l is the autotrophic denitrification after partial nitritation. At the University of Stuttgart the first semi-technical trickling filter plant was built by which autotrophic denitrification was achieved. At the wastewater treatment plant of Sindelfingen the first full-scale implementation of the autotrophic denitrification in trickling filters has been designed and built. In a first trickling filter 60% of ammonia is transformed to nitrite. The investigations showed, that a few mg/l of free ammonia in this trickling filter were sufficient to inhibit the nitratation but not the nitritation. To achieve this, operating conditions as pH and temperature are of great importance. The concentration of free ammonia should be kept constant because there is an adaption of the microorganisms to free ammonia. After a decrease of the free ammonia concentration the inhibition of the nitratation declines. By thermally killing the biomass and restarting the process, can guarantee a total inhibition of the nitratation, while the concentration of free ammonia is low. In the second, closed trickling filter (anoxic conditions) ammonium is converted autotrophically to nitrogen with nitrite as electron acceptor. It was possible to set up the anoxic ammonium oxidation in full scale without inoculating the process. The very slow growth of the anammox-bacteria leads to a long adaptation phase of the process. All operating conditions such as anoxic conditions, high temperature and a concentration of nitrite below 70 mg/l have to be observed

  9. Partitioning soil CO2 fluxes by tree-girdling in a Mediterranean (Pinus pinaster) ecosystem reveals a different response of autotrophic and heterotrophic components to environmental variables and photosynthesis under drought conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, M.; Cescatti, A.; Gruening, C.; Ballarin, I. G.; Guenther, S.; Magnani, F.; Nali, C.; Lorenzini, G.

    2012-04-01

    The response of ecosystems to environmental factors, such as temperature and rainfall, is crucial to understand the impact of climate change on the terrestrial C cycle. Forest soil respiration represents the main pathway by which photosynthetically assimilated C is released to atmosphere; its intensity depends not only on soil environmental conditions, but also on the availability of organic substrates respired by roots and microorganisms. Several techniques have been applied to partition the autotrophic and heterotrophic components of soil respiration in boreal and temperate forests; there is a general lack of information, on the contrary, on the dynamics of soil CO2 efflux in Mediterranean ecosystems. The IPCC A1B scenario highlighted the importance of the Mediterranean area since it is expected to experience a temperature increase (from 2.2 °C to 5.1 °C) and a rainfall reduction ranging from -4 to -27% on annual basis. We used the tree-girdling technique together with periodic chamber-based measurements to study the partitioning of total soil respiration (Rs) into its autotrophic (Ra) and heterotrophic (Rh) components in a 60-year old forest in Central Italy (San Rossore) dominated by Pinus pinaster. This technique has been extensively used to block the flux of photosynthates from leaves to roots, thus stopping the autotrophic root respiration in the soil. We found that two weeks after the treatment soil respiration in the girdled plots decreased by 29% and remained stable over the period of analysis, suggesting that Rh dominates total soil respiration. The anomalous low rainfall regimen of May to October 2011 (102 mm cumulated rain) associated with average air temperatures (with a mean value of 19,6 °C over the period) gave us the opportunity to investigate the decoupled response of soil respiration to water and temperature. Time series analysis performed under this severe drought conditions showed overall low values of soil respiration with three clear

  10. Potential coupling effects of ammonia-oxidizing and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria on completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite biofilm formation induced by the second messenger cyclic diguanylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Liu, Sitong; Xu, Xiaochen; Zhao, Chuanqi; Yang, Fenglin; Wang, Dong

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) on the coupling effects between ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria for the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) biofilm formation in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR). Analysis of the quantity of EPS and cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) confirmed that the contents of polysaccharides and c-di-GMP were correlated in the AOB sludge, anammox sludge, and CANON biofilm. The anammox sludge secreted more EPS (especially polysaccharides) than AOB with a markedly higher c-di-GMP content, which could be used by the bacteria to regulate the synthesis of exopolysaccharides that are ultimately used as a fixation matrix, for the adhesion of biomass. Indeed, increased intracellular c-di-GMP concentrations in the anammox sludge enhanced the regulation of polysaccharides to promote the adhesion of AOB and formation of the CANON biofilm. Overall, the results of this study provide new comprehensive information regarding the coupling effects of AOB and anammox bacteria for the nitrogen removal process.

  11. Identification and genetic assay of a high-chlorophyll-content mutant in Rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Baofu; Chen Xifeng; Jin Yang; Gu Zhimin; Ma Bojun; Zhu Xudong

    2011-01-01

    A deep rice mutant ZM1120 was screened from the γ-rays irradiation mutation library of Zhonghua 11. Compared to the wild-type control, this mutant were darker (greener) in shoots and leaves, and after sowing 60 and 90 d, the content of chlorophyll were increased by 16.0% and 7.2%, respectively, and the content of carotenoid also increased by 23.1% and 24.2%, respectively. After sowing 90 d the net photosynthetic rate and transpiration rate were increased by 16.3% and 11.4%, respectively. The agronomical traits of this mutant significantly changed, and the traits of plant height, flag-leaf length, flag-leaf width, tiller number per plant, panicle length and setting rate decreased, but the grain length and 1000-grain weight increased by 7.9% and 2.6%. Genetic analysis revealed that the mutation phenotype was controlled by a single recessive nuclear gene, and further cloning and function assay will be useful for understanding the mechanism of photosynthesis and for rice breeding in future. (authors)

  12. High mortality and poor growth of green mussels, Perna viridis, in high chlorophyll- a environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Tan Kar; Denil, Delta Jenetty; Ransangan, Julian

    2016-03-01

    The current study was carried out from May 2014 to April 2015 to estimate the stock status of P. viridis in Marudu Bay. The gonad development was monitored by histological examination, while the population parameters including asymptotic length ( L ∞), growth coefficient ( K), mortality rate ( Z, F and M), exploitation level ( E) and recruitment of P. viridis were estimated using the lengthfrequency data. Results of the current study demonstrated that P. viridis in Marudu Bay spawned throughout the year with two major peaks, one in April to May and another one in October to December. The recruitment pattern was continuous with the peak in May to June 2014, which corresponded to the first spawning peak in April. However, no significant recruitment was observed from the second spawning peak due to the difference in spawning timing between male and female populations. The estimated asymptotic length ( L ∞), growth coefficient ( K), total mortality ( Z), natural mortality ( M), fishing mortality ( F) and growth performance ( φ) of P. viridis in Marudu Bay were estimate to be 117 mm, 0.97 yr-1, 4.39 yr-1, 1.23 yr-1, 3.16 yr-1 and 4.123, respectively. The exponent b of the lengthweight relationship was 2.4 and exploitation level ( E) was 0.72. The high mortality, low condition indices and negative allometric of P. viridis in Marudu Bay is caused by a lack of suitable food in the surrounding water.

  13. Noviherbaspirillum denitrificans sp. nov., a denitrifying bacterium isolated from rice paddy soil and Noviherbaspirillum autotrophicum sp. nov., a denitrifying, facultatively autotrophic bacterium isolated from rice paddy soil and proposal to reclassify Herbaspirillum massiliense as Noviherbaspirillum massiliense comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Satoshi; Ashida, Naoaki; Ohno, Hiroki; Segawa, Takahiro; Yabe, Shuhei; Otsuka, Shigeto; Yokota, Akira; Senoo, Keishi

    2017-06-01

    Thirty-nine denitrifying bacterial strains closely related to one another, represented by strains TSA40T and TSA66T, were isolated from rice paddy soils. Strains TSA40T and TSA66T were Gram-stain-negative, slightly curved rod-shaped, and motile by means of polar flagella. They were able to reduce nitrate, nitrite and nitrous oxide, but unable to fix atmospheric N2. While strain TSA66T was able to grow autotrophically by H2-dependent denitrification, strain TSA40T could not. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that they belong to the family Oxalobacteraceae, the order Burkholderiales in the class Betaproteobacteria. Major components in the fatty acids (C16 : 0, C17 : 0 cyclo, C18 : 1ω7c and summed feature 3) and quinone (Q-8) also supported the affiliation of strains TSA40T and TSA66T to the family Oxalobacteraceae. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons, strains TSA40T and TSA66T showed the greatest degree of similarity to Herbaspirillum massiliense JC206T, Noviherbaspirillum malthae CC-AFH3T, Noviherbaspirillum humi U15T, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z67T and Paucimonas lemoignei LMG 2207T, and lower similarities to the members of other genera. Average nucleotide identity values between the genomes of strain TSA40T, TSA66T and H. massiliense JC206T were 75-77 %, which was lower than the threshold value for species discrimination (95-96 %). Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis in combination with physiological, chemotaxonomic and genomic properties, strains TSA40T (=JCM 17722T=ATCC TSD-69T) and TSA66T (=JCM 17723T=DSM 25787T) are the type strains of two novel species within the genus Noviherbaspirillum, for which the names Noviherbaspirillum denitrificans sp. nov. and Noviherbaspirillum autotrophicum sp. nov. are proposed, respectively. We also propose the reclassification of Herbaspirillum massiliense as Noviherbaspirillum massiliense comb. nov.

  14. Growth of microalgae in autotrophic stationary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cunha

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we evaluate the growth of nine marine microalgae species (Nannochloropsis oculata, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Isochrysis galbana, Tetraselmis suecica, Tetraselmis chuii, Chaetoceros muelleri, Thalassiosira fluviatilis and Isochrysis sp. and one freshwater species (Chlorella vulgaris under stationary autotrophy conditions, using erlenmeyers fl asks with 800mL of culture medium exposed to constant light intensities providing a photon flux density of about 150μmol.m-2.s-1 and 25±2oC temperature and constant air flow. The experiment was carried out in a controlled environment considering a block delineating randomized over time with three replicates. The Nannochloropsis oculata showed the highest value of maximum cellular density, but with a longer period of time and a lower growth rate. This was probably due to its tiny cell size, demanding a large number of cells per volume to attain its optimum conditions for light, nutrients, water and atmospheric carbon dioxide. In addition, in spite of showing one of the lowest values of maximum cellular density, Thalassiosira fluviatilis was the species that reached its maximum in a short period of time at the highest growth rate. Chlorella vulgaris was the only freshwater species tested and it showed the poorest performance for all the variables analyzed in the current study.

  15. Autotrophic Ecosystems on the Early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ophiolite sequences, sections of lower oceanic crust and upper mantle that have been thrust onto continental craton, are located in northern and central California and provide easily accessible areas that serve as good analogs for similar, more extensive areas of the early Earth. We have begun investigating and characterizing these sites in order to understand better the processes that may be responsible for the water chemistry, mineralogy and biology of similar environments on the early Earth. The geophysical and geochemical processes in these terranes provide niches for unique communities of extremeophiles and likely provide a good analog to the location that first gave rise to life on Earth. The ophiolites found in northern and central California include the Trinity, Josephine, Coast Range and Point Sal, all of which are approximately 160 million years old. Fluids from serpentinizing springs are generally alkaline with high pH and H2 contents, indicating that the mafic rock compositions control the fluid composition through water-rock reactions during relatively low-grade hydrothermal processes. There are significant amounts of primary mineralogy remaining in the rocks, meaning that substantial alteration processes are still occurring in these terranes. The general reaction for serpentinization of olivine is given by one of the authors. olivine + H2O = serpentine + brucite + magnetite + H2. We have analyzed the mineralogical composition of several rock samples collected from the Coast Range Ophiolite near Clear Lake, CA by electron microprobe. The remnant primary mineralogy is fairly urnform in composition, with an olivine composition of Fo(sub 90), and with pyroxene compositions of En(sub 90) for orthopyroxene and En(sub 49)Wo(sub 48)Fs(sub 03) for the clinopyroxene. Other primary phases observed include chromites and other spinels. Examination of petrographic thin sections reveals that serpentinization reactions have occurred in these locations. The serpentine resulting from aqueous alteration of olivine resides in veins that are see to cross cut the primary mineral grains. There are several generations of alteration products, comprised mostly of serpentines that are magnesium rich, with magnetite, brucite and carbonates observed as accessory minerals. The formation of carbonates can be taken to indicate the presence of CO2 in the altering fluids. We collected samples from a spring in the Coast Range Ophiolite in order to determine whether the geochemical environment serves as a habitat for chemotrophic microorganisms. DNA was extracted from the sediment samples and the 16s rRNA gene was PCR amplified using universal Archaeal primers. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to determine the community of Archaea thriving in these samples. Our results indicate that there were 8 different genera of Archaea from a single sample. A sequence was obtained from one of these eight. The sequence is of an organism similar to Halorubrum tibetense, and alkalophilic Archaeon. This result suggests that these environments are likely hosts for communities of organisms that are adapted for the unique chemistry provided by the alkaline spring.

  16. Electro-autotrophic synthesis of higher alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, James C.; Cho, Kwang Myung

    2016-11-01

    The disclosure provides a process that converts CO.sub.2 to higher alcohols (e.g. isobutanol) using electricity as the energy source. This process stores electricity (e.g. from solar energy, nuclear energy, and the like) in liquid fuels that can be used as high octane number gasoline substitutes. Instead of deriving reducing power from photosynthesis, this process derives reducing power from electrically generated mediators, either H.sub.2 or formate. H.sub.2 can be derived from electrolysis of water. Formate can be generated by electrochemical reduction of CO.sub.2. After delivering the reducing power in the cell, formate becomes CO.sub.2 and recycles back. Therefore, the biological CO.sub.2 fixation process can occur in the dark.

  17. A first insight into the occurrence and expression of functional amoA and accA genes of autotrophic and ammonia-oxidizing bathypelagic Crenarchaeota of Tyrrhenian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimov, Michail M.; Cono, Violetta La; Denaro, Renata

    2009-05-01

    The autotrophic and ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeal assemblage at offshore site located in the deep Mediterranean (Tyrrhenian Sea, depth 3000 m) water was studied by PCR amplification of the key functional genes involved in energy (ammonia mono-oxygenase alpha subunit, amoA) and central metabolism (acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha subunit, accA). Using two recently annotated genomes of marine crenarchaeons, an initial set of primers targeting archaeal accA-like genes was designed. Approximately 300 clones were analyzed, of which 100% of amoA library and almost 70% of accA library were unambiguously related to the corresponding genes from marine Crenarchaeota. Even though the acetyl-CoA carboxylase is phylogenetically not well conserved and the remaining clones were affiliated to various bacterial acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA carboxylase genes, the pool of archaeal sequences was applied for development of quantitative PCR analysis of accA-like distribution using TaqMan ® methodolgy. The archaeal accA gene fragments, together with alignable gene fragments from the Sargasso Sea and North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (ALOHA Station) metagenome databases, were analyzed by multiple sequence alignment. Two accA-like sequences, found in ALOHA Station at the depth of 4000 m, formed a deeply branched clade with 64% of all archaeal Tyrrhenian clones. No close relatives for residual 36% of clones, except of those recovered from Eastern Mediterranean, was found, suggesting the existence of a specific lineage of the crenarchaeal accA genes in deep Mediterranean water. Alignment of Mediterranean amoA sequences defined four cosmopolitan phylotypes of Crenarchaeota putative ammonia mono-oxygenase subunit A gene occurring in the water sample from the 3000 m depth. Without exception all phylotypes fell into Deep Marine Group I cluster that contain the vast majority of known sequences recovered from global deep-sea environment. Remarkably, three phylotypes accounted for 91% of all Mediterranean

  18. 75 FR 50777 - Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan; John Hay National Wildlife Refuge, Merrimack County, NH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... return to the trailhead without entering The Fells' property, post explanatory signage at the trailhead... spur trail to the fen and back with informational signage on the ecology of fens, and install a... a much broader array of programming and outreach. In addition to the trail and signage improvements...

  19. 75 FR 7287 - John Hay National Wildlife Refuge, Merrimack County, NH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... shape the almost 80 acres of mature upland forest to maintain the cultural legacy, encourage natural... Canada warbler and wood thrush). Natural processes would also shape the fens, vernal pools, and other... and riparian corridor along the approximately 1,750 feet of Beech Brook on the refuge for species...

  20. 78 FR 23793 - Fidelity Merrimack Street Trust, et al.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... companies or series thereof that utilize active management investment strategies (``Future Funds''). Any.... \\18\\ If Shares are listed on The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (``Nasdaq'') or a similar electronic Stock... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Investment Company Act Release No. 30464; 812-14104] Fidelity...

  1. Management of autotrophic mass cultures of micro-algae

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Toerien, DF

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the mass cultivation of micro-algae as feed and foodstuff has existed since the turn of the century (Robinson and Toerien, 1962). Experiments using algae in photosynthetic research (Warburg, 1919) also led to an appreciation...

  2. HYDROGEN KINETICS LIMITATION OF AN AUTOTROPHIC SULPHATE REDUCTION REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CÉSAR SÁEZ-NAVARRETE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El uso de sustratos inorgánicos podría reducir los costos y simplificar la operación de sistemas de tratamiento de aguas que utilizan bacterias reductoras de sulfato. Sin embargo, el uso de H2 como sustrato energético y la bioproducción de H2S podrían provocar limitaciones cinéticas. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar las condiciones en las que la capacidad de transferencia de masa de un bioreactor de reducción de sulfato, limita su cinética de reducción. La cinética del reactor fue obtenida monitoreando la presión del sistema en condiciones de no limitación por sulfato. Se concluyó que el diseño del bioreactor debería basarse en sus propiedades de transferencia. La tasa de consumo de H2 alcanzó un máximo de 10-4 M/min, para una tasa de reducción de sulfato de 3.4 g·L-1·d-1. Para evitar limitación por H2 se requirió un kLa de 1.48 min-1 a 1.2·109 cells/L (1.23·10-9 L·min-1·cell-1, valor relevante para propósitos de escalamiento.

  3. The state of autotrophic ethanol production in Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, J; Armshaw, P; Sheahan, C; Pembroke, J T

    2015-07-01

    Ethanol production directly from CO2 , utilizing genetically engineered photosynthetic cyanobacteria as a biocatalyst, offers significant potential as a renewable and sustainable source of biofuel. Despite the current absence of a commercially successful production system, significant resources have been deployed to realize this goal. Utilizing the pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas species, metabolically derived pyruvate can be converted to ethanol. This review of both peer-reviewed and patent literature focuses on the genetic modifications utilized for metabolic engineering and the resultant effect on ethanol yield. Gene dosage, induced expression and cassette optimizat-ion have been analyzed to optimize production, with production rates of 0·1-0·5 g L(-1) day(-1) being achieved. The current 'toolbox' of molecular manipulations and future directions focusing on applicability, addressing the primary challenges facing commercialization of cyanobacterial technologies are discussed. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Autotrophic and heterotrophic characteristics in a polluted tropical estuarine complex

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, Neelam; Ramaiah, N.; Chandramohan, D.; Nair, V.R.

    discharges and pronounced semi-diurnal tidal exchanges must be helpful in rapid dilution of sewage and other industrial effluents discharged into this complex. They are flushed out fairly continuously thus diluting the contaminants and their adverse...-ocean plumes upon bacterioplankton production of the strait of Georgia, British Columbia. Marine Ecology Progress Series 12, 107-113. Bapat, S. V. & Bal, D. V. 1952 The food of some young fishes from Bombay. Proceedings of the Indian Acaden O, of Sciences B...

  5. Cell Biology of Chromerids: Autotrophic Relatives to Apicomplexan Parasites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oborník, Miroslav; Lukeš, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 306, č. 2013 (2013), s. 333-369 ISSN 1937-6448 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G055; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : long-branch attraction * Plasmodium falciparum * Toxoplasma gondii Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.522, year: 2013

  6. Cell Biology of Chromerids: Autotrophic Relatives to Apicomplexan Parasites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oborník, Miroslav; Lukeš, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 306, č. 2013 (2013), s. 333-369 ISSN 1937-6448 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : long-branch attraction * Plasmodium falciparum * Toxoplasma gondii * phylogenetic analysis * extrachromosomal DNA * sterol composition * ribosomal RNA * life cycle * phtotosynthetic alveolata Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.522, year: 2013

  7. Autotrophic and heterotrophic bacterial diversity from Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.; Haldeman, D.L.; Igbinovia, A.; Castro, P.

    1996-01-01

    A basic understanding of the types and functions of microbiota present within the deep subsurface of Yucca Mountain will be important in terms of modeling the long term stability of a nuclear waste repository. Microorganisms can degrade building materials used in tunnel construction such as concrete and steel. For example, high concentrations of nitrifying bacteria, may cause corrosion of concrete due to the release of nitric acid. Likewise, sulfur-oxidizing and iron-oxidizing bacteria have been implicated in microbially influenced corrosion (MIC), and may contribute to the degradation of waste packages. In addition, the metabolic activities of microbiota may alter the geochemistry of surrounding environments, which may in turn influence the permeability of subsurface strata and the fate of radioactive compounds. Microorganisms that play roles in these processes have diverse methods of obtaining the energy required for growth and metabolism and have been recovered from a wide range of environments, including the deep subsurface. The purpose of this research was to determine if these bacterial groups, important to the long-term success of a high-level nuclear waste repository, were indigenous to Yucca Mountain

  8. 78 FR 7439 - Proposed Alterations to Pawtucket Dam on the Merrimack River in Lowell, MA; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ..., Lowell National Historical Park, Boott Mills, Second Floor, 115 John Street, Lowell, MA 01852. FOR... out, financially assist, or license on historic properties. When, as is the case here, an undertaking... the Lowell Historic Preservation District (LHPD) and the National Park Service's List of Classified...

  9. 2011 NOAA Ortho-rectified Mosaic of Merrimack River and Plum Island Sound, Massachusetts (Mean High Water)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  10. The Incidence of Local Water Pollution Abatement Expenditures: A Case Study of the Merrimack River Basin (1974)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part I is an analysis of the determinants of local government expenditures on water pollution abatement facilities. Part II is an investigation of the incidence of costs and benefits of public environmental programs.

  11. Why do satellite imageries show exceptionally high chlorophyll in the Gulf of mannar and the Palk bay during the norteast monsoon?.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jyothibabu, R.; Madhu, N.V.; Jagadeesan, L.; Anjusha, A.; Mohan, A.P.; Ullas, N.; Sudheesh, K.; Karnan, C.

    in the Indian sector of the GoM and the PB in January 2011 showed significant overestimations in the satellite data. This error was much higher in the PB (60–80 %) as compared to the GoM (18–28 %). The multivariate analyses evidenced that the exceptionally high...

  12. Sea-floor texture and physiographic zones of the inner continental shelf from Salisbury to Nahant, Massachusetts, including the Merrimack Embayment and Western Massachusetts Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Elizabeth E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Foster, David S.; Schwab, William C.; Andrews, Brian D.; Ackerman, Seth D.

    2015-10-26

    A series of maps that describe the distribution and texture of sea-floor sediments and physiographic zones of Massachusetts State waters from Nahant to Salisbury, Massachusetts, including western Massachusetts Bay, have been produced by using high-resolution geophysical data (interferometric and multibeam swath bathymetry, lidar bathymetry, backscatter intensity, and seismic reflection profiles), sediment samples, and bottom photographs. These interpretations are intended to aid statewide efforts to inventory and manage coastal and marine resources, link with existing data interpretations, and provide information for research focused on coastal evolution and environmental change. Marine geologic mapping of the inner continental shelf of Massachusetts is a statewide cooperative effort of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management.

  13. NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Merrimack River and Plum Island Sound, Massachusetts, June 2011 (NODC Accession 0103944)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains both true color (RGB) and infrared (IR) ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping...

  14. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Lake Gardner Dam (MA 00152), Merrimack River Basin, Amesbury, Massachusetts. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    Amesbury. MA Contract No. DACW-33-78-C-0301 Gentlemen-’ On 24 Mfay 1278. Mr. Peter L. LeCount and Mr. John W. Critcfield of this office attended an on-site...Critchfleid Peter L. LeCount JWC/Pt.L/mcI’ Enclosure B- 52 APPENDIX C SELECTED PHOTOGRAPHS OF PROJECT LOCATION PLAN Page No. 5 Site Plan Sketch PHOTOGRA PHS No...LIENT AAOa ALIB D NOEa -2 En~m u Enq.u.ws -40jec" . ::EC D r - Somm. MaIL OFTAI.L A~ ’: ;.-rcD S =&Q 3o, 2-ri dx -5 V’ Z’ -L71 M, ; . ZEc C7"",- D-2 a

  15. Fourteen Annually Repeated Droughts Suppressed Autotrophic Soil Respiration and Resulted in an Ecosystem Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopittke, G.R.; Tietema, A.; van Loon, E.; Asscheman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Predictions of future climate over the next 100 years show that the frequency of long periods of droughts in summer will increase in the Netherlands. This study investigated the effect of 14 annually repeated droughts on soil respiration at a Dutch heathland. Field measurements of total soil

  16. PO43- dependence of the tolerance of autotrophic and heterotrophic biofilm communities to copper and diuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, Ahmed; Bérard, Annette; Roulier, Jean-Louis; Volat, Bernadette; Montuelle, Bernard

    2010-06-10

    Pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) concept is based on the assumption that the toxicant exerts selection pressure on the biological communities when exposure reaches a critical level for a sufficient period of time and therefore sensitive species are eliminated. However, induced tolerance of microbial biofilm communities cannot be attributed solely to the presence of toxicants in rivers but also to various environmental factors, such as amount of nutrients. An experimental study was undertaken to highlight the potential impact of a phosphorus gradient on the sensitivity of periphytic microbial community to Cu and diuron. Biofilms were exposed to real-world levels of chronic environmental contamination of toxicants with a phosphorus gradient. Biofilm sensitivity to Cu and diuron was assessed by performing short-term inhibition tests based on photosynthetic efficiency to target photoautotrophs, extracellular enzyme activity (beta-glucosidase and leucine-aminopeptidase) and substrate-induced respiration activity to target heterotrophs. The impact of P-gradient associated to pollution was evaluated by measuring pesticide concentrations in biofilms, biomass parameters (chla, AFDW), bacterial cell density, photosynthetic efficiency and community structure (using 18S and 16S rDNA gene analysis to target eukaryotes and DGGE and HPLC pigment analysis to target bacteria and photoautotrophs). The obtained results show that depending on the studied toxicant and the used structural or functional parameter, the effect of the phosphorus gradient was variable. This highlights the importance of using a range of parameters that target all the biological communities in the biofilm. The PICT method can be regarded as a good tool for assessing anthropogenic environmental contamination, but it is necessary to dissociate the real impact of toxicants from environmental factors.

  17. Evaluating four mathematical models for nitrous oxide production by autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo; Chandran, Kartik; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Murthy, Sudhir

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are major contributors to N(2)O emissions from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Although the fundamental metabolic pathways for N(2)O production by AOB are now coming to light, the mechanisms responsible for N(2)O production by AOB in WWTP are not fully understood. Mathematical modeling provides a means for testing hypotheses related to mechanisms and triggers for N(2)O emissions in WWTP, and can then also become a tool to support the development of mitigation strategies. This study examined the ability of four mathematical model structures to describe two distinct mechanisms of N(2)O production by AOB. The production mechanisms evaluated are (1) N(2)O as the final product of nitrifier denitrification with NO(2)- as the terminal electron acceptor and (2) N(2)O as a byproduct of incomplete oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH) to NO(2)-. The four models were compared based on their ability to predict N(2)O dynamics observed in three mixed culture studies. Short-term batch experimental data were employed to examine model assumptions related to the effects of (1) NH4+ concentration variations, (2) dissolved oxygen (DO) variations, (3) NO(2)- accumulations and (4) NH(2OH as an externally provided substrate. The modeling results demonstrate that all these models can generally describe the NH4+, NO(2)-, and NO(3)- data. However, none of these models were able to reproduce all measured N(2)O data. The results suggest that both the denitrification and NH(2)OH pathways may be involved in N(2)O production and could be kinetically linked by a competition for intracellular reducing equivalents. A unified model capturing both mechanisms and their potential interactions needs to be developed with consideration of physiological complexity. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Management of microbial community composition, architecture and performance in autotrophic nitrogen removing bioreactors through aeration regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutlu, A. Gizem

    to describe aggregation and architectural evolution in nitritation/anammox reactors, incorporating the possible influences of intermediates formed with intermittent aeration. Community analysis revealed an abundant fraction of heterotrophic types despite the absence of organic carbon in the feed. The aerobic...... and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing guilds were dominated by fast-growing Nitrosomonas spp. and Ca. Brocadia spp., while the nitrite oxidizing guild was dominated by high affinity Nitrospira spp. Emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) was evaluated from both reactors under dynamic aeration regimes. Contrary to the widely...... impacts could be isolated, increasing process understanding. It was demonstrated that aeration strategy can be used as a powerful tool to manipulate the microbial community composition, its architecture and reactor performance. We suggest operation via intermittent aeration with short aerated periods...

  19. Current views on the regulation of autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation via the Calvin cycle in bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, L.; Harder, W.

    1984-01-01

    The Calvin cycle of carbon dioxide fixation constitutes a biosynthetic pathway for the generation of (multi-carbon) intermediates of central metabolism from the one-carbon compound carbon dioxide. The product of this cycle can be used as a precursor for the synthesis of all components of cell

  20. Cell specific primary production of autotrophic and mixotrophic phytoplankton in acidified lakes of the Bohemian Forest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Znachor, Petr; Nedoma, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 112, - (2004), s. 141-155 ISSN 0342-1120 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/98/0727; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/97/0072 Keywords : autoradiography * mixotrophy * primary production Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  1. PIGMENT CONTENT AND COMPOSITION IN AUTOTROPHIC AND HETEROTROPHIC LEAF TISSUES OF AMARANTH SPECIES A. TRICOLOR L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Gins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present there is numerous evidence of the antioxidant positive role in the defensive reaction that is capable to protect not only plants, but also humans against oxidative stress. Plant pigments such as natural dyes from leaves, flowers and fruits are known to have high antioxidant activity. Amaranth species A. tricolor L. cultivar ‘Early Splendor’ is a convenient model for the comparative studying of the formation processes of differently colored pigment composition in leaf tissues that differs in the ability to photosynthesize. Leaves of amaranth cultivar ‘Valentina’ were as a standard. The aim of the experiment was a comparative studying of the pigments content: amaranthine, chlorophyll a and b, carotenoids in the cauline leaves of amaranth cultivars ‘Valentina’ and ‘Early Splendor’, as well as in the red and green areas of the leaves. Analysis of the aqueous extract of red Early Splendor amaranth apical leaves showed the presence of betacyanin pigment - amaranthine, in the absorption spectrum in which peak was seen in the green region at 540 nm. In addition to the antioxidant amaranthine there are  also antioxidants which might be phenolic glycosides, and ascorbic acid in the extract, the total content of which is almost twice as small as in the leaves of amaranth cauline of this cultivar. Yellow fraction was found in the ethanolic extract of red leaves. Its absorption spectrum had peaks in the blue region at 445 nm and 472 nm and a shoulder at 422 nm that indicated the presence of betaxanthin, betalamic acid or carotenoids. Water-soluble antioxidants - amaranthine and ascorbic acid were found in  auline leaves of studied species. Their content in the leaves of Valentina cultivar was higher than in the leaves of cultivar ‘Early Splendor’, and the maximum level of photosynthetic pigments was found in ‘Early Splendor’ leaves. The obtained results showed that the amaranth is a promising source of pigments with the antioxidant  activity that can be used for production of food dyes.

  2. Dynamics of various viral groups infecting autotrophic plankton in Lake Geneva

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, A.; Zhong, X.; Jacquet, S.

    both the presence and relative abundance of bands using the GelCompare II software package (Applied Maths, Kortrijk, Belgium) and the Paleontological Statistics Software Package for education and Software analysis (PAST version 2.14) (Hammer et al...

  3. Distinguishing autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration based on diel oxygen change curves: revisiting Dr. Faustus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosten, S.; Demars, B.O.L.; Moss, B.

    2014-01-01

    * In his paper ‘Climate change, nutrient pollution and the bargain of Dr. Faustus’, Moss (Freshwater Biology, 55, 2010, 175) described the interacting and mutually reinforcing effects of climate change and nutrient pollution on aquatic ecosystems. * Among other things, Moss (Freshwater Biology, 55,

  4. Microarray and bioinformatic analyses suggest models for carbon metabolism in the autotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Appia-ayme; R. Quatrini; Y. Denis; F. Denizot; S. Silver; F. Roberto; F. Veloso; J. Valdes; J. P. Cardenas; M. Esparza; O. Orellana; E. Jedlicki; V. Bonnefoy; D. Holmes

    2006-09-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that uses iron or sulfur as an energy and electron source. Bioinformatic analysis was used to identify putative genes and potential metabolic pathways involved in CO2 fixation, 2P-glycolate detoxification, carboxysome formation and glycogen utilization in At. ferrooxidans. Microarray transcript profiling was carried out to compare the relative expression of the predicted genes of these pathways when the microorganism was grown in the presence of iron versus sulfur. Several gene expression patterns were confirmed by real-time PCR. Genes for each of the above predicted pathways were found to be organized into discrete clusters. Clusters exhibited differential gene expression depending on the presence of iron or sulfur in the medium. Concordance of gene expression within each cluster, suggested that they are operons Most notably, clusters of genes predicted to be involved in CO2 fixation, carboxysome formation, 2P-glycolate detoxification and glycogen biosynthesis were up-regulated in sulfur medium, whereas genes involved in glycogen utilization were preferentially expressed in iron medium. These results can be explained in terms of models of gene regulation that suggest how A. ferrooxidans can adjust its central carbon management to respond to changing environmental conditions.

  5. A novel high-throughput drip-flow system to grow autotrophic biofilms of contrasting diversities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Marta; Dechesne, Arnaud; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    The impact of community diversity on the functioning and assembly of microbial systems remains a central questions in microbial ecology. This question is often addressed by either combining a few cultures without necessarily a history of coexistence, or by using environmental communities, which a...

  6. Autotrophic microbe metagenomes and metabolic pathways differentiate adjacent red sea brine pools

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong; Cao, Huiluo; Zhang, Guishan; Bougouffa, Salim; Lee, On On; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    In the Red Sea, two neighboring deep-sea brine pools, Atlantis II and Discovery, have been studied extensively, and the results have shown that the temperature and concentrations of metal and methane in Atlantis II have increased over the past

  7. Microbial community structure in autotrophic nitrifying granules characterized by experimental and simulation analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsumoto, S.; Katoku, M.; Saeki, G.

    2010-01-01

    of these groups also became evident from a 16S rRNA clone library. Microprofiles of NH4+, NO2-, NO3- and O-2 concentrations measured with microelectrodes showed good agreement with the spatial organization of nitrifying bacteria. One- and two-dimensional numerical biofilm models were constructed to explain......This study evaluates the community structure in nitrifying granules (average diameter of 1600 mu m) produced in an aerobic reactor fed with ammonia as the sole energy source by a multivalent approach combining molecular techniques, microelectrode measurements and mathematical modelling...... the observed granule development as a result of the multiple bacteria-substrate interactions. The interaction between nitrifying and heterotrophic bacteria was evaluated by assuming three types of heterotrophic bacterial growth on soluble microbial products from nitrifying bacteria. The models described well...

  8. Effect of simulated tillage on microbial autotrophic CO2 fixation in paddy and upland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Tida; Wu, Xiaohong; Liu, Qiong; Zhu, Zhenke; Yuan, Hongzhao; Wang, Wei; Whiteley, A. S.; Wu, Jinshui

    2016-01-01

    Tillage is a common agricultural practice affecting soil structure and biogeochemistry. To evaluate how tillage affects soil microbial CO2 fixation, we incubated and continuously labelled samples from two paddy soils and two upland soils subjected to simulated conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT) treatments. Results showed that CO2 fixation (14C-SOC) in CT soils was significantly higher than in NT soils. We also observed a significant, soil type- and depth-dependent effect of tillage on the incorporation rates of labelled C to the labile carbon pool. Concentrations of labelled C in the carbon pool significantly decreased with soil depth, irrespective of tillage. Additionally, quantitative PCR assays revealed that for most soils, total bacteria and cbbL-carrying bacteria were less abundant in CT versus NT treatments, and tended to decrease in abundance with increasing depth. However, specific CO2 fixation activity was significantly higher in CT than in NT soils, suggesting that the abundance of cbbL-containing bacteria may not always reflect their functional activity. This study highlights the positive effect of tillage on soil microbial CO2 fixation, and the results can be readily applied to the development of sustainable agricultural management. PMID:26795428

  9. Monitoring system for the study of autotrophic biofilms in bioremediation of polyaromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarie, Jean P.; Bruttig, A.; Miller, Gordon H.; Hill, Walter; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1999-02-01

    Bacterial and other natural materials such as plants and algae have received increasing interest for bioremediation efforts. The identificatIon of materials capable of biodegrading or sequestering environmental pollutants offers an attractive alternative to chemical or physical means of remediation. A number of bacteria capable of biodegrAding organic or reducing metal pollutants have received great interest. Similarly, the use of natural plants to absorb pollutants from soil anD liquid samples is another potential approach. Our interest lies in identification of naturally occurring algae and their ability to absorb polyaromatic compounds (PAC) from groundwater sources (i.e. streams). These algae could serve as natural water filters for streams contaminated with Polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Polycyclic aromatic compounds, which comprise a complex class of condensed multi-ring benzenoid compounds, are important environmental pollutants originating from a wide variety of natural and anthropogenic sources. PACs are generally formed during incomplete combustion or pyrolysis of organic matter containing carbon and hydrogen. Because combustion of organic materials is involved in countless natural processes or human activities, PACs are omnipresent and abundant pollutants in air, soil and water. Among energy-related products, fossil fuels are the major sources of PACs. The primary sources of airborne PACs are associated with combustion, coal coking, and petroleum catalytic cracking. Coal and shale conversion also contribute to production of PACs. Production, transportation and, use of synthetic fuels and petroleum products provide emission sources for PACs. In urban environments an significant source of PACs is diesel exhaust. Food cooking and cigarette smoking activities contribute to PAC occurrence in indoor environments. Chemical analysis of PACs is of great environmental and toxicological interest because many of them have been shown to be mutagens and/or potent carcinogens in laboratory animal assays. The parent homocyclic species, which contain only carbon and hydrogen, are the familiar polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. In addition to the PAH compounds, there are thousands of substituted compounds that could have various substituent groups, such as alkyl, amino, chloro, cyano, hydroxy, oxy, or thio groups. In this study we investigate anthracene and pyrene as PAH model systems. A portable fiberoptic instrument capable of real-time measurements has been developed for field screening these PAHs in surface water and natural algae systems. Our preliminary studies investigated the detection limits of anthracene and pyrene and the adsorption properties of two algae using fluorescence monitoring. An exposure study of the algae to 5 ppb anthracene was performed to investigate the ability of the algae to adsorb PAHs.

  10. Intergenomic evolution and metabolic cross-talk between rumen and thermophilic autotrophic methanogenic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, M; Chellapandi, P

    2017-02-01

    Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1 (MRU) is a rumen methanogenic archaean that can be able to utilize formate and CO 2 /H 2 as growth substrates. Extensive analysis on the evolutionary genomic contexts considered herein to unravel its intergenomic relationship and metabolic adjustment acquired from the genomic content of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus ΔH. We demonstrated its intergenomic distance, genome function, synteny homologs and gene families, origin of replication, and methanogenesis to reveal the evolutionary relationships between Methanobrevibacter and Methanothermobacter. Comparison of the phylogenetic and metabolic markers was suggested for its archaeal metabolic core lineage that might have evolved from Methanothermobacter. Orthologous genes involved in its hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis might be acquired from intergenomic ancestry of Methanothermobacter via Methanobacterium formicicum. Formate dehydrogenase (fdhAB) coding gene cluster and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (cooF) coding gene might have evolved from duplication events within Methanobrevibacter-Methanothermobacter lineage, and fdhCD gene cluster acquired from bacterial origins. Genome-wide metabolic survey found the existence of four novel pathways viz. l-tyrosine catabolism, mevalonate pathway II, acyl-carrier protein metabolism II and glutathione redox reactions II in MRU. Finding of these pathways suggested that MRU has shown a metabolic potential to tolerate molecular oxygen, antimicrobial metabolite biosynthesis and atypical lipid composition in cell wall, which was acquainted by metabolic cross-talk with mammalian bacterial origins. We conclude that coevolution of genomic contents between Methanobrevibacter and Methanothermobacter provides a clue to understand the metabolic adaptation of MRU in the rumen at different environmental niches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling, Experimentation, and Control of Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal in Granular Sludge Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine

    is convenient for treating anaerobic digester liquor, landfill leachate, or special industrial wastewaters, because costs related to the need for aeration and carbon addition are lowered by 60% and 100%, respectively, compared to conventional nitrification denitrification treatment. Energy and capital costs can...... at the expense of slightly slower dynamic responses and additional complexity of the control structure. The functionality of this strategy was tested experimentally in a lab-scale reactor, where it showed the ability to reject disturbances in the incoming ammonium concentrations. However, during high ammonium...

  12. Carbon isotope fractionation by thermophilic phototrophic sulfur bacteria: evidence for autotrophic growth in natural populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, M. T.; Takigiku, R.; Lee, R. G.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Purple phototrophic bacteria of the genus Chromatium can grow as either photoautotrophs or photoheterotrophs. To determine the growth mode of the thermophilic Chromatium species, Chromatium tepidum, under in situ conditions, we have examined the carbon isotope fractionation patterns in laboratory cultures of this organism and in mats of C. tepidum which develop in sulfide thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park. Isotopic analysis (13C/12C) of total carbon, carotenoid pigments, and bacteriochlorophyll from photoautotrophically grown cultures of C. tepidum yielded 13C fractionation factors near -20%. Cells of C. tepidum grown on excess acetate, wherein synthesis of the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase) was greatly repressed, were isotopically heavier, fractionation factors of ca. -7% being observed. Fractionation factors determined by isotopic analyses of cells and pigment fractions of natural populations of C. tepidum growing in three different sulfide thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park were approximately -20%, indicating that this purple sulfur bacterium grows as a photoautotroph in nature.

  13. Calibration and validation of a model describing complete autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular SBR system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mutlu, Ayten Gizem; Gernaey, Krist

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A validated model describing the nitritation-anammox process in a granular sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system is an important tool for: a) design of future experiments and b) prediction of process performance during optimization, while applying process control, or during system scale......-up. RESULTS: A model was calibrated using a step-wise procedure customized for the specific needs of the system. The important steps in the procedure were initialization, steady-state and dynamic calibration, and validation. A fast and effective initialization approach was developed to approximate pseudo...... screening of the parameter space proposed by Sin et al. (2008) - to find the best fit of the model to dynamic data. Finally, the calibrated model was validated with an independent data set. CONCLUSION: The presented calibration procedure is the first customized procedure for this type of system...

  14. A BIOPHYSICAL MODEL OF POPULATION DYNAMICS OF THE AUTOTROPHIC DINOFLAGELLATE GYMNODINIUM BREVE. (R827085)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Membrane biofouling in a wastewater nitrification reactor: microbial succession from autotrophic colonization to heterotrophic domination

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Huijie; Xue, Zheng; Saikaly, Pascal; Nunes, Suzana Pereira; Bluver, Ted R.; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2015-01-01

    through significant changes. Initial colonizers were replaced by fast-growing and metabolically versatile heterotrophs (e.g., unclassified Sphingobacteria). The declining EPS polysaccharide to protein (PS:PN) ratios could be correlated well

  16. Process engineering and scale-up of autotrophic Clostridium strain P11 syngas fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundiyana, Dimple Kumar Aiyanna

    Scope and Method of Study. Biomass gasification followed by fermentation of syngas to ethanol is a potential process to produce bioenergy. The process is currently being researched under laboratory- and pilot-scale in an effort to optimize the process conditions and make the process feasible for commercial production of ethanol and other biofuels such as butanol and propanol. The broad research objectives for the research were to improve ethanol yields during syngas fermentation and to design a economical fermentation process. The research included four statistically designed experimental studies in serum bottles, bench-scale and pilot-scale fermentors to screen alternate fermentation media components, to determine the effect of process parameters such as pH, temperature and buffer on syngas fermentation, to determine the effect of key limiting nutrients of the acetyl-CoA pathway in a continuous series reactor design, and to scale-up the syngas fermentation in a 100-L pilot scale fermentor. Findings and Conclusions. The first experimental study identified cotton seed extract (CSE) as a feasible medium for Clostridium strain P11 fermentation. The study showed that CSE at 0.5 g L-1 can potentially replace all the standard Clostridium strain P11 fermentation media components while using a media buffer did not significantly improve the ethanol production when used in fermentation with CSE. Scale-up of the CSE fermentation in 2-L and 5-L stirred tank fermentors showed 25% increase in ethanol yield. The second experimental study showed that syngas fermentation at 32°C without buffer was associated with higher ethanol concentration and reduced lag time in switching to solventogenesis. Conducting fermentation at 40°C or by lowering incubation pH to 5.0 resulted in reduced cell growth and no production of ethanol or acetic acid. The third experiment studied the effect of three limiting nutrients, calcium pantothenate, vitamin B12 and CoCl2 on syngas fermentation. Results indicated that it is possible to modulate the product formation by limiting key nutrients of acetyl-CoA pathway and using a continuous fermentation in two-stage fermentor design to improve ethanol yields. The last experimental study was conducted to commission a pilot scale fermentor, and subsequently scale-up the Clostridium strain P11 fermentation from a bench-scale to a pilot scale 100-L fermentor. Results indicated a six-fold improvement in ethanol concentration (25.3 g L-1 at the end of 59 d) compared to previous Clostridium strain P11 and Clostridium carboxidivorans fermentations plus the formation of other compounds such as isopropyl alcohol, acetic acid and butanol, which are of commercial importance.

  17. Diffusive fractionation complicates isotopic partitioning of autotrophic and heterotrophic sources of soil respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Andrew B; Gaines, Sarah J; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Bowling, David R

    2010-11-01

    Carbon isotope ratios (δ¹³C) of heterotrophic and rhizospheric sources of soil respiration under deciduous trees were evaluated over two growing seasons. Fluxes and δ¹³C of soil respiratory CO₂ on trenched and untrenched plots were calculated from closed chambers, profiles of soil CO₂ mole fraction and δ¹³C and continuous open chambers. δ¹³C of respired CO₂ and bulk carbon were measured from excised leaves and roots and sieved soil cores. Large diel variations (>5‰) in δ¹³C of soil respiration were observed when diel flux variability was large relative to average daily fluxes, independent of trenching. Soil gas transport modelling supported the conclusion that diel surface flux δ¹³C variation was driven by non-steady state gas transport effects. Active roots were associated with high summertime soil respiration rates and around 1‰ enrichment in the daily average δ¹³C of the soil surface CO₂ flux. Seasonal δ¹³C variability of about 4‰ (most enriched in summer) was observed on all plots and attributed to the heterotrophic CO₂ source. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Loblolly pine heterotrophic and autotrophic soil respiration as influenced by fertilization and reduced throughfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett C. Heim; Brian D. Strahm; John R. Seiler

    2015-01-01

    Carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems is one of the main reservoirs in the global C cycle (Schimel 1995). Within these terrestrial ecosystems, soil C in the form of organic matter and plant biomass are the two largest pools of C.

  19. Autotrophic potential in mesophilic heterotrophic bacterial isolates from Sino-Pacific marine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Cao, W.; Das, A.; Saren, G.; Jiang, M.; Zhang, H.; Yu, X.

    concentrations of reduced iron (10–6 to 10–5 fmol/(cell·h) and sulfide (10–5 fmol/(cell·h) decreased the uptake potential significantly at p<0.1. Bacterial tolerance to formaldehyde suggested propensities of anaplerotic chemical reactions that form metabolic...

  20. Freshwater mineral nitrogen and essential elements in autotrophs in James Ross Island, West Antarctica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coufalík, Pavel; Procházková, P.; Zvěřina, O.; Trnková, K.; Skácelová, K.; Nývlt, D.; Komárek, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2016), s. 477-491 ISSN 0138-0338 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : antarctica * cyanobacteria * algae * nutrients Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.636, year: 2016

  1. Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal in a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactor Under Continuous Aeration: A Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, Kevin R.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the successful coupling of partial nitrification (nitritation) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in a membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) with continuous aeration. Controlling the relative surface loadings of oxygen versus ammonium prevented complete nitrite oxidation and a...

  2. Rare bacteriohopanepolyols as markers for an autotrophic, intra-aerobic methanotroph

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, D.M.; Talbot, H.M.; Rush, D.; Ettwig, K.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) and their diagenetic products, hopanoids, are of great interest for their potential as bio-marker lipids in both present day environments as well as in the geological record. Specific structural features such as methylation of the A-ring, and number and type of

  3. Framework for Construction of Multi-scale Models for Biological Wastewater Treatment Processes - Case Study: Autotrophic Nitrogen Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Gernaey, Krist

    2011-01-01

    In wastewater treatment technologies, employing biofilms or granular biomass, processes might occur at very different spatial and temporal scales. Model development for such systems is typically a tedious, complicated, and time consuming task, which involves selecting appropriate model equations...... for the different scales, making appropriate and simplifying assumptions, connecting them through a defined linking scheme, analyzing and solving the model equations numerically, and performing parameter estimations if necessary. In this study, a structured framework for modeling such systems is developed. It aims...... to support the user at the various steps and to reduce the time it takes to generate a model ready for application. An implementation of the framework is illustrated using a simple case study, which considers treatment of a nitrogen-rich wastewater via nitritation....

  4. Contribution of crenarchaeal autotrophic ammonia oxidizers to the dark primary production in Tyrrhenian deep waters (Central Mediterranean Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimov, Michail M; Cono, Violetta La; Smedile, Francesco; DeLuca, Thomas H; Juárez, Silvia; Ciordia, Sergio; Fernández, Marisol; Albar, Juan Pablo; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N; Giuliano, Laura

    2011-06-01

    Mesophilic Crenarchaeota have recently been thought to be significant contributors to nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) cycling. In this study, we examined the vertical distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota at offshore site in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. The median value of the crenachaeal cell to amoA gene ratio was close to one suggesting that virtually all deep-sea Crenarchaeota possess the capacity to oxidize ammonia. Crenarchaea-specific genes, nirK and ureC, for nitrite reductase and urease were identified and their affiliation demonstrated the presence of 'deep-sea' clades distinct from 'shallow' representatives. Measured deep-sea dark CO(2) fixation estimates were comparable to the median value of photosynthetic biomass production calculated for this area of Tyrrhenian Sea, pointing to the significance of this process in the C cycle of aphotic marine ecosystems. To elucidate the pivotal organisms in this process, we targeted known marine crenarchaeal autotrophy-related genes, coding for acetyl-CoA carboxylase (accA) and 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase (4-hbd). As in case of nirK and ureC, these genes are grouped with deep-sea sequences being distantly related to those retrieved from the epipelagic zone. To pair the molecular data with specific functional attributes we performed [(14)C]HCO(3) incorporation experiments followed by analyses of radiolabeled proteins using shotgun proteomics approach. More than 100 oligopeptides were attributed to 40 marine crenarchaeal-specific proteins that are involved in 10 different metabolic processes, including autotrophy. Obtained results provided a clear proof of chemolithoautotrophic physiology of bathypelagic crenarchaeota and indicated that this numerically predominant group of microorganisms facilitate a hitherto unrecognized sink for inorganic C of a global importance.

  5. Contribution of crenarchaeal autotrophic ammonia oxidizers to the dark primary production in Tyrrhenian deep waters (Central Mediterranean Sea)

    OpenAIRE

    Yakimov, Michail M.; La Cono, Violetta; Smedile, Francesco; DeLuca, Thomas H.; Juarez, Silvia; Ciordia, Sergio; Fernandez, Marisol; Albar, Juan Pablo; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N.; Giuliano, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Mesophilic Crenarchaeota have recently been thought to be significant contributors to nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) cycling. In this study, we examined the vertical distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota at offshore site in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. The median value of the crenachaeal cell to amoA gene ratio was close to one suggesting that virtually all deep-sea Crenarchaeota possess the capacity to oxidize ammonia. Crenarchaea-specific genes, nirK and ureC, for nitrite reductase and u...

  6. Albibacter methylovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel aerobic, facultatively autotrophic and methylotrophic bacterium that utilizes dichloromethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronina, N V; Trotsenko, Y A; Tourova, T P; Kuznetsov, B B; Leisinger, T

    2001-05-01

    A novel genus, Albibacter, with one species, Albibacter methylovorans sp. nov., is proposed for a facultatively chemolithotrophic and methylotrophic bacterium (strain DM10T) with the ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) pathway of C1 assimilation. The bacterium is a Gram-negative, aerobic, asporogenous, nonmotile, colourless rod that multiplies by binary fission. The organism utilizes dichloromethane, methanol, methylamine, formate and CO2/H2, as well as a variety of polycarbon compounds, as carbon and energy sources. It is neutrophilic and mesophilic. The major cellular fatty acids are straight-chain unsaturated C18:1, saturated C16:0 and cyclopropane C19:0 acids. The main ubiquinone is Q-10. The dominant phospholipids are phosphatidyl ethanolamine, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl choline and cardiolipin. The DNA G+C content is 66.7 mol%. Strain DM10T has a very low degree of DNA-DNA hybridization (4-7%) with the type species of the genera Paracoccus, Xanthobacter, Blastobacter, Angulomicrobium, Ancylobacter and Ralstonia of RuBP pathway methylobacteria. Another approach, involving comparative 16S rDNA analysis, has shown that the novel isolate represents a separate branch within the alpha-2 subgroup of the Proteobacteria. The type species of the new genus is Albibacter methylovorans sp. nov.; the type strain is DM10T (= VKM B-2236T = DSM 13819T).

  7. Sensitivity analysis of autotrophic N removal by a granule based bioreactor: Influence of mass transfer versus microbial kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Gernaey, Krist

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive and global sensitivity analysis was conducted under a range of operating conditions. The relative importance of mass transfer resistance versus kinetic parameters was studied and found to depend on the operating regime as follows: Operating under the optimal loading ratio of 1.90 ...

  8. pH variation and influence in an autotrophic nitrogen removing biofilm system using an efficient numerical solution strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Valverde Perez, Borja

    2013-01-01

    A pH simulator consisting of an efficient numerical solver of a system of nine nonlinear equations was constructed and implemented in the modeling software MATLAB. The pH simulator was integrated in a granular biofilm model and used to simulate the pH profiles within granules performing...... the nitritation-anammox process for a range of operating points. The simulation results showed that pH profiles were consistently increasing with increasing depth into the granule, since the proton producing aerobic ammonium oxidizers (AOB) were located close to the granule surface.Despite this pH profile, more...... NH3 was available for AOB than for anaerobic ammonium oxidizers (AnAOB), located in the center of the granules. However, operating at a higher oxygen loading resulted in steeper changes in pH over the depth of the granule and caused the NH3 concentration profile to increase from the granule surface...

  9. pH variation and influence in an autotrophic nitrogen removing biofilm system using an efficient numerical solution strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio-Iglesias, Miguel; Valverde-Pérez, Borja; Gernaey, Krist V; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-01-01

    A pH simulator consisting of an efficient numerical solver of a system of nine nonlinear equations was constructed and implemented in the modeling software MATLAB. The pH simulator was integrated in a granular biofilm model and used to simulate the pH profiles within granules performing the nitritation-anammox process for a range of operating points. The simulation results showed that pH profiles were consistently increasing with increasing depth into the granule, since the proton-producing aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were located close to the granule surface. Despite this pH profile, more NH3 was available for AOB than for anaerobic ammonium oxidizers, located in the center of the granules. However, operating at a higher oxygen loading resulted in steeper changes in pH over the depth of the granule and caused the NH3 concentration profile to increase from the granule surface towards the center. The initial value of the background charge and influent bicarbonate concentration were found to greatly influence the simulation result and should be accurately measured. Since the change in pH over the depth of the biofilm was relatively small, the activity potential of the microbial groups affected by the pH did not change more than 5% over the depth of the granules.

  10. Autotrophs' challenge to Dynamic Energy Budget theory: Comment on ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geček, Sunčana

    2017-03-01

    Jusup and colleagues in the recent review on physics of metabolic organization [1] discuss in detail motivational considerations and common assumptions of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory, supply readers with a practical guide to DEB-based modeling, demonstrate the construction and dynamics of the standard DEB model, and illustrate several applications. The authors make a step forward from the existing literature by seamlessly bridging over the dichotomy between (i) thermodynamic foundations of the theory (which are often more accessible and understandable to physicists and mathematicians), and (ii) the resulting bioenergetic models (mostly used by biologists in real-world applications).

  11. Characterization of a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 autotrophic growth in a flat-panel photobioreactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zavřel, T.; Sinětova, M. A.; Búzová, Diana; Literáková, Petra; Červený, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2015), s. 122-132 ISSN 1618-0240 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0256 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Carbon dioxide * Exponential phase * Growth optimization * Light * Temperature Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2015

  12. Bacterial diversity of autotrophic enriched cultures from remote, glacial Antarctic, Alpine and Andean aerosol, snow and soil samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    González-Toril, E.; Amils, R.; Delmas, R.J.; Petit, J.-L.; Komárek, Jiří; Elster, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2009), s. 33-44 ISSN 1726-4170 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 934; GA MŠk ME 945; GA ČR GA206/05/0253 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : bacteria * glacial ecosytems * polar and high mountains habitats Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.246, year: 2009

  13. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Souhegan River Watershed Dam Number 35 (NH 00435), NHWRB 175.21, Merrimack River Basin, New Ipswich, New Hampshire. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    left end of the service platform has spalled over a 12 inch by 4 inch area. This spalling is attributed to excessive concrete vibra- tion. A...reinforced rod on ton of service platform exposed for 12"’ 1-f f Irescenct- NKone notedl Hon n E, com r)-1 12"’ x I" on headwa . seer- S age flowing through...3 nL 3 o m W(\\ +4 X -. = 0 wix .- X a kD X-~ W-I)~ + 0 5 Z I-- wJ 0 - U) w X -n = -o-Xb \\ W -- ~U)~.I-+ + -L a " fJ f It 1.Z’ X - r X tO U- -w LLI- W

  14. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Lake Franklin Pierce Dam (NH 00199), NHWRB-116.04, Merrimack River Basin, Hillsboro, New Hampshire. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    ATTENTION OF: NEDED-~EAR1817*V Honorable Hugh J. Gallen ... Governor of the State of New Hampshire , State House Concord, New Hampshire 03301 Dear...8217.. . , , .. .. , .. . . . - :o , ... . ?....* -. , _ _ :, . ,,. ., Q ,; ,-. t,’. ,. NEDED-E Honorable Hugh J. Gallen It is recommended that within twelve...7.5 ft. diameter penstock runs downstream from the dam a distance of 1.3 miles to the Jackman Hydroelectric ..* *. Station. The dam is owned by the

  15. Effect of heterotrophic versus autotrophic food on feeding and reproduction of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa : relationship with prey fatty acid composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broglio, E.; Jonasdottir, Sigrun; Calbet, A.

    2003-01-01

    Gymnodinium sanguineum. The diets were also analyzed for fatty acid contents and composition, relationships with EPE and reproductive success were determined. Clear differences were found in the fatty acid contents and the composition of the different diets offered, but these differences did not correspond...... with variability in EPE. However, egg viability was correlated with ingestion of certain prey essential fatty acids; interestingly, our data do not show that ciliates and heterotrophic dinoflagellates are nutritionally superior prey for marine copepods, contrary to general expectations....

  16. Autotrophic and heterotrophic nitrification-anoxic denitrification dominated the anoxic/oxic sewage treatment process during optimization for higher loading rate and energy savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueyu; Zheng, Shaokui; Zhang, Hangyu; Duan, Shoupeng

    2018-04-30

    This study clarified the dominant nitrogen (N)-transformation pathway and the key ammonia-oxidizing microbial species at three loading levels during optimization of the anoxic/oxic (A/O) process for sewage treatment. Comprehensive N-transformation activity analysis showed that ammonia oxidization was performed predominantly by aerobic chemolithotrophic and heterotrophic ammonia oxidization, whereas N 2 production was performed primarily by anoxic denitrification in the anoxic unit. The abundances of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and anaerobic AOB in activated sludge reflected their activities on the basis of high-throughput sequencing data. AOB amoA gene clone libraries revealed that the predominant AOB species in sludge samples shifted from Nitrosomonas europaea (61% at the normal loading level) to Nitrosomonas oligotropha (58% and 81% at the two higher loading levels). Following isolation and sequencing, the predominant culturable heterotrophic AOB in sludge shifted from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (42% at the normal loading level) to Acinetobacter johnsonii (52% at the highest loading level). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome-Scale Metabolic Model for the Green Alga Chlorella vulgaris UTEX 395 Accurately Predicts Phenotypes under Autotrophic, Heterotrophic, and Mixotrophic Growth Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuñiga, Cristal; Li, Chien-Ting; Huelsman, Tyler; Levering, Jennifer; Zielinski, Daniel C; McConnell, Brian O; Long, Christopher P; Knoshaug, Eric P; Guarnieri, Michael T; Antoniewicz, Maciek R; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Zengler, Karsten

    2016-09-01

    The green microalga Chlorella vulgaris has been widely recognized as a promising candidate for biofuel production due to its ability to store high lipid content and its natural metabolic versatility. Compartmentalized genome-scale metabolic models constructed from genome sequences enable quantitative insight into the transport and metabolism of compounds within a target organism. These metabolic models have long been utilized to generate optimized design strategies for an improved production process. Here, we describe the reconstruction, validation, and application of a genome-scale metabolic model for C. vulgaris UTEX 395, iCZ843. The reconstruction represents the most comprehensive model for any eukaryotic photosynthetic organism to date, based on the genome size and number of genes in the reconstruction. The highly curated model accurately predicts phenotypes under photoautotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic conditions. The model was validated against experimental data and lays the foundation for model-driven strain design and medium alteration to improve yield. Calculated flux distributions under different trophic conditions show that a number of key pathways are affected by nitrogen starvation conditions, including central carbon metabolism and amino acid, nucleotide, and pigment biosynthetic pathways. Furthermore, model prediction of growth rates under various medium compositions and subsequent experimental validation showed an increased growth rate with the addition of tryptophan and methionine. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Genome-Scale Metabolic Model for the Green Alga Chlorella vulgaris UTEX 395 Accurately Predicts Phenotypes under Autotrophic, Heterotrophic, and Mixotrophic Growth Conditions1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuñiga, Cristal; Li, Chien-Ting; Zielinski, Daniel C.; Guarnieri, Michael T.; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.; Zengler, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The green microalga Chlorella vulgaris has been widely recognized as a promising candidate for biofuel production due to its ability to store high lipid content and its natural metabolic versatility. Compartmentalized genome-scale metabolic models constructed from genome sequences enable quantitative insight into the transport and metabolism of compounds within a target organism. These metabolic models have long been utilized to generate optimized design strategies for an improved production process. Here, we describe the reconstruction, validation, and application of a genome-scale metabolic model for C. vulgaris UTEX 395, iCZ843. The reconstruction represents the most comprehensive model for any eukaryotic photosynthetic organism to date, based on the genome size and number of genes in the reconstruction. The highly curated model accurately predicts phenotypes under photoautotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic conditions. The model was validated against experimental data and lays the foundation for model-driven strain design and medium alteration to improve yield. Calculated flux distributions under different trophic conditions show that a number of key pathways are affected by nitrogen starvation conditions, including central carbon metabolism and amino acid, nucleotide, and pigment biosynthetic pathways. Furthermore, model prediction of growth rates under various medium compositions and subsequent experimental validation showed an increased growth rate with the addition of tryptophan and methionine. PMID:27372244

  19. Summer monsoon onset-induced changes of autotrophic pico- and nanoplankton in the largest monsoonal estuary along the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohan, A.P.; Jyothibabu, R; Jagadeesan, L.; Lallu, K.R; Karnan, C.

    to the microbial food web of the northwestern Indian Ocean.Deep sea research part II. 40: 773–782. Callieri, C., E. Amicucci, R. Bertoni, and L. Voros. 1996. Fluorometric characterization of two picocyanobacteria strains from different underwater light quality.... 2014. Waning of plankton food web in the upstream region of the Cochin backwaters during the Southwest Monsoon. Indian Journal of Marine Sciences (In Press). Jyothibabu, R., N. V. Madhu, L. Jagadeesan, A. Anjusha, A. P. Mohan , N.Ullas, N. Sudheesh...

  20. Enrichment and Characterization of an Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon of Mesophilic Crenarchaeal Group I.1a from an Agricultural Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, M.Y.; Park, S.J.; Min, D.; Kim, J.S.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kim, G.J.; Madsen, E.L.; Rhee, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Soil nitrification is an important process for agricultural productivity and environmental pollution. Though one cultivated representative of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea from soil has been described, additional representatives warrant characterization. We describe an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon (strain

  1. Regulation of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Metabolism in Pseudomonas oxalaticus OX1 : Growth on Mixtures of Acetate and Formate in Continuous Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, L.; Harder, W.

    1979-01-01

    Growth of Pseudomonas oxalaticus in carbon- and energy-limited continuous cultures with mixtures of acetate and formate resulted in the simultaneous utilization of both substrates at all dilution rates tested. During growth on these mixtures, acetate repressed the synthesis of ribulosebisphosphate

  2. Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal from Low Concentrated Effluents : Study of system configurations and operational features for post-treatment of anaerobic effluents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Guilen, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    On a global scale, sewage represents the main point-source of water pollution and is also the predominant source of nitrogen contamination in urban regions. The present research is focused on the study of the main challenges that need to be addressed in order to achieve a successful inorganic

  3. Sand Waves That Impede Navigation of Coastal Inlet Navigation Channels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whitmeyer, Shelley J; FitzGerald, Duncan M

    2006-01-01

    .... Mary's Entrance, FL; Merrimack River, MA, and Kennebec River, ME. This technical note discusses the characteristics of the bed forms found in those areas and conditions responsible for their development.

  4. St. Laurent Construction Co., Inc. Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Laurent Construction Co., Inc. (the Company) is located in Nashua, New Hampshire. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at properties constructed prior to 1978, located in Merrimack and Nashua, New Hampshire.

  5. EPA Selects Lawrence, Mass. Group for Brownfields Job Training Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today, EPA announced that the Merrimack Valley Workforce Investment Board, of Lawrence, Mass., was one of 14 organizations nationwide selected to receive funding to operate environmental job training programs for local unemployed residents.

  6. DMSP and DMS dynamics and microzooplankton grazing in the Labrador Sea: application of the dilution technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Gordon V.; Levasseur, Maurice; Cantin, Guy; Michaud, Sonia

    2000-12-01

    We adapted the dilution technique to study microzooplankton grazing of algal dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) vs. Chl a, and to estimate the impact of microzooplankton grazing on dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production in the Labrador Sea. Phytoplankton numbers were dominated by autotrophic nanoflagellates in the Labrador basin, but diatoms and colonial Phaeocystis pouchetii contributed significantly to phytomass at several high chlorophyll stations and on the Newfoundland and Greenland shelfs. Throughout the region, growth of algal Chl a and DMSP was generally high (0.2-1 d -1), but grazing rates were lower and more variable, characteristic of the early spring bloom period. Production and consumption of Chl a vs. DMSP followed no clear pattern, and sometimes diverged greatly, likely because of their differing distributions among algal prey taxa and size class. In several experiments where Phaeocystis was abundant, we observed DMS production proportional to grazing rate, and we found clear evidence of DMS production by this haptophyte following physical stress such as sparging or filtration. It is possible that grazing-activated DMSP cleavage by Phaeocystis contributes to grazer deterrence: protozoa and copepods apparently avoided healthy colonies (as judged by relative growth and grazing rates of Chl a and DMSP), and grazing of Phaeocystis was significant only at one station where cells were in poor condition. Although we hoped to examine selective grazing on or against DMSP-containing algal prey, the dilution technique cannot differentiate selective ingestion and varying digestion rates of Chl a and DMSP. We also found that the dilution method alone was poorly suited for assessing the impact of grazing on dissolved sulfur pools, because of rapid microbial consumption and the artifactual release of DMSP and DMS during filtration. Measuring and understanding the many processes affecting organosulfur cycling by the microbial food web in natural populations remain a

  7. Secretion of human epidermal growth factor (EGF) in autotrophic culture by a recombinant hydrogen-utilizing bacterium, Pseudomonas pseudoflava, carrying broad-host-range EGF secretion vector pKSEGF2.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayase, N; Ishiyama, A; Niwano, M

    1994-01-01

    We constructed the broad-host-range human epidermal growth factor (EGF) secretion plasmid pKSEGF2 by inserting the Escherichia coli tac promoter, the signal sequence of Pseudomonas stutzeri amylase, and the synthesized EGF gene into the broad-host-range vector pKT230. E. coli JM109 carrying pKSEGF2 secreted EGF into the periplasm and the culture medium under the control of the tac promoter. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1161 carrying pKSEGF2 and Pseudomonas putida AC10 carrying pKSEGF2 secreted E...

  8. Mixotrophs in aquatic ecosystems : linking physiology to food web dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilken, S.

    2013-01-01

    Mixotrophs combine traits from plants (autotrophs) and animals (heterotrophs. They can use sunlight for photosynthesis but also feed on other organisms. Understanding the intricate interaction and regulation of these autotrophic and heterotrophic processes within mixotrophs is essential for

  9. The Complete Guide to Job Sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, Marcia D.

    This booklet provides information on job sharing that resulted from the research and experience of the Merrimack Valley Job Sharing Project. An overview of the topic considers the need for job sharing, employer benefits, types of jobs shared, job division, benefits, employer costs and savings, financial considerations for job sharers, perspectives…

  10. 77 FR 65151 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans and Designation of Areas for Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    ... organic compounds (VOCs) react in the presence of sunlight to form ground-level ozone. NO X and VOCs are.... This area includes 54 cities and towns in Hillsborough, Merrimack, Rockingham, and Strafford Counties. See 40 CFR 81.330, for exact listing of cities and towns. The CAA contains two sets of provisions...

  11. Dynamic Diversity in a Catholic Augustinian College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joseph T.

    2010-01-01

    This article shows how Merrimack College's Catholic heritage and Augustinian tradition provide intellectual and spiritual resources for the college to fulfill its educational responsibility to prepare students for virtuous citizenship in a religiously and culturally pluralistic society. It uses four major Vatican documents and several foundational…

  12. 28 CFR Appendix to Part 51 - Jurisdictions Covered Under Section 4(b) of the Voting Rights Act, as Amended

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FR 9897 Aug. 7, 1965. New Hampshire: Cheshire County: Rindge Town Nov. 1, 1968 39 FR 16912 May 10... Nov. 1, 1968 39 FR 16912 May 10, 1974. Grafton County: Benton Town Nov. 1, 1968 39 FR 16912 May 10, 1974. Hillsborough County: Antrim Town Nov. 1, 1968 39 FR 16912 May 10, 1974. Merrimack County...

  13. An Innovative Approach to Pulic School Staff Development. A Collaborative Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Richard J.; Schuttenberg, Ernest M.

    This paper describes the planning and implementation of a Staff Development Program for teachers and administrators in the 22 school systems served by MEC (Merrimack Education Center). This program, which provided in-service learning experiences for educational practitioners, is discussed following an introductory statement. Information concerning…

  14. 77 FR 14426 - Petitions for Modification of Application of Existing Mandatory Safety Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... the well. The drivage sights will be installed in the headgate and tailgate. (3) Fire-fighting... Merrimack County, New Hampshire. Regulation Affected: 30 CFR 56.19090 (Dual signaling system). Modification... percent on the hand signal system to swing lower and stop movement of the man-box at the exclusive...

  15. Nitrous oxide in fresh water systems: An estimate for the yield of atmospheric N2O associated with disposal of human waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, W. A.; Elkins, J. W.; Kolb, C. E.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Wofsy, S. C.; Duran, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    The N2O content of waters in the Potomac and Merrimack Rivers was measured on a number of occasions over the period April to July 1977. The concentrations of dissolved N2O exceeded those which would apply in equilibrium with air by factors ranging from about 46 in the Potomac to 1.2 in the Merrimack. Highest concentrations of dissolved N2O were associated with sewage discharges from the vicinity of Washington, D. C., and analysis indicates a relatively high yield, 1.3 to 11%, for prompt conversion of waste nitrogen to N2O. Measurements of dissolved N2O in fresh water ponds near Boston demonstrated that aquatic systems provide both strong sources and sinks for atmospheric N2O.

  16. Changing climate increases discharge and attenuates its seasonal distribution in the northeastern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Rouzbeh Berton; Charles T. Driscoll; David G. Chandler

    2016-01-01

    Study region: The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest is well-established as a Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site for climate change and anthropogenic impacts studies on hydrological processes. It is located at the headwater regions of the Merrimack Watershed, the fourth largest basin in New England, USA. The watershed is mostly forested (67%) with some developed regions (16%). Study focus: We assessed the scale-dependency of streamflow response to climate variation, river regulation,...

  17. Feasibility assessment, Lowell Hydroelectric Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The results are presented of a feasibility analysis for hydroelectric generating facilities on the Merrimack River at Lowell, Massachusetts. The projected facility would utilize the existing Pawtucket Dam and a portion of the existing Northern Canal. The project was examined for economic, engineering, and environmental viability, and the results are favorable. The owners intend to proceed to the next step of negotiating a firm power purchase agreement.

  18. Regional impacts of climate change and elevated carbon dioxide on forest productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer C. Jenkins; David W. Kicklighter; John D. Aber

    2000-01-01

    Net primary production (NPP) is defined as the rate at which carbon (C) is accumulated by autotrophs and is expressed as the difference between gross photosynthesis and autotrophic respiration. NPP is the resource providing for the growth and reproduction of all heterotrophs on Earth; as a result, it determines the planet's carrying capacity (Vitousek et al., 1986...

  19. Biological nitrate removal processes from drinking water supply-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni-Bandpi, Anoushiravan; Elliott, David Jack; Zazouli, Mohammad Ali

    2013-12-19

    This paper reviews both heterotrophic and autotrophic processes for the removal of nitrate from water supplies. The most commonly used carbon sources in heterotrophic denitrification are methanol, ethanol and acetic acid. Process performance for each feed stock is compared with particular reference nitrate and nitrite residual and to toxicity potential. Autotrophic nitrate removal has the advantages of not requiring an organic carbon source; however the slow growth rate of autotrophic bacteria and low nitrate removal rate have contributed to the fact that relatively few full scale plants are in operation at the present time.

  20. Coastal Zone Color Scanner data of rich coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Klooster, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    Comparisons of chlorophyll concentrations and diffuse attenuation coefficients measured from ships off the central California coast were made with satellite derived estimates of the same parameters using data from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner. Very high chlorophyll concentrations were encountered in Monterey Bay. Although lower chlorophyll values acquired off Pt. Sur agreed satisfactorily with the satellite data, the high chlorophyll values departed markedly from agreement. Two possible causes for the disagreement are suggested. Comparison of diffuse attenuation coefficients from the same data sets showed closer agreement.

  1. Seamount Hydrothermal Systems as Analogies for Ocean Worlds: Reaction Paths Throughout the Lo'ihi Seamount (Hawaii Archipelago)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milesi, V.; Shock, E.

    2018-05-01

    Thermodynamic modeling is performed to investigate the possible reaction paths of sea water throughout the Lo'ihi seamount and the associated geochemical supplies of energy that can support autotrophic microbial communities.

  2. RESPONSE OF THREE PALEO-PRIMARY PRODUCTION PROXY MEASURES TO DEVELOPMENT OF AN URBAN ESTUARY

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study we present a novel comparison of three proxy indicators of paleoproductivity, pigments, biogenic silica (BSi), and cysts of autotrophic dinoflagellates measured in cored sediments from New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts. In addition to detailed historical reports we ...

  3. A first look at the dinoflagellate cysts abundance in the Bay of Bengal: implications on Late Quaternary productivity and climate change

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Patil, J.S.; Narale, D.D.; Anil, A.C.

    glacial period reflect the affinity to climate change between these two periods, like other regions. Greater abundance of heterotroph and autotroph cysts and higher species diversity were noticed during Holocene than in the last glacial period, which...

  4. Bacterial domination over Archaea in ammonia oxidation in a monsoon-driven tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vipindas, P.V.; Anas, A.; Jasmin, C.; Lallu, K.R.; Fausia, K.H.; Balachandran, K.K.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Nair, S.

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizing microorganisms,which are responsible for the rate-limiting step of nitrification in most aquatic systems, have not been studied in tropical estuaries. Cochin estuary (CE) is one of the largest, productive, and monsoon...

  5. Data-directed modelling of Daphnia dynamics in a long-term micro-ecosystem experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Nes, van E.H.; Kersting, K.

    2009-01-01

    The micro-ecosystem under consideration consists of three compartments forming a closed chain in which water circulates. Three trophic levels are represented in different compartments: autotrophs (algae, mainly Chlorella vulgaris), herbivores (Daphnia magna) and microbial decomposers. From a 20

  6. Discrimination of Pigments of Microalgae, Bacteria and Yeasts Using Lightweight Handheld Raman Spectrometers: Prospects for Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehlicka, J.; Osterrothova, K.; Nedbalova, L.; Gunde-Cimerman, N.; Oren, A.

    2014-06-01

    Handheld Raman instrumentation with 532 nm lasers can be used to distinguish carotenoids of autotrophic microalgae, purple sulfur bacteria, halophilic Archaea and pigmented yeasts. Pigments are proposed as biomarkers for astrobiology of Mars.

  7. FiveS rRNA sequences and fatty acid profiles of colourless sulfur-oxidising bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Ortiz-conde, B.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.; Colwell, R.R.

    Colourless sulfur-oxidising bacteria have been encountered extensively in the oxygen minimum layers of the Arabian Sea. These oligotrophs have been known to mediate nitrogen cycle reductively even under autotrophic conditions. Some...

  8. Biomass production efficiency controlled by management in temperate and boreal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campioli, M.; Vicca, S.; Luyssaert, S.; Bilcke, J.; Ceschia, E.; Chapin, F.S. III; Ciais, P.; Fernández-Martínez, M.; Malhi, Y.; Obersteiner, M.; Olefeldt, D.; Papale, D.; Piao, S.L.; Peñuelas, J.; Sullivan, P. F.; Wang, X.; Zenone, T.; Janssens, I.A.

    2015-01-01

    Plants acquire carbon through photosynthesis to sustain biomass production, autotrophic respiration and production of non-structural compounds for multiple purposes. The fraction of photosynthetic production used for biomass production, the biomass production efficiency, is a key determinant of the

  9. Novel class III phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase: structure and properties of the tetrameric, phosphate-activated, non-allosterically inhibited enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadziola, Anders; Jepsen, Clemens H; Johansson, Eva

    2005-01-01

    The prs gene encoding phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRPP) synthase of the hyperthermophilic autotrophic methanogenic archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Subsequently, M.jannaschii PRPP synthase has been purified, characterised, crystallised, and...

  10. Quantifying manganese and nitrogen cycle coupling in manganese-rich, organic carbon-starved marine sediments : Examples from the Clarion-Clipperton fracture zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mogollon, J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304823783; Mewes, Konstantin; Kasten, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Extensive deep-sea sedimentary areas are characterized by low organic carbon contents and thus harbor suboxic sedimentary environments where secondary (autotrophic) redox cycling becomes important for microbial metabolic processes. Simulation results for three stations in the Eastern Equatorial

  11. Contribution of orchardgrass and white clover roots to total soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding ecosystem carbon dioxide flux requires knowledge of component fluxes including photosynthetic uptake and respiratory loss. Experimental separation of soil respiration into its heterotrophic and autotrophic components has been difficult, complicating efforts to quantify management and e...

  12. Mixotrophic organisms become more heterotrophic with rising temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilken, S.; Huisman, J.; Naus-Wiezer, S.; van Donk, E.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic theory of ecology predicts that temperature affects heterotrophic processes more strongly than autotrophic processes. We hypothesized that this differential temperature response may shift mixotrophic organisms towards more heterotrophic nutrition with rising temperature. The hypothesis

  13. Evaluation of Control Strategies to Effectively Meet 70-90% Mercury Reduction on an Eastern Bituminous Coal Cyclone Boiler with SCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom Campbell

    2008-12-31

    This is the final site report for testing conducted at Public Service of New Hampshire's (PSNH) Merrimack Unit 2 (MK2). This project was funded through the DOE/NETL Innovations for Existing Plants program. It was a Phase III project with the goal to develop mercury control technologies that can achieve 50-70% mercury capture at costs 25-50% less than baseline estimates of $50,000-$70,000/lb of mercury removed. While results from testing at Merrimack indicate that the DOE goal was partially achieved, further improvements in the process are recommended. Merrimack burned a test blend of eastern bituminous and Venezuelan coals, for a target coal sulfur content of 1.2%, in its 335-MW Unit 2. The blend ratio is approximately a 50/50 split between the two coals. Various sorbent injection tests were conducted on the flue gas stream either in front of the air preheater (APH) or in between the two in-series ESPs. Initial mercury control evaluations indicated that, without SO3 control, the sorbent concentration required to achieve 50% control would not be feasible, either economically or within constraints specific to the maximum reasonable particle loading to the ESP. Subsequently, with SO{sub 3} control via trona injection upstream of the APH, economically feasible mercury removal rates could be achieved with PAC injection, excepting balance-of-plant concerns. The results are summarized along with the impacts of the dual injection process on the air heater, ESP operation, and particulate emissions.

  14. The near-term prediction of drought and flooding conditions in the northeastern United States based on extreme phases of AMO and NAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Rouzbeh; Driscoll, Charles T.; Adamowski, Jan F.

    2017-10-01

    A series of hydroclimatic teleconnection patterns were identified between variations in either Atlantic or Pacific oceanic indices with precipitation and discharge anomalies in the northeastern United States. We hypothesized that temporal annual or seasonal changes in discharge could be explained by variations in extreme phases of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO index, SST: Sea Surface Temperature anomalies) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO index, SLP: Sea-Level Pressure anomalies) up to three seasons in advance. The Merrimack River watershed, the fourth largest basin in New England, with a drainage area of 13,000 km2, is a compelling study site because it not only provides an opportunity to investigate the teleconnection between hydrologic variables and large-scale climate circulation patterns, but also how those patterns may become obscured by anthropogenic disturbances such as river regulation or urban development. We considered precipitation and discharge data of 21 gauging stations within the Merrimack River watershed, including the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), NH, with a median record length of 55 years beginning as early as 1904. The discharge anomalies were statistically significant (p-value ≤ 0.2) between extreme positive and negative phases of AMO (1857-2011) and NAO (1900-2011) and revealed the potential teleconnectivity of climate circulation patterns with discharge. Annual and seasonal correlations of discharge were examined with the extreme phases of AMO and NAO at zero-, one-, or two- year/season lags (total of 30 scenarios). When AMO was greater than 0.2, the strongest correlations of AMO and NAO with discharge were observed at headwater catchments. This correlation weakened downstream towards larger regulated and/or developed sub-basins. We introduced a simple approach for near-term prediction of drought and flooding events. An exponential decay function was regressed through the historic occurrence of the relative

  15. Enhanced chlorophyll a and primary production in the northern Arabian Sea during the spring intermonsoon due to green Noctiluca scintillans bloom

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhu, N.V.; Jyothibabu, R.; Maheswaran, P.A.; Jayaraj, K.A.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    The surface waters of the northeastern Arabian Sea sustained relatively high chlorophyll a (average 0.81+ or -0.80 mg m sup(-3)) and primary production (average 29.5+ or -23.6 mgC m sup(-3)d sup(-1)) during the early spring intermonsoon 2000...

  16. Assessment of viability in the bacterial standing stock of the Antarctic Sea from the Indian side

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Chandramohan, D.

    designated as section 2 they were one order higher and ranged from 10 sup(9-10) L sup(-1). The percentage of viability in the region was high corresponding to the generally high chlorophyll and primary productivity encountered in the eastern Agulhas bank...

  17. On extreme atmospheric and marine nitrogen fluxes and chlorophyll-a levels in the Kattegat Strait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, C.B.; Carstensen, J.; Ellermann, T.

    2003-01-01

    A retrospective analysis is carried out to investigate the importance of the vertical fluxes of nitrogen to the marine sea surface layer in which high chlorophyll a levels may cause blooms of harmful algae and subsequent turn over and oxygen depletion at the bottom of the sea. Typically nitrogen ...

  18. Seasonal variation in marine C:N:P stoichiometry: can the composition of seston explain stable Redfield ratios?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Frigstad

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seston is suspended particulate organic matter, comprising a mixture of autotrophic, heterotrophic and detrital material. Despite variable proportions of these components, marine seston often exhibits relatively small deviations from the Redfield ratio (C:N:P = 106:16:1. Two time-series from the Norwegian shelf in Skagerrak are used to identify drivers of the seasonal variation in seston elemental ratios. An ordination identified water mass characteristics and bloom dynamics as the most important drivers for determining C:N, while changes in nutrient concentrations and biomass were most important for the C:P and N:P relationships. There is no standardized method for determining the functional composition of seston and the fractions of POC, PON and PP associated with phytoplankton, therefore any such information has to be obtained by indirect means. In this study, a generalized linear model was used to differentiate between the live autotrophic and non-autotrophic sestonic fractions, and for both stations the non-autotrophic fractions dominated with respective annual means of 76 and 55%. This regression model approach builds on assumptions (e.g. constant POC:Chl-a ratio and the robustness of the estimates were explored with a bootstrap analysis. In addition the autotrophic percentage calculated from the statistical model was compared with estimated phytoplankton carbon, and the two independent estimates of autotrophic percentage were comparable with similar seasonal cycles. The estimated C:nutrient ratios of live autotrophs were, in general, lower than Redfield, while the non-autotrophic C:nutrient ratios were higher than the live autotrophic ratios and above, or close to, the Redfield ratio. This is due to preferential remineralization of nutrients, and the P content mainly governed the difference between the sestonic fractions. Despite the seasonal variability in seston composition and the generally low contribution of autotrophic

  19. Changing climate increases discharge and attenuates its seasonal distribution in the northeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouzbeh Berton

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Study region: The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest is well-established as a Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER site for climate change and anthropogenic impacts studies on hydrological processes. It is located at the headwater regions of the Merrimack Watershed, the fourth largest basin in New England, USA. The watershed is mostly forested (67% with some developed regions (16%. Study focus: We assessed the scale-dependency of streamflow response to climate variation, river regulation, and development for dry, average, and wet years using long-term precipitation and discharge records. New hydrological insights for the region: The effects of basin scale were limited to discharges with exceedance probability less than 15% and greater than 60% and were expressed as lagged discharge in large sub-basins and earlier discharge in small catchments. Annual discharge responded to increases in annual precipitation but not to river regulation or land development. In general, the temporal trends showed less discharge in dry and greater discharge in wet hydrologic flow classes. Keywords: Climate change, Land development, Hydrologic indicator, Scale dependency, Merrimack river, Northeastern United States

  20. Nutritional support of estuary perch ( Macquaria colonorum) in a temperate Australian inlet: Evaluating the relative importance of invasive Spartina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindell, J. S.; Warry, F. Y.

    2010-12-01

    The invasive saltmarsh grass Spartina is widely considered a threat to the health of coastal ecosystems in south-eastern Australia, however, the ecological impacts of Spartina on estuarine communities are poorly understood. The largest infestation of Spartina in Victoria occurs in Anderson Inlet. The relative contribution of Spartina, vs. non-invasive autotrophs, to the nutrition of an estuarine fish, Macquaria colonorum was assessed using stable isotopes and gut content analyses. The δ 13C and δ 15N compositions of autotrophs and M. colonorum varied spatially across the study area. Based on gut content analyses, adults and juveniles were between two and three trophic levels above autotrophs. Isosource modelling of δ 13C signatures, suggested several autotrophs contributed to the nutrition of M. colonorum with a combination of seagrass and Spartina likely important contributors, particularly for adults. Isotopic sulphur was subsequently used to distinguish between seagrass and Spartina. Modelling of δ 13C and δ 34S signatures of M. colonorum and a subset of autotrophs again indicated a combination of seagrass and Spartina was likely a major contributor to nutritional support of M. colonorum. Given the limited areal extent of seagrass within Anderson Inlet, current Spartina eradication programs may compromise the nutritional support of M. colonorum.

  1. Antagonistic interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and the cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Sarah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and filamentous cyanobacteria. Here, interactions between the filamentous heterotrophic bacteria Fibrella aestuarina (strain BUZ 2 and Fibrisoma limi (BUZ 3 with an axenic strain of the autotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum (SAG 25.82 were studied in mixed cultures under nutrient rich (carbon source present in medium and poor (carbon source absent in medium conditions. Findings F. aestuarina BUZ 2 significantly reduced the cyanobacterial population whereas F. limi BUZ 3 did not. Physical contact between heterotrophs and autotroph was observed and the cyanobacterial cells showed some level of damage and lysis. Therefore, either contact lysis or entrapment with production of extracellular compounds in close vicinity of host cells could be considered as potential modes of action. The supernatants from pure heterotrophic cultures did not have an effect on Nostoc cultures. However, supernatant from mixed cultures of BUZ 2 and Nostoc had a negative effect on cyanobacterial growth, indicating that the lytic compounds were only produced in the presence of Nostoc. The growth and survival of tested heterotrophs was enhanced by the presence of Nostoc or its metabolites, suggesting that the heterotrophs could utilize the autotrophs and its products as a nutrient source. However, the autotroph could withstand and out-compete the heterotrophs under nutrient poor conditions. Conclusions Our results suggest that the nutrients in cultivation media, which boost or reduce the number of heterotrophs, were the important factor influencing the outcome of the interplay between filamentous heterotrophs and autotrophs. For better understanding of these interactions, additional research is needed. In particular, it is necessary to elucidate the mode of action for lysis by heterotrophs, and the possible defense mechanisms of the autotrophs.

  2. Bacterial leaching of uranium ores - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowson, R.T.

    1975-11-01

    The bacterial leaching of uranium ores involves the bacterially catalysed oxidation of associated pyrite to sulphuric acid and Fe 3+ by autotrophic bacteria and the leaching of the uranium by the resulting acidic, oxidising solution. Industrial application has been limited to Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at pH 2 to 3, and examples of these are described. The bacterial catalysis can be improved with nutrients or prevented with poisons. The kinetics of leaching are controlled by the bed depth, particle size, percolation rate, mineralogy and temperature. Current work is aimed at quantitatively defining the parameters controlling the kinetics and extending the method to alkaline conditions with other autotrophic bacteria. (author)

  3. Ecosystem metabolism in a temporary Mediterranean marsh (Donana National Park, SW Spain)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz-Hansen, O.; Montes, C.; Duarte, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    metabolic balance of the open waters supporting submerged macrophytes of the Donana marsh (SW Spain) was investigated in spring, when community production is highest. The marsh community (benthic + pelagic) was net autotrophic with net community production rates averaging 0.61 g C m(-2) d(-1......), and gross production rates exceeding community respiration rates by, on average, 43%. Net community production increased greatly with increasing irradiance, with the threshold irradiance for communities to become net autotrophic ranging from 42 to 255 mu E m(-2) s(-1), with net heterotrophic at lower...

  4. Adaptation of European beech (Fagus silvatica L.) to different ecological conditions: leaf size variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, M.

    2004-01-01

    In beech trees, both leaf morphology and leaf area show considerable adaptation capabilities to the local radiation climate. The plants adapting to shade conditions create large leaf area with high chlorophyll concentration and high water content in the living tissues. On the other hand, the leaves of plants exposed to radiation of higher intensity have smaller area, several layers of mesophyll, thick epidermis and cuticle, higher dry weight, higher energy potential of the dry mass and several other characteristic properties

  5. Tides and their dynamics over the Sunda Shelf of the southern South China Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daryabor, Farshid; Ooi, See Hai Ooi; Samah, Azizan Abu

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional Regional Ocean Modelling System is used to study the tidal characteristics and their dynamics in the Sunda Shelf of the southern South China Sea. In this model, the outer domain is set with a 25 km resolution and the inner one, with a 9 km resolution. Calculations are performe...... on these model analyses, the significant tidal mixing frontal areas are located primarily off Sarawak coast as indicated by high chlorophyll-a concentrations in the area....

  6. Retrofitting for fossil fuel flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newell, J.; Trueblood, R.C.; Lukas, R.W.; Worster, C.M.; Marx, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    Described in this paper are two fossil plant retrofits recently completed by the Public Service Company of New Hampshire that demonstrate the type of planning and execution required for a successful project under the current regulatory and budget constraints. Merrimack Units 1 and 2 are 120 MW and 338 MW nominal cyclone-fired coal units in Bow, New Hampshire. The retrofits recently completed at these plants have resulted in improved particulate emissions compliance, and the fuel flexibility to allow switching to lower sulphur coals to meet current and future SO 2 emission limits. Included in this discussion are the features of each project including the unique precipitator procurement approach for the Unit 1 Retrofit, and methods used to accomplish both retrofits within existing scheduled maintenance outages through careful planning and scheduling, effective use of pre-outage construction, 3-D CADD modeling, modular construction and early procurement. Operating experience while firing various coals in the cyclone fired boilers is also discussed

  7. Evidence for episodic acidification effects on migrating Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John T; Lerner, Darrren T.; O'Dea, Michael F.; Regish, Amy M.; Monette, Michelle Y.; Hawkes, J.P.; Nislow, Keith H.; McCormick, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Field studies were conducted to determine levels of gill aluminium as an index of acidification effects on migrating Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolts in the north-eastern U.S.A. along mainstem river migration corridors in several major river basins. Smolts emigrating from the Connecticut River, where most (but not all) tributaries were well buffered, had low or undetectable levels of gill aluminium and high gill Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) activity. In contrast, smolts emigrating from the upper Merrimack River basin where most tributaries are characterized by low pH and high inorganic aluminium had consistently elevated gill aluminium and lower gill NKA activity, which may explain the low adult return rates of S. salar stocked into the upper Merrimack catchment. In the Sheepscot, Narraguagus and Penobscot Rivers in Maine, river and year-specific effects on gill aluminium were detected that appeared to be driven by underlying geology and high spring discharge. The results indicate that episodic acidification is affecting S. salar smolts in poorly buffered streams in New England and may help explain variation in S. salar survival and abundance among rivers and among years, with implications for the conservation and recovery of S. salar in the north-eastern U.S.A. These results suggest that the physiological condition of outmigrating smolts may serve as a large-scale sentinel of landscape-level recovery of atmospheric pollution in this and other parts of the North Atlantic region.

  8. Deglaciation events in part of the Manchester South 7.5' quadrangle south-central New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Byron D.

    1971-01-01

    The study-area lies in south-central New Hampshire, and is bordered on the west by the Merrimack River, the principal north-south drainage route of central New Hampshire. The classical two tills of New England outcrop in the area. In a unique exposure of the sandy upper till, a loose ablation unit overlies a compact basal unit. Both upper till facies overlie a sheared section of dense, olive-gray lower till. Outwash sequences mapped in the study-area are progressively younger to the north, indicating backwastage of the Wisconsinan ice sheet. Primary structures in proglacial Lake Merrimack sediments include contorted bedding, buckled laminae, and folds. A large slumped section in lake sediments exhibits three distinct deformation zones, characterized by brittle, ductile, and unconsolidated deformation. Cross-cutting relationships establish four fold generations and a deformation sequence in the slumped section. Slip in each fold generation was along nearly parallel slip-lines, as deduced from analyses of fold rotation senses. The primary and slump deformation features contrast sharply with the intense style of deformation of lake beds below till at an apparent ice readvance cut. The deduced drag fold slip-line agrees with till fabric point maxima and dip-slip on one group of thrust faults. A southerly movement of readvancing ice is inferred.The study-area was deglaciated about 13,000 years ago, according to a proposed deglaciation model for New Hampshire. The model is based on Nye's theoretical glacier surface gradient, and evidence for active retreat of the Wisconsinan ice sheet.

  9. Metabolic engineering in chemolithoautotrophic hosts for the production of fuels and chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nybo, S Eric; Khan, Nymul E; Woolston, Benjamin M; Curtis, Wayne R

    2015-07-01

    The ability of autotrophic organisms to fix CO2 presents an opportunity to utilize this 'greenhouse gas' as an inexpensive substrate for biochemical production. Unlike conventional heterotrophic microorganisms that consume carbohydrates and amino acids, prokaryotic chemolithoautotrophs have evolved the capacity to utilize reduced chemical compounds to fix CO2 and drive metabolic processes. The use of chemolithoautotrophic hosts as production platforms has been renewed by the prospect of metabolically engineered commodity chemicals and fuels. Efforts such as the ARPA-E electrofuels program highlight both the potential and obstacles that chemolithoautotrophic biosynthetic platforms provide. This review surveys the numerous advances that have been made in chemolithoautotrophic metabolic engineering with a focus on hydrogen oxidizing bacteria such as the model chemolithoautotrophic organism (Ralstonia), the purple photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodobacter), and anaerobic acetogens. Two alternative strategies of microbial chassis development are considered: (1) introducing or enhancing autotrophic capabilities (carbon fixation, hydrogen utilization) in model heterotrophic organisms, or (2) improving tools for pathway engineering (transformation methods, promoters, vectors etc.) in native autotrophic organisms. Unique characteristics of autotrophic growth as they relate to bioreactor design and process development are also discussed in the context of challenges and opportunities for genetic manipulation of organisms as production platforms. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biological deammonification of livestock effluents after anaerobic digestion using specialized bacterial cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated a deammonification process for the removal of ammonia from anaerobi digestion (AD) effluents. This process is autotrophic and removes N without carbon. Instant deammonification reaction was obtained by mixing a high performance nitrifying sludge (HPNS) (NRRL B-50298) with anammox slu...

  11. Habitat connectivity and ecosystem productivity: implications from a simple model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, James E

    2007-01-01

    The import of resources (food, nutrients) sustains biological production and food webs in resource-limited habitats. Resource export from donor habitats subsidizes production in recipient habitats, but the ecosystem-scale consequences of resource translocation are generally unknown. Here, I use a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton model to show how dispersive connectivity between a shallow autotrophic habitat and a deep heterotrophic pelagic habitat can amplify overall system production in metazoan food webs. This result derives from the finite capacity of suspension feeders to capture and assimilate food particles: excess primary production in closed autotrophic habitats cannot be assimilated by consumers; however, if excess phytoplankton production is exported to food-limited heterotrophic habitats, it can be assimilated by zooplankton to support additional secondary production. Transport of regenerated nutrients from heterotrophic to autotrophic habitats sustains higher system primary production. These simulation results imply that the ecosystem-scale efficiency of nutrient transformation into metazoan biomass can be constrained by the rate of resource exchange across habitats and that it is optimized when the transport rate matches the growth rate of primary producers. Slower transport (i.e., reduced connectivity) leads to nutrient limitation of primary production in autotrophic habitats and food limitation of secondary production in heterotrophic habitats. Habitat fragmentation can therefore impose energetic constraints on the carrying capacity of aquatic ecosystems. The outcomes of ecosystem restoration through habitat creation will be determined by both functions provided by newly created aquatic habitats and the rates of hydraulic connectivity between them.

  12. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effets de six composts sur les réponses physiologiques, biochimiques et agronomiques du niébé Vigna unguiculata L. Walp var. KVX. 61.1. au déficit hydrique. Abstract PDF · Vol 8, No 5 (2014) - Articles Separating autotrophic respiration due to roots from soil heterotrophic respiration in an agroforestry parkland system in ...

  13. THE BIOENERGETICS OF AMMONIA AND HYDROXYLAMINE OXIDATION IN NITROSOMONAS-EUROPAEA AT ACID AND ALKALINE PH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRIJLINK, MJ; ABEE, T; LAANBROEK, HJ; DEBOER, W; KONINGS, WN

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizers depend on alkaline or neutral conditions for optimal activity. Below pH 7 growth and metabolic activity decrease dramatically. Actively oxidizing cells of Nitrosomonas europaea do not maintain a constant internal pH when the external pH is varied from 5 to 8. Studies of

  14. Cyanotoxins: a poison that frees phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A

    2010-10-12

    Autotrophic organisms obtain phosphorus from the environment by secreting alkaline phosphatases that act on esters, resulting in inorganic phosphate that is then taken up. New work shows that the cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon ovalisporum obtains inorganic phosphate by secreting the cyanotoxin cylindrospermopsin, which induces alkaline phosphatase in other phytoplankton species. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Model-Based Integration and Analysis of Biogeochemical and Isotopic Dynamics in a Nitrate-Polluted Pyritic Aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.C.; Prommer, H.; Slomp, C.P.; Broers, H.P.; van der Grift, B.; Passier, H.F.; Greskowiak, J.; Boettcher, M.E.; van Capellen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from agricultural land to groundwater and the resulting nitrate pollution are a major environmental problem worldwide. Its impact is often mitigated in aquifers hosting sufficiently reactive reductants that can promote autotrophic denitrification. In the case of pyrite acting as

  16. Stoichiometry and food chain dynamics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, L.D.J.; Kooi, B.W.; Anderson, T.R.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional models of chemostat systems looking at interactions between predator, prey and nutrients have used only a single currency, such as energy or nitrogen. In reality, growth of autotrophs and heterotrophs may be limited by various elements, e.g. carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous or iron. In this

  17. Model-based integration and analysis of biogeochemical and isotopic dynamics in a nitrate-polluted pyritic aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.-C.; Prommer, H.; Broers, H.P.; Slomp, C.P.; Greskowiak, J.; Van Der Grift, B.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from agricultural land to groundwater and the resulting nitrate pollution are a major environmental problem worldwide. Its impact is often mitigated in aquifers hosting sufficiently reactive reductants that can promote autotrophic denitrification. In the case of pyrite acting as

  18. Heterotrophs are key contributors to nitrous oxide production in activated sludge under low C-to-N ratios during nitrification-Batch experiments and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo-Félez, Carlos; Pellicer-Nàcher, Carles; Petersen, Morten S; Jensen, Marlene M; Plósz, Benedek G; Smets, Barth F

    2017-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O), a by-product of biological nitrogen removal during wastewater treatment, is produced by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria (HB). Mathematical models are used to predict N 2 O emissions, often including AOB as the main N 2 O producer. Several model structures have been proposed without consensus calibration procedures. Here, we present a new experimental design that was used to calibrate AOB-driven N 2 O dynamics of a mixed culture. Even though AOB activity was favoured with respect to HB, oxygen uptake rates indicated HB activity. Hence, rigorous experimental design for calibration of autotrophic N 2 O production from mixed cultures is essential. The proposed N 2 O production pathways were examined using five alternative process models confronted with experimental data inferred. Individually, the autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification pathway could describe the observed data. In the best-fit model, which combined two denitrification pathways, the heterotrophic was stronger than the autotrophic contribution to N 2 O production. Importantly, the individual contribution of autotrophic and heterotrophic to the total N 2 O pool could not be unambiguously elucidated solely based on bulk N 2 O measurements. Data on NO would increase the practical identifiability of N 2 O production pathways. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 132-140. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Acetylene and oxygen as inhibitors of nitrous oxide production in Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosospira briensis: a cautionary tale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wrage, N.; Velthof, G.L.; Oenema, O.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    Autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria produce nitrous oxide (N2O) as a by-product of nitrification or as an intermediate of nitrifier denitrification. In soil incubations, acetylene (C2H2) and large partial pressures of oxygen (O2) are used to distinguish between these sources. C2H2 inhibits

  20. Carbon Flows in the Westerschelde Estuary (the Netherlands) Evaluated by Means of an Ecosystem Model (Moses)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Herman, P.M.J.

    1995-01-01

    The autotrophic production and heterotrophic consumption of organic matter in the Westerschelde, a highly turbid and eutrophic estuary in the Southwest Netherlands is examined by means of a dynamic simulation model. The model describes the ecologically relevant processes in thirteen spatial

  1. Mycorrhizal specificity in the fully mycoheterotrophic Hexalectris Raf. (Orchidaceae: Epidendroideae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron H. Kennedy; D. Lee Taylor; Linda E. Watson

    2011-01-01

    Mycoheterotrophic species have abandoned an autotrophic lifestyle and obtain carbon exclusively from mycorrhizal fungi. Although these species have evolved independently in many plant families, such events have occurred most often in the Orchidaceae, resulting in the highest concentration of these species in the tracheophytes. Studies of mycoheterotrophic species...

  2. Opposite metabolic responses of shoots and roots to drought

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gargallo-Garriga, A.; Sardans, J.; Pérez-Trujillo, M.; Rivas-Ubach, A.; Oravec, Michal; Večeřová, Kristýna; Urban, Otmar; Jentsch, A.; Kreyling, J.; Beierkuhnlein, C.; Parella, T.; Penuelas, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 6829 (2014), s. 1-7 ISSN 2045-2322 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200871201 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : shoot and roots * autotrophic and heterotrophic organs * environmental change * growth metabolism * water and nutirens Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.578, year: 2014

  3. Harnessing the power of microbial autotrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassens, Nico J.; Machado de Sousa, Diana; Martins dos Santos, Vitor; Vos, de Willem M.; Oost, van der John

    2016-01-01

    Autotrophic microorganisms convert CO2 into biomass by deriving energy from light or inorganic electron donors. These CO2-fixing microorganisms have a large, but so far only partially realized, potential for the sustainable production of chemicals and biofuels.

  4. Quantitative steps in symbiogenesis and the evolution of homeostasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, S.A.L.M.; Auger, P.; Poggiale, J.C.; Kooi, B.W.

    2003-01-01

    The merging of two independent populations of heterotrophs and autotrophs into a single population of mixotrophs has occurred frequently in evolutionary history. It is an example of a wide class of related phenomena, known as symbiogenesis. The physiological basis is almost always (reciprocal)

  5. Batch studies on nitrate removal from potable water | Darbi | Water SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A sulphur / limestone autotrophic denitrification process was used to achieve the biological removal of nitrate from groundwater. The feasibility of the system was evaluated under anaerobic conditions using laboratory-scale batch reactors. The optimum sulphur / limestone ratio was determined to be 1:1 (wt/wt). Different ...

  6. Studies on benthic denitrification in the Chwaka Bay mangrove ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatial variations in denitrification rates were due to variations in concentration levels of organic matter and possibly to disproportionate competition for inorganic nitrogen between denitrifiers and benthic autotrophs among sites. There were no seasonal differences in denitrification rates. Results from the present study ...

  7. Saldanha Bay, South Africa II: estimating bay productivity | Pitcher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autotrophic communities, where organic matter is produced in excess of respiratory demand, were confined on average to the upper 5.8 m of the water column, and often excluded the bulk of the phytoplankton community, where light limitation is considered to lead to heterotrophic community metabolism. Estimates of ...

  8. Removal of nitrogen from anaerobically digested swine wastewater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This result indicates that the sulfur-packed biofilter would be used as an efficient option for denitrification by autotrophic denitrifiers during swine wastewater treatment. Key words: Biological nitrogen removal, nitrification, denitrification, chemical oxygen demand (COD), intermittent aeration, sulfur-packed bed reactor, swine ...

  9. laboratory study of the effect of temperature changes on mixing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    at about 5‰, the autotrophic- nitrifying bac- teria practically cease functioning. At 2‰, even the chemo-heterotrophic bacteria acting on carbonaceous material become essentially dormant. As temperature rises, the rate of reac- tion also increases. In order to have a reasonable methane production rate, the temperature ...

  10. When do mixotrophs specialize? Adaptive dynamics theory applied to a dynamic energy budget model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, T.A.; Kooi, B.W.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2005-01-01

    In evolutionary history, several events have occurred at which mixotrophs specialized into pure autotrophs and heterotrophs. We studied the conditions under which such events take place, using the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory for physiological rules of the organisms' metabolism and Adaptive

  11. Treatment of domestic wastewater by anaerobic denitrification ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SALAMA YOUSSEF

    for the denitrification process could be deduced from the. pH variation. The alkalinity and pH increased in heterotrophic and H2-based autotrophic denitrification because nitrite reduction consumed protons (H+). Proton consumption is illustrated in Equations (1 to 4) (Rittmann and McCarty, 2001). Heterotrophic denitrification.

  12. Euphausiid population structure and grazing in the Antarctic Polar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The daily ration estimates of autotrophic carbon for the euphausiids suggest that phytoplankton represent a minor component in their diets, with only the sub-adult E. vallentini consuming sufficient phytoplankton to meet their daily carbon requirements. Keywords: euphausiid; ingestion; Polar Frontal Zone; population ...

  13. Effect of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) on in vitro root induction in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ishtiaq

    2012-03-08

    Mar 8, 2012 ... physiological analyses of photo autotrophic callus cultures of the fern Platycerium coronarium (Koenig) under CO2 enrichment. J. Exp. Bot. 46 (10): 1535-1542. Liu C, Zhu J, Liu Z, Li L, Pan R, Jin L (2002). Exogenous auxin effects on growth and phenotype of normal and hairy roots of Pueraria lobata. (Wild.) ...

  14. THE RED-TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE, ALEXANDRIUM MONILATUM, SUPPRESSES GROWTH OF MIXED NATURAL PHYTOPLANKTON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrium monilatum is a large, chain-forming, autotrophic dinoflagellate associated with red-tides and fish kills along the US Gulf of Mexico coast. When cultured inocula of A. monilatum were added to nutrient-amended seawater samples, growth rates and biomass yields of the na...

  15. Carbon flows in eutrophic Lake Rotsee: a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, J.M.; Schubert, C. J.; Reichart, G.-J.

    2016-01-01

    The microbial segment of food webs playsa crucial role in lacustrine food-web functioning andcarbon transfer, thereby influencing carbon storageand CO2 emission and uptake in freshwater environments.Variability in microbial carbon processing(autotrophic and heterotrophic production and

  16. Carbon flows in eutrophic Lake Rotsee : a ¹³C-labelling experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, J.M.; Schubert, C.J.; Middelburg, J.J.; Reichart, Gert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    The microbial segment of food webs plays a crucial role in lacustrine food-web functioning and carbon transfer, thereby influencing carbon storage and CO2 emission and uptake in freshwater environments. Variability in microbial carbon processing (autotrophic and heterotrophic production and

  17. Dual-mode cultivation of Chlorella protothecoides applying inter-reactors gas transfer improves microalgae biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, C A; Nobre, B; Lopes da Silva, T; Pinheiro, H M; Reis, A

    2014-08-20

    Chlorella protothecoides, a lipid-producing microalga, was grown heterotrophically and autotrophically in separate reactors, the off-gases exiting the former being used to aerate the latter. Autotrophic biomass productivity with the two-reactor association, 0.0249gL(-1)h(-1), was 2.2-fold the value obtained in a control autotrophic culture, aerated with ambient air. Fatty acid productivity was 1.7-fold the control value. C. protothecoides heterotrophic biomass productivity was 0.229gL(-1)h(-1). This biomass' fatty acid content was 34.5% (w/w) with a profile suitable for biodiesel production, according to European Standards. The carbon dioxide fixed by the autotrophic biomass was 45mgCO2L(-1)h(-1) in the symbiotic arrangement, 2.1 times the control reactor value. The avoided CO2 atmospheric emission represented 30% of the CO2 produced in the heterotrophic stage, while the released O2 represented 49% of the oxygen demand in that stage. Thus, an increased efficiency in the glucose carbon source use and a higher environmental sustainability were achieved in microalgal biodiesel production using the proposed assembly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria: A model for molecular microbial ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalchuk, G.A.; Stephen, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The eutrophication of many ecosystems in recent decades has led to an increased interest in the ecology of nitrogen transformation. Chemolitho-autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are responsible for the rate-limiting step of nitrification in a wide variety of environments, making them important

  19. Carbon flow from volcanic CO2 into soil microbial communities of a wetland mofette

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beulig, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Effects of extremely high carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations on soil microbial communities and associated processes are largely unknown. We studied a wetland area affected by spots of subcrustal CO2 degassing (mofettes) with focus on anaerobic autotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis because ...

  20. Partitioning of net carbon dioxide flux measured by automatic transparent chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyukarev, EA

    2018-03-01

    Mathematical model was developed for describing carbon dioxide fluxes at open sedge-sphagnum fen during growing season. The model was calibrated using the results of observations from automatic transparent chamber and it allows us to estimate autotrophic, heterotrophic and ecosystem respiration fluxes, gross and net primary vegetation production, and the net carbon balance.

  1. Calorimetry and thermodynamic aspects of heterotrophic, mixotrophic, and phototrophic growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockar, von U.; Marison, I.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Patino, R.

    2011-01-01

    A simple stoichiometric model is proposed linking the biomass yield to the enthalpy and Gibbs energy changes in chemo-heterotrophic, mixotrophic, and photo-autotrophic microbial growth. A comparison with calorimetric experiments on the algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed the

  2. Modes of carbon fixation in an arsenic and CO2-rich shallow hydrothermal ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callac, Nolwenn; Posth, Nicole R.; Rattray, Jayne E.

    2017-01-01

    for autotrophic carbon fixation used in the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) and reverse tricaboxylic acid (rTCA) cycles. Both forms of RuBisCO, together with ATP citrate lyase genes in the rTCA cycle, increase with distance from the active hydrothermal centres and decrease with sediment depth. Clustering of Ru...

  3. Does diet influence consumer nutrient cycling? Macroinvertebrate and fish excretion in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan McManamay; Jackson Webster; H. Valett; C. Dolloff

    2011-01-01

    Consumer nutrient cycling supplies limiting elements to autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms in aquatic systems. However, the role of consumers in supplying nutrients may change depending on their diet and their own stoichiometry. We evaluated the stoichiometry, N and P excretion, and diets of the dominant macroinvertebrates and fish at 6 stream sites to determine...

  4. Induction of the gap-pgk operon encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase of Xanthobacter flavus requires the LysR-type transcriptional activator CbbR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, W.G; van den Bergh, E.R E; Smith, L.M

    In a previous study, a gene (pgk) encoding phosphoglycerate kinase was isolated from a genomic labrid of Xanthobacter flavus. Although this gene is essential for autotrophic growth, it is not located within the cbb operon encoding other Calvin cycle enzymes. An analysis of the nucleotide sequence

  5. Effect of nickel monolayer deposition on the structural and electronic properties of the low miller indices of (bcc) iron : A DFT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwawu, Caroline; Tia, Richard; Adei, Evans; Dzade, Nelson Y.; Catlow, Richard; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2017-01-01

    Metal clusters of both iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) have been found in nature as active electro-catalytic sites, for example in the enzyme carbon mono-oxide dehydrogenase found in autotrophic organisms. Thus, surface modification of iron with nickel could improve the surface work function to enhance

  6. The role of photosynthesis and food uptake for the growth of marine mixotrophic dinoflagellates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Juel

    2011-01-01

    Mixotrophy (i.e. combined use of photosynthesis and food uptake for growth) is widespread among marine dinoflagellates. Species with permanent chloroplasts generally display a growth response towards irradiance like an ordinary autotrophic alga. However, some species cannot grow in the light...

  7. Nitrogen removal from urban wastewater by activated sludge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study deals with nitrogen removal from urban wastewater employing the activated sludge process at low temperature. It aims at determining the performances and rates of nitrification, and characterising the autotrophic biomass (concentration and kinetic parameters) at 11°C and for F/M ratios higher than the ...

  8. Abundance and relationship of bacteria with transparent exopolymer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    were high in surface waters at 18--20 N along 64 E with concentrations well over 25 mg alginic acid equivalents lА1 due ... and subsurface BCD in the northern Arabian Sea. 1. ..... ganic nutrients essential for autotrophic production in euphotic ...

  9. Benthic dinoflagellate blooms in tropical intertidal rock pools: Elucidation of photoprotection mechanisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Rodrigues, R.V.; Paul, P.; Sathish, K.; Rafi, M.; Anil, A.C.

    (HT), mid tide (MT), and low tide (LT) zones on the rocky shores of Anjuna, Goa (India) facing the Arabian Sea. MT-RPs and LT-RPs were dominated by diatoms and HT-RPs by dinoflagellates due to the blooms of autotrophic benthic dinoflagellates belonging...

  10. ESTIMATING ROOT RESPIRATION IN SPRUCE AND BEECH: DECREASES IN SOIL RESPIRATION FOLLOWING GIRDLING

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was undertaken to follow seasonal fluxes of CO2 from soil and to estimate the contribution of autotrophic (root + mycorrhizal) to total soil respiration (SR) in a mixed stand of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) near Freising, Germany. Matu...

  11. Physiology of alkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from soda lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banciu, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    The inorganic sulfur oxidation by obligate haloalkaliphilic chemolithoautotrophs was only recently discovered and investigated. These autotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB), capable of oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds at moderate to high salt concentration and at high pH, can be divided

  12. Comparative diversity of ammonia oxidizer 16S rRNA gene sequences in native, tilled, and successional soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, M.A.; Stephen, J.R.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Prosser, J.I.; Paul, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizer (AAO) populations in soils from native, tilled, and successional treatments at the Kellogg Biological Station Long-Term Ecological Research site in southwestern Michigan were compared to assess effects of disturbance on these bacteria. N fertilization effects on AAO

  13. What's the flux? Unraveling how CO2 fluxes from trees reflect underlying physiological processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumbore, Susan E. [Max-Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena (Germany); Angert, Alon [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). The Institute of Earth Sciences; Kunert, Norbert [Max-Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena (Germany); Muhr, Jan [Max-Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena (Germany); Chambers, Jeffrey Q. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Climate Sciences Dept.

    2012-12-18

    We report that the CO2 emitted from a stem is produced by physiological processes, but the challenge remains identifying what portion is produced by local tissues, which will facilitate much-needed mechanistic understanding of factors controlling autotrophic respiration.

  14. Dissolved organic carbon in water fluxes of Eucalyptus grandis plantations in northeastern Entre Ríos Province, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalia Tesón; Víctor H Conzonno; Marcelo F Arturi; Jorge L Frangi

    2014-01-01

    Water fluxes in tree plantations and other ecosystems carry dissolved organic carbon (DOC) provided by atmospheric inputs, autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms and from the lysis of dead material. These compounds may be colorless or provide a yellow-to-brown color to water and may also absorb visible light due to the presence of chromophores in the chemical...

  15. The Ecology, Life History, and Phylogeny of the Marine Thecate Heterotrophic Dinoflagellates Protoperidinium and Diplopsalidaceae (Dinophyceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    specimens, appeared to be identical to Actinophrys sol and other distinct protist species (as discussed in Coats 2002). Being unaware of the...hypothesizes that photosynthetic eukaryotes evolved through a series of symbiotic relationships between heterotrophic protists and autotrophic prokaryotes...species or genus level. Athecate dinoflagellates were not well preserved by formalin-fixation, and thus were not counted. Metazoans and protists

  16. Phytoplankton biomass and pigment responses to Fe amendments in the Pine Island and Amundsen polynyas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mills, M.M.; Alderkamp, A.C.; Thuróczy, C.E.; van Dijken, G.L.; Laan, P.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Arrigo, K.R.

    2012-01-01

    Nutrient addition experiments were performed during the austral summer in the Amundsen Sea (Southern Ocean) to investigate the availability of organically bound iron (Fe) to the phytoplankton communities, as well as assess their response to Fe amendment. Changes in autotrophic biomass, pigment

  17. Ciliates and their picophytoplankton-feeding activity in a high altitude warm-monomictic saline lake

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peštová, D.; Macek, Miroslav; Pérez, M. E. M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2008), s. 13-25 ISSN 0932-4739 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : ciliates * autotrophic picoplankton * feeding rates Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2008

  18. Zooplankton biomass to chlorophyll ratios in relation to trophic status ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rising eutrophication in South African reservoirs is of major concern, leading to the consideration of top-down biomanipulation as a management option – reducing zooplankton-eating fish to sustain zooplankton grazing pressure and thus restrict autotrophic plankton that proliferate with nutrient increases. The biomass ratio ...

  19. Biomaterials and the U.S. Navy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-10

    genetics, immunology, cell biology, micro- biology (including procaryotes and eucaryotes as well as heterotropha and autotrophs), biochemistry...expression in a marine animal and associated cellular events. Metallothionein genes offer a mechanism for detoxification of chemical effluents, as well as...cross-linked, would have interesting structural and cellular effector properties for a biomaterial. In addition, the regular cross-linking sequences

  20. Development of the trophic part of consortia’s relations of the gossamer-winged butterflies (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae with Salvia nutans (Lamiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Goloborodko

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of dummy individual consortia of Salvia nutans L. an important component of fertilization mechanism – the dynamics of trophic relations of antophylus agents with an entomophilous angiosperm autotroph was investigated. The dominant position in species structure of fertilizers in conditionally native steppe ecosystems is occupied by relict TomaresnogelidobrogensisCar.

  1. Viral lysis of marine microbes in relation to vertical stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojica, K.D.A.

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis is to investigate how changes in vertical stratification affect autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial communities along a meridional gradient in the Atlantic Ocean. The Northeast Atlantic Ocean is a key area in global ocean circulation and a important sink for

  2. Relationships between net primary productivity and forest stand age in U.S. forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liming He; Jing M. Chen; Yude Pan; Richard Birdsey; Jens. Kattge

    2012-01-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is a key flux in the terrestrial ecosystem carbon balance, as it summarizes the autotrophic input into the system. Forest NPP varies predictably with stand age, and quantitative information on the NPP-age relationship for different regions and forest types is therefore fundamentally important for forest carbon cycle modeling. We used four...

  3. Integrated In Silico Analysis of Pathway Designs for Synthetic Photo-Electro-Autotrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Volpers

    Full Text Available The strong advances in synthetic biology enable the engineering of novel functions and complex biological features in unprecedented ways, such as implementing synthetic autotrophic metabolism into heterotrophic hosts. A key challenge for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals entails the engineering of synthetic autotrophic organisms that can effectively and efficiently fix carbon dioxide by using sustainable energy sources. This challenge involves the integration of carbon fixation and energy uptake systems. A variety of carbon fixation pathways and several types of photosystems and other energy uptake systems can be chosen and, potentially, modularly combined to design synthetic autotrophic metabolism. Prior to implementation, these designs can be evaluated by the combination of several computational pathway analysis techniques. Here we present a systematic, integrated in silico analysis of photo-electro-autotrophic pathway designs, consisting of natural and synthetic carbon fixation pathways, a proton-pumping rhodopsin photosystem for ATP regeneration and an electron uptake pathway. We integrated Flux Balance Analysis of the heterotrophic chassis Escherichia coli with kinetic pathway analysis and thermodynamic pathway analysis (Max-min Driving Force. The photo-electro-autotrophic designs are predicted to have a limited potential for anaerobic, autotrophic growth of E. coli, given the relatively low ATP regenerating capacity of the proton pumping rhodopsin photosystems and the high ATP maintenance of E. coli. If these factors can be tackled, our analysis indicates the highest growth potential for the natural reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle and the synthetic pyruvate synthase-pyruvate carboxylate -glyoxylate bicycle. Both carbon fixation cycles are very ATP efficient, while maintaining fast kinetics, which also results in relatively low estimated protein costs for these pathways. Furthermore, the synthetic bicycles are highly

  4. Seasonal variations in energy levels and metabolic processes of two dominant Acropora species ( A. spicifera and A. digitifera) at Ningaloo Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, S.; Patten, N. L.; Allcock, R. J. N.; Saunders, S. M.; Strickland, D.; Waite, A. M.

    2013-09-01

    Seasonal variations in coral health indices reflecting autotrophic activity (chlorophyll a and zooxanthellae density), metabolic rates (RNA/DNA ratio and protein) and energy storage (ratio of storage: structural lipids or lipid ratios) were examined for two dominant Acropora species [ Acropora digitifera ( AD) and Acropora spicifera ( AS)] at Ningaloo Reef (north-western Australia). Such detailed investigation of metabolic processes is important background, with regard to understanding the vulnerability of corals to environmental change. Health indices in AD and AS were measured before and after spawning in austral autumn and winter 2010, and austral summer 2011 at six stations. Health indices showed seasonal and species-specific differences but negligible spatial differences across a reef section. For AD, autotrophic indices were negatively correlated with lipid ratios and metabolic indices. Metabolic indices were significantly higher in AS than AD. No correlation was observed between RNA/DNA ratios and lipid ratios with any autotrophic indices for AS. Lipid ratios were stable throughout the year for AS while they changed significantly for AD. For both species, indices of metabolic activity were highest during autumn, while autotrophic indices were highest in winter and summer. Results suggest that the impact of the broadcast spawning event on coral health indices at Ningaloo Reef occurred only as a backdrop to massive seasonal changes in coral physiology. The La Niña summer pattern resulted in high autotrophic indices and low metabolic indices and energy stores. Our results imply different metabolic processes in A. digitifera and A. spicifera as well as a strong impact of extreme events on coral physiology.

  5. Microbial plankton communities in the coastal southeastern Black Sea: biomass, composition and trophic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulgen Aytan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We investigated biomass and composition of the pico-, nano- and microplankton communities in a coastal station of the southeastern Black Sea during 2011. We also examined trophic interactions within these communities from size-fractionated dilution experiments in February, June and December. Autotrophic and heterotrophic biomasses showed similar seasonal trends, with a peak in June, but heterotrophs dominated throughout the year. Autotrophic biomass was mainly comprised by nanoflagellates and diatoms in the first half of the year, and by dinoflagellates and Synechococcus spp. in the second half. Heterotrophic biomass was mostly dominated by heterotrophic bacteria, followed by nanoflagellates and microzooplankton. Dilution experiments suggest that nano- and microzooplankton were significant consumers of autotrophs and heterotrophic bacteria. More than 100% of bacterial production was consumed by grazers in all experiments, while 46%, 21% and 30% of daily primary production were consumed in February, June and December, respectively. In February, autotrophs were the main carbon source, but in December, it was heterotrophic bacteria. An intermediate situation was observed in June, with similar carbon flows from autotrophs and heterotrophic bacteria. Size-fraction dilution experiments suggested that heterotrophic nanoflagellates are an important link between the high heterotrophic bacterial biomass and microzooplankton. In summary, these results indicate that nano- and microzooplankton were responsible for comprising a significant fraction of total microbial plankton biomass, standing stocks, growth and grazing processes. This suggests that in 2011, the microbial food web was an important compartment of the planktonic food web in the coastal southeastern Black Sea. Keywords: Phytoplankton, Microzooplankton, Carbon biomass, Microbial food web, Grazing, Black Sea

  6. Insights into Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II) Oxidation Mechanisms through Analysis of Cell-Mineral Associations, Cell Encrustation, and Mineralogy in the Chemolithoautotrophic Enrichment Culture KS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordhoff, M; Tominski, C; Halama, M; Byrne, J M; Obst, M; Kleindienst, S; Behrens, S; Kappler, A

    2017-07-01

    Most described nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (NRFeOB) are mixotrophic and depend on organic cosubstrates for growth. Encrustation of cells in Fe(III) minerals has been observed for mixotrophic NRFeOB but not for autotrophic phototrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. So far, little is known about cell-mineral associations in the few existing autotrophic NRFeOB. Here, we investigate whether the designated autotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing strain (closely related to Gallionella and Sideroxydans ) or the heterotrophic nitrate reducers that are present in the autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment culture KS form mineral crusts during Fe(II) oxidation under autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. In the mixed culture, we found no significant encrustation of any of the cells both during autotrophic oxidation of 8 to 10 mM Fe(II) coupled to nitrate reduction and during cultivation under mixotrophic conditions with 8 to 10 mM Fe(II), 5 mM acetate, and 4 mM nitrate, where higher numbers of heterotrophic nitrate reducers were present. Two pure cultures of heterotrophic nitrate reducers ( Nocardioides and Rhodanobacter ) isolated from culture KS were analyzed under mixotrophic growth conditions. We found green rust formation, no cell encrustation, and only a few mineral particles on some cell surfaces with 5 mM Fe(II) and some encrustation with 10 mM Fe(II). Our findings suggest that enzymatic, autotrophic Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction forms poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and proceeds without cellular encrustation while indirect Fe(II) oxidation via heterotrophic nitrate-reduction-derived nitrite can lead to green rust as an intermediate mineral and significant cell encrustation. The extent of encrustation caused by indirect Fe(II) oxidation by reactive nitrogen species depends on Fe(II) concentrations and is probably negligible under environmental conditions in most habitats. IMPORTANCE Most described nitrate

  7. Insights into Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II) Oxidation Mechanisms through Analysis of Cell-Mineral Associations, Cell Encrustation, and Mineralogy in the Chemolithoautotrophic Enrichment Culture KS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordhoff, M.; Tominski, C.; Halama, M.; Byrne, J. M.; Obst, M.; Behrens, S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most described nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (NRFeOB) are mixotrophic and depend on organic cosubstrates for growth. Encrustation of cells in Fe(III) minerals has been observed for mixotrophic NRFeOB but not for autotrophic phototrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. So far, little is known about cell-mineral associations in the few existing autotrophic NRFeOB. Here, we investigate whether the designated autotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing strain (closely related to Gallionella and Sideroxydans) or the heterotrophic nitrate reducers that are present in the autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment culture KS form mineral crusts during Fe(II) oxidation under autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. In the mixed culture, we found no significant encrustation of any of the cells both during autotrophic oxidation of 8 to 10 mM Fe(II) coupled to nitrate reduction and during cultivation under mixotrophic conditions with 8 to 10 mM Fe(II), 5 mM acetate, and 4 mM nitrate, where higher numbers of heterotrophic nitrate reducers were present. Two pure cultures of heterotrophic nitrate reducers (Nocardioides and Rhodanobacter) isolated from culture KS were analyzed under mixotrophic growth conditions. We found green rust formation, no cell encrustation, and only a few mineral particles on some cell surfaces with 5 mM Fe(II) and some encrustation with 10 mM Fe(II). Our findings suggest that enzymatic, autotrophic Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction forms poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and proceeds without cellular encrustation while indirect Fe(II) oxidation via heterotrophic nitrate-reduction-derived nitrite can lead to green rust as an intermediate mineral and significant cell encrustation. The extent of encrustation caused by indirect Fe(II) oxidation by reactive nitrogen species depends on Fe(II) concentrations and is probably negligible under environmental conditions in most habitats. IMPORTANCE Most described nitrate

  8. Multiple stressors for oceanic primary production

    KAUST Repository

    Agusti, Susana

    2015-12-15

    Marine ecosystems are increasingly exposed to stress factors of anthropogenic origin that change their function, structure and services they deliver society. Climate change occurs simultaneously with other changes in the environment acting jointly in a context of global environmental change. For oceanic phytoplankton communities, the research conducted so far has identified stress factors associated with global change and their impact individually (warming, acidification, increased UVB radiation, pollutants). But when several stressors act simultaneously interactions and responses are not equal to the sum of individual impacts, but may have synergistic effects (the effects are multiplied) or antagonistic (cancel out the effects) that hinder predictions of the vulnerability of ecosystems to global change. Here we will examine the vulnerability of oceanic primary producers to the accumulation of different stressors associated with global change. The trend for autotrophic picoplankton to increase with temperature in the ocean has led to predictions that autotrophic picoplankton abundance will increase with warming. However, it is documented a trend towards a decline in productivity, due to declined autotroph biomass and production with warming and the associated stratification in the subtropical ocean. Models predicting an increase in abundance are in contradiction with the reported decrease in productivity in several oceanic areas, and associate oligotrophication. Here we perform a global study to analyze the relationships of autotrophic picoplankton with oceanic temperature, nutrients, underwater light and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, and productivity. We built a model to project the future changes of autotrophic picoplankton considering multiple environmental changes in future climate scenarios for the subtropical gyres. We considered increased water temperature, and associated changes in productivity and underwater light and UVB. The model show that warming and

  9. Multiple stressors for oceanic primary production

    KAUST Repository

    Agusti, Susana; Llabré s, Moira; Lubiá n, Luis M.; Moreno-Ostos, Enrique; Estrada, Marta; Duarte, Carlos M.; Cerezo, Maria I.

    2015-01-01

    Marine ecosystems are increasingly exposed to stress factors of anthropogenic origin that change their function, structure and services they deliver society. Climate change occurs simultaneously with other changes in the environment acting jointly in a context of global environmental change. For oceanic phytoplankton communities, the research conducted so far has identified stress factors associated with global change and their impact individually (warming, acidification, increased UVB radiation, pollutants). But when several stressors act simultaneously interactions and responses are not equal to the sum of individual impacts, but may have synergistic effects (the effects are multiplied) or antagonistic (cancel out the effects) that hinder predictions of the vulnerability of ecosystems to global change. Here we will examine the vulnerability of oceanic primary producers to the accumulation of different stressors associated with global change. The trend for autotrophic picoplankton to increase with temperature in the ocean has led to predictions that autotrophic picoplankton abundance will increase with warming. However, it is documented a trend towards a decline in productivity, due to declined autotroph biomass and production with warming and the associated stratification in the subtropical ocean. Models predicting an increase in abundance are in contradiction with the reported decrease in productivity in several oceanic areas, and associate oligotrophication. Here we perform a global study to analyze the relationships of autotrophic picoplankton with oceanic temperature, nutrients, underwater light and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, and productivity. We built a model to project the future changes of autotrophic picoplankton considering multiple environmental changes in future climate scenarios for the subtropical gyres. We considered increased water temperature, and associated changes in productivity and underwater light and UVB. The model show that warming and

  10. Infrared remote sensing for canopy temperature in paddy field and relationship between leaf temperature and leaf color

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakiyama, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Infrared remote sensing is used for crop monitoring, for example evaluation of water stress, detection of infected crops and estimation of transpiration and photosynthetic rates. This study was conducted to show another application of remote sensing information. The relationship between rice leaf temperature and chlorophyll content in the leaf blade was investigated by using thermography during the ripening period. The canopy of a rice community fertilized by top dressing was cooler than that not fertilized in a 1999 field experiment. In an experiment using thermocouples to measure leaf temperature, a rice leaf with high chlorophyll content was also cooler than that with a low chlorophyll content. Transpiration resistance and transpiration rate were measured with a porometer. Transpiration rate was higher with increasing chlorophyll content in the leaf blade. Stomatal aperture is related to chlorophyll content in the leaf blade. High degree of stomatal aperture is caused by high chlorophyll content in the leaf blade. As degree of stomatal aperture increases, transpiration rate increases. Therefore the rice leaf got cooler with increasing chlorophyll content in leaf blade. Paddy rice communities with different chlorophyll contents were provided with fertilization of different nitrogen levels on basal and top dressing in a 2000 field experiment. Canopy temperature of the rice community with high chlorophyll content was 0.85°C cooler than that of the rice community with low chlorophyll content. Results of this study revealed that infrared remote sensing could detect difference in chlorophyll contents in rice communities and could be used in fertilizer management in paddy fields. (author)

  11. Microbial population responses in three stratified Antarctic meltwater ponds during the autumn freeze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safi, Karl; Hawes, Ian; Sorrell, Brian Keith

    2012-01-01

    The planktonic microbial communities of three meltwater ponds, located on the McMurdo Ice Shelf, were investigated from the end of January 2008 to early April, during which almost the entire pond volumes froze. The ponds were comprised of an upper mixed layer overlying a salt-stabilized density g...... for increasing heterotrophy within the remaining microbial communities, although all components of the food web eventually decline as the final freeze approaches....... role of autotrophic and heterotrophic microplankton within the ponds. The results showed that microbial groups responded to the onset of winter by declining in abundance, though an exception was the appearance of filamentous cyanobacteria in the water column in March. As freezing progressed, autotrophs...... declined more rapidly than heterotrophs and grazing rates and abundances of mixotrophic and heterotrophic organisms increased. Grazing pressure on bacteria and picophytoplankton also increased, in part explaining their decline over time. The results indicate that stressors imposed during freezing select...

  12. The use of mechanistic descriptions of algal growth and zooplankton grazing in an estuarine eutrophication model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, M. E.; Walker, S. J.; Wallace, B. B.; Webster, I. T.; Parslow, J. S.

    2003-03-01

    A simple model of estuarine eutrophication is built on biomechanical (or mechanistic) descriptions of a number of the key ecological processes in estuaries. Mechanistically described processes include the nutrient uptake and light capture of planktonic and benthic autotrophs, and the encounter rates of planktonic predators and prey. Other more complex processes, such as sediment biogeochemistry, detrital processes and phosphate dynamics, are modelled using empirical descriptions from the Port Phillip Bay Environmental Study (PPBES) ecological model. A comparison is made between the mechanistically determined rates of ecological processes and the analogous empirically determined rates in the PPBES ecological model. The rates generally agree, with a few significant exceptions. Model simulations were run at a range of estuarine depths and nutrient loads, with outputs presented as the annually averaged biomass of autotrophs. The simulations followed a simple conceptual model of eutrophication, suggesting a simple biomechanical understanding of estuarine processes can provide a predictive tool for ecological processes in a wide range of estuarine ecosystems.

  13. A consilience model to describe N2O production during biological N removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domingo Felez, Carlos; Smets, Barth F.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, is produced during biological nitrogen conversion in wastewater treatment operations. Complex mechanisms underlie N2O production by autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms, which continue to be unravelled. Mathematical models that describe nitric oxide...... (NO) and N2O dynamics have been proposed. Here, a first comprehensive model that considers all relevant NO and N2O production and consumption mechanisms is proposed. The model describes autotrophic NO production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria associated with ammonia oxidation and with nitrite reduction......, followed by NO reduction to N2O. It also considers NO and N2O as intermediates in heterotrophic denitrification in a 4-step model. Three biological NO and N2O production pathways are accounted for, improving the capabilities of existing models while not increasing their complexity. Abiotic contributions...

  14. The impact of dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorous on responses of microbial plankton to the Texas City "Y" oil spill in Galveston Bay, Texas (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alicia K; Bacosa, Hernando P; Quigg, Antonietta

    2017-08-15

    Ongoing bioremediation research seeks to promote naturally occurring microbial polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation during and after oil spill events. However, complex relationships among functionally different microbial groups, nutrients and PAHs remain unconstrained. We conducted a surface water survey and corresponding nutrient amendment bioassays following the Texas City "Y" oil spill in Galveston Bay, Texas. Resident microbial groups, defined as either heterotrophic or autotrophic were enumerated by flow cytometry. Heterotrophic abundance was increased by oil regardless of nutrient concentrations. Contrastingly, autotrophic abundance was inhibited by oil, but this reaction was less severe when nutrient concentrations were higher. Several PAH compounds were reduced in nutrient amended treatments relative to controls suggesting nutrient enhanced microbial PAH processing. These findings provide a first-look at nutrient limitation during microbial oil processing in Galveston Bay, an important step in understanding if nutrient additions would be a useful bioremediation strategy in this and other estuarine systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Efficient Total Nitrogen Removal in an Ammonia Gas Biofilter through High-Rate OLAND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Clippeleir, Haydée; Courtens, Emilie; Mosquera, Mariela

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia gas is conventionally treated in nitrifying biofilters; however, addition of organic carbon to perform post-denitrification is required to obtain total nitrogen removal. Oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification (OLAND), applied in full-scale for wastewater treatment, can...... offer a cost-effective alternative for gas treatment. In this study, the OLAND application thus was broadened toward ammonia loaded gaseous streams. A down flow, oxygen-saturated biofilter (height of 1.5 m; diameter of 0.11 m) was fed with an ammonia gas stream (248 ± 10 ppmv) at a loading rate of 0...... at water flow rates of 1.3 ± 0.4 m3 m–2 biofilter section d–1. Profile measurements revealed that 91% of the total nitrogen activity was taking place in the top 36% of the filter. This study demonstrated for the first time highly effective and sustainable autotrophic ammonia removal in a gas biofilter...

  16. Current /sup 14/C methods for measuring primary production: gross underestimates in oceanic waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieskes, W W.C.; Kraay, G W; Baars, M A [Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Texel, Netherlands

    1979-10-01

    The amount of organic matter produced through autotrophic processes in the euphotic zone of the tropical open ocean and available for respiration of autotrophs and heterotrophs was at least 5 to 15 times higher than values derived from the common /sup 14/C method suggested. The new estimates are based on measurements of /sup 14/C incorporation in organic matter of ocean samples incubated in bottles of up to 4 litres. Oceanic phytoplankton appeared to have a high growth rate, with generation times of hours, not days. High heterotrophic activity, finding its expression in high dark fixation rates of /sup 14/C, took place in conjunction with this high primary production of organic matter.

  17. Sulfur availability regulates plant growth via glucose-TOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yihan; Silbermann, Marleen; Speiser, Anna; Forieri, Ilaria; Linster, Eric; Poschet, Gernot; Allboje Samami, Arman; Wanatabe, Mutsumi; Sticht, Carsten; Teleman, Aurelio A; Deragon, Jean-Marc; Saito, Kazuki; Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2017-10-27

    Growth of eukaryotic cells is regulated by the target of rapamycin (TOR). The strongest activator of TOR in metazoa is amino acid availability. The established transducers of amino acid sensing to TOR in metazoa are absent in plants. Hence, a fundamental question is how amino acid sensing is achieved in photo-autotrophic organisms. Here we demonstrate that the plant Arabidopsis does not sense the sulfur-containing amino acid cysteine itself, but its biosynthetic precursors. We identify the kinase GCN2 as a sensor of the carbon/nitrogen precursor availability, whereas limitation of the sulfur precursor is transduced to TOR by downregulation of glucose metabolism. The downregulated TOR activity caused decreased translation, lowered meristematic activity, and elevated autophagy. Our results uncover a plant-specific adaptation of TOR function. In concert with GCN2, TOR allows photo-autotrophic eukaryotes to coordinate the fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur for efficient cysteine biosynthesis under varying external nutrient supply.

  18. Carbon flow from volcanic CO2 into soil microbial communities of a wetland mofette

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beulig, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Effects of extremely high carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations on soil microbial communities and associated processes are largely unknown. We studied a wetland area affected by spots of subcrustal CO2 degassing (mofettes) with focus on anaerobic autotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis because ......2-induced geochemical changes promoted anaerobic and acidophilic organisms and altered carbon turnover in affected soils.......Effects of extremely high carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations on soil microbial communities and associated processes are largely unknown. We studied a wetland area affected by spots of subcrustal CO2 degassing (mofettes) with focus on anaerobic autotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis because...... the pore gas phase was largely hypoxic. Compared with a reference soil, the mofette was more acidic (ΔpH ~0.8), strongly enriched in organic carbon (up to 10 times), and exhibited lower prokaryotic diversity. It was dominated by methanogens and subdivision 1 Acidobacteria, which likely thrived under stable...

  19. Origin of the Reductive Tricarboxylic Acid (rTCA Cycle-Type CO2 Fixation: A Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Kitadai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA cycle is among the most plausible candidates for the first autotrophic metabolism in the earliest life. Extant enzymes fixing CO2 in this cycle contain cofactors at the catalytic centers, but it is unlikely that the protein/cofactor system emerged at once in a prebiotic process. Here, we discuss the feasibility of non-enzymatic cofactor-assisted drive of the rTCA reactions in the primitive Earth environments, particularly focusing on the acetyl-CoA conversion to pyruvate. Based on the energetic and mechanistic aspects of this reaction, we propose that the deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments with active electricity generation in the presence of various sulfide catalysts are a promising setting for it to progress. Our view supports the theory of an autotrophic origin of life from primordial carbon assimilation within a sulfide-rich hydrothermal vent.

  20. Dinoflagellate community structure from the stratified environment of the Bay of Bengal, with special emphasis on harmful algal bloom species

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, R.K.; Hegde, S.; Anil, A.C.

    the total marine phytoplankton species, approximately 7% are capable of forming algal blooms (red tides) (Sournia 1995); dinoflagellates are the most important group producing toxic and harmful algal blooms (Steidinger 1983, 1993; Anderson 1989... Taxonomic identification revealed 134 species of dinoflagellates in surface waters of the BOB during the observation period (Table 2). Further grouping of these identified species based on their nutritional mode, revealed 40 autotrophic, 50 mixotrophic...

  1. An engineered Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle for carbon dioxide fixation in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Borzyskowski, Lennart Schada; Carrillo, Martina; Leupold, Simeon; Glatter, Timo; Kiefer, Patrick; Weishaupt, Ramon; Heinemann, Matthias; Erb, Tobias J

    2018-04-03

    Organisms are either heterotrophic or autotrophic, meaning that they cover their carbon requirements by assimilating organic compounds or by fixing inorganic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The conversion of a heterotrophic organism into an autotrophic one by metabolic engineering is a long-standing goal in synthetic biology and biotechnology, because it ultimately allows for the production of value-added compounds from CO 2 . The heterotrophic Alphaproteobacterium Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 is a platform organism for a future C1-based bioeconomy. Here we show that M. extorquens AM1 provides unique advantages for establishing synthetic autotrophy, because energy metabolism and biomass formation can be effectively separated from each other in the organism. We designed and realized an engineered strain of M. extorquens AM1 that can use the C1 compound methanol for energy acquisition and forms biomass from CO 2 by implementation of a heterologous Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle. We demonstrate that the heterologous CBB cycle is active, confers a distinct phenotype, and strongly increases viability of the engineered strain. Metabolic 13 C-tracer analysis demonstrates the functional operation of the heterologous CBB cycle in M. extorquens AM1 and comparative proteomics of the engineered strain show that the host cell reacts to the implementation of the CBB cycle in a plastic way. While the heterologous CBB cycle is not able to support full autotrophic growth of M. extorquens AM1, our study represents a further advancement in the design and realization of synthetic autotrophic organisms. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Mixotrophy and chemiosmotic aspects of acidophilism in facultative thiobacilli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, A.

    1984-01-01

    Mixotrophic chemolithotrophs possess the unique potential of combining the use of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth substrates. This report discusses studies on dual substrate utilization by such organisms and recants the author's studies on mixotropy in Thiobacillus novellus using traditional batch cultures. It is concluded that although T. novellus can express its mixotrophic potential in both types of environments, this expression is complete and beneficial only under nutrient-limited conditions. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. Metabolism and Gaseous Exchanges in Two Coastal Lagoons from Rio de Janeiro with Distinct Limnological Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Sidinei M. Thomaz; Alex Enrich-Prast; José F. Gonçalves Jr.; Anderson M. dos Santos; Francisco A. Esteves

    2001-01-01

    The global metabolism and exchange of gases with the atmosphere were measured during a diel cycle in two tropical coastal lagoons, using the curves of carbon dioxide and dissolved oxygen. Heterotrophic metabolism (net CO2 production and net O2 consumption) was observed in a black water lagoon (Comprida), and autotrophic metabolism (net O2 production and net CO2 consumption) in a clear water lagoon (Imboassica). These differences were attributed to the limnological characteristics of both ecos...

  4. Role of amino acids and vitamins in nutrition of mesophilic Methanococcus spp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitman, W.B.; Sohn, S.; Kuk, S.; Xing, R.

    1987-01-01

    In this study the authors found that autotrophic methanococci similar to Methanococcus maripaludis obtained up to 57% of their cellular carbon from exogeneous amino acids. About 85% of the incorporation was into protein. Primarily nonpolar and basic amino acids and glycine were incorporated; only small amounts of acidic and some polar amino acids were taken up. An additional 10% of the incorporation was into the nucleic acid fraction. Because little 14 CO 2 was formed from the 14 C-amino acids, little metabolism of the amino acids occurred. Therefore, the growth stimulation by amino acids was probably due to the sparing of anabolic energy requirements. Of the amino acids incorporated, only alanine was also a sole nitrogen source for these methanococci. In contrast, Methanococcus vannielii and Methanococcus aeolicus are autotrophic methanococci which did not incorporate amino acids and did not utilize alanine as a sole nitrogen source. Although glutamine served as a sole nitrogen source for the autotrophic methanococci and Methanococcus voltae, a heterotrophic methanococcus, growth was due to chemical deamination in the medium. M. voltae requires leucine and isoleucine for growth. However, these amino acids were not significant nitrogen sources, and alanine was not a sole nitrogen source for the growth of M. voltae. The branched-chain amino acids were not extensively metabolized by M. voltae. Pantoyl lactone and pantoic acid were readily incorporated by M. voltae. The intact vitamin pantothenate was neither stimulatory to growth nor incorporated. In conclusion, although amino acids and vitamins are nutritionally important to both autotrophic and heterotrophic methanococci, generally they are not subject to extensive catabolism

  5. 2012 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Research Conferences and Gordon Research Seminar, August 4-10,2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Thomas

    2012-08-10

    The 2012 Gordon Conference will present and discuss cutting-edge research in the field of microbial metabolism of C1 compounds. The conference will feature the roles and application of C1 metabolism in natural and synthetic systems at scales from molecules to ecosystems. The conference will stress molecular aspects of the unique metabolism exhibited by autotrophic bacteria, methanogens, methylotrophs, aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs, and acetogens.

  6. Recent Advances in Outdoor High-Density Cultivation of Novelty Micro-Algae Strain with High Content of Lipids

    OpenAIRE

    Kaštánek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was the pilot plant examination of a newly developed integrated process for autotrophic cultivation of useful micro-algae. The process utilizes waste carbon dioxide as a source of carbon and yields simultaneously products that can be utilized in food and cosmetic industries, turned into biodiesel and/or used as a supplement in animal feed. At present, the cultivation of micro-algae merely for the production of biofuels is not economically viable. In the proposed pr...

  7. A stable-isotope mass spectrometry-based metabolic footprinting approach to analyze exudates from phytoplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Ralf J. M.; Selander, Erik; Sommer, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton exudates play an important role in pelagic ecology and biogeochemical cycles of elements. Exuded compounds fuel the microbial food web and often encompass bioactive secondary metabolites like sex pheromones, allelochemicals, antibiotics, or feeding attractants that mediate biological...... interactions. Despite this importance, little is known about the bioactive compounds present in phytoplankton exudates. We report a stable-isotope metabolic footprinting method to characterise exudates from aquatic autotrophs. Exudates from 13C-enriched alga were concentrated by solid phase extraction...

  8. Interconnection of nitrogen fixers and iron in the Pacific Ocean: Theory and numerical simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Ward, B. A.; Monteiro, F.; Follows, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the interplay between iron supply, iron concentrations and phytoplankton communities in the Pacific Ocean. We present a theoretical framework which considers the competition for iron and nitrogen resources between phytoplankton to explain where nitrogen fixing autotrophs (diazotrophs, which require higher iron quotas, and have slower maximum growth) can co-exist with other phytoplankton. The framework also indicates that iron and fixed nitrogen concentrations can be strongly contro...

  9. Evidence of carbon fixation pathway in a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 revealed with genomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiping Wang

    Full Text Available Autotrophic CO2 fixation is the most important biotransformation process in the biosphere. Research focusing on the diversity and distribution of relevant autotrophs is significant to our comprehension of the biosphere. In this study, a draft genome of a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 was reconstructed with the metagenome of an industrial activated sludge. Based on comparative genomics, this autotrophy may occur via a newly discovered carbon fixation path, the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate (HPHB cycle, which was demonstrated in a previous work to be uniquely possessed by some genera from Archaea. This bacterium possesses all of the thirteen enzymes required for the HPHB cycle; these enzymes share 30∼50% identity with those in the autotrophic species of Archaea that undergo the HPHB cycle and 30∼80% identity with the corresponding enzymes of the mixotrophic species within Bradyrhizobiaceae. Thus, this bacterium might have an autotrophic growth mode in certain conditions. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene reveals that the phylotypes within candidate phylum SBR1093 are primarily clustered into 5 clades with a shallow branching pattern. This bacterium is clustered with phylotypes from organically contaminated environments, implying a demand for organics in heterotrophic metabolism. Considering the types of regulators, such as FnR, Fur, and ArsR, this bacterium might be a facultative aerobic mixotroph with potential multi-antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. This is the first report on Bacteria that may perform potential carbon fixation via the HPHB cycle, thus may expand our knowledge of the distribution and importance of the HPHB cycle in the biosphere.

  10. Studies on phytoplankton-bacterial interactions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeCosta, P.M.

    community was most diverse during the pre- monsoon period. Heterotrophic dinoflagellates were abundant in the water column as well as sediment. A seasonal cycling between vegetative and resting cysts of autotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates... governed by the environmental characteristics of the study area was observed. Temperature, salinity and Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) were the main factors affecting dinoflagellate community structure in both the water column and sediment...

  11. Inhibition of photosynthesis by carbon monoxide and suspension of the carbon monoxide inhibition by light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gewitz, H S; Voelker, W

    1963-08-01

    The experimental subject was the autotroph Chlorella pyrenoidosa. It was found that growth conditions determine whether the alga is inhibited by carbon monoxide or not. Respiration and photosynthesis are inhibited by carbon monoxide if the cells have grown rapidly under high light intensities. The inhibition of respiration and photosynthesis found in such cells is completely reversible. The inhibition depends not only on carbon monoxide pressure, but also on the oxygen pressure prevailing at the same time. 5 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  12. Comparative analysis of sterol acquisition in the oomycetes Saprolegnia parasitica and Phytophthora infestans

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlin, Paul; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Ekengren, Sophia; McKee, Lauren S.; Bulone, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The oomycete class includes pathogens of animals and plants which are responsible for some of the most significant global losses in agriculture and aquaculture. There is a need to replace traditional chemical means of controlling oomycete growth with more targeted approaches, and the inhibition of sterol synthesis is one promising area. To better direct these efforts, we have studied sterol acquisition in two model organisms: the sterol-autotrophic Saprolegnia parasitica, and the sterol-heter...

  13. Carbon cycling and calcification in hypersaline microbial mats

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are laminated aggregations of microorganisms that thrive in extreme and oligotrophic environments. Primary production rates by oxygenic phototrophs are extremely high. Primary producers supply heterotrophic mat members with organic carbon, which in turn regenerate CO2 needed for autotrophic carbon fixation. Another potential source of CO2 is calcification, which is known to shift the carbonate equilibrium towards CO2. This thesis investigated the carbon cycle of mi...

  14. On the Origin of Heterotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönheit, Peter; Buckel, Wolfgang; Martin, William F

    2016-01-01

    The theory of autotrophic origins of life posits that the first cells on Earth satisfied their carbon needs from CO2. At hydrothermal vents, spontaneous synthesis of methane via serpentinization links an energy metabolic reaction with a geochemical homologue. If the first cells were autotrophs, how did the first heterotrophs arise, and what was their substrate? We propose that cell mass roughly similar to the composition of Escherichia coli was the substrate for the first chemoorganoheterotrophs. Amino acid fermentations, pathways typical of anaerobic clostridia and common among anaerobic archaea, in addition to clostridial type purine fermentations, might have been the first forms of heterotrophic carbon and energy metabolism. Ribose was probably the first abundant sugar, and the archaeal type III RubisCO pathway of nucleoside monophosphate conversion to 3-phosphoglycerate might be a relic of ancient heterotrophy. Participation of chemiosmotic coupling and flavin-based electron bifurcation--a soluble energy coupling process--in clostridial amino acid and purine fermentations is consistent with an autotrophic origin of both metabolism and heterotrophy, as is the involvement of S(0) as an electron acceptor in the facilitated fermentations of anaerobic heterotrophic archaea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitrogen Fixation Aligns with nifH Abundance and Expression in Two Coral Trophic Functional Groups

    KAUST Repository

    Pogoreutz, Claudia

    2017-06-28

    Microbial nitrogen fixation (diazotrophy) is a functional trait widely associated with tropical reef-building (scleractinian) corals. While the integral role of nitrogen fixation in coral nutrient dynamics is recognized, its ecological significance across different coral functional groups remains yet to be evaluated. Here we set out to compare molecular and physiological patterns of diazotrophy (i.e., nifH gene abundance and expression as well as nitrogen fixation rates) in two coral families with contrasting trophic strategies: highly heterotrophic, free-living members of the family Fungiidae (Pleuractis granulosa, Ctenactis echinata), and mostly autotrophic coral holobionts with low heterotrophic capacity (Pocilloporidae: Pocillopora verrucosa, Stylophora pistillata). The Fungiidae exhibited low diazotroph abundance (based on nifH gene copy numbers) and activity (based on nifH gene expression and the absence of detectable nitrogen fixation rates). In contrast, the mostly autotrophic Pocilloporidae exhibited nifH gene copy numbers and gene expression two orders of magnitude higher than in the Fungiidae, which coincided with detectable nitrogen fixation activity. Based on these data, we suggest that nitrogen fixation compensates for the low heterotrophic nitrogen uptake in autotrophic corals. Consequently, the ecological importance of diazotrophy in coral holobionts may be determined by the trophic functional group of the host.

  16. Improvement of kinetics, yield, and colloidal stability of biogenic gold nanoparticles using living cells of Euglena gracilis microalga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahoumane, Si Amar; Yéprémian, Claude; Djédiat, Chakib; Couté, Alain; Fiévet, Fernand; Coradin, Thibaud; Brayner, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    Recent years have witnessed a boom in the biosynthesis of a large variety of nanomaterials using different biological resources among which algae-based entities have been gaining much more attention within the community of material scientists worldwide. In our previously published findings, we explored some factors that governed the biofabrication of gold nanoparticles using living cultures of microalgae, such as the utilized microalgal genera, the phylum they belong to, and the impact of tetrachloroauric acid concentrations on the ability of these strains to perform the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles once in contact with these cations. As a follow-up, we present in this paper an improvement of the features of bioproduced gold colloids using living cells of Euglena gracilis microalga when this species is grown under either mixotrophic or autotrophic conditions, i.e., exposed to light and grown in an organic carbon-enriched culture medium versus under autotrophic conditions. As an outcome to this alteration, the growth rate of this photosynthetic microorganism is multiplied 7-8 times when grown under mixotrophic conditions compared to autotrophic ones. Therefore, the yield, the kinetics, and the colloidal stability of the biosynthesized gold nanoparticles are dramatically enhanced. Moreover, the shape and the size of the as-produced nano-objects via this biological method are affected. In addition to round-shaped gold nanoparticles, particular shapes, such as triangles and hexagons, appear. These findings add up to the amassed knowledge toward the design of photobioreactors for the scalable and sustainable production of interesting nanomaterials.

  17. Improvement of kinetics, yield, and colloidal stability of biogenic gold nanoparticles using living cells of Euglena gracilis microalga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahoumane, Si Amar, E-mail: sa.dahoumane@gmail.com [Paris-Diderot University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Interfaces, Traitements, Organisation et Dynamique des Systèmes (ITODYS), UMR 7086, CNRS (France); Yéprémian, Claude; Djédiat, Chakib; Couté, Alain [Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Département RDDM, UMR 7245, Unité MCAM (France); Fiévet, Fernand [Paris-Diderot University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Interfaces, Traitements, Organisation et Dynamique des Systèmes (ITODYS), UMR 7086, CNRS (France); Coradin, Thibaud, E-mail: thibaud.coradin@upmc.fr [UPMC—Paris 06, CNRS, Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris, Collège de France (France); Brayner, Roberta, E-mail: roberta.brayner@univ-paris-diderot.fr [Paris-Diderot University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Interfaces, Traitements, Organisation et Dynamique des Systèmes (ITODYS), UMR 7086, CNRS (France)

    2016-03-15

    Recent years have witnessed a boom in the biosynthesis of a large variety of nanomaterials using different biological resources among which algae-based entities have been gaining much more attention within the community of material scientists worldwide. In our previously published findings, we explored some factors that governed the biofabrication of gold nanoparticles using living cultures of microalgae, such as the utilized microalgal genera, the phylum they belong to, and the impact of tetrachloroauric acid concentrations on the ability of these strains to perform the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles once in contact with these cations. As a follow-up, we present in this paper an improvement of the features of bioproduced gold colloids using living cells of Euglena gracilis microalga when this species is grown under either mixotrophic or autotrophic conditions, i.e., exposed to light and grown in an organic carbon-enriched culture medium versus under autotrophic conditions. As an outcome to this alteration, the growth rate of this photosynthetic microorganism is multiplied 7–8 times when grown under mixotrophic conditions compared to autotrophic ones. Therefore, the yield, the kinetics, and the colloidal stability of the biosynthesized gold nanoparticles are dramatically enhanced. Moreover, the shape and the size of the as-produced nano-objects via this biological method are affected. In addition to round-shaped gold nanoparticles, particular shapes, such as triangles and hexagons, appear. These findings add up to the amassed knowledge toward the design of photobioreactors for the scalable and sustainable production of interesting nanomaterials.

  18. New concepts of microbial treatment processes for the nitrogen removal: effect of protein and amino acids degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, Alejandro; Calderón, Kadiya; González-López, Jesús

    2016-05-01

    High concentrations of proteins and amino acids can be found in wastewater and wastewater stream produced in anaerobic digesters, having shown that amino acids could persist over different managements for nitrogen removal affecting the nitrogen removal processes. Nitrogen removal is completely necessary because of their implications and the significant adverse environmental impact of ammonium such as eutrophication and toxicity to aquatic life on the receiving bodies. In the last decade, the treatment of effluents with high ammonium concentration through anammox-based bioprocesses has been enhanced because these biotechnologies are cheaper and more environmentally friendly than conventional technologies. However, it has been shown that the presence of important amounts of proteins and amino acids in the effluents seriously affects the microbial autotrophic consortia leading to important losses in terms of ammonium oxidation efficiency. Particularly the presence of sulfur amino acids such as methionine and cysteine has been reported to drastically decrease the autotrophic denitrification processes as well as affect the microbial community structure promoting the decline of ammonium oxidizing bacteria in favor of other phylotypes. In this context we discuss that new biotechnological processes that improve the degradation of protein and amino acids must be considered as a priority to increase the performance of the autotrophic denitrification biotechnologies.

  19. The Effect of Light on Bacterial Activity in a Seaweed Holobiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Souza, Sergio A; Jenkins, Stuart R; Casarin, Antonio; Baeta-Neves, Maria Helena; Salgado, Leonardo T; Guimaraes, Jean R D; Coutinho, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    Holobionts are characterized by the relationship between host and their associated organisms such as the biofilm associated with macroalgae. Considering that light is essential to macroalgae survival, the aim of this study was to verify the effect of light on the heterotrophic activity in biofilms of the brown macroalgae Sargassum furcatum during its growth cycle. Measurements of heterotrophic activity were done under natural light levels at different times during a daily cycle and under an artificial extinction of natural light during the afternoon. We also measured Sargassum primary production under these light levels in the afternoon. Both measurements were done with and without photosynthesis inhibitor and antibiotics. Biofilm composition was mainly represented by bacteria but diatoms, cyanobacteria, and other organisms were also common. When a peak of diatom genera was recorded, the heterotrophic activity of the biofilm was higher. Heterotrophic activity was usually highest during the afternoon and the presence of a photosynthesis inhibitor caused an average reduction of 17% but there was no relationship with Sargassum primary production. These results indicate that autotrophic production in the biofilm was reduced by the inhibitor with consequences on bacterial activity. Heterotrophic activity was mainly bacterial and the antibiotics chloramphenicol and penicillin were more effective than streptomycin. We suggest primary producers in the biofilm are more important to increase bacterial activity than the macroalgae itself because of coherence of the peaks of heterotrophic and autotrophic activity in biofilm during the afternoon and the effects of autotrophic inhibitors on heterotrophic activity.

  20. Nitrogen removal from sludge digester liquids by nitrification/denitrification or partial nitritation/anammox: environmental and economical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fux, C; Siegrist, H

    2004-01-01

    In wastewater treatment plants with anaerobic sludge digestion, 15-20% of the nitrogen load is recirculated to the main stream with the return liquors from dewatering. Separate treatment of this ammonium-rich digester supernatant significantly reduces the nitrogen load of the activated sludge system. Two biological applications are considered for nitrogen elimination: (i) classical autotrophic nitrification/heterotrophic denitrification and (ii) partial nitritation/autotrophic anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). With both applications 85-90% nitrogen removal can be achieved, but there are considerable differences in terms of sustainability and costs. The final gaseous products for heterotrophic denitrification are generally not measured and are assumed to be nitrogen gas (N2). However, significant nitrous oxide (N2O) production can occur at elevated nitrite concentrations in the reactor. Denitrification via nitrite instead of nitrate has been promoted in recent years in order to reduce the oxygen and the organic carbon requirements. Obviously this "achievement" turns out to be rather disadvantageous from an overall environmental point of view. On the other hand no unfavorable intermediates are emitted during anaerobic ammonium oxidation. A cost estimate for both applications demonstrates that partial nitritation/anammox is also more economical than classical nitrification/denitrification. Therefore autotrophic nitrogen elimination should be used in future to treat ammonium-rich sludge liquors.

  1. Energetic differences between bacterioplankton trophic groups and coral reef resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDole Somera, Tracey; Bailey, Barbara; Barott, Katie; Grasis, Juris; Hatay, Mark; Hilton, Brett J; Hisakawa, Nao; Nosrat, Bahador; Nulton, James; Silveira, Cynthia B; Sullivan, Chris; Brainard, Russell E; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-04-27

    Coral reefs are among the most productive and diverse marine ecosystems on the Earth. They are also particularly sensitive to changing energetic requirements by different trophic levels. Microbialization specifically refers to the increase in the energetic metabolic demands of microbes relative to macrobes and is significantly correlated with increasing human influence on coral reefs. In this study, metabolic theory of ecology is used to quantify the relative contributions of two broad bacterioplankton groups, autotrophs and heterotrophs, to energy flux on 27 Pacific coral reef ecosystems experiencing human impact to varying degrees. The effective activation energy required for photosynthesis is lower than the average energy of activation for the biochemical reactions of the Krebs cycle, and changes in the proportional abundance of these two groups can greatly affect rates of energy and materials cycling. We show that reef-water communities with a higher proportional abundance of microbial autotrophs expend more metabolic energy per gram of microbial biomass. Increased energy and materials flux through fast energy channels (i.e. water-column associated microbial autotrophs) may dampen the detrimental effects of increased heterotrophic loads (e.g. coral disease) on coral reef systems experiencing anthropogenic disturbance. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Nitrate removal from drinking water with a focus on biological methods: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Fariba; Sarrafzadeh, Mohammad-Hossein; Ebrahimi, Sirous; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2017-05-31

    This article summarizes several developed and industrial technologies for nitrate removal from drinking water, including physicochemical and biological techniques, with a focus on autotrophic nitrate removal. Approaches are primarily classified into separation-based and elimination-based methods according to the fate of the nitrate in water treatment. Biological denitrification as a cost-effective and promising method of biological nitrate elimination is reviewed in terms of its removal process, applicability, efficiency, and associated disadvantages. The various pathways during biological nitrate removal, including assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, are also explained. A comparative study was carried out to provide a better understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification. Sulfur-based and hydrogen-based denitrifications, which are the most common autotrophic processes of nitrate removal, are reviewed with the aim of presenting the salient features of hydrogenotrophic denitrification along with some drawbacks of the technology and research areas in which it could be used but currently is not. The application of algae-based water treatment is also introduced as a nature-inspired approach that may broaden future horizons of nitrate removal technology.

  3. Cultivation of Spirulina maxima in medium supplemented with sugarcane vinasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Raquel Rezende; Araújo, Ofélia de Queiroz Fernandes; de Medeiros, José Luiz; Chaloub, Ricardo Moreira

    2016-03-01

    The feasibility of sugarcane vinasse as supplement in growth medium of Spirulina maxima was investigated. The cell was cultivated under autotrophic (no vinasse, 70 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)), heterotrophic (no light, culture medium supplemented with vinasse at 0.1% v/v and 1.0% v/v) and mixotrophic conditions (70 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), vinasse at 0.1% v/v and 1.0% v/v). These preliminary results suggested a cyclic two-stage cultivation - CTSC, with autotrophic condition during light phase of the photoperiod (12 h, 70-200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) and heterotrophic condition during dark phase (12h, 3.0% v/v vinasse). The adopted CTSC strategy consisted in three cycles with 75% withdrawal of suspension and reposition of medium containing 3.0% v/v vinasse, separated by autotrophic rest periods of few days between cycles. Results show an increase of biomass concentration between 0.495 g L(-1) and 0.609 g L(-1) at the 7th day of each cycle and high protein content (between 74.3% and 77.3% w/w). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of indices for evaluating the periphytic community in two kinds of substrate in Imboassica Lagoon, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes V. O.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological indices based on the biomass (dry weight, ash content, and chlorophyll-a of the periphyton in a natural (submersed leaves of Typha domingensis Pers and in an artificial (plastic hoses substrate were compared, in experiments performed in summer and winter, in two sampling stations of Imboassica Lagoon, Macaé, Rio de Janeiro. The periphytic community exhibited low biomass at the beginning and end of the experiments, and moderate biomass in the intermediate period of the experiment, whatever the kind of substrate, sampling station, and season. In both seasons, there was a spatial variation regarding the degree of trophy of the periphyton, due to the difference of nutrient availability among the sampling stations. The alternation of inorganic and organic periphyton, as well as of their heterotrophic, hetero-autotrophic, auto-heterotrophic and, autotrophic character was due to changes in the abiotic factors of the sampling periods. The Lakatos index proved more sensitive than the Autotrophic Index to variations in the composition of the periphytic community.

  5. Synthetic Biology of Cyanobacteria: Unique Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram M Berla

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic organisms, and especially cyanobacteria, hold great promise as sources of renewably-produced fuels, bulk and specialty chemicals, and nutritional products. Synthetic biology tools can help unlock cyanobacteria’s potential for these functions, but unfortunately tool development for these organisms has lagged behind that for S. cerevisiae and E. coli. While these organisms may in many cases be more difficult to work with as ‘chassis’ strains for synthetic biology than certain heterotrophs, the unique advantages of autotrophs in biotechnology applications as well as the scientific importance of improved understanding of photosynthesis warrant the development of these systems into something akin to a ‘green E. coli’. In this review, we highlight unique challenges and opportunities for development of synthetic biology approaches in cyanobacteria. We review classical and recently developed methods for constructing targeted mutants in various cyanobacterial strains, and offer perspective on what genetic tools might most greatly expand the ability to engineer new functions in such strains. Similarly, we review what genetic parts are most needed for the development of cyanobacterial synthetic biology. Finally, we highlight recent methods to construct genome-scale models of cyanobacterial metabolism and to use those models to measure properties of autotrophic metabolism. Throughout this paper, we discuss some of the unique challenges of a diurnal, autotrophic lifestyle along with how the development of synthetic biology and biotechnology in cyanobacteria must fit within those constraints.

  6. Nitrogen Fixation Aligns with nifH Abundance and Expression in Two Coral Trophic Functional Groups

    KAUST Repository

    Pogoreutz, Claudia; Radecker, Nils; Cardenas, Anny; Gä rdes, Astrid; Wild, Christian; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial nitrogen fixation (diazotrophy) is a functional trait widely associated with tropical reef-building (scleractinian) corals. While the integral role of nitrogen fixation in coral nutrient dynamics is recognized, its ecological significance across different coral functional groups remains yet to be evaluated. Here we set out to compare molecular and physiological patterns of diazotrophy (i.e., nifH gene abundance and expression as well as nitrogen fixation rates) in two coral families with contrasting trophic strategies: highly heterotrophic, free-living members of the family Fungiidae (Pleuractis granulosa, Ctenactis echinata), and mostly autotrophic coral holobionts with low heterotrophic capacity (Pocilloporidae: Pocillopora verrucosa, Stylophora pistillata). The Fungiidae exhibited low diazotroph abundance (based on nifH gene copy numbers) and activity (based on nifH gene expression and the absence of detectable nitrogen fixation rates). In contrast, the mostly autotrophic Pocilloporidae exhibited nifH gene copy numbers and gene expression two orders of magnitude higher than in the Fungiidae, which coincided with detectable nitrogen fixation activity. Based on these data, we suggest that nitrogen fixation compensates for the low heterotrophic nitrogen uptake in autotrophic corals. Consequently, the ecological importance of diazotrophy in coral holobionts may be determined by the trophic functional group of the host.

  7. Genomic analysis reveals versatile heterotrophic capacity of a potentially symbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium in sponge

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Renmao

    2014-08-29

    Sulfur-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) play essential roles in marine sponges. However, the detailed characteristics and physiology of the bacteria are largely unknown. Here, we present and analyse the first genome of sponge-associated SOB using a recently developed metagenomic binning strategy. The loss of transposase and virulence-associated genes and the maintenance of the ancient polyphosphate glucokinase gene suggested a stabilized SOB genome that might have coevolved with the ancient host during establishment of their association. Exclusive distribution in sponge, bacterial detoxification for the host (sulfide oxidation) and the enrichment for symbiotic characteristics (genes-encoding ankyrin) in the SOB genome supported the bacterial role as an intercellular symbiont. Despite possessing complete autotrophic sulfur oxidation pathways, the bacterium developed a much more versatile capacity for carbohydrate uptake and metabolism, in comparison with its closest relatives (Thioalkalivibrio) and to other representative autotrophs from the same order (Chromatiales). The ability to perform both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolism likely results from the unstable supply of reduced sulfur in the sponge and is considered critical for the sponge-SOB consortium. Our study provides insights into SOB of sponge-specific clade with thioautotrophic and versatile heterotrophic metabolism relevant to its roles in the micro-environment of the sponge body. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Valorisation of CO2-rich off-gases to biopolymers through biotechnological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Linsey; De Wever, Heleen

    2017-11-01

    As one of the key enabling technologies, industrial biotechnology has a high potential to tackle harmful CO2 emissions and to turn CO2 into a valuable commodity. So far, experimental work mainly focused on the bioconversion of pure CO2 to chemicals and plastics and little is known about the tolerance of the bioprocesses to the presence of impurities. This work is the first to investigate the impact of real CO2-rich off-gases on autotrophic production of polyhydroxybutyrate. To this end, two-phase heterotrophic-autotrophic fermentation experiments were set up, consisting of heterothrophic cell mass growth using glucose as substrate followed by autotrophic biopolymer production using either pure synthetic CO2 or industrial off-gases sampled at two point sources. The use of real off-gases did not affect the bacterial performance. High biopolymer content (up to 73%) and productivities (up to 0.227 g/lh) were obtained. Characterisation of the polymers showed that all biopolymers had similar properties, independent of the CO2 source. Moreover, the CO2-derived biopolymers' properties were comparable to commercial ones and biopolymers reported in literature, which are all produced from organic carbon sources. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Comparative proteomics of leaves found at different stem positions of maize seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Bo; Wang, Dan; Ge, Xuan-Liang; Zhao, Biligen-Gaowa; Wang, Xu-Chu; Wang, Bai-Chen

    2016-07-01

    To better understand the roles of leaves at different stem positions during plant development, we measured the physiological properties of leaves 1-4 on maize seedling stems, and performed a proteomics study to investigate the differences in protein expression in the four leaves using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry in conjunction with database searching. A total of 167 significantly differentially expressed protein spots were found and identified. Of these, 35% are involved in photosynthesis. By further analysis of the data, we speculated that in leaf 1 the seedling has started to transition from a heterotroph to an autotroph, development of leaf 2 is the time at which the seedling fully transitions from a heterotroph to an autotroph, and leaf maturity was reached only with fully expanded leaves 3 and 4, although there were still some protein expression differences in the two leaves. These results suggest that the different leaves make different contributions to maize seedling growth via modulation of the expression of the photosynthetic proteins. Together, these results provide insight into the roles of the different maize leaves as the plant develops from a heterotroph to an autotroph. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Randhir K; Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC), however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  11. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randhir K Bharti

    Full Text Available A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO. The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC, however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  12. Stem girdling affects the quantity of CO2 transported in xylem as well as CO2 efflux from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, Jasper; Agneessens, Laura; Van Meulebroek, Lieven; Aubrey, Doug P; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O; Steppe, Kathy

    2014-02-01

    There is recent clear evidence that an important fraction of root-respired CO2 is transported upward in the transpiration stream in tree stems rather than fluxing to the soil. In this study, we aimed to quantify the contribution of root-respired CO2 to both soil CO2 efflux and xylem CO2 transport by manipulating the autotrophic component of belowground respiration. We compared soil CO2 efflux and the flux of root-respired CO2 transported in the transpiration stream in girdled and nongirdled 9-yr-old oak trees (Quercus robur) to assess the impact of a change in the autotrophic component of belowground respiration on both CO2 fluxes. Stem girdling decreased xylem CO2 concentration, indicating that belowground respiration contributes to the aboveground transport of internal CO2 . Girdling also decreased soil CO2 efflux. These results confirmed that root respiration contributes to xylem CO2 transport and that failure to account for this flux results in inaccurate estimates of belowground respiration when efflux-based methods are used. This research adds to the growing body of evidence that efflux-based measurements of belowground respiration underestimate autotrophic contributions. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. [Dynamic changes in soil respiration components and their regulating factors in the Moso bamboo plantation in subtropical China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-jia; Li, Yong-fu; Jiang, Pei-kun; Zhou, Guo-mo; Liu, Juan

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic changes (from April 2013 to March 2014) in soil respiration components were investigated by Li-8100 in the Moso bamboo plantation in Lin' an City, Zhejiang Province. Results showed that the average annual values for the soil total respiration rate, heterotrophic respiration rate, and autotrophic respiration rate in the Moso bamboo plantation were 2.93, 1.92 and 1.01 imol CO2 . m-2 . s-1, respectively. The soil respiration rate and its components exhibited strongly a seasonal dynamic pattern. The maximum appeared in July 2013, and the minimum appeared in January 2014. The annual cumulative CO2 emissions through soil respiration, heterotrophic respiration, and autotrophic respiration were 37.25, 24.61 and 12.64 t CO2 . hm-2 . a-1, respectively. The soil respiration and its components showed a close relation with soil temperature of 5 cm depth, and the corresponding Q10, values at 5 cm depth were 2.05, 1.95 and 2.34, respectively. Both the soil respiration and heterotrophic respiration were correlated to soil water soluble organic C (WSOC) content, but no significant relationship between autotrophic respiration and WSOC was observed. There were no significant relationships between soil respiration components and soil moisture content or microbial biomass C. The seasonal changes in soil respiration components in the Moso bamboo plantation were predominantly controlled by the soil temperature, and the soil WSOC content was an important environmental factor controlling total soil respiration and soil heterotrophic respiration.

  14. Early Microbial Evolution: The Age of Anaerobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F; Sousa, Filipa L

    2015-12-18

    In this article, the term "early microbial evolution" refers to the phase of biological history from the emergence of life to the diversification of the first microbial lineages. In the modern era (since we knew about archaea), three debates have emerged on the subject that deserve discussion: (1) thermophilic origins versus mesophilic origins, (2) autotrophic origins versus heterotrophic origins, and (3) how do eukaryotes figure into early evolution. Here, we revisit those debates from the standpoint of newer data. We also consider the perhaps more pressing issue that molecular phylogenies need to recover anaerobic lineages at the base of prokaryotic trees, because O2 is a product of biological evolution; hence, the first microbes had to be anaerobes. If molecular phylogenies do not recover anaerobes basal, something is wrong. Among the anaerobes, hydrogen-dependent autotrophs--acetogens and methanogens--look like good candidates for the ancestral state of physiology in the bacteria and archaea, respectively. New trees tend to indicate that eukaryote cytosolic ribosomes branch within their archaeal homologs, not as sisters to them and, furthermore tend to root archaea within the methanogens. These are major changes in the tree of life, and open up new avenues of thought. Geochemical methane synthesis occurs as a spontaneous, abiotic exergonic reaction at hydrothermal vents. The overall similarity between that reaction and biological methanogenesis fits well with the concept of a methanogenic root for archaea and an autotrophic origin of microbial physiology. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  15. Benthic algae compensate for phytoplankton losses in large aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Soren; Vadeboncoeur, Yvonne; Sibley, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities can induce major trophic shifts in aquatic systems, yet we have an incomplete understanding of the implication of such shifts on ecosystem function and on primary production (PP) in particular. In recent decades, phytoplankton biomass and production in the Laurentian Great Lakes have declined in response to reduced nutrient concentrations and invasive mussels. However, the increases in water clarity associated with declines in phytoplankton may have positive effects on benthic PP at the ecosystem scale. Have these lakes experienced oligotrophication (a reduction of algal production), or simply a shift in autotrophic structure with no net decline in PP? Benthic contributions to ecosystem PP are rarely measured in large aquatic systems, but our calculations based on productivity rates from the Great Lakes indicate that a significant proportion (up to one half, in Lake Huron) of their whole-lake production may be benthic. The large declines (5-45%) in phytoplankton production in the Great Lakes from the 1970s to 2000s may be substantially compensated by benthic PP, which increased by up to 190%. Thus, the autotrophic productive capacity of large aquatic ecosystems may be relatively resilient to shifts in trophic status, due to a redirection of production to the near-shore benthic zone, and large lakes may exhibit shifts in autotrophic structure analogous to the regime shifts seen in shallow lakes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Multitude potential of wheatgrass juice (Green Blood: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Padalia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheatgrass is the young grass of the common wheat plant Triticum aestivum Linn., family Poeaceae (Graminae. It is commonly known as the "green blood" due to its high chlorophyll content which accounts for 70% of its chemical constituents. It contains a plethora of vitamins, minerals, amino acids and vital enzymes like superoxide dismutase and cytochrome oxidase. The vitamin content makes it an important adjuvant in anti-allergic and anti-asthmatic treatment, while the enzymes play a pivotal role in the anticancer approach of this herbal drug. A notable feature of the wheatgrass juice is its bioflavonoid content which are the naturally occurring antioxidants and ac-count for many of its clinical utilities such as management of inflammatory bowel disease and as a general detoxi-fier. However, the most remarkable feature of the wheatgrass juice is its high chlorophyll content. Chlorophyll bears structural similarity to hemoglobin and has been found to regenerate or act as a substitute of hemoglobin in hemoglobin deficiency conditions. This might be the reason behind the utility of wheatgrass in clinical conditions like thalassemia and hemolytic anemia. The present article focuses onto the various studies emphasizing the multi-tude potentials of wheatgrass.

  17. Atlantic salmon brood stock management and breeding handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Harold L.; Stanley, Jon G.

    1989-01-01

    Anadromus runs of Atlantic salmon have been restored to the Connecticut, Merrimack, Pawcatuck, Penobscot, and St. Croix rivers in New England by the stocking of more than 8 million smolts since 1948. Fish-breeding methods have been developed that minimize inbreeding and domestication and enhance natural selection. Methods are available to advance the maturation of brood stock, control the sex of production lots and store gametes. Current hatchery practices emphasize the use of sea-run brood stock trapped upon return to the rivers and a limited number of captive brood stock and rejuvenated kelts. Fish are allowed to mature naturally, after which they are spawned and incubated artificially. Generally, 1-year smolts are produced, and excess fish are stocked as fry in headwater streams. Smolts are stocked during periods of rising water in spring. Self-release pools are planned that enable smolts to choose the emigration time. Culturists keep good records that permit evaluation of the performance of strains and the effects of breeding practices. As Atlantic salmon populations expand, culturists must use sound breeding methods that enhance biotic potential while maintaining genetic diversity and protecting unique gene pools.

  18. Retrofit of a MultiFamily Mass Masonry Building in New England

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Kerrigan, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Wytrykowska, H. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Van Straaten, R. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) has partnered with Building Science Corporation to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing brick building (a former convent) into condominiums. The research performed for this project provides information regarding advanced retrofit packages for multi-family masonry buildings in Cold climates. In particular, this project demonstrates safe, durable, and cost-effective solutions that will potentially benefit millions of multi-family brick buildings throughout the East Coast and Midwest (Cold climates). The retrofit packages provide insight on the opportunities for and constraints on retrofitting multifamily buildings with ambitious energy performance goals but a limited budget. The condominium conversion project will contribute to several areas of research on enclosures, space conditioning, and water heating. Enclosure items include insulation of mass masonry building on the interior, airtightness of these types of retrofits, multi-unit building compartmentalization, window selection, and roof insulation strategies. Mechanical system items include combined hydronic and space heating systems with hydronic distribution in small (low load) units, and ventilation system retrofits for multifamily buildings.

  19. Retrofit of a Multifamily Mass Masonry Building in New England

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K.; Kerrigan, P.; Wytrykowska, H.; Van Straaten, R.

    2013-08-01

    Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) has partnered with Building Science Corporation to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing brick building (a former convent) into condominiums. The research performed for this project provides information regarding advanced retrofit packages for multi-family masonry buildings in Cold climates. In particular, this project demonstrates safe, durable, and cost-effective solutions that will potentially benefit millions of multi-family brick buildings throughout the East Coast and Midwest (Cold climates). The retrofit packages provide insight on the opportunities for and constraints on retrofitting multifamily buildings with ambitious energy performance goals but a limited budget. The condominium conversion project will contribute to several areas of research on enclosures, space conditioning, and water heating. Enclosure items include insulation of mass masonry building on the interior, airtightness of these types of retrofits, multi-unit building compartmentalization, window selection, and roof insulation strategies. Mechanical system items include combined hydronic and space heating systems with hydronic distribution in small (low load) units, and ventilation system retrofits for multifamily buildings.

  20. Integrated funnel-and-gate/GZB product recovery technologies for in situ management of creosote NAPL-impacted aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.G.; Borchert, S.M.; Klingel, E.J.

    1997-01-01

    An in situ source management system was modeled and designed for the containment and recovery of creosote non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) at a former wood treating facility in Nashua, New Hampshire. The conceptual system was based on the integration of patented technologies for physical source containment and management (ie., funnel-and-gate technology) with patented in situ product recovery (i.e, GZB technology - described below). A funnel-and-gate physical barrier was proposed to mitigate the continued flow of NAPL into the Merrimack River. The purpose of the funnel was to divert groundwater (and potential NAPL) flow through two gate areas. Where required, an in situ system for product recovery was integrated. Mathematical modeling of the combined technologies led to the selection of a metal sheet pile barrier wall along 650 feet of the river's shoreline with the wall anchored into an underlying zone of lesser permeability. Multiple GZB wells were placed strategically within the system. This combination of technologies promised to offer a more effective, cost-efficient approach for long-term management of environmental concerns at Nashua, and related sites

  1. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Old Lyme Quadrangle, New London and Middlesex Counties, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Gregory J.; Scott, Robert B.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Armstrong, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    The bedrock geology of the Old Lyme quadrangle consists of Neoproterozoic and Permian gneisses and granites of the Gander and Avalon terranes, Silurian metasedimentary rocks of the Merrimack terrane, and Silurian to Devonian metasedimentary rocks of uncertain origin. The Avalon terrane rocks crop out within the Selden Neck block, and the Gander terrane rocks crop out within the Lyme dome. The Silurian to Devonian rocks crop out between these two massifs. Previous mapping in the Old Lyme quadrangle includes the work by Lawrence Lundgren, Jr. Lundgren's work provides an excellent resource for rock descriptions and detailed modal analyses of rock units that will not be duplicated in this current report. New research that was not covered in detail by Lundgren is the focus of this report and includes (1) evaluation of the rocks in the core of the Lyme dome in an effort to subdivide units in this area; (2) structural analysis of foliations and folds in and around the Lyme dome; (3) geochronology of selected units within the Lyme dome; and (4) analysis of joints and the fracture properties of the rocks.

  2. 9th annual European Antibody Congress, November 11-13, 2013, Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M; Beck, Alain; Lugovskoy, Alexey A; Wurch, Thierry; Coats, Steven; Brezski, Randall J

    2014-01-01

    The annual European Antibody Congress (EAC) has traditionally been the key event for updates on critical scientific advances in the antibody field, and 2013 was no exception. Organized by Terrapinn, the well-attended meeting featured presentations on considerations for developing antibodies and antibody-like therapeutics, with separate tracks for antibody-drug conjugates, naked antibodies, and multispecific antibodies or protein scaffolds. The overall focus of the EAC was current approaches to enhance the functionality of therapeutic antibodies or other targeted proteins, with the ultimate goal being improvement of the safety and efficacy of the molecules as treatments for cancer, immune-mediated disorders and other diseases. Roundtable discussion sessions gave participants opportunities to engage in group discussions with industry leaders from companies such as Genmab, Glenmark Pharmaceuticals, MedImmune, Merrimack Pharmaceuticals, and Pierre Fabre. As the 2013 EAC was co-located with the World Biosimilar Congress, participants also received an update on European Medicines Agency guidelines and thoughts on the future direction and development of biosimilar antibodies in the European Union.

  3. Preliminary stage and streamflow data at selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in Maine and New Hampshire for the flood of October 30–31, 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiah, Richard G.; Stasulis, Nicholas W.

    2018-03-08

    Rainfall from a storm on October 24–27, 2017, and Tropical Storm Philippe on October 29–30, created conditions that led to flooding across portions of New Hampshire and western Maine. On the basis of streamflow data collected at 30 selected U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgages in the Androscoggin River, Connecticut River, Merrimack River, and Saco River Basins, the storms caused minor to moderate flooding in those basins on October 30–31, 2017. During the storms, the USGS deployed hydrographers to take discrete measurements of streamflow. The measurements were used to confirm the stage-to-streamflow relation (rating curve) at the selected USGS streamgages. Following the storms, hydrographers documented high-water marks in support of indirect measurements of streamflow. Seven streamgages with greater than 50 years of streamflow data recorded preliminary streamflow peaks within the top five for the periods of record. Twelve streamgages recorded preliminary peak streamflows greater than an estimate of the 100-year streamflow based on drainage area.

  4. Storm tide monitoring during the blizzard of January 26-28, 2015, in eastern Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Andrew J.; Verdi, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a temporary monitoring network of six storm surge sensors and four barometric pressure sensors along the Atlantic coast in eastern Massachusetts, from Plymouth to Newburyport, before the blizzard of January 26–28, 2015 (Blizzard of January 2015), to record the timing and magnitude of storm tide at select locations where forecasters had predicted the potential for coastal flooding. Additionally, water-level data were recorded and transmitted in near real-time from four permanent USGS tidal stations—three on Cape Cod and one near the mouth of the Merrimack River in Newburyport. The storm surge sensors were deployed at previously established fixed sites outfitted with presurveyed mounting brackets. The mounting brackets were installed in 2014 as part of the USGS Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamic (SWaTH) Network (https://water.usgs.gov/floods/STN/), which was funded through congressional supplemental appropriations for the U.S. Department of the Interior after the devastating landfall of Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012 (Simmons and others, 2014). The USGS received this funding to enable better understanding of coastal flooding hazards in the region, to improve preparedness for future coastal storms, and to increase the resilience of coastal cities, infrastructure, and natural systems in the region (Buxton and others, 2013). The USGS established 163 monitoring locations along the New England coast for the SWaTH Network, including 70 sites in Massachusetts.

  5. Pathways of carbon and energy metabolism of the epibiotic community associated with the deep-sea hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügler, Michael; Petersen, Jillian M; Dubilier, Nicole; Imhoff, Johannes F; Sievert, Stefan M

    2011-01-07

    The shrimp Rimicaris exoculata dominates the faunal biomass at many deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In its enlarged gill chamber it harbors a specialized epibiotic bacterial community for which a nutritional role has been proposed. We analyzed specimens from the Snake Pit hydrothermal vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge by complementing a 16S rRNA gene survey with the analysis of genes involved in carbon, sulfur and hydrogen metabolism. In addition to Epsilon- and Gammaproteobacteria, the epibiotic community unexpectedly also consists of Deltaproteobacteria of a single phylotype, closely related to the genus Desulfocapsa. The association of these phylogenetic groups with the shrimp was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Based on functional gene analyses, we hypothesize that the Gamma- and Epsilonproteobacteria are capable of autotrophic growth by oxidizing reduced sulfur compounds, and that the Deltaproteobacteria are also involved in sulfur metabolism. In addition, the detection of proteobacterial hydrogenases indicates the potential for hydrogen oxidation in these communities. Interestingly, the frequency of these phylotypes in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from the mouthparts differ from that of the inner lining of the gill chamber, indicating potential functional compartmentalization. Our data show the specific association of autotrophic bacteria with Rimicaris exoculata from the Snake Pit hydrothermal vent field, and suggest that autotrophic carbon fixation is contributing to the productivity of the epibiotic community with the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle as one important carbon fixation pathway. This has not been considered in previous studies of carbon fixation and stable carbon isotope composition of the shrimp and its epibionts. Furthermore, the co-occurrence of sulfur-oxidizing and sulfur-reducing epibionts raises the possibility that both may be involved in the syntrophic exchange of sulfur compounds

  6. Whole-system metabolism and CO2 fluxes in a Mediterranean Bay dominated by seagrass beds (Palma Bay, NW Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gazeau

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic and benthic incubations (bare and Posidonia oceanica vegetated sediments were performed at monthly intervals from March 2001 to October 2002 in a seagrass vegetated area of the Bay of Palma (Mallorca, Spain. Results showed a contrast between the planktonic compartment, which was on average near metabolic balance (−4.6±5.9 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 and the benthic compartment, which was autotrophic (17.6±8.5 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. During two cruises in March and June 2002, planktonic and benthic incubations were performed at several stations in the bay to estimate the whole-system metabolism and to examine its relationship with partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 and apparent oxygen utilisation (AOU spatial patterns. Moreover, during the second cruise, when the residence time of water was long enough, net ecosystem production (NEP estimates based on incubations were compared, over the Posidonia oceanica meadow, to rates derived from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and oxygen (O2 mass balance budgets. These budgets provided NEP estimates in fair agreement with those derived from direct metabolic estimates based on incubated samples over the Posidonia oceanica meadow. Whereas the seagrass community was autotrophic, the excess organic carbon production therein could only balance the planktonic heterotrophy in shallow waters relative to the maximum depth of the bay (55 m. This generated a horizontal gradient from autotrophic or balanced communities in the shallow seagrass-covered areas, to strongly heterotrophic communities in deeper areas of the bay. It seems therefore that, on an annual scale in the whole bay, the organic matter production by the Posidonia oceanica may not be sufficient to fully compensate the heterotrophy of the planktonic compartment, which may require external organic carbon inputs, most likely from land.

  7. Atmospheric Deposition Effects on Plankton Communities in the Eastern Mediterranean: A Mesocosm Experimental Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana M. Tsagaraki

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of atmospheric deposition on plankton community structure were examined during a mesocosm experiment using water from the Cretan Sea (Eastern Mediterranean, an area with a high frequency of atmospheric aerosol deposition events. The experiment was carried out under spring-summer conditions (May 2012. The main objective was to study the changes induced from a single deposition event, on the autotrophic and heterotrophic surface microbial populations, from viruses to zooplankton. To this end, the effects of Saharan dust addition were compared to the effects of mixed aerosol deposition on the plankton community over 9 days. The effects of the dust addition seemed to propagate throughout the food-web, with changes observed in nearly all of the measured parameters up to copepods. The dust input stimulated increased productivity, both bacterial and primary. Picoplankton, both autotrophic and heterotrophic capitalized on the changes in nutrient availability and microzooplankton abundance also increased due to increased availability of prey. Five days after the simulated deposition, copepods also responded, with an increase in egg production. The results suggest that nutrients were transported up the food web through autotrophs, which were favored by the Nitrogen supplied through both treatments. Although, the effects of individual events are generally short lived, increased deposition frequency and magnitude of events is expected in the area, due to predicted reduction in rainfall and increase in temperature, which can lead to more persistent changes in plankton community structure. Here we demonstrate how a single dust deposition event leads to enhancement of phytoplankton and microzooplankton and can eventually, through copepods, transport more nutrients up the food web in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

  8. A symbiotic gas exchange between bioreactors enhances microalgal biomass and lipid productivities: taking advantage of complementary nutritional modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, C A; Ferreira, M E; da Silva, T Lopes; Gouveia, L; Novais, J M; Reis, A

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the association of two bioreactors: one photoautotrophic and the other heterotrophic, connected by the gas phase and allowing an exchange of O(2) and CO(2) gases between them, benefiting from a symbiotic effect. The association of two bioreactors was proposed with the aim of improving the microalgae oil productivity for biodiesel production. The outlet gas flow from the autotrophic (O(2) enriched) bioreactor was used as the inlet gas flow for the heterotrophic bioreactor. In parallel, the outlet gas flow from another heterotrophic (CO(2) enriched) bioreactor was used as the inlet gas flow for the autotrophic bioreactor. Aside from using the air supplied from the auto- and hetero-trophic bioreactors as controls, one mixotrophic bioreactor was also studied and used as a model, for its claimed advantage of CO(2) and organic carbon being simultaneously assimilated. The microalga Chlorella protothecoides was chosen as a model due to its ability to grow under different nutritional modes (auto, hetero, and mixotrophic), and its ability to attain a high biomass productivity and lipid content, suitable for biodiesel production. The comparison between heterotrophic, autotrophic, and mixotrophic Chlorella protothecoides growth for lipid production revealed that heterotrophic growth achieved the highest biomass productivity and lipid content (>22%), and furthermore showed that these lipids had the most suitable fatty acid profile in order to produce high quality biodiesel. Both associations showed a higher biomass productivity (10-20%), when comparing the two separately operated bioreactors (controls) which occurred on the fourth day. A more remarkable result would have been seen if in actuality the two bioreactors had been inter-connected in a closed loop. The biomass productivity gain would have been 30% and the lipid productivity gain would have been 100%, as seen by comparing the productivities of the symbiotic assemblage with the sum of the two

  9. Does microbial biomass affect pelagic ecosystem efficiency? An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, J D; Le, J; Campbell, L

    1994-01-01

    Bacteria and other microorganisms in the pelagic zone participate in the recycling of organic matter and nutrients within the water column. The microbial loop is thought to enhance ecosystem efficiency through rapid recycling and reduced sinking rates, thus reducing the loss of nutrients contained in organisms remaining within the photic zone. We conducted experiments with lake communities in 5400-liter mesocosms, and measured the flux of materials and nutrients out of the water column. A factorial design manipulated 8 nutrient treatments: 4 phosphorus levels × 2 nitrogen levels. Total sedimentation rates were greatest in high-N mesocosms; within N-surplus communities, [Symbol: see text]1 µM P resulted in 50% increase in total particulate losses. P additions without added N had small effects on nutrient losses from the photic zone; +2 µM P tanks received 334 mg P per tank, yet after 14 days lost only 69 mg more particulate-P than did control communities. Nutrient treatments resulted in marked differences in phytoplankton biomass (twofold N effect, fivefold P effect in +N mesocosms only), bacterioplankton densities (twofold N-effect, twofold P effects in -N and +N mesocosms), and the relative importance of autotrophic picoplankton (maximum in high NY mesocosms). Multiple regression analysis found that of 8 plankton and water chemistry variables, the ratio of autotrophic picoplankton to total phytoplankton (measured as chlorophyll α) explained the largest portion of the total variation in sedimentation loss rates (65% of P-flux, 57% of N-flux, 26% of total flux). In each case, systems with greater relative importance of autotrophic picoplankton had significantly reduced loss rates. In contrast, greater numbers of planktonic bacteria were associated with increased sedimentation rates and lower system efficiency. We suggest that different microbial components may have contrasting effects on the presumed enhanced efficiency provided by the microbial loop.

  10. Processing watershed-derived nitrogen in a well-flushed New England estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, C.R.; Cieri, M.; Peterson, B.J.; Deegan, Linda A.; Vallino, J.; Hughes, J.

    2003-01-01

    Isotopically labeled nitrate (15NO3-) was added continuously to the Rowley estuary, Massachusetts, for 22 d to assess the transport, uptake, and cycling of terrestrially derived nitrogen during a period of high river discharge and low phytoplankton activity. Isotopic enrichment of the 3.5-km tidal prism (150,000 m3) was achieved for the 3 weeks and allowed us to construct a nitrogen mass balance model for the upper estuary. Mean ??15NO3- in the estuary ranged from 300??? to 600???, and approximately 75%-80% of the 15N was exported conservatively as 15NO 3- to the coastal ocean. Essentially all of the 20%-25% of the 15N processed in the estuary occurred in the benthos and was evenly split between direct denitrification and autotrophic assimilation. The lack of water-column 15N uptake was attributed to low phytoplankton stocks and short water residence times (1.2-1.4 d). Uptake of water-column NO3- by benthic autotrophs (enriched in excess of 100???) was a function of NO3- concentration and satisfied up to 15% and 25% of the total nitrogen demand for benthic microalgae and macroalgae, respectively. Approximately 10% of tracer assimilated by benthic autotrophs was mineralized and released back to the water column as 15NH4+. By the end of the study, 15N storage in sediments and marsh macrophytes accounted for 50%-70% of the 15N assimilated in the estuary. These compartments may sequester watershed-derived nitrogen in the estuary for time scales of months to years.

  11. N2O production pathways in the subtropical acid forest soils in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinbo; Cai Zucong; Zhu Tongbin

    2011-01-01

    To date, N 2 O production pathways are poorly understood in the humid subtropical and tropical forest soils. A 15 N-tracing experiment was carried out under controlled laboratory conditions to investigate the processes responsible for N 2 O production in four subtropical acid forest soils (pH 2 O emission in the subtropical acid forest soils, being responsible for 56.1%, 53.5%, 54.4%, and 55.2% of N 2 O production, in the GC, GS, GB, and TC soils, respectively, under aerobic conditions (40%-52%WFPS). The heterotrophic nitrification (recalcitrant organic N oxidation) accounted for 27.3%-41.8% of N 2 O production, while the contribution of autotrophic nitrification was little in the studied subtropical acid forest soils. The ratios of N 2 O-N emission from total nitrification (heterotrophic+autotrophic nitrification) were higher than those in most previous references. The soil with the lowest pH and highest organic-C content (GB) had the highest ratio (1.63%), suggesting that soil pH-organic matter interactions may exist and affect N 2 O product ratios from nitrification. The ratio of N 2 O-N emission from heterotrophic nitrification varied from 0.02% to 25.4% due to soil pH and organic matter. Results are valuable in the accurate modeling of N2O production in the subtropical acid forest soils and global budget. - Highlights: → We studied N 2 O production pathways in subtropical acid forest soil under aerobic conditions. → Denitrification was the main source of N 2 O production in subtropical acid forest soils. → Heterotrophic nitrification accounted for 27.3%-41.8% of N 2 O production. → While, contribution of autotrophic nitrification to N 2 O production was little. → Ratios of N 2 O-N emission from nitrification were higher than those in most previous references.

  12. Distribution pattern of picoplankton carbon biomass linked to mesoscale dynamics in the southern gulf of Mexico during winter conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linacre, Lorena; Lara-Lara, Rubén; Camacho-Ibar, Víctor; Herguera, Juan Carlos; Bazán-Guzmán, Carmen; Ferreira-Bartrina, Vicente

    2015-12-01

    In order to characterize the carbon biomass spatial distribution of autotrophic and heterotrophic picoplankton populations linked to mesoscale dynamics, an investigation over an extensive open-ocean region of the southern Gulf of Mexico (GM) was conducted. Seawater samples from the mixed layer were collected during wintertime (February-March 2013). Picoplankton populations were counted and sorted using flow cytometry analyses. Carbon biomass was assessed based on in situ cell abundances and conversion factors from the literature. Approximately 46% of the total picoplankton biomass was composed of three autotrophic populations (Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, and pico-eukaryotes), while 54% consisted of heterotrophic bacteria populations. Prochlorococcus spp. was the most abundant pico-primary producer (>80%), and accounted for more than 60% of the total pico-autotrophic biomass. The distribution patterns of picoplankton biomass were strongly associated with the mesoscale dynamics that modulated the hydrographic conditions of the surface mixed layer. The main features of the carbon distribution pattern were: (1) the deepening of picoplankton biomass to layers closer to the nitracline base in anticyclonic eddies; (2) the shoaling of picoplankton biomass in cyclonic eddies, constraining the autoprokaryote biomasses to the upper layers, as well as accumulating the pico-eukaryote biomass in the cold core of the eddies; and (3) the increase of heterotrophic bacteria biomass in frontal regions between counter-paired anticyclonic and cyclonic eddies. Factors related to nutrient preferences and light conditions may as well have contributed to the distribution pattern of the microbial populations. The findings reveal the great influence of the mesoscale dynamics on the distribution of picoplankton populations within the mixed layer. Moreover, the significance of microbial components (especially Prochlorococcus) in the southern GM during winter conditions was revealed

  13. Multifractal analysis of oceanic chlorophyll maps remotely sensed from space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. de Montera

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton patchiness has been investigated with multifractal analysis techniques. We analyzed oceanic chlorophyll maps, measured by the SeaWiFS orbiting sensor, which are considered to be good proxies for phytoplankton. The study area is the Senegalo-Mauritanian upwelling region, because it has a low cloud cover and high chlorophyll concentrations. Multifractal properties are observed, from the sub-mesoscale up to the mesoscale, and are found to be consistent with the Corssin-Obukhov scale law of passive scalars. This result indicates that, in this specific region and within this scale range, turbulent mixing would be the dominant effect leading to the observed variability of phytoplankton fields. Finally, it is shown that multifractal patchiness can be responsible for significant biases in the nonlinear source and sink terms involved in biogeochemical numerical models.

  14. Evaluation of Mariut Lake water quality using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing and laboratory works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neven G. Rostom

    2017-04-01

    The main objectives of this research are assessing water contamination by heavy metal in Mariut Lake using laboratory analysis and developing a predictive model for water pollution based on the spectral characteristics and lab data obtained. It is resulted that Pb, Ni and Cr concentrations exceed permissible limit of USEPA. Also, the spectral reflectance of (6–13, 16, 19 and 20 at wavelength 582–653 nm is related to the spectral behavior of the high chlorophyll concentration. Also there are 7 samples (1, 3, 6, 10, 11, 19 and 21 showed high and low values of turbidity. As the suspended sediment concentration increased, reflectance also increased at all wavelengths between 400 and 850 nm. It is concluded that most of models predicting heavy metals concentration using reflectance spectroscopy have high significant correlation ranged from 0.27 to 0.97.

  15. Fluctuations in coral health of four common inshore reef corals in response to seasonal and anthropogenic changes in water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Nicola K; Tay, Jason K L; Low, Jeffrey; Larson, Ole; Todd, Peter A

    2015-04-01

    Environmental drivers of coral condition (maximum quantum yield, symbiont density, chlorophyll a content and coral skeletal growth rates) were assessed in the equatorial inshore coastal waters of Singapore, where the amplitude of seasonal variation is low, but anthropogenic influence is relatively high. Water quality variables (sediments, nutrients, trace metals, temperature, light) explained between 52 and 83% of the variation in coral condition, with sediments and light availability as key drivers of foliose corals (Merulina ampliata, Pachyseris speciosa), and temperature exerting a greater influence on a branching coral (Pocillopora damicornis). Seasonal reductions in water quality led to high chlorophyll a concentrations and maximum quantum yields in corals, but low growth rates. These marginal coral communities are potentially vulnerable to climate change, hence, we propose water quality thresholds for coral growth with the aim of mitigating both local and global environmental impacts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Ionic and Chelate Assisted Hexavalent Chromium on Mung Bean Seedlings (Vigna radiata L. wilczek. var k-851 During Seedling Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanty, Monalisa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Cr+6 with and without chelating agents were assessed in mung bean seedlings grown hydroponically. It was noted that the growth parameters showed a declining trend with increasing Cr+6 concentrations without chelate application. Among the seedlings grown with chelated chromium complexes, Cr+6–DTPA (10µM showed highest growth rate of roots as well as shoots. At higher concentration of Chromium i.e. Cr+6 (100µM, there exhibited high chlorophyll content in mung bean leaves where the seedlings showed stunted growth. The seedlings treated without and with chelated chromium complexes showed increased proline content as compared to control. The enzymatic study showed that, the catalase activity was maximum in shoots as compared to roots and the reverse is true in the case of peroxidase activity i.e. the roots showed higher value than that of the shoots.

  17. Tracing anthropogenic inputs to production in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan - A stable isotope approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Todd W.; Omori, Koji; Hamaoka, Hideki; Shibata, Jun-ya; Hidejiro, Onishi

    2010-01-01

    The Seto Inland Sea (SIS) receives waste runoff from ∼24% of Japan's total population, yet it is also important in regional fisheries, recreation and commerce. During August 2006 we measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of particulate organic matter (POM) and zooplankton across urban population gradients of the SIS. Results showed a consistent trend of increasing δ 15 N in POM and zooplankton from the western to eastern subsystems of the SIS, corresponding to increasing population load. Principal components analysis of environmental variables indicated high positive loadings of δ 15 N and δ 13 C with high chlorophyll-a and surface water temperatures, and negative loadings of low salinities related to inputs from large rivers and high urban development in the eastern SIS. Anthropogenic nitrogen was therefore readily integrated into the SIS food web from primary production to copepods, which are a critical food source for many commercially important fishes.

  18. Tracing anthropogenic inputs to production in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan--a stable isotope approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd W; Omori, Koji; Hamaoka, Hideki; Shibata, Jun-ya; Hidejiro, Onishi

    2010-10-01

    The Seto Inland Sea (SIS) receives waste runoff from ∼24% of Japan's total population, yet it is also important in regional fisheries, recreation and commerce. During August 2006 we measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of particulate organic matter (POM) and zooplankton across urban population gradients of the SIS. Results showed a consistent trend of increasing δ(15)N in POM and zooplankton from the western to eastern subsystems of the SIS, corresponding to increasing population load. Principal components analysis of environmental variables indicated high positive loadings of δ(15)N and δ(13)C with high chlorophyll-a and surface water temperatures, and negative loadings of low salinities related to inputs from large rivers and high urban development in the eastern SIS. Anthropogenic nitrogen was therefore readily integrated into the SIS food web from primary production to copepods, which are a critical food source for many commercially important fishes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  20. Microbiology and physiology of anaerobic fermentation of cellulose. Annual report for 1990, 1992, 1993 and final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljungdahl, L.G.; Wiegel, J.; Peck, H.D. Jr.; Mortenson, L.E.

    1993-08-31

    This report focuses on the bioconversion of cellulose to methane by various anaerobes. The structure and enzymatic activity of cellulosome and polycellulosome was studied in Clostridium thermocellum. The extracellular enzymes involved in the degradation of plant material and the physiology of fermentation was investigated in anaerobic fungi. Enzymes dealing with CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}OH, as well as electron transport and energy generation coupled to the acetyl-CoA autotrophic pathway was studied in acetogenic clostridia.

  1. Desulfotomaculum spp. and related Gram-positive sulfate-reducing bacteria in deep subsurface environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eAullo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gram-positive spore-forming sulfate reducers and particularly members of the genus Desulfotomaculum are commonly found in the subsurface biosphere by culture based and molecular approaches. Due to their metabolic versatility and their ability to persist as endospores. Desulfotomaculum spp. are well adapted for colonizing environments through a slow sedimentation process. Because of their ability to grow autotrophically (H2/CO2 and produce sulfide or acetate, these microorganisms may play key roles in deep lithoautotrophic microbial communities. Available data about Desulfotomaculum spp. and related species from studies carried out from deep freshwater lakes, marine sediments, oligotrophic and organic rich deep geological settings are discussed in this review.

  2. Nitrogen Removal from Digested Black Water by One-stage Partial Nitritation and Anammox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaeminck, S.E.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the technical feasibility to treat digested black water from vacuum toilets (> 1000 mg NH4+-N L-1) in a lab-scale oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification (OLAND) rotating biological contactor. After an adaptation period of 2.5 months, a stable. nitrogen removal...... conversion was very low, in contrast to the high specific AnAOB activity. DGGE analysis showed that the dominant AerAOB and AnAOB species were resistant to the transition from synthetic medium to digested black water. This study demonstrates high-rate nitrogen removal from digested black water by one...

  3. Microbial ecology studies at two coal mine refuse sites in Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R. M.; Cameron, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was made of the microflora associated with coal refuse at two abandoned mines in the midwestern United States. Information was gathered for both the edaphic and the biotic composition of the refuse material. Emphasis was placed on heterotrophic and autotrophic components as to numbers, kinds, and physiological groups. The presence of chemolithotrophs was also investigated. The relationship between abiotic and biotic components in regard to distribution of bacteria, fungi, and algae is discussed. Information presented in this report will be utilized in assessing trends and changes in microbial numbers and composition related to manipulations of the edaphic and biotic ecosystem components associated with reclamation of the refuse piles.

  4. Viral lysis of Phaeocystis pouchetii: implications for algal population dynamics and heterotrophic C, N and P cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Brandt Borup; Middelboe, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    in the microbial food web was associated with significant N and P mineralization, supporting the current view that viral lysates can be an important source of inorganic nutrients in marine systems. In the presence of R. salina, the generated NH(4)(+) supported 11% of the observed R. salina growth. Regrowth...... of virus-resistant P. pouchetii following cell lysis was observed in long-term incubations (150 days), and possibly influenced by nutrient availability and competition from R. salina. The observed impact of viral activity on autotrophic and heterotrophic processes provides direct experimental evidence...

  5. Increase in the biomass of some green algae species in nitrate and ammonium mediums depending on auto-, mixo- or heterotrophic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Gumiński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in total dry mass and protein in cultures of Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Scenedesmus quadricauda and Ankistrodesmus acicularis was studied. Under autotrophic conditions, increases in dry mass were, as a rule, larger in the nitrate medium than in the ammonium one, under mixotrophic conditions the situation was reversed and in the case of heterotrophy, the individual species reacted differently. The dependence ot the protein content increase on the nitrate or ammonium form of the medium was not clear. Changes in time of the pH and rH of the mediums were followed and the interdependence of these changes with the production of biomass is discussed.

  6. Low nitrous oxide production in intermittent-feed high performance nitritating reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Qingxian; Jensen, Malene M.; Smets, Barth F.

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production from autotrophic nitrogen removal processes, especially nitritating systems, is of growing concern. N2O dynamics were characterized and N2O production factors were quantified in two lab-scale intermittent-feed nitritating SBRs. 93 ± 14% of the oxidized ammonium...... was converted to nitrite, with the average total net N2O production of 2.1 ± 0.7% of the ammonium oxidized. Operation with intermittent feeding appears an effective optimization approach to mitigate N2O emissions from nitritating systems. Net N2O production rates transiently increased with a rise in pH after...

  7. Composition of microbial communities in aerosol, snow and ice samples from remote glaciated areas (Antarctica, Alps, Andes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elster, J.; Delmas, R. J.; Petit, J.-R.; Řeháková, K.

    2007-06-01

    Taxonomical and ecological analyses were performed on micro-autotrophs (cyanobacteria and algae together with remnants of diatom valves), micro-fungi (hyphae and spores), bacteria (rod, cocci and red clusters), yeast, and plant pollen extracted from various samples: Alps snow (Mt. Blank area), Andean snow (Illimani, Bolivia), Antarctic aerosol filters (Dumont d'Urville, Terre Adélie), and Antarctic inland ice (Terre Adélie). Three methods for ice and snow sample's pre-concentration were tested (filtration, centrifugation and lyophilisation). Afterwards, cultivation methods for terrestrial, freshwater and marine microorganisms (micro-autotrophs and micro-fungi) were used in combination with liquid and solid media. The main goal of the study was to find out if micro-autotrophs are commonly transported by air masses, and later stored in snow and icecaps around the world. The most striking result of this study was the absence of culturable micro-autotrophs in all studied samples. However, an unusual culturable pigmented prokaryote was found in both alpine snow and aerosol samples. Analyses of many samples and proper statistical analyses (PCA, RDA- Monte Carlo permutation tests) showed that studied treatments highly significantly differ in both microbial community and biotic remnants composition F=9.33, p=0.001. In addition, GLM showed that studied treatments highly significantly differ in numbers of categories of microorganisms and remnants of biological material F=11.45, p=0.00005. The Antarctic aerosol samples were characterised by having red clusters of bacteria, the unusual prokaryote and yeasts. The high mountain snow from the Alps and Andes contained much more culturable heterotrophs. The unusual prokaryote was very abundant, as were coccoid bacteria, red clusters of bacteria, as well as yeasts. The Antarctic ice samples were quite different. These samples had higher numbers of rod bacteria and fungal hyphae. The microbial communities and biological remnants of

  8. Dynamic modelling of nitrous oxide emissions from three Swedish sludge liquor treatment systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblom, E.; Arnell, M.; Flores-Alsina, X.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to model the dynamics and validate the results of nitrous oxide (N2O)emissions from three Swedish nitrifying/denitrifying, nitritation and anammox systems treating real anaerobic digester sludge liquor. The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 is extended to describe N2O...... production by both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification. In addition, mass transfer equations are implemented to characterize the dynamics of N2O in the water and the gas phases.The biochemical model is simulated and validated for two hydraulic patterns: (1) a sequencing batch reactor; and, (2...

  9. Water Quality Interaction with Alkaline Phosphatase in the Ganga River: Implications for River Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Amita; Pandey, Jitendra

    2017-07-01

    Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus inputs through atmospheric deposition, surface runoff and point sources were measured in the Ganga River along a gradient of increasing human pressure. Productivity variables (chlorophyll a, gross primary productivity, biogenic silica and autotrophic index) and heterotrophy (respiration, substrate induced respiration, biological oxygen demand and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis) showed positive relationships with these inputs. Alkaline phosphatase (AP), however, showed an opposite trend. Because AP is negatively influenced by available P, and eutrophy generates a feedback on P fertilization, the study implies that the alkaline phosphatase can be used as a high quality criterion for assessing river health.

  10. Thallophytic algal flora from a new Silurian Lagerstätte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinn, Oive

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Algae have always been the most diverse and numerous eukaryotic autotrophs in marine ecosystems. Both fossil andmolecular data point to an early Proterozoic origin for algae. Although known for their long evolutionary history, the fossil recordof algae is sparse and mainly remains of taxa with heavily calcified thalli are preserved. However, fossils of noncalcareous algae,known as extremely sporadic and occasional finds from different parts of the world, provide important insights into thepalaeobiology of algal flora in the Earth's past. Here we describe highly diverse flora of noncalcareous thallophytic algae from aSilurian age deposit.

  11. Influence of heterotrophic microbial growth on biological oxidation of pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, E.A.; Silverstein, J. [University of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2002-12-15

    Experiments were carried out to examine the possibility that enhanced growth of heterotrophic (non-iron-oxidising) bacteria would inhibit pyrite oxidation by Acidithiobacillus ferroxidans by out-competing the more slowly growing autotrophs for oxygen, nutrients or even attachment sites on the mineral surface. Glucose was added to microcosms containing pyrite, acidic mineral solution and cultures of A-ferrooxidans and Acidiphilium acidophilus under various experimental conditions. Results suggest that encouraging the growth of heterotrophic microorganisms under acid mine drainage conditions may be a feasible strategy for decreasing both the rate and the extent of sulfide mineral oxidation. 43 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Aggregate Size and Architecture Determine Microbial Activity Balance for One-Stage Partial Nitritation and Anammox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaeminck, S.E.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2010-01-01

    by the anoxic nitrite consumption rate. The smallest reactor A, B, and C aggregates were nitrite sources (NARR, > 1.7). Large reactor A and C aggregates were granules capable of autonomous nitrogen removal (NARR, 0.6 to 1.1) with internal AnAOB zones surrounded by an AerAOB rim. Around 50% of the autotrophic......AOB-rich aggregates (reactors B and C). The hypothesized granulation pathways include granule replication by division and budding and are driven by growth and/or decay based on species-specific physiology and by hydrodynamic shear and mixing....

  13. Investigations into the transfer of cesium 137 and strontium 90 in selected exposure pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roemmelt, R.; Hiersche, L.; Wirth, E.

    1991-12-01

    This research project investigates the behaviour of radiocesium and strontium 90 in natural conifer forest sites and derives corresponding transfer factors for radioecological calculations. As a point of particular interest the question was investigated in how far the requirements of the different mushroom species and the properties of the forest soil bear on the dynamics and transfer rate of radiocesium and strontium 90. To complement the investigations, autotrophic plants were included. The results of these studies are compared with the behaviour of the same radionuclides on farmland. The differences are discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Thioploca spp: filamentous sulfur bacteria with nitrate vacuoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, BB; Gallardo, VA

    1999-01-01

    communities of large Thioploca species live along the Pacific coast of South America and in other upwelling areas of high organic matter sedimentation with bottom waters poor in oxygen and rich in nitrate. Each cell of these thioplocas harbors a large liquid vacuole which is used as a storage for nitrate...... with a concentration of lip to 506 mM. The nitrate is used as an electron acceptor for sulfide oxidation and the bacteria may grow autotrophically or mixotrophically using acetate or other organic molecules as carbon source. The filaments stretch up into the overlying seawater, from which they take up nitrate...

  15. Whole ecosystem approaches for assessing the coupling of N and P cycles in small streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, J. D.; Thomas, S. A.; Seybold, E. C.; Drake, T.; Lewis, K.; MacNeill, K.; Zimov, N.

    2010-12-01

    The most pressing environmental problems faced by society are manifestations of changes in biogeochemical cycles. The urgency of mitigating these problems has brought into sharp focus the need for a stronger mechanistic understanding of the factors that control biogeochemical cycles and how these factors affect multiple elements. Our overarching goal is to assess the strength of coupling between carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in small headwater streams, including streams draining small watersheds in Northern California and the East Siberian Arctic. We have used a range of whole ecosystem approaches, rooted in nutrient spiraling theory, including plateau and pulsed nutrient enrichment experiments at a range of N:P ratios in heterotrophic and autotrophic streams. We use these experiments to calculate changes in nutrient spiraling metrics in response to changes in absolute and relative supply of N and P, and we use these results to infer the strength of the linkage between N and P cycles. In all California study streams, ecological processes are N limited, and we have observed significant changes in the strength of N and P coupling depending on position along the stream network. In small heterotrophic streams, addition of N caused significant increases in P uptake, while P had little influence on N. In larger autotrophic streams, N and P were only weakly coupled, which we attributed to a shift towards dominance of uptake by algae rather than heterotrophic bacteria, which is associated with differences in cellular structures. In addition, we have observed a small but consistent reduction in P uptake at high N:P of supply in autotrophic streams, which we speculate may indicate a suppression of N fixers at high N supply. In the Arctic, we have observed less consistency in the response of streams to nutrient enrichment, with some streams showing very little change in N or P uptake with changes in supply N:P, and others showing a decrease in N uptake in response

  16. Composition of phytoplankton in the Bransfield Strait and Elephant Island during austral summer of 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Sánchez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors inform about the composition and distribution of phytoplanktonic community between the first 75 m of depth in Bransfield Strait y around the Elephant island, during the ANTAR X expedition in the 1999 Austral Summer (22nd–29th January 1999. The higher cellular concentration (500 cel/mL was given by the autotrophic nanoplankton, with a high density mainly on the bay stations and down the first 25 m of depth. Among the most representative species we have Leucocryptos marina, Phaeocystis antarctica, the Monadas and the pennate diatoms.

  17. Changes of communities of phytobenthos of Drevnica River - ecological condition assessment in space and time; Zmeny spolecenstev fytobentosu reky Drevnice - hodnoceni ekologickeho stavu v prostoru a case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safarova, M.; Uher, B.; Chattova, B. [Masarykova univerzita, Ustav botaniky a zoologie, 62100 Brno-Reckovice (Czech Republic)

    2013-04-16

    The study deals with a biological evaluation of water quality of the Drevnice River (Eastern Moravia) by a community of cyanobacteria and algae which are tied to the bottom substrate (e.g. mud, sand, stones). Phytobenthos, as this file of benthic autotrophic organisms is called, has a significant position among bioindicators of water quality for the ability to reflect environmental changes in a short time. The work consisted in monitoring changes in diversity of phytobenthos community and measurement of physicochemical parameters within one year. The aim was to find relations between the organisms and parameters and to determinate the current ecological status of the river. (authors)

  18. Modelling and control design for SHARON/Anammox reactor sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valverde Perez, Borja; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    metabolism against fast chemical reaction and mass transfer. Likewise, the analysis of the dynamics contributed to establish qualitatively the requirements for control of the reactors, both for regulation and for optimal operation. Work in progress on quantitatively analysing different control structure......With the perspective of investigating a suitable control design for autotrophic nitrogen removal, this work presents a complete model of the SHARON/Anammox reactor sequence. The dynamics of the reactor were explored pointing out the different scales of the rates in the system: slow microbial...

  19. Hotspots of anaerobic ammonia oxidation in land - freshwater interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Guibing; Wang, Shanyun; Wang, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    sampled fromlake riparian zones in North China. Laboratory incubations in the presence of ammonium or nitrate—at concentrations equivalent to no more than 10% of those detected in situ—yielded some of the highest potential anammox activities reported for natural environments to date. Potential rates......For decades, the conversion of organic nitrogen to dinitrogen gas by heterotrophic bacteria, termed heterotrophic denitrification, was assumed to be the main pathway of nitrogen loss in natural ecosystems. Recently, however, autotrophic bacteria have been shown to oxidize ammonium in the absence...

  20. Spatial variations in time-integrated plankton metabolic rates in Sagami Bay using triple oxygen isotopes and O2:Ar ratios

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Abe, O.; Saino, T.

    processes are substantially out of balance in the open-ocean regions, i.e., respiration is higher than produc- tion (del Giorgio and Duarte 2002; Williams et al. 2004), while coastal oceans are net autotrophic (Ducklow and McAllister 2005). Williams (1997... advection (del Giorgio and Duarte 2002). In order to assess the way in which short-term variability in plankton metabolic rates could influence our measure- ments, 18 O-enriched and DO incubation experiments were conducted in central Sagami Bay (sta. S3...

  1. Iron bacterial phylogeny and their execution towards iron availability in Equatorial Indian Ocean and Coastal Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajasabapathy, R.; Mohandass, C.; VijayRaj, A.S.; Madival, V.V.; Meena, R.M.

    -264. Edwards K.J., W. Bach, T.M. McCollom and D.R. Rogers. 2004. Neutrophilic Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria in the Ocean: Their Habitats, Diversity, and Roles in Mineral Deposition, Rock Alteration, and Biomass Production in the Deep-Sea. Geomicrobiol. J. 21: 393...-404. Edwards K.J., D.R. Rogers, C.O. Wirsen and T.M. McCollom. 2003. Isolation and characterization of novel psychrophilic, neutrophilic, Fe-oxidizing chemolitho-autotrophic α- and γ -Proteobacteria from the deep sea. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69: 2906...

  2. State Estimation for a Biological Phosphorus Removal Process using an Asymptotic Observer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larose, Claude Alain; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the use of an asymptotic observer for state estimation in a continuous biological phosphorus removal process. The estimated states are the concentration of heterotrophic, autotrophic, and phosphorus accumulating organisms, polyphosphate, glycogen and PHA. The reaction scheme...... if the convergence, driven by the dilution rate, was slow (from 15 to 60 days). The propagation of the measurement noise and a bias in the estimation of glycogen and PHA could be the result of the high condition number of one of the matrices used in the algorithm of the asymptotic observer for the aerated tanks....

  3. A multiomics approach to study the microbiome response to phytoplankton blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liyan

    2017-06-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are predictable features of marine and freshwater habitats. Despite a good knowledge base of the environmental factors controlling blooms, complex interactions between the bacterial and archaeal communities and phytoplankton bloom taxa are only now emerging. Here, the current research on bacterial community's structural and functional response to phytoplankton blooms is reviewed and discussed and further research is proposed. More attention should be paid on structure and function of autotrophic bacteria and archaea during phytoplankton blooms. A multiomics integration approach is needed to investigate bacterial and archaeal communities' diversity, metabolic diversity, and biogeochemical functions of microbial interactions during phytoplankton blooms.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2009-05-20

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the genus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobiaceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomicrobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. TOR signalling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexin, Daniel; Meyer, Christian; Robaglia, Christophe; Veit, Bruce

    2015-08-15

    Although the eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signalling pathway has emerged as a key player for integrating nutrient-, energy- and stress-related cues with growth and metabolic outputs, relatively little is known of how this ancient regulatory mechanism has been adapted in higher plants. Drawing comparisons with the substantial knowledge base around TOR kinase signalling in fungal and animal systems, functional aspects of this pathway in plants are reviewed. Both conserved and divergent elements are discussed in relation to unique aspects associated with an autotrophic mode of nutrition and adaptive strategies for multicellular development exhibited by plants. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  6. Biological processes in the North Sea: comparison of Calanus helgolandicus and Calanus finmarchicus vertical distribution and production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasdottir, Sigrun; Koski, Marja

    2011-01-01

    stratified with a tidally generated deep chlorophyll maximum at 30 m depth. When co-occurring, a separation of the species was evident, where C. finmarchicus preferred colder (9°C) deeper waters, while C. helgolandicus stayed in the warmer (16°C) surface waters. Egg production rates (EPRs) were...... not statistically different between the species, and the population egg production depended primarily on female abundance and was generally higher for C. finmarchicus. EPRs of the Calanus spp. were best explained by the abundance of autotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates, flagellates and ciliates. Hatching...

  7. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et

  8. Climate change and ocean acidification effects on seagrasses and marine macroalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marguerite; Bowes, George; Ross, Cliff; Zhang, Xing-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Although seagrasses and marine macroalgae (macro-autotrophs) play critical ecological roles in reef, lagoon, coastal and open-water ecosystems, their response to ocean acidification (OA) and climate change is not well understood. In this review, we examine marine macro-autotroph biochemistry and physiology relevant to their response to elevated dissolved inorganic carbon [DIC], carbon dioxide [CO2 ], and lower carbonate [CO3 (2-) ] and pH. We also explore the effects of increasing temperature under climate change and the interactions of elevated temperature and [CO2 ]. Finally, recommendations are made for future research based on this synthesis. A literature review of >100 species revealed that marine macro-autotroph photosynthesis is overwhelmingly C3 (≥ 85%) with most species capable of utilizing HCO3 (-) ; however, most are not saturated at current ocean [DIC]. These results, and the presence of CO2 -only users, lead us to conclude that photosynthetic and growth rates of marine macro-autotrophs are likely to increase under elevated [CO2 ] similar to terrestrial C3 species. In the tropics, many species live close to their thermal limits and will have to up-regulate stress-response systems to tolerate sublethal temperature exposures with climate change, whereas elevated [CO2 ] effects on thermal acclimation are unknown. Fundamental linkages between elevated [CO2 ] and temperature on photorespiration, enzyme systems, carbohydrate production, and calcification dictate the need to consider these two parameters simultaneously. Relevant to calcifiers, elevated [CO2 ] lowers net calcification and this effect is amplified by high temperature. Although the mechanisms are not clear, OA likely disrupts diffusion and transport systems of H(+) and DIC. These fluxes control micro-environments that promote calcification over dissolution and may be more important than CaCO3 mineralogy in predicting macroalgal responses to OA. Calcareous macroalgae are highly vulnerable to OA

  9. Enhanced performance of denitrifying sulfide removal process under micro-aerobic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-07-15

    The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process with bio-granules comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide and acetate into di-nitrogen gas, elementary sulfur and carbon dioxide, respectively, at high loading rates. This study determines the reaction rate of sulfide oxidized into sulfur, as well as the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, would be enhanced under a micro-aerobic condition. The presence of limited oxygen mitigated the inhibition effects of sulfide on denitrifier activities, and enhanced the performance of DSR granules. The advantages and disadvantages of applying the micro-aerobic condition to the DSR process are discussed. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced performance of denitrifying sulfide removal process under micro-aerobic condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chuan; Ren Nanqi; Wang Aijie; Liu Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-01-01

    The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process with bio-granules comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide and acetate into di-nitrogen gas, elementary sulfur and carbon dioxide, respectively, at high loading rates. This study determines the reaction rate of sulfide oxidized into sulfur, as well as the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, would be enhanced under a micro-aerobic condition. The presence of limited oxygen mitigated the inhibition effects of sulfide on denitrifier activities, and enhanced the performance of DSR granules. The advantages and disadvantages of applying the micro-aerobic condition to the DSR process are discussed.

  11. Denitrifying sulfide removal process on high-salinity wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunshuang; Zhao, Chaocheng; Wang, Aijie; Guo, Yadong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-08-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide, and acetate into nitrogen gas, elemental sulfur (S(0)), and carbon dioxide, respectively. Sulfide- and nitrate-laden wastewaters at 2-35 g/L NaCl were treated by DSR process. A C/N ratio of 3:1 was proposed to maintain high S(0) conversion rate. The granular sludge with a compact structure and smooth outer surface was formed. The microbial communities of DSR consortium via high-throughput sequencing method suggested that salinity shifts the predominating heterotrophic denitrifiers at 10 g/L NaCl.

  12. Multitude potential of wheatgrass juice (Green Blood: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Raheja

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Wheatgrass is the young grass of the common wheat plant Triticum aestivum Linn., family Poeaceae (Graminae. It is commonly known as the “green blood” due to its high chlorophyll content which accounts for 70% of its chemical constituents. It contains a plethora of vitamins, minerals, amino acids and vital enzymes like superoxide dismutase and cytochrome oxidase. The vitamin content makes it an important adjuvant in anti-allergic and anti-asthmatic treatment, while the enzymes play a pivotal role in the anticancer approach of this herbal drug. A notable feature of the wheatgrass juice is its bioflavonoid content which are the naturally occurring antioxidants and account for many of its clinical utilities such as management of inflammatory bowel disease and as a general detoxifier. However, the most remarkable feature of the wheatgrass juice is its high chlorophyll content. Chlorophyll bears structural similarity to hemoglobin and has been found to regenerate or act as a substitute of hemoglobin in hemoglobin deficiency conditions. This might be the reason behind the utility of wheatgrass in clinical conditions like thalassemia and hemolytic anemia. The present article focuses onto the various studies emphasizing the multitude potentials of wheatgrass.

  13. Water-quality assessment of the New England Coastal Basins in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island : environmental settings and implications for water quality and aquatic biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sarah M.; Nielsen, Martha G.; Robinson, Keith W.; Coles, James F.

    1999-01-01

    The New England Coastal Basins in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island constitute one of 59 study units selected for water-quality assessment as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. England Coastal Basins study unit encompasses the fresh surface waters and ground waters in a 23,000 square-mile area that drains to the Atlantic Ocean. Major basins include those of the Kennebec, Androscoggin, Saco, Merrimack, Charles, Blackstone, Taunton, and Pawcatuck Rivers. Defining the environmental setting of the study unit is the first step in designing and conducting a multi-disciplinary regional water-quality assessment. The report describes the natural and human factors that affect water quality in the basins and includes descriptions of the physiography, climate, geology, soils, surface- and ground-water hydrology, land use, and the aquatic ecosystem. Although surface-water quality has greatly improved over the past 30 years as a result of improved wastewater treatment at municipal and industrial wastewater facilities, a number of water-quality problems remain. Industrial and municipal wastewater discharges, combined sewer overflows, hydrologic modifications from dams and water diversions, and runoff from urban land use are the major causes of water-quality degradation in 1998. The most frequently detected contaminants in ground water in the study area are volatile organic compounds, petroleum-related products, nitrates, and chloride and sodium. Sources of these contaminants include leaking storage tanks, accidental spills, landfills, road salting, and septic systems and lagoons. Elevated concentrations of mercury are found in fish tissue from streams and lakes throughout the study area.

  14. Centennial-scale human alterations, unintended natural-system responses, and event-driven mitigation within a coupled fluvial-coastal system: Lessons for collective management and long-term coastal change planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, C. J.; Hoagland, P.; Huang, J. C.; Canuel, E. A.; Fitzsimons, G.; Rosen, P.; Shi, W.; Fallon, A. R.; Shawler, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    On decadal to millennial timescales, human modifications of linked riparian and coastal landscapes have altered the natural transport of sediments to the coast, causing time-varying sediment fluxes to estuaries, wetlands, and beaches. This study explored the role of historical changes in land use and river/coastal engineering on patterns of coastal erosion in the coupled system comprising the Merrimack River and the Plum Island barrier beach (northern Massachusetts, USA). Recreational values of the beach, attendant impacts on the local housing market, human perceptions of future beach utilization, and collective management options were investigated. Key historical changes included the installation of dams to benefit industry and control flooding in the early 19th century; river-mouth jetties to maintain navigation and allow for the residential development of a more stable barrier in the early 20th century; and the progressive hardening of the shoreline in response to multi-decadal cyclical erosion and house losses throughout the latter 20th and 21st centuries. The tools of sedimentology, shoreline-change analysis, historic documentation, population surveys, and economic modeling were used to examine these changes and the dynamic linked responses of the natural system and human populations. We found cascading effects of human alterations to the river that changed sediment fluxes to the coastal zone, driving a need for mitigation over centennial timescales. More recently, multidecadal erosion-accretion cycles of the beach have had little impact on the housing market, which is instead more responsive to public shoreline stabilization efforts in response to short-term (sustainable management of coupled fluvial-coastal systems.

  15. Biological denitrification process based on the Fe(0)-carbon micro-electrolysis for simultaneous ammonia and nitrate removal from low organic carbon water under a microaerobic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shihai; Li, Desheng; Yang, Xue; Xing, Wei; Li, Jinlong; Zhang, Qi

    2016-11-01

    A combined process between micro-electrolysis and biological denitrification (MEBD) using iron scraps and an activated carbon-based micro-electrolysis carrier was developed for nitrogen removal under a microaerobic condition. The process provided NH4(+)-N and total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiencies of 92.6% and 95.3%, respectively, and TN removal rate of 0.373±0.11kgN/(m(3)d) at corresponding DO of 1.0±0.1mg/L and HRT of 3h, and the optimal pH of 7.6-8.4. High-throughput sequencing analysis verified that dominant classes belonged to β-, α-, and γ-Proteobacteria, and Nitrospira. The dominant genera Hydrogenophaga and Sphaerotilus significantly increased during the operation, covering 13.2% and 6.1% in biofilms attached to the carrier in the middle of the reactor, respectively. Autotrophic denitrification contributed to >80% of the TN removal. The developed MEBD achieved efficient simultaneous nitrification and autotrophic denitrification, presenting significant potential for application in practical low organic carbon water treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Increasing Water Temperature Triggers Dominance of Small Freshwater Plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasconi, Serena; Gall, Andrea; Winter, Katharina; Kainz, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Climate change scenarios predict that lake water temperatures will increase up to 4°C and rainfall events will become more intense and frequent by the end of this century. Concurrently, supply of humic substances from terrestrial runoff is expected to increase, resulting in darker watercolor ("brownification") of aquatic ecosystems. Using a multi-seasonal, low trophic state mesocosm experiment, we investigated how higher water temperature and brownification affect plankton community composition, phenology, and functioning. We tested the hypothesis that higher water temperature (+3°C) and brownification will, a) cause plankton community composition to shift toward small sized phytoplankton and cyanobacteria, and, b) extend the length of the growing season entailing higher phytoplankton production later in the season. We demonstrate that the 3°C increase of water temperature favored the growth of heterotrophic bacteria and small sized autotrophic picophytoplankton cells with significantly higher primary production during warmer fall periods. However, 3X darker water (effect of brownification) caused no significant changes in the plankton community composition or functioning relative to control conditions. Our findings reveal that increased temperature change plankton community structure by favoring smaller sized species proliferation (autotrophic phytoplankton and small size cladocerans), and increase primary productivity and community turnover. Finally, results of this multi-seasonal experiment suggest that warming by 3°C in aquatic ecosystems of low trophic state may cause planktonic food web functioning to become more dominated by fast growing, r-trait species (i.e., small sizes and rapid development).

  17. Simultaneous bioreduction of nitrate and chromate using sulfur-based mixotrophic denitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahinkaya, Erkan, E-mail: erkansahinkaya@yahoo.com [Istanbul Medeniyet University, Bioengineering Department, Goztepe, Istanbul (Turkey); Kilic, Adem [Harran University, Environmental Engineering Department, Osmanbey Campus, 63000 Sanliurfa (Turkey); Calimlioglu, Beste; Toker, Yasemin [Istanbul Medeniyet University, Bioengineering Department, Goztepe, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification was stimulated. • Simultaneous bioreduction of nitrate and chromate was achieved. • Total chromium decreased <50 μg/L when the influent Cr(VI) was ≤5 mg/L. -- Abstract: This study aims at evaluating simultaneous chromate and nitrate reduction using sulfur-based mixotrophic denitrification process in a column reactor packed with elemental sulfur and activated carbon. The reactor was supplemented with methanol at C/N ratio of 1.33 or 2. Almost complete denitrification was achieved at influent NO{sub 3}{sup −}–N and Cr(VI) concentrations of 75 mg/L and 10 mg/L, respectively, and 3.7 h HRT. Maximum denitrification rate was 0.5 g NO{sub 3}{sup −}–N/(L.d) when the bioreactor was fed with 75 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup −}–N, 150 mg/L methanol and 10 mg/L Cr(VI). The share of autotrophic denitrification was between 12% and 50% depending on HRT, C/N ratio and Cr(VI) concentration. Effluent total chromium was below 50 μg/L provided that influent Cr(VI) concentration was equal or below 5 mg/L. DGGE results showed stable microbial community throughout the operation and the presence of sulfur oxidizing denitrifying bacteria (Thiobacillus denitrificans) and Cr(VI) reducing bacteria (Exiguobacterium spp.) in the column bed.

  18. (Carbon and hydrogen metabolism of green algae in light and dark)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The focus of this project was the elucidation of anaerobic metabolism in ecuaryotic green algae, chlamydomonas reinhardii. Chlamydomonas is a versatile organism that can grow under disparate conditions such as fresh water lakes and sewage ponds. The cell an photoassimilate CO{sub 2} aerobically and anaerobically, the latter after adaptation'' to a hydrogen metabolism. It can recall the knallgas or oxyhydrogen reaction and utilize hydrogen the simplest of all reducing agents for the dark assimilation of CO{sub 2} by the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle. The dark reduction with hydrogen lies on the border line between autotrophic and heterotrophic carbon assimilation. Both autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are known in which molecular hydrogen can replace either inorganic or organic hydrogen donors. Here the dark reduction of CO{sub 2} acquires a particular importance since it occurs in the same cell that carries on photoreduction and photosynthesis. We will demonstrate here that the alga chloroplast possesses a respiratory capacity. It seems likely that Chlamydomonas may have retained the chloroplastic respiratory pathway because of the selective advantage provided to the algae under a wide range of environmental conditions that the cells experience in nature. The ability to cycle electrons and poise the reduction level of the photosynthetic apparatus under aerobic and microaerobic conditions could allow more efficient CO{sub 2} fixation and enhanced growth under unfavorable conditions or survival under more severe conditions.

  19. Energetics and Application of Heterotrophy in Acetogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchmann, Kai; Müller, Volker

    2016-07-15

    Acetogenic bacteria are a diverse group of strictly anaerobic bacteria that utilize the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for CO2 fixation and energy conservation. These microorganisms play an important part in the global carbon cycle and are a key component of the anaerobic food web. Their most prominent metabolic feature is autotrophic growth with molecular hydrogen and carbon dioxide as the substrates. However, most members also show an outstanding metabolic flexibility for utilizing a vast variety of different substrates. In contrast to autotrophic growth, which is hardly competitive, metabolic flexibility is seen as a key ability of acetogens to compete in ecosystems and might explain the almost-ubiquitous distribution of acetogenic bacteria in anoxic environments. This review covers the latest findings with respect to the heterotrophic metabolism of acetogenic bacteria, including utilization of carbohydrates, lactate, and different alcohols, especially in the model acetogen Acetobacterium woodii Modularity of metabolism, a key concept of pathway design in synthetic biology, together with electron bifurcation, to overcome energetic barriers, appears to be the basis for the amazing substrate spectrum. At the same time, acetogens depend on only a relatively small number of enzymes to expand the substrate spectrum. We will discuss the energetic advantages of coupling CO2 reduction to fermentations that exploit otherwise-inaccessible substrates and the ecological advantages, as well as the biotechnological applications of the heterotrophic metabolism of acetogens. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Prokaryotic responses to ammonium and organic carbon reveal alternative CO2 fixation pathways and importance of alkaline phosphatase in the mesopelagic North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Baltar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To decipher the response of mesopelagic prokaryotic communities to input of nutrients, we tracked changes in prokaryotic abundance, extracellular enzymatic activities, heterotrophic production, dark dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC fixation, community composition (16S rRNA sequencing and community gene expression (metatranscriptomics in 3 microcosm experiments with water from the mesopelagic North Atlantic. Responses in 3 different treatments amended with thiosulfate, ammonium or organic matter (i.e. pyruvate plus acetate were compared to unamended controls. The strongest stimulation was found in the organic matter enrichments, where all measured rates increased >10-fold. Strikingly, in the organic matter treatment, the dark DIC fixation rates —assumed to be related to autotrophic metabolisms— were equally stimulated as all the other heterotrophic-related parameters. This increase in DIC fixation rates was paralleled by an up-regulation of genes involved in DIC assimilation via anaplerotic pathways. Alkaline phosphatase was the metabolic rate most strongly stimulated and its activity seemed to be related to cross-activation by nonpartner histidine kinases, and/or the activation of genes involved in the regulation of elemental balance during catabolic processes. These findings suggest that episodic events such as strong sedimentation of organic matter into the mesopelagic might trigger rapid increases of originally rare members of the prokaryotic community, enhancing heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon uptake rates, ultimately affecting carbon cycling. Our experiments highlight a number of fairly unstudied microbial processes of potential importance in mesopelagic waters that require future attention.

  1. Nutrient budgets and trophic state in a hypersaline coastal lagoon: Lagoa de Araruama, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Marcelo F. L.; Kjerfve, Björn; Knoppers, Bastiaan; Landim de Souza, Weber F.; Damasceno, Raimundo N.

    2003-08-01

    Lagoa de Araruama in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is a hypersaline lagoon with salinity varying spatially from 45 to 56. We collected water samples during monthly cruises throughout the lagoon, and along the streams feeding the system, from April 1991 to March 1992. Nutrients and other water quality parameters exhibited great spatial and temporal variations. Mass balance calculations indicate large amounts of anthropogenic nutrient inputs. The data indicate that the lagoon currently is oligotrophic but is in a state of transition to become a mesotrophic system. Molar dissolved inorganic nitrogen:dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIN/DIP) varied between 2.2:1 and 659:1 with a volume-weighted average of 22:1. The high DIN/DIP ratio contrasts with that found in nearby lagoons, suggesting that phytoplankton primary production is limited by phosphorus in Lagoa de Araruama. The major loss of DIP is apparently driven by biological assimilation and diagenic reactions in the sediments. Calculations indicate that the lagoon is slightly net autotrophic at +0.9 mol C m -2 yr -1. This suggests that the biomass of the primary producers is restricted by phosphorus availability. Phosphorus retention in the sediment and the hypersaline state of the lagoon prevent changes in autotrophic communities and the formation of eutrophic conditions.

  2. Microalgal biofactories: a promising approach towards sustainable omega-3 fatty acid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adarme-Vega T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA provide significant health benefits and this has led to an increased consumption as dietary supplements. Omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA are found in animals, transgenic plants, fungi and many microorganisms but are typically extracted from fatty fish, putting additional pressures on global fish stocks. As primary producers, many marine microalgae are rich in EPA (C20:5 and DHA (C22:6 and present a promising source of omega-3 fatty acids. Several heterotrophic microalgae have been used as biofactories for omega-3 fatty acids commercially, but a strong interest in autotrophic microalgae has emerged in recent years as microalgae are being developed as biofuel crops. This paper provides an overview of microalgal biotechnology and production platforms for the development of omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA. It refers to implications in current biotechnological uses of microalgae as aquaculture feed and future biofuel crops and explores potential applications of metabolic engineering and selective breeding to accumulate large amounts of omega-3 fatty acids in autotrophic microalgae.

  3. Variations in organic carbon fluxes from Long Island Sound to the Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, P.; Whitney, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    Organic carbon balances for the Long Island Sound estuary over the years 2009-2012 are presented to assess the particulate and dissolved organic carbon contributions of the estuary to the adjacent shelf waters with respect to the Delaware and Chesapeake. Observations were coupled to a hydrodynamic model (ROMS) for both seasonal and annual estimates. During stratified summer periods, LIS was consistently a net exporter of OC to the continental shelf. LIS annual net carbon export however, varied with river flow. The heterotrophic or autotrophic nature of LIS also shifted seasonally and inter-annually. During the mass balance analysis period LIS ranged between net OC import from the continental shelf and heterotrophy in the lowest river flow year (2012) and net export of OC and autotrophy in the highest flow year (2011). Analysis suggests that LIS switches from net OC import to export when the annual river inputs exceed 19 km3 yr-1. Applying these thresholds to the annual river flow record suggests that net import occurred in 15% of the last 20 years and that LIS usually is a net exporter of OC (85%). Annually averaged LIS carbon export values based on river flow conditions over the last 20 yr are estimated at 56 ± 64 x 106 km3 yr-1. Analysis also suggests that LIS shifts from net heterotrophic to net autotrophic when annual river flow exceeds 26 km3 yr-1 (35% of the last 20 yr). Net heterotrophic conditions are most common, representing 65% of the last 20 yr.

  4. Mussel farming impact on pelagic production and respiration rates in a coastal upwelling embayment (Ría de Vigo, NW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froján, María; Castro, Carmen G.; Zúñiga, Diana; Arbones, Belén; Alonso-Pérez, Fernando; Figueiras, Francisco G.

    2018-05-01

    This paper provides the first diagnosis of the impact of mussel farming on the primary production (PP) and the metabolic balance in a coastal upwelling region (Ría de Vigo). Measurements of size-fractionated PP and microbial plankton metabolism were performed outside (reference station; ReS) and inside the farming area (raft station; RaS). At ReS, integrated PP was higher during upwelling (1.05 ± 0.45 g C m-2 d-1) with microphytoplankton dominating carbon fixation (74 ± 14%). The significance of nanophytoplankton and picophytoplankton increased during winter linked to lower PP (0.24 ± 0.03 g C m-2 d-1). Water column at ReS was always autotrophic with net community production (NCP) ranging from 186 ± 67 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 during upwelling to 43 ± 22 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 in winter. At RaS, there was a decrease in PP attributable not only to mussel consumption but also to the lower irradiance under mussel rafts. Concomitant decrease in NCP was also observed (by 56%), yet remained autotrophic, supporting the view that under current conditions food does not limit mussel growth in the Ría, thus securing the carrying capacity of the system in terms of production.

  5. Few apparent short-term effects of elevated soil temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation on the abundance and taxonomic diversity of desert soil micro- and meso-fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, B.J.; Neher, D.A.; Housman, D.C.; Belnap, J.

    2011-01-01

    Frequent hydration and drying of soils in arid systems can accelerate desert carbon and nitrogen mobilization due to respiration, microbial death, and release of intracellular solutes. Because desert microinvertebrates can mediate nutrient cycling, and the autotrophic components of crusts are known to be sensitive to rapid desiccation due to elevated temperatures after wetting events, we studied whether altered soil temperature and frequency of summer precipitation can also affect the composition of food web consumer functional groups. We conducted a two-year field study with experimentally-elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation in the Colorado Plateau desert, measuring the change in abundance of nematodes, protozoans, and microarthropods. We hypothesized that microfauna would be more adversely affected by the combination of elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation than either effect alone, as found previously for phototrophic crust biota. Microfauna experienced normal seasonal fluctuations in abundance, but the effect of elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation was statistically non-significant for most microfaunal groups, except amoebae. The seasonal increase in abundance of amoebae was reduced with combined elevated temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation compared to either treatment alone, but comparable with control (untreated) plots. Based on our findings, we suggest that desert soil microfauna are relatively more tolerant to increases in ambient temperature and frequency of summer precipitation than the autotrophic components of biological soil crust at the surface.

  6. Coupled RNA-SIP and metatranscriptomics of active chemolithoautotrophic communities at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Huber, Julie A

    2016-08-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic microbial community of the rocky subseafloor potentially provides a large amount of organic carbon to the deep ocean, yet our understanding of the activity and metabolic complexity of subseafloor organisms remains poorly described. A combination of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) analyses were used to identify the metabolic potential, expression patterns, and active autotrophic bacteria and archaea and their pathways present in low-temperature hydrothermal fluids from Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic results showed the presence of genes and transcripts for sulfur, hydrogen, and ammonium oxidation, oxygen respiration, denitrification, and methanogenesis, as well as multiple carbon fixation pathways. In RNA-SIP experiments across a range of temperatures under reducing conditions, the enriched (13)C fractions showed differences in taxonomic and functional diversity. At 30 °C and 55 °C, Epsilonproteobacteria were dominant, oxidizing hydrogen and primarily reducing nitrate. Methanogenic archaea were also present at 55 °C, and were the only autotrophs present at 80 °C. Correspondingly, the predominant CO2 fixation pathways changed from the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle to the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway with increasing temperature. By coupling RNA-SIP with meta-omics, this study demonstrates the presence and activity of distinct chemolithoautotrophic communities across a thermal gradient of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

  7. Low nitrous oxide production through nitrifier-denitrification in intermittent-feed high-rate nitritation reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qingxian; Ma, Chun; Domingo-Félez, Carlos; Kiil, Anne Sofie; Thamdrup, Bo; Jensen, Marlene Mark; Smets, Barth F

    2017-10-15

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) production from autotrophic nitrogen conversion processes, especially nitritation systems, can be significant, requires understanding and calls for mitigation. In this study, the rates and pathways of N 2 O production were quantified in two lab-scale sequencing batch reactors operated with intermittent feeding and demonstrating long-term and high-rate nitritation. The resulting reactor biomass was highly enriched in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, and converted ∼93 ± 14% of the oxidized ammonium to nitrite. The low DO set-point combined with intermittent feeding was sufficient to maintain high nitritation efficiency and high nitritation rates at 20-26 °C over a period of ∼300 days. Even at the high nitritation efficiencies, net N 2 O production was low (∼2% of the oxidized ammonium). Net N 2 O production rates transiently increased with a rise in pH after each feeding, suggesting a potential effect of pH on N 2 O production. In situ application of 15 N labeled substrates revealed nitrifier denitrification as the dominant pathway of N 2 O production. Our study highlights operational conditions that minimize N 2 O emission from two-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The possible evolution and future of CO2-concentrating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs), based either on active transport of inorganic carbon (biophysical CCMs) or on biochemistry involving supplementary carbon fixation into C4 acids (C4 and CAM), play a major role in global primary productivity. However, the ubiquitous CO2-fixing enzyme in autotrophs, Rubisco, evolved at a time when atmospheric CO2 levels were very much higher than today and O2 was very low and, as CO2 and O2 approached (by no means monotonically), today's levels, at some time subsequently many organisms evolved a CCM that increased the supply of CO2 and decreased Rubisco oxygenase activity. Given that CO2 levels and other environmental factors have altered considerably between when autotrophs evolved and the present day, and are predicted to continue to change into the future, we here examine the drivers for, and possible timing of, evolution of CCMs. CCMs probably evolved when CO2 fell to 2-16 times the present atmospheric level, depending on Rubisco kinetics. We also assess the effects of other key environmental factors such as temperature and nutrient levels on CCM activity and examine the evidence for evolutionary changes in CCM activity and related cellular processes as well as limitations on continuity of CCMs through environmental variations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Terrestrial sedimentary pyrites as a potential source of trace metal release to groundwater – A case study from the Emsland, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houben, Georg J.; Sitnikova, Maria A.; Post, Vincent E.A.

    2017-01-01

    Pyrite is a common minor constituent of terrestrial freshwater sediments and a sink for trace elements. Different amounts and morphological types (framboids and euhedral crystals) of sedimentary pyrites were found in the heavy mineral fraction of cores obtained from several drillholes located in the Emsland region, NW Germany. Their trace element contents were investigated to assess their potential for groundwater contamination after oxidation, e.g. induced by dewatering or autotrophic denitrification. Nickel, arsenic and cadmium were found in significant concentrations in pyrite. Geochemical modeling showed that elevated trace metal concentrations in groundwater, potentially exceeding drinking water standards, should preferentially occur in a less than 1 m thick zone situated around the depth of the redoxcline, where nitrate is reduced by pyrite. This was confirmed by depth-specific groundwater sampling in the Emsland and by previously published studies. The absolute concentration of released trace metals depends on their content in the pyrite but also strongly on the nitrate load of groundwater. - Highlights: • Pyrite from heavy mineral fraction of aquifer sediment analyzed for trace metal content. • Pyrites contain significant concentration of trace metals, such as nickel, arsenic, cadmium. • Trace elements are released by autotrophic denitrification. • Reactive transport model predicts small zone of trace element accumulation. • Release of trace elements strongly dependent on nitrate content of groundwater.

  10. Inorganic Nitrogen Deposition and Its Impacts on N:P-Ratios and Lake Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag O. Hessen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The pronounced increase in the cycling and deposition of biologically reactive dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN over large areas globally not only cause increased concentrations of DIN in surface waters, but it will also affect nutrient ratios in rivers, lakes and coastal areas. This review addresses the flux and fate of DIN, focusing NO3 in lakes of boreal and alpine catchments. Not only DIN-deposition, but also catchment properties strongly affect the concentrations of NO3 in lakes, as well as NO3:total P (TP ratios. This ratio displays an extreme variability, and does also serve as an indicator of shift between N and P-limitation of aquatic autotrophs. A high share of forests and bogs in the catchment generally decreases NO3:total P ratios, while alpine and subalpine catchments with sparse vegetation cover may have high NO3:total P ratios, especially in regions with high DIN-deposition. Several empirical and experimental studies indicate a shift from an initial N to P-limitation, but for N-limited lakes, an increased growth of phytoplankton, periphytes and macrophytes may be accredited to elevated inputs of DIN. An intensified P-limitation may also be a consequence of elevated DIN-deposition. This P-limitation may again yield higher C:P-ratios in autotrophs with negative impacts on grazers and higher trophic levels.

  11. Archaeal Diversity and CO2 Fixers in Carbonate-/Siliciclastic-Rock Groundwater Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandre Sara Lazar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater environments provide habitats for diverse microbial communities, and although Archaea usually represent a minor fraction of communities, they are involved in key biogeochemical cycles. We analysed the archaeal diversity within a mixed carbonate-rock/siliciclastic-rock aquifer system, vertically from surface soils to subsurface groundwater including aquifer and aquitard rocks. Archaeal diversity was also characterized along a monitoring well transect that spanned surface land uses from forest/woodland to grassland and cropland. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that only a few surface soil-inhabiting Archaea were present in the groundwater suggesting a restricted input from the surface. Dominant groups in the groundwater belonged to the marine group I (MG-I Thaumarchaeota and the Woesearchaeota. Most of the groups detected in the aquitard and aquifer rock samples belonged to either cultured or predicted lithoautotrophs (e.g., Thaumarchaeota or Hadesarchaea. Furthermore, to target autotrophs, a series of 13CO2 stable isotope-probing experiments were conducted using filter pieces obtained after filtration of 10,000 L of groundwater to concentrate cells. These incubations identified the SAGMCG Thaumarchaeota and Bathyarchaeota as groundwater autotrophs. Overall, the results suggest that the majority of Archaea on rocks are fixing CO2, while archaeal autotrophy seems to be limited in the groundwater.

  12. Assessing the potential for isotopic partitioning of soil respiration at research sites in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risk, D.; Kellman, L.; Black, M. [Saint Francis Xavier Univ., Antigonish, NS (Canada). Environmental Sciences Research Centre

    2005-07-01

    The stable isotope ratios of carbon and oxygen in different tree species were studied with respect to different tissues, at different points within the tree, through soil profiles and in carbon dioxide respired from laboratory incubations. Although isotopic methods of partitioning autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration have been used with some success, stable isotopic methods are complicated by the fact that carbon isotope fractionations are small in natural systems, and radiocarbon techniques are time and equipment intensive. Studies that use isotopic analysis opportunistically, such as in C3/C4 transitional systems, have proven to be the most successful. Previously unexploited opportunities have the potential to be used for stable isotope-based partitioning in natural systems if the autotrophic/heterotrophic process distribution in the profile is well understand and if there is good process resolution and concurrent analyses using physical partitioning methods such as trenches. This study explored the different paths of opportunity in terms of background isotopic characterization that is being carried out for an existing network of carbon flux research sites in eastern Nova Scotia and in western Newfoundland. The new continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS) at the Environmental Earth Sciences Laboratory at St. Francis Xavier University was used for the isotopic analyses. The isotopic information will be evaluated for potential partitioning opportunities, considering the combination of approaches that will give the best chances of success. Isotopic partitioning trials will take place at suitable sites.

  13. Simultaneous biological removal of sulfur, nitrogen and carbon using EGSB reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Chuan; Ren Nanqi; Wang Aijie; Yu Zhenguo [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China); Lee Duu-Jong [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China); Dept. of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (China)

    2008-04-15

    High-rate biological conversion of sulfide and nitrate in synthetic wastewater to, respectively, elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}) and nitrogen-containing gas (such as N{sub 2}) was achieved in an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor. A novel strategy was adopted to first cultivate mature granules using anaerobic sludge as seed sludge in sulfate-laden medium. The cultivated granules were then incubated in sulfide-laden medium to acclimate autotrophic denitrifiers. The incubated granules converted sulfide, nitrate, and acetate simultaneously in the same EGSB reactor to S{sup 0}, N-containing gases and CO{sub 2} at loading rates of 3,0 kg S m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, 1.45 kg N m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, and 2.77 kg Ac m{sup -1} d{sup -1}, respectively, and was not inhibited by sulfide concentrations up to 800 mg l{sup -1}. Effects of the C/N ratio on granule performance were identified. The granules cultivated in the sulfide-laden medium have Pseudomonas spp. and Azoarcus sp. presenting the heterotrophs and autotrophs that co-work in the high-rate EGSB-SDD (simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification) reactor. (orig.)

  14. A Review on the Assessment of Stress conditions for Simultaneous Production of Microalgal Lipids and Carotenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amritpreet kaur Minhas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microalgal species are potential resource of both biofuels and high-value metabolites, and their production is growth dependent. Growth parameters can be screened for the selection of novel microalgal species that produce molecules of interest. In this context our review confirms that, autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms have demonstrated a dual potential, namely the ability to produce lipids as well as value-added products (particularly carotenoids under influence of various physico-chemical stresses on microalgae. Some species of microalgae can synthesize, besides some pigments, very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VL-PUFA,>20C such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, those have significant applications in food and health. Producing value-added by-products in addition to biofuels, fatty acid methyl esters (FAME, and lipids has the potential to improve microalgae-based biorefineries by employing either the autotrophic or the heterotrophic mode, which could be an offshoot of biotechnology. The review considers the potential of microalgae to produce a range of products and indicates future directions for developing suitable criteria for choosing novel isolates through bioprospecting large gene pool of microalga obtained from various habitats and climatic conditions.

  15. A Review on the Assessment of Stress Conditions for Simultaneous Production of Microalgal Lipids and Carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhas, Amritpreet K.; Hodgson, Peter; Barrow, Colin J.; Adholeya, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal species are potential resource of both biofuels and high-value metabolites, and their production is growth dependent. Growth parameters can be screened for the selection of novel microalgal species that produce molecules of interest. In this context our review confirms that, autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms have demonstrated a dual potential, namely the ability to produce lipids as well as value-added products (particularly carotenoids) under influence of various physico-chemical stresses on microalgae. Some species of microalgae can synthesize, besides some pigments, very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VL-PUFA,>20C) such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, those have significant applications in food and health. Producing value-added by-products in addition to biofuels, fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and lipids has the potential to improve microalgae-based biorefineries by employing either the autotrophic or the heterotrophic mode, which could be an offshoot of biotechnology. The review considers the potential of microalgae to produce a range of products and indicates future directions for developing suitable criteria for choosing novel isolates through bioprospecting large gene pool of microalga obtained from various habitats and climatic conditions. PMID:27199903

  16. Role of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in tolerance response against Armillaria mellea in lavender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinta Calvet

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lavender species form the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and are at the same time highly susceptible to white root rot. In an attempt to evaluate the response of mycorrhizal Lavandula angustifolia L. to Armillaria mellea (Vahl:Fr P. Kumm in a greenhouse experiment, plants were previously inoculated with an isolate of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (former Glomus intraradices BEG 72 and the influence of the pH growing medium on the plant-symbiont-pathogen interaction was tested in gnotobiotic autotrophic growth systems in which mycorrhizal inoculum was obtained from root organ cultures. After ten months growth dual-inoculated lavender plants grown in containers with a pasteurized substrate mixture produced a similar number of spikes than healthy plants and achieved equivalent plant diameter coverage. When the growing medium in the autotrophic systems was supplemented with calcium carbonate, the inoculation of lavender plantlets with R. irregularis at higher pH (7.0 and 8.5 media caused a significant decrease of A. mellea presence in plant roots, as detected by qPCR. Moreover, the observation of internal root mycorrhizal infection showed that the extent of mycorrhizal colonization increasedin plant rootsgrown at higher pH, indicating that tolerance to white root rot in lavender plants inoculated with R. irregularis could be associated to mycorrhizal establishment.

  17. Natural high pCO2 increases autotrophy in Anemonia viridis (Anthozoa) as revealed from stable isotope (C, N) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Rael; Borell, Esther M; Yam, Ruth; Shemesh, Aldo; Fine, Maoz

    2015-03-05

    Contemporary cnidarian-algae symbioses are challenged by increasing CO2 concentrations (ocean warming and acidification) affecting organisms' biological performance. We examined the natural variability of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis to investigate dietary shifts (autotrophy/heterotrophy) along a natural pCO2 gradient at the island of Vulcano, Italy. δ(13)C values for both algal symbionts (Symbiodinium) and host tissue of A. viridis became significantly lighter with increasing seawater pCO2. Together with a decrease in the difference between δ(13)C values of both fractions at the higher pCO2 sites, these results indicate there is a greater net autotrophic input to the A. viridis carbon budget under high pCO2 conditions. δ(15)N values and C/N ratios did not change in Symbiodinium and host tissue along the pCO2 gradient. Additional physiological parameters revealed anemone protein and Symbiodinium chlorophyll a remained unaltered among sites. Symbiodinium density was similar among sites yet their mitotic index increased in anemones under elevated pCO2. Overall, our findings show that A. viridis is characterized by a higher autotrophic/heterotrophic ratio as pCO2 increases. The unique trophic flexibility of this species may give it a competitive advantage and enable its potential acclimation and ecological success in the future under increased ocean acidification.

  18. Psychrophilic Biomass Producers in the Trophic Chain of the Microbial Community of Lake Untersee, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    The study of photosynthetic microorganisms from the Lake Untersee samples showed dispersed distribution of phototrophs within 80 m water column. Lake Untersee represents a unique ecosystem that experienced complete isolation: sealed by the Anuchin Glacier for many millennia. Consequently, its biocenosis has evolved over a significant period of time without exchange or external interaction with species from other environments. The major producers of organic matter in Lake Untersee are represented by phototrophic and chemolithotrophic microorganisms. This is the traditional trophic scheme for lacustrine ecosystems on Earth. Among the phototrophs, diatoms were not found, which differentiates this lake from other known ecosystems. The dominant species among phototrophs was Chlamydomonas sp. with typical morphostructure: green chloroplasts, bright red round spot, and two polar flagella near the opening. As expected, the physiology of studied phototrophs was limited by low temperature, which defined them as obligate psychrophilic microorganisms. By the quantity estimation of methanogenesis in this lake, the litho-autotrophic production of organic matter is competitive with phototrophic production. However, pure cultures of methanogens have not yet been obtained. We discuss the primary producers of organic matter and the participation of our novel psychrophilic homoacetogen into the litho-autotrophic link of biomass production in Lake Untersee.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Hydrogenobacter thermophilus type strain (TK-6T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeytun, Ahmet [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Nolan, Matt [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Lapidus, Alla L. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Lucas, Susan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Han, James [Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Cheng, Jan-Fang [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Liolios, Konstantinos [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Palaniappan, Krishna [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Ubler, Susanne [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Bristow, James [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Eisen, Jonathan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Markowitz, Victor [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogenobacter thermophilus Kawasumi et al. 1984 is the type species of the genus Hydrogenobacter. H. thermophilus was the first obligate autotrophic organism reported among aerobic hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. Strain TK-6T is of interest because of the unusually efficient hydrogen-oxidizing ability of this strain, which results in a faster generation time compared to other autotrophs. It is also able to grow anaerobically using nitrate as an electron acceptor when molecular hydrogen is used as the energy source, and able to aerobically fix CO2 via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. This is the fifth completed genome sequence in the family Aquificaceae, and the second genome sequence determined from a strain derived from the original isolate. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,742,932 bp long genome with its 1,899 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. Lipid Biomarkers and Stable Isotope Signatures of Microbial Mats in Hot Springs of Kamchatka, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, C. S.; Mills, G. L.; Jones, M. E.; Paddock, L.; Li, Y.; Zhang, C. L.; Wiegel, J.

    2004-12-01

    Various hot springs of the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, were analyzed for their chemical and stable isotope composition to better understand the relationship(s) between thermophilic microorganisms and the environments in which they live. The springs had water temperatures ranging from 40-90\\deg C and pH ranging from 5.6-5.9. Gases that emanated from the springs were composed predominantly of CO2 (20 to 90%), with lesser amounts of CH4, (Archaea. Results of PLFA showed 16:0 as the most abundant fatty acid (33-44%), which is universal in all living organisms. Other significant biomarkers included 18:1ω (19 to 24%), 18:2ω (5 to 13%), 16:1ω (3 to 12%), and 18:0 (2 to 7%). These biomarkers are characteristic of cyanobacteria, green-sulfur bacteria, and green non-sulfur bacteria, respectively, which are common autotrophic organisms in terrestrial hot springs. On the other hand, biomarkers of heterotrophic bacteria, such as iso- and anteiso-15:0 were low (2-8%), indicating that the bacterial carbon cycle was dominated by autotrophic organisms. Analogous archaeal constituents were present in significant abundance in the ether lipids fraction.

  1. Saharan dust inputs and high UVR levels jointly alter the metabolic balance of marine oligotrophic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrerizo, Marco J.; Medina-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; González-Olalla, Juan Manuel; Villar-Argaiz, Manuel; Carrillo, Presentación

    2016-10-01

    The metabolic balance of the most extensive bioma on the Earth is a controversial topic of the global-change research. High ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels by the shoaling of upper mixed layers and increasing atmospheric dust deposition from arid regions may unpredictably alter the metabolic state of marine oligotrophic ecosystems. We performed an observational study across the south-western (SW) Mediterranean Sea to assess the planktonic metabolic balance and a microcosm experiment in two contrasting areas, heterotrophic nearshore and autotrophic open sea, to test whether a combined UVR × dust impact could alter their metabolic balance at mid-term scales. We show that the metabolic state of oligotrophic areas geographically varies and that the joint impact of UVR and dust inputs prompted a strong change towards autotrophic metabolism. We propose that this metabolic response could be accentuated with the global change as remote-sensing evidence shows increasing intensities, frequencies and number of dust events together with variations in the surface UVR fluxes on SW Mediterranean Sea. Overall, these findings suggest that the enhancement of the net carbon budget under a combined UVR and dust inputs impact could contribute to boost the biological pump, reinforcing the role of the oligotrophic marine ecosystems as CO2 sinks.

  2. Seed germination in parasitic plants: what insights can we expect from strigolactone research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Guillaume; Braem, Lukas; Thoiron, Séverine; Gevaert, Kris; Goormachtig, Sofie; Delavault, Philippe

    2018-04-23

    Obligate root-parasitic plants belonging to the Orobanchaceae family are deadly pests for major crops all over the world. Because these heterotrophic plants severely damage their hosts even before emerging from the soil, there is an unequivocal need to design early and efficient methods for their control. The germination process of these species has probably undergone numerous selective pressure events in the course of evolution, in that the perception of host-derived molecules is a necessary condition for seeds to germinate. Although most of these molecules belong to the strigolactones, structurally different molecules have been identified. Since strigolactones are also classified as novel plant hormones that regulate several physiological processes other than germination, the use of autotrophic model plant species has allowed the identification of many actors involved in the strigolactone biosynthesis, perception, and signal transduction pathways. Nevertheless, many questions remain to be answered regarding the germination process of parasitic plants. For instance, how did parasitic plants evolve to germinate in response to a wide variety of molecules, while autotrophic plants do not? What particular features are associated with their lack of spontaneous germination? In this review, we attempt to illustrate to what extent conclusions from research into strigolactones could be applied to better understand the biology of parasitic plants.

  3. The Genome of the Epsilonproteobacterial Chemolithoautotroph Sulfurimonas dentrificans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    USF Genomics Class; Sievert, Stefan M.; Scott, Kathleen M.; Klotz, Martin G.; Chain, Patrick S.G.; Hauser, Loren J.; Hemp, James; Hugler, Michael; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Larimer, Frank W.; Lucas, Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Meyer, Folker; Paulsen, Ian T.; Ren, Qinghu; Simon, Jorg

    2007-08-08

    Sulfur-oxidizing epsilonproteobacteria are common in a variety of sulfidogenic environments. These autotrophic and mixotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are believed to contribute substantially to the oxidative portion of the global sulfur cycle. In order to better understand the ecology and roles of sulfur-oxidizing epsilonproteobacteria, in particular those of the widespread genus Sulfurimonas, in biogeochemical cycles, the genome of Sulfurimonas denitrificans DSM1251 was sequenced. This genome has many features, including a larger size (2.2 Mbp), that suggest a greater degree of metabolic versatility or responsiveness to the environment than seen for most of the other sequenced epsilonproteobacteria. A branched electron transport chain is apparent, with genes encoding complexes for the oxidation of hydrogen, reduced sulfur compounds, and formate and the reduction of nitrate and oxygen. Genes are present for a complete, autotrophic reductive citric acid cycle. Many genes are present that could facilitate growth in the spatially and temporally heterogeneous sediment habitat from where Sulfurimonas denitrificans was originally isolated. Many resistance-nodulation-development family transporter genes (10 total) are present; of these, several are predicted to encode heavy metal efflux transporters. An elaborate arsenal of sensory and regulatory protein-encoding genes is in place, as are genes necessary to prevent and respond to oxidative stress.

  4. The deep-sea glass sponge Lophophysema eversa harbours potential symbionts responsible for the nutrient conversions of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ren-Mao; Sun, Jin; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Wei-Peng; Zhou, Guo-Wei; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Glass sponge (Hexactinellida, Porifera) is a special lineage because of its unique tissue organization and skeleton material. Structure and physiology of glass sponge have been extensively studied. However, our knowledge of the glass sponge-associated microbial community and of the interaction with the host is rather limited. Here, we performed genomic studies on the microbial community in the glass sponge Lophophysema eversa in seamount. The microbial community was dominated by an ammonia-oxidizing archaeum (AOA), a nitrite-oxidizing bacterium (NOB) and a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB), all of which were autotrophs. Genomic analysis on the AOA, NOB and SOB in the sponge revealed specific functional features of sponge-associated microorganisms in comparison with the closely related free-living relatives, including chemotaxis, phage defence, vitamin biosynthesis and nutrient uptake among others, which are related to ecological functions. The three autotrophs play essential roles in the cycles of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in the microenvironment inside the sponge body, and they are considered to play symbiotic roles in the host as scavengers of toxic ammonia, nitrite and sulfide. Our study extends knowledge regarding the metabolism and the evolution of chemolithotrophs inside the invertebrate body. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Feeding by larvae of intertidal invertebrates: assessing their position in pelagic food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Cristian A; Manríquez, Patricio H; Navarrete, Sergio A

    2006-02-01

    One of the leading determinants of the structure and dynamics of marine populations is the rate of arrival of new individuals to local sites. While physical transport processes play major roles in delivering larvae to the shore, these processes become most important after larvae have survived the perils of life in the plankton, where they usually suffer great mortality. The lack of information regarding larval feeding makes it difficult to assess the effects of food supply on larval survival, or the role larvae may play in nearshore food webs. Here, we examine the spectrum of food sizes and food types consumed by the larvae of two intertidal barnacle species and of the predatory gastropod Concholepas concholepas. We conducted replicated experiments in which larvae were exposed to the food size spectrum (phytoplankton, microprotozoan and autotrophic picoplankton) found in nearshore waters in central Chile. Results show that barnacle nauplii and gastropod veligers are omnivorous grazers, incorporating significant fractions of heterotrophs in their diets. In accordance with their feeding mechanisms and body size, barnacle nauplii were able to feed on autotrophic picoplankton (concholepas larvae also consumed picoplankton cells, while competent larvae of this species ingested mostly the largest phytoplankton cells and heterotrophic protozoans. Results suggest that persistent changes in the structure of pelagic food webs can have important effects on the species-specific food availability for invertebrate larvae, which can result in large-scale differences in recruitment rates of a given species, and in the relative recruitment success of the different species that make up benthic communities.

  6. Maximum in the middle: nonlinear response of microbial plankton to ultraviolet radiation and phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Delgado-Molina, José Antonio; Bratbak, Gunnar; Bullejos, Francisco José; Villar-Argaiz, Manuel; Carrillo, Presentación

    2013-01-01

    The responses of heterotrophic microbial food webs (HMFW) to the joint action of abiotic stressors related to global change have been studied in an oligotrophic high-mountain lake. A 2×5 factorial design field experiment performed with large mesocosms for >2 months was used to quantify the dynamics of the entire HMFW (bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates, ciliates, and viruses) after an experimental P-enrichment gradient which approximated or surpassed current atmospheric P pulses in the presence vs. absence of ultraviolet radiation. HMFW underwent a mid-term (ultraviolet radiation. However, after depletion of dissolved inorganic P, the HMFW collapsed and was outcompeted by a low-diversity autotrophic compartment, which constrained the development of HMFW and caused a significant loss of functional biodiversity. The dynamics and relationships among variables, and the response patterns found, suggest the importance of biotic interactions (predation/parasitism and competition) in restricting HMFW development, in contrast to the role of abiotic factors as main drivers of autotrophic compartment. The response of HMFW may contribute to ecosystem resilience by favoring the maintenance of the peculiar paths of energy and nutrient-mobilization in these pristine ecosystems, which are vulnerable to threats by the joint action of abiotic stressors related to global change.

  7. Maximum in the middle: nonlinear response of microbial plankton to ultraviolet radiation and phosphorus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Medina-Sánchez

    Full Text Available The responses of heterotrophic microbial food webs (HMFW to the joint action of abiotic stressors related to global change have been studied in an oligotrophic high-mountain lake. A 2×5 factorial design field experiment performed with large mesocosms for >2 months was used to quantify the dynamics of the entire HMFW (bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates, ciliates, and viruses after an experimental P-enrichment gradient which approximated or surpassed current atmospheric P pulses in the presence vs. absence of ultraviolet radiation. HMFW underwent a mid-term (<20 days acute development following a noticeable unimodal response to P enrichment, which peaked at intermediate P-enrichment levels and, unexpectedly, was more accentuated under ultraviolet radiation. However, after depletion of dissolved inorganic P, the HMFW collapsed and was outcompeted by a low-diversity autotrophic compartment, which constrained the development of HMFW and caused a significant loss of functional biodiversity. The dynamics and relationships among variables, and the response patterns found, suggest the importance of biotic interactions (predation/parasitism and competition in restricting HMFW development, in contrast to the role of abiotic factors as main drivers of autotrophic compartment. The response of HMFW may contribute to ecosystem resilience by favoring the maintenance of the peculiar paths of energy and nutrient-mobilization in these pristine ecosystems, which are vulnerable to threats by the joint action of abiotic stressors related to global change.

  8. Light and spectral properties as determinants of C:N:P-ratios in phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessen, Dag O.; Leu, Eva; Færøvig, Per J.; Falk Petersen, Stig

    2008-10-01

    Light is a major determinant not only for carbon (C)-fixation in autotrophs, but also for the cellular proportions of major elements like C, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). High intensities of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) increase C:P-ratios in experiments with arctic marine and freshwater phytoplankton species. While high levels of PAR promote high autotrophic productivity, the increased C:P may invoke a "paradox of enrichment" effect since this means lower stoichiometric food quality for herbivores. In contrast, exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) gave reduced cellular C:P-ratios (and N:P) in phytoplankton. This was partly owing to a strong reduction in C-fixation under UVR, but also due to enhanced uptake of P, presumably in response to increased demands for nucleotide repair under UVR stress. The net outcome of these opposing effects will depend on optical properties and mixing depth in the water column. These stoichiometric responses could cause deviations from Redfield ratio in phytoplankton as well as affecting biogeochemical cycling and trophic transfer efficiency in aquatic food-webs.

  9. Using Partial Genomic Fosmid Libraries for Sequencing CompleteOrganellar Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeal, Joel R.; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Arumuganathan, K.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2005-08-26

    Organellar genome sequences provide numerous phylogenetic markers and yield insight into organellar function and molecular evolution. These genomes are much smaller in size than their nuclear counterparts; thus, their complete sequencing is much less expensive than total nuclear genome sequencing, making broader phylogenetic sampling feasible. However, for some organisms it is challenging to isolate plastid DNA for sequencing using standard methods. To overcome these difficulties, we constructed partial genomic libraries from total DNA preparations of two heterotrophic and two autotrophic angiosperm species using fosmid vectors. We then used macroarray screening to isolate clones containing large fragments of plastid DNA. A minimum tiling path of clones comprising the entire genome sequence of each plastid was selected, and these clones were shotgun-sequenced and assembled into complete genomes. Although this method worked well for both heterotrophic and autotrophic plants, nuclear genome size had a dramatic effect on the proportion of screened clones containing plastid DNA and, consequently, the overall number of clones that must be screened to ensure full plastid genome coverage. This technique makes it possible to determine complete plastid genome sequences for organisms that defy other available organellar genome sequencing methods, especially those for which limited amounts of tissue are available.

  10. Do Continental Shelves Act as an Atmospheric CO2 Sink?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, W.

    2003-12-01

    Recent air-to-sea CO2 flux measurements at several major continental shelves (European Atlantic Shelves, East China Sea and U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight) suggest that shelves may act as a one-way pump and absorb atmospheric CO2 into the ocean. These observations also favor the argument that continental shelves are autotrophic (i.e., net production of organic carbon, OC). The U.S. South Atlantic Bight (SAB) contrasts these findings in that it acts as a strong source of CO2 to the atmosphere while simultaneously exporting dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) to the open ocean. We report pCO2, DIC, and alkalinity data from the SAB collected in 8 cruises along a transect from the shore to the shelf break in the central SAB. The shelf-wide net heterotrophy and carbon exports in the SAB are subsidized by the export of OC from the abundant intertidal marshes, which are a sink for atmospheric CO2. It is proposed here that the SAB represents a marsh-dominated heterotrophic ocean margin as opposed to river-dominated autotrophic margins. To further investigate why margins may behave differently in term of CO2 sink/source, the physical and biological conditions of several western boundary current margins are compared. Based on this and other studies, DIC export flux from margins to the open ocean must be significant in the overall global ocean carbon budget.

  11. The geomicrobiology of used and disused mines in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christofi, N.; Philp, J.C.; West, J.M.; Robbins, J.E.

    1984-03-01

    Several used and disused mines in Britain have been analysed for microbial presence, content and activity. The sites sampled are located in Cornwall, Derbyshire and Cumbria. The mines in Cornwall can be called 'working' and were being operated at the time of sampling. The mine in Derbyshire was disused until recently re-opened by cavers while the mines in Cumbria had remained closed up to the time of sampling. Waters and solid materials have been sampled where detailed microbiology has been undertaken. In Cumbria a detailed description of structures of biological interest was carried out. Both heterotrophic and autotrophic microorganisms have been found in some waters and on mine walls. The actual content of each mine is different according to local conditions and chemistries. The results of the microbiological analyses are given. The origin of these microorganisms cannot be determined although it is likely that they have been introduced by water running down mine shafts from surface strata and/or from excavation processes. Activity measurements have shown that waters in some mines are organic carbon limited. There are indications from the working mines that such carbon would be available from autotrophic populations present within the ecosystem or from backfill material. (author)

  12. Investigating the inhibitory effect of cyanide, phenol and 4-nitrophenol on the activated sludge process employed for the treatment of petroleum wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglezakis, V J; Malamis, S; Omirkhan, A; Nauruzbayeva, J; Makhtayeva, Z; Seidakhmetov, T; Kudarova, A

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the inhibitory effect of cyanide, phenol and 4-nitrophenol on the activated sludge process was investigated. The inhibition of the aerobic oxidation of organic matter, nitrification and denitrification were examined in batch reactors by measuring the specific oxygen uptake rate (sOUR), the specific ammonium uptake rate (sAUR) and the specific nitrogen uptake rate (sNUR) respectively. The tested cyanide, phenol and 4-nitrophenol concentrations were 0.2-1.7 mg/L, 4.8-73.1 mg/L and 8.2-73.0 mg/L respectively. Cyanide was highly toxic as it significantly (>50%) inhibited the activity of autotrophic biomass, heterotrophic biomass under aerobic conditions and denitrifiers even at relatively low concentrations (1.0-1.7 mgCN - /L). The determination of the half maximum inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) confirmed this, since for cyanide IC 50 values were very low for the examined bioprocesses (25 mg/L) for the tested bioprocesses since appreciable concentrations were required to accomplish significant inhibition. The autotrophic bacteria were more sensitive to phenol than the aerobic heterotrophs. The denitrifiers were found to be very resistant to phenol. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. The geomicrobiology of calcium montmorillonite (Fuller's Earth)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philp, J.C.; Christofi, N.; West, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Oxfordshire Fuller's Earth contains high populations of aerobic heterotrophic microorganisms and smaller populations of anaerobic heterotrophs. These groups seem to be generally unaffected by depth. The aerobic heterotroph activity in Fuller's Earth extract is continuous indicating that the necessary organic carbon is available. Chemical analysis has shown that all other necessary nutrients are present in the waters sampled. Activity can also be stimulated by the addition of TCA cycle intermediates. It is likely that the carbon dioxide produced by the aerobic heterotrophs could be utilised by autotrophic populations. Similarly, bicarbonate rich groundwaters could also supply inorganic carbon for them. These populations already exist at low levels and include corrosion important microorganisms. The organic carbon thus produced by the autotrophs could be used as a source for further heterotrophic activity. These findings indicate that microbial inhibition would only occur if the availability of organic carbon was controlled. The use of Fuller's Earth as a backfill material in other groundwater environments, especially those rich in bicarbonate, may stimulate various microbial groups and lead to interactions affecting waste isolation. It would thus be prudent to reduce or eliminate the organic carbon content in Fuller's Earth should it be used as a backfill material. (author)

  14. The relative contributions of biological and abiotic processes to carbon dynamics in subarctic sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Thomas, David; Rysgaard, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge on the relative effects of biological activity and precipitation/dissolution of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in influencing the air-ice CO2 exchange in sea-ice-covered season is currently lacking. Furthermore, the spatial and temporal occurrence of CaCO3 and other biogeochemical parameters...... in sea ice are still not well described. Here we investigated autotrophic and heterotrophic activity as well as the precipitation/dissolution of CaCO3 in subarctic sea ice in South West Greenland. Integrated over the entire ice season (71 days), the sea ice was net autotrophic with a net carbon fixation...... and CaCO3 precipitation. The net biological production could only explain 4 % of this sea-ice-driven CO2 uptake. Abiotic processes contributed to an air-sea CO2 uptake of 1.5 mmol m(-2) sea ice day(-1), and dissolution of CaCO3 increased the air-sea CO2 uptake by 36 % compared to a theoretical estimate...

  15. Bioprocess Engineering Aspects of Biopolymer Production by the Cyanobacterium Spirulina Strain LEB 18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Guimarães Martins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biopolymers can replace environmentally damaging plastics derived from petrochemicals. We investigated biopolymer synthesis by the cyanobacterium Spirulina strain LEB 18. Autotrophic culture used unmodified Zarrouk medium or modified Zarrouk medium in which the NaNO3 content was reduced to 0.25 g L−1 and the NaHCO3 content reduced to 8.4 g L−1 or increased to 25.2 g L−1. Heterotrophic culture used modified Zarrouk medium containing 0.25 g L−1 NaNO3 with the NaHCO3 replaced by 0.2 g L−1, 0.4 g L−1, or 0.6 g L−1 of glucose (C6H12O6 or sodium acetate (CH3COONa. Mixotrophic culture used modified Zarrouk medium containing 0.25 g L−1 NaNO3 plus 16.8 g L−1 NaHCO3 with the addition of 0.2 g L−1, 0.4 g L−1, or 0.6 g L−1 of glucose or sodium acetate. The highest biopolymer yield was 44% when LEB 18 was growing autotrophically in media containing 0.25 g L−1 NaNO3 and 8.4 g L−1 NaHCO3.

  16. The Temporal Dynamics of Coastal Phytoplankton and Bacterioplankton in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofrat Raveh

    Full Text Available This study considers variability in phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterial abundances and production rates, in one of the most oligotrophic marine regions in the world-the Levantine Basin. The temporal dynamics of these planktonic groups were studied in the coastal waters of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea approximately every two weeks for a total of two years. Heterotrophic bacteria were abundant mostly during late summer and midwinter, and were positively correlated with bacterial production and with N2 fixation. Based on size fractionating, picophytoplankton was abundant during the summer, whereas nano-microphytoplankton predominated during the winter and early spring, which were also evident in the size-fractionated primary production rates. Autotrophic abundance and production correlated negatively with temperature, but did not correlate with inorganic nutrients. Furthermore, a comparison of our results with results from the open Levantine Basin demonstrates that autotrophic and heterotrophic production, as well as N2 fixation rates, are considerably higher in the coastal habitat than in the open sea, while nutrient levels or cell abundance are not different. These findings have important ecological implications for food web dynamics and for biological carbon sequestration in this understudied region.

  17. Role of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in tolerance response against Armillaria mellea in lavender

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvet, C.; Garcia-Figueres, F.; Lovato, P.; Camprubi, A.

    2015-07-01

    Lavender species form the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and are at the same time highly susceptible to white root rot. In an attempt to evaluate the response of mycorrhizal Lavandula angustifolia L. to Armillaria mellea (Vahl:Fr) P. Kumm in a greenhouse experiment, plants were previously inoculated with an isolate of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (former Glomus intraradices BEG 72) and the influence of the pH growing medium on the plant-symbiont-pathogen interaction was tested in gnotobiotic autotrophic growth systems in which mycorrhizal inoculum was obtained from root organ cultures. After ten months growth dual-inoculated lavender plants grown in containers with a pasteurized substrate mixture produced a similar number of spikes than healthy plants and achieved equivalent plant diameter coverage. When the growing medium in the autotrophic systems was supplemented with calcium carbonate, the inoculation of lavender plantlets with R. irregularis at higher pH (7.0 and 8.5) media caused a significant decrease of A. mellea presence in plant roots, as detected by qPCR. Moreover, the observation of internal root mycorrhizal infection showed that the extent of mycorrhizal colonization increasedin plant rootsgrown at higher pH, indicating that tolerance to white root rot in lavender plants inoculated with R. irregularis could be associated to mycorrhizal establishment. (Author)

  18. Biodiversity maintenance in food webs with regulatory environmental feedbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdassarian, Carey K; Dunham, Amy E; Brown, Christopher G; Rauscher, Daniel

    2007-04-21

    Although the food web is one of the most fundamental and oldest concepts in ecology, elucidating the strategies and structures by which natural communities of species persist remains a challenge to empirical and theoretical ecologists. We show that simple regulatory feedbacks between autotrophs and their environment when embedded within complex and realistic food-web models enhance biodiversity. The food webs are generated through the niche-model algorithm and coupled with predator-prey dynamics, with and without environmental feedbacks at the autotroph level. With high probability and especially at lower, more realistic connectance levels, regulatory environmental feedbacks result in fewer species extinctions, that is, in increased species persistence. These same feedback couplings, however, also sensitize food webs to environmental stresses leading to abrupt collapses in biodiversity with increased forcing. Feedback interactions between species and their material environments anchor food-web persistence, adding another dimension to biodiversity conservation. We suggest that the regulatory features of two natural systems, deep-sea tubeworms with their microbial consortia and a soil ecosystem manifesting adaptive homeostatic changes, can be embedded within niche-model food-web dynamics.

  19. Discriminating the biophysical impacts of coastal upwelling and mud banks along the southwest coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnan, C.; Jyothibabu, R.; Arunpandi, N.; Jagadeesan, L.; Muraleedharan, K. R.; Pratihari, A. K.; Balachandran, K. K.; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2017-08-01

    Coastal upwelling and mud banks are two oceanographic processes concurrently operating along certain stretches of the southwest (Kerala) coast of India during the Southwest Monsoon period (June-September), facilitating significant enhancement in plankton biomass. Mud banks have scientific and societal attention from time immemorial, predominantly due to the large fisheries associated with them. In this paper, for the first time, the specific biophysical roles of these oceanographic processes have been discriminated, based on a focused 18 weekly/fortnightly time-series study (April to September 2014) in a mud bank-upwelling area (off Alappuzha, southwest coast of India). In conjunction with standard hydrographical and satellite remote sensing data, we utilised a FlowCAM to track the biophysical linkage in terms of plankton composition abundance and size structure at three locations (M1, M2 and M3) in the study area. During the Pre-Southwest Monsoon (April-May), the entire study area was warmer with low nitrate concentration in the surface waters, which caused lower biomass of autotrophs compared to the Southwest Monsoon (June-September). By the onset of the Southwest Monsoon (June), drastic hydrographical transformations took place in the study domain due to the Coastal upwelling, reflected as the surfacing of significantly cool, high nutrient and hypoxic waters. Concurrently, mud bank formed at location M2 due to the presence of relatively high-suspended sediments in the region, creating a localised calm environment conducive for fishing activities. In response to the hydrographical transformations in the entire study area during the Southwest Monsoon, the autotrophic plankton biomass and size structure experienced significant change. The micro-autotrophs biomass that was low during the Pre-Southwest Monsoon (av. 0.33 ± 0.2 mgC L- 1 at surface and av. 0.07 ± 0.04 mgC L- 1 at subsurface) noticeably increased during the Southwest Monsoon (av. 1.6 ± 0.4 mgC L- 1 at

  20. Comparative analysis of food webs based on flow networks: effects of nutrient supply on structure and function of coastal plankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Yngvar; Reinertsen, Helge; Vadstein, Olav; Andersen, Tom; Gismervik, Ingrid; Duarte, Carlos; Agusti, Susana; Stibor, Herwig; Sommer, Ulrich; Lignell, Risto; Tamminen, Timo; Lancelot, Christiane; Rousseau, Veronique; Hoell, Espen; Sanderud, Knut Arvid

    2001-12-01

    The objective of COMWEB was to develop efficient analytical, numerical and experimental methods for assessing and predicting the effects of nutrient (N, P, Si) supply on the stability and persistence of pelagic food web structure and function in coastal waters. The experimental comparative work included a geographic gradient covering Baltic, Mediterranean, and NE Atlantic waters and a NE Atlantic gradient in state of eutrophication. COMWEB has been an experimental approach to coastal eutrophication, studying effects of enhanced nutrient supply on components and flows of the entire lower pelagic food web. Flow network representations of pelagic food webs has been a framework of data reduction and flows were established by sophisticated inverse modelling. Fundamental information on physiological properties of functional key species in the pelagic food web was used to constrain flow estimations. A main conclusion derived from the flow networks was that very little energy and materials were transferred from the microbial food web to the main food chain. The lower food web could therefore be described as two parallel food chains with relatively limited interaction between heterotrophic groups. Short-term effects of nutrient perturbations were examined in mesocosms along the geographic gradient. The response was comparable in all systems, with a stronger effect on the activity and biomass of autotrophic groups than those of heterotrophic ones. Mediterranean waters showed much lower autotrophic biomass response than Baltic and NE Atlantic waters, which responded almost equally. The response of primary production was, however, more comparable. High phytoplankton lysis rate explained this low accumulation of biomass in Mediterranean waters. The study of Atlantic coastal waters of different eutrophic states revealed that the ecological response was higher in the closed nutrient perturbed mesocosms than in open systems exposed for >4 summer months (summer/autumn season). The

  1. Variation in foliar respiration and wood CO2 efflux rates among species and canopy layers in a wet tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Shinichi; Bedoya-Arrieta, Ricardo; Ryan, Michael G

    2015-02-01

    As tropical forests respond to environmental change, autotrophic respiration may consume a greater proportion of carbon fixed in photosynthesis at the expense of growth, potentially turning the forests into a carbon source. Predicting such a response requires that we measure and place autotrophic respiration in a complete carbon budget, but extrapolating measurements of autotrophic respiration from chambers to ecosystem remains a challenge. High plant species diversity and complex canopy structure may cause respiration rates to vary and measurements that do not account for this complexity may introduce bias in extrapolation more detrimental than uncertainty. Using experimental plantations of four native tree species with two canopy layers, we examined whether species and canopy layers vary in foliar respiration and wood CO2 efflux and whether the variation relates to commonly used scalars of mass, nitrogen (N), photosynthetic capacity and wood size. Foliar respiration rate varied threefold between canopy layers, ∼0.74 μmol m(-2) s(-1) in the overstory and ∼0.25 μmol m(-2) s(-1) in the understory, but little among species. Leaf mass per area, N and photosynthetic capacity explained some of the variation, but height explained more. Chamber measurements of foliar respiration thus can be extrapolated to the canopy with rates and leaf area specific to each canopy layer or height class. If area-based rates are sampled across canopy layers, the area-based rate may be regressed against leaf mass per area to derive the slope (per mass rate) to extrapolate to the canopy using the total leaf mass. Wood CO2 efflux varied 1.0-1.6 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for overstory trees and 0.6-0.9 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for understory species. The variation in wood CO2 efflux rate was mostly related to wood size, and little to species, canopy layer or height. Mean wood CO2 efflux rate per surface area, derived by regressing CO2 efflux per mass against the ratio of surface

  2. Quantitative analysis of an engineered CO2-fixing Escherichia coli reveals great potential of heterotrophic CO2 fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fuyu; Liu, Guoxia; Zhai, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Jie; Cai, Zhen; Li, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Production of fuels from the abundant and wasteful CO2 is a promising approach to reduce carbon emission and consumption of fossil fuels. Autotrophic microbes naturally assimilate CO2 using energy from light, hydrogen, and/or sulfur. However, their slow growth rates call for investigation of the possibility of heterotrophic CO2 fixation. Although preliminary research has suggested that CO2 fixation in heterotrophic microbes is feasible after incorporation of a CO2-fixing bypass into the central carbon metabolic pathway, it remains unclear how much and how efficient that CO2 can be fixed by a heterotrophic microbe. A simple metabolic flux index was developed to indicate the relative strength of the CO2-fixation flux. When two sequential enzymes of the cyanobacterial Calvin cycle were incorporated into an E. coli strain, the flux of the CO2-fixing bypass pathway accounts for 13 % of that of the central carbon metabolic pathway. The value was increased to 17 % when the carbonic anhydrase involved in the cyanobacterial carbon concentrating mechanism was introduced, indicating that low intracellular CO2 concentration is one limiting factor for CO2 fixation in E. coli. The engineered CO2-fixing E. coli with carbonic anhydrase was able to fix CO2 at a rate of 19.6 mg CO2 L(-1) h(-1) or the specific rate of 22.5 mg CO2 g DCW(-1) h(-1). This CO2-fixation rate is comparable with the reported rates of 14 autotrophic cyanobacteria and algae (10.5-147.0 mg CO2 L(-1) h(-1) or the specific rates of 3.5-23.7 mg CO2 g DCW(-1) h(-1)). The ability of CO2 fixation was created and improved in E. coli by incorporating partial cyanobacterial Calvin cycle and carbon concentrating mechanism, respectively. Quantitative analysis revealed that the CO2-fixation rate of this strain is comparable with that of the autotrophic cyanobacteria and algae, demonstrating great potential of heterotrophic CO2 fixation.

  3. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate under denitrifying sulfide removal condition: Modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xijun; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Aijie; Guo, Wanqian; Zhou, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Lee, Duu-Jong, E-mail: djlee@ntu.edu.tw [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Ren, Nanqi, E-mail: rnq@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Model evaluation applied to case study 1: (A-G) S{sup 2−}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N, NO{sub 2}{sup −}-N, and Ac{sup −}-C profiles under initial sulfide concentrations of 156.2 (A), 539 (B), 964 (C), 1490 (D), 342.7 (E), 718 (F), and 1140.7 (G) mg L{sup −1}. The solid line represents simulated result and scatter represents experimental result. -- Highlights: • This work developed a mathematical model for DSR process. • Kinetics of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between denitrifiers were studied. • Kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting. • The model described kinetic behaviors of DSR processes over wide parametric range. -- Abstract: Simultaneous removal of sulfide (S{sup 2−}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup −}) and acetate (Ac{sup −}) under denitrifying sulfide removal process (DSR) is a novel biological wastewater treatment process. This work developed a mathematical model to describe the kinetic behavior of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between autotrophic denitrifiers and heterotrophic denitrifiers. The kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting considering the effects of initial S{sup 2−} concentration, S{sup 2−}/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio and Ac{sup −}-C/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio. Simulation supported that the heterotrophic denitratation step (NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction to NO{sub 2}{sup −}) was inhibited by S{sup 2−} compared with the denitritation step (NO{sub 2}{sup −} reduction to N{sub 2}). Also, the S{sup 2−} oxidation by autotrophic denitrifiers was shown two times lower in rate with NO{sub 2}{sup −} as electron acceptor than that with NO{sub 3}{sup −} as electron acceptor. NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction by autotrophic denitrifiers occurs 3–10 times slower when S{sup 0} participates as final electron donor compared to the S{sup 2−}-driven pathway. Model simulation on continuous-flow DSR reactor suggested that the adjustment of

  4. Genes and pathways for CO2 fixation in the obligate, chemolithoautotrophic acidophile, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Carbon fixation in A. ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esparza Mario

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is chemolithoautotrophic γ-proteobacterium that thrives at extremely low pH (pH 1-2. Although a substantial amount of information is available regarding CO2 uptake and fixation in a variety of facultative autotrophs, less is known about the processes in obligate autotrophs, especially those living in extremely acidic conditions, prompting the present study. Results Four gene clusters (termed cbb1-4 in the A. ferrooxidans genome are predicted to encode enzymes and structural proteins involved in carbon assimilation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycle including form I of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO, EC 4.1.1.39 and the CO2-concentrating carboxysomes. RT-PCR experiments demonstrated that each gene cluster is a single transcriptional unit and thus is an operon. Operon cbb1 is divergently transcribed from a gene, cbbR, encoding the LysR-type transcriptional regulator CbbR that has been shown in many organisms to regulate the expression of RubisCO genes. Sigma70-like -10 and -35 promoter boxes and potential CbbR-binding sites (T-N11-A/TNA-N7TNA were predicted in the upstream regions of the four operons. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs confirmed that purified CbbR is able to bind to the upstream regions of the cbb1, cbb2 and cbb3 operons, demonstrating that the predicted CbbR-binding sites are functional in vitro. However, CbbR failed to bind the upstream region of the cbb4 operon that contains cbbP, encoding phosphoribulokinase (EC 2.7.1.19. Thus, other factors not present in the assay may be required for binding or the region lacks a functional CbbR-binding site. The cbb3 operon contains genes predicted to encode anthranilate synthase components I and II, catalyzing the formation of anthranilate and pyruvate from chorismate. This suggests a novel regulatory connection between CO2 fixation and tryptophan biosynthesis. The presence of a form II Rubis

  5. HYDICE data from Lake Tahoe: comparison to coincident AVIRIS and in-situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, Mary E.; Davis, Curtiss O.; Rhea, W. J.

    1996-11-01

    Coordinated flights of two calibrated airborne imaging spectrometers, HYDICE and AVIRIS, were conducted on June 22, 1995 over Lake Tahoe. As part of HYDICE's first operational mission, one objective was to test the system performance over the dark homogeneous target provided by the clear deep waters of the lake. The high altitude and clear atmosphere makes Lake Tahoe a simpler test target than near-shore marine environments, where large aerosols complicate atmospheric correction and sediment runoff and high chlorophyll levels make interpretation of he data difficult. Calibrated data from both runoff and high chlorophyll levels make interpretation of the data difficult. Calibrated data from both sensors was provided in physical units of radiance. The atmospheric radiative transfer code, MODTRAN was used to remove the path radiance between the ground and sensor and the skylight reflected from the water surface. The resulting water-leaving spectrometer, and with values calculated form in-water properties using the HYDROLIGHT radiative transfer code. The agreement of the water-leaving radiance for the HYDICE data, the ground-truth spectral measurements, and the results of the radiative transfer code are excellent for wavelengths greater than 0.45 micrometers . The AVIRIS flight took place more than an hour closer to noon, which makes the radiance measurements not directly comparable. Comparisons to radiative transfer output for this later time indicate that the AVIRIS data is strongly by sun glint. Because water-leaving radiance is dependent upon the characteristics of the water, it can be analyzed for some of those properties. Using the CZCS algorithm based on the water-leaving radiance at two wavelengths, the chlorophyll content of Lake Tahoe was computed from the HYDICE and ground-truth data. Resulting values are slightly higher than measurements made two weeks earlier from water samples, indicating a growth in the phytoplankton population which is very plausible

  6. Leaf Surface Effects on Retrieving Chlorophyll Content from Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feng; Chen, JingMing; Ju, Weimin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Qian

    2017-04-01

    .1 ug/cm2, while mean correlation coefficient is 0.81). Underestimation of high chlorophyll content, which is due to underestimation of reflectance in the visible region of PROSPECT, is partially corrected or alleviated. Improvements are particularly noticeable for leaves with high surface reflectance or high chlorophyll content, which both lead to large proportions of surface reflectance to the total leaf reflectance.

  7. Physiological and genomic features of highly alkaliphilic hydrogen-utilizing Betaproteobacteria from a continental serpentinizing site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shino; Kuenen, J Gijs; Schipper, Kira; van der Velde, Suzanne; Ishii, Shun'ichi; Wu, Angela; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Tenney, Aaron; Meng, XianYing; Morrill, Penny L; Kamagata, Yoichi; Muyzer, Gerard; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2014-05-21

    Serpentinization, or the aqueous alteration of ultramafic rocks, results in challenging environments for life in continental sites due to the combination of extremely high pH, low salinity and lack of obvious electron acceptors and carbon sources. Nevertheless, certain Betaproteobacteria have been frequently observed in such environments. Here we describe physiological and genomic features of three related Betaproteobacterial strains isolated from highly alkaline (pH 11.6) serpentinizing springs at The Cedars, California. All three strains are obligate alkaliphiles with an optimum for growth at pH 11 and are capable of autotrophic growth with hydrogen, calcium carbonate and oxygen. The three strains exhibit differences, however, regarding the utilization of organic carbon and electron acceptors. Their global distribution and physiological, genomic and transcriptomic characteristics indicate that the strains are adapted to the alkaline and calcium-rich environments represented by the terrestrial serpentinizing ecosystems. We propose placing these strains in a new genus 'Serpentinomonas'.

  8. Model ecosystem approach to estimate community level effects of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masahiro, Doi; Nobuyuki, Tanaka; Shoichi, Fuma; Nobuyoshi, Ishii; Hiroshi, Takeda; Zenichiro, Kawabata [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Environmental and Toxicological Sciences Research Group, Chiba (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Mathematical computer model is developed to simulate the population dynamics and dynamic mass budgets of the microbial community realized as a self sustainable aquatic ecological system in the tube. Autotrophic algae, heterotrophic protozoa and sapro-trophic bacteria live symbiotically with inter-species' interactions as predator-prey relationship, competition for the common resource, autolysis of detritus and detritus-grazing food chain, etc. The simulation model is the individual-based parallel model, built in the demographic stochasticity, environmental stochasticity by dividing the aquatic environment into patches. Validity of the model is checked by the multifaceted data of the microcosm experiments. In the analysis, intrinsic parameters of umbrella endpoints (lethality, morbidity, reproductive growth, mutation) are manipulated at the individual level, and tried to find the population level, community level and ecosystem level disorders of ecologically crucial parameters (e.g. intrinsic growth rate, carrying capacity, variation, etc.) that related to the probability of population extinction. (author)

  9. Model ecosystem approach to estimate community level effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masahiro, Doi; Nobuyuki, Tanaka; Shoichi, Fuma; Nobuyoshi, Ishii; Hiroshi, Takeda; Zenichiro, Kawabata

    2004-01-01

    Mathematical computer model is developed to simulate the population dynamics and dynamic mass budgets of the microbial community realized as a self sustainable aquatic ecological system in the tube. Autotrophic algae, heterotrophic protozoa and sapro-trophic bacteria live symbiotically with inter-species' interactions as predator-prey relationship, competition for the common resource, autolysis of detritus and detritus-grazing food chain, etc. The simulation model is the individual-based parallel model, built in the demographic stochasticity, environmental stochasticity by dividing the aquatic environment into patches. Validity of the model is checked by the multifaceted data of the microcosm experiments. In the analysis, intrinsic parameters of umbrella endpoints (lethality, morbidity, reproductive growth, mutation) are manipulated at the individual level, and tried to find the population level, community level and ecosystem level disorders of ecologically crucial parameters (e.g. intrinsic growth rate, carrying capacity, variation, etc.) that related to the probability of population extinction. (author)

  10. Effects on vegetable seeds due to non ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acri, G.; Oliva, A.; Falcone, G. [Universita della Calabria, Dipt. di Fisica, Cosenza (Italy); Acri, G.; Testagrossa, B.; Vermiglio, G.; Tripepi, M.G. [Universita della Calabria, Dipt. di Ecologia, Cosenza (Italy); Bitonti, M.B.; Chiappetta, A. [Universita di Messina, Dipt. di Protezionistica Ambientale, Sanitaria, Sociale ed Industriale, Messina (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Based on the tightly relationship between light and plants growth and development, the present work aims to obtain some further insight into the effects of non ionizing radiation the photo-autotrophic organisms, due to the relevant implications for both scientific knowledge and economical and social effects. In this context, a set of experiments was conducted to investigate the influence of a long-lasting exposition to both RF at 1850 MHz and polarized light source on roots elongation of corn kernels. The radical apparatus was chosen as a sensible parameter and the elongation of the roots was monitored as a function of time. Mitotic index and length of meta-xylem cells were estimated in root apex as an index of cell proliferation and cell expansion activity, respectively. (N.C.)

  11. P2M2: Physical and physiological properties of membrane-aerated and membrane-supported biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles

    ) can enhance biofilm strength under certain conditions. Despite their crucial importance, there is currently no agreement within the scientific community on a protocol that optimizes EPS recovery from microbial samples without significantly compromising the viability of the embedded bacterial cells....... This behaviour was described with the addition of two terms (depending on system characteristics and reactor loading conditions) to existing model structures. In conclusion, we presented control strategies to engineer the microbial communities catalysing autotrophic nitrogen removal in MABRs, proposed methods...... to minimise the risk and effect of bacterial sloughing, and developed novel strategies to characterize, optimize, and better regulate oxygen transfer. Overall, the present work should serve to better design reactors supporting a cleaner, more robust, and cost-effective nitrogen removal. Furthermore, the large...

  12. [Engineering photosynthetic cyanobacterial chassis: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qin; Chen, Lei; Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Weiwen

    2013-08-01

    Photosynthetic cyanobacteria possess a series of good properties, such as their abilities to capture solar energy for CO2 fixation, low nutritional requirements for growth, high growth rate, and relatively simple genetic background. Due to the high oil price and increased concern of the global warming in recent years, cyanobacteria have attracted widespread attention because they can serve as an 'autotrophic microbial factory' for producing renewable biofuels and fine chemicals directly from CO2. Particularly, significant progress has been made in applying synthetic biology techniques and strategies to construct and optimize cyanobacteria chassis. In this article, we critically summarized recent advances in developing new methods to optimize cyanobacteria chassis, improving cyanobacteria photosynthetic efficiency, and in constructing cyanobacteria chassis tolerant to products or environmental stresses. In addition, various industrial applications of cyanobacteria chassis are also discussed.

  13. Predictive isotopic biogeochemistry of lipids from the Black Sea and Cariaco Trench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, K.H.; Hayes, J.M.; Wakeham, S.G.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon isotopic compositions of autotrophic organisms can be predicted based on recently established relationships between [CO 2 (aq)] and var-epsilon p , the isotopic fractionation accompanying carbon fixation. In both the Black Sea and the Cariaco Trench, where [CO 2 (aq)] values are known and δ values for hydrocarbons were recently determined, predicted biomass δ values can be compared to those of biomarkers extracted from POM and sediment samples. The agreement is good, although a 5 per-thousand range in δ values is observed for the lipids, which may be due to ecological factors or to contributions from organisms that assimilate HCO 3 -. Lycopane and pentamethyleicosane apparently derive from planktonic organisms. Diploptene in the Black Sea apparently is derived from chemoautotrophic bacteria living at the oxic/anoxic interface. Some odd-C, long-chain n-alkanes have planktonic δ values, and the authors suggest they are not strict terrestrial indicators

  14. Dry limit to photosynthesis and cyanobacterial spatial pattern in the Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Rhodes, K. A.; Pointing, S. B.; Ewing, S.; Lacap, D.; Gomez-Silva, B.; Amundson, R.; Friedmann, E. I.; McKay, C. P.

    2005-12-01

    Hypolithic autotrophs inhabit translucent rocks in the world`'s most extreme hot and cold deserts. Across a rainfall gradient in the Atacama, we measured a three-fold decline in the molecular diversity of cyanobacterial communities and a drop in their abundance from 28% in relatively wet sites to 0.08% in the driest core. Like plants, hypoliths appear to exhibit traits of self-organized patchiness (aggregated spatial patterns) that tightly correlate with rainfall. Rare cyanobacteria in the core live slowly (3,200 y turnover times) and survive in spatially isolated patches of self-augmented fertility, with the dry limit to their survival occurring at ~Mars but may have existed in rare oases in the past. The spatial distributions of terrestrial desert microbes should be considered in the remote search for life on Mars.

  15. [Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and their important roles in nitrogen biogeochemical cycling: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Wu, Wei-Xiang; Ding, Ying; Shi, De-Zhi; Chen, Ying-Xu

    2010-08-01

    As the first step of nitrification, ammonia oxidation is the key process in global nitrogen biogeochemical cycling. So far, the autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the beta- and gamma-subgroups of proteobacteria have been considered as the most important contributors to ammonia oxidation, but the recent researches indicated that ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are widely distributed in various kinds of ecosystems and quantitatively predominant, playing important roles in the global nitrogen biogeochemical cycling. This paper reviewed the morphological, physiological, and ecological characteristics and the molecular phylogenies of AOA, and compared and analyzed the differences and similarities of the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and its encoding genes between AOA and AOB. In addition, the potential significant roles of AOA in nitrogen biogeochemical cycling in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems were summarized, and the future research directions of AOA in applied ecology and environmental protection were put forward.

  16. Innovative process scheme for removal of organic matter, phosphorus and nitrogen from pig manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    blanket (UASB) reactor, partial oxidation), nitrogen (oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification, OLAND) and phosphorus (phosphorus removal by precipitation as struvite, PRS) from pig manure were tested. Results obtained showed that microfiltration was unsuitable for pig manure treatment....... PRS treated effluent was negatively affecting the further processing of the pig manure in UASB, and was therefore not included in the final process flow scheme. In a final scheme (PIGMAN concept) combination of the following successive process steps was used: thermophilic anaerobic digestion...... with sequential separation by decanter centrifuge, post-digestion in UASB reactor, partial oxidation and finally OLAND process. This combination resulted in reduction of the total organic, nitrogen and phosphorus contents by 96%, 88%, and 81%, respectively....

  17. Next generation biofuel engineering in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronenberg, Luisa S.; Marcheschi, Ryan J.; Liao, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation biofuels must be compatible with current transportation infrastructure and be derived from environmentally sustainable resources that do not compete with food crops. Many bacterial species have unique properties advantageous to the production of such next-generation fuels. However, no single species possesses all characteristics necessary to make high quantities of fuels from plant waste or CO2. Species containing a subset of the desired characteristics are used as starting points for engineering organisms with all desired attributes. Metabolic engineering of model organisms has yielded high titer production of advanced fuels, including alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives. Technical developments now allow engineering of native fuel producers, as well as lignocellulolytic and autotrophic bacteria, for the production of biofuels. Continued research on multiple fronts is required to engineer organisms for truly sustainable and economical biofuel production. PMID:23623045

  18. Enhanced sensitivity to the lethal and mutagenic effects of photosensitizing action of chlorpromazine in ethylenediaminetetraacetate-treated Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, S.; Todo, T.

    1982-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) treatment of Escherichia coli H/r30 (Arg - ) enhanced cell sensitivity to the lethal and mutagenic effects of the photosensitizing action of chlorpromazine (CPZ). The most obvious effect of EDTA on the fluence-survival curve was an elimination of the shoulder. In the absence of EDTA, CPZ plus near-UV radiation did not induce the reversion from arginine-auxotroph to autotroph of E. coli H/r30. However, when EDTA (5 mM)-treated cells were subjected to CPZ plus near-UV radiation, the induced reversion frequency increased with time of irradiation. It is concluded that the enhanced penetration of CPZ into E. coli cells by EDTA facilitates the drug binding to DNA within the cells upon near-UV irradiation and that this is the cause for the enhanced photosensitized lethal and mutagenic effects of CPZ. (author)

  19. Effects of mutation and some environmental factors on the physiology and pathogenicity of selected bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decicco, B. T.

    1974-01-01

    Studies with mutants of Staphylococcus aureus lacking some virulence factors suggest that the presence of deoxyribonuclease correlates with mouse pathogenicity of S. aureus, while the ability to ferment mannitol or the possession of coagulases are not required for virulence. Autotrophy investigations on mycobacteria demonstrate a complete correlation between the ability to grow with hydrogen and the species of scotochromogenic mycobacterium tested. All tested strains of M. gordonae, a saprophyte, could grow autotrophically while none of the tested strains of M. scrofulaceum, a clinically important species, possessed this ability. A series of heat tolerant mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescences were obtained which can grow at temperatures up to 54 C, in contrast to a maximum growth temperature of 37 C for the wild type.

  20. A Tyrosine-Dependent Riboswitch Controls the Expression of a Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetase from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Bustamante

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Expression of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is regulated by a variety of mechanisms at the level of transcription or translation. A T-box dependent transcription termination / antitermination riboswitch system that responds to charged / uncharged tRNA regulates expression of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase genes in Gram-positive bacteria. TyrZ, the gene encoding tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, a Gram-negative acidophilic bacterium that participates in bioleaching of minerals, resembles the gene from Bacillus subtilis including the 5´-untranslated region encoding the riboswitch. Transcription of A. ferrooxidans tyrZ is induced by the presence of tyrosine by a mechanism involving antitermination of transcription. This mechanism is probably adapted to the low supply of amino acids of acidic environments of autotrophic bioleaching microorganisms. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.