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Sample records for high-amplitude theta bursts

  1. High amplitude theta wave bursts: a novel electroencephalographic feature of rem sleep and cataplexy.

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    Lo Martire, Viviana Carmen; Bastianini, Stefano; Berteotti, Chiara; Silvani, Alessandro; Zoccoli, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    High amplitude theta wave bursts (HATs) were originally described during REMS and cataplexy in ORX-deficient mice as a novel neurophysiological correlate of narcolepsy (Bastianini et al., 2012). This finding was replicated the following year by Vassalli et al. in both ORX-deficient narcoleptic mice and narcoleptic children during cataplexy episodes (Vassalli et al., 2013). The relationship between HATs and narcolepsy-cataplexy in mice and patients indicates that the lack of ORX peptides is responsible for this abnormal EEG activity, the physiological meaning of which is still unknown. This review aimed to explore different phasic EEG events previously described in the published literature in order to find analogies and differences with HATs observed in narcoleptic mice and patients. We found similarities in terms of morphology, frequency and duration between HATs and several physiological (mu and wicket rhythms, sleep spindles, saw-tooth waves) or pathological (SWDs, HVSs, bursts of polyphasic complexes EEG complexes reported in a mouse model of CJD, and BSEs) EEG events. However, each of these events also shows significant differences from HATs, and thus cannot be equaled to them. The available evidence thus suggests that HATs are a novel neurophysiological phenomenon. Further investigations on HATs are required in order to investigate their physiological meaning, to individuate their brain structure(s) of origin, and to clarify the neural circuits involved in their manifestation.

  2. Thalamic Bursts Down-regulate Cortical Theta and Nociceptive Behavior.

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    LeBlanc, Brian W; Cross, Brent; Smith, Kelsey A; Roach, Catherine; Xia, Jimmy; Chao, Yu-Chieh; Levitt, Joshua; Koyama, Suguru; Moore, Christopher I; Saab, Carl Y

    2017-05-30

    We tested the relation between pain behavior, theta (4-8 Hz) oscillations in somatosensory cortex and burst firing in thalamic neurons in vivo. Optically-induced thalamic bursts attenuated cortical theta and mechanical allodynia. It is proposed that thalamic bursts are an adaptive response to pain that de-synchronizes cortical theta and decreases sensory salience.

  3. Continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation affects brain functional connectivity.

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    Dan Cao; Yingjie Li; Ling Wei; Yingying Tang

    2016-08-01

    Prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays an important role in the emotional processing as well as in the functional brain network. Hyperactivity in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) would be found in anxious participants. However, it is still unclear what the role of PFC played in a resting functional network. Continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (cTBS) is an effective tool to create virtual lesions on brain regions. In this paper, we applied cTBS over right prefrontal area, and investigated the effects of cTBS on the brain activity for functional connectivity by the method of graph theory. We recorded 64-channels EEG on thirteen healthy participants in the resting condition and emotional tasks before and after 40 s of cTBS. This work focused on the effect of cTBS on cortical activities in the resting condition by calculating the coherence between EEG channels and building functional networks before and after cTBS in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands. Results revealed that 1) The functional connectivity after cTBS was significantly increased compared with that before cTBS in delta, theta, alpha and beta bands in the resting condition; 2) The efficiency-cost reached the maximum before and after cTBS both with the cost about 0.3 in the bands above, which meant that the information transmission of functional brain network with this cost was highly efficient; 3) the clustering coefficient and path length after cTBS was significantly increased in delta, theta and beta bands. In conclusion, cTBS over PFC indeed enhanced the functional connectivity in the resting condition. In addition, the information transmission in the resting brain network was highly efficient with the cost about 0.3.

  4. Simultaneous application of slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation and theta burst stimulation prolongs continuous theta burst stimulation-induced suppression of corticomotor excitability in humans.

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    Doeltgen, Sebastian H; McAllister, Suzanne M; Ridding, Michael C

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether the simultaneous application of slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation enhances the neuroplastic response to transcranial magnetic theta burst stimulation. Motor evoked potential amplitude was assessed at baseline and at regular intervals up to 60 min following continuous theta burst stimulation, slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation, and the simultaneous application of these paradigms. In addition, the electroencephalographic power spectra of slow and fast delta, and theta frequency bands recorded over the motor cortex were analyzed prior to and up to 5 min following each intervention. There was longer-lasting motor evoked potential suppression following the simultaneous application of continuous theta burst stimulation and slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation compared with when continuous theta burst stimulation was applied alone. Slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation applied alone did not modulate the motor evoked potential amplitude. No significant changes in spectral power were observed following slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation. Simultaneous application of continuous theta burst stimulation and slow-oscillation transcranial direct current stimulation may provide an approach to prolong the induction of neuroplastic changes in motor cortical circuits by repetitive transcranial magnetic brain stimulation.

  5. Continuous theta-burst stimulation modulates tactile synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Temporal order judgement (TOJ) is the ability to detect the order of occurrence of two sequentially delivered stimuli. Previous research has shown that TOJ in the presence of synchronized periodic conditioning stimuli impairs TOJ performance, and this phenomenon is suggested to be mediated by GABAergic interneurons that cause perceptual binding across the two skin sites. Application of continuous theta-burst repetitive TMS (cTBS) over primary somatosensory cortex (SI) alters temporal and spatial tactile perception. The purpose of this study was to examine TOJ perception in the presence and absence of synchronized periodic conditioning stimuli before and after cTBS applied over left-hemisphere SI. A TOJ task was administered on the right index and middle finger (D2 and D3) in two separate sessions in the presence and absence of conditioning stimuli (a background low amplitude sinusoidal vibration). Results CTBS reduced the impact of the conditioning stimuli on TOJ performance for up to 18 minutes following stimulation while sham cTBS did not affect TOJ performance. In contrast, the TOJ task performed in the absence of synchronized conditioning stimulation was unaltered following cTBS. Conclusion We conclude that cTBS suppresses inhibitory networks in SI that mediate perceptual binding during TOJ synchronization. CTBS offers one method to suppress cortical excitability in the cortex and potentially benefit clinical populations with altered inhibitory cortical circuits. Additionally, TOJ measures with conditioning stimuli may provide an avenue to assess sensory processing in neurologically impaired patient populations. PMID:23968301

  6. Bilateral theta-burst TMS to influence global gestalt perception.

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    Ritzinger, Bernd; Huberle, Elisabeth; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2012-01-01

    While early and higher visual areas along the ventral visual pathway in the inferotemporal cortex are critical for the recognition of individual objects, the neural representation of human perception of complex global visual scenes remains under debate. Stroke patients with a selective deficit in the perception of a complex global Gestalt with intact recognition of individual objects - a deficit termed simultanagnosia - greatly helped to study this question. Interestingly, simultanagnosia typically results from bilateral lesions of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). The present study aimed to verify the relevance of this area for human global Gestalt perception. We applied continuous theta-burst TMS either unilaterally (left or right) or bilateral simultaneously over TPJ. Healthy subjects were presented with hierarchically organized visual stimuli that allowed parametrical degrading of the object at the global level. Identification of the global Gestalt was significantly modulated only for the bilateral TPJ stimulation condition. Our results strengthen the view that global Gestalt perception in the human brain involves TPJ and is co-dependent on both hemispheres.

  7. Bilateral theta-burst TMS to influence global gestalt perception.

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    Bernd Ritzinger

    Full Text Available While early and higher visual areas along the ventral visual pathway in the inferotemporal cortex are critical for the recognition of individual objects, the neural representation of human perception of complex global visual scenes remains under debate. Stroke patients with a selective deficit in the perception of a complex global Gestalt with intact recognition of individual objects - a deficit termed simultanagnosia - greatly helped to study this question. Interestingly, simultanagnosia typically results from bilateral lesions of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ. The present study aimed to verify the relevance of this area for human global Gestalt perception. We applied continuous theta-burst TMS either unilaterally (left or right or bilateral simultaneously over TPJ. Healthy subjects were presented with hierarchically organized visual stimuli that allowed parametrical degrading of the object at the global level. Identification of the global Gestalt was significantly modulated only for the bilateral TPJ stimulation condition. Our results strengthen the view that global Gestalt perception in the human brain involves TPJ and is co-dependent on both hemispheres.

  8. Theta, alpha and beta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation: brain modulation in tinnitus

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    Dirk De Ridder, Elsa van der Loo, Karolien Van der Kelen, Tomas Menovsky, Paul van de Heyning, Aage Moller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some forms of tinnitus are considered to be auditory phantom phenomena related to reorganization and hyperactivity of the auditory central nervous system. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a non-invasive tool capable of modulating human brain activity, using single pulse or burst stimuli. Burst rTMS has only been performed in the theta range, and has not been used clinically. The authors analyze whether burst TMS at theta (5 Hz, alpha (10 Hz and beta (20 Hz frequencies can temporarily suppress narrow band noise/white noise tinnitus, which has been demonstrated to be intractable to tonic stimulation. Methods: rTMS is performed both in tonic and burst mode in 46 patients contralateral to the tinnitus side, at 5, 10 and 20 Hz. Fourteen placebo negative rTMS responders are further analyzed. Results: In 5 patients, maximal tinnitus suppression is obtained with theta, in 2 with alpha and in 7 with beta burst stimulation. Burst rTMS suppresses narrow band/white tinnitus much better than tonic rTMS t(13=6.4, p<.000. Women experience greater suppression of their tinnitus with burst stimulation than men, t(12=2.9, p<.05. Furthermore left sided tinnitus is perceived as more distressing on the TQ than right sided tinnitus, t(12=3.2, p<.01. The lower the tinnitus pitch the more effectively rTMS suppresses tinnitus(r=-0.65, p<0.05. Discussion: Burst rTMS can be used clinically, not only theta burst, but also alpha and beta burst. Burst rTMS is capable of suppressing narrow band/white noise tinnitus very much better than tonic rTMS. This could be due the simple fact that burst neuromodulation is more powerful than tonic neuromodulation or to a differential effect of burst and tonic stimulation on the lemniscal and extralemniscal auditory system. In some patients only alpha or beta burst rTMS is capable of suppressing tinnitus, and theta burst not. Therefore in future rTMS studies it could be worthwhile not to limit burst

  9. Continuous Theta-Burst Stimulation Demonstrates a Causal Role of Premotor Homunculus in Action Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, John; Sandberg, Kristian; Skewes, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well established that regions of premotor cortex (PMC) are active during action observation, it remains controversial whether they play a causal role in action understanding. In the experiment reported here, we used offline continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) to investigate...

  10. Continuous Theta-Burst Stimulation Demonstrates a Causal Role of Premotor Homunculus in Action Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, John; Sandberg, Kristian; Skewes, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well established that regions of premotor cortex (PMC) are active during action observation, it remains controversial whether they play a causal role in action understanding. In the experiment reported here, we used offline continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) to investigate t...

  11. Hidden focal EEG seizures during prolonged suppressions and high-amplitude bursts in early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

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    Al-Futaisi, Amna; Banwell, Brenda; Ochi, Ayako; Hew, Justine; Chu, Bill; Oishi, Makoto; Otsubo, Hiroshi

    2005-05-01

    We report on a 27-month-old female with atypical early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE), who developed tonic spasms, partial seizures and myoclonic jerks along with episodic bradycardia at 5 days. We recorded digital electroencephalography (EEG) using either an 11-channel neonatal montage or 19 channel scalp electrodes, at 200 Hz sampling rate, and a single reference for a minimum of 30 min. At 18 days EEG showed suppression-burst (SB) patterns during wakefulness and sleep. Tonic spasms concomitant with bursts recorded as brief, low-amplitude fast waves. EEG at 8 months showed increased amplitude of bursts to 1 mV and extension of suppression periods to 65 s. By increasing recording sensitivity, we detected focal epileptiform discharges of slow rhythmic sharp and slow waves building to 30 microV during suppression periods. Status epilepticus occurred at 16 months. EEG at 27 months returned to the previous SB pattern with rare partial seizures. This report is the first to demonstrate clinically silent focal EEG seizures during prolonged suppression periods in atypical EIEE by off-line digital EEG. Digital EEG sensitivity can reveal covert electrical activity during suppression periods in epileptic neonates and infants.

  12. The Application of Theta Burst Stimulation in Negative Symptoms of Patients with Schizophrenia

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    Reza Kazemi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this research is study of theta burst stimulation on left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in remission of negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.Materials and Methods: In a placebo, double blind and randomized study, 10 patients with schizophrenia assigned in experimental and control group. The experimental group received 20 sessions of TBS with 50 Hz frequency, but control group were treated just with sham coil. All the patients were appraised before, the 10th sessions and after the treatment. The treatment efficacy was calculated with ANOVA.Results: The results indicated that the experimental group had statistical difference to control group in negative symptoms (p>0.007 and social functioning (p>0.01. But there weren’t any significant difference in quality of life and depression between two groups.Conclusion: Theta burst stimulation can be mentioned as an efficacious treatment for people with schizophrenia.

  13. Effects of theta burst stimulation on referred phantom sensations in patients with spinal cord injury.

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    Nardone, Raffaele; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Höller, Yvonne; Taylor, Alexandra C; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-03-02

    To further explore the mechanisms underlying cortical reorganization in patients with phantom sensations after deafferentation, a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation study was carried out in two patients with referred phantom sensations (RPS) after incomplete spinal cord injury at the thoracic level. We delivered continuous (inhibitory), intermittent (excitatory), and placebo theta burst stimulation to the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1), primary somatosensory cortex (S1), and secondary somatosensory cortex (S2). Perception of RPS was significantly and transiently disrupted by inhibitory theta burst stimulation applied over S1 and, to a lesser extent, S2. This study supports the hypothesis that RPS depend on remapping in the somatosensory cortex and provides further electrophysiological evidence in vivo that cortical reorganizational processes are critically modulated by GABAergic mechanisms. Enhancement of GABAergic activity may block cortical reorganization, leading to RPS in spinal cord injury patients.

  14. Theta burst stimulation reduces disability during the activities of daily living in spatial neglect.

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    Cazzoli, Dario; Müri, René M; Schumacher, Rahel; von Arx, Sebastian; Chaves, Silvia; Gutbrod, Klemens; Bohlhalter, Stephan; Bauer, Daniel; Vanbellingen, Tim; Bertschi, Manuel; Kipfer, Stefan; Rosenthal, Clive R; Kennard, Christopher; Bassetti, Claudio L; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Left-sided spatial neglect is a common neurological syndrome following right-hemispheric stroke. The presence of spatial neglect is a powerful predictor of poor rehabilitation outcome. In one influential account of spatial neglect, interhemispheric inhibition is impaired and leads to a pathological hyperactivity in the contralesional hemisphere, resulting in a biased attentional allocation towards the right hemifield. Inhibitory transcranial magnetic stimulation can reduce the hyperactivity of the contralesional, intact hemisphere and thereby improve spatial neglect symptoms. However, it is not known whether this improvement is also relevant to the activities of daily living during spontaneous behaviour. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate whether the repeated application of continuous theta burst stimulation trains could ameliorate spatial neglect on a quantitative measure of the activities of daily living during spontaneous behaviour. We applied the Catherine Bergego Scale, a standardized observation questionnaire that can validly and reliably detect the presence and severity of spatial neglect during the activities of daily living. Eight trains of continuous theta burst stimulation were applied over two consecutive days on the contralesional, left posterior parietal cortex in patients suffering from subacute left spatial neglect, in a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled design, which also included a control group of neglect patients without stimulation. The results showed a 37% improvement in the spontaneous everyday behaviour of the neglect patients after the repeated application of continuous theta burst stimulation. Remarkably, the improvement persisted for at least 3 weeks after stimulation. The amelioration of spatial neglect symptoms in the activities of daily living was also generally accompanied by significantly better performance in the neuropsychological tests. No significant amelioration in symptoms was observed after sham

  15. Continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) on left cerebellar hemisphere affects mental rotation tasks during music listening

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Picazio, Silvia; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    ...) mental rotation tasks of subjects listening Mozart Sonata K.448, which is reported to improve spatial-temporal reasoning, in the presence or in the absence of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS...

  16. Continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (cTBS) on Left Cerebellar Hemisphere Affects Mental Rotation Tasks during Music Listening: e64640

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silvia Picazio; Massimiliano Oliveri; Giacomo Koch; Carlo Caltagirone; Laura Petrosini

    2013-01-01

    ...) mental rotation tasks of subjects listening Mozart Sonata K.448, which is reported to improve spatial-temporal reasoning, in the presence or in the absence of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS...

  17. Priming theta-burst repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with low- and high-frequency stimulation.

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    Todd, Gabrielle; Flavel, Stanley C; Ridding, Michael C

    2009-05-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can be used to study metaplasticity in human motor cortex. The term metaplasticity describes a phenomenon where the prior synaptic history of a pathway can affect the subsequent induction of long-term potentiation or depression. In the current study, we investigated metaplasticity in human motor cortex with the use of inhibitory continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS). cTBS involves short bursts of high frequency (50 Hz) rTMS applied every 200 ms for 40 s. In the first series of experiments, cTBS was primed with 10 min of intermittent 2 or 6 Hz rTMS. Subjects (n = 20) received priming stimulation at 70% of active motor threshold or 90% of resting motor threshold. In another series of experiments, cTBS was primed with excitatory intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS). iTBS involves a 2 s train of theta-burst stimulation delivered every 10 s for 190 s. Stimuli were delivered over the first dorsal interosseus motor area.. The effect of cTBS alone and primed cTBS on motor cortical excitability was investigated by recording motor-evoked potentials (MEP) in the first dorsal interosseus following single-pulse TMS. MEP area in the cTBS alone condition was not significantly different from cTBS primed with 2 or 6 Hz rTMS. However, priming cTBS with iTBS suppressed MEP area to a greater extent than in cTBS alone. Our results provide further evidence of metaplasticity in human motor cortex when appropriate priming protocols are employed.

  18. Is theta burst stimulation applied to visual cortex able to modulate peripheral visual acuity?

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    Sabrina Brückner

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is usually applied to visual cortex to explore the effects on cortical excitability. Most researchers therefore concentrate on changes of phosphene threshold, rarely on consequences for visual performance. Thus, we investigated peripheral visual acuity in the four quadrants of the visual field using Landolt C optotypes before and after repetitive stimulation of the visual cortex. We applied continuous and intermittend theta burst stimulation with various stimulation intensities (60%, 80%, 100%, 120% of individual phosphene threshold as well as monophasic and biphasic 1 Hz stimulation, respectively. As an important result, no serious adverse effects were observed. In particular, no seizure was induced, even with theta burst stimulation applied with 120% of individual phosphene threshold. In only one case stimulation was ceased because the subject reported intolerable pain. Baseline visual acuity decreased over sessions, indicating a continuous training effect. Unexpectedly, none of the applied transcranial magnetic stimulation protocols had an effect on performance: no change in visual acuity was found in any of the four quadrants of the visual field. Binocular viewing as well as the use of peripheral instead of foveal presentation of the stimuli might have contributed to this result. Furthermore, intraindividual variability could have masked the TMS- induced effects on visual acuity.

  19. The Predictive Nature of Pseudoneglect for Visual Neglect: Evidence from Parietal Theta Burst Stimulation.

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    Alice Varnava

    Full Text Available Following parietal damage most patients with visual neglect bisect horizontal lines significantly away from the true centre. Neurologically intact individuals also misbisect lines; a phenomenon referred to as 'pseudoneglect'. In this study we examined the relationship between neglect and pseudoneglect by testing how patterns of pre-existing visuospatial asymmetry predict asymmetry caused by parietal interference. Twenty-four participants completed line bisection and Landmark tasks before receiving continuous theta burst stimulation to the left or right angular gyrus. Results showed that a pre-existing pattern of left pseudoneglect (i.e. right bias, but not right pseudoneglect, predicts left neglect-like behaviour during line bisection following right parietal cTBS. This correlation is consistent with the view that neglect and pseudoneglect arise via a common or linked neural mechanism.

  20. Neglect-like visual exploration behaviour after theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation of the right posterior parietal cortex.

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    Nyffeler, Thomas; Cazzoli, Dario; Wurtz, Pascal; Lüthi, Mathias; von Wartburg, Roman; Chaves, Silvia; Déruaz, Anouk; Hess, Christian W; Müri, René M

    2008-04-01

    The right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is critically involved in visual exploration behaviour, and damage to this area may lead to neglect of the left hemispace. We investigated whether neglect-like visual exploration behaviour could be induced in healthy subjects using theta burst repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). To this end, one continuous train of theta burst rTMS was applied over the right PPC in 12 healthy subjects prior to a visual exploration task where colour photographs of real-life scenes were presented on a computer screen. In a control experiment, stimulation was also applied over the vertex. Eye movements were measured, and the distribution of visual fixations in the left and right halves of the screen was analysed. In comparison to the performance of 28 control subjects without stimulation, theta burst rTMS over the right PPC, but not the vertex, significantly decreased cumulative fixation duration in the left screen-half and significantly increased cumulative fixation duration in the right screen-half for a time period of 30 min. These results suggest that theta burst rTMS is a reliable method of inducing transient neglect-like visual exploration behaviour.

  1. Transient Beneficial Effects of Excitatory Theta Burst Stimulation in a Patient with Phonological Agraphia after Left Supramarginal Gyrus Infarction

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    Nardone, Raffaele; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Zuccoli, Giulio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2012-01-01

    We report a patient showing isolated phonological agraphia after an ischemic stroke involving the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG). In this patient, we investigated the effects of focal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) given as theta burst stimulation (TBS) over the left SMG, corresponding to the Brodmann area (BA) 40. The patient…

  2. The Contribution of Primary Motor Cortex Is Essential for Probabilistic Implicit Sequence Learning: Evidence from Theta Burst Magnetic Stimulation

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    Wilkinson, Leonora; Teo, James T.; Obeso, Ignacio; Rothwell, John C.; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2010-01-01

    Theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TBS) is considered to produce plastic changes in human motor cortex. Here, we examined the inhibitory and excitatory effects of TBS on implicit sequence learning using a probabilistic serial reaction time paradigm. We investigated the involvement of several cortical regions associated with implicit…

  3. Interindividual Variability and Intraindividual Reliability of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation-induced Neuroplasticity Mechanisms in the Healthy Brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilberg, Lukas; Schuhmann, Teresa; Sack, Alexander T

    2017-01-01

    We combined patterned TMS with EMG in several sessions of a within-subject design to assess and characterize intraindividual reliability and interindividual variability of TMS-induced neuroplasticity mechanisms in the healthy brain. Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) was applied over M1 to

  4. Transient Beneficial Effects of Excitatory Theta Burst Stimulation in a Patient with Phonological Agraphia after Left Supramarginal Gyrus Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Zuccoli, Giulio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2012-01-01

    We report a patient showing isolated phonological agraphia after an ischemic stroke involving the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG). In this patient, we investigated the effects of focal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) given as theta burst stimulation (TBS) over the left SMG, corresponding to the Brodmann area (BA) 40. The patient…

  5. Combined transcranial alternating current stimulation and continuous theta burst stimulation: a novel approach for neuroplasticity induction.

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    Goldsworthy, Mitchell R; Vallence, Ann-Maree; Yang, Ruiting; Pitcher, Julia B; Ridding, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation can induce functionally relevant plasticity in the human cortex, making it potentially useful as a therapeutic tool. However, the induced changes are highly variable between individuals, potentially limiting research and clinical utility. One factor that might contribute to this variability is the level of cortical inhibition at the time of stimulation. The alpha rhythm (~ 8-13 Hz) recorded with electroencephalography (EEG) is thought to reflect pulsatile cortical inhibition; therefore, targeting non-invasive brain stimulation to particular phases of the alpha rhythm may provide an approach to enhance plasticity induction. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has been shown to entrain cortical oscillations in a frequency-specific manner. We investigated whether the neuroplastic response to continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) was enhanced by timing bursts of stimuli to the peak or the trough of a tACS-imposed alpha rhythm. While motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were unaffected when cTBS was applied in-phase with the peak of the tACS-imposed oscillation, MEP depression was enhanced when cTBS was applied in-phase with the trough. This enhanced MEP depression was dependent on the individual peak frequency of the endogenous alpha rhythm recorded with EEG prior to stimulation, and was strongest in those participants classified as non-responders to standard cTBS. These findings suggest that tACS may be used in combination with cTBS to enhance the plasticity response. Furthermore, the peak frequency of endogenous alpha, as measured with EEG, may be used as a simple marker to pre-select those individuals likely to benefit from this approach.

  6. Direct-current-dependent shift of theta-burst-induced plasticity in the human motor cortex.

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    Hasan, Alkomiet; Hamada, Masashi; Nitsche, Michael A; Ruge, Diane; Galea, Joseph M; Wobrock, Thomas; Rothwell, John C

    2012-03-01

    Animal studies using polarising currents have shown that induction of synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) by bursts of patterned stimulation is affected by the membrane potential of the postsynaptic neurone. The aim of the present experiments was to test whether it is possible to observe similar phenomena in humans with the aim of improving present protocols of inducing synaptic plasticity for therapeutic purposes. We tested whether the LTP/LTD-like after effects of transcranial theta-burst stimulation (TBS) of human motor cortex, an analogue of patterned electrical stimulation in animals, were affected by simultaneous transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS), a non-invasive method of polarising cortical neurones in humans. Nine healthy volunteers were investigated in a single-blind, balanced cross-over study; continuous TBS (cTBS) was used to introduce LTD-like after effects, whereas intermittent TBS (iTBS) produced LTP-like effects. Each pattern was coupled with concurrent application of tDCS (motor thresholds and intracortical inhibitory/facilitatory networks were not altered by any of the stimulation protocols. We conclude that the after effects of TBS can be modulated by concurrent tDCS. We hypothesise that tDCS changes the membrane potential of the apical dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurones and that this changes the response to patterned synaptic input evoked by TBS. The data show that it may be possible to enhance LTP-like plasticity after TBS in the human cortex.

  7. High visual demand following theta burst stimulation modulates the effect on visual cortex excitability.

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    Brückner, Sabrina; Kammer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Modulatory effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) depend on the activity of the stimulated cortical area before, during, and even after application. In the present study, we investigated the effects of theta burst stimulation (TBS) on visual cortex excitability using phosphene threshold (PTs). In a between-group design either continuous or intermittent TBS was applied with 100% of individual PT intensity. We varied visual demand following stimulation in form of high demand (acuity task) or low demand (looking at the wall). No change of PTs was observed directly after TBS. We found increased PTs only if subjects had high visual demand following continuous TBS. With low visual demand following stimulation no change of PT was observed. Intermittent TBS had no effect on visual cortex excitability at all. Since other studies showed increased PTs following continuous TBS using subthreshold intensities, our results highlight the importance of stimulation intensity applying TBS to the visual cortex. Furthermore, the state of the neurons in the stimulated cortex area not only before but also following TBS has an important influence on the effects of stimulation, making it necessary to scrupulously control for activity during the whole experimental session in a study.

  8. The effects of theta-burst stimulation on vigilance in humans

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    Armand eMensen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation has become a popular tool to modulate neuronal networks and associated brain functions in both clinical and basic research. Yet few studies have examined the potential effects of cortical stimulation on general levels of vigilance. In this exploratory study, we used theta-burst protocols, both continuous (cTBS and intermittent (iTBS patterns, to examine whether inhibition or excitation of the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC was able to induce reliable and acute changes to vigilance measures, compared to the left dorso-lateral associative visual cortex (dlAVC as a control site in line with previous work. Partially sleep restricted participants underwent four separate sessions in a single day, in a between subjects design for TBS stimulation type and within subjects for locaton, each consisting of maintenance of wakefulness test, a sleep latency test, and a psychomotor vigilance task. TBS significantly affected measures of sleep consolidation, namely latency to sleep stage 2 and sleep efficiency, but had no effects on sleep drive or psychomotor vigilance levels for either TBS type or location. Contrary to our initial hypothesis of the dlAVC as a control site, stimulation to this region resulted in the largest differential effects between stimulation types. Moreover, the effect of TBS was found to be consistent throughout the day. These data may provide the basis for further investigation into therapeutic applications of TBS in sleep disorders.

  9. Short theta burst stimulation to left frontal cortex prior to encoding enhances subsequent recognition memory.

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    Demeter, Elise; Mirdamadi, Jasmine L; Meehan, Sean K; Taylor, Stephan F

    2016-08-01

    Deep semantic encoding of verbal stimuli can aid in later successful retrieval of those stimuli from long-term episodic memory. Evidence from numerous neuropsychological and neuroimaging experiments demonstrate regions in left prefrontal cortex, including left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), are important for processes related to encoding. Here, we investigated the relationship between left DLPFC activity during encoding and successful subsequent memory with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In a pair of experiments using a 2-session within-subjects design, we stimulated either left DLPFC or a control region (Vertex) with a single 2-s train of short theta burst stimulation (sTBS) during a semantic encoding task and then gave participants a recognition memory test. We found that subsequent memory was enhanced on the day left DLPFC was stimulated, relative to the day Vertex was stimulated, and that DLPFC stimulation also increased participants' confidence in their decisions during the recognition task. We also explored the time course of how long the effects of sTBS persisted. Our data suggest 2 s of sTBS to left DLPFC is capable of enhancing subsequent memory for items encoded up to 15 s following stimulation. Collectively, these data demonstrate sTBS is capable of enhancing long-term memory and provide evidence that TBS protocols are a potentially powerful tool for modulating cognitive function.

  10. Facilitation of Fast Backward Priming After Left Cerebellar Continuous Theta-Burst Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Walker, Louise S T; Bracewell, R Martyn; Thierry, Guillaume; Mari-Beffa, Paloma

    2017-09-05

    Traditional theories of backward priming account only for the priming effects found at long stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). Here, we suggest that the presence of backward priming at short SOAs may be related to the integrative role of the cerebellum. Previous research has shown that the right cerebellum is involved in forward associative priming. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals some activation of the left cerebellar hemisphere during backward priming; but what this activation represents is unclear. Here we explore this issue using continuous theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (cTBS) and associative priming in a lexical decision task. We tested the hypothesis that the left cerebellum plays a role in backward priming and that this is dissociated from the role of the right cerebellum in forward priming. Before and after cTBS was applied to their left and right cerebellar hemispheres, participants completed a lexical decision task. Although we did not replicate the forward priming effect reported in the literature, we did find a significant increase in backward priming after left relative to right cerebellar cTBS. We consider how theories of cerebellar function in the motor domain can be extended to language and cognitive models of backward priming.

  11. Theta burst stimulation in the treatment of incapacitating tinnitus accompanied by severe depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekadar, Surjo R; Arfeller, Carola; Rilk, Albrecht; Plontke, Stefan K; Plewnia, Christian

    2009-04-01

    This case report describes the use of transcranial magnetic theta burst stimulation (TBS) in the treatment of incapacitating tinnitus accompanied by symptoms of severe depression. Tinnitus is known to be associated with hyperactivity and maladaptive cortical reorganization of the central auditory system. Combined with anxiety and depression, it can occasionally constitute a psychiatric emergency. Recently, it has been demonstrated that tinnitus can be temporarily suppressed by non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation. TBS is a newly developed technique for rapid and lasting modulation of cortical excitability. Herein, we present a case of a 54-year-old woman with incapacitating tinnitus that has significantly decreased after three cycles of 1-week treatment with continuous TBS to the temporo-parietal auditory association cortex. According to the Tinnitus Questionnaire, tinnitus intensity decreased from 84 points before to 59 points after treatment. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score dropped from 44 to 23 points. TBS showed to be efficient, well-tolerated, and practical in the management of distressing tinnitus accompanied by symptoms of severe depression.

  12. Interhemispheric Plasticity following Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Chronic Poststroke Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C. Griffis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of noninvasive neurostimulation on brain structure and function in chronic poststroke aphasia are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS applied to residual language-responsive cortex in chronic patients using functional and anatomical MRI data acquired before and after iTBS. Lateralization index (LI analyses, along with comparisons of inferior frontal gyrus (IFG activation and connectivity during covert verb generation, were used to assess changes in cortical language function. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM was used to assess effects on regional grey matter (GM. LI analyses revealed a leftward shift in IFG activity after treatment. While left IFG activation increased, right IFG activation decreased. Changes in right to left IFG connectivity during covert verb generation also decreased after iTBS. Behavioral correlations revealed a negative relationship between changes in right IFG activation and improvements in fluency. While anatomical analyses did not reveal statistically significant changes in grey matter volume, the fMRI results provide evidence for changes in right and left IFG function after iTBS. The negative relationship between post-iTBS changes in right IFG activity during covert verb generation and improvements in fluency suggests that iTBS applied to residual left-hemispheric language areas may reduce contralateral responses related to language production and facilitate recruitment of residual language areas after stroke.

  13. Effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation on spasticity after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Langthaler, Patrick B; Orioli, Andrea; Höller, Peter; Höller, Yvonne; Frey, Vanessa N; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2017-01-01

    Spasticity is a common disorder in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of this study was to investigate whether intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS), a safe, non-invasive and well-tolerated protocol of excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), is effective in modulating spasticity in SCI patients. In this randomized, double-blind, crossover, sham-controlled study, ten subjects with incomplete cervical or thoracic SCI received 10 days of daily sessions of real or sham iTBS. The H/M amplitude ratio of the Soleus H reflex, the amplitude of the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) at rest and during background contraction, as well as Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and the Spinal Cord Injury Assessment Tool for Spasticity (SCAT) were compared before and after the stimulation protocols. Patients receiving real iTBS showed significant increased resting and active MEPs amplitude and a significant reduction of the H/M amplitude ratio. In these patients also the MAS and SCAT scores were significantly reduced after treatment. These changes persisted up to 1 week after the end of the iTBS treatment, and were not observed under the sham-TBS condition. These findings suggest that iTBS may be a promising therapeutic tool for the spasticity in SCI patients.

  14. Continuous theta-burst stimulation of the primary motor cortex in essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellriegel, Helge; Schulz, Eva M; Siebner, Hartwig R; Deuschl, Günther; Raethjen, Jan H

    2012-05-01

    We investigated whether essential tremor (ET) can be altered by suppressing the corticospinal excitability in the primary motor cortex (M1) with transcranial magnetic stimulation. 10 Patients with ET and 10 healthy controls underwent transcranial continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) of the left primary motor hand area at 80% (real cTBS) and 30% (control cTBS) of active motor threshold in two separate sessions at least one week apart. Postural tremor was rated clinically and measured accelerometrically before and after cTBS. Corticospinal excitability was assessed by recording the motor evoked potentials (MEP) from the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Real cTBS but not control cTBS reduced the tremor total power assessed with accelerometry. This beneficial effect was subclinical as there were no significant changes in clinical tremor rating after real cTBS. Relative to control cTBS, real cTBS reduced corticospinal excitability in the stimulated primary motor cortex only in healthy controls but not in ET patients. Real cTBS has a beneficial effect on ET. Since cTBS did not induce a parallel reduction in corticospinal excitability, this effect was not mediated by a suppression of the corticospinal motor output. "Inhibitory" cTBS of M1 leads to a consistent but subclinical reduction in tremor amplitude. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Continuous theta-burst stimulation over primary somatosensory cortex modulates short-latency afferent inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Philemon; Jacobs, Mark F; Lee, Kevin G H; Asmussen, Michael J; Zapallow, Christopher M; Nelson, Aimee J

    2014-11-01

    The present study investigated the effects of continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) over primary somatosensory (SI) and motor (M1) cortices on motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) and short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI). MEPs and SAI were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle of the right hand following 30Hz cTBS over left-hemisphere SI and M1 delivered to the same participants in separate sessions. Measurements were taken before and up to 60min following cTBS. CTBS over M1 suppressed MEPs and did not alter SAI. In contrast cTBS over SI facilitated MEPs and decreased median and digital nerve evoked SAI. These findings indicate that SAI amplitude is influenced by cTBS over SI but not M1, suggesting an important role for SI in the modulation of this circuit. These data provide further evidence that cTBS over SI versus M1 has opposite effects on corticospinal excitability. To date, plasticity-inducing TMS protocols delivered over M1 have failed to modulate SAI, and the present research continues to support these findings. However, in young adults, cTBS over SI acts to reduce SAI and simultaneously increase corticospinal excitability. Future studies may investigate the potential to modulate SAI via targeting neural activity within SI. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Theta-burst repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation suppresses specific excitatory circuits in the human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, V; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Oliviero, A; Dileone, M; Mazzone, P; Insola, A; Tonali, P A; Ranieri, F; Huang, Y Z; Rothwell, J C

    2005-06-15

    In four conscious patients who had electrodes implanted in the cervical epidural space for the control of pain, we recorded corticospinal volleys evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex before and after a 20 s period of continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS). It has previously been reported that this form of repetitive TMS reduces the amplitude of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), with the maximum effect occurring at 5-10 min after the end of stimulation. The present results show that cTBS preferentially decreases the amplitude of the corticospinal I1 wave, with approximately the same time course. This is consistent with a cortical origin of the effect on the MEP. However, other protocols that lead to MEP suppression, such as short-interval intracortical inhibition, are characterized by reduced excitability of late I waves (particularly I3), suggesting that cTBS suppresses MEPs through different mechanisms, such as long-term depression in excitatory synaptic connections.

  17. Priming theta burst stimulation enhances motor cortex plasticity in young but not old adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opie, George M; Vosnakis, Eleni; Ridding, Michael C; Ziemann, Ulf; Semmler, John G

    Primary motor cortex neuroplasticity is reduced in old adults, which may contribute to the motor deficits commonly observed in the elderly. Previous research in young subjects suggests that the neuroplastic response can be enhanced using non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS), with a larger plastic response observed following priming with both long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD)-like protocols. However, it is not known if priming stimulation can also modulate plasticity in older adults. To investigate if priming NIBS can be used to modulate motor cortical plasticity in old subjects. In 16 young (22.3 ± 1.0 years) and 16 old (70.2 ± 1.7 years) subjects, we investigated the response to intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS; LTP-like) when applied 10 min after sham stimulation, continuous TBS (cTBS; LTD-like) or an identical block of iTBS. Corticospinal plasticity was assessed by recording changes in motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude. In young subjects, priming with cTBS (cTBS + iTBS) resulted in larger MEPs than priming with either iTBS (iTBS + iTBS; P = 0.001) or sham (sham + iTBS; P  0.9), whereas the response to cTBS + iTBS was reduced relative to iTBS + iTBS (P = 0.02) and sham + iTBS (P = 0.04). Priming TBS is ineffective for modifying M1 plasticity in older adults, which may limit the therapeutic use of priming stimulation in neurological conditions common in the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Speed of processing in the primary motor cortex: a continuous theta burst stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Bimal; Bolton, David A E; Miyasike-Dasilva, Veronica; Vette, Albert H; McIlroy, William E

    2014-03-15

    'Temporally urgent' reactions are extremely rapid, spatially precise movements that are evoked following discrete stimuli. The involvement of primary motor cortex (M1) and its relationship to stimulus intensity in such reactions is not well understood. Continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) suppresses focal regions of the cortex and can assess the involvement of motor cortex in speed of processing. The primary objective of this study was to explore the involvement of M1 in speed of processing with respect to stimulus intensity. Thirteen healthy young adults participated in this experiment. Behavioral testing consisted of a simple button press using the index finger following median nerve stimulation of the opposite limb, at either high or low stimulus intensity. Reaction time was measured by the onset of electromyographic activity from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle of each limb. Participants completed a 30 min bout of behavioral testing prior to, and 15 min following, the delivery of cTBS to the motor cortical representation of the right FDI. The effect of cTBS on motor cortex was measured by recording the average of 30 motor evoked potentials (MEPs) just prior to, and 5 min following, cTBS. Paired t-tests revealed that, of thirteen participants, five demonstrated a significant attenuation, three demonstrated a significant facilitation and five demonstrated no significant change in MEP amplitude following cTBS. Of the group that demonstrated attenuated MEPs, there was a biologically significant interaction between stimulus intensity and effect of cTBS on reaction time and amplitude of muscle activation. This study demonstrates the variability of potential outcomes associated with the use of cTBS and further study on the mechanisms that underscore the methodology is required. Importantly, changes in motor cortical excitability may be an important determinant of speed of processing following high intensity stimulation.

  19. Quadri-Pulse Theta Burst Stimulation using Ultra-High Frequency Bursts - A New Protocol to Induce Changes in Cortico-Spinal Excitability in Human Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Gleich, Bernhard; Gattinger, Norbert; Hoess, Catrina; Haug, Carolin; Siebner, Hartwig R; Mall, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Patterned transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) such as theta burst stimulation (TBS) or quadri-pulse stimulation (QPS) can induce changes in cortico-spinal excitability, commonly referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term depression (LTD)-like effects in human motor cortex (M1). Here, we aimed to test the plasticity-inducing capabilities of a novel protocol that merged TBS and QPS. 360 bursts of quadri-pulse TBS (qTBS) were continuously given to M1 at 90% of active motor threshold (1440 full-sine pulses). In a first experiment, stimulation frequency of each burst was set to 666 Hz to mimic the rhythmicity of the descending cortico-spinal volleys that are elicited by TMS (i.e., I-wave periodicity). In a second experiment, burst frequency was set to 200 Hz to maximize postsynaptic Ca2+ influx using a temporal pattern unrelated to I-wave periodicity. The second phase of sinusoidal TMS pulses elicited either a posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (AP) directed current in M1. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded before and after qTBS to probe changes in cortico-spinal excitability. PA-qTBS at 666 Hz caused a decrease in PA-MEP amplitudes, whereas AP-qTBS at 666 Hz induced an increase in mean AP-MEP amplitudes. At a burst frequency of 200 Hz, PA-qTBS and AP-qTBS produced an increase in cortico-spinal excitability outlasting for at least 60 minutes in PA- and AP-MEP amplitudes, respectively. Continuous qTBS at 666 Hz or 200 Hz can induce lasting changes in cortico-spinal excitability. Induced current direction in the brain appears to be relevant when qTBS targets I-wave periodicity, corroborating that high-fidelity spike timing mechanisms are critical for inducing bi-directional plasticity in human M1.

  20. Quadri-Pulse Theta Burst Stimulation using Ultra-High Frequency Bursts - A New Protocol to Induce Changes in Cortico-Spinal Excitability in Human Motor Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Gleich, Bernhard; Gattinger, Norbert;

    2016-01-01

    of sinusoidal TMS pulses elicited either a posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (AP) directed current in M1. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded before and after qTBS to probe changes in cortico-spinal excitability. PA-qTBS at 666 Hz caused a decrease in PA-MEP amplitudes, whereas AP...... in cortico-spinal excitability. Induced current direction in the brain appears to be relevant when qTBS targets I-wave periodicity, corroborating that high-fidelity spike timing mechanisms are critical for inducing bi-directional plasticity in human M1.......Patterned transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) such as theta burst stimulation (TBS) or quadri-pulse stimulation (QPS) can induce changes in cortico-spinal excitability, commonly referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term depression (LTD)-like effects in human motor cortex (M...

  1. Continuous theta burst stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex decreases medium load working memory performance in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicktanz, Nathalie; Fastenrath, Matthias; Milnik, Annette; Spalek, Klara; Auschra, Bianca; Nyffeler, Thomas; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Schwegler, Kyrill

    2015-01-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) plays a key role in working memory. Evidence indicates that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the DLPFC can interfere with working memory performance. Here we investigated for how long continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) over the DLPFC decreases working memory performance and whether the effect of cTBS on performance depends on working memory load. Forty healthy young subjects received either cTBS over the left DLPFC or sham stimulation before performing a 2-, and 3-back working memory letter task. An additional 0-back condition served as a non-memory-related control, measuring general attention. cTBS over the left DLPFC significantly impaired 2-back working memory performance for about 15 min, whereas 3-back and 0-back performances were not significantly affected. Our results indicate that the effect of left DLPFC cTBS on working memory performance lasts for roughly 15 min and depends on working memory load.

  2. Use of theta-burst stimulation in changing excitability of motor cortex: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sung Wook; Hill, Aron T; Rogasch, Nigel C; Hoy, Kate E; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2016-04-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation has been demonstrated to modulate cortical activity in humans. In particular, theta burst stimulation (TBS) has gained notable attention due to its ability to induce lasting physiological changes after short stimulation durations. The present study aimed to provide a comprehensive meta-analytic review of the efficacy of two TBS paradigms; intermittent (iTBS) and continuous (cTBS), on corticospinal excitability in healthy individuals. Literature searches yielded a total of 87 studies adhering to the inclusion criteria. iTBS yielded moderately large MEP increases lasting up to 30 min with a pooled SMD of 0.71 (pstimulation (SMD=-0.9, Pstimulation and BDNF polymorphisms. Further research investigating optimal TBS stimulation parameters, particularly for iTBS, is needed in order for these paradigms to be successfully translated into clinical settings.

  3. Continuous theta-burst stimulation combined with occupational therapy for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Naoki; Kakuda, Wataru; Kondo, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masato; Sageshima, Masashi; Mitani, Sugao; Abo, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) combined with intensive occupational therapy (OT) for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke. Ten patients with history of stroke and upper limb hemiparesis (age 62.0 ± 11.1 years, time since stroke 95.7 ± 70.2 months, mean ± SD) were studied. Each patient received 13 sessions, each comprising 160 s of cTBS applied to the skull on the area of the non-lesional hemisphere (using a 70-mm figure-8 coil, three pulse bursts at 50 Hz, repeated every 200 ms, i.e., 5 Hz, with total stimulation of 2,400 pulses), followed by intensive OT (comprising 120-min one-to-one training and 120-min self-training) during 15-day hospitalization. The motor function of the affected upper limb was evaluated by Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) on the days of admission and discharge. All patients completed the 15-day protocol without any adverse effects. Treatment significantly increased the FMA score (from 46.6 ± 8.7 to 51.6 ± 8.2 points, p < 0.01) and shortened the log performance time of WMFT (from 2.5 ± 1.1 to 2.2 ± 1.2 s, p < 0.01). The 15-day protocol of cTBS combined with intensive OT is a safe and potentially useful therapeutic modality for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke.

  4. A comparative study of the impact of theta-burst and high-frequency stimulation on memory performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yating eZhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of the information stored in the working memory into the system of long-term memory depends on the physiological mechanism, long-term potential (LTP. In a large number of experimental studies, theta-burst stimulation (TBS and high-frequency stimulation (HFS are LTP induction protocols. However, they have not been adapted to the model related to memory. In this paper, the improved Camperi-Wang (C-W model with Ca2+ subsystem-induced bi-stability was adopted, and TBS and HFS were simulated to act as the initial stimuli of this working memory model. Evaluating the influence of stimuli properties (cycle, amplitude, duty ration on memory mechanism of the model, it is found that both TBS and HFS can be adopted to activate working memory model and produce long-term memory. Moreover, the different impacts of two types of stimuli on the formation of long-term memory were analyzed as well. Thus the importance of this study lies firstly in describing the link and interaction between working memory and long-term memory from the quantitative view, which provides a theoretical basis for the study of neural dynamics mechanism of long-term memory formation in the future.

  5. Continuous Theta Burst Stimulation over the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Decreases Medium Load Working Memory Performance in Healthy Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicktanz, Nathalie; Fastenrath, Matthias; Milnik, Annette; Spalek, Klara; Auschra, Bianca; Nyffeler, Thomas; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.; Schwegler, Kyrill

    2015-01-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) plays a key role in working memory. Evidence indicates that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the DLPFC can interfere with working memory performance. Here we investigated for how long continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) over the DLPFC decreases working memory performance and whether the effect of cTBS on performance depends on working memory load. Forty healthy young subjects received either cTBS over the left DLPFC or sham stimulation before performing a 2-, and 3-back working memory letter task. An additional 0-back condition served as a non-memory-related control, measuring general attention. cTBS over the left DLPFC significantly impaired 2-back working memory performance for about 15 min, whereas 3-back and 0-back performances were not significantly affected. Our results indicate that the effect of left DLPFC cTBS on working memory performance lasts for roughly 15 min and depends on working memory load. PMID:25781012

  6. An improvement in perception of self-generated tactile stimuli following theta-burst stimulation of primary motor cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Martin; Bays, Paul M.; Rothwell, John C.; Wolpert, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that self-generated tactile sensations are perceived as weaker than the same sensations externally generated. This has been linked to a central comparator mechanism that uses efference copy to attenuate the predictable component of sensory inputs arising from one's own actions in order to enhance the salience of external stimuli. To provide a quantitative measure of this attenuation, a force-matching task was developed in which subjects experience a force applied to their finger and are then required to match the perceived force by actively pushing on the finger using their other hand. The attenuation of predictable sensory input results in subjects producing a larger active force than was experienced passively. Here, we have examined the effects of a novel rTMS protocol, theta-burst stimulation (TBS), over primary motor cortex on this attenuation. TBS can alter the excitability of motor cortex to incoming activity. We show that application of a 20 s continuous train of TBS, that depresses motor cortex, significantly improves performance in a force-matching task. This suggests that the TBS intervention disturbed the predictive process that uses efference copy signals to attenuate predictable sensory input. A possible explanation for the effect is that TBS has a differential effect on the populations of neurones that generate motor output in M1 than on those neural structures that are involved in generating an efference copy of the motor command. PMID:17560617

  7. Network based statistical analysis detects changes induced by continuous theta burst stimulation on brain activity at rest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eMastropasqua

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We combined continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS and resting state (RS -fMRI approaches to investigate changes in functional connectivity (FC induced by right dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC cTBS at rest in a group of healthy subjects. Seed based fMRI analysis revealed a specific pattern of correlation between the right prefrontal cortex and several brain regions: based on these results, we defined a 29-node network to assess changes in each network connection before and after, respectively, DLPFC-cTBS and sham sessions. A decrease of correlation between the right prefrontal cortex and right parietal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 40 respectively was detected after cTBS, while no significant result was found when analyzing sham-session data. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates within-subject changes in FC induced by cTBS applied on prefrontal area. The possibility to induce selective changes in a specific region without interfering with functionally correlated area could have several implications for the study of functional properties of the brain, and for the emerging therapeutic strategies based on transcranial stimulation.

  8. DOES THE INFERIOR FRONTAL SULCUS PLAY A FUNCTIONAL ROLE IN DECEPTION? A NEURONAVIGATED THETA-BURST TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION STUDY

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    Bruno eVerschuere

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. By definition, lying involves withholding the truth. Response inhibition may therefore be the cognitive function at the heart of deception. Neuroimaging research has shown that the same brain region that is activated during response inhibition tasks, namely the inferior frontal region, is also activated during deception paradigms. This led to the hypothesis that the inferior frontal region is the neural substrate critically involved in withholding the truth. Objective. We critically examine the functional necessity of the inferior frontal region in withholding the truth during deception. Method. We experimentally manipulated the neural activity level in right inferior frontal sulcus (IFS by means of neuronavigated continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS. Individual structural magnetic resonance brain images (MRI were used to allow precise stimulation in each participant. Twenty-six participants answered autobiographical questions truthfully or deceptively before and after sham and real cTBS. Results. Deception was reliably associated with more errors, longer and more variable response times than truth telling. Despite the potential role of IFS in deception as suggested by neuroimaging data, the cTBS-induced disruption of right IFS did not affect response times or error rates, when compared to sham stimulation. Conclusions. The present findings do not support the hypothesis that the right inferior frontal sulcus is critically involved in deception.

  9. Theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation to the prefrontal or parietal cortex does not impair metacognitive visual awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Daniel; Schwartzman, David J.; Barrett, Adam B.; Seth, Anil K.

    2017-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies commonly associate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and posterior parietal cortex with conscious perception. However, such studies only investigate correlation, rather than causation. In addition, many studies conflate objective performance with subjective awareness. In an influential recent paper, Rounis and colleagues addressed these issues by showing that continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (cTBS) applied to the DLPFC impaired metacognitive (subjective) awareness for a perceptual task, while objective performance was kept constant. We attempted to replicate this finding, with minor modifications, including an active cTBS control site. Using a between-subjects design for both DLPFC and posterior parietal cortices, we found no evidence of a cTBS-induced metacognitive impairment. In a second experiment, we devised a highly rigorous within-subjects cTBS design for DLPFC, but again failed to find any evidence of metacognitive impairment. One crucial difference between our results and the Rounis study is our strict exclusion of data deemed unsuitable for a signal detection theory analysis. Indeed, when we included this unstable data, a significant, though invalid, metacognitive impairment was found. These results cast doubt on previous findings relating metacognitive awareness to DLPFC, and inform the current debate concerning whether or not prefrontal regions are preferentially implicated in conscious perception. PMID:28192502

  10. Continuous theta burst stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex decreases medium load working memory performance in healthy humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Schicktanz

    Full Text Available The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC plays a key role in working memory. Evidence indicates that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS over the DLPFC can interfere with working memory performance. Here we investigated for how long continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS over the DLPFC decreases working memory performance and whether the effect of cTBS on performance depends on working memory load. Forty healthy young subjects received either cTBS over the left DLPFC or sham stimulation before performing a 2-, and 3-back working memory letter task. An additional 0-back condition served as a non-memory-related control, measuring general attention. cTBS over the left DLPFC significantly impaired 2-back working memory performance for about 15 min, whereas 3-back and 0-back performances were not significantly affected. Our results indicate that the effect of left DLPFC cTBS on working memory performance lasts for roughly 15 min and depends on working memory load.

  11. Continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS on left cerebellar hemisphere affects mental rotation tasks during music listening.

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    Silvia Picazio

    Full Text Available Converging evidence suggests an association between spatial and music domains. A cerebellar role in music-related information processing as well as in spatial-temporal tasks has been documented. Here, we investigated the cerebellar role in the association between spatial and musical domains, by testing performances in embodied (EMR or abstract (AMR mental rotation tasks of subjects listening Mozart Sonata K.448, which is reported to improve spatial-temporal reasoning, in the presence or in the absence of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS of the left cerebellar hemisphere. In the absence of cerebellar cTBS, music listening did not influence either MR task, thus not revealing a "Mozart Effect". Cerebellar cTBS applied before musical listening made subjects faster (P = 0.005 and less accurate (P = 0.005 in performing the EMR but not the AMR task. Thus, cerebellar inhibition by TBS unmasked the effect of musical listening on motor imagery. These data support a coupling between music listening and sensory-motor integration in cerebellar networks for embodied representations.

  12. Continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) on left cerebellar hemisphere affects mental rotation tasks during music listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picazio, Silvia; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests an association between spatial and music domains. A cerebellar role in music-related information processing as well as in spatial-temporal tasks has been documented. Here, we investigated the cerebellar role in the association between spatial and musical domains, by testing performances in embodied (EMR) or abstract (AMR) mental rotation tasks of subjects listening Mozart Sonata K.448, which is reported to improve spatial-temporal reasoning, in the presence or in the absence of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) of the left cerebellar hemisphere. In the absence of cerebellar cTBS, music listening did not influence either MR task, thus not revealing a "Mozart Effect". Cerebellar cTBS applied before musical listening made subjects faster (P = 0.005) and less accurate (P = 0.005) in performing the EMR but not the AMR task. Thus, cerebellar inhibition by TBS unmasked the effect of musical listening on motor imagery. These data support a coupling between music listening and sensory-motor integration in cerebellar networks for embodied representations.

  13. Plasticity Induced by Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Bilateral Motor Cortices Is Not Altered in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickins, Daina S E; Sale, Martin V; Kamke, Marc R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that plasticity induced in the motor cortex by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is attenuated in older adults. Those investigations, however, have focused solely on the stimulated hemisphere. Compared to young adults, older adults exhibit more widespread activity across bilateral motor cortices during the performance of unilateral motor tasks, suggesting that the manifestation of plasticity might also be altered. To address this question, twenty young (65 years) underwent intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) whilst attending to the hand targeted by the plasticity-inducing procedure. The amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by single pulse TMS was used to quantify cortical excitability before and after iTBS. Individual responses to iTBS were highly variable, with half the participants showing an unexpected decrease in cortical excitability. Contrary to predictions, however, there were no age-related differences in the magnitude or manifestation of plasticity across bilateral motor cortices. The findings suggest that advancing age does not influence the capacity for, or manifestation of, plasticity induced by iTBS.

  14. Theta Burst Stimulation of the Cerebellum Modifies the TMS-Evoked N100 Potential, a Marker of GABA Inhibition.

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    Allanah Harrington

    Full Text Available Theta burst stimulation (TBS of the cerebellum, a potential therapy for neurological disease, can modulate corticospinal excitability via the dentato-thalamo-cortical pathway, but it is uncertain whether its effects are mediated via inhibitory or facilitatory networks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 30Hz cerebellar TBS on the N100 waveform of the TMS-evoked potential (TEP, a marker of intracortical GABAB-mediated inhibition. 16 healthy participants (aged 18-30 years; 13 right handed and 3 left handed received 30Hz intermittent TBS (iTBS, continuous TBS (cTBS or sham stimulation over the right cerebellum, in three separate sessions. The first 8 participants received TBS at a stimulus intensity of 80% of active motor threshold (AMT, while the remainder received 90% of AMT. Motor evoked potentials (MEP and TEP were recorded before and after each treatment, by stimulating the first dorsal interosseus area of the left motor cortex. Analysis of the 13 right handed participants showed that iTBS at 90% of AMT increased the N100 amplitude compared to sham and cTBS, without significantly altering MEP amplitude. cTBS at 80% of active motor threshold decreased the N100 amplitude and cTBS overall reduced resting MEP amplitude. The study demonstrates effects of 30Hz cerebellar TBS on inhibitory cortical networks that may be useful for treatment of neurological conditions associated with dysfunctional intracortical inhibition.

  15. Accelerated intermittent Theta Burst stimulation for suicide risk in therapy-resistant depressed patients: a randomized, sham-controlled trial.

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    Stefanie Desmyter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives We aimed to examine the effects and safety of accelerated intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation (iTBS on suicide risk in a group of treatment-resistant unipolar depressed patients, using an extensive suicide assessment scale. Methods In 50 therapy-resistant, antidepressant-free depressed patients, an intensive protocol of accelerated iTBS was applied over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in a randomized, sham-controlled cross-over design. Patients received 20 iTBS sessions over 4 days. Suicide risk was assessed using the Beck Scale of Suicide ideation (BSI. Results The iTBS protocol was safe and well-tolerated. We observed a significant decrease of the BSI score over time, unrelated to active or sham stimulation and unrelated to depression-response. No worsening of suicidal ideation was observed. The effects of accelerated iTBS on mood and depression severity are reported in Duprat et al. (2016. The decrease in suicide risk lasted up to one month after baseline, even in depression non-responders. Conclusions This accelerated iTBS protocol was safe. The observed significant decrease in suicide risk was unrelated to active or sham stimulation and unrelated to depression response. Further sham-controlled research in suicidal depressed patients is necessary.(clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01832805

  16. Plasticity Induced by Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Bilateral Motor Cortices Is Not Altered in Older Adults

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    Daina S. E. Dickins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have reported that plasticity induced in the motor cortex by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is attenuated in older adults. Those investigations, however, have focused solely on the stimulated hemisphere. Compared to young adults, older adults exhibit more widespread activity across bilateral motor cortices during the performance of unilateral motor tasks, suggesting that the manifestation of plasticity might also be altered. To address this question, twenty young (65 years underwent intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS whilst attending to the hand targeted by the plasticity-inducing procedure. The amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs elicited by single pulse TMS was used to quantify cortical excitability before and after iTBS. Individual responses to iTBS were highly variable, with half the participants showing an unexpected decrease in cortical excitability. Contrary to predictions, however, there were no age-related differences in the magnitude or manifestation of plasticity across bilateral motor cortices. The findings suggest that advancing age does not influence the capacity for, or manifestation of, plasticity induced by iTBS.

  17. Continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) over the lateral prefrontal cortex alters reinforcement learning bias.

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    Ott, Derek V M; Ullsperger, Markus; Jocham, Gerhard; Neumann, Jane; Klein, Tilmann A

    2011-07-15

    The prefrontal cortex is known to play a key role in higher-order cognitive functions. Recently, we showed that this brain region is active in reinforcement learning, during which subjects constantly have to integrate trial outcomes in order to optimize performance. To further elucidate the role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in reinforcement learning, we applied continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) either to the left or right DLPFC, or to the vertex as a control region, respectively, prior to the performance of a probabilistic learning task in an fMRI environment. While there was no influence of cTBS on learning performance per se, we observed a stimulation-dependent modulation of reward vs. punishment sensitivity: Left-hemispherical DLPFC stimulation led to a more reward-guided performance, while right-hemispherical cTBS induced a more avoidance-guided behavior. FMRI results showed enhanced prediction error coding in the ventral striatum in subjects stimulated over the left as compared to the right DLPFC. Both behavioral and imaging results are in line with recent findings that left, but not right-hemispherical stimulation can trigger a release of dopamine in the ventral striatum, which has been suggested to increase the relative impact of rewards rather than punishment on behavior.

  18. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation Alters Corticospinal Output in Patients with Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

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    Hunter J. Fassett

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS is intended primarily to alter corticospinal excitability, creating an attractive opportunity to alter neural output following incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI. This study is the first to assess the effects of iTBS in SCI. Eight individuals with chronic incomplete SCI were studied. Sham or real iTBS was delivered (to each participant over primary motor and somatosensory cortices in separate sessions. Motor-evoked potential (MEP recruitment curves were obtained from the flexor carpi radialis muscle before and after iTBS. Results indicate similar responses for iTBS to both motor and somatosensory cortex and reduced MEPs in 56.25% and increased MEPs in 25% of instances. Sham stimulation exceeded real iTBS effects in the remaining 18.25%. It is our opinion that observing short-term neuroplasticity in corticospinal output in chronic SCI is an important advance and should be tested in future studies as an opportunity to improve function in this population. We emphasize the need to re-consider the importance of the direction of MEP change following a single session of iTBS since the relationship between MEP direction and motor function is unknown and multiple sessions of iTBS may yield very different directional results. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of including sham control in the experimental design. The fundamental point from this pilot research is that a single session of iTBS is often capable of creating short-term change in SCI. Future sham-controlled randomized trials may consider repeat iTBS sessions to promote long-term changes in corticospinal excitability.

  19. Continuous theta burst stimulation over the left pre-motor cortex affects sensorimotor timing accuracy and supraliminal error correction.

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    Bijsterbosch, Janine D; Lee, Kwang-Hyuk; Dyson-Sutton, William; Barker, Anthony T; Woodruff, Peter W R

    2011-09-02

    Adjustments to movement in response to changes in our surroundings are common in everyday behavior. Previous research has suggested that the left pre-motor cortex (PMC) is specialized for the temporal control of movement and may play a role in temporal error correction. The aim of this study was to determine the role of the left PMC in sensorimotor timing and error correction using theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TBS). In Experiment 1, subjects performed a sensorimotor synchronization task (SMS) with the left and the right hand before and after either continuous or intermittent TBS (cTBS or iTBS). Timing accuracy was assessed during synchronized finger tapping with a regular auditory pacing stimulus. Responses following perceivable local timing shifts in the pacing stimulus (phase shifts) were used to measure error correction. Suppression of the left PMC using cTBS decreased timing accuracy because subjects tapped further away from the pacing tones and tapping variability increased. In addition, error correction responses returned to baseline tap-tone asynchrony levels faster following negative shifts and no overcorrection occurred following positive shifts after cTBS. However, facilitation of the left PMC using iTBS did not affect timing accuracy or error correction performance. Experiment 2 revealed that error correction performance may change with practice, independent of TBS. These findings provide evidence for a role of the left PMC in both sensorimotor timing and error correction in both hands. We propose that the left PMC may be involved in voluntarily controlled phase correction responses to perceivable timing shifts.

  20. Effect of 30 Hz Theta Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on the Primary Motor Cortex in Children and Adolescents

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    Ernest ePedapati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen healthy children (13.8±2.2 years, range 10 to 16; M:F=5:9 received 30 Hz intermittent theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (iTBS with a stimulation intensity of 70% of resting motor threshold (RMT with a total of 300 (iTBS300 pulses. All volunteers were free of neurologic, psychiatric and serious medical illnesses, not taking any neuropsychiatric medications, and did not have any contraindications to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation. Changes in the mean amplitudes of motor-evoked potentials from baseline following iTBS were expressed as a ratio and assessed from 1 to 10 minutes (BLOCK1 and 1 to 30 minutes (BLOCK2 using repeated-measures analysis of variance. All 14 subjects completed iTBS300 over the dominant primary motor cortex (M1 without any clinically reported adverse events. ITBS300 produced significant M1 facilitation (F5,65=3.165, p=0.01 at BLOCK1 and trend level M1 facilitation at BLOCK2 (F10,129=1.69, p=0.089. Although iTBS300 (stimulation duration of 92 seconds at 70% RMT delivered over M1 in typically developed children was well-tolerated and produced on average significant facilitatory changes in cortical excitability, the post-iTBS300 neurophysiologic response was variable in our small sample. ITBS300-induced changes may represent a potential neuroplastic biomarker in healthy children and those with neuro-genetic or neuro-psychiatric disorders. However, a larger sample size is needed to address safety and concerns of response variability.

  1. Does a single session of theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation of inferior temporal cortex affect tinnitus perception?

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    Moser Tobias

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cortical excitability changes as well as imbalances in excitatory and inhibitory circuits play a distinct pathophysiological role in chronic tinnitus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the temporoparietal cortex was recently introduced to modulate tinnitus perception. In the current study, the effect of theta-burst stimulation (TBS, a novel rTMS paradigm was investigated in chronic tinnitus. Twenty patients with chronic tinnitus completed the study. Tinnitus severity and loudness were monitored using a tinnitus questionnaire (TQ and a visual analogue scale (VAS before each session. Patients received 600 pulses of continuous TBS (cTBS, intermittent TBS (iTBS and intermediate TBS (imTBS over left inferior temporal cortex with an intensity of 80% of the individual active or resting motor threshold. Changes in subjective tinnitus perception were measured with a numerical rating scale (NRS. Results TBS applied to inferior temporal cortex appeared to be safe. Although half of the patients reported a slight attenuation of tinnitus perception, group analysis resulted in no significant difference when comparing the three specific types of TBS. Converting the NRS into the VAS allowed us to compare the time-course of aftereffects. Only cTBS resulted in a significant short-lasting improvement of the symptoms. In addition there was no significant difference when comparing the responder and non-responder groups regarding their anamnestic and audiological data. The TQ score correlated significantly with the VAS, lower loudness indicating less tinnitus distress. Conclusion TBS does not offer a promising outcome for patients with tinnitus in the presented study.

  2. Continuous theta burst stimulation of the supplementary motor area: effect upon perception and somatosensory and motor evoked potentials.

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    Legon, Wynn; Dionne, Jennifer K; Staines, W Richard

    2013-11-01

    The supplementary motor area (SMA) has been implicated in many aspects of movement preparation and execution. In addition to motor roles, the SMA is responsive to somesthetic stimuli though it is unclear exactly what role the SMA plays in a somatosensory network. It is the purpose of this study to assess how continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) of the SMA affects both somatosensory (SEPs) and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and if cTBS leads to alterations in tactile perception thresholds of the index fingertip. In experiment 1, cTBS was delivered over scalp sites FCZ (SMA stimulation) (n = 10) and CZ (control stimulation) (n = 10) in separate groups for 40 s (600 pulses) at 90% of participants' resting motor threshold. For both groups, median nerve SEPs were elicited from the right wrist at rest via electrical stimulation (0.5 ms pulse) before and at 10 min intervals post-cTBS out to 30 min (t = pre, 10, 20, and 30 min). Subjects' perceptual thresholds were assessed at similar time intervals as the SEP data using a biothesiometer (120 Hz vibration). In experiment 2 (n = 10) the effect of cTBS to SMA upon single and paired-pulse MEP amplitudes from the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) was assessed. cTBS to scalp site FCZ (SMA stimulation) reduced the frontal N30 SEP and increased tactile perceptual thresholds 30 min post-stimulation. However, parietal SEPs and MEP amplitudes from both single and paired-pulse stimulation were unaffected at all time points post-stimulation. cTBS to stimulation site CZ (control) did not result in any physiological or behavioral changes. These data demonstrate cTBS to the SMA reduces the amplitude of the N30 coincident with an increase in vibration sensation threshold but does not affect primary somatosensory or motor cortex excitability. The SMA may play a significant role in a somatosensory tactile attention network. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Visual-spatial memory may be enhanced with theta burst deep brain stimulation of the fornix: a preliminary investigation with four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan P; Sweet, Jennifer A; Bailey, Christopher M; Munyon, Charles N; Luders, Hans O; Fastenau, Philip S

    2015-07-01

    Memory loss after brain injury can be a source of considerable morbidity, but there are presently few therapeutic options for restoring memory function. We have previously demonstrated that burst stimulation of the fornix is able to significantly improve memory in a rodent model of traumatic brain injury. The present study is a preliminary investigation with a small group of cases to explore whether theta burst stimulation of the fornix might improve memory in humans. Four individuals undergoing stereo-electroencephalography evaluation for drug-resistant epilepsy were enrolled. All participants were implanted with an electrode into the proximal fornix and dorsal hippocampal commissure on the language dominant (n = 3) or language non-dominant (n = 1) side, and stimulation of this electrode reliably produced a diffuse evoked potential in the head and body of the ipsilateral hippocampus. Each participant underwent testing of verbal memory (Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test), visual-spatial memory (Medical College of Georgia Complex Figure Test), and visual confrontational naming (Boston Naming Test Short Form) once per day over at least two consecutive days using novel test forms each day. For 50% of the trials, the fornix electrode was continuously stimulated using a burst pattern (200 Hz in 100 ms trains, five trains per second, 100 µs, 7 mA) and was compared with sham stimulation. Participants and examiners were blinded to whether stimulation was active or not, and the order of stimulation was randomized. The small sample size precluded use of inferential statistics; therefore, data were analysed using descriptive statistics and graphic analysis. Burst stimulation of the fornix was not perceived by any of the participants but was associated with a robust reversible improvement in immediate and delayed performance on the Medical College of Georgia Complex Figure Test. There were no apparent differences on either Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test or Boston Naming

  4. High Amplitude Secondary Mass Drive

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    DYCK,CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM; ALLEN,JAMES J.; HUBER,ROBERT JOHN; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.

    2000-07-06

    In this paper we describe a high amplitude electrostatic drive for surface micromachined mechanical oscillators that may be suitable for vibratory gyroscopes. It is an advanced design of a previously reported dual mass oscillator (Dyck, et. al., 1999). The structure is a 2 degree-of-freedom, parallel-plate driven motion amplifier, termed the secondary mass drive oscillator (SMD oscillator). During each cycle the device contacts the drive plates, generating large electrostatic forces. Peak-to-peak amplitudes of 54 {micro}m have been obtained by operating the structure in air with an applied voltage of 11 V. We describe the structure, present the analysis and design equations, and show recent results that have been obtained, including frequency response data, power dissipation, and out-of- plane motion.

  5. Intermittent Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Alters Electrical Properties of Fast-Spiking Neocortical Interneurons in an Age-Dependent Fashion

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    Kathrin eHoppenrath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of human cortical excitability by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS appears to be in part related to changed activity of inhibitory systems. Our own studies showed that intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS applied via rTMS to rat cortex primarily affects the parvalbumin-expressing (PV fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs, evident via a strongly reduced PV expression. We further found the iTBS effect on PV to be age-dependent since no reduction in PV could be induced before the perineuronal nets (PNNs of FSIs start to grow around postnatal day 30. To elucidate possible iTBS-induced changes in the electrical properties of FSIs and cortical network activity during cortical critical period, we performed ex vivo – in vitro whole-cell patch clamp recordings from pre-labelled FSIs in the current study. FSIs of verum iTBS-treated rats displayed a higher excitability than sham-treated controls at PD29-38, evident as higher rates of induced action potential firing at low current injections (100-200 pA and a more depolarized resting membrane potential. This effect was absent in younger (PD26-28 and older animals (PD40-62. Slices of verum iTBS-treated rats further showed higher rates of spontaneous EPSCs. Based on these and previous findings we conclude that FSIs are particularly sensitive to theta-burst stimulation during early cortical development, when FSIs show an activity-driven step of maturation which is paralleled by intense growth of the PNNs and subsequent closure of the cortical critical period. Although to be proven further, rTMS may be a possible early intervention to compensate for hypo-activity related mal-development of cortical neuronal circuits.

  6. Is prepulse modification altered by continuous theta burst stimulation? DAT1 genotype and motor threshold interact on prepulse modification following brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notzon, S; Vennewald, N; Gajewska, A; Klahn, A L; Diemer, J; Winter, B; Fohrbeck, I; Arolt, V; Pauli, P; Domschke, K; Zwanzger, P

    2017-03-24

    Previous studies suggest an inhibitory top-down control of the amygdala by the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Both brain regions play a role in the modulation of prepulse modification (PPM) of the acoustic startle response by a pre-stimulus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can modulate the activity of the PFC and might thus affect PPM. This study tested the effect of inhibitory rTMS on PPM accounting for a genetic variant of the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1). Healthy participants (N = 102) were stimulated with continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS, an intense form of inhibitory rTMS) or sham treatment over the right PFC. Afterwards, during continuous presentation of a background white noise a louder noise burst was presented either alone (control startle) or preceded by a prepulse. Participants were genotyped for a DAT1 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism. Two succeeding sessions of cTBS over the right PFC (2 × 600 stimuli with a time lag of 15 min) attenuated averaged prepulse inhibition (PPI) in participants with a high resting motor threshold. An attenuation of PPI induced by prepulses with great distances to the pulse (480, 2000 ms) was observed following active cTBS in participants that were homozygous carriers of the 10-repeat-allele of the DAT1 genotype and had a high resting motor threshold. Our results confirm the importance of the prefrontal cortex for the modulation of PPM. The effects were observed in participants with a high resting motor threshold only, probably because they received a higher dose of cTBS. The effects in homozygous carriers of the DAT1 10-repeat allele confirm the relevance of dopamine for PPM. Conducting an exploratory study we decided against the use of a correction for multiple testing.

  7. Intermittent Theta-Burst Stimulation of the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex to Promote Metaphor Comprehension in Parkinson Disease: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Christina; Monetta, Laura; Langlois, Mélanie; Schneider, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    This single-case research-designed study explored whether intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) could improve metaphor comprehension in people with Parkinson disease (PD) and language impairments. A right-handed participant with PD diagnosed 9 years ago, receiving long-term treatment with levodopa, and with metaphor comprehension impairment was recruited to undergo 10 sessions of sham stimulation (in 2wk), a washout period (6wk), and then 10 sessions of iTBS (in 2wk). Clinical scores of metaphor comprehension and motor evaluation (Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale part III) and transcranial magnetic stimulation to test the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1) were used at baseline, postsham, post-iTBS, and at 3 follow-ups (8, 14, and 20wk post-iTBS). Metaphor comprehension was improved after iTBS, and the highest scores were obtained 8 weeks later (P=.01). This improvement was correlated with the increase of the right M1 excitability (r=-.86, P=.03) and with the decrease of transcallosal inhibition latency from the left to the right hemisphere (r=-.88, P=.02). Sham yielded no effect (P>.05). Administration of iTBS over the right DLPFC improved metaphor comprehension likely by a long-term influence on brain synaptic plasticity, including improvement of interhemispheric dialogue. More studies are warranted to confirm these findings in larger samples of participants with PD.

  8. The Impact of Single Session Intermittent Theta-Burst Stimulation over the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex and Posterior Superior Temporal Sulcus on Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

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    Hsing-Chang Ni

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS, a patterned repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, was applied over the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS or dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC to explore its impact in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Among 25 adults with ASD, 19 (mean age: 20.8 years completed the randomized, sham-controlled, crossover trial. Every participant received iTBS over the bilateral DLPFC, bilateral pSTS and inion (as a sham control stimulation in a randomized order with a 1-week interval. Neuropsychological functions were assessed using the Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CCPT and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST. Behavioral outcomes were measured using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS and the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS. In comparison to that in the sham stimulation, the reaction time in the CCPT significantly decreased following single DLPFC session (p = 0.04, effect size = 0.71 while there were no significant differences in the CCPT and WCST following single pSTS session. Besides, the results in behavioral outcomes were inconsistent and had discrepancy between reports of parents and patients. In conclusion, a single session of iTBS over the bilateral DLPFC may alter the neuropsychological function in adults with ASD. The impacts of multiple-sessions iTBS over the DLPFC or pSTS deserve further investigations.

  9. Reversed Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation following Motor Training That Vary as a Function of Training-Induced Changes in Corticospinal Excitability

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    Tino Stöckel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS has the potential to enhance corticospinal excitability (CSE and subsequent motor learning. However, the effects of iTBS following motor learning are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of iTBS on CSE and performance following motor learning. Therefore twenty-four healthy participants practiced a ballistic motor task for a total of 150 movements. iTBS was subsequently applied to the trained motor cortex (STIM group or the vertex (SHAM group. Performance and CSE were assessed before motor learning and before and after iTBS. Training significantly increased performance and CSE in both groups. In STIM group participants, subsequent iTBS significantly reduced motor performance with smaller reductions in CSE. CSE changes as a result of motor learning were negatively correlated with both the CSE changes and performance changes as a result of iTBS. No significant effects of iTBS were found for SHAM group participants. We conclude that iTBS has the potential to degrade prior motor learning as a function of training-induced CSE changes. That means the expected LTP-like effects of iTBS are reversed following motor learning.

  10. Theta-burst stimulation of hippocampal slices induces network-level calcium oscillations and activates analogous gene transcription to spatial learning.

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    Graham K Sheridan

    Full Text Available Over four decades ago, it was discovered that high-frequency stimulation of the dentate gyrus induces long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission. LTP is believed to underlie how we process and code external stimuli before converting it to salient information that we store as 'memories'. It has been shown that rats performing spatial learning tasks display theta-frequency (3-12 Hz hippocampal neural activity. Moreover, administering theta-burst stimulation (TBS to hippocampal slices can induce LTP. TBS triggers a sustained rise in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i in neurons leading to new protein synthesis important for LTP maintenance. In this study, we measured TBS-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations in thousands of cells at increasing distances from the source of stimulation. Following TBS, a calcium wave propagates radially with an average speed of 5.2 µm/s and triggers multiple and regular [Ca2+]i oscillations in the hippocampus. Interestingly, the number and frequency of [Ca2+]i fluctuations post-TBS increased with respect to distance from the electrode. During the post-tetanic phase, 18% of cells exhibited 3 peaks in [Ca2+]i with a frequency of 17 mHz, whereas 2.3% of cells distributed further from the electrode displayed 8 [Ca2+]i oscillations at 33 mHz. We suggest that these observed [Ca2+]i oscillations could lead to activation of transcription factors involved in synaptic plasticity. In particular, the transcription factor, NF-κB, has been implicated in memory formation and is up-regulated after LTP induction. We measured increased activation of NF-κB 30 min post-TBS in CA1 pyramidal cells and also observed similar temporal up-regulation of NF-κB levels in CA1 neurons following water maze training in rats. Therefore, TBS of hippocampal slice cultures in vitro can mimic the cell type-specific up-regulations in activated NF-κB following spatial learning in vivo. This indicates that TBS may induce similar transcriptional changes to

  11. Intermittent Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Alters Electrical Properties of Fast-Spiking Neocortical Interneurons in an Age-Dependent Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppenrath, Kathrin; Härtig, Wolfgang; Funke, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of human cortical excitability by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) appears to be in part related to changed activity of inhibitory systems. Our own studies showed that intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) applied via rTMS to rat cortex primarily affects the parvalbumin-expressing (PV) fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs), evident via a strongly reduced PV expression. We further found the iTBS effect on PV to be age-dependent since no reduction in PV could be induced before the perineuronal nets (PNNs) of FSIs start to grow around postnatal day (PD) 30. To elucidate possible iTBS-induced changes in the electrical properties of FSIs and cortical network activity during cortical critical period, we performed ex vivo-in vitro whole-cell patch clamp recordings from pre-labeled FSIs in the current study. FSIs of verum iTBS-treated rats displayed a higher excitability than sham-treated controls at PD29-38, evident as higher rates of induced action potential firing at low current injections (100-200 pA) and a more depolarized resting membrane potential. This effect was absent in younger (PD26-28) and older animals (PD40-62). Slices of verum iTBS-treated rats further showed higher rates of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). Based on these and previous findings we conclude that FSIs are particularly sensitive to TBS during early cortical development, when FSIs show an activity-driven step of maturation which is paralleled by intense growth of the PNNs and subsequent closure of the cortical critical period. Although to be proven further, rTMS may be a possible early intervention to compensate for hypo-activity related mal-development of cortical neuronal circuits.

  12. Dose-Dependent Effects of Theta Burst rTMS on Cortical Excitability and Resting-State Connectivity of the Human Motor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettekoven, Charlotte; Volz, Lukas J.; Kutscha, Martha; Pool, Eva-Maria; Rehme, Anne K.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Fink, Gereon R.

    2014-01-01

    Theta burst stimulation (TBS), a specific protocol of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), induces changes in cortical excitability that last beyond stimulation. TBS-induced aftereffects, however, vary between subjects, and the mechanisms underlying these aftereffects to date remain poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether increasing the number of pulses of intermittent TBS (iTBS) (1) increases cortical excitability as measured by motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) and (2) alters functional connectivity measured using resting-state fMRI, in a dose-dependent manner. Sixteen healthy, human subjects received three serially applied iTBS blocks of 600 pulses over the primary motor cortex (M1 stimulation) and the parieto-occipital vertex (sham stimulation) to test for dose-dependent iTBS effects on cortical excitability and functional connectivity (four sessions in total). iTBS over M1 increased MEP amplitudes compared with sham stimulation after each stimulation block. Although the increase in MEP amplitudes did not differ between the first and second block of M1 stimulation, we observed a significant increase after three blocks (1800 pulses). Furthermore, iTBS enhanced resting-state functional connectivity between the stimulated M1 and premotor regions in both hemispheres. Functional connectivity between M1 and ipsilateral dorsal premotor cortex further increased dose-dependently after 1800 pulses of iTBS over M1. However, no correlation between changes in MEP amplitudes and functional connectivity was detected. In summary, our data show that increasing the number of iTBS stimulation blocks results in dose-dependent effects at the local level (cortical excitability) as well as at a systems level (functional connectivity) with a dose-dependent enhancement of dorsal premotor cortex-M1 connectivity. PMID:24828639

  13. Efficacy and safety of bilateral continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS for the treatment of chronic tinnitus: design of a three-armed randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plontke Stefan K

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tinnitus, the perception of sound and noise in absence of an auditory stimulus, has been shown to be associated with maladaptive neuronal reorganization and increased activity of the temporoparietal cortex. Transient modulation of tinnitus by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS indicated that these areas are critically involved in the pathophysiology of tinnitus and suggested new treatment strategies. However, the therapeutic efficacy of rTMS in tinnitus is still unclear, individual response is variable, and the optimal stimulation area disputable. Recently, continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS has been put forward as an effective rTMS protocol for the reduction of pathologically enhanced cortical excitability. Methods 48 patients with chronic subjective tinnitus will be included in this randomized, placebo controlled, three-arm trial. The treatment consists of two trains of cTBS applied bilaterally to the secondary auditory cortex, the temporoparietal associaction cortex, or to the lower occiput (sham condition every working day for four weeks. Primary outcome measure is the change of tinnitus distress as quantified by the Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ. Secondary outcome measures are tinnitus loudness and annoyance as well as tinnitus change during and after treatment. Audiologic and speech audiometric measurements will be performed to assess potential side effects. The aim of the present trail is to investigate effectiveness and safety of a four weeks cTBS treatment on chronic tinnitus and to compare two areas of stimulation. The results will contribute to clarify the therapeutic capacity of rTMS in tinnitus. Trial registration The trial was registered with the clinical trials register of http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00518024.

  14. Investigations of motor-cortex cortical plasticity following facilitatory and inhibitory transcranial theta-burst stimulation in schizophrenia: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Brinkmann, Caroline; Strube, Wolfgang; Palm, Ulrich; Malchow, Berend; Rothwell, John C; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Impaired neural plasticity has been proposed as an important pathophysiological feature underlying the neurobiology and symptomatology of schizophrenia. In this proof-of-concept study, we aimed to explore cortical plasticity in schizophrenia patients with two different transcranial theta-burst (TBS) paradigms. TBS induces Ca(2+)-dependent long-term-potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term-depression (LTP)-like plasticity in the human motor cortex. A total of 10 schizophrenia patients and 10 healthy controls were included in this study. Cortical excitability was investigated using transcranial magnetic stimulation in each study participant before and after TBS applied to the left primary motor-cortex on two different days. cTBS600 was used to induce LTD-like and cTBS300 was used to induce LTP-like plasticity in the absence of any prior motor-cortex activation. Repeated measures ANOVAs showed a significant interaction between the timecourse, the study group and the stimulation paradigm (cTBS600 vs. cTBS300) for the left, but not for the right hemisphere. Healthy controls showed an MEP amplitude decrease at a trend level following cTBS600 and a numeric, but not significant, increase in MEP amplitudes following cTBS300. Schizophrenia patients did not show an MEP amplitude decrease following cTBS600, but surprisingly a significant MEP decrease following cTBS300. The proportion of subjects showing the expected changes in motor-cortex excitability following both cTBS paradigms was higher in healthy controls. These preliminary results indicate differences in cortical plasticity following two different cTBS protocols in schizophrenia patients compared to healthy controls. However, the incomplete plasticity response in the healthy controls and the proof-of-concept nature of this study need to be considered as important limitations.

  15. Safety and Tolerability of Theta Burst Stimulation versus Single and Paired Pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Comparative Study of 165 Pediatric Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaejee H Hong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although single- and paired-pulse (sp/pp transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies are considered minimal risk in adults and children, the safety profile for theta-burst TMS (TBS is unknown.Objective: In this comparative analysis, we explored the rate, severity, and specific symptoms of TMS-related adverse effects (AEs between sp/ppTMS and TBS in subjects between ages 6 and 18 years.Method: Data from 165 participants from 2009-2014 were analyzed. Assessment of AEs was performed based on baseline and post-TMS administration of a symptom-based questionnaire that rated AEs on a 5-level ordinal scale (minimal, mild, moderate, marked, severe. AE rates and severity were compared using Chi Square or Fisher’s Exact Test depending on data characteristics.Result: Overall, no seizures or severe-rated AEs were reported by 165 pediatric participants. The rate of AE in all TBS sessions was 10.5% (n=76, 95% CI: 4.7 - 19.7%, whereas the rate of AE in all sp/ppTMS sessions was 12.4% (n=89, 95% CI: 6.3 - 21.0%. There was no statistical difference in AE rates between TBS and sp/ppTMS (p=0.71. In all sp/ppTMS and TBS sessions, 20 subjects reported a total of 35 AEs, among these 31 (~88.6% were rated as minimal or mild. There was no difference in the severity of AE between TBS and sp/ppTMS (p=1.0. Only one of 76 TBS participants reported an AE rated as more than minimal/mild.Conclusion: Our comparative analysis showed that TBS appears to be as safe as sp/ppTMS in terms of AE rate and severity. This report supports further investigation of TBS in children.

  16. Modulation of Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation Applied Over Primary Motor Cortex (M1) by Conditioning Stimulation of the Opposite M1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragert, Patrick; Camus, Mickael; Vandermeeren, Yves; Dimyan, Michael A.; Cohen, Leonardo G.

    2009-01-01

    The excitability of the human primary motor cortex (M1) as tested with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) depends on its previous history of neural activity. Homeostatic plasticity might be one important physiological mechanism for the regulation of corticospinal excitability and synaptic plasticity. Although homeostatic plasticity has been demonstrated locally within M1, it is not known whether priming M1 could result in similar homeostatic effects in the homologous M1 of the opposite hemisphere. Here, we sought to determine whether down-regulating excitability (priming) in the right (R) M1 with 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) changes the excitability-enhancing effect of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) applied over the homologous left (L) M1. Subjects were randomly allocated to one of four experimental groups in a sham-controlled parallel design with real or sham R M1 1-Hz TMS stimulation always preceding L M1 iTBS or sham by about 10 min. The primary outcome measure was corticospinal excitability in the L M1, as measured by recruitment curves (RCs). Secondary outcome measures included pinch force, simple reaction time, and tapping speed assessed in the right hand. The main finding of this study was that preconditioning R M1 with 1-Hz rTMS significantly decreased the excitability-enhancing effects of subsequent L M1 iTBS on RCs. Application of 1-Hz rTMS over R M1 alone and iTBS over L M1 alone resulted in increased RC in L M1 relative to sham interventions. The present findings are consistent with the hypothesis that homeostatic mechanisms operating across hemispheric boundaries contribute to regulate motor cortical function in the primary motor cortex. PMID:19474173

  17. Interaction of motor training and intermittent theta burst stimulation in modulating motor cortical plasticity: influence of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Lee

    Full Text Available Cortical physiology in human motor cortex is influenced by behavioral motor training (MT as well as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol such as intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS. This study aimed to test whether MT and iTBS can interact with each other to produce additive changes in motor cortical physiology. We hypothesized that potential interaction between MT and iTBS would be dependent on BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, which is known to affect neuroplasticity in the human motor cortex. Eighty two healthy volunteers were genotyped for BDNF polymorphism. Thirty subjects were assigned for MT alone, 23 for iTBS alone, and 29 for MT + iTBS paradigms. TMS indices for cortical excitability and motor map areas were measured prior to and after each paradigm. MT alone significantly increased the motor cortical excitability and expanded the motor map areas. The iTBS alone paradigm also enhanced excitability and increased the motor map areas to a slightly greater extent than MT alone. A combination of MT and iTBS resulted in the largest increases in the cortical excitability, and the representational motor map expansion of MT + iTBS was significantly greater than MT or iTBS alone only in Val/Val genotype. As a result, the additive interaction between MT and iTBS was highly dependent on BDNF Val66Met polymorphism. Our results may have clinical relevance in designing rehabilitative strategies that combine therapeutic cortical stimulation and physical exercise for patients with motor disabilities.

  18. Offline continuous theta burst stimulation over right inferior frontal gyrus and pre-supplementary motor area impairs inhibition during a go/no-go task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Neil M; Cressman, Erin K; Carlsen, Anthony N

    2017-05-01

    In a typical go/no-go task a single imperative stimulus is presented each trial, either a go or no-go stimulus. Participants are instructed to initiate a known response upon appearance of the go-signal and withhold the response if the no-go signal is presented. It is unclear whether the go-response is prepared in advance of the imperative stimulus in a go/no-go task. Moreover, it is unclear if inhibitory control processes suppress preparatory go-activation. The purpose of the present experiment was 1) to determine whether the go-response is prepared in advance of stimulus identification with the use of a startling acoustic stimulus (SAS), and 2) investigate the inhibitory role of the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) and pre-supplementary motor area (preSMA) during the performance of a go/no-go task with the use of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS). The experiment consisted of three phases; a pre-cTBS phase in which participants completed a go/no-go and simple-RT task, followed by offline cTBS to temporarily deactivate either rIFG or preSMA (with a sham control), then a post-cTBS phase which was identical to the pre-cTBS phase. Results revealed that stimulation to both cortical sites impaired participants' ability to withhold movements during no-go trials. Notably, rIFG or preSMA stimulation did not affect the latency of voluntary go-responses and did not enable the SAS to involuntarily trigger responses. These findings suggest that preparation and initiation of the go-response occurs after the imperative stimulus, with the rIFG and preSMA involved in inhibiting the go-response once the stimulus is identified as a no-go signal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduction in cortical parvalbumin expression due to intermittent theta-burst stimulation correlates with maturation of the perineuronal nets in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mix, Annika; Hoppenrath, Kathrin; Funke, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) using transcranial magnetic stimulation strongly reduces the number of rat neocortical interneurons expressing glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 kDa (GAD67) and parvalbumin (PV), indicating changed activity of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. In advance of in vitro studies intended to characterize changes in electrical properties of FS interneurons under these conditions, we tested whether the iTBS effect is age-dependent. Conscious Sprague-Dawley rats aged between 28 and 90 days received three blocks of iTBS at 15 min intervals. We found that iTBS-related reduction in PV+ cells was absent up to an age of 32 days, then gradually increased, and approached a maximum of about 40% reduction at an age of about 40 days. The relative number of cells expressing PV (PV+, 8-9%) did not change with age in sham-controls and also the increase in cortical c-Fos expression induced by iTBS was not principally age-dependent. However, a prominent growth of the perineuronal nets, typically surrounding the PV+ cells, exactly paralleled the increase in the iTBS effect. Based on these findings, we conclude that the functional development of the inhibitory network of PV+ interneurons with regard to intracortical synaptic connectivity is not sufficiently matured in rats younger than 35 d to enable activity-dependent modifications during iTBS. Outgrowth of the perineuronal nets and associated maturation of excitatory cortical inputs, as is characteristic for the critical cortical period, may take place before PV+ interneurons can be sufficiently activated via repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, allowing plastic changes of molecular phenotype and likely also synaptic plasticity.

  20. Premature temporal theta (PT theta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J R; Fino, J J; Hart, L A

    1987-07-01

    A distinctive pattern called premature temporal theta (PT theta) was studied in 436 infants, ranging in age from 24 to 46 weeks. The pattern is seen in early prematurity, maximizes at 29-31 weeks and then diminishes and disappears near term. Usually the pattern is found independently on both temporal areas, but with a right-sided preference. Patients without PT theta or with a significantly low amount had either neurological or non-neurological (medical) conditions. With age there is a tendency for an increase in frequency and a decrease in amplitude. Five different peaks in the amount of this pattern are seen at approximately every month. Unilateral PT theta tends to be seen in older babies, more often on the right side and with an abnormal EEG. An abnormal EEG is usually associated with a delay in both the appearance and disappearance of this wave form. PT theta is also associated mainly with REM or active sleep. A polynomial rather than an exponential or power function best describes these data with changes of age. PT theta may arise from the inferior temporal gyrus and/or especially the transverse gyrus.

  1. 右侧额顶网络在空间注意认知过程中的作用机制%Modulatory effects of continuous theta burst stimulation over the right frontoparietal network on visuospatial attention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐光青; 兰月; 何小飞; 赵江莉; 黄东锋

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To probe the modulatory effects of continuous theta burst stimulation over the right frontoparietal network(FPN) on visuospatial attention using attention network test (ANT) paradigm in healthy human subjects.Method:Sixty healthy,right-handed volunteers (30 males and 30 females) aged between 19 and 23 years were recruited.They were divided into two groups as frontal group and parietal group in accordance with sex for the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) stimuli studies,respectively.The ANT was used to test subjects following the continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation(rTMS) to either the right DLPFC or the right PPC.The ANT provided measures for three different components of visual attention:alerting,orienting and executive control.Result:During the ANT task,subjects with real right-PPC cTBS showed significant deficits in network effect indices compared with the shams on the alerting and orienting.Moreover,compared with the sham cTBS condition,the real right-DLPFC cTBS resulted in significant decreases in the efficiency of the conflict,but significant increase in the orienting index.Conclusion:These findings suggested that the right DLPFC played a crucial role in the executive control processes,and right PPC associated with orienting attentional function.Furthermore,the results of this studies supported a theory of intra-hemispheric competition within one hemisphere in the visuospatial attention network.%目的:探讨右侧额顶网络(FPN)与视空间注意认知功能的关联性和作用机制.方法:选取志愿受试者60人参加本实验,随机分为顶叶组和额叶组.采用持续短阵快速脉冲(cTBS)经颅磁刺激(rTMS)右侧背外侧前额叶(DLPFC)和后顶叶皮质(DPC)后进行注意网络测试(ANT),所有受试者均按照随机顺序进行真/假刺激.结果:持续短阵快速脉冲经颅磁刺激施加于前额叶和后顶叶,不同提

  2. Simulation of transients of high amplitude in pipe systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, J.M.; Looijmans, K.N.H.

    1999-01-01

    Fast high-amplitude transients ask for a non-linear modelling approach in which large density variations and heat exchange can be considered. Operation of safety-valves, relief valves, the occurrence of valve failure and the start-up or shutdown of rotating equipment in industrial pipe systems can l

  3. Burst Suppression: A Review and New Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Dillon Kenny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression is a pattern of brain electrical activity characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude bursts and electrical silence. Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the results of our new study showing clear electrophysiological differences in burst suppression patterns induced by two common general anesthetics, sevoflurane and propofol. Our data suggest that the circuit mechanisms that generate burst suppression activity may differ between different general anesthetics.

  4. Subharmonic and fundamental high amplitude excitation of an axisymmetric jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of simultaneous excitation at the fundamental and subharmonic frequencies on the behavior of a circular jet shear layer is studied. Attention is given to the effect of the initial phase difference, the Strouhal number pair, and amplitudes of the fundamental and subharmonic tones. High-amplitude excitation devices which can provide a wide range of forcing conditions when used in conjunction with equipment that produces complex waveforms are used.

  5. 后顶叶皮质调控视空间注意功能的经颅磁刺激研究%The posterior parietal cortex in visuospatial attention:study with continuous theta burst stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐光青; 兰月; 陈正宏; 赵江莉; 黄东锋

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨后顶叶皮质与视空间注意功能的关联性及其调控机制.方法 选取志愿受试者40例参加本实验,所有受试者均按照随机顺序对左、右侧后顶叶进行真、假刺激.于刺激前和每次刺激后(刺激后)对40例受试者进行神经行为学评价和注意网络测试,并对所获得的数据进行分析.结果 刺激前、后,受试者各项行为学评价差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).右侧真刺激与假刺激比较,空间提示状态下平均RT明显延长,差异具有统计学意义(t=2.648,P<0.05);且右侧真刺激时与左侧真刺激时空间提示状态下的平均RT比较,差异有统计学意义(t=3.689,P<0.01).右侧PPC真刺激后,警觉网络效率(t=2.843,P<0.01)及其比率(f=2.841,P<0.01)明显降低,而左侧PPC真刺激后,警觉网络效率(t=2.324,P<0.05)及其比率(t=2.225,P<0.05)明显增强,且左侧与右侧真刺激后警觉网络效率及其比率比较,差异均也有统计学意义(P<0.05);定向网络——右侧PPC真刺激后,定向网络效率(t=5.535,P<0.01)及其比率(t=5.245,P<0.01)明显降低,左侧与右侧真刺激后定向网络效率及其比率比较,差异均也有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 后顶叶皮质主要与定向和警觉功能有关,具有明显的右侧半球优势.在双侧大脑半球同源脑区间,视空间注意认知过程存在竞争性抑制.%Objective To seek more direct evidence of the role of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in controlling visuospatial attention.Methods Forty healthy subjects took the Attention Network Test following continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) applied over the left or right PPC or sham stimulation.The Attention Network Test measures the alerting,orienting and executive control components of visual attention separately.Results Subjects responded to spatial cues significantly slower after cTBS.Alerting and orienting showed deficits after cTBS over the right PPC.cTBS over the left

  6. Theta vocabulary I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchev, S.; Zabrodin, A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper is an annotated list of transformation properties and identities satisfied by the four theta functions θ1, θ2, θ3, θ4 of one complex variable, presented in a ready-to-use form. An attempt is made to reveal a pattern behind various identities for the theta-functions. It is shown that all possible 3, 4 and 5-term identities of degree four emerge as algebraic consequences of the six fundamental bilinear 3-term identities connecting the theta-functions with modular parameters τ and 2 τ.

  7. High Amplitude (delta)-Scutis in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, A; Cook, K H; Nikolaev, S; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Becker, A C; Challis, P; Clocchiatti, A; Miknaitis, G; Minniti, D; Morelli, L; Olsen, K; Prieto, J L; Suntzeff, N B; Welch, D L; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2010-01-25

    The authors present 2323 High-Amplitude {delta}-Scutis (HADS) candidates discovered in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by the SuperMACHO survey (Rest et al. 2005). Frequency analyses of these candidates reveal that several are multimode pulsators, including 119 whose largest amplitude of pulsation is in the fundamental (F) mode and 19 whose largest amplitude of pulsation is in the first overtone (FO) mode. Using Fourier decomposition of the HADS light curves, they find that the period-luminosity (PL) relation defined by the FO pulsators does not show a clear separation from the PL-relation defined by the F pulsators. This differs from other instability strip pulsators such as type c RR Lyrae. They also present evidence for a larger amplitude, subluminous population of HADS similar to that observed in Fornax (Poretti et al. 2008).

  8. High Amplitude \\delta-Scutis in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Garg, A; Nikolaev, S; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Becker, A C; Challis, P; Clocchiatti, A; Miknaitis, G; Minniti, D; Morelli, L; Olsen, K; Prieto, J L; Suntzeff, N B; Welch, D L; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2010-01-01

    We present 2323 High-Amplitude \\delta-Scuti (HADS) candidates discovered in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by the SuperMACHO survey (Rest et al. 2005). Frequency analyses of these candidates reveal that several are multimode pulsators, including 119 whose largest amplitude of pulsation is in the fundamental (F) mode and 19 whose largest amplitude of pulsation is in the first overtone (FO) mode. Using Fourier decomposition of the HADS light curves, we find that the period-luminosity (PL) relation defined by the FO pulsators does not show a clear separation from the PL-relation defined by the F pulsators. This differs from other instability strip pulsators such as type c RR Lyrae. We also present evidence for a larger amplitude, subluminous population of HADS similar to that observed in Fornax (Poretti et al. 2008).

  9. On the Theta semigroup

    OpenAIRE

    Zayed, Ahmed; Urbina, Wilfredo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a semigroup on trigonometric expansions that will be called the Theta semigroup since its kernel is a multiple of the third Jacobi theta function. We study properties of this semigroup and prove that it is a positive diffusion semigroup. We also obtain that its subordinated semigroup is the classical Poisson semigroup. The extensions to higher dimensions and to periodic ultra distributions are also considered.

  10. Theta Oscillations and Reactivity of Hippocampal Stratum Oriens Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina F. Kitchigina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The supposition was advanced that the neuronal theta rhythmicity is the key mode of signal selection at the hippocampal level. To address this hypothesis, the experimental data on the responses of putative hippocampal interneurons of the stratum oriens CA1-CA3 to stimulation during enhanced theta rhythm and after its blockade are reviewed. Both a strong increase and a decrease of the natural theta rhythm disturbed the reactions of hippocampal neurons; during theta augmentation, the responses were masked or disappeared, and after theta blockade, they lost the ability to habituate. In both cases, two important events were broken: the resetting of the background activity and the phase-locking of theta cycles to stimulus. These data allow one to suppose that only important stimuli are normally capable to evoke these events and these stimuli are selected for recording. When the response to a significant stimulus occurs, the following theta prevents the responses to other stimuli. This probably protects the hippocampal activity from interference from irrelevant signals. Presumably, the absence of the theta deprives the hippocampus of this protection. During enhanced and persistent theta oscillations, the reset disappeared and theta bursts were generated without stimulus locking. In this state, the system is probably closed and the information cannot be recorded. During the theta blockade, the reset was too long and did not habituate. In this case, the system is open for any signals and the hippocampus loses the ability to select signal. This analysis suggests that information selection in the hippocampus may be performed with the participation of nonpyramidal neurons.

  11. Injection coupling with high amplitude transverse modes: Experimentation and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mery, Yoann; Ducruix, Sébastien; Scouflaire, Philippe; Candel, Sébastien

    2009-06-01

    High frequency combustion instabilities have technical importance in the design of liquid rocket engines. These phenomena involve a strong coupling between transverse acoustic modes and combustion. They are currently being investigated by combining experimentation and numerical simulations. On the experimental level, the coupling is examined in a model scale system featuring a multiple injector combustor (MIC) comprising five coaxial injectors fed with liquid oxygen and gaseous methane. This system is equipped with a novel VHAM actuator (Very High Amplitude Modulator) which comprises two nozzles and a rotating toothed wheel blocking the nozzles in an alternate fashion. This device was designed to obtain the highest possible levels of transverse oscillation in the MIC. After a brief review of the VHAM, this article reports cold flow experiments using this modulator. Velocity maps obtained under resonant conditions using the VHAM are examined at different instants during a cycle of oscillation. Experimental data are compared with numerical pressure and velocity fields obtained from an acoustic solver. The good agreement observed in the nozzle vicinity indicates that numerical simulations can be used to analyze the complex flow field generated by the VHAM. To cite this article: Y. Mery et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  12. The High Amplitude delta Scuti Star AD Canis Minoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, R. A.; Napier-Munn, T.

    2016-12-01

    The high amplitude delta Scuti star AD Canis Minoris was studied by photoelectric photometry (PEP) during one night in in February 2011 and by digital single lens reflex (DSLR) photometry during seven nights in January and February 2016. Nine light curve peaks were captured, eight of them by DSLR photometry. A review of the literature enabled us to tabulate 109 times of maximum since 1959, to which we added 9 times of maximum from our data, thus creating the largest dataset to date for this star. Assuming a linear ephemeris, the period of AD CMi was calculated to be 0.122974511 (+/- 0.000000004) d, almost identical to that quoted in earlier literature. We constructed an observed minus computed (O-C) diagram which exhibited a quasi-sinusoidal shape, and fitted a weighted model characterised by combined quadratic and trigonometric functions. The fit indicates that the shape of the O-C diagram is attributable to the effects of a slow increase in the pulsation period of AD CMi at a constant rate, and the light time effect of a binary pair, confirming the results from previous authors, and updating most of the coefficients of the equation for the fitted model. The values of all of the coefficients in the function are statistically significant. The rate of increase in the pulsation period of AD CMi was calculated from the entire dataset to be dP/dt = 6.17 (+/- 0.75) x 10-9 d yr-1 or dP/Pdt = 5.01 (+/- 0.61) x 10-8 yr-1.

  13. Long-term plasticity is proportional to theta-activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Tsanov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Theta rhythm in the hippocampal formation is a main feature of exploratory behaviour and is believed to enable the encoding of new spatial information and the modification of synaptic weights. Cyclic changes of dentate gyrus excitability during theta rhythm are related to its function, but whether theta epochs per se are able to alter network properties of dentate gyrus for long time-periods is still poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used low-frequency stimulation protocols that amplify the power of endogenous theta oscillations, in order to estimate the plasticity effect of endogenous theta oscillations on a population level. We found that stimulation-induced augmentation of the theta rhythm is linked to a subsequent increase of neuronal excitability and decrease of the synaptic response. This EPSP-to-Spike uncoupling is related to an increased postsynaptic spiking on the positive phases of theta frequency oscillations. Parallel increase of the field EPSP slope and the population spike occurs only after concurrent pre- and postsynaptic activation. Furthermore, we observed that long-term potentiation (>24 h occurs in the dentate gyrus of freely behaving adult rats after phasic activity of entorhinal afferents in the theta-frequency range. This plasticity is proportional to the field bursting activity of granule cells during the stimulation, and may comprise a key step in spatial information transfer. Long-term potentiation of the synaptic component occurs only when the afferent stimulus precedes the evoked population burst, and is input-specific. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data confirm the role of the dentate gyrus in filtering information to the subsequent network during the activated state of the hippocampus.

  14. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  15. Theta-rhythmic drive between medial septum and hippocampus in slow-wave sleep and microarousal: a Granger causality analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, D.; Ding, M.; Topchiy, I.; Shifflett, L.

    2015-01-01

    Medial septum (MS) plays a critical role in controlling the electrical activity of the hippocampus (HIPP). In particular, theta-rhythmic burst firing of MS neurons is thought to drive lasting HIPP theta oscillations in rats during waking motor activity and REM sleep. Less is known about MS-HIPP interactions in nontheta states such as non-REM sleep, in which HIPP theta oscillations are absent but theta-rhythmic burst firing in subsets of MS neurons is preserved. The present study used Granger causality (GC) to examine the interaction patterns between MS and HIPP in slow-wave sleep (SWS, a nontheta state) and during its short interruptions called microarousals (a transient theta state). We found that during SWS, while GC revealed a unidirectional MS→HIPP influence over a wide frequency band (2–12 Hz, maximum: ∼8 Hz), there was no theta peak in the hippocampal power spectra, indicating a lack of theta activity in HIPP. In contrast, during microarousals, theta peaks were seen in both MS and HIPP power spectra and were accompanied by bidirectional GC with MS→HIPP and HIPP→MS theta drives being of equal magnitude. Thus GC in a nontheta state (SWS) vs. a theta state (microarousal) primarily differed in the level of HIPP→MS. The present findings suggest a modification of our understanding of the role of MS as the theta generator in two regards. First, a MS→HIPP theta drive does not necessarily induce theta field oscillations in the hippocampus, as found in SWS. Second, HIPP theta oscillations entail bidirectional theta-rhythmic interactions between MS and HIPP. PMID:26354315

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Guillardia theta [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Guillardia theta Guillardia theta Guillardia_theta_L.png Guillardia_theta_NL.png Guillardia_the...ta_S.png Guillardia_theta_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+the...ta&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+theta&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+theta&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+the

  17. Justifying the exotic Theta+ pentaquark

    CERN Document Server

    Diakonov, Dmitri

    2009-01-01

    The existence of a light S=+1 baryon resonance follows from Quantum Field Theory applied to baryons. This is illustrated in the Skyrme model (where Theta+ exists but is too strong) and in a new mean field approach where Theta+ arises as a consequence of three known resonances: Lambda(1405), N(1440) and N(1535).

  18. Theta vocabulary II. Multidimensional case

    CERN Document Server

    Kharchev, S

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the Jacobi and Riemann identities of degree four for the multidimensional theta functions as well as the Weierstrass identities emerge as algebraic consequences of the fundamental multidimensional binary identities connecting the theta functions with Riemann matrices $\\tau$ and $2\\tau$.

  19. Theta vocabulary II. Multidimensional case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchev, S.; Zabrodin, A.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that the Jacobi and Riemann identities of degree four for the multidimensional theta functions as well as the Weierstrass identities emerge as algebraic consequences of the fundamental multidimensional binary identities connecting the theta functions with Riemann matrices τ and 2 τ.

  20. Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was launched in June 2008. During the last five years the instrument has observed several hundreds of bursts from 8 confirmed magnetars and 19 events from unconfirmed sources. I will discuss the results of the GBM magnetar burst catalog, expand on the different properties of their diverse source population, and compare these results with the bursting activity of past sources. I will then conclude with thoughts of how these properties fit the magnetar theoretical models.

  1. Theta functions and mirror symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This is a survey covering aspects of varied work of the authors with Mohammed Abouzaid, Paul Hacking, and Sean Keel. While theta functions are traditionally canonical sections of ample line bundles on abelian varieties, we motivate, using mirror symmetry, the idea that theta functions exist in much greater generality. This suggestion originates with the work of the late Andrei Tyurin. We outline how to construct theta functions on the degenerations of varieties constructed in previous work of the authors, and then explain applications of this construction to homological mirror symmetry and constructions of broad classes of mirror varieties.

  2. Alpha Theta Meditation: Phenomenological, neurophysiologic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... neurophysiologic, mindfulness, mood, health and sport implications ... Integrated findings are in line with other studies which support the psychological value of alpha theta training.

  3. In search of objective manometric criteria for colonic high-amplitude propagated pressure waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Schryver, AMP; Samsom, M; Smout, AJPM

    2002-01-01

    The aims of this study were to explore all characteristics of high-amplitude propagated contractions (HAPCs) that would allow them to be distinguished from nonHAPC colonic pressure waves, and to develop computer algorithms for automated HAPC detection. Colonic manometry recordings obtained from 24 h

  4. Numerical modeling of dune progression in a high amplitude meandering channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory experiments carried out by Abad and Garcia (2009) in a high-amplitude Kinoshita meandering channel show bed morphodynamics to comprise steady (local scour and deposition) and unsteady (migrating bedforms) components. The experiments are replicated with a numerical model. The sediment tran...

  5. Brh V128 is a Double-Mode High-Amplitude delta Scuti Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, K.; Pejcha, O.; Proksch, W.; Quester, W.; van Cauteren, P.; Wils, P.

    2004-08-01

    CCD-V and unfiltered photometric data show that Brh V128 = GSC 1893-89 is a new high-amplitude double-mode Delta Scuti variable with a fundamental period of 0.1534 days and a period ratio of 0.767. The amplitude of the first overtone pulsation is slightly larger than that of the fundamental mode.

  6. Theta angle in holographic QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvinen, Matti

    2016-01-01

    V-QCD is a class of effective holographic models for QCD which fully includes the backreaction of quarks to gluon dynamics. The physics of the theta-angle and the axial anomaly can be consistently included in these models. We analyze their phase diagrams over ranges of values of the quark mass, N_f/N_c, and theta, computing observables such as the topological susceptibility and the meson masses. At small quark mass, where effective chiral Lagrangians are reliable, they agree with the predictions of V-QCD.

  7. Non-Linear High Amplitude Oscillations in Wave-shaped Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antao, Dion; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2011-11-01

    A numerical and experimental study of non-linear, high amplitude standing waves in ``wave-shaped'' resonators is reported here. These waves are shock-less and can generate peak acoustic overpressures that can exceed the ambient pressure by three/four times its nominal value. A high fidelity compressible axisymmetric computational fluid dynamic model is used to simulate the phenomena in cylindrical and arbitrarily shaped axisymmetric resonators. Working fluids (Helium, Nitrogen and R-134a) at various operating pressures are studied. The experiments are performed in a constant cross-section cylindrical resonator in atmospheric pressure nitrogen and helium to provide model validation. The high amplitude non-linear oscillations demonstrated can be used as a prime mover in a variety of applications including thermoacoustic cryocooling. The work reported is supported by the US National Science Foundation under grant CBET-0853959.

  8. Analysis of the Petersen Diagram of Double-Mode High-Amplitude {\\delta} Scuti Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Furgoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    I created the Petersen diagram relative to all the Double Mode High Amplitude {\\delta} Scuti stars listed in the AAVSO's International Variable Star Index up to date December 29, 2015. For the first time I noticed that the ratio between the two periods P1/P0 seems in evident linear relation with the duration of the period P0, a finding never explicitly described in literature regarding this topic.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VVV high amplitude NIR variable stars (Contreras Pena+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Pena, C.; Lucas, P. W.; Minniti, D.; Kurtev, R.; Stimson, W.; Navarro Molina, C.; Borissova, J.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Thompson, M. A.; Gledhill, T.; Terzi, R.; Froebrich, D.; Caratti o Garatti, A.

    2017-08-01

    We present the single epoch ZYJHKs photometry obtained from VVV catalogues for 816 high-amplitude variables. We also present the amplitude of the Ks light curve of the objects derived from 2010-2015 photometry. For each object we also provide a provisional classification derived from the shape of the light curve. For objects found to be likely associated with SFRs we present an spectral index derived from the object's spectral energy distribution. (2 data files).

  10. Kepler observations of the high-amplitude δ Scuti star V2367 Cyg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balona, L. A.; Lenz, P.; Antoci, V.

    2012-01-01

    We analyse Kepler observations of the high-amplitude δ Scuti (HADS) star V2367 Cyg (KIC 9408694). The variations are dominated by a mode with frequency f1= 5.6611 d−1. Two other independent modes with f2= 7.1490 d−1 and f3= 7.7756 d−1 have amplitudes an order of magnitude smaller than f1. Nearly ...

  11. Theta height and Faltings height

    CERN Document Server

    Pazuki, F

    2009-01-01

    Using original ideas from J.-B. Bost and S. David, we provide an explicit comparison between the Theta height and the stable Faltings height of a principally polarized abelian variety. We also give as an application an explicit upper bound on the number of K-rational points of a curve of genus g>1 over a number filed K under a conjecture of S. Lang and J. Silverman. We complete the study with a comparison between differential lattice structures.

  12. Theta dependence in Holographic QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, Lorenzo; Bolognesi, Stefano; Cotrone, Aldo L; Manenti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We study the effects of the CP-breaking topological $\\theta$-term in the large $N_c$ QCD model by Witten, Sakai and Sugimoto with $N_f$ degenerate light flavors. We first compute the ground state energy density, the topological susceptibility and the masses of the lowest lying mesons, finding agreement with expectations from the QCD chiral effective action. Then, focusing on the $N_f=2$ case, we consider the baryonic sector and determine, to leading order in the small $\\theta$ regime, the related holographic instantonic soliton solutions. We find that while the baryon spectrum does not receive ${\\cal O}(\\theta)$ corrections, this is not the case for observables like the electromagnetic form factor of the nucleons. In particular, it exhibits a dipole term, which turns out to be vector-meson dominated. The resulting neutron electric dipole moment, which is exactly the opposite as that of the proton, is of the same order of magnitude of previous estimates in the literature. Finally, we compute the CP-violating p...

  13. Rapid high-amplitude circumferential slow wave propagation during normal gastric pacemaking and dysrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, G; Du, P; Paskaranandavadivel, N; Angeli, T R; Lammers, W J E P; Asirvatham, S J; Windsor, J A; Farrugia, G; Pullan, A J; Cheng, L K

    2012-07-01

    Gastric slow waves propagate aborally as rings of excitation. Circumferential propagation does not normally occur, except at the pacemaker region. We hypothesized that (i) the unexplained high-velocity, high-amplitude activity associated with the pacemaker region is a consequence of circumferential propagation; (ii) rapid, high-amplitude circumferential propagation emerges during gastric dysrhythmias; (iii) the driving network conductance might switch between interstitial cells of Cajal myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) and circular interstitial cells of Cajal intramuscular (ICC-IM) during circumferential propagation; and (iv) extracellular amplitudes and velocities are correlated. An experimental-theoretical study was performed. High-resolution gastric mapping was performed in pigs during normal activation, pacing, and dysrhythmia. Activation profiles, velocities, and amplitudes were quantified. ICC pathways were theoretically evaluated in a bidomain model. Extracellular potentials were modeled as a function of membrane potentials. High-velocity, high-amplitude activation was only recorded in the pacemaker region when circumferential conduction occurred. Circumferential propagation accompanied dysrhythmia in 8/8 experiments was faster than longitudinal propagation (8.9 vs 6.9 mm s(-1) ; P = 0.004) and of higher amplitude (739 vs 528 μV; P = 0.007). Simulations predicted that ICC-MP could be the driving network during longitudinal propagation, whereas during ectopic pacemaking, ICC-IM could outpace and activate ICC-MP in the circumferential axis. Experimental and modeling data demonstrated a linear relationship between velocities and amplitudes (P propagation. Rapid circumferential propagation also emerges during a range of gastric dysrhythmias, elevating extracellular amplitudes and organizing transverse wavefronts. One possible explanation for these findings is bidirectional coupling between ICC-MP and circular ICC-IM networks. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. High amplitude nonlinear acoustic wave driven flow fields in cylindrical and conical resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antao, Dion Savio; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2013-08-01

    A high fidelity computational fluid dynamic model is used to simulate the flow, pressure, and density fields generated in a cylindrical and a conical resonator by a vibrating end wall/piston producing high-amplitude standing waves. The waves in the conical resonator are found to be shock-less and can generate peak acoustic overpressures that exceed the initial undisturbed pressure by two to three times. A cylindrical (consonant) acoustic resonator has limitations to the output response observed at one end when the opposite end is acoustically excited. In the conical geometry (dissonant acoustic resonator) the linear acoustic input is converted to high energy un-shocked nonlinear acoustic output. The model is validated using past numerical results of standing waves in cylindrical resonators. The nonlinear nature of the harmonic response in the conical resonator system is further investigated for two different working fluids (carbon dioxide and argon) operating at various values of piston amplitude. The high amplitude nonlinear oscillations observed in the conical resonator can potentially enhance the performance of pulse tube thermoacoustic refrigerators and these conical resonators can be used as efficient mixers.

  15. QCD at $\\Theta \\sim \\pi$

    CERN Document Server

    Smilga, A V

    1999-01-01

    Taking into account the quadratic in quark mass terms in the effective chiral lagrangian, we show that, at \\theta \\sim \\pi, the theory with 2 light quarks of equal mass involves two degenerate vacuum states separated by a barrier. For three flavors, the energy barrier between two vacua appears already in the leading order in mass. This corresponds to the first order phase transition at different vacua is calculated. In the immediate vicinity of the phase transition point, two minima of the potential still exist, but one of them becomes metastable. The probability of the false vacuum decay is estimated.

  16. Algebraic geometry and theta functions

    CERN Document Server

    Coble, Arthur B

    1929-01-01

    This book is the result of extending and deepening all questions from algebraic geometry that are connected to the central problem of this book: the determination of the tritangent planes of a space curve of order six and genus four, which the author treated in his Colloquium Lecture in 1928 at Amherst. The first two chapters recall fundamental ideas of algebraic geometry and theta functions in such fashion as will be most helpful in later applications. In order to clearly present the state of the central problem, the author first presents the better-known cases of genus two (Chapter III) and

  17. Decreased rhythmic GABAergic septal activity and memory-associated theta oscillations after hippocampal amyloid-beta pathology in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villette, Vincent; Poindessous-Jazat, Frédérique; Simon, Axelle; Léna, Clément; Roullot, Elodie; Bellessort, Brice; Epelbaum, Jacques; Dutar, Patrick; Stéphan, Aline

    2010-08-18

    The memory deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease result to a great extent from hippocampal network dysfunction. The coordination of this network relies on theta (symbol) oscillations generated in the medial septum. Here, we investigated in rats the impact of hippocampal amyloid beta (Abeta) injections on the physiological and cognitive functions that depend on the septohippocampal system. Hippocampal Abeta injections progressively impaired behavioral performances, the associated hippocampal theta power, and theta frequency response in a visuospatial recognition test. These alterations were associated with a specific reduction in the firing of the identified rhythmic bursting GABAergic neurons responsible for the propagation of the theta rhythm to the hippocampus, but without loss of medial septal neurons. Such results indicate that hippocampal Abeta treatment leads to a specific functional depression of inhibitory projection neurons of the medial septum, resulting in the functional impairment of the temporal network.

  18. {theta}{sub 13}{sup PMNS}={theta}{sub C}/{radical}(2) from GUTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antusch, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.antusch@unibas.ch [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Muenchen (Germany); Gross, Christian, E-mail: christian.gross@unibas.ch [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Maurer, Vinzenz, E-mail: vinzenz.maurer@unibas.ch [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Sluka, Constantin, E-mail: constantin.sluka@unibas.ch [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2013-01-21

    The recent observations of the leptonic mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}{sup PMNS} are consistent with {theta}{sub 13}{sup PMNS}={theta}{sub C}/{radical}(2) (with {theta}{sub C} being the Cabibbo angle {theta}{sub 12}{sup CKM}). We discuss how this relation can emerge in Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) via charged lepton corrections. The key ingredient is that in GUTs the down-type quark Yukawa matrix and the charged lepton Yukawa matrix are generated from the same set of GUT operators, which implies that the resulting entries are linked and differ only by group-theoretical Clebsch factors. This allows a link {theta}{sub 12}{sup e} Almost-Equal-To {theta}{sub C} to be established, which can induce {theta}{sub 13}{sup PMNS} Almost-Equal-To {theta}{sub C}/{radical}(2) provided that the 1-3 mixing in the neutrino mass matrix is much smaller than {theta}{sub C}. We find simple conditions under which {theta}{sub 13}{sup PMNS} Almost-Equal-To {theta}{sub C}/{radical}(2) can arise via this link in SU(5) GUTs and Pati-Salam models. We also discuss possible corrections to the exact relation. Using lepton mixing sum rules different neutrino mixing patterns can be distinguished by their predictions for the Dirac CP phase {delta}{sup PMNS}.

  19. Pulsation analysis of the high amplitude δ Scuti star CW Serpentis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jia-Shu; Fu, Jian-Ning; Zong, Wei-Kai

    2013-10-01

    Time-series photometric observations were made for the high amplitude δ Scuti star CW Ser between 2011 and 2012 at the Xinglong Station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. After performing the frequency analysis of the light curves, we confirmed the fundamental frequency of f = 5.28677 c d-1, together with seven harmonics of the fundamental frequency, which are newly detected. No additional frequencies were detected. The O — C diagram, produced with the 21 newly determined times of maximum light combined with those provided in the literature, helps to obtain a new ephemeris formula of the times of maximum light with the pulsation period of 0.189150355 ± 0.000000003 d.

  20. The analysis of high amplitude of potential oscillations near the hollow cathode of ion thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yu; Xie, Kan; Guo, Ning; Zhang, Zun; Zhang, Cen; Gu, Zengjie; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Zhaorui; Ouyang, Jiting

    2017-05-01

    The influence of gas flow, current level, and different shapes of anode on the oscillation amplitude and the characteristics of the hollow cathode discharge were investigated. The average plasma potential, temporal measurements of plasma potential, ion density, the electron temperature, as well as waveforms of plasma potential for test conditions were measured. At the same time, the time-resolved images of the plasma plume were also recorded. The results show that the potential oscillations appear at high discharge current or low flow rate. The potential oscillation boundaries, the position of maximum amplitude of plasma potential, and the position where the highest ion density was observed, were found. Both of the positions are affected by different shapes of anode configurations. This high amplitude of potential oscillations is ionization-like instabilities. The xenon ions ionized in space was analyzed for the fast potential rise and spatial dissipation of the space xenon ions was the reason for the gradual potential delay.

  1. WEATHER ON OTHER WORLDS. III. A SURVEY FOR T DWARFS WITH HIGH-AMPLITUDE OPTICAL VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinze, Aren N.; Metchev, Stanimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Kellogg, Kendra, E-mail: aren.heinze@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: smetchev@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2015-03-10

    We have monitored 12 T dwarfs with the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope using an F814W filter (0.7-0.95 μm) to place in context the remarkable 10%-20% variability exhibited by the nearby T dwarf Luhman 16B in this wavelength regime. The motivation was the poorly known red optical behavior of T dwarfs, which have been monitored almost exclusively at infrared wavelengths, where variability amplitudes greater than 10% have been found to be very rare. We detect highly significant variability in two T dwarfs. The T2.5 dwarf 2MASS 13243559+6358284 shows consistent ∼17% variability on two consecutive nights. The T2 dwarf 2MASS J16291840+0335371 exhibits ∼10% variability that may evolve from night to night, similarly to Luhman 16B. Both objects were previously known to be variable in the infrared, but with considerably lower amplitudes. We also find evidence for variability in the T6 dwarf J162414.37+002915.6, but since it has lower significance, we conservatively refrain from claiming this object as a variable. We explore and rule out various telluric effects, demonstrating that the variations we detect are astrophysically real. We suggest that high-amplitude photometric variability for T dwarfs is likely more common in the red optical than at longer wavelengths. The two new members of the growing class of high-amplitude variable T dwarfs offer excellent prospects for further study of cloud structures and their evolution.

  2. Facilitation of epileptic activity during sleep is mediated by high amplitude slow waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauscher, Birgit; von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Avoli, Massimo; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2015-06-01

    Epileptic discharges in focal epilepsy are frequently activated during non-rapid eye movement sleep. Sleep slow waves are present during this stage and have been shown to include a deactivated ('down', hyperpolarized) and an activated state ('up', depolarized). The 'up' state enhances physiological rhythms, and we hypothesize that sleep slow waves and particularly the 'up' state are the specific components of non-rapid eye movement sleep that mediate the activation of epileptic activity. We investigated eight patients with pharmaco-resistant focal epilepsies who underwent combined scalp-intracerebral electroencephalography for diagnostic evaluation. We analysed 259 frontal electroencephalographic channels, and manually marked 442 epileptic spikes and 8487 high frequency oscillations during high amplitude widespread slow waves, and during matched control segments with low amplitude widespread slow waves, non-widespread slow waves or no slow waves selected during the same sleep stages (total duration of slow wave and control segments: 49 min each). During the slow waves, spikes and high frequency oscillations were more frequent than during control segments (79% of spikes during slow waves and 65% of high frequency oscillations, both P ∼ 0). The spike and high frequency oscillation density also increased for higher amplitude slow waves. We compared the density of spikes and high frequency oscillations between the 'up' and 'down' states. Spike and high frequency oscillation density was highest during the transition from the 'up' to the 'down' state. Interestingly, high frequency oscillations in channels with normal activity expressed a different peak at the transition from the 'down' to the 'up' state. These results show that the apparent activation of epileptic discharges by non-rapid eye movement sleep is not a state-dependent phenomenon but is predominantly associated with specific events, the high amplitude widespread slow waves that are frequent, but not

  3. Nonlinear reflection of high-amplitude laser pulses from relativistic electron mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulagin, V. V.; Kornienko, V. N.; Cherepenin, V. A.

    2016-04-01

    A coherent X-ray pulse of attosecond duration can be formed in the reflection of a counterpropagating laser pulse from a relativistic electron mirror. The reflection of a high-amplitude laser pulse from the relativistic electron mirror located in the field of an accelerating laser pulse is investigated by means of two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation. It is shown that provided the amplitude of the counterpropagating laser pulse is several times greater than the amplitude of the accelerating laser pulse, the reflection process is highly nonlinear, which causes a significant change in the X-ray pulse shape and its shortening up to generation of quasi-unipolar pulses and single-cycle pulses. A physical mechanism responsible for this nonlinearity of the reflection process is explained, and the parameters of the reflected X-ray pulses are determined. It is shown that the duration of these pulses may constitute 50 - 60 as, while their amplitude may be sub-relativistic.

  4. High amplitude phase resetting in rev-erbalpha/per1 double mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Jud

    Full Text Available Over time, organisms developed various strategies to adapt to their environment. Circadian clocks are thought to have evolved to adjust to the predictable rhythms of the light-dark cycle caused by the rotation of the Earth around its own axis. The rhythms these clocks generate persist even in the absence of environmental cues with a period of about 24 hours. To tick in time, they continuously synchronize themselves to the prevailing photoperiod by appropriate phase shifts. In this study, we disrupted two molecular components of the mammalian circadian oscillator, Rev-Erbalpha and Period1 (Per1. We found that mice lacking these genes displayed robust circadian rhythms with significantly shorter periods under constant darkness conditions. Strikingly, they showed high amplitude resetting in response to a brief light pulse at the end of their subjective night phase, which is rare in mammals. Surprisingly, Cry1, a clock component not inducible by light in mammals, became slightly inducible in these mice. Taken together, Rev-Erbalpha and Per1 may be part of a mechanism preventing drastic phase shifts in mammals.

  5. Adhesive bond strength evaluation in composite materials by laser-generated high amplitude ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perton, M.; Blouin, A.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composites laminates is highly efficient but is not used for joining primary aircraft structures, since there is presently no nondestructive inspection technique to ensure the quality of the bond. We are developing a technique based on the propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves to evaluate the adhesive bond strength. Large amplitude compression waves are generated by a short pulse powerful laser under water confinement and are converted after reflection by the assembly back surface into tensile waves. The resulting tensile stresses can cause a delamination inside the laminates or at the bond interfaces. The adhesion strength is evaluated by increasing the laser pulse energy until disbond. A good bond is unaffected by a certain level of stress whereas a weaker one is damaged. The method is shown completely non invasive throughout the whole composite assembly. The sample back surface velocity is measured by an optical interferometer and used to estimate stress history inside the sample. The depth and size of the disbonds are revealed by a post-test inspection by the well established laser-ultrasonic technique. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to differentiate weak bond from strong bonds and to estimate quantitatively their bond strength.

  6. Characterizing Oscillatory Bursts in Single-Trial EEG Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, K. H.; Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Oscillatory bursts in numerous bands ranging from low (theta) to high frequencies (e.g., gamma) undoubtedly play an important role in cortical dynamics. Largely because of the inadequacy of existing analytic techniques. however, oscillatory bursts and their role in cortical processing remains poorly understood. To study oscillatory bursts effectively one must be able to isolate them and characterize them in the single trial. We describe a series of straightforward analysis techniques that produce useful indices of burst characteristics. First, stimulus-evoked responses are estimated using Differentially Variable Component Analysis (dVCA), and are subtracted from the single-trial. The single-trial characteristics of the evoked responses are stored to identify possible correlations with burst activity. Time-frequency (T-F), or wavelet, analyses are then applied to the single trial residuals. While T-F plots have been used in recent studies to identify and isolate bursts, we go further by fitting each burst in the T-F plot with a two-dimensional Gaussian. This provides a set of burst characteristics, such as, center time. burst duration, center frequency. frequency dispersion. and amplitude, all of which contribute to the accurate characterization of the individual burst. The burst phase can also be estimated. Burst characteristics can be quantified with several standard techniques (e.g.. histogramming and clustering), as well as Bayesian techniques (e.g., blocking) to allow a more parametric description analysis of the characteristics of oscillatory bursts, and the relationships of specific parameters to cortical excitability and stimulus integration.

  7. Characterizing Oscillatory Bursts in Single-Trial EEG Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, K. H.; Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Oscillatory bursts in numerous bands ranging from low (theta) to high frequencies (e.g., gamma) undoubtedly play an important role in cortical dynamics. Largely because of the inadequacy of existing analytic techniques. however, oscillatory bursts and their role in cortical processing remains poorly understood. To study oscillatory bursts effectively one must be able to isolate them and characterize them in the single trial. We describe a series of straightforward analysis techniques that produce useful indices of burst characteristics. First, stimulus-evoked responses are estimated using Differentially Variable Component Analysis (dVCA), and are subtracted from the single-trial. The single-trial characteristics of the evoked responses are stored to identify possible correlations with burst activity. Time-frequency (T-F), or wavelet, analyses are then applied to the single trial residuals. While T-F plots have been used in recent studies to identify and isolate bursts, we go further by fitting each burst in the T-F plot with a two-dimensional Gaussian. This provides a set of burst characteristics, such as, center time. burst duration, center frequency. frequency dispersion. and amplitude, all of which contribute to the accurate characterization of the individual burst. The burst phase can also be estimated. Burst characteristics can be quantified with several standard techniques (e.g.. histogramming and clustering), as well as Bayesian techniques (e.g., blocking) to allow a more parametric description analysis of the characteristics of oscillatory bursts, and the relationships of specific parameters to cortical excitability and stimulus integration.

  8. Noninvasive respiratory support of juvenile rabbits by high-amplitude bubble continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diblasi, Robert M; Zignego, Jay C; Tang, Dennis M; Hildebrandt, Jack; Smith, Charles V; Hansen, Thomas N; Richardson, C Peter

    2010-06-01

    Bubble continuous positive airway pressure (B-CPAP) applies small-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations in airway pressure (DeltaPaw) that may improve gas exchange in infants with respiratory disease. We developed a device, high-amplitude B-CPAP (HAB-CPAP), which provides greater DeltaPaw than B-CPAP provides. We studied the effects of different operational parameters on DeltaPaw and volumes of gas delivered to a mechanical infant lung model. In vivo studies tested the hypothesis that HAB-CPAP provides noninvasive respiratory support greater than that provided by B-CPAP. Lavaged juvenile rabbits were stabilized on ventilator nasal CPAP. The animals were then supported at the same mean airway pressure, bias flow, and fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) required for stabilization, whereas the bubbler angle was varied in a randomized crossover design at exit angles, relative to vertical, of 0 (HAB-CPAP0; equivalent to conventional B-CPAP), 90 (HAB-CPAP90), and 135 degrees (HAB-CPAP135). Arterial blood gases and pressure-rate product (PRP) were measured after 15 min at each bubbler angle. Pao2 levels were higher (p<0.007) with HAB-CPAP135 than with conventional B-CPAP. PaCO2 levels did not differ (p=0.073) among the three bubbler configurations. PRP with HAB-CPAP135 were half of the PRP with HAB-CPAP0 or HAB-CPAP90 (p=0.001). These results indicate that HAB-CPAP135 provides greater respiratory support than conventional B-CPAP does.

  9. Short-lived high-amplitude cooling on Svalbard during the Dark Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bilt, Willem; D`Andrea, William; Bakke, Jostein; Balascio, Nicholas; Werner, Johannes; Hoek, Wim

    2016-04-01

    As the paradigm of a stable Holocene climate has shifted, an increasing number of high-resolution proxy timeseries reveal dynamic conditions, characterized by high-amplitude climate shifts. Some of these events occurred during historical times and allow us to study the interaction between environmental and cultural change, providing valuable lessons for the near future. These include the Dark Ages Cold Period (DACP) between 300 and 800 AD, a period marked by political upheaval and climate instability that remains poorly investigated. Here, we present two temperature reconstructions from the High Arctic Svalbard Archipelago. To this end, we applied the established alkenone-based UK37 paleothermometer on sediments from two lakes on western Spitsbergen, Lake Hajeren and Lake Hakluyt. The Arctic is presently warming twice as fast as the global average and proxy data as well as model simulations suggest that this amplified response is characteristic for regional climate. The Arctic therefore provides a uniquely sensitive environment to study relatively modest climate shifts, like the DACP, that may not be adequately captured at lower-latitude sites. Owing to undisturbed sediments, a high sampling resolution and robust chronological control, the presented reconstructions resolve the attendant sub-centennial-scale climate shifts. Our findings suggest that the DACP marks a cold spell within the cool Neoglacial period, which started some 4 ka BP on Svalbard. Close investigation reveals a distinct temperature minimum around 500 AD that is reproduced in another alkenone-based temperature reconstruction from a nearby lake. At ± 1.75 °C, cooling underlines the sensitivity of Arctic climate as well as the magnitude of the DACP.

  10. Spectral determinants and quantum theta functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Alba

    2016-12-01

    It has been recently conjectured that the spectral determinants of operators associated to mirror curves can be expressed in terms of a generalization of theta functions, called quantum theta functions. In this paper we study the symplectic properties of these spectral determinants by expanding them around the point {\\hslash }=2π , where the quantum theta functions become conventional theta functions. We find that they are modular invariant, order by order, and we give explicit expressions for the very first terms of the expansion. Our derivation requires a detailed understanding of the modular properties of topological string free energies in the Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit. We derive these properties in a diagrammatic form. Finally, we use our results to provide a new test of the duality between topological strings and spectral theory.

  11. On Probing theta_{23} in Neutrino Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, Sandhya; Rodejohann, Werner

    2008-01-01

    Among all neutrino mixing parameters, the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle theta_{23} introduces the strongest variation on the flux ratios of ultra high energy neutrinos. We investigate the potential of these flux ratio measurements at neutrino telescopes to constrain theta_{23}. We consider astrophysical neutrinos originating from pion, muon-damped and neutron sources and make a comparative study of their sensitivity reach to theta_{23}. It is found that neutron sources are most favorable for testing deviations from maximal theta_{23}. Using a chi^2 analysis, we show in particular the power of combining (i) different flux ratios from the same type of source, and also (ii) combining flux ratios from different astrophysical sources. We include in our analysis ``impure'' sources, i.e., deviations from the usually assumed initial (1 : 2 : 0), (0 : 1 : 0) or (1 : 0 : 0) flux compositions.

  12. Geometric relation for neutrino mixing angles and theta(13)

    CERN Document Server

    Lipmanov, E M

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by the recent T2K discovery of a relatively large theta(13) angle in the neutrino mixing matrix we propose here a simple geometric relation between the three usually thought "independent" neutrino mixing angles - solar {\\theta}12, atmospheric {\\theta}23 and reactor {\\theta}13 ones: cos2(2{\\theta}sol) + cos2(2{\\theta}atm) + cos2(2{\\theta}13) = 1. Using the estimations for the two largest neutrino mixing angles from experimental data analyses in the literature, {\\theta}sol{\\cong} ~ 34.4o, {\\theta}atm{\\cong} ~ 42.8o, the reactor neutrino mixing angle is uniquely predicted {\\theta}13 = 10.8o. In case a little changed data, {\\theta}sol{\\cong} = 34o and {\\theta}atm{\\cong} = 43o the result will be {\\theta}13 =11.2o. And so, the {\\theta}13-value is not very sensitive to the accurate magnitudes of the two largest mixing angles. That prediction for the 'small' neutrino mixing angle is compatible with the latest T2K experimental data with best fit values for the reactor angle ({\\theta}13)bf{\\cong}= 9.7o(11o) fo...

  13. Learning alters theta amplitude, theta-gamma coupling and neuronal synchronization in inferotemporal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicol Alister U

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How oscillatory brain rhythms alone, or in combination, influence cortical information processing to support learning has yet to be fully established. Local field potential and multi-unit neuronal activity recordings were made from 64-electrode arrays in the inferotemporal cortex of conscious sheep during and after visual discrimination learning of face or object pairs. A neural network model has been developed to simulate and aid functional interpretation of learning-evoked changes. Results Following learning the amplitude of theta (4-8 Hz, but not gamma (30-70 Hz oscillations was increased, as was the ratio of theta to gamma. Over 75% of electrodes showed significant coupling between theta phase and gamma amplitude (theta-nested gamma. The strength of this coupling was also increased following learning and this was not simply a consequence of increased theta amplitude. Actual discrimination performance was significantly correlated with theta and theta-gamma coupling changes. Neuronal activity was phase-locked with theta but learning had no effect on firing rates or the magnitude or latencies of visual evoked potentials during stimuli. The neural network model developed showed that a combination of fast and slow inhibitory interneurons could generate theta-nested gamma. By increasing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor sensitivity in the model similar changes were produced as in inferotemporal cortex after learning. The model showed that these changes could potentiate the firing of downstream neurons by a temporal desynchronization of excitatory neuron output without increasing the firing frequencies of the latter. This desynchronization effect was confirmed in IT neuronal activity following learning and its magnitude was correlated with discrimination performance. Conclusions Face discrimination learning produces significant increases in both theta amplitude and the strength of theta-gamma coupling in the inferotemporal cortex

  14. Measuring Theta_13 at Daya Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Kwong [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-03-14

    We measured the neutrino mixing angle, theta13, presumably related to the preponderance of matter over antimatter in our universe with high precision. We determined theta13 by measuring the disappearance of neutrinos from a group of six nuclear reactors. The target, located inside a mountain at about 2 km from the reactors, is 80 tons of liquid scintillator doped with trace amount of Gadolinium to increase its neutron detection efficiency. The neutrino flux is measured by the inverse beta-decay reaction where the final-state particles are detected by the liquid scintillator. The measured value of theta13, based on data collected over 3 years, is large, around 8 degrees, rendering the measurement of the parameter related to matter-antimatter asymmetry in future long baseline neutrino experiments easier.

  15. Cubic metaplectic forms and theta functions

    CERN Document Server

    Proskurin, Nikolai

    1998-01-01

    The book is an introduction to the theory of cubic metaplectic forms on the 3-dimensional hyperbolic space and the author's research on cubic metaplectic forms on special linear and symplectic groups of rank 2. The topics include: Kubota and Bass-Milnor-Serre homomorphisms, cubic metaplectic Eisenstein series, cubic theta functions, Whittaker functions. A special method is developed and applied to find Fourier coefficients of the Eisenstein series and cubic theta functions. The book is intended for readers, with beginning graduate-level background, interested in further research in the theory of metaplectic forms and in possible applications.

  16. Search for the exotic $\\Theta^+$ resonance in the NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Samoylov, O; Autiero, D; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldo-Ceolin, M; Banner, M; Bassompierre, G; Benslama, K; Besson, N; Bird, I; Blumenfeld, B; Bobisut, F; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S; Bueno, A; Bunyatov, S; Camilleri, L L; Cardini, A; Cattaneo, P W; Cavasinni, V; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Challis, R; Chukanov, A; Collazuol, G; Conforto, G; Conta, C; Contalbrigo, M; Cousins, R; Daniels, D; De Santo, A; Degaudenzi, H M; Del Prete, T; Di Lella, L; Dignan, T; Do Couto e Silva, E; Dumarchez, J; Ellis, M; Feldman, G J; Ferrari, R; Ferrère, D; Flaminio, V; Fraternali, M; Gaillard, J M; Gangler, E; Geiser, A; Geppert, D; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S; Godley, A; Gosset, J; Gouanère, M; Grant, A; Graziani, G; Guglielmi, A M; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gössling, C; Hagner, C; Hernando, J; Hubbard, D; Hurst, P; Hyett, N; Iacopini, E; Joseph, C; Juget, F; Kent, N; Kirsanov, M; Klimov, O; Kokkonen, J; Kovzelev, A; Krasnoperov, A V; La Rotonda, L; Lacaprara, S; Lachaud, C; Lakic, B; Lanza, A; Laveder, M; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Linssen, L; Ljubicic, A; Long, J; Lupi, A; Lyubushkin, V; Lévy, J M; Marchionni, A; Martelli, F; Mendiburu, J P; Meyer, J P; Mezzetto, M; Mishra, S R; Moorhead, G F; Méchain, X; Naumov, D; Nefedov, Yu; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nédélec, P; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Peak, L S; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Petti, R; Placci, A; Polesello, G; Pollmann, D; Polyarush, A Yu; Popov, B; Poulsen, C; Rebuffi, L; Rico, J; Riemann, P; Roda, C; Rubbia, André; Salvatore, F; Schahmaneche, K; Schmidt, B; Schmidt, T; Sconza, A; Sevior, M; Sillou, D; Soler, F J P; Sozzi, G; Steele, D; Stiegler, U; Stipcevic, M; Stolarczyk, T; Tareb-Reyes, M; Taylor, G N; Tereshchenko, V V; Toropin, A; Touchard, A M; Tovey, S N; Tran, M T; Tsesmelis, E; Ulrichs, J; Vacavant, L; Valdata-Nappi, M; Valuev, V; Vannucci, F; Varvell, K E; Veltri, M; Vercesi, V; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Vieira, J M; Vinogradova, T; Weber, F V; Weisse, T; Wilson, F F; Winton, L J; Yabsley, B D; Zaccone, Henri; Zuber, K; Zuccon, P

    2007-01-01

    A search for exotic Theta baryon via Theta -> proton +Ks decay mode in the NOMAD muon neutrino DIS data is reported. The special background generation procedure was developed. The proton identification criteria are tuned to maximize the sensitivity to the Theta signal as a function of xF which allows to study the Theta production mechanism. We do not observe any evidence for the Theta state in the NOMAD data. We provide an upper limit on Theta production rate at 90% CL as 2.13 per 1000 of neutrino interactions.

  17. Double Chooz and Reactor Theta13 Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    This is a contribution paper from the Double Chooz experiment to the special issue of NPB on neutrino oscillations. The physics and history of the reactor theta13 experiments, as well as Double Chooz experiment and its neutrino oscillation analyses are reviewed.

  18. Hippocampal theta frequency shifts and operant behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Kamp, A.

    1. 1. A shift of hippocampal dominant theta frequency to 6 c/sec has been demonstrated in the post-reward period in two dogs, which occurs consistently related in time to a well defined behavioural pattern in the course of an operant conditioning paradigm. 2. 2. The frequency shift was detected and

  19. Unveiling the population of orphan Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ghirlanda, G; Campana, S; Vergani, S D; Japelj, J; Bernardini, M G; Burlon, D; D'Avanzo, P; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A; Nappo, F; Paladini, R; Pescalli, A; Salafia, O S; Tagliaferri, G

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts are detectable in the gamma-ray band if their jets are oriented towards the observer. However, for each GRB with a typical theta_jet, there should be ~2/theta_jet^2 bursts whose emission cone is oriented elsewhere in space. These off-axis bursts can be eventually detected when, due to the deceleration of their relativistic jets, the beaming angle becomes comparable to the viewing angle. Orphan Afterglows (OA) should outnumber the current population of bursts detected in the gamma-ray band even if they have not been conclusively observed so far at any frequency. We compute the expected flux of the population of orphan afterglows in the mm, optical and X-ray bands through a population synthesis code of GRBs and the standard afterglow emission model. We estimate the detection rate of OA by on-going and forthcoming surveys. The average duration of OA as transients above a given limiting flux is derived and described with analytical expressions: in general OA should appear as daily transients in o...

  20. Theta-vacuum: Phase Transitions and/or Symmetry Breaking at $\\theta = \\pi$

    CERN Document Server

    Azcoiti, V; Laliena, V

    2003-01-01

    Assuming that a quantum field theory with a $\\theta$-vacuum term in the action shows non-trivial $\\theta$-dependence and provided that some reasonable properties of the probability distribution function of the order parameter hold, we argue that the theory either breaks spontaneously CP at $\\theta = \\pi$ or shows a singular behavior at some critical $\\theta_c$ between 0 and $\\pi$. This result, which applies to any model with a pure imaginary contribution to the euclidean action consisting in a quantized charge coupled to a phase, as QCD, is illustrated with two simple examples; one of them intimately related to Witten's result on SU(N) in the large $N$ limit.

  1. Burst Mechanisms in Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Knobloch, E

    1999-01-01

    Different mechanisms believed to be responsible for the generation of bursts in hydrodynamical systems are reviewed and a new mechanism capable of generating regular or irregular bursts of large dynamic range near threshold is described. The new mechanism is present in the interaction between oscillatory modes of odd and even parity in systems of large but finite aspect ratio, and provides an explanation for the bursting behavior observed in binary fluid convection. Additional applications of the new mechanism are proposed.

  2. Indefinite theta series and generalized error functions

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Manschot, Jan; Pioline, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Theta series for lattices with indefinite signature $(n_+,n_-)$ arise in many areas of mathematics including representation theory and enumerative algebraic geometry. Their modular properties are well understood in the Lorentzian case ($n_+=1$), but have remained obscure when $n_+\\geq 2$. Using a higher-dimensional generalization of the usual (complementary) error function, discovered in an independent physics project, we construct the modular completion of a class of `conformal' holomorphic theta series ($n_+=2$). As an application, we determine the modular properties of a generalized Appell-Lerch sum attached to the lattice ${\\operatorname A}_2$, which arose in the study of rank 3 vector bundles on $\\mathbb{P}^2$. The extension of our method to $n_+>2$ is outlined.

  3. Inverse theta functions as quantum modular forms

    CERN Document Server

    Bringmann, Kathrin; Rolen, Larry

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the Fourier coefficients of a special class of meromorphic Jaocbi forms of negative index. Much recent work has been done on the Fourier coefficients of meromorphic Jacobi forms of positive index, but almost nothing is known for Jacobi forms of negative index. Here we show from two different perspectives that their Fourier coefficients have a simple decomposition in terms of partial theta functions. The first perspective uses the language of Lie super algebras, and the second applies the theory of elliptic functions. In particular, we find a new infinite family of rank-crank type PDEs generalizing the famous example of Atkin and Garvan. We then describe the modularity properties of these coefficients, showing that they are \\emph{mixed quantum modular forms}, along the way determining a new class of quantum modular partial theta functions.

  4. Propeller tone bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succi, G. P.; Munro, D. H.; Ingard, K. U.

    1983-01-01

    Intense high frequency (25-38 kHz) tone bursts have been observed in acoustic tests of a scale model of a general aviation propeller. The amplitude of the tone burst is approximately equal to the amplitude of the propeller noise signature. The conditions necessary for the production of these tone bursts are described. The experiments indicate that the origin of these bursts is a periodic flow oscillation on the suction surface of the propeller blade tips which may be due to the interaction between an oscillating shock wave and a laminar boundary layer.

  5. Parvalbumin Interneurons of Hippocampus Tune Population Activity at Theta Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amilhon, Bénédicte; Huh, Carey Y L; Manseau, Frédéric; Ducharme, Guillaume; Nichol, Heather; Adamantidis, Antoine; Williams, Sylvain

    2015-06-03

    Hippocampal theta rhythm arises from a combination of recently described intrinsic theta oscillators and inputs from multiple brain areas. Interneurons expressing the markers parvalbumin (PV) and somatostatin (SOM) are leading candidates to participate in intrinsic rhythm generation and principal cell (PC) coordination in distal CA1 and subiculum. We tested their involvement by optogenetically activating and silencing PV or SOM interneurons in an intact hippocampus preparation that preserves intrinsic connections and oscillates spontaneously at theta frequencies. Despite evidence suggesting that SOM interneurons are crucial for theta, optogenetic manipulation of these interneurons modestly influenced theta rhythm. However, SOM interneurons were able to strongly modulate temporoammonic inputs. In contrast, activation of PV interneurons powerfully controlled PC network and rhythm generation optimally at 8 Hz, while continuously silencing them disrupted theta. Our results thus demonstrate a pivotal role of PV but not SOM interneurons for PC synchronization and the emergence of intrinsic hippocampal theta.

  6. The MACHO Project Sample of Galactic Bulge High-Amplitude Scuti Stars: Pulsation Behavior and Stellar Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, D.P.; Cook, K.H.; Freeman, K.C.; Geha, M.; Griest, K.; Lehner, M.J.; Marshall, S.L.; McNamara, B.J.; Minniti, D.; Nelson, C.; Peterson, B.A.; Popowski, P.; Pratt, M.R.; Quinn, P.J.; Rodgers, A.W.; Sutherland, W.; Templeton, M.R.; Vandehei, T.; Welch, D.L.

    1999-11-16

    We have detected 90 objects with periods and lightcurve structure similar to those of field {delta} Scuti stars, using the Massive Compact Halo Object (MACHO) Project database of Galactic bulge photometry. If we assume similar extinction values for all candidates and absolute magnitudes similar to those of other field high-amplitude {delta} Scuti stars (HADS), the majority of these objects lie in or near the Galactic bulge. At least two of these objects are likely foreground {delta} Scuti stars, one of which may be an evolved nonradial pulsator, similar to other evolved, disk-population {delta} Scuti stars. We have analyzed the light curves of these objects and find that they are similar to the light curves of field {delta} Scuti stars and the {delta} Scuti stars found by the Optical Gravitational Lens Experiment (OGLE). However, the amplitude distribution of these sources lies between those of low- and high-amplitude {delta} Scuti stars, which suggests that they may be an intermediate population. We have found nine double-mode HADS with frequency ratios ranging from 0.75 to 0.79, four probable double- and multiple-mode objects, and another four objects with marginal detections of secondary modes. The low frequencies (5-14 cycles d{sup -1}) and the observed period ratios of {approx}0.77 suggest that the majority of these objects are evolved stars pulsating in fundamental or first overtone radial modes.

  7. A flavour GUT model with theta_13^PMNS = theta_C / sqrt(2)

    CERN Document Server

    Antusch, Stefan; Maurer, Vinzenz; Sluka, Constantin

    2013-01-01

    We propose a supersymmetric SU(5) GUT model with an A_4 family symmetry - including a full flavon- and messenger sector - which realises the relation theta_13^PMNS \\simeq theta_C / sqrt(2). The neutrino sector features tri-bimaximal mixing, and theta_13^PMNS \\simeq theta_C / sqrt(2) emerges from the charged lepton contribution to the PMNS matrix, which in turn is linked to quark mixing via specific GUT relations. These GUT relations arise after GUT symmetry breaking from a novel combination of group theoretical Clebsch-Gordan factors, which in addition to large theta_13^PMNS lead to promising quark lepton mass ratios for all generations of quarks and leptons and to m_s / m_d = 18.95_(-0.24)^(+0.33), in excellent agreement with experimental results. The model also features spontaneous CP violation, with all quark and lepton CP phases determined from family symmetry breaking. We perform a full Markov Chain Monte Carlo fit to the available quark and lepton data, and discuss how the model can be tested by present...

  8. Probing the spin-parity of the pentaquark $\\Theta^+$ baryon

    CERN Document Server

    Barmin, V V; Curceanu, C; Davidenko, G V; Guaraldo, C; Kubantsev, M A; Larin, I F; Matveev, V A; Shebanov, V A; Shishov, N N; Sokolov, L I; Tarasov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Using the DIANA data on the charge-exchange reaction K^+n --> pK^0 on a bound neutron, in which the s-channel formation of the pentaquark baryon \\Theta^+(1538) has been observed,we analyze the dependence of the background-subtracted \\Theta^+ --> pK^0 signal on the K^0 emission angle in the pK^0 rest frame. The data are consistent with the angular dependence of a form dW/d\\cos\\Theta_cms ~ (\\cos\\Theta_cms + A)^2 with a positive offset A. This form of the \\cos\\Theta_cms distribution suggests an interference between the \\Theta-mediated p-wave contribution and the nonresonant s-wave contribution to the total amplitude of the charge-exchange reaction. The p-wave nature of the \\Theta-mediated amplitude is consistent with the spin-parity assignment of 1/2^+ for the \\Theta^+ baryon. The selection in \\cos\\Theta_cms based on the observed angular dependence of the \\Theta^+ --> pK^0 signal allows to boost the statistical significance of the signal up to 6.8 standard deviations. \\e

  9. Is \\theta_{13}^{PMNS} correlated with \\theta_{23}^{PMNS} or not?

    CERN Document Server

    Araki, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    By assuming the Tri-Bi-Maximal mixing at leading order and postulating \\theta_{23} \\simeq 45^\\circ + \\eta\\theta_{13} where \\eta is equal to \\pm 1/\\sqrt{2} or 0, we seek for preferable correction terms to the charged lepton and neutrino mass matrices and discuss their origins. The global fits of neutrino oscillation parameters favor the case of \\eta=\\pm 1/\\sqrt{2}; it corresponds to the relation found by Edy, Frampton and Mastuzaki some years ago in the context of a T^\\prime flavor model. In contrast, the results from the \

  10. High-amplitude THz and GHz strain waves, generated by ultrafast screening of piezoelectric fields in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik; van Capel, P.J.S.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    Screening of large built-in piezoelectric fields in InGaN/GaN quantum wells leads to high-amplitude acoustic emission. We will compare acoustic emission by quantum wells with different thicknesses with photoluminescence; indicating screening.......Screening of large built-in piezoelectric fields in InGaN/GaN quantum wells leads to high-amplitude acoustic emission. We will compare acoustic emission by quantum wells with different thicknesses with photoluminescence; indicating screening....

  11. Eta Products and Theta Series Identities

    CERN Document Server

    Kohler, Gunter

    2011-01-01

    This monograph deals with products of Dedekind's eta function, with Hecke theta series on quadratic number fields, and with "Eisenstein series." The author brings to the public the large number of identities that have been discovered over the past 20 years, the majority of which have not been published elsewhere. This book will be of interest to graduate students and scholars in the field of number theory and, in particular, modular forms. It is not an introductory text in this field. Nevertheless, some theoretical background material is presented that is important for understanding

  12. Lower trait frontal theta activity in mindfulness meditators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guaraci Ken Tanaka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute and long-term effects of mindfulness meditation on theta-band activity are not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate frontal theta differences between long- and short-term mindfulness practitioners before, during, and after mindfulness meditation. Twenty participants were recruited, of which 10 were experienced Buddhist meditators. Despite an acute increase in the theta activity during meditation in both the groups, the meditators showed lower trait frontal theta activity. Therefore, we suggested that this finding is a neural correlate of the expert practitioners’ ability to limit the processing of unnecessary information (e.g., discursive thought and increase the awareness of the essential content of the present experience. In conclusion, acute changes in the theta band throughout meditation did not appear to be a specific correlate of mindfulness but were rather related to the concentration properties of the meditation. Notwithstanding, lower frontal theta activity appeared to be a trait of mindfulness practices.

  13. {theta}-Compactness in L-topological spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanafy, I.M. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Suez Canal University, El-Arish (Egypt)], E-mail: ihanafy@hotmail.com

    2009-12-15

    Recently, El-Naschie has shown that the notion of fuzzy topology may be relevant to quantum particle physics in connection with string theory and e{sup {infinity}} theory. In 2005, Caldas and Jafari have introduced {theta}-compact fuzzy topological spaces. In this paper, the concepts of{theta}-compactness, countable{theta}-compactness and the{theta}-Lindeloef property are introduced and studied in L-topological spaces, where L is a complete de Morgan algebra. They are defined by means of{theta}-openL-sets and their inequalities. They does not rely on the structure of basis lattice L and no distributivity in L is required. They can also be characterized by{theta}-closedL-sets and their inequalities. When L is a completely de Morgan algebra, their many characterizations are presented.

  14. Predictions via large {theta}{sub 13} from cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haba, Naoyuki, E-mail: haba@phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Takahashi, Ryo, E-mail: ryo.takahashi@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-08-26

    We investigate a relation among neutrino observables, three mixing angles and two mass squared differences, from a cascade texture of neutrino mass matrix. We show an allowed region of the correlation by use of current data of neutrino oscillation experiments. The relation predicts sharp correlations among neutrino mixing angles as 0.315{<=}sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 12}{<=}0.332 and 0.480{<=}sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 23}{<=}0.500 with a large {theta}{sub 13} (0.03theta}{sub 13}<0.28). These magnitudes are modified 0.310{<=}sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 12}{<=}0.330 and 0.540{<=}sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 23}{<=}0.560 when the charged lepton mass matrix also has the cascade form.

  15. Long-range temporal correlations in the EEG bursts of human preterm babies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Hartley

    Full Text Available The electrical activity in the very early human preterm brain, as recorded by scalp EEG, is mostly discontinuous and has bursts of high-frequency oscillatory activity nested within slow-wave depolarisations of high amplitude. The temporal organisation of the occurrence of these EEG bursts has not been previously investigated. We analysed the distribution of the EEG bursts in 11 very preterm (23-30 weeks gestational age human babies through two estimates of the Hurst exponent. We found long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs in the occurrence of these EEG bursts demonstrating that even in the very immature human brain, when the cerebral cortical structure is far from fully developed, there is non-trivial temporal structuring of electrical activity.

  16. Artificial theta stimulation impairs encoding of contextual fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arto Lipponen

    Full Text Available Several experiments have demonstrated an intimate relationship between hippocampal theta rhythm (4-12 Hz and memory. Lesioning the medial septum or fimbria-fornix, a fiber track connecting the hippocampus and the medial septum, abolishes the theta rhythm and results in a severe impairment in declarative memory. To assess whether there is a causal relationship between hippocampal theta and memory formation we investigated whether restoration of hippocampal theta by electrical stimulation during the encoding phase also restores fimbria-fornix lesion induced memory deficit in rats in the fear conditioning paradigm. Male Wistar rats underwent sham or fimbria-fornix lesion operation. Stimulation electrodes were implanted in the ventral hippocampal commissure and recording electrodes in the septal hippocampus. Artificial theta stimulation of 8 Hz was delivered during 3-min free exploration of the test cage in half of the rats before aversive conditioning with three foot shocks during 2 min. Memory was assessed by total freezing time in the same environment 24 h and 28 h after fear conditioning, and in an intervening test session in a different context. As expected, fimbria-fornix lesion impaired fear memory and dramatically attenuated hippocampal theta power. Artificial theta stimulation produced continuous theta oscillations that were almost similar to endogenous theta rhythm in amplitude and frequency. However, contrary to our predictions, artificial theta stimulation impaired conditioned fear response in both sham and fimbria-fornix lesioned animals. These data suggest that restoration of theta oscillation per se is not sufficient to support memory encoding after fimbria-fornix lesion and that universal theta oscillation in the hippocampus with a fixed frequency may actually impair memory.

  17. More on {theta}-compact fuzzy topological spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekici, Erdal [Department of Mathematics, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Terzioglu Campus, 17020 Canakkale (Turkey)] e-mail: eekici@comu.edu.tr

    2006-03-01

    Recently, El-Naschie has shown that the notion of fuzzy topology may be relevant to quantum particle physics in connection with string theory and {epsilon} {sup {infinity}} theory. In 2005, Caldas and Jafari have introduced {theta}-compact fuzzy topological spaces. The purpose of this paper is to investigate further properties of {theta}-compact fuzzy topological spaces. Moreover, the notion of {theta}-closed fuzzy topological spaces is introduced and properties of it are obtained.

  18. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  19. Exotic Theta^+ baryon production induced by photon and pion

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, Y; Lee, S H; Oh, Yongseok; Kim, Hungchong; Lee, Su Houng

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the photoproduction of the $\\Theta^+(1540)$ on a nucleon ($\\gamma n \\to K^- \\Theta^+$, $\\gamma p \\to \\bar{K}^0 \\Theta^+$) and the pion-induced $\\Theta^+$ production reaction on the proton ($\\pi^- p \\to K^- \\Theta^+$). The total cross sections near threshold are estimated by using hadronic models with effective interaction Lagrangians and form factors that preserve gauge-invariance of the electromagnetic current. The photoproduction cross sections are found to be a few hundred nb, with the cross section on the proton being larger than that on the neutron. The pion-induced production cross section is found to be around a few hundred $\\mu$b but sensitive to the $K^* N \\Theta$ coupling whose value is not yet known. We also study the production cross section assuming that the $\\Theta^+$ has negative parity. The cross sections are then found to be much suppressed compared to the case where $\\Theta^+$ has positive parity. Hence, the interpretation of the $\\Theta^+$ as an odd-parity pentaquark state se...

  20. Theta oscillations accompanying concurrent auditory stream segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Brigitta; Kocsis, Zsuzsanna; Urbán, Gábor; Winkler, István

    2016-08-01

    The ability to isolate a single sound source among concurrent sources is crucial for veridical auditory perception. The present study investigated the event-related oscillations evoked by complex tones, which could be perceived as a single sound and tonal complexes with cues promoting the perception of two concurrent sounds by inharmonicity, onset asynchrony, and/or perceived source location difference of the components tones. In separate task conditions, participants performed a visual change detection task (visual control), watched a silent movie (passive listening) or reported for each tone whether they perceived one or two concurrent sounds (active listening). In two time windows, the amplitude of theta oscillation was modulated by the presence vs. absence of the cues: 60-350ms/6-8Hz (early) and 350-450ms/4-8Hz (late). The early response appeared both in the passive and the active listening conditions; it did not closely match the task performance; and it had a fronto-central scalp distribution. The late response was only elicited in the active listening condition; it closely matched the task performance; and it had a centro-parietal scalp distribution. The neural processes reflected by these responses are probably involved in the processing of concurrent sound segregation cues, in sound categorization, and response preparation and monitoring. The current results are compatible with the notion that theta oscillations mediate some of the processes involved in concurrent sound segregation.

  1. Fast Radio Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akshaya Rane; Duncan Lorimer

    2017-09-01

    We summarize our current state of knowledge of fast radio bursts (FRBs) which were first discovered a decade ago. Following an introduction to radio transients in general, including pulsars and rotating radio transients, we discuss the discovery of FRBs. We then discuss FRB follow-up observations in the context of repeat bursts before moving on to review propagation effects on FRB signals, FRB progenitor models and an outlook on FRBs as potential cosmological tools.

  2. Continuous theta-burst stimulation of the primary motor cortex in essential tremor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellriegel, Helge; Schulz, Eva M; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether essential tremor (ET) can be altered by suppressing the corticospinal excitability in the primary motor cortex (M1) with transcranial magnetic stimulation.......We investigated whether essential tremor (ET) can be altered by suppressing the corticospinal excitability in the primary motor cortex (M1) with transcranial magnetic stimulation....

  3. Parietal theta burst TMS: Functional fractionation observed during bistable perception not evident in attention tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Georg; Kanai, Ryota; Brascamp, Jan W

    2016-02-01

    When visual input is ambiguous, perception spontaneously alternates between interpretations: bistable perception. Studies have identified two distinct sites near the right intraparietal sulcus where inhibitory transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) affects the frequency of occurrence of these alternations, but strikingly with opposite directions of effect for the two sites. Lesion and TMS studies on spatial and sustained attention have also indicated a parcellation of right parietal cortex, into areas serving distinct attentional functions. We used the exact TMS procedure previously employed to affect bistable perception, yet measured its effect on spatial and sustained attention tasks. Although there was a trend for TMS to affect performance, trends were consistently similar for both parietal sites, with no indication of opposite effects. We interpret this as signifying that the previously observed parietal fractionation of function regarding the perception of ambiguous stimuli is not due to TMS-induced modification of spatial or sustained attention.

  4. Nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube-polymer composite films for high-amplitude optoacoustic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baac, Hyoung Won; Ok, Jong G.; Lee, Taehwa; Jay Guo, L.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite films that can be used as highly efficient and robust ultrasound transmitters for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. An inherent architecture of the nano-composite provides unique thermal, optical, and mechanical properties that are accommodated not just for efficient energy conversion but also for extraordinary robustness against pulsed laser ablation. First, we explain a thermoacoustic transfer mechanism within the nano-composite. CNT morphologies are examined to determine a suitable arrangement for heat transfer to the surrounding PDMS. Next, we introduce an approach to enhance optical extinction of the composite films, which uses shadowed deposition of a thin Au layer through an as-grown CNT network. Finally, the transmitter robustness is quantified in terms of laser-induced damage threshold. This reveals that the CNT-PDMS films can withstand an order-of-magnitude higher optical fluence (and extinction) than a Cr film used as a reference. Such robustness is crucial to increase the maximum-available optical energy for optoacoustic excitation and pressure generation. All of these structure-originated characteristics manifest the CNT-PDMS composite films as excellent optoacoustic transmitters for high-amplitude and high-frequency ultrasound generation.

  5. Nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube-polymer composite films for high-amplitude optoacoustic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baac, Hyoung Won; Ok, Jong G; Lee, Taehwa; Guo, L Jay

    2015-09-14

    We demonstrate nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite films that can be used as highly efficient and robust ultrasound transmitters for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. An inherent architecture of the nano-composite provides unique thermal, optical, and mechanical properties that are accommodated not just for efficient energy conversion but also for extraordinary robustness against pulsed laser ablation. First, we explain a thermoacoustic transfer mechanism within the nano-composite. CNT morphologies are examined to determine a suitable arrangement for heat transfer to the surrounding PDMS. Next, we introduce an approach to enhance optical extinction of the composite films, which uses shadowed deposition of a thin Au layer through an as-grown CNT network. Finally, the transmitter robustness is quantified in terms of laser-induced damage threshold. This reveals that the CNT-PDMS films can withstand an order-of-magnitude higher optical fluence (and extinction) than a Cr film used as a reference. Such robustness is crucial to increase the maximum-available optical energy for optoacoustic excitation and pressure generation. All of these structure-originated characteristics manifest the CNT-PDMS composite films as excellent optoacoustic transmitters for high-amplitude and high-frequency ultrasound generation.

  6. A photometric monitoring of bright high-amplitude delta Scuti stars. II. Period updates for seven stars

    CERN Document Server

    Derekas, A; Székely, P; Alfaro, E J; Csák, B; Mészáros, S; Rodríguez, E; Rolland, A; Sarneczky, K; Szabó, G M; Szatmary, K; Varadi, M; Kiss, C; Meszaros, Sz.; Szabo, Gy.M.; Kiss, Cs.

    2003-01-01

    We present new photometric data for seven high-amplitude delta Scuti stars. The observations were acquired between 1996 and 2002, mostly in the Johnson photometric system. For one star (GW UMa), our observations are the first since the discovery of its pulsational nature from the Hipparcos data.The primary goal of this project was to update our knowledge on the period variations of the target stars. For this, we have collected all available photometric observations from the literature and constructed decades-long O-C diagrams of the stars. This traditional method is useful because of the single-periodic nature of the light variations. Text-book examples of slow period evolution (XX Cyg, DY Her, DY Peg) and cyclic period changes due to light-time effect (LITE) in a binary system (SZ Lyn) are updated with the new observations. For YZ Boo, we find a period decrease instead of increase. The previously suggested LITE-solution of BE Lyn (Kiss & Szatmary 1995) is not supported with the new O-C diagram. Instead o...

  7. Spontaneous CP violation in the NJL model at theta = pi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Daniel; Boomsma, Jorn K.

    2009-01-01

    As is well-known, spontaneous CP-violation in the strong interaction is possible at theta = pi, which is commonly referred to as Dashen's phenomenon. This phenomenon has been studied extensively using chiral Lagrangians. Here the two-flavor NJL model at theta = pi is discussed. It turns out that the

  8. Geometry of theta divisors --- a survey

    CERN Document Server

    Grushevsky, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    We survey the geometry of the theta divisor and discuss various loci of principally polarized abelian varieties (ppav) defined by imposing conditions on its singularities. The loci defined in this way include the (generalized) Andreotti-Mayer loci, but also other geometrically interesting cycles such as the locus of intermediate Jacobians of cubic threefolds. We shall discuss questions concerning the dimension of these cycles as well as the computation of their class in the Chow or the cohomology ring. In addition we consider the class of their closure in suitable toroidal compactifications and describe degeneration techniques which have proven useful. For this we include a discussion of the construction of the universal family of ppav with a level structure and its possible extensions to toroidal compactifications. The paper contains numerous open questions and conjectures.

  9. Superconformal algebras and mock theta functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, Tohru [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hikami, Kazuhiro [Department of Mathematics, Naruto University of Education, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: eguchi@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: hikami@naruto-u.ac.jp

    2009-07-31

    It is known that characters of BPS representations of extended superconformal algebras do not have good modular properties due to extra singular vectors coming from the BPS condition. In order to improve their modular properties we apply the method of Zwegers which has recently been developed to analyze modular properties of mock theta functions. We consider the case of the N=4 superconformal algebra at general levels and obtain the decomposition of characters of BPS representations into a sum of simple Jacobi forms and an infinite series of non-BPS representations. We apply our method to study elliptic genera of hyper-Kaehler manifolds in higher dimensions. In particular, we determine the elliptic genera in the case of complex four dimensions of the Hilbert scheme of points on K3 surfaces K{sup [2]} and complex tori A{sup [[3

  10. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  11. A Burst to See

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    On 19 March, Nature was particularly generous and provided astronomers with the wealth of four gamma-ray bursts on the same day. But that was not all: one of them is the most luminous object ever observed in the Universe. Despite being located in a distant galaxy, billions of light years away, it was so bright that it could have been seen, for a brief while, with the unaided eye. ESO PR Photo 08a/08 ESO PR Photo 08a/08 The REM Telescope and TORTORA Camera Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. Gamma-ray bursts, which are invisible to our eyes, are discovered by telescopes in space. After releasing their intense burst of high-energy radiation, they become detectable for a short while in the optical and in the near-infrared. This 'afterglow' fades very rapidly, making detailed analysis possible for only a few hours after the gamma-ray detection. This analysis is important in particular in order to determine the GRB's distance and, hence, intrinsic brightness. The gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite. "It was so bright that it almost blinded the Swift instruments for a while," says Guido Chincarini, Italian principal investigator of the mission. A bright optical counterpart was soon identified in the Boötes Constellation (the "Bear Driver" or "Herdsman"). A host of ground-based telescopes reacted promptly to study this new object in the sky. In particular, the optical emission was detected by a few wide-field cameras on telescopes that constantly monitor a large fraction of the sky, including the TORTORA camera in symbiosis with the 0.6-m REM telescope located at La Silla

  12. Phase-locking of bursting neuronal firing to dominant LFP frequency components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Maria; Elijah, Daniel H; Squirrell, Daniel; Gigg, John; Montemurro, Marcelo A

    2015-10-01

    Neuronal firing in the hippocampal formation relative to the phase of local field potentials (LFP) has a key role in memory processing and spatial navigation. Firing can be in either tonic or burst mode. Although bursting neurons are common in the hippocampal formation, the characteristics of their locking to LFP phase are not completely understood. We investigated phase-locking properties of bursting neurons using simulations generated by a dual compartmental model of a pyramidal neuron adapted to match the bursting activity in the subiculum of a rat. The model was driven with stochastic input signals containing a power spectral profile consistent with physiologically relevant frequencies observed in LFP. The single spikes and spike bursts fired by the model were locked to a preferred phase of the predominant frequency band where there was a peak in the power of the driving signal. Moreover, the preferred phase of locking shifted with increasing burst size, providing evidence that LFP phase can be encoded by burst size. We also provide initial support for the model results by analysing example data of spontaneous LFP and spiking activity recorded from the subiculum of a single urethane-anaesthetised rat. Subicular neurons fired single spikes, two-spike bursts and larger bursts that locked to a preferred phase of either dominant slow oscillations or theta rhythms within the LFP, according to the model prediction. Both power-modulated phase-locking and gradual shift in the preferred phase of locking as a function of burst size suggest that neurons can use bursts to encode timing information contained in LFP phase into a spike-count code.

  13. The Glast Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will include a secondary instrument to augment the observatory's capabilities for GRB studies. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBK is a collaboration between Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Huntsville, Alabama, and the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. The purpose of the GBM is to extend energy coverage below the main instrument's lower limit of about 20 MeV, and to provide an on-board burst trigger and approximate location. The instrument consists of twelve NaI detectors and two BGO detectors. This combination provides energy coverage from a few keV up to about 30 MeV.

  14. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  15. Generation of theta and gamma rhythms in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, L S

    1998-03-01

    In the behaving rat, theta rhythm was dominant during walking and rapid-eye-movement sleep, while irregular slow activity predominated during immobility and slow-wave sleep. Oscillatory evoked potentials of 20-50 Hz and spontaneous fast (gamma) waves were more prominent during theta compared with non-theta behaviors. The oscillations were simulated by a systems model with recurrent inhibition. The model also predicts a behaviorally dependent inhibition, which was confirmed experimentally using paired-pulse responses. Paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) of the population spikes in CA1 was larger during walking than immobility, mostly mediated by a cholinergic input. Spike responses in vitro were characterized by a relative lack of inhibition or disinhibition compared with the behaving rat. The two-input, two-dipole model of the theta rhythm in CA1 is reviewed. Afferents to the CA1 pyramidal cells are assumed to be rhythmic and consist of atropine-sensitive and atropine-resistant inputs driving the somata and distal dendrites, respectively. The atropine-sensitive theta rhythm was mainly caused by a series of Cl- mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) on pyramidal cells. It is suggested that previous claims of the participation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and not IPSPs in the intracellular recordings in vivo were flawed. Single cell recordings in vitro suggested that intrinsic voltage-dependent membrane potential oscillations modulate the response to a theta-frequency driving. Membrane potentials of pyramidal cells in vitro showed resonance in the theta frequency range.

  16. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  17.  Gap junction involvement in hippocampal theta rhythm generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bocian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available  Hippocampal theta rhythm is probably the best example of oscillations and synchrony phenomena occurring in neuronal networks of the central nervous system. It is well known that intraneuronal communication via chemical and electrical synapses underlies these oscillatory processes. Despite well-documented knowledge concerning the participation of chemical transmission in production of theta activity, the role of much faster gap junction communication is still not fully understood. This paper provides an overview of current research data concerning the involvement of electrical transmission in generation of the best synchronized EEG pattern recorded from the mammalian brain – theta rhythm.

  18. A Geometrical Model for Non-Zero $\\theta_{13}$

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jun-Mou; Li, Xue-Qian

    2011-01-01

    Based on Friedberg and Lee's geometric picture by which the tribimaximal PMNS leptonic mixing matrix is constructed, namely corresponding mixing angles correspond to the geometric angles among the sides of a cube. We suggest that the three realistic mixing angles which slightly deviate from the values determined for the cube, are due to a viable deformation from the perfectly cubic shape. Taking the best fitted results of $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\theta_{23}$ as inputs, we determine the central value of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ should be 0.0238 with a relatively large error tolerance, this value lies in the range of measurement precision of the Daya Bay experiment.

  19. Two-Component Jet Models of Gamma-Ray Burst Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, F; Granot, J; Peng, Fang; Konigl, Arieh; Granot, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical studies have raised the possibility that the collimated outflows in gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources have two distinct components: a narrow (opening half-angle $\\theta_{\\rm n}$), highly relativistic (initial Lorentz factor $\\eta_\\rmn \\gtrsim 10^2$) outflow, from which the $\\gamma$-ray emission originates, and a wider ($\\theta_{\\rm w} \\lesssim 3 \\theta_{\\rm n}$), moderately relativistic ($\\eta_{\\rm w}\\sim 10$) surrounding flow. Using a simple synchrotron emission model, we calculate the R-band afterglow lightcurves expected in this scenario and derive algebraic expressions for the flux ratios of the emission from the two jet components at the main transition times in the lightcurve. We apply this model to GRB sources, for explaining the structure of afterglows and source energetics, as well as to X-ray flash sources, which we interpret as GRB jets viewed at an angle $\\theta_{\\rm obs} > \\theta_{\\rm n}$. Finally, we argue that a neutron-rich hydromagnetic outflow may naturally g...

  20. A new delirium phenotype with rapid high amplitude onset and nearly as rapid reversal: Central Coast Australia Delirium Intervention Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regal PJ

    2015-02-01

    , and 45%/80% for the Delirium Index. General medicine and geriatric medicine groups had similar outcomes.Conclusion: This delirium phenotype selects for a rapid high amplitude critical decline in attention, executive function, IADL, and apathy that recovers almost as rapidly.Keywords: delirium, inattention, executive function, dementia

  1. Age-related changes in rat hippocampal theta rhythms: a difference between type 1 and type 2 theta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Y; Toyosawa, K

    1999-05-01

    The age-related changes in two types of theta rhythms recorded from the hippocampus in young (4 months-old), mature (12-13 months-old) and aged (22-25 months-old) rats were investigated. The type 1 theta rhythm was measured from hippocampal EEG recorded from walking rats and the type 2 theta was measured from the EEG induced by reticular pontin oralis nucleus (PON) stimulation in urethane anesthetized rats. The peak frequency and the peak power were detected from power spectra calculated on each theta sample by fast Fourier transformation (FFT). No age-related alteration was observed on the peak frequency of type 1 theta rhythm. However, on type 2 theta rhythm, the peak frequency was decreased in the aged rats compared with the young and the mature rats. The type 2 theta rhythm is cholinergic, and therefore this result suggests that age-related deterioration can be clearly observed in the cholinergic system including the hippocampus in rats.

  2. Combinatorics of tenth-order mock theta functions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K SAREEN; M RANA

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we provide the combinatorial interpretations of two tenth order mock theta functions which appeared in some identities given in Ramanujan’s lost notebook ((1988) Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi).

  3. Precise measurement of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ using Japanese Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Suekane, F; Araki, T; Jongok, K

    2004-01-01

    After the KamLAND results, the remaining important targets in neutrino experiments are to measure still unknown 3 basic parameters; absolute neutrino mass scale, CP violation phase $\\delta_{CP}$ and last mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. The angle $\\theta_{13}$ among them is expected to be measured in near future by long baseline accelerator experiments and reactor experiments. In this paper, a realistic idea of high sensitivity reactor measurement of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ is described. This experiment uses a giant nuclear power plant as the neutrino source and three identical detectors are used to cancel detector and neutrino flux uncertainties. The sensitivity reach on $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ is $0.017\\sim0.026$ at $\\Delta m^2_{13} \\sim 3 \\times 10^{-3}eV^2$, which is five to seven times better than the current upper limit measured by CHOOZ.

  4. Measuring theta12 Despite an Uncertain Reactor Neutrino Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ciuffoli, Emilio; Grassi, Marco; Zhang, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    The recently discovered 5 MeV bump highlights that the uncertainty in the reactor neutrino spectrum is far greater than some theoretical estimates. Medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments will deliver by far the most precise ever measurements of theta12. However, as a result of the bump, such a determination of theta12 using the theoretical spectrum would yield a value of sin^2(2theta12) which is more than 1% higher than the true value. We show that by using recent measurements of the reactor neutrino spectrum the precision of a measurement of theta12 at a medium baseline reactor neutrino experiment can be improved appreciably. We estimate this precision as a function of the 9Li spallation background veto efficiency and dead time.

  5. Matter Mass Generation and Theta Vacuum Dynamical Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Roh, H S

    2001-01-01

    This work proposes a stringent concept of matter mass generation and Theta vacuum in the context of local gauge theory for the strong force under the constraint of the flat universe. The matter mass is generated as the consequence of dynamical spontaneous symmetry breaking (DSSB) of gauge symmetry and discrete symmetries, which is motivated by the parameter Theta representing the surface term. Matter mass generation introduces the typical features of constituent particle mass, dual Meissner effect, and hyperfine structure. The Theta term plays important roles on the DSSB of the gauge group and on the quantization of the matter and vacuum space. The Theta vacuum exhibits the intrinsic principal number and intrinsic angular momentum for intrinsic space quantization in analogy with the extrinsic principal number and extrinsic angular momentum for extrinsic space quantization.

  6. Examining the limits of cellular adaptation bursting mechanisms in biologically-based excitatory networks of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, K A; Njap, F; Nicola, W; Skinner, F K; Campbell, S A

    2015-12-01

    Determining the biological details and mechanisms that are essential for the generation of population rhythms in the mammalian brain is a challenging problem. This problem cannot be addressed either by experimental or computational studies in isolation. Here we show that computational models that are carefully linked with experiment provide insight into this problem. Using the experimental context of a whole hippocampus preparation in vitro that spontaneously expresses theta frequency (3-12 Hz) population bursts in the CA1 region, we create excitatory network models to examine whether cellular adaptation bursting mechanisms could critically contribute to the generation of this rhythm. We use biologically-based cellular models of CA1 pyramidal cells and network sizes and connectivities that correspond to the experimental context. By expanding our mean field analyses to networks with heterogeneity and non all-to-all coupling, we allow closer correspondence with experiment, and use these analyses to greatly extend the range of parameter values that are explored. We find that our model excitatory networks can produce theta frequency population bursts in a robust fashion.Thus, even though our networks are limited by not including inhibition at present, our results indicate that cellular adaptation in pyramidal cells could be an important aspect for the occurrence of theta frequency population bursting in the hippocampus. These models serve as a starting framework for the inclusion of inhibitory cells and for the consideration of additional experimental features not captured in our present network models.

  7. The Double Firing Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomers from around the world combined data from ground- and space-based telescopes to paint a detailed portrait of the brightest explosion ever seen. The observations reveal that the jets of the gamma-ray burst called GRB 080319B were aimed almost directly at the Earth. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 28/08 A Gamma-Ray Burst with Two Jets Read more on this illuminating blast in the additional story. GRB 080319B was so intense that, despite happening halfway across the Universe, it could have been seen briefly with the unaided eye (ESO 08/08). In a paper to appear in the 11 September issue of Nature, Judith Racusin of Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA), and a team of 92 co-authors report observations across the electromagnetic spectrum that began 30 minutes before the explosion and followed it for months afterwards. "We conclude that the burst's extraordinary brightness arose from a jet that shot material almost directly towards Earth at almost the speed of light - the difference is only 1 part in 20 000," says Guido Chincarini, a member of the team. Gamma-ray bursts are the Universe's most luminous explosions. Most occur when massive stars run out of fuel. As a star collapses, it creates a black hole or neutron star that, through processes not fully understood, drives powerful gas jets outward. As the jets shoot into space, they strike gas previously shed by the star and heat it, thereby generating bright afterglows. The team believes the jet directed toward Earth contained an ultra-fast component just 0.4 degrees across (this is slightly smaller than the apparent size of the Full Moon). This jet is contained within another slightly less energetic jet about 20 times wider. The broad component is more typical of other bursts. "Perhaps every gamma-ray burst has a narrow jet, but astronomers miss it most of the time," says team member Stefano Covino. "We happened to view this monster down the barrel of the very narrow and energetic jet, and the chance for

  8. Hippocampal Theta Dysfunction after Lateral Fluid Percussion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Chronic memory deficits are a major cause of morbidity following traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the rat, the hippocampal theta rhythm is a well-studied correlate of memory function. This study sought to investigate disturbances in hippocampal theta rhythm following lateral fluid percussion injury in the rat. A total of 13 control rats and 12 TBI rats were used. Electrodes were implanted in bilateral hippocampi and an electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded while the rats explored a new envi...

  9. Genetic dissection of theta rhythm heterogeneity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jonghan; Kim, Daesoo; Bianchi, Riccardo; Wong, Robert K S; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2005-12-13

    Rhythmic oscillatory activities at the theta frequency (4-12 Hz) in the hippocampus have long-attracted attention because they have been implicated in diverse brain functions, including spatial cognition. Although studies based on pharmacology and lesion experiments suggested heterogeneity of these rhythms and their behavioral correlates, controversies are abundant on these issues. Here we show that mice harboring a phospholipase C (PLC)-beta1(-/-) mutation (PLC-beta1(-/-) mice) lack one subset of theta rhythms normally observed during urethane anesthesia, alert immobility, and passive whole-body rotation. In contrast, the other subset of theta rhythms observed during walking or running was intact in these mutant mice. PLC-beta1(-/-) mice also have somewhat disrupted theta activity during paradoxical sleep but do have an atropine-resistant component of theta rhythm. In addition, carbachol-induced oscillations were obliterated in hippocampal slices of PLC-beta1(-/-) mice. Interestingly, PLC-beta1(-/-) mice showed deficits in a hidden platform version of the Morris water maze yet performed well in motor coordination tests and a visual platform version of the Morris water maze. The results genetically define the existence of at least two subtypes of theta rhythms and reveal their association with different behaviors.

  10. Intrinsic Ca2+-dependent theta oscillations in apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Allan Kjeldsen; Nedergaard, Steen; Andreasen, Mogens

    2014-08-01

    Behavior-associated theta-frequency oscillation in the hippocampal network involves a patterned activation of place cells in the CA1, which can be accounted for by a somatic-dendritic interference model predicting the existence of an intrinsic dendritic oscillator. Here we describe an intrinsic oscillatory mechanism in apical dendrites of in vitro CA1 pyramidal cells, which is induced by suprathreshold depolarization and consists of rhythmic firing of slow spikes in the theta-frequency band. The incidence of slow spiking (29%) increased to 78% and 100% in the presence of the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (2 μM) or 4-aminopyridine (2 mM), respectively. Prior depolarization facilitated the induction of slow spiking. Applied electrical field polarization revealed a distal dendritic origin of slow spikes. The oscillations were largely insensitive to tetrodotoxin, but blocked by nimodipine (10 μM), indicating that they depend on activation of L-type Ca2+ channels. Antagonists of T-, R-, N-, and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels had no detectable effect. The slow spike dimension and frequency was sensitive to 4-aminopyridine (0.1-2 mM) and TEA (10 mM), suggesting the contribution from voltage-dependent K+ channels to the oscillation mechanism. α-Dendrotoxin (10 μM), stromatoxin (2 μM), iberiotoxin (0.2 μM), apamin (0.5 μM), linorpidine (30 μM), and ZD7288 (20 μM) were without effect. Oscillations induced by sine-wave current injection or theta-burst synaptic stimulation were voltage-dependently attenuated by nimodipine, indicating an amplifying function of L-type Ca2+ channels on imposed signals. These results show that the apical dendrites have intrinsic oscillatory properties capable of generating rhythmic voltage fluctuations in the theta-frequency band.

  11. Generation of intense circularly polarized attosecond light bursts from relativistic laser plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Guangjin; Yu, M Y; Shen, Baifei; Veisz, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the polarization of attosecond light bursts generated by nanobunches of electrons from relativistic few-cycle laser pulse interaction with the surface of overdense plasmas. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the polarization state of the generated attosecond burst depends on the incident-pulse polarization, duration, carrier envelope phase, as well as the plasma scale length. Through laser and plasma parameter control, without compromise of generation efficiency, a linearly polarized laser pulse with azimuth $\\theta^i=10^\\circ$ can generate an elliptically polarized attosecond burst with azimuth $|\\theta^r_{\\rm atto}|\\approx61^\\circ$ and ellipticity $\\sigma^r_{\\rm atto}\\approx0.27$; while an elliptically polarized laser pulse with $\\sigma^i\\approx0.36$ can generate an almost circularly polarized attosecond burst with $\\sigma^r_{\\rm atto}\\approx0.95$. The results propose a new way to a table-top circularly polarized XUV source as a probe with attosecond scale time resolution for many a...

  12. Paired burst stimulation causes GABAA receptor-dependent spike firing facilitation in CA1 of rat hippocampal slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eTominaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The theta oscillation (4–8 Hz is a pivotal form of oscillatory activity in the hippocampus that is intermittently concurrent with gamma (25–100 Hz burst events. In in vitro preparation, a stimulation protocol that mimics the theta oscillation, theta burst stimulation (TBS, is used to induce long-term potentiation. Thus, TBS is thought to have a distinct role in the neural network of the hippocampal slice preparation. However, the mechanisms that make TBS uniquely induce such neural circuit modifications are still unknown. Using electrophysiology and voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI, we have found that TBS induces augmentation of spike firing. The augmentation was apparent in the first couple of brief burst stimulation (100Hz four pulses on a TBS-train in a presence of NMDA receptor blocker (APV 50 µM. In this study, we focused on the characterises of the NMDA independent augmentation caused by a pair of the brief burst stimulation (the first pair of the TBS; PBS. We found that PBS enhanced membrane potential responses on VSDI signal and intracellular recordings while it was absent in the current recording under whole-cell clamp condition. The enhancement of the response accompanied the augmentation of excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP to spike firing (E-S coupling. The paired burst facilitation (PBF reached a plateau when the number of the first burst stimulation (priming burst exceeds three. The interval between the bursts of 150 ms resulted in the maximum PBF. Gabazine (a GABAA receptor antagonist abolished PBF. The threshold for spike generation of the postsynaptic cells measured with a current injection to cells was not lowered by the priming burst of PBS. These results indicate that PBS activates the GABAergic system to cause short-term E-S augmentation without raising postsynaptic excitability. We propose that a GABAergic system of area CA1 of the hippocampus produce the short-term E-S plasticity that could cause exaggerated

  13. A review of crustacean sensitivity to high amplitude underwater noise: Data needs for effective risk assessment in relation to UK commercial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Nathan J; Firmin, Christopher J; Goldsmith, Denise; Faulkner, Rebecca C; Wood, Daniel T

    2016-07-15

    High amplitude anthropogenic noise is associated with adverse impacts among a variety of organisms but detailed species-specific knowledge is lacking in relation to effects upon crustaceans. Brown crab (Cancer pagurus), European lobster (Homarus gammarus) and Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) together represent the most valuable commercial fishery in the UK (Defra, 2014). Critical evaluation of literature reveals physiological sensitivity to underwater noise among N. norvegicus and closely related crustacean species, including juvenile stages. Current evidence supports physiological sensitivity to local, particle motion effects of sound production in particular. Derivation of correlative relationships between the introduction of high amplitude impulsive noise and crustacean distribution/abundance is hindered by the coarse resolution of available data at the present time. Future priorities for research are identified and argument for enhanced monitoring under current legislative frameworks outlined. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantum modular forms, mock modular forms, and partial theta functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimport, Susanna

    Defined by Zagier in 2010, quantum modular forms have been the subject of an explosion of recent research. Many of these results are aimed at discovering examples of these functions, which are defined on the rational numbers and have "nice" modularity properties. Though the subject is in its early stages, numerous results (including Zagier's original examples) show these objects naturally arising from many areas of mathematics as limits of other modular-like functions. One such family of examples is due to Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades, who connected these new objects to partial theta functions (introduced by Rogers in 1917) and mock modular forms (about which there is a rich theory, whose origins date back to Ramanujan in 1920). In this thesis, we build off of the work of Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades by providing an infinite family of quantum modular forms of arbitrary positive half-integral weight. Further, this family of quantum modular forms "glues" mock modular forms to partial theta functions and is constructed from a so-called "universal" mock theta function by extending a method of Eichler and Zagier (originally defined for holomorphic Jacobi forms) into a non-holomorphic setting. In addition to the infinite family, we explore the weight 1/2 and 3/2 functions in more depth. For both of these weights, we are able to explicitly write down the quantum modular form, as well as the corresponding "errors to modularity," which can be shown to be Mordell integrals of specific theta functions and, as a consequence, are real-analytic functions. Finally, we turn our attention to the partial theta functions associated with these low weight examples. Berndt and Kim provide asymptotic expansions for a certain class of partial theta functions as q approaches 1 radially within the unit disk. Here, we extend this work to not only obtain asymptotic expansions for this class of functions as q approaches any root of unity, but also for a certain class of derivatives of these functions

  15. Harnessing the power of theta: natural manipulations of cognitive performance during hippocampal theta-contingent eyeblink conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Loren C.; Cicchese, Joseph J.; Berry, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Neurobiological oscillations are regarded as essential to normal information processing, including coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within structures as well as in long feedback loops of distributed neural systems. The hippocampal theta rhythm is a 3–12 Hz oscillatory potential observed during cognitive processes ranging from spatial navigation to associative learning. The lower range, 3–7 Hz, can occur during immobility and depends upon the integrity of cholinergic forebrain systems. Several studies have shown that the amount of pre-training theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning. Our lab has used a brain-computer interface (BCI) that delivers eyeblink conditioning trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. A behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to four-fold increase in learning speed. This behavioral effect is accompanied by enhanced amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potential (LFP)s, multi-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns that depend on theta state. Additionally, training in the presence of hippocampal theta has led to increases in the salience of tone-induced unit firing patterns in the medial prefrontal cortex, followed by persistent multi-unit activity during the trace interval. In cerebellum, rhythmicity and precise synchrony of stimulus time-locked LFPs with those of hippocampus occur preferentially under the theta condition. Here we review these findings, integrate them into current models of hippocampal-dependent learning and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories of medial temporal lobe processes underlying intact and pathological learning. PMID:25918501

  16. Amyloid Beta Peptides Differentially Affect Hippocampal Theta Rhythms In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando I. Gutiérrez-Lerma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble amyloid beta peptide (Aβ is responsible for the early cognitive dysfunction observed in Alzheimer's disease. Both cholinergically and glutamatergically induced hippocampal theta rhythms are related to learning and memory, spatial navigation, and spatial memory. However, these two types of theta rhythms are not identical; they are associated with different behaviors and can be differentially modulated by diverse experimental conditions. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate whether or not application of soluble Aβ alters the two types of theta frequency oscillatory network activity generated in rat hippocampal slices by application of the cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists carbachol or DHPG, respectively. Due to previous evidence that oscillatory activity can be differentially affected by different Aβ peptides, we also compared Aβ25−35 and Aβ1−42 for their effects on theta rhythms in vitro at similar concentrations (0.5 to 1.0 μM. We found that Aβ25−35 reduces, with less potency than Aβ1−42, carbachol-induced population theta oscillatory activity. In contrast, DHPG-induced oscillatory activity was not affected by a high concentration of Aβ25−35 but was reduced by Aβ1−42. Our results support the idea that different amyloid peptides might alter specific cellular mechanisms related to the generation of specific neuronal network activities, instead of exerting a generalized inhibitory effect on neuronal network function.

  17. Breaking Tri-bimaximal Mixing and Large $\\theta_{13}$

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, Yusuke; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    The long baseline neutrino experiment, T2K, and the reactor experiment, Double Chooz will soon present new data. If we expect $\\sin\\theta_{13}$ to be 0.1-0.2, which is close to the present experimental upper bound, we should not persist in the paradigm of the tri-bimaximal mixing. We discuss the breaking the tri-bimaximal mixing by adding a simple mass matrix, which could be derived from some non-Abelian discrete symmetries. It is found that $\\sin\\theta_{13}=0.1-0.2$ is expected in our model independent analysis of the generalized mass matrix. On the other hand, $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{12}$ are expected to be not far from 1/2 and 1/3, respectively. As a typical example, we also discuss the $A_4$ flavor model with the 1 and 1' flavons, which break the tri-bimaximal mixing considerably. In this modified version of the Altarelli and Feruglio model, $\\sin\\theta_{13}$ is predicted to be around 0.15 in the case of the normal hierarchical neutrino masses $m_3\\gg m_2, m_1$, and 0.2 in the case of the i...

  18. On the pullback of an arithmetic theta function

    CERN Document Server

    Kudla, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the relation between the simplest types of arithmetic theta series, those associated to the cycles on the moduli space $\\Cal C$ of elliptic curves with CM by the ring of integers $\\OK$ in an imaginary quadratic field $\\kay$, on the one hand, and those associated to cycles on the arithmetic surface $\\M$ parametrizing 2-dimensional abelian varieties with an action of the maximal order $O_B$ in an indefinite quaternion algebra $B$ over $\\Q$, on the other. We show that the arithmetic degree of the pullback to $Cal C$ of the arithmetic theta function of weight 3/2 valued in $\\hat CH^1(\\M)$ can be expressed as a linear combination of arithmetic theta functions of weight 1 for $\\Cal C$ and unary theta series. This identity can be viewed as an arithmetic seesaw identity. In addition, we show that the arithmetic theta series of weight 1 coincide with the central derivative of certain incoherent Eisenstein series for SL(2)/Q, generalizing earlier joint work with M. Rapoport for the case of a ...

  19. Solar Partial N-burst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Jun Ning; Yu-Ying Liu; Qi-Jun Fu; Fu-Ying Xu

    2003-01-01

    We present a new sub-class of type III solar radio burst at the highfrequencies around 6.0 GHz. In addition to a descending and an ascending branchon the dynamic spectrum, it has an inverted morphology different from the simpletype U-burst. We call it "partial N-burst" because it is interpreted as the knownN-burst minus its first branch. The partial N-burst presented here was detectedamong a reverse slope type III (RS-III) burst group prior to the type V solar radiocontinuum and was simultaneously recorded by two spectrometers at the NationalAstronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC, 5.20-7.60 GHz)and at Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO, 4.50-7.50 GHz) on 1999 August 25.After the N-burst and M-burst, the partial N-burst is a third piece of evidence for amagnetic mirror effect in solar radio observation, when the same electron is reflectedat a pinched foot of a flare loop.

  20. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  1. Type III von Neumann Algebras associated with $\\O_\\theta$

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Dilian

    2011-01-01

    Let $\\Fth$ be a 2 graph generated by $m$ blue edges and $n$ red edges, and $\\omega$ be the distinguished faithful state associated with its graph C*-algebra $\\O_\\theta$. In this paper, we characterize the factorness of the von Neumann algebra $\\pi_\\omega(\\O_\\theta)"$ induced from the GNS representation of $\\omega$ under a certain condition. Moreover, when $\\pi_\\omega(\\O_\\theta)"$ is a factor, then it is of type III$_{m^{-\\frac{1}{b}}}$ (or III$_{n^{-\\frac{1}{a}}}$) if $\\frac{\\ln m}{\\ln n}\\in\\bQ$, where $a,b\\in\\bN$ with $\\gcd(a,b)=1$ satisfy $m^a=n^b$, and of type III$_1$ if $\\frac{\\ln m}{\\ln n}\

  2. Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Brdar, Vedran; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a p-wave process than for s-wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to Standard Model particles later, the annihilation bu...

  3. Tri-Permuting Mixing Matrix and predictions for theta_13

    CERN Document Server

    Bazzocchi, F

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new texture for neutrino mixing named Tri-Permuting (TP) mixing matrix. This pattern is characterized by maximal solar and atmospheric angles and by a large reactor angle satisfying sin(theta_13)=1/3. The correct lepton mixing matrix is obtained when combining the charged lepton mixing matrix with the neutrino one. In this way we get new predictions for theta_13 with respect to those obtained by the well studied TBM or BM mixing patterns. We present a specific model that gives rise to TP mixing in the neutrino sector as well as the required corrections from the charged lepton one.

  4. Precise measurement of theta_13 at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, M -C

    2008-01-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment is designed to determine the yet unknown neutrino mixing angle theta_13 by measuring the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from several nuclear reactor cores, using multiple underground detectors at different baselines to minimize systematic errors and to suppress the cosmogenic background. The civil construction has begun since October 2007, enabling first commissioning data in 2009, and full data taking will begin in late 2010. The planned sensitivity in sin^2 (2theta_13) of better than 0.01 at 90% CL will be achieved in three years of data-taking. I will present an overview and current status of the experiment.

  5. Double Chooz: Searching for theta13 with reactor neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Novella, P

    2011-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment is meant to search for the neutrino mixing angle theta13 taking advantage of the neutrinos generated at the nuclear power plant of Chooz. Double Chooz relies on neutrino flux measurements at two different locations, the so-called far and near detectors, although the first phase runs only with the far detector. The commissioning of the far detector started in January 2011 and first results improving the current limit on theta13 are expected by the summer 2011. The status of the Double Chooz experiment is presented.

  6. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  7. Passionflower Extract Induces High-amplitude Rhythms without Phase Shifts in the Expression of Several Circadian Clock Genes in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Kazuya; Hitoe, Shoketsu; Takeda, Shogo; Shimizu, Norihito; Shimoda, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Circadian rhythms play key roles in the regulation of physiological and behavioral systems including wake-sleep cycles. We evaluated the effects of passionflower (aerial parts of Passiflora incarnata Linnaeus) extract (PFE) on circadian rhythms using NIH3T3 cells and mice. PFE (100 μg/mL) induced high-amplitude rhythms in the expression of period circadian protein (Per) 2, cryptochrome (Cry) 1, superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in vitro from 12 h after a treatment with serum-rich medium. Isovitexin 2"-O-glucoside, isoschaftoside, and homoorientin, which were purified from PFE, also significantly enhanced Per2 mRNA expression at 20 h. An oral treatment with PFE (100 mg/kg/day) at zeitgeber time (ZT) 0 h for 15 days improved sleep latencies and sleeping times in the pentobarbital-induced sleep test in mice, similar to muscimol (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.). PFE induced high-amplitude rhythms without obvious phase shifts in serum corticosterone levels and the expression of Per1, Per2, and Cry1 in the liver as well as NIH3T3 cells. However, in the cerebrum, PFE enhanced the circadian expression of brain-muscle ARNT-like protein (Bmal) 1, circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock), and Per1. Regarding this difference, we suggest the involvement of several neurotransmitters that influence the circadian rhythm. Indeed, PFE significantly increased dopamine levels at ZT 18 h, and then affected the mRNA expression of the synthetic and metabolic enzymes such as monoamine oxidase (MAO), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). The results obtained show that PFE positively modulates circadian rhythms by inducing high-amplitude rhythms in the expression of several circadian clock genes.

  8. Bursts de raios gama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, J.

    2003-02-01

    Nos últimos anos, graças principalmente aos dados obtidos pelo Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory e pelo satélite ítalo-holandês BeppoSAX, grandes avanços foram obtidos no nosso conhecimento sobre os fascinantes e enigmáticos fenômenos conhecidos por "bursts"de raios gama. Neste trabalho é feita uma revisão sobre a fenomenologia desses misteriosos objetos e são apresentados os desenvolvimentos recentes nessa área palpitante da astrofísica moderna, ressaltando tanto os resultados observacionais obtidos até o momento quanto os modelos teóricos propostos para explixá-los.

  9. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Balamurugan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical burst switching (OBS is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS. This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks.

  10. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks.

  11. Classical Conditioning of Hippocampal Theta Patterns in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-08-01

    associated with changes in performance of learned tasks , 1,4,5, 8,9 there have been very few studies of neurona l plasticity of the hippocampus It self...rapid development of a conditioned hippocampal theta response to a visual sti mulus demonstrates tha t there is considerable neurona l plasticity in the

  12. A Low energy neutrino factory for large theta(13)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, Steve; Mena, Olga; /Fermilab /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Pascoli, Silvia; /Durham U., IPPP

    2007-01-01

    If the value of {theta}{sub 13} is within the reach of the upcoming generation of long-baseline experiments, T2K and NOvA, they show that a low-energy neutrino factory, with peak energy in the few GeV range, would provide a sensitive tool to explore CP-violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy. They consider baselines with typical length 1000-1500 km. The unique performance of the low energy neutrino factory is due to the rich neutrino oscillation pattern at energies between 1 and 4 GeV at baselines {Omicron}(1000) km. They perform both a semi-analytical study of the sensitivities and a numerical analysis to explore how well this setup can measure {theta}{sub 13}, CP-violation, and determine the type of mass hierarchy and the {theta}{sub 23} quadrant. A low energy neutrino factory provides a powerful tool to resolve ambiguities and make precise parameter determinations, for both large and fairly small values of the mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13}.

  13. Midfrontal theta tracks action monitoring over multiple interactive time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael X

    2016-11-01

    Quickly detecting and correcting mistakes is a crucial brain function. EEG studies have identified an idiosyncratic electrophysiological signature of online error correction, termed midfrontal theta. Midfrontal theta has so far been investigated over the fast time-scale of a few hundred milliseconds. But several aspects of behavior and brain activity unfold over multiple time scales, displaying "scale-free" dynamics that have been linked to criticality and optimal flexibility when responding to changing environmental demands. Here we used a novel line-tracking task to demonstrate that midfrontal theta is a transient yet non-phase-locked response that is modulated by task performance over at least three time scales: a few hundred milliseconds at the onset of a mistake, task performance over a fixed window of the previous 5s, and scale-free-like fluctuations over many tens of seconds. These findings provide novel evidence for a role of midfrontal theta in online behavioral adaptation, and suggest new approaches for linking EEG signatures of human executive functioning to its neurobiological underpinnings.

  14. Dynamical stability of the alpha and theta phases of alumina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodziana, Zbigniew; Parlinski, K.

    2003-01-01

    Using density functional calculations the phonon dispersion relations, phonon density of states, and free energy of theta and alpha phases of alumina are investigated. The temperature dependence of the free energy indicates that entropy contributes to the destabilization of the alpha phase...

  15. Frontal theta reflects uncertainty and unexpectedness during exploration and exploitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, James F; Figueroa, Christina M; Cohen, Michael X; Frank, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    In order to understand the exploitation/exploration trade-off in reinforcement learning, previous theoretical and empirical accounts have suggested that increased uncertainty may precede the decision to explore an alternative option. To date, the neural mechanisms that support the strategic application of uncertainty-driven exploration remain underspecified. In this study, electroencephalography (EEG) was used to assess trial-to-trial dynamics relevant to exploration and exploitation. Theta-band activities over middle and lateral frontal areas have previously been implicated in EEG studies of reinforcement learning and strategic control. It was hypothesized that these areas may interact during top-down strategic behavioral control involved in exploratory choices. Here, we used a dynamic reward-learning task and an associated mathematical model that predicted individual response times. This reinforcement-learning model generated value-based prediction errors and trial-by-trial estimates of exploration as a function of uncertainty. Mid-frontal theta power correlated with unsigned prediction error, although negative prediction errors had greater power overall. Trial-to-trial variations in response-locked frontal theta were linearly related to relative uncertainty and were larger in individuals who used uncertainty to guide exploration. This finding suggests that theta-band activities reflect prefrontal-directed strategic control during exploratory choices.

  16. On identities involving the sixth order mock theta functions

    CERN Document Server

    Lovejoy, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    We present q-series proofs of four identities involving sixth order mock theta functions from Ramanujan's lost notebook. We also show how Ramanujan's identities can be used to give a quick proof of four sixth order identities of Berndt and Chan.

  17. Determination of {theta}{sup 12} in future experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choubey, Sandhya [INFN and SISSA, Trieste (Italy)

    2005-08-15

    We discuss the possibility of high precision measurement of solar mixing angle in future reactor and solar neutrino experiments. Reactor experiments tuned to Survival Probability MINima (SPMIN) can measure sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 12} to within 2%(6%) at l{sigma}(3{sigma})

  18. Frontal theta activity reflects distinct aspects of mental fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wascher, Edmund; Rasch, Björn; Sänger, Jessica; Hoffmann, Sven; Schneider, Daniel; Rinkenauer, Gerhard; Heuer, Herbert; Gutberlet, Ingmar

    2014-02-01

    Longer lasting performance in cognitively demanding tasks leads to an exhaustion of cognitive resources and to a state commonly described as mental fatigue. More specifically, the allocation and focusing of attention become less efficient with time on task. Additionally, the selection of even simple responses becomes more error prone. With respect to the recorded EEG, mental fatigue has been reported to be associated with an increase in frontal theta and frontal and occipital alpha activity. The present study focused on the time course of changes in behavior and in the EEG to characterize fatigue-related processes. Participants performed a spatial stimulus-response-compatibility task in eight blocks for an overall duration of 4h. Error rates increased continuously with time on task. Total alpha power was larger at the end compared to the beginning of the experiment. However, alpha power increased rapidly and reached its maximal amplitude already after 1h, whereas frontal theta showed a continuous increase with time on task, possibly related to increased effort to keep the performance level high. Time frequency analyses revealed power changes in the theta band induced by task relevant information that might be assigned to a drain of executive control capacities. Thus, frontal theta turned out to be a reliable marker of distinct changes in cognitive processing with increasing fatigue.

  19. Athletes in a Slump: Neurophysiological Evidence from Frontal Theta Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingu Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the neurophysiological differences in athletes who suffer from a slump and other athletes who do not. Eighteen high school student athletes participated in this experiment. A subjective questionnaire was conducted to identify athletes in a slump (i.e., the slump group and not in a slump (i.e., the no-slump group. EEG data was recorded at 4 regions (left prefrontal, right prefrontal, left frontal, and right frontal. A two-way (2 groups x 4 regions ANOVA was performed on the dependent variable (i.e., frontal theta power. The findings of this study demonstrated that participants in the no-slump group showed higher frontal theta activity than their counterparts in the slump group. From the findings of this study, it is suggested that mental fatigue may cause low frontal theta activity in athletes who experience a slump. The present study makes an important contribution to the current literature by being the first to report that EEG theta power over frontal regions can be used as a marker of athletes suffering from a slump.

  20. A Search for the Theta^*++ Pentaquark in B+ -> p pbar K+

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Altenburg, D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M; Back, J J; Bailey, S; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P; Bóna, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Borgland, A W; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Briand, H; Brochard, F; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bulten, H; Burchat, Patricia R; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Côté, D; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Christ, S; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Colecchia, F; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cormack, C M; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L M; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Buono, L; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Dickopp, M; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dorigo, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckmann, R; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Elsen, E E; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fan, S; Farbin, A; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B J; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J M; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Geddes, N I; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giraud, P F; Giroux, X; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M; Grancagnolo, S; Green, M G; Greene, M G; Grenier, G J; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hart, P A; Hartfiel, B L; Harton, J L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hicheur, A; Hill, E J; Hitlin, D G; Höcker, A; Hodgkinson, M C; Hollar, J J; Honscheid, K; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Ivanchenko, V N; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Laplace, S; Latham, T E; Lau, Y P; Lavin, D; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, H; Libby, J; Lillard, V; Lista, L; Liu, R; LoSecco, J M; Lo Vetere, M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, A; Lü, C; Luitz, S; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lüth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lyon, A J; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Manfredi, P F; Mangeol, D J J; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Meyer, T I; Meyer, W T; Miftakov, V; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Paick, K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petrak, S; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Pivk, M; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Re, V; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Roe, N A; Röthel, W; Ronan, Michael T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Rubin, A E; Ryd, A; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Sandrelli, F; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Sarti, A; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schott, G; Schrenk, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shelkov, V G; Shen, B C; Simani, M C; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Sloane, R J; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Soha, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spradlin, P; Stängle, H; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; T'Jampens, S; Tan, P; Tantot, L; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thiessen, D; Tiozzo, G; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Treadwell, E; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Vuagnin, G; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walsh, J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winter, M A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, S; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yéche, C; Yi, J; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; De Sangro, R; La Vaissière, C de

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of a search for the Theta*++ pentaquark in the decay B+ -> Theta*++ pbar where Theta*++ -> pK+ using 81fb^-1 of data collected on the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the BaBar detector at PEP-II. We find an upper limit on the branching fraction of B+ -> Theta*++ pbar where Theta*++ -> pK+ to be 1.5x10^-7 for 1.43Theta*++)<1.85GeV/c^2, 2.4x10^-7 for 1.85Theta*++)<2.00GeV/c^2 and 3.3x10^-7 for 2.00Theta*++)<2.36GeV/c^2, at 90% confidence level. All results are preliminary.

  1. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM)

    OpenAIRE

    Lichti, G. G.; Briggs, M.S.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G.; Georgii, R.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W.; Preece, R.; Schoenfelder, V.; von Kienlin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The selection of the GLAST burst monitor (GBM) by NASA will allow the investigation of the relation between the keV and the MeV-GeV emission from gamma-ray bursts. The GBM consists of 12 NaI and 2 BGO crystals allowing a continuous measurement of the energy spectra of gamma-ray bursts from ~5 keV to \\~30 MeV. One feature of the GBM is its high time resolution for time-resolved gamma-ray spectroscopy. Moreover the arrangement of the NaI crystals allows a rapid on-board location (

  2. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  3. Evidence that Clostridium perfringens theta-toxin induces colloid-osmotic lysis of erythrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, R W; Sims, P J; Tweten, R K

    1991-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens theta-toxin was shown to lyse target erythrocytes by a colloid-osmotic mechanism. Analysis showed the onset of lysis of erythrocytes by theta-toxin could be temporarily stabilized with 0.3 M sucrose. Flow cytometry analysis of the size distribution of theta-toxin-treated erythrocytes showed swelling of the erythrocytes prior to lysis.

  4. Modulation of Hippocampal Theta Oscillations and Spatial Memory by Relaxin-3 Neurons of the Nucleus Incertus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sherie; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E.; Hossain, M. Akhter; Lin, Feng; Kuei, Chester; Liu, Changlu; Wade, John D.; Sutton, Steven W.; Nunez, Angel; Gundlach, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01

    Hippocampal theta rhythm is thought to underlie learning and memory, and it is well established that "pacemaker" neurons in medial septum (MS) modulate theta activity. Recent studies in the rat demonstrated that brainstem-generated theta rhythm occurs through a multisynaptic pathway via the nucleus incertus (NI), which is the primary source of the…

  5. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  6. Disinhibition Bursting of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin J Lobb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc dopaminergic neurons receive strong tonic inputs from GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr and globus pallidus (GP, and glutamatergic neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. The presence of these tonic inputs raises the possibility that phasic disinhibition may trigger phasic bursts in dopaminergic neurons. We first applied constant NMDA and GABAA conductances onto a two-compartment single cell model of the dopaminergic neuron (Kuznetsov et al., 2006. The model exhibited disinhibition bursting upon stepwise removal of inhibition. A further bifurcation analysis suggests that disinhibition may be more robust than excitation alone in that for most levels of NMDA conductance, the cell remains capable of bursting even after a complete removal of inhibition, whereas too much excitatory input will drive the cell into depolarization block. To investigate the network dynamics of disinhibition, we used a modified version of an integrate-and-fire based model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al., 2006. Synaptic activity generated in the network was delivered to the two-compartment single cell dopaminergic neuron. Phasic activation of the D1-expressing medium spiny neurons in the striatum (D1STR produced disinhibition bursts in dopaminergic neurons through the direct pathway (D1STR to SNpr to SNpc. Anatomical studies have shown that D1STR neurons have collaterals that terminate in GP. Adding these collaterals to the model, we found that striatal activation increased the intra-burst firing frequency of the disinhibition burst as the weight of this connection was increased. Our studies suggest that striatal activation is a robust means by which disinhibition bursts can be generated by SNpc dopaminergic neurons, and that recruitment of the indirect pathway via collaterals may enhance disinhibition bursting.

  7. Gamma-ray burst models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew

    2007-05-15

    I consider various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries. In addition to the much-studied neutron star+neutron star and black hole+neutron star cases usually considered good candidates for short-duration bursts, there are also other possibilities. In particular, neutron star+massive white dwarf has several desirable features. These systems are likely to produce long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), in some cases definitely without an accompanying supernova, as observed recently. This class of burst would have a strong correlation with star formation and occur close to the host galaxy. However, rare members of the class need not be near star-forming regions and could have any type of host galaxy. Thus, a long-duration burst far from any star-forming region would also be a signature of this class. Estimates based on the existence of a known progenitor suggest that this type of GRB may be quite common, in agreement with the fact that the absence of a supernova can only be established in nearby bursts.

  8. Do Gamma-Ray Burst Sources Repeat?

    OpenAIRE

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and...

  9. Inhibition-induced theta resonance in cortical circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Eran; Eichler, Ronny; Roux, Lisa; Fujisawa, Shigeyoshi; Rotstein, Horacio G.; Buzsáki, György

    2013-01-01

    Both circuit and single-cell properties contribute to network rhythms. In vitro, pyramidal cells exhibit theta-band membrane potential (subthreshold) resonance, but whether and how sub-threshold resonance translates into spiking resonance in behaving animals is unknown. Here, we used optogenetic activation to trigger spiking in pyramidal cells or parvalbumin immunoreactive interneurons (PV) in the hippocampus and neocortex of freely-behaving rodents. Individual directly-activated pyramidal ce...

  10. Grid cells and theta as oscillatory interference: Theory and predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The oscillatory interference model (Burgess, Barry, & O’Keefe, 2007) of grid cell firing is reviewed as an algorithmic level description of a path integration and as an implementation level description of grid cells and their inputs. New analyses concern the relationships between the variables in the model and the theta rhythm, running speed and the intrinsic firing frequencies of grid cells. New simulations concern the implementation of velocity-controlled oscillators (VCOs) with different preferred directions in different neurons. To summarize the model, the distance travelled along a specific direction is encoded by the phase of a VCO relative to a baseline frequency. Each VCO is an intrinsic membrane potential oscillation whose frequency increases from baseline as a result of depolarisation by synaptic input from speed modulated head-direction cells. Grid cell firing is driven by the VCOs whose preferred directions match the current direction of motion. VCOs are phase-reset by location-specific input from place cells to prevent accumulation of error. The baseline frequency is identified with the local average of VCO frequencies, while EEG theta frequency is identified with the global average VCO frequency and comprises two components: the frequency at zero speed, and a linear response to running speed. Quantitative predictions are given for the inter-relationships between a grid cell’s intrinsic firing frequency and grid scale, the two components of theta frequency, and the running speed of the animal. Qualitative predictions are given for the properties of the VCOs, and relationship between environmental novelty, the two components of theta, grid scale and place cell remapping. PMID:19021256

  11. The role of REM theta activity in emotional memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Camilla Hutchison

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available While NREM sleep has been strongly implicated in the reactivation and consolidation of memory traces, the role of REM sleep remains unclear. A growing body of research on humans and animals provide behavioral evidence for a role of REM sleep in the strengthening and modulation of emotional memories. Theta activity – which describes low frequency oscillations in the local field potential within the hippocampus, amygdala and neocortex – is a prominent feature of both wake and REM sleep in humans and rodents. Theta coherence between the hippocampus and amygdala drives large-scale PGO waves, the density of which predicts increases in plasticity-related gene expression. This could potentially facilitate the processing of emotional memory traces within the hippocampus during REM sleep. Further, the timing of hippocampal activity in relation to theta phase is vital in determining subsequent potentiation of neuronal activity. This could allow the emotionally modulated strengthening of novel and the gradual weakening of consolidated hippocampal memory traces observed in both wake and REM sleep. Hippocampal theta activity is also correlated with REM sleep acetylcholine levels – which are thought to reduce hippocampal afferent inputs in the neocortex. The additional low levels of noradrenaline during REM sleep, which facilitate recurrent activation within the neocortex, could allow the integration of novel memory traces previously consolidated during NREM sleep. We therefore propose that REM sleep mediates the prioritized processing of emotional memories within the hippocampus, the integration of previously consolidated memory traces within the neocortex, as well as the disengagement of consolidated neocortical memory traces from the hippocampus.

  12. Theta coordinated error-driven learning in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Ketz

    Full Text Available The learning mechanism in the hippocampus has almost universally been assumed to be Hebbian in nature, where individual neurons in an engram join together with synaptic weight increases to support facilitated recall of memories later. However, it is also widely known that Hebbian learning mechanisms impose significant capacity constraints, and are generally less computationally powerful than learning mechanisms that take advantage of error signals. We show that the differential phase relationships of hippocampal subfields within the overall theta rhythm enable a powerful form of error-driven learning, which results in significantly greater capacity, as shown in computer simulations. In one phase of the theta cycle, the bidirectional connectivity between CA1 and entorhinal cortex can be trained in an error-driven fashion to learn to effectively encode the cortical inputs in a compact and sparse form over CA1. In a subsequent portion of the theta cycle, the system attempts to recall an existing memory, via the pathway from entorhinal cortex to CA3 and CA1. Finally the full theta cycle completes when a strong target encoding representation of the current input is imposed onto the CA1 via direct projections from entorhinal cortex. The difference between this target encoding and the attempted recall of the same representation on CA1 constitutes an error signal that can drive the learning of CA3 to CA1 synapses. This CA3 to CA1 pathway is critical for enabling full reinstatement of recalled hippocampal memories out in cortex. Taken together, these new learning dynamics enable a much more robust, high-capacity model of hippocampal learning than was available previously under the classical Hebbian model.

  13. ON THE THETA OPERATOR FOR MODULAR FORMS MODULO PRIME POWERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Imin; Kiming, Ian

    2016-01-01

    We consider the classical theta operator θ on modular forms modulo pm and level N prime to p, where p is a prime greater than three. Our main result is that θ mod pm will map forms of weight k to forms of weight k+2+2pm−1(p−1) and that this weight is optimal in certain cases when m is at least two...

  14. Modular forms of orthogonal type and Jacobi theta-series

    CERN Document Server

    Clery, Fabien

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider Jacobi forms of half-integral index for any positive definite lattice L (classical Jacobi forms from the book of Eichler and Zagier correspond to the lattice A_1=). We give a lot of examples of Jacobi forms of singular and critical weights for root systems using Jacobi theta-series. We describe the Jacobi lifting for Jacobi forms of half-integral indices. In some case it gives additive lifting construction of new reflective modular forms.

  15. The role of REM sleep theta activity in emotional memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Isabel C; Rathore, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    While non-REM (NREM) sleep has been strongly implicated in the reactivation and consolidation of memory traces, the role of rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep remains unclear. A growing body of research on humans and animals provide behavioral evidence for a role of REM sleep in the strengthening and modulation of emotional memories. Theta activity-which describes low frequency oscillations in the local field potential within the hippocampus, amygdala and neocortex-is a prominent feature of both wake and REM sleep in humans and rodents. Theta coherence between the hippocampus and amygdala drives large-scale pontine-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves, the density of which predicts increases in plasticity-related gene expression. This could potentially facilitate the processing of emotional memory traces within the hippocampus during REM sleep. Further, the timing of hippocampal activity in relation to theta phase is vital in determining subsequent potentiation of neuronal activity. This could allow the emotionally modulated strengthening of novel and gradual weakening of consolidated hippocampal memory traces during REM sleep. Hippocampal theta activity is also correlated with REM sleep levels of achetylcholine - which is thought to reduce hippocampal inputs in the neocortex. The additional low levels of noradrenaline during REM sleep, which facilitate feedback within the neocortex, could allow the integration of novel memory traces previously consolidated during NREM sleep. We therefore propose that REM sleep mediates the prioritized processing of emotional memories within the hippocampus, the integration of previously consolidated memory traces within the neocortex, as well as the disengagement of consolidated neocortical memory traces from the hippocampus.

  16. Wilson Loops in 2D Noncommutative Euclidean Gauge Theory: 2. 1/\\theta Expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Ambjørn, Jan; Makeenko, Y; Ambjorn, Jan; Dubin, Andrei; Makeenko, Yuri

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the $1/\\theta$ and 1/N expansions of the Wilson loop averages $_{U_\\theta (N)}$ in the two-dimensional noncommutative $U_\\theta (N)$ gauge theory with the parameter of noncommutativity $\\theta$. For a generic rectangular contour $C$, a concise integral representation is derived (non-perturbatively both in the coupling constant $g^{2}$ and in $\\theta$) for the next-to-leading term of the $1/\\theta$ expansion. In turn, in the limit when ${\\theta}$ is much larger than the area $A(C)$ of the surface bounded by $C$, the large $\\theta$ asymptote of this representation is argued to yield the next-to-leading term of the $1/\\theta$ series. For both of the expansions, the next-to-leading contribution exhibits only a power-like decay for areas $A(C)>>\\sigma^{-1}$ (but $A(C)<<{\\theta}$) much larger than the inverse of the string tension $\\sigma$ defining the range of the exponential decay of the leading term. Consequently, for large $\\theta$, it hinders a direct stringy interpretation of the subleading t...

  17. $\\theta$ dependence of 4D $SU(N)$ gauge theories in the large-$N$ limit

    CERN Document Server

    Bonati, Claudio; Rossi, Paolo; Vicari, Ettore

    2016-01-01

    We study the large-$N$ scaling behavior of the $\\theta$ dependence of the ground-state energy density $E(\\theta)$ of four-dimensional (4D) $SU(N)$ gauge theories and two-dimensional (2D) $CP^{N-1}$ models, where $\\theta$ is the parameter associated with the Lagrangian topological term. We consider its $\\theta$ expansion around $\\theta=0$, $E(\\theta)-E(0) = {1\\over 2}\\chi \\,\\theta^2 ( 1 + b_2 \\theta^2 + b_4\\theta^4 +\\cdots)$ where $\\chi$ is the topological susceptibility and $b_{2n}$ are dimensionless coefficients. We focus on the first few coefficients $b_{2n}$, which parametrize the deviation from a simple Gaussian distribution of the topological charge at $\\theta=0$. We present a numerical analysis of Monte Carlo simulations of 4D $SU(N)$ lattice gauge theories for $N=3,\\,4,\\,6$ in the presence of an imaginary $\\theta$ term. The results provide a robust evidence of the large-$N$ behavior predicted by standard large-$N$ scaling arguments, i.e. $b_{2n}= O(N^{-2n})$. In particular, we obtain $b_2=\\bar{b}_2/N^2...

  18. A Modified Theta Projection Model for Creep Behavior of Metals and Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Singh, I. V.; Mishra, B. K.; Ahmad, S.; Venugopal Rao, A.; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a modified theta projection model is proposed for the constitutive modeling of creep behavior of metals and alloys. In the conventional theta projection model, strain hardening exponent is a function of time and theta, whereas in the modified theta projection model, the exponent is taken as a function of time, theta, and applied stress. The results obtained by the modified theta projection model for Al 2124 T851 alloy at constant uniaxial tensile stress are compared with the experimental results and with the predictions of the conventional theta projection method. The creep behavior of Al 7075 T651 alloy is also predicted using modified and conventional theta projection model and compared with the available experimental data. It is observed that the modified theta projection model captures the creep behavior more accurately as compared to the conventional theta projection model. The modified theta projection model can be used to predict the creep strain of pure metals and class M alloys (similar creep behavior to pure metals) for intermediate range of stress and temperature.

  19. Search for high-amplitude Delta Scuti and RR Lyrae stars in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 using principal component analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Süveges, M; Váradi, M; Mowlavi, N; Becker, A C; Ivezić, Ž; Beck, M; Nienartowicz, K; Rimoldini, L; Dubath, P; Bartholdi, P; Eyer, L

    2012-01-01

    We propose a robust principal component analysis (PCA) framework for the exploitation of multi-band photometric measurements in large surveys. Period search results are improved using the time series of the first principal component due to its optimized signal-to-noise ratio.The presence of correlated excess variations in the multivariate time series enables the detection of weaker variability. Furthermore, the direction of the largest variance differs for certain types of variable stars. This can be used as an efficient attribute for classification. The application of the method to a subsample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 data yielded 132 high-amplitude Delta Scuti variables. We found also 129 new RR Lyrae variables, complementary to the catalogue of Sesar et al., 2010, extending the halo area mapped by Stripe 82 RR Lyrae stars towards the Galactic bulge. The sample comprises also 25 multiperiodic or Blazhko RR Lyrae stars.

  20. Background-independent measurement of $\\theta_{13}$ in Double Chooz

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Y; Barriere, J C; Baussan, E; Bekman, I; Bergevin, M; Bezerra, T J C; Bezrukov, L; Blucher, E; Buck, C; Busenitz, J; Cabrera, A; Caden, E; Camilleri, L; Carr, R; Cerrada, M; Chang, P -J; Chauveau, E; Chimenti, P; Collin, A P; Conover, E; Conrad, J M; Crespo-Anadón, J I; Crum, K; Cucoanes, A; Damon, E; Dawson, J V; Dietrich, D; Djurcic, Z; Dracos, M; Elnimr, M; Etenko, A; Fallot, M; von Feilitzsch, F; Felde, J; Fernandes, S M; Fischer, V; Franco, D; Franke, M; Furuta, H; Gil-Botella, I; Giot, L; Göger-Neff, M; Gonzalez, L F G; Goodenough, L; Goodman, M C; Grant, C; Haag, N; Hara, T; Haser, J; Hofmann, M; Horton-Smith, G A; Hourlier, A; Ishitsuka, M; Jochum, J; Jollet, C; Kaether, F; Kalousis, L N; Kamyshkov, Y; Kaplan, D M; Kawasaki, T; Kemp, E; de Kerret, H; Konno, T; Kryn, D; Kuze, M; Lachenmaier, T; Lane, C E; Lasserre, T; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Lima, H P; Lindner, M; López-Casta\; LoSecco, J M; Lucht, S; Maeda, J; Mariani, C; Maricic, J; Martino, J; Matsubara, T; Mention, G; Meregaglia, A; Miletic, T; Milincic, R; Minotti, A; Nagasaka, Y; Nakajima, K; Nikitenko, Y; Novella, P; Obolensky, M; Oberauer, L; Onillon, A; Osborn, A; Palomares, C; Pepe, I M; Perasso, S; Pfahler, P; Porta, A; Pronost, G; Reichenbacher, J; Reinhold, B; Röhling, M; Roncin, R; Roth, S; Rybolt, B; Sakamoto, Y; Santorelli, R; Sato, F; Schilithz, A C; Schönert, S; Schoppmann, S; Shaevitz, M H; Sharankova, R; Shimojima, S; Sibille, V; Sinev, V; Skorokhvatov, M; Smith, E; Spitz, J; Stahl, A; Stancu, I; Stokes, L F F; Strait, M; Stüken, A; Suekane, F; Sukhotin, S; Sumiyoshi, T; Sun, Y; Svoboda, R; Terao, K; Tonazzo, A; Thi, H H Trinh; Valdiviesso, G; Vassilopoulos, N; Veyssiere, C; Vivier, M; Wagner, S; Watanabe, H; Wiebusch, C; Winslow, L; Wurm, M; Yang, G; Yermia, F; Zimmer, V

    2014-01-01

    The oscillation results published by the Double Chooz collaboration in 2011 and 2012 rely on background models substantiated by reactor-on data. In this analysis, we present a background-model-independent measurement of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by including 7.53 days of reactor-off data. A global fit of the observed neutrino rates for different reactor power conditions is performed, yielding a measurement of both $\\theta_{13}$ and the total background rate. The results on the mixing angle are improved significantly by including the reactor-off data in the fit, as it provides a direct measurement of the total background rate. This reactor rate modulation analysis considers antineutrino candidates with neutron captures on both Gd and H, whose combination yields $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})=$ 0.102 $\\pm$ 0.028(stat.) $\\pm$ 0.033(syst.). The results presented in this study are fully consistent with the ones already published by Double Chooz, achieving a competitive precision. They provide, for the first time, a de...

  1. Cosmological lepton asymmetry with a nonzero mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$

    CERN Document Server

    Castorina, Emanuele; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Lesgourgues, Julien; Mangano, Gianpiero; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pastor, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    While the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is nowadays well measured by cosmological observations, the bounds on the lepton asymmetry in the form of neutrinos are still significantly weaker. We place limits on the relic neutrino asymmetries using some of the latest cosmological data, taking into account the effect of flavor oscillations. We present our results for two different values of the neutrino mixing angle \\theta_{13}, and show that for large \\theta_{13} the limits on the total neutrino asymmetry become more stringent, diluting even large initial flavor asymmetries. In particular, we find that the present bounds are still dominated by the limits coming from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, while the limits on the total neutrino mass from cosmological data are essentially independent of \\theta_{13}. Finally, we perform a forecast for COrE, taken as an example of a future CMB experiment, and find that it could improve the limits on the total lepton asymmetry approximately by up to a factor 5.

  2. Theta signal as the neural signature of social exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofori, Irene; Moretti, Laura; Harquel, Sylvain; Posada, Andres; Deiana, Gianluca; Isnard, Jean; Mauguière, François; Sirigu, Angela

    2013-10-01

    The feeling of being excluded from a social interaction triggers social pain, a sensation as intense as actual physical pain. Little is known about the neurophysiological underpinnings of social pain. We addressed this issue using intracranial electroencephalography in 15 patients performing a ball game where inclusion and exclusion blocks were alternated. Time-frequency analyses showed an increase in power of theta-band oscillations during exclusion in the anterior insula (AI) and posterior insula, the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC), and the fusiform "face area" (FFA). Interestingly, the AI showed an initial fast response to exclusion but the signal rapidly faded out. Activity in the sACC gradually increased and remained significant thereafter. This suggests that the AI may signal social pain by detecting emotional distress caused by the exclusion, whereas the sACC may be linked to the learning aspects of social pain. Theta activity in the FFA was time-locked to the observation of a player poised to exclude the participant, suggesting that the FFA encodes the social value of faces. Taken together, our findings suggest that theta activity represents the neural signature of social pain. The time course of this signal varies across regions important for processing emotional features linked to social information.

  3. Numerical Simulation on Seismic Response of the Filled Joint under High Amplitude Stress Waves Using Finite-Discrete Element Method (FDEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper numerically investigates the seismic response of the filled joint under high amplitude stress waves using the combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM. A thin layer of independent polygonal particles are used to simulate the joint fillings. Each particle is meshed using the Delaunay triangulation scheme and can be crushed when the load exceeds its strength. The propagation of the 1D longitude wave through a single filled joint is studied, considering the influences of the joint thickness and the characteristics of the incident wave, such as the amplitude and frequency. The results show that the filled particles under high amplitude stress waves mainly experience three deformation stages: (i initial compaction stage; (ii crushing stage; and (iii crushing and compaction stage. In the initial compaction stage and crushing and compaction stage, compaction dominates the mechanical behavior of the joint, and the particle area distribution curve varies little. In these stages, the transmission coefficient increases with the increase of the amplitude, i.e., peak particle velocity (PPV, of the incident wave. On the other hand, in the crushing stage, particle crushing plays the dominant role. The particle size distribution curve changes abruptly with the PPV due to the fragments created by the crushing process. This process consumes part of wave energy and reduces the stiffness of the filled joint. The transmission coefficient decreases with increasing PPV in this stage because of the increased amount of energy consumed by crushing. Moreover, with the increase of the frequency of the incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases and fewer particles can be crushed. Under the same incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases when the filled thickness increases and the filled particles become more difficult to be crushed.

  4. Brain Responses to a 6-Hz Binaural Beat: Effects on General Theta Rhythm and Frontal Midline Theta Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nantawachara Jirakittayakorn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A binaural beat is a beat phenomenon that is generated by the dichotic presentation of two almost equivalent pure tones but with slightly different frequencies. The brain responses to binaural beats remain controversial; therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate theta activity responses to a binaural beat by controlling factors affecting localization, including beat frequency, carrier tone frequency, exposure duration, and recording procedure. Exposure to a 6-Hz binaural beat on a 250 Hz carrier tone for 30 min was utilized in this study. Quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG was utilized as the recording modality. Twenty-eight participants were divided into experimental and control groups. Emotional states were evaluated by Brunel Mood Scale (BRMUS before and after exposing to the stimulus. The results showed that theta activity was induced in the entire cortex within 10 min of exposure to the stimulus in the experimental group. Compared to the control group, theta activity was also induced at the frontal and parietal-central regions, which included the Fz position, and left hemisphere dominance was presented for other exposure durations. The pattern recorded for 10 min of exposure appeared to be brain functions of a meditative state. Moreover, tension factor of BRUMS was decreased in experimental group compared to control group which resembled the meditation effect. Thus, a 6-Hz binaural beat on a 250 Hz carrier tone was suggested as a stimulus for inducing a meditative state.

  5. Brain Responses to a 6-Hz Binaural Beat: Effects on General Theta Rhythm and Frontal Midline Theta Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirakittayakorn, Nantawachara; Wongsawat, Yodchanan

    2017-01-01

    A binaural beat is a beat phenomenon that is generated by the dichotic presentation of two almost equivalent pure tones but with slightly different frequencies. The brain responses to binaural beats remain controversial; therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate theta activity responses to a binaural beat by controlling factors affecting localization, including beat frequency, carrier tone frequency, exposure duration, and recording procedure. Exposure to a 6-Hz binaural beat on a 250 Hz carrier tone for 30 min was utilized in this study. Quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) was utilized as the recording modality. Twenty-eight participants were divided into experimental and control groups. Emotional states were evaluated by Brunel Mood Scale (BRMUS) before and after exposing to the stimulus. The results showed that theta activity was induced in the entire cortex within 10 min of exposure to the stimulus in the experimental group. Compared to the control group, theta activity was also induced at the frontal and parietal-central regions, which included the Fz position, and left hemisphere dominance was presented for other exposure durations. The pattern recorded for 10 min of exposure appeared to be brain functions of a meditative state. Moreover, tension factor of BRUMS was decreased in experimental group compared to control group which resembled the meditation effect. Thus, a 6-Hz binaural beat on a 250 Hz carrier tone was suggested as a stimulus for inducing a meditative state.

  6. Broadband Spectral Study of Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmizibayrak, Demet; Gogus, Ersin; Sasmaz Mus, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki

    2016-07-01

    Magnetar bursts occur sporadically on random occasions, and every burst-active episode carries unique information about the bursting magnetar. Therefore, in-depth spectral and temporal analyses of each of the magnetar bursts provide new insights into the bursting and radiation mechanisms. There have been a number of studies over the last decade, investigating the spectral and temporal properties of magnetar bursts. The spectra of typical magnetar bursts were generally described with the Comptonized model or the sum of two blackbody functions. However, it was recently shown that the actual spectral nature of these bursts can be conclusively determined if the spectral analysis is performed on a wide energy coverage. We present the results of in-depth systematic broadband (2 - 250 keV) spectral analysis of a large number of bursts originated from three magnetars: SGR 1806-20, SGR 1900+14, and SGR J1550-5418, observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer.

  7. Modulation of induced frontocentral theta (Fm-theta) event-related (de-)synchronisation dynamics following mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in Major Depressive Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenberg, P.L.; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Depressive severity has been associated with attenuated neocortical frontal midline theta (Fm-theta) power/evoked activity. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) has shown to be a successful novel intervention for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), albeit precise working mechanisms remain elusive

  8. Amplitude-Modulated Bursting: A Novel Class of Bursting Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Theodore; Kramer, Mark A.; Kaper, Tasso J.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the discovery of a novel class of bursting rhythms, called amplitude-modulated bursting (AMB), in a model for intracellular calcium dynamics. We find that these rhythms are robust and exist on open parameter sets. We develop a new mathematical framework with broad applicability to detect, classify, and rigorously analyze AMB. Here we illustrate this framework in the context of AMB in a model of intracellular calcium dynamics. In the process, we discover a novel family of singularities, called toral folded singularities, which are the organizing centers for the amplitude modulation and exist generically in slow-fast systems with two or more slow variables.

  9. Fast-reset of pacemaking and theta-frequency resonance patterns in cerebellar golgi cells: Simulations of their impact in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Solinas

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi cells are inhibitory interneurons of the cerebellar granular layer, which respond to afferent stimulation in vivo with a burst-pause sequence interrupting their irregular background low-frequency firing (Vos et al., 1999a. Eur. J. Neurosci. 11, 2621–2634. However, Golgi cells in vitro are regular pacemakers (Forti et al., 2006. J. Physiol. 574, 711–729, raising the question how their ionic mechanisms could impact on responses during physiological activity. Using patch-clamp recordings in cerebellar slices we show that the pacemaker cycle can be suddenly reset by spikes, making the cell highly sensitive to input variations. Moreover, the neuron resonates around the pacemaker frequency, making it specifically sensitive to patterned stimulation in the theta-frequency band. Computational analysis based on a model developed to reproduce Golgi cell pacemaking (Solinas et al., 2008 Front. Neurosci., 1:2 predicted that phase-reset required spike-triggered activation of SK channels and that resonance was sustained by a slow voltage-dependent potassium current and amplified by a persistent sodium current. Adding balanced synaptic noise to mimic the irregular discharge observed in vivo, we found that pacemaking converts into spontaneous irregular discharge, that phase-reset plays an important role in generating the burst-pause pattern evoked by sensory stimulation, and that repetitive stimulation at theta-frequency enhances the time-precision of spike coding in the burst. These results suggest that Golgi cell intrinsic properties exert a profound impact on time-dependent signal processing in the cerebellar granular layer.

  10. Fast-reset of pacemaking and theta-frequency resonance patterns in cerebellar golgi cells: simulations of their impact in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solinas, Sergio; Forti, Lia; Cesana, Elisabetta; Mapelli, Jonathan; De Schutter, Erik; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2007-01-01

    The Golgi cells are inhibitory interneurons of the cerebellar granular layer, which respond to afferent stimulation in vivo with a burst-pause sequence interrupting their irregular background low-frequency firing (Vos et al., 1999a. Eur. J. Neurosci. 11, 2621-2634). However, Golgi cells in vitro are regular pacemakers (Forti et al., 2006. J. Physiol. 574, 711-729), raising the question how their ionic mechanisms could impact on responses during physiological activity. Using patch-clamp recordings in cerebellar slices we show that the pacemaker cycle can be suddenly reset by spikes, making the cell highly sensitive to input variations. Moreover, the neuron resonates around the pacemaker frequency, making it specifically sensitive to patterned stimulation in the theta-frequency band. Computational analysis based on a model developed to reproduce Golgi cell pacemaking (Solinas et al., 2008Front. Neurosci., 2:2) predicted that phase-reset required spike-triggered activation of SK channels and that resonance was sustained by a slow voltage-dependent potassium current and amplified by a persistent sodium current. Adding balanced synaptic noise to mimic the irregular discharge observed in vivo, we found that pacemaking converts into spontaneous irregular discharge, that phase-reset plays an important role in generating the burst-pause pattern evoked by sensory stimulation, and that repetitive stimulation at theta-frequency enhances the time-precision of spike coding in the burst. These results suggest that Golgi cell intrinsic properties exert a profound impact on time-dependent signal processing in the cerebellar granular layer.

  11. Does the inferior frontal sulcus play a functional role in deception? A neuronavigated theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Verschuere; T. Schuhmann; A.T. Sack

    2012-01-01

    By definition, lying involves withholding the truth. Response inhibition may therefore be the cognitive function at the heart of deception. Neuroimaging research has shown that the same brain region that is activated during response inhibition tasks, namely the inferior frontal region, is also activ

  12. Mapping the after-effects of theta burst stimulation on the human auditory cortex with functional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Jamila; Zatorre, Robert J

    2012-09-12

    Auditory cortex pertains to the processing of sound, which is at the basis of speech or music-related processing. However, despite considerable recent progress, the functional properties and lateralization of the human auditory cortex are far from being fully understood. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique that can transiently or lastingly modulate cortical excitability via the application of localized magnetic field pulses, and represents a unique method of exploring plasticity and connectivity. It has only recently begun to be applied to understand auditory cortical function. An important issue in using TMS is that the physiological consequences of the stimulation are difficult to establish. Although many TMS studies make the implicit assumption that the area targeted by the coil is the area affected, this need not be the case, particularly for complex cognitive functions which depend on interactions across many brain regions. One solution to this problem is to combine TMS with functional Magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The idea here is that fMRI will provide an index of changes in brain activity associated with TMS. Thus, fMRI would give an independent means of assessing which areas are affected by TMS and how they are modulated. In addition, fMRI allows the assessment of functional connectivity, which represents a measure of the temporal coupling between distant regions. It can thus be useful not only to measure the net activity modulation induced by TMS in given locations, but also the degree to which the network properties are affected by TMS, via any observed changes in functional connectivity. Different approaches exist to combine TMS and functional imaging according to the temporal order of the methods. Functional MRI can be applied before, during, after, or both before and after TMS. Recently, some studies interleaved TMS and fMRI in order to provide online mapping of the functional changes induced by TMS. However, this online combination has many technical problems, including the static artifacts resulting from the presence of the TMS coil in the scanner room, or the effects of TMS pulses on the process of MR image formation. But more importantly, the loud acoustic noise induced by TMS (increased compared with standard use because of the resonance of the scanner bore) and the increased TMS coil vibrations (caused by the strong mechanical forces due to the static magnetic field of the MR scanner) constitute a crucial problem when studying auditory processing. This is one reason why fMRI was carried out before and after TMS in the present study. Similar approaches have been used to target the motor cortex, premotor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex and language-related areas, but so far no combined TMS-fMRI study has investigated the auditory cortex. The purpose of this article is to provide details concerning the protocol and considerations necessary to successfully combine these two neuroscientific tools to investigate auditory processing. Previously we showed that repetitive TMS (rTMS) at high and low frequencies (resp. 10 Hz and 1 Hz) applied over the auditory cortex modulated response time (RT) in a melody discrimination task. We also showed that RT modulation was correlated with functional connectivity in the auditory network assessed using fMRI: the higher the functional connectivity between left and right auditory cortices during task performance, the higher the facilitatory effect (i.e. decreased RT) observed with rTMS. However those findings were mainly correlational, as fMRI was performed before rTMS. Here, fMRI was carried out before and immediately after TMS to provide direct measures of the functional organization of the auditory cortex, and more specifically of the plastic reorganization of the auditory neural network occurring after the neural intervention provided by TMS. Combined fMRI and TMS applied over the auditory cortex should enable a better understanding of brain mechanisms of auditory processing, providing physiological information about functional effects of TMS. This knowledge could be useful for many cognitive neuroscience applications, as well as for optimizing therapeutic applications of TMS, particularly in auditory-related disorders.

  13. Role of Broca's Area in Implicit Motor Skill Learning: Evidence from Continuous Theta-Burst Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerget, Emeline; Poncin, William; Fadiga, Luciano; Olivier, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Complex actions can be regarded as a concatenation of simple motor acts, arranged according to specific rules. Because the caudal part of the Broca's region (left Brodmann's area 44, BA 44) is involved in processing hierarchically organized behaviors, we aimed to test the hypothesis that this area may also play a role in learning structured motor…

  14. Continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) over the lateral prefrontal cortex alters reinforcement learning bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott, D.V.M.; Ullsperger, M.; Jocham, G.; Neumann, J.; Klein, T.A.

    2011-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex is known to play a key role in higher-order cognitive functions. Recently, we showed that this brain region is active in reinforcement learning, during which subjects constantly have to integrate trial outcomes in order to optimize performance. To further elucidate the role of

  15. High Redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 gamma-ray bursts per year for 7 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. GRBs are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=9.4 giving information on metallicity, star formation rate and reionization. The talk will present the latest results.

  16. High-amplitude, centennial-scale climate oscillations during the last glacial in the western Third Pole as recorded in the Guliya ice cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, L. G.; Yao, T.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; Wu, G.; Davis, M. E.; Tian, L.; Lin, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Guliya ice cap, located in the Kunlun Mountains in the western Third Pole (TP) region near the northern limit of the southwest monsoon influence, may be the only non-polar ice field that provides detailed histories of climate and environment over the last glacial cycle. A continuous climate record from an ice core drilled in 1992 contains Eemian ice, and basal temperatures measured that year confirmed that the record was not being removed from the bottom. The δ18O record throughout Marine Isotope Stage 2 (MIS2) displays the occurrence of high-amplitude (~20‰) episodes of ~200-year periodicity, and the aerosol records suggest snow cover, regional vegetation and fire frequency that vary in synchrony. These oscillations might reflect the movement of the northernmost penetration of the monsoon precipitation through the Late Glacial Stage, which is restricted by the topographic barrier posed by the Kunlun range, and might also reflect solar-driven nonlinearities in the climate system such as sudden shifts in the jet stream. Recent model simulations suggest that glacial cooling over China was significantly amplified by stationary waves, and the Guliya MIS2 oscillations could reflect cyclical variability in these waves. These results are supported by clumped isotope thermometry of carbonates from the Chinese Loess Plateau, which indicate a 6 to 7oC decrease in Last Glacial Maximum summer temperatures. These studies will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms driving such high-frequency, high-amplitude oscillations. A review of the 2015 Sino-American cooperative ice core drilling program on Guliya is presented. This program will serve as a flagship for the TP Environment Program, an international, multidisciplinary collaboration among professionals and students in 14 countries designed to investigate environmental changes across the TP. The rapidly warming TP contains ~46,000 glaciers that collectively hold one of Earth's largest stores of fresh water that

  17. Theta Brain Rhythms Index Perceptual Narrowing in Infant Speech Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis eBosseler

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of speech perception shows a dramatic transition between infancy and adulthood. Between 6 and 12 months, infants’ initial ability to discriminate all phonetic units across the worlds’ languages narrows—native discrimination increases while nonnative discrimination shows a steep decline. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG to examine whether brain oscillations in the theta band (4-8Hz, reflecting increases in attention and cognitive effort, would provide a neural measure of the perceptual narrowing phenomenon in speech. Using an oddball paradigm, we varied speech stimuli in two dimensions, stimulus frequency (frequent vs. infrequent and language (native vs. nonnative speech syllables and tested 6-month-old infants, 12-month-old infants, and adults. We hypothesized that 6-month-old infants would show increased relative theta power (RTP for frequent syllables, regardless of their status as native or nonnative syllables, reflecting young infants’ attention and cognitive effort in response to highly frequent stimuli (statistical learning. In adults, we hypothesized increased RTP for nonnative stimuli, regardless of their presentation frequency, reflecting increased cognitive effort for nonnative phonetic categories. The 12-month-old infants were expected to show a pattern in transition, but one more similar to adults than to 6-month-old infants. The MEG brain rhythm results supported these hypotheses. We suggest that perceptual narrowing in speech perception is governed by an implicit learning process. This learning process involves an implicit shift in attention from frequent events (infants to learned categories (adults. Theta brain oscillatory activity may provide an index of perceptual narrowing beyond speech, and would offer a test of whether the early speech learning process is governed by domain-general or domain-specific processes.

  18. Is $n\\sin\\theta$ conserved along light path?

    CERN Document Server

    Noorbala, Mahdiyar

    2016-01-01

    Snell's law states that the quantity $n\\sin\\theta$ is unchanged in refraction of light passing from one medium to another. We inquire whether this is true in the general case where the speed of light varies continuously within a medium. It turns out to be an instructive exercise in application of Snell's law and Fermat's principle. It also provides good pedagogical problems in calculus of variations to deal with the subtleties of a variable domain of integration and inclusion of constraints. The final result of these exercises is that, contrary to an initial expectation, the answer to the question in the title is negative.

  19. FERMIGBRST - Fermi GBM Burst Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by a subset of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO) which have been classified as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Note that...

  20. Fluctuating inhibitory inputs promote reliable spiking at theta frequencies in hippocampal interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Duluxan eSritharan; Frances K Skinner

    2012-01-01

    Theta frequency (4-12 Hz) rhythms in the hippocampus play important roles in learning and memory. CA1 interneurons located at the stratum lacunosum-moleculare and radiatum junction (LM/RAD) are thought to contribute to hippocampal theta population activities by rhythmically pacing pyramidal cells with inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. This implies that LM/RAD cells need to fire reliably at theta frequencies in vivo. To determine whether this could occur, we use biophysically-based LM/RAD mo...

  1. Hippocampal theta phase-contingent memory retrieval in delay and trace eyeblink conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waselius, Tomi; Pöllänen, Eveliina; Wikgren, Jan; Penttonen, Markku; Nokia, Miriam S

    2017-09-04

    Hippocampal theta oscillations (3-12Hz) play a prominent role in learning. It has been suggested that encoding and retrieval of memories are supported by different phases of the theta cycle. Our previous study on trace eyeblink conditioning in rabbits suggests that the timing of the conditioned stimulus (CS) in relation to theta phase affects encoding but not retrieval of the memory trace. Here, we directly tested the effects of hippocampal theta phase on memory retrieval in two experiments conducted on adult female New Zealand White rabbits. In Experiment 1, animals were trained in trace eyeblink conditioning followed by extinction, and memory retrieval was tested by presenting the CS at troughs and peaks of the theta cycle during different stages of learning. In Experiment 2, animals were trained in delay conditioning either contingent on a high level of theta or at a random neural state. Conditioning was then followed by extinction conducted either at a random state, contingent on theta trough or contingent on theta peak. Our current results indicate that the phase of theta at CS onset has no effect on the performance of the behavioral learned response at any stage of classical eyeblink conditioning or extinction. In addition, theta-contingent trial presentation does not improve learning during delay eyeblink conditioning. The results are consistent with our earlier findings and suggest that the theta phase alone is not sufficient to affect learning at the behavioral level. It seems that the retrieval of recently acquired memories and consequently performing a learned response is moderated by neural mechanisms other than hippocampal theta. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. High Precision Measurements of $\\theta_{\\odot}$ in Solar and Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, A; Goswami, S; Petcov, S T; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Choubey, Sandhya; Goswami, Srubabati

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the possibilities of high precision measurement of the solar neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_\\odot \\equiv \\theta_{12}$ in solar and reactor neutrino experiments. The improvements in the determination of $\\sin^2\\theta_{12}$, which can be achieved with the expected increase of statistics and reduction of systematic errors in the currently operating solar and KamLAND experiments, are summarised. The potential of LowNu $\

  3. Microscopic characteristics of burst coal seams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.; Wang, C. [Shandong University of Science and Technology (China)

    2000-08-01

    Based on the analytical results of coal samples with microscope and scanning electron microscope, the paper explains the petrographic characteristics and microscopic depredation of burst coal. Quantitative analysis on the components and microstructures of the burst coal is conducted. The influence of the microscopic characteristics on coal burst is discussed. For coal seams with burst tendency, it has provided the necessary forecasting parameters. 2 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Millisecond extragalactic radio bursts as magnetar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S B

    2013-01-01

    Properties of the population of millisecond extragalactic radio bursts discovered by Thornton et al. (2013) are in good correspondence with the hypothesis that such events are related to hyperflares of magnetars, as was proposed by us after the first observation of an extragalactic millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al. (2007). We also point that some of multiple millisecond radio bursts from M31 discovered by Rubio-Herrera et al. (2013) also can be related to weaker magnetar bursts.

  5. GABAB receptor blockade enhances theta and gamma rhythms in the hippocampus of behaving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, L Stan; Shen, Bixia

    2007-01-01

    The participation of GABA(B) receptors in hippocampal EEG generation was studied by intracerebroventricular (icv) and intracerebral infusions of GABA(B) receptor antagonist p-(3-aminopropyl)-p-diethoxymethyl-phosphinic acid (CGP35348) in freely behaving rats. During awake-immobility, icv CGP35348 induced a theta rhythm and increased gamma waves (30-100 Hz) in the hippocampus. The immobility theta peaked at 6-7 Hz and had a theta phase in CA1 stratum radiatum of approximately 160 degrees with reference to the theta at the alveus, when compared with approximately 130 degrees during walking. Immobility theta power peaks at 6-7 Hz was also found in normal rats, and it was detected in 27% of the EEG segments during immobility. Incidence of immobility theta increased to 87.5% after 480 nmol of CGP35348 icv. Muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (5 mg/kg, ip) suppressed the induction of immobility theta and the gamma power increase after icv CGP35348. CGP35348 icv did not significantly change the hippocampal theta power at 7-8 Hz during walking (theta fundamental), but it increased power at 12-15 Hz, at the second harmonic of theta. CGP35348 icv also increased 30-50 Hz gamma power during walking. Medial septal infusion of CGP35348 (12 nmol in 0.4 microl) increased the power and the frequency of the hippocampal theta second harmonic during walking, but did not increase gamma activity. Infusion of CGP35348 (8 nmol in 0.4 microl) in the hippocampus increased the local gamma activity at 30-100 Hz, but did not induce immobility theta or affect the walking theta rhythm. In conclusion, icv GABA(B) receptor blockade increased an atropine-sensitive input that generated an immobility theta rhythm, while GABA(B) receptor blockade of the medial septum increased atropine-resistant theta harmonics possibly generated by apical dendritic spikes. GABA(B) receptor blockade may enhance cognitive task performance by activating hippocampal theta and gamma rhythms in behaving rats.

  6. Theta variation and spatiotemporal scaling along the septotemporal axis of the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L Long

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal theta has been related to locomotor speed, attention, anxiety, sensorimotor integration and memory among other emergent phenomena. One difficulty in understanding the function of theta is that the hippocampus (HPC modulates voluntary behavior at the same time that it processes sensory input. Both functions are correlated with characteristic changes in theta indices. The current review highlights a series of studies examining theta local field potential (LFP signals across the septotemporal or longitudinal axis of the HPC. While the theta signal is coherent throughout the entirety of the HPC, the amplitude, but not the frequency, of theta varies significantly across its three-dimensional expanse. We suggest that the theta signal offers a rich vein of information about how distributed neuronal ensembles support emergent function. Further, we speculate that emergent function across the long axis varies with respect to spatiotemporal scale. Thus, septal hippocampus processes details of the proximal spatiotemporal environment while more temporal aspects process larger spaces and wider time-scales. The degree to which emergent functions are supported by the synchronization of theta across the septotemporal axis is an open question. Our working model is that theta synchrony serves to bind ensembles representing varying resolutions of spatiotemporal information at interdependent septotemporal areas of the HPC. Such synchrony and cooperative interactions along the septotemporal axis likely support memory formation and subsequent consolidation and retrieval.

  7. Non-trivial \\theta-Vacuum Effects in the 2-d O(3) Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bögli, Michael; Pepe, Michele; Wiese, Uwe-Jens

    2011-01-01

    We study \\theta-vacua in the 2-d lattice O(3) model using the standard action and an optimized constraint action with very small cut-off effects, combined with the geometric topological charge. Remarkably, dislocation lattice artifacts do not spoil the non-trivial continuum limit at \\theta\\ non-zero, and there are different continuum theories for each value of \\theta. A very precise Monte Carlo study of the step scaling function indirectly confirms the exact S-matrix of the 2-d O(3) model at \\theta = \\pi.

  8. Nonzero $\\theta_{13}$ in $SO(3) \\rightarrow A_4$ lepton models

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Yuval

    2014-01-01

    The simplest neutrino mass models based on $A_4$ symmetry predict $\\theta_{13} = 0$ at tree level, a value that contradicts recent data. We study models that arise from the spontaneous breaking of an $SO(3)$ symmetry to its $A_4$ subgroup, and find two ways to get a nonzero $\\theta_{13}$ at tree level. In the first method extra heavy fields mixed with the charged leptons generate $\\theta_{13}$ of order the ratio between the $A_4$-breaking and the $SO(3)$-breaking scales. In the second method the flavon vacuum alignment is modified, such that it generates $\\theta_{13}$ of order the amount of misalignment.

  9. D3-instantons, Mock Theta Series and Twistors

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Pioline, Boris

    2013-01-01

    The D-instanton corrected hypermultiplet moduli space of type II string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau threefold is known in the type IIA picture to be determined in terms of the generalized Donaldson-Thomas invariants, through a twistorial construction. At the same time, in the mirror type IIB picture, and in the limit where only D3-D1-D(-1)-instanton corrections are retained, it should carry an isometric action of the S-duality group SL(2,Z). We prove that this is the case in the one-instanton approximation, by constructing a holomorphic action of SL(2,Z) on the linearized twistor space. Using the modular invariance of the D4-D2-D0 black hole partition function, we show that the standard Darboux coordinates in twistor space have modular anomalies controlled by period integrals of a Siegel-Narain theta series, which can be canceled by a contact transformation generated by a holomorphic mock theta series.

  10. D3-instantons, mock theta series and twistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Manschot, Jan; Pioline, Boris

    2013-04-01

    The D-instanton corrected hypermultiplet moduli space of type II string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau threefold is known in the type IIA picture to be determined in terms of the generalized Donaldson-Thomas invariants, through a twistorial construction. At the same time, in the mirror type IIB picture, and in the limit where only D3-D1-D(-1)-instanton corrections are retained, it should carry an isometric action of the S-duality group SL(2, {Z} ). We prove that this is the case in the one-instanton approximation, by constructing a holomorphic action of SL(2, {Z} ) on the linearized twistor space. Using the modular invariance of the D4-D2-D0 black hole partition function, we show that the standard Darboux coordinates in twistor space have modular anomalies controlled by period integrals of a Siegel-Narain theta series, which can be canceled by a contact transformation generated by a holomorphic mock theta series.

  11. The Line-Profile Variations of Theta2 Tauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, E. J.; Walker, G. A. H.

    1996-04-01

    With a 5.4-hour time series of high-resolution CFHT spectra, the oscillations of the rapidly-rotating delta Scuti star Theta2 Tauri (A7 IV + A5 V) are investigated. Line-profile variations are discovered and identified with the spectrum of the primary star of this binary system. Radial velocity variations are derived from the data and analyzed to reveal an oscillation frequency near 13.7 cycles day^-1. Variations within the absorption profiles are analyzed with a Fourier-Doppler Imaging (FDI) technique to reveal that high-degree oscillations with a frequency of 16.1 cycles day ^-1 and an apparent degree of about l = 8 are also present in the star. Whereas the low-degree variations of Theta2 Tau have been shown to be consistent with p-modes of radial order n=2 or 3, the identification of the high-degree variations in terms of pressure modes requires confirmation with theoretical models. (SECTION: Stars)

  12. $R^4$ couplings, the fundamental membrane and exceptional theta correspondences

    CERN Document Server

    Pioline, B; Plefka, J; Waldron, A

    2001-01-01

    This letter is an attempt to carry out a first-principle computation in M-theory using the point of view that the eleven-dimensional membrane gives the fundamental degrees of freedom of M-theory. Our aim is to derive the exact BPS $R^4$ couplings in M-theory compactified on a torus $T^{d+1}$ from the toroidal BPS membrane, by pursuing the analogy with the one-loop string theory computation. We exhibit an $Sl(3,\\Zint)$ modular invariance hidden in the light-cone gauge (but obvious in the Polyakov approach), and recover the correct classical spectrum and membrane instantons; the summation measure however is incorrect. It is argued that the correct membrane amplitude should be given by an exceptional theta correspondence lifting $Sl(3,\\Zint)$ modular forms to $\\exc(\\Zint)$ automorphic forms, generalizing the usual theta lift between $Sl(2,\\Zint)$ and $SO(d,d,\\Zint)$ in string theory. The exceptional correspondence $Sl(3)\\times E_{6(6)}\\subset E_{8(8)}$ offers the interesting prospect of solving the membrane smal...

  13. Increased entorhinal-prefrontal theta synchronization parallels decreased entorhinal-hippocampal theta synchronization during learning and consolidation of associative memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori eTakehara-Nishiuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Memories are thought to be encoded as a distributed representation in the neocortex. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC has been shown to support the expression of memories that initially depend on the hippocampus (HPC, yet the mechanisms by which the HPC and mPFC access the distributed representations in the neocortex are unknown. By measuring phase synchronization of local field potential (LFP oscillations, we found that learning initiated changes in neuronal communication of the HPC and mPFC with the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC, an area that is connected with many other neocortical regions. LFPs were recorded simultaneously from the three brain regions while rats formed an association between an auditory stimulus (CS and eyelid stimulation (US in a trace eyeblink conditioning paradigm, as well as during retention one month following learning. Over the course of learning, theta oscillations in the LEC and mPFC became strongly synchronized following the presentation of the CS on trials in which rats exhibited a conditioned response (CR, and this strengthened synchronization was also observed during retention one month after learning. In contrast, CS-evoked theta synchronization between the LEC and HPC decreased with learning. Our results suggest that the communication between the LEC and mPFC is strengthened with learning whereas the communication between the LEC and HPC is concomitantly weakened, suggesting that enhanced LEC-mPFC communication may be a key process for theoretically-proposed neocortical reorganization accompanying encoding and consolidation of a memory.

  14. Establishing the Thematic Structure and Investigating the most Prominent Theta Roles Used in Sindhi Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Ali Veesar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the thematic structure of the Sindhi verbs to find theta roles in the Sindhi language. The study tries to answer the research questions; “What are the thematic structures of Sindhi verbs?” and “What are the prominent theta roles in the Sindhi language?” It examines the argument/thematic structure of Sindhi verbs and also finds the theta roles assigned by the Sindhi verbs to their arguments along with the most prominent theta roles used in the Sindhi language. The data come from the two interviews taken from two young native Sindhi speakers, which consist of 2 hours conversation having 1,669 sentences in natural spoken version of the Sindhi language. Towards the end, it has been found that the Sindhi language has certain theta roles which are assigned by the verbs to their arguments in sentences. Each verb phrase in our data is thus examined and studied in detail in terms of Argument/Thematic structure in order to find theta roles in Sindhi language. Thus, in this regard, each verb phrase (in a sentence has been examined with the help of Carnie’s theoretical framework (Thematic Relation and Theta Roles: 2006 in order to find the prominent theta roles in the Sindhi language. The data have been examined and analysed on the basis of the Carnie’s theoretical framework. The study finds that the Sindhi language has all (09 theta roles which have been proposed by Carnie (2006. It has been found that six prominent theta roles out of nine are used prominently in Sindhi. The six prominent theta roles in Sindhi language are: agent, theme, beneficiary, recipient, locative and goal.

  15. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenq-Wei Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  16. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  17. Patterns of coupled theta activity in amygdala-hippocampal-prefrontal cortical circuits during fear extinction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Lesting

    Full Text Available Signals related to fear memory and extinction are processed within brain pathways involving the lateral amygdala (LA for formation of aversive stimulus associations, the CA1 area of the hippocampus for context-dependent modulation of these associations, and the infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC for extinction processes. While many studies have addressed the contribution of each of these modules individually, little is known about their interactions and how they function as an integrated system. Here we show, by combining multiple site local field potential (LFP and unit recordings in freely behaving mice in a fear conditioning paradigm, that theta oscillations may provide a means for temporally and functionally connecting these modules. Theta oscillations occurred with high specificity in the CA1-LA-mPFC network. Theta coupling increased between all areas during retrieval of conditioned fear, and declined during extinction learning. During extinction recall, theta coupling partly rebounded in LA-mPFC and CA1-mPFC, and remained at a low level in CA1-LA. Interfering with theta coupling through local electrical microstimulation in CA1-LA affected conditioned fear and extinction recall depending on theta phase. These results support the hypothesis that theta coupling provides a means for inter-areal coordination in conditioned behavioral responsiveness. More specifically, theta oscillations seem to contribute to a population code indicating conditioned stimuli during recall of fear memory before and after extinction.

  18. Frontal and rostral anterior cingulate (rACC) theta EEG in depression: implications for treatment outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arns, M.W.; Etkin, A.; Hegerl, U.; Williams, L.M.; DeBattista, C.; Palmer, D.M.; Fitzgerald, P.B.; Harris, A.; deBeuss, R.; Gordon, E.

    2015-01-01

    In major depressive disorder (MDD), elevated theta current density in the rostral anterior cingulate (rACC), as estimated by source localization of scalp-recorded electroencenphalogram (EEG), has been associated with response to antidepressant treatments, whereas elevated frontal theta has been link

  19. Theta Function Identities Associated with Ramanujan's Modular Equations of Degree 15

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rupam Barman; Nayandeep Deka Baruah

    2010-06-01

    We present alternative proofs of some of Ramanujan’s theta function identities associated with the modular equations of composite degree 15. Along the way we also find some new theta-function identities. We also give simple proofs of his modular equations of degree 15.

  20. Theta dynamics in rat: speed and acceleration across the Septotemporal axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L Long

    Full Text Available Theta (6-12 Hz rhythmicity in the local field potential (LFP reflects a clocking mechanism that brings physically isolated neurons together in time, allowing for the integration and segregation of distributed cell assemblies. Variation in the theta signal has been linked to locomotor speed, sensorimotor integration as well as cognitive processing. Previously, we have characterized the relationship between locomotor speed and theta power and how that relationship varies across the septotemporal (long axis of the hippocampus (HPC. The current study investigated the relationship between whole body acceleration, deceleration and theta indices at CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG sites along the septotemporal axis of the HPC in rats. Results indicate that whole body acceleration and deceleration predicts a significant amount of variability in the theta signal beyond variation in locomotor speed. Furthermore, deceleration was more predictive of variation in theta amplitude as compared to acceleration as rats traversed a linear track. Such findings highlight key variables that systematically predict the variability in the theta signal across the long axis of the HPC. A better understanding of the relative contribution of these quantifiable variables and their variation as a function of experience and environmental conditions should facilitate our understanding of the relationship between theta and sensorimotor/cognitive functions.

  1. Theta dynamics in rat: speed and acceleration across the Septotemporal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lauren L; Hinman, James R; Chen, Chi-Ming; Escabi, Monty A; Chrobak, James J

    2014-01-01

    Theta (6-12 Hz) rhythmicity in the local field potential (LFP) reflects a clocking mechanism that brings physically isolated neurons together in time, allowing for the integration and segregation of distributed cell assemblies. Variation in the theta signal has been linked to locomotor speed, sensorimotor integration as well as cognitive processing. Previously, we have characterized the relationship between locomotor speed and theta power and how that relationship varies across the septotemporal (long) axis of the hippocampus (HPC). The current study investigated the relationship between whole body acceleration, deceleration and theta indices at CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) sites along the septotemporal axis of the HPC in rats. Results indicate that whole body acceleration and deceleration predicts a significant amount of variability in the theta signal beyond variation in locomotor speed. Furthermore, deceleration was more predictive of variation in theta amplitude as compared to acceleration as rats traversed a linear track. Such findings highlight key variables that systematically predict the variability in the theta signal across the long axis of the HPC. A better understanding of the relative contribution of these quantifiable variables and their variation as a function of experience and environmental conditions should facilitate our understanding of the relationship between theta and sensorimotor/cognitive functions.

  2. Resting-state EEG theta activity and risk learning: sensitivity to reward or punishment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massar, S.A.A.; Kenemans, J.L.; Schutter, D.J.L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Increased theta (4-7 Hz)-beta.(13-30 Hz) power ratio in resting state electroencephalography (EEG) has been associated with risky disadvantageous decision making and with impaired reinforcement learning. However, the specific contributions of theta and beta power in risky decision making remain uncl

  3. Laser--plasma interaction in a theta-pinch geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, W.T.

    1978-06-01

    Prompt stimulated Brillouin scatter (SBS) is studied in an experiment wherein a high power, pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser irradiates an independently produced, theta-pinch plasma. SBS does not significantly affect laser heating of the plasma. Measurements of density profiles and temperature histories permitted examination of laser refraction, local heating and net absorption. Refractive containment of the CO/sub 2/ laser beam by an on-axis density minimum was observed at early times during the laser pulse. However, refractive containment was lost at late times due to the diffusive loss of the density minimum. Classical modeling of the expected heating required ''bleached'' absorption to account for the observed heating. A plasma absorptivity of approximately 46% was inferred from calorimetry measurements at 250 mtorr fill pressure. These results confirm that classical heating and refraction dominated the laser-plasma interaction.

  4. Determination of $sin^{2}\\theta_W$ using $\

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad

    2013-01-01

    We have studied nonisoscalarity and medium effects in the extraction of weak mixing angle using Paschos and Wolfenstein relation in the iron nucleus. Paschos and Wolfenstein(PW) relation is valid for an isoscalar target. We have modified the PW relation for nonisoscalar target as well as incorporated the medium effects like Pauli blocking, Fermi motion, nuclear binding energy and pion rho cloud contributions. In our calculations we have used the relativistic nuclear spectral function which includes nucleon correlations. Finally local density approximation is applied to translate the numerical results to the finite nuclei. We have studied the dependence of $sin^{2}\\theta_W$ on Bjorken variables $x$ and $y$, four momentum transfer square ($Q^2$), energy of the neutrino and antineutrino, and effect of excess neutrons over protons in the nuclear target.

  5. Small Neutrino Masses from Gravitational $\\theta$-Term

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2016-01-01

    We present how a neutrino condensate and small neutrino masses emerge from a topological formulation of gravitational anomaly. We first recapitulate how a gravitational $\\theta$-term leads to the emergence of a new bound neutrino state analogous to the $\\eta'$ meson of QCD. Then we show the consequent formation of a neutrino vacuum condensate which effectively generates small neutrino masses. Afterwards we outline numerous phenomenological consequences of our model. The cosmological neutrino mass bound vanishes since we predict the neutrinos to be massless until the very late universe, $T\\sim {\\rm meV}$. Coherent radiation of new light particles in the neutrino sector could be detected in future precision experiments. The current cosmological neutrino background consists only of the lightest neutrinos which are either bound up, form a superfluid, or completely annihilate into massless bosons. The deviations from an equal flavor rate due to enhanced neutrino decays in extraterrestrial neutrino fluxes can be ob...

  6. Energy transfer efficiency of a spherical theta-pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teske, Christian; Fedjuschenko, Andreas; Jacoby, Joachim; Schweizer, Waldemar [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A spherical theta-pinch device for VUV generation and plasma stripper applications with an operating frequency of 12 kHz has been developed. The setup consists of a series resonance circuit with a load capacitance of 27 {mu}F and a large diameter induction coil surrounding a spherical discharge vessel with a discharge volume of 4000 ml. First measurements have been made to evaluate the transfer efficiency of the pulsed inductive discharge in Argon with 2.8% Hydrogen at gas pressures from 0.6 Pa up to 100 Pa at load voltages from 4 kV to 8 kV. Pulsed coil currents reached a maximum value of 18 kA with current rise times of 2 kA/mys while achieving a maximum energy transfer efficiency of 85% between the driving circuit and the plasma. Pulsed power peak values inside the plasma reached more than 2 MW.

  7. Quark splitting in non-trivial \\theta-vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, Hongxi; Yuan, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Quark splitting in non-trivial $\\theta$-vacuum with a given helicity is investigated in pQCD with a modified quark propagator. We found that the quark splitting functions were modified by the presence of a topologically non-trivial QCD background field, though there is no explicit helicity flip associated with the radiative processes. The interaction with the topological non-trivial field leads to the degeneracy of the quark splitting functions for left- and right-handed quarks. Such degeneracy can lead to imbalance of left- and right-handed quarks in quark jet showers. We also discuss phenomenological consequences of such imbalance if there exists non-trivial topological gluon field configuration in heavy-ion collisions.

  8. Higher Spin Fields in Siegel Space, Currents and Theta Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfond, O A

    2009-01-01

    Dynamics of four-dimensional massless fields of all spins is formulated in the Siegel space of complex $4\\times 4$ symmetric matrices. It is shown that the unfolded equations of free massless fields, that have a form of multidimensional Schrodinger equations, naturally distinguish between positive- and negative-frequency solutions of relativistic field equations, i.e. particles and antiparticles. Multidimensional Riemann theta functions are shown to solve massless field equations in the Siegel space. We establish the correspondence between conserved higher-spin currents in four-dimensional Minkowski space and those in the ten-dimensional matrix space. It is shown that global symmetry parameters of the current in the matrix space should be singular to reproduce a nonzero current in Minkowski space. The $\\D$-function integral evolution formulae for 4d massless fields in the Fock-Siegel space are obtained. The generalization of the proposed scheme to higher dimensions and systems of higher ranks is considered.

  9. Fermion Wavefunctions in Magnetized branes Theta identities and Yukawa couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Panda, Binata

    2009-01-01

    Computation of Yukawa couplings, determining superpotentials as well as the Kähler metric, with oblique (non-commuting) fluxes in magnetized brane constructions is an interesting unresolved issue, in view of the importance of such fluxes for obtaining phenomenologically viable models. In order to perform this task, fermion (scalar) wavefunctions on toroidally compactified spaces are presented for general fluxes, parameterized by Hermitian matrices with eigenvalues of arbitrary signatures. We also give explicit mappings among fermion wavefunctions, of different internal chiralities on the tori, which interchange the role of the flux components with the complex structure of the torus. By evaluating the overlap integral of the wavefunctions, we give the expressions for Yukawa couplings among chiral multiplets arising from an arbitrary set of branes (or their orientifold images). The method is based on constructing certain mathematical identities for general Riemann theta functions with matrix valued modular par...

  10. Environmental novelty elicits a later theta phase of firing in CA1 but not subiculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, Colin; Burton, Stephen; Jeewajee, Ali; Wills, Thomas J; Cacucci, Francesca; Burgess, Neil; O'Keefe, John

    2010-02-01

    The mechanism supporting the role of the hippocampal formation in novelty detection remains controversial. A comparator function has been variously ascribed to CA1 or subiculum, whereas the theta rhythm has been suggested to separate neural firing into encoding and retrieval phases. We investigated theta phase of firing in principal cells in subiculum and CA1 as rats foraged in familiar and novel environments. We found that the preferred theta phase of firing in CA1, but not subiculum, was shifted to a later phase of the theta cycle during environmental novelty. Furthermore, the amount of phase shift elicited by environmental change correlated with the extent of place cell remapping in CA1. Our results support a relationship between theta phase and novelty-induced plasticity in CA1.

  11. Search for $\\Theta^{++}$ Pentaquarks in the Exclusive Reaction $\\gamma p\\to K^+K^-p$

    CERN Document Server

    Kubarovski, V; De Vita, R; Goett, J; Guo, L; Mutchler, G S; Stoler, P; Weygand, D P; Ambrozewicz, P; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Chen, S; Clinton, E; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Credé, V; Cummings, J P; De Masi, R; Dale, D; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Funsten, H; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gan, L; Garçon, M; Gasparian, A; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Glamazdin, O; Goetz, J T; Golovach, E; Gonenc, A; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kühn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Lee, T; Li, J; Livingston, K; Lü, H; MacCormick, M; Markov, N; McKinnon, B; Mecking, B A; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R C; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mochalov, V; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nakagawa, I; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O I; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Shvedunov, N V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Stavinsky, A V; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Teymurazyan, A; Thoma, U; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S I; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Weinstein, L B; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B

    2006-01-01

    The reaction $\\gamma p \\to pK^+K^-$ was studied at Jefferson Lab with photon energies from 1.8 to 3.8 GeV using a tagged photon beam. The goal was to search for a $\\Theta^{++}$ pentaquark, a narrow doubly charged baryon state having strangeness S=+1 and isospin I=1, in the $pK^+$ invariant mass spectrum. No statistically significant evidence of a $\\Theta^{++}$ was found. Upper limits on the total and differential production cross section for the reaction $\\gamma p \\to K^-\\Theta^{++}$ were obtained in the mass range from 1.5 to 2.0 GeV/c$^2$, with an upper limit of about 0.15 nb, 95% C.L. for a narrow resonance with a mass $M_{\\Theta^{++}}=1.54$ GeV/c$^2$. This result places a very stringent upper limit on the $\\Theta^{++}$ width.

  12. Theta frontoparietal connectivity associated with proactive and reactive cognitive control processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Patrick S; Wong, Aaron S W; Fulham, W Ross; Thienel, Renate; Mansfield, Elise; Michie, Patricia T; Karayanidis, Frini

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive control involves both proactive and reactive processes. Paradigms that rely on reactive control have shown that frontoparietal oscillatory synchronization in the theta frequency band is associated with interference control. This study examines whether proactive control is also associated with connectivity in the same frontoparietal theta network or involves a distinct neural signature. A task-switching paradigm was used to differentiate between proactive and reactive control processes, involved in preparing to switch or repeat a task and resolving post-target interference, respectively. We confirm that reactive control is associated with frontoparietal theta connectivity. Importantly, we show that proactive control is also associated with theta band oscillatory synchronization but in a different frontoparietal network. These findings support the existence of distinct proactive and reactive cognitive control processes that activate different theta frontoparietal oscillatory networks.

  13. Observation of the positive-strangeness pentaquark $\\Theta^+$ in photoproduction with the SAPHIR detector at ELSA

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, J; Ernst, J; Glander, K H; Hannappel, J; Jöpen, N; Kalinowsky, H; Klein, F; Klempt, E; Lawall, R; Link, J; Menze, D W; Neuerburg, W; Ostrick, M; Paul, E; Van Pee, H; Schulday, I; Schwille, W J; Wiegers, B; Wieland, F W; Wisskirchen, J; Wu, C

    2003-01-01

    The positive--strangeness baryon resonance $\\Theta^+$ is observed in photoproduction of the $\\rm nK^+K^0_s$ final state with the SAPHIR detector at the Bonn ELectron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA. It is seen as a peak in the $\\rm nK^+$ invariant mass distribution with a $4.8\\sigma$ confidence level. We find a mass $\\rm M_{\\Theta^+} = 1540\\pm 4\\pm 2$ MeV and an upper limit of the width $\\rm \\Gamma_{\\Theta^+} < 25$ MeV at 90% c.l. The photoproduction cross section for $\\rm\\bar K^0\\Theta^+$ is in the order of 300 nb. From the absence of a signal in the $\\rm pK^+$ invariant mass distribution in $\\rm\\gamma p\\to pK^+K^-$ at the expected strength we conclude that the $\\Theta^+$ must be isoscalar.

  14. Entropy of the EEG in transition to burst suppression in deep anesthesia: Surrogate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anier, Andres; Lipping, Tarmo; Jantti, Ville; Puumala, Pasi; Huotari, Ari-Matti

    2010-01-01

    In this paper 5 methods for the assessment of signal entropy are compared in their capability to follow the changes in the EEG signal during transition from continuous EEG to burst suppression in deep anesthesia. To study the sensitivity of the measures to phase information in the signal, phase randomization as well as amplitude adjusted surrogates are also analyzed. We show that the selection of algorithm parameters and the use of normalization are important issues in interpretation and comparison of the results. We also show that permutation entropy is the most sensitive to phase information among the studied measures and that the EEG signal during high amplitude delta activity in deep anesthesia is of highly nonlinear nature.

  15. A measurement of sin2 2theta13 with the Double Chooz experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, Keith Alan

    The observation of neutrino flavor oscillations provided the first definitive evidence of nonzero neutrino masses and cross-generational mixing in the lepton sector of the Standard Model. Flavor oscillations are characterized by three mixing angles---theta12, theta13, and theta23---as well as two neutrino mass squared differences and three possible CP-violating phases. The Double Chooz experiment was designed to measure the final unmeasured mixing angle theta13 by observing the energy-dependent "disappearance" of electron antineutrinos as they oscillate into the other flavor states. The Double Chooz experiment detects electron antineutrinos in gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator after they interact with a proton via inverse beta decay, yielding a positron that is detected promptly and a neutron that is captured later, either by gadolinium or hydrogen. Separate measurements of theta13 were performed by the Double Chooz collaboration for neutrons which captured on gadolinium and those which captured on hydrogen. This dissertation presents the most recent results of a gadolinium-capture analysis, which used 467.90 live-days of data. Performing a fit to the inverse beta decay positron spectrum, we measured sin 2(2theta13) = 0.090-0.029+0.032 with chi2/d.o.f. = 52.2/40 for the normal neutrino mass hierarchy (Deltam2_ee = (2.44 -0.10 +0.09) * 10. -3eV2). Assuming an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy (Delta m2ee = (2.38-0.10 +0.09) * 10-3 eV2), we find sin2(2theta13) = 0.092-0.029 +0.033 with chi2/d.o.f. = 52.2/40. Additional rate-based measurements of sin2(2theta13) were also performed. These results are in agreement with other reactor theta 13 experiments and represent the most precise measurement of theta 13 at Double Chooz to date.

  16. A computational predictor of human episodic memory based on a theta phase precession network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Sato

    Full Text Available In the rodent hippocampus, a phase precession phenomena of place cell firing with the local field potential (LFP theta is called "theta phase precession" and is considered to contribute to memory formation with spike time dependent plasticity (STDP. On the other hand, in the primate hippocampus, the existence of theta phase precession is unclear. Our computational studies have demonstrated that theta phase precession dynamics could contribute to primate-hippocampal dependent memory formation, such as object-place association memory. In this paper, we evaluate human theta phase precession by using a theory-experiment combined analysis. Human memory recall of object-place associations was analyzed by an individual hippocampal network simulated by theta phase precession dynamics of human eye movement and EEG data during memory encoding. It was found that the computational recall of the resultant network is significantly correlated with human memory recall performance, while other computational predictors without theta phase precession are not significantly correlated with subsequent memory recall. Moreover the correlation is larger than the correlation between human recall and traditional experimental predictors. These results indicate that theta phase precession dynamics are necessary for the better prediction of human recall performance with eye movement and EEG data. In this analysis, theta phase precession dynamics appear useful for the extraction of memory-dependent components from the spatio-temporal pattern of eye movement and EEG data as an associative network. Theta phase precession may be a common neural dynamic between rodents and humans for the formation of environmental memories.

  17. Movement-related theta rhythm in humans: coordinating self-directed hippocampal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Raphael; Doeller, Christian F; Barnes, Gareth R; Litvak, Vladimir; Düzel, Emrah; Bandettini, Peter A; Burgess, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The hippocampus is crucial for episodic or declarative memory and the theta rhythm has been implicated in mnemonic processing, but the functional contribution of theta to memory remains the subject of intense speculation. Recent evidence suggests that the hippocampus might function as a network hub for volitional learning. In contrast to human experiments, electrophysiological recordings in the hippocampus of behaving rodents are dominated by theta oscillations reflecting volitional movement, which has been linked to spatial exploration and encoding. This literature makes the surprising cross-species prediction that the human hippocampal theta rhythm supports memory by coordinating exploratory movements in the service of self-directed learning. We examined the links between theta, spatial exploration, and memory encoding by designing an interactive human spatial navigation paradigm combined with multimodal neuroimaging. We used both non-invasive whole-head Magnetoencephalography (MEG) to look at theta oscillations and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to look at brain regions associated with volitional movement and learning. We found that theta power increases during the self-initiation of virtual movement, additionally correlating with subsequent memory performance and environmental familiarity. Performance-related hippocampal theta increases were observed during a static pre-navigation retrieval phase, where planning for subsequent navigation occurred. Furthermore, periods of the task showing movement-related theta increases showed decreased fMRI activity in the parahippocampus and increased activity in the hippocampus and other brain regions that strikingly overlap with the previously observed volitional learning network (the reverse pattern was seen for stationary periods). These fMRI changes also correlated with participant's performance. Our findings suggest that the human hippocampal theta rhythm supports memory by coordinating exploratory

  18. Phase dependency of long-term potentiation induction during the intermittent bursts of carbachol-induced β oscillation in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Motoshi; Nakatsuka, Hiroki; Natsume, Kiyohisa

    2012-01-01

    The rodent hippocampus possesses theta (θ) and beta (β) rhythms, which occur intermittently as bursts. Both rhythms are related to spatial memory processing in a novel environment. θ rhythm is related to spatial memory encoding process. β rhythm is related to the match/mismatch process. In the match/mismatch process, rodent hippocampus detects a representation matching sensory inputs of the current place among the retrieved internal representations of places. Long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) is induced in both processes. The cholinergic agent carbachol induces intermittent θ and β oscillations in in vitro slices similar to in vivo bursts. LTP is facilitated during the generation of θ oscillation, suggesting that the facilitation of LTP is dependent upon the phases of intermittent burst (burst phases) of the oscillation. However, whether this is the case for β oscillation has not yet been studied. In the present study, LTP-inducing θ-burst stimulation was administered at the different burst phases of carbachol-induced β oscillations (CIBO), and the synaptic changes were measured at CA3-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses (CA3 synapse) and at CA3-CA1 pyramidal cell synapses (CA1 synapse). At the CA3 synapse, the largest magnitude of LTP was induced at the late burst phases of CIBO. At the CA1 synapse, LTP was induced only at the late burst phases. Modulation of LTP was suppressed when CIBO was blocked by the application of atropine at both synapses. The results suggest that the bursts of hippocampal β rhythm can determine the optimal temporal period for completing with the match/mismatch process.

  19. Physics of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the accumulating evidence for the view that gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars, discussing the physical properties of the emission region and the radiation processes expected in strong magnetic fields, and emphasizing that the observed burst spectra require that the emission region be optically thin. This entails that the energy of the emitting plasma and/or the plasma itself be continuously replenished during a burst, and that the cooling time scale of the emitting plasma be much shorter than the observed duration of the bursts. This characteristic of the cooling time scale implies that the burst intensity and spectrum can vary on extremely short time scales, and that the burst duration must have a separate explanation. It is emphasized that synchrotron emission is favored as the gamma-ray production mechanism; it is the only mechanism capable of satisfying the optical thinness constraint while producing the observed luminosity.

  20. Statistics of gamma ray burst temporal asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Link, B; Link, Bennett; Epstein, Richard

    1996-01-01

    We study the temporal asymmetry of over 600 bursts from the BATSE 3B catalog, encompassing a 200-fold range in peak flux. By comparing the rates of rise and fall of the flux near the highest burst peak, we find that about two-thirds of the bursts exhibit a preferred asymmetry in the sense that the flux rises more rapidly than it falls, confirming the conclusions of previous studies employing smaller databases. The statistical significance of the average time asymmetry of the sample is >99.999\\%; therefore, models that predict time symmetry of the burst profile are ruled out. We find no statistically significant correlation between burst temporal asymmetry and peak. This result is consistent with both cosmological and local interpretations of the gamma ray burst phenomenon.

  1. Stirling Colgate and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Donald

    2014-10-01

    Even before the discovery of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), Stirling Colgate proposed that bursts of x rays and gamma rays might be produced by a relativistic shock created in the supernova explosion of a massive star. We trace the scientific story of GRBs from their detection to the present, highlighting along the way Stirling's interest in them and his efforts to understand them. We summarize our current understanding that short, soft, repeating bursts are produced by magnetic neutron stars; short, hard bursts are produced by the mergers of neutron star-neutron star binaries; and long, hard bursts are produced by the core collapse of massive stars that have lost their hydrogen and helium envelopes. We then discuss some important open questions about GRBs and how they might be answered. We conclude by describing the recent serendipitous discovery of an x-ray burst of exactly the kind he proposed, and the insights into core collapse supernovae and GRBs that it provided.

  2. Hardness/intensity correlations among BATSE bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conclusions about the nature of gamma-ray bursts derived from the size-frequency distribution may be altered if a significant correlation exists between burst intensity and spectral shape. Moreover, if gamma-ray bursts have a cosmological origin, such a correlation may be expected to result from the expansion of the universe. We have performed a rudimentary search of the BATSE bursts for hardness/intensity correlations. The range of spectral shapes was determined for each burst by computing the ratio of the intensity in the range 100-300 keV to that in 55-300 keV. We find weak evidence for the existence of a correlation, the strongest effect being present when comparing the maximum hardness ratio for each burst with its maximum rate.

  3. Three types of $\\gamma$-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, S; Babu, G J; Murtagh, F; Fraley, C; Raftery, A E; Mukherjee, Soma; Feigelson, Eric D.; Babu, Gutti Jogesh; Murtagh, Fionn; Fraley, Chris; Raftery, Adrian

    1998-01-01

    A multivariate analysis of gamma-ray burst (GRB) bulk properties is presented to discriminate between distinct classes of GRBs. Several variables representing burst duration, fluence and spectral hardness are considered. Two multivariate clustering procedures are used on a sample of 797 bursts from the Third BATSE Catalog: a nonparametric average linkage hierarchical agglomerative clustering procedure validated with Wilks' $\\Lambda^*$ and other MANOVA tests; and a parametric maximum likelihood model-based clustering procedure assuming multinormal populations calculated with the EM Algorithm and validated with the Bayesian Information Criterion. The two methods yield very similar results. The BATSE GRB population consists of three classes with the following Duration/Fluence/Spectrum bulk properties: Class I with long/bright/intermediate bursts, Class II with short/hard/faint bursts, and Class III with intermediate/intermediate/soft bursts. One outlier with poor data is also present. Classes I and II correspond...

  4. Pulse Phase Dependence of the Magnetar Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chetana Jain; Anjan Dutta; Biswajit Paul

    2007-12-01

    We report here results from a study of X-ray bursts from 3 magnetar candidates (SGR 1806–20, SGR 1900+14 and AXP 1E 2259+586). We have searched for a pulse phase dependence of the X-ray burst rate from these sources. X-ray light curves were obtained with the Proportional Counter Array on-board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the periods of intense burst activity in these sources. On detailed analysis of the three sources, we found a very significant burst rate for all pulsar phases. However, some locations appear to produce bursts slightly more often, rendering the non-isotropic distribution. Only in the case of SGR 1900+14, there is a clear pulse phase dependence of burst rate.

  5. Detection of a 1258 Hz high-amplitude kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillation in the ultra-compact X-ray binary 1A 1246-588

    CERN Document Server

    Jonker, P G; Méndez, M; Van der Klis, M

    2007-01-01

    We have observed the ultra-compact low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) 1A 1246-588 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). In this manuscript we report the discovery of a kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in 1A 1246-588. The kilohertz QPO was only detected when the source was in a soft high-flux state reminiscent of the lower banana branch in atoll sources. Only one kilohertz QPO peak is detected at a relatively high frequency of 1258+-2 Hz and at a single trial significance of more than 7 sigma. Kilohertz QPOs with a higher frequency have only been found on two occasions in 4U 0614+09. Furthermore, the frequency is higher than that found for the lower kilohertz QPO in any source, strongly suggesting that the QPO is the upper of the kilohertz QPO pair often found in LMXBs. The full-width at half maximum is 25+-4 Hz, making the coherence the highest found for an upper kilohertz QPO. From a distance estimate of ~6 kpc from a radius expansion burst we derive that 1A 1246-588 is at a persistent flux of ~0....

  6. Ballerina - pirouettes in search of gamma bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, S.; Lund, N.; Pedersen, H.; Hjorth, J.; BALLERINA Collaboration

    1999-09-01

    The cosmological origin of gamma ray bursts has now been established with reasonable certainty. Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large diversity in properties which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We are proposing Ballerina, a small satellite to provide accurate positions and new data on the gamma-ray bursts. We anticipate a detection rate an order of magnitude larger than obtained from Beppo-SAX.

  7. United assembly algorithm for optical burst switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhui Yu(于金辉); Yijun Yang(杨教军); Yuehua Chen(陈月华); Ge Fan(范戈)

    2003-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising optical switching technology. The burst assembly algorithm controls burst assembly, which significantly impacts performance of OBS network. This paper provides a new assembly algorithm, united assembly algorithm, which has more practicability than conventional algorithms. In addition, some factors impacting selections of parameters of this algorithm are discussed and the performance of this algorithm is studied by computer simulation.

  8. Fast Radio Burst/Gamma-Ray Burst Cosmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, He; Li, Zhuo; Zhang, Bing

    2014-06-01

    Recently, both theoretical arguments and observational evidence suggested that a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) could be associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). If such FRB/GRB association systems are commonly detected in the future, the combination of dispersion measures (DM) derived from FRBs and redshifts derived from GRBs makes these systems a plausible tool to conduct cosmography. We quantify uncertainties in deriving the redshift-dependent DM_{IGM} as a function of z and test how well dark energy models can be constrained with Monte Carlo simulations. We show that with several tens of FRB/GRB systems potentially detected in a decade or so, one may reach reasonable constraints on wCDM models. When combined with Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, unprecedented constraints on the dark energy equation of state may be achieved, thanks to the prospects of detecting FRB/GRB systems at relatively high redshifts. The ratio between the mean value \\lt {DM_IGM} (z)\\gt and luminosity distance (D L(z)) is insensitive to dark energy models. This gives the prospect of applying SN Ia data to calibrate \\lt {DM_IGM} (z)\\gt using a relatively small sample of FRB/GRB systems, allowing a reliable constraint on the baryon inhomogeneity distribution as a function of redshift. The methodology developed in this paper can also be applied if the FRB redshifts can be measured by other means. Some caveats of putting this method into practice are also discussed.

  9. Fast radio burst/gamma-ray burst cosmography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Li, Zhuo, E-mail: gaohe@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhuo.li@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-20

    Recently, both theoretical arguments and observational evidence suggested that a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) could be associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). If such FRB/GRB association systems are commonly detected in the future, the combination of dispersion measures (DM) derived from FRBs and redshifts derived from GRBs makes these systems a plausible tool to conduct cosmography. We quantify uncertainties in deriving the redshift-dependent DM{sub IGM} as a function of z and test how well dark energy models can be constrained with Monte Carlo simulations. We show that with several tens of FRB/GRB systems potentially detected in a decade or so, one may reach reasonable constraints on wCDM models. When combined with Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, unprecedented constraints on the dark energy equation of state may be achieved, thanks to the prospects of detecting FRB/GRB systems at relatively high redshifts. The ratio between the mean value and luminosity distance (D {sub L}(z)) is insensitive to dark energy models. This gives the prospect of applying SN Ia data to calibrate using a relatively small sample of FRB/GRB systems, allowing a reliable constraint on the baryon inhomogeneity distribution as a function of redshift. The methodology developed in this paper can also be applied if the FRB redshifts can be measured by other means. Some caveats of putting this method into practice are also discussed.

  10. Two classes of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    1995-01-01

    Data from the 3B Catalogue suggest that short and long GRB are the results of different classes of events, rather than different parameter values within a single class: Short bursts have harder spectra in the BATSE bands, but chiefly long bursts are detected at photon energies over 1 MeV, implying that their hard photons are radiated by a process not found in short bursts. The values of \\langle V/V_{max} \\rangle for short and long bursts differ by 4.3 \\sigma, implying different spatial distributions. Only the soft gamma-ray radiation mechanisms are the same in both classes.

  11. Bubble burst as jamming phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Saito, Yukiko Umeno; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    Recently research on bubble and its burst attract much interest of researchers in various field such as economics and physics. Economists have been regarding bubble as a disorder in prices. However, this research strategy has overlooked an importance of the volume of transactions. In this paper, we have proposed a bubble burst model by focusing the transactions incorporating a traffic model that represents spontaneous traffic jam. We find that the phenomenon of bubble burst shares many similar properties with traffic jam formation by comparing data taken from US housing market. Our result suggests that the transaction could be a driving force of bursting phenomenon.

  12. Age-related changes of frontal-midline theta is predictive of efficient memory maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardos, Z; Tóth, B; Boha, R; File, B; Molnár, M

    2014-07-25

    Frontal areas are thought to be the coordinators of working memory processes by controlling other brain areas reflected by oscillatory activities like frontal-midline theta (4-7 Hz). With aging substantial changes can be observed in the frontal brain areas, presumably leading to age-associated changes in cortical correlates of cognitive functioning. The present study aimed to test whether altered frontal-midline theta dynamics during working memory maintenance may underlie the capacity deficits observed in older adults. 33-channel EEG was recorded in young (18-26 years, N=20) and old (60-71 years, N=16) adults during the retention period of a visual delayed match-to-sample task, in which they had to maintain arrays of 3 or 5 colored squares. An additional visual odd-ball task was used to be able to measure the electrophysiological indices of sustained attentional processes. Old participants showed reduced frontal theta activity during both tasks compared to the young group. In the young memory maintenance-related frontal-midline theta activity was shown to be sensitive both to the increased memory demands and to efficient subsequent memory performance, whereas the old adults showed no such task-related difference in the frontal theta activity. The decrease of frontal-midline theta activity in the old group indicates that cerebral aging may alter the cortical circuitries of theta dynamics, thereby leading to age-associated decline of working memory maintenance function.

  13. Frontal Theta Dynamics during Response Conflict in Long-Term Mindfulness Meditators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Han-Gue; Malinowski, Peter; Schmidt, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Mindfulness meditators often show greater efficiency in resolving response conflicts than non-meditators. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the improved behavioral efficiency are unclear. Here, we investigated frontal theta dynamics—a neural mechanism involved in cognitive control processes—in long-term mindfulness meditators. The dynamics of EEG theta oscillations (4–8 Hz) recorded over the medial frontal cortex (MFC) were examined in terms of their power (MFC theta power) and their functional connectivity with other brain areas (the MFC-centered theta network). Using a flanker-type paradigm, EEG data were obtained from 22 long-term mindfulness meditators and compared to those from 23 matched controls without meditation experience. Meditators showed more efficient cognitive control after conflicts, evidenced by fewer error responses irrespective of response timing. Furthermore, meditators exhibited enhanced conflict modulations of the MFC-centered theta network shortly before the response, in particular for the functional connection between the MFC and the motor cortex. In contrast, MFC theta power was comparable between groups. These results suggest that the higher behavioral efficiency after conflicts in mindfulness meditators could be a function of increased engagement to control the motor system in association with the MFC-centered theta network. PMID:28638334

  14. Frontal Theta Dynamics during Response Conflict in Long-Term Mindfulness Meditators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Han-Gue; Malinowski, Peter; Schmidt, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Mindfulness meditators often show greater efficiency in resolving response conflicts than non-meditators. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the improved behavioral efficiency are unclear. Here, we investigated frontal theta dynamics-a neural mechanism involved in cognitive control processes-in long-term mindfulness meditators. The dynamics of EEG theta oscillations (4-8 Hz) recorded over the medial frontal cortex (MFC) were examined in terms of their power (MFC theta power) and their functional connectivity with other brain areas (the MFC-centered theta network). Using a flanker-type paradigm, EEG data were obtained from 22 long-term mindfulness meditators and compared to those from 23 matched controls without meditation experience. Meditators showed more efficient cognitive control after conflicts, evidenced by fewer error responses irrespective of response timing. Furthermore, meditators exhibited enhanced conflict modulations of the MFC-centered theta network shortly before the response, in particular for the functional connection between the MFC and the motor cortex. In contrast, MFC theta power was comparable between groups. These results suggest that the higher behavioral efficiency after conflicts in mindfulness meditators could be a function of increased engagement to control the motor system in association with the MFC-centered theta network.

  15. Resting-state EEG theta activity and risk learning: sensitivity to reward or punishment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massar, Stijn A A; Kenemans, J Leon; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2014-03-01

    Increased theta (4-7 Hz)-beta (13-30 Hz) power ratio in resting state electroencephalography (EEG) has been associated with risky disadvantageous decision making and with impaired reinforcement learning. However, the specific contributions of theta and beta power in risky decision making remain unclear. The first aim of the present study was to replicate the earlier found relationship and examine the specific contributions of theta and beta power in risky decision making using the Iowa Gambling Task. The second aim of the study was to examine whether the relation were associated with differences in reward or punishment sensitivity. We replicated the earlier found relationship by showing a positive association between theta/beta ratio and risky decision making. This correlation was mainly driven by theta oscillations. Furthermore, theta power correlated with reward motivated learning, but not with punishment learning. The present results replicate and extend earlier findings by providing novel insights into the relation between thetabeta ratios and risky decision making. Specifically, findings show that resting-state theta activity is correlated with reinforcement learning, and that this association may be explained by differences in reward sensitivity.

  16. Investigating the parity of the exotic Theta^+ baryon from the kaon photoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, B G; Ji, C R; Yu, Byung Geel; Choi, Tae Keun; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2003-01-01

    Based on the hadronic model with an improved version of gauge prescription including form factors, we investigate the possibility of determining the parity state of $\\Theta^+$ baryon using photon induced processes, $\\gamma n\\to K^- \\Theta^+$, $\\gamma p\\to \\bar{K}^0 \\Theta^+$. The total and differential cross sections are simulated in two versions of pseudovector(PV) and pseudoscalar(PS) coupling schemes for $KN\\Theta$ interaction and the results are reported both on the positive and negative parity states of $\\Theta^+$ baryon. It is found that in both schemes the total cross sections from the neutron are larger than those from the proton. In particular, not only the cross sections of the positive parity $\\Theta^+$ production but also those of the negative parity $\\Theta^+$ production are found to be comparable to the cross section observed in the SAPHIR experiment. Our analysis suggests that the observation of angular distribution rather than just the total cross section in the photoproduction processes may b...

  17. Fast entrainment of human electroencephalogram to a theta-band photic flicker during successful memory encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki eSato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Theta band power (4-8Hz in the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG is thought to be stronger during memory encoding for subsequently remembered items than for forgotten items. According to simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI measurements, the memory-dependent EEG theta is associated with multiple regions of the brain. This suggests that the multiple regions cooperate with EEG theta synchronization during successful memory encoding. However, a question still remains: What kind of neural dynamic organizes such a memory-dependent global network? In this study, the modulation of the EEG theta entrainment property during successful encoding was hypothesized to lead to EEG theta synchronization among a distributed network. Then, a transient response of EEG theta to a theta-band photic flicker with a short duration was evaluated during memory encoding. In the results, flicker-induced EEG power increased and decreased with a time constant of several hundred milliseconds following the onset and the offset of the flicker, respectively. Importantly, the offset response of EEG power was found to be significantly decreased during successful encoding. Moreover, the offset response of the phase locking index was also found to associate with memory performance. According to computational simulations, the results are interpreted as a smaller time constant (i.e., faster response of a driven harmonic oscillator rather than a change in the spontaneous oscillatory input. This suggests that the fast response of EEG theta forms a global EEG theta network among memory-related regions during successful encoding, and it contributes to a flexible formation of the network along the time course.

  18. Novel space alters theta and gamma synchrony across the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    stephanie c penley

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal theta (6-10 Hz and gamma (25-50 Hz and 65-100 Hz local field potentials reflect the dynamic synchronization of inputs impinging upon hippocampal neurons. Novel experience is known to engage hippocampal physiology and promote successful encoding. Does novelty synchronize or desynchronize theta and/or gamma frequency inputs across the septotemporal (long axis of the hippocampus? The present study tested the hypothesis that a novel spatial environment would alter theta power and coherence across the long axis. We compared theta and gamma local field potential signals at individual (power and millimeter distant electrode pairs (coherence within the dentate gyrus (DG and CA1 region while rats navigated a runway 1 in a familiar environment, 2 with a modified path in the same environment and 3 in a novel space. Locomotion in novel space was related to increases in theta and gamma power at most CA1 and DG sites. The increase in theta and gamma power was concurrent with an increase in theta and gamma coherence across the long axis of CA1; however, there was a significant decrease in theta coherence across the long axis of the DG. These findings illustrate significant shifts in the synchrony of entorhinal, CA3 and/or neuromodulatory afferents conveying novel spatial information to the dendritic fields of CA1 and DG targets across the long axis of the hippocampus. This shift suggests that the entire theta/gamma-related input to the CA1 network, and likely output, receives and conveys a more coherent message in response to novel sensory experience. Such may contribute to the successful encoding of novel sensory experience.

  19. Hippocampal Non-Theta-Contingent Eyeblink Classical Conditioning: A Model System for Neurobiological Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchese, Joseph J; Berry, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Typical information processing is thought to depend on the integrity of neurobiological oscillations that may underlie coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within and between structures. The 3-7 Hz bandwidth of hippocampal theta rhythm is associated with cognitive processes essential to learning and depends on the integrity of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic forebrain systems. Since several significant psychiatric disorders appear to result from dysfunction of medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurochemical systems, preclinical studies on animal models may be an important step in defining and treating such syndromes. Many studies have shown that the amount of hippocampal theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning and attainment of asymptotic performance. Our lab has developed a brain-computer interface that makes eyeblink training trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. The behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to fourfold increase in learning speed over non-theta states. The non-theta behavioral impairment is accompanied by disruption of the amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potentials, multiple-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns dependent on theta state. Our findings indicate a significant electrophysiological and behavioral impact of the pretrial state of the hippocampus that suggests an important role for this MTL system in associative learning and a significant deleterious impact in the absence of theta. Here, we focus on the impairments in the non-theta state, integrate them into current models of psychiatric disorders, and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories and treatment of psychiatric

  20. [Theta/beta ratio (NEBA) in the diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Mejía, Iván D; Palencia-Avendaño, M Luisa; Mogollón-Rincón, Carolina; Etchepareborda, Máximo C

    2014-02-24

    Introduccion. En julio del año 2013, la Food and Drug Administration estadounidense aprobo el NEBA como el primer dispositivo para la evaluacion complementaria del trastorno por deficit de atencion/hiperactividad (TDAH), basado en el electroencefalograma cuantificado (EEGq) e incluyendo la relacion theta/beta estandarizada, cuyos resultados fueron consistentes con la evaluacion clinica, tanto medica como psicologica, y es una herramienta util para determinar si el TDAH es primario, secundario o comorbido a otro trastorno. Sin embargo, ninguna de las publicaciones, hasta la fecha, especifica si se trata de un cociente theta/beta total, o theta/beta-1 y theta/beta-2, como tampoco se aportan datos para discriminar entre subtipos diagnosticos del TDAH. Objetivo. Cuantificar los cocientes theta/beta, a traves del EEGq, en una muestra de pacientes rioplatenses con diagnostico principal confirmado de TDAH, para comparar el patron neurofisiologico segun el subtipo diagnostico. Pacientes y metodos. Muestra aleatoria estratificada de 62 sujetos de ambos sexos, de 8 a 17 años, distribuidos en dos grupos segun subtipo diagnostico, TDAH subtipo deficit de atencion (n = 31) y TDAH subtipo combinado (n = 31). Resultados. Se confirman cocientes altos theta/beta-1 y theta/beta-2 en la region Cz, mayores a los cocientes en las areas C3 y C4. Se encontraron diferencias moderadas y estadisticamente significativas entre los dos subtipos solo en la banda beta-1 en las regiones occipitales. El analisis de la coherencia interhemisferica sugiere una asociacion del pico de potencia cruzada con el subtipo diagnostico, que para el subtipo combinado es el pico mas rapido (10 Hz). No se encuentran diferencias importantes al analizar los espectros de fase, ni los cocientes theta/alfa. Conclusiones. Si bien la bibliografia cientifica, especificamente el sistema NEBA, plantea la importancia del cociente theta/beta en el diagnostico diferencial del TDAH de muestras controles y otros trastornos

  1. Role of CA3 theta-modulated interneurons during the transition to spontaneous seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Suganya; Grasse, Dane W; Moxon, Karen A

    2016-09-01

    Multiple studies have observed heterogeneous neuronal firing patterns as a local network transitions to spontaneous seizures. We demonstrated that separately examining interneurons and pyramidal cells during this transition in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy elucidates some of this heterogeneity. Recently, it was demonstrated that classifying cells into specific theta-related subtypes further clarified the heterogeneity. Moreover, changes in neuronal synchrony with the local field potential were identified and determined to be specific to interneurons during the transition to seizures. To extend our understanding of the chronic changes in epileptic networks, we examined field potentials and single neuron activity in the CA3 hippocampus of pilocarpine-treated rats during interictal periods and compared these to neuronal activity in healthy controls and during preictal periods. Neurons were classified into theta-subtypes based on changes in firing patterns during theta periods. As previously reported, we find a high probability of theta oscillations before seizure onset and a selective increase in theta-on interneuron firing rate immediately preceding seizure onset. However, we also find overall slower theta rhythm and a general decrease in subtype-specific firing during interictal periods compared to that in control animals. The decrease in subtype specific interneuron activity is accompanied by increases in synchrony. Exceptionally, theta-on interneurons, that selectively increase their firing rate at seizure onset, maintain similar firing rates and synchrony as controls during interictal period. These data suggest that increased synchrony during interictal periods may compensate for low firing rates creating instability during theta that is prone to seizure initiation via a transition to hyper-synchronous activation of theta-on interneurons.

  2. Nicotine induction of theta frequency oscillations in rodent hippocampus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C B; Henderson, Z

    2010-03-10

    The hippocampus is an area important for learning and memory and exhibits prominent and behaviourally relevant theta (4-12 Hz) and gamma (30-100 Hz) frequency oscillations in vivo. Hippocampal slices produce similar types of oscillatory activity in response to bath-application of neurotransmitter receptor agonists. The medial septum diagonal band area (MS/DB) provides both a cholinergic and GABAergic projection to the hippocampus, and although it plays a major role in the generation and maintenance of the hippocampal theta rhythm in vivo, there is evidence for intrinsic theta generation mechanisms in the hippocampus, especially in area CA3. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the nicotinic receptor (nAChR) in the induction of oscillatory field activity in the in vitro preparation of the rat hippocampus. Bath-application of a low concentration of nicotine (1 muM) to transversely-cut hippocampal slices produced persistent theta-frequency oscillations in area CA3 of the hippocampus. These oscillations were reduced by both GABA(A) receptor antagonists and ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, indicating the involvement of local GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in the production of the rhythmic theta activity. The nicotine-induced theta activity was inhibited by non-selective nAChR antagonists and partially by an alpha7* nAChR antagonist. The induction of theta frequency oscillations in CA3 by nicotine was mimicked alpha7* nAChR agonists but not by non-alpha7* nAChR agonists. In conclusion, theta activity in the hippocampus may be promoted by tonic stimulation of alpha7* nAChRs, possibly via selective stimulation of theta-preferring interneurons in the hippocampus that express post-synaptic alpha7* nAChRs.

  3. Analysis of historic bursts and burst detection in water supply areas of different size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Trietsch, E.A.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in water distribution networks lead to water losses and a risk of damaging the urban environment. We studied hydraulic data and customer contact records of 44 real bursts for a better understanding of the phenomena. We found that most bursts were reported to the water company shortly aft

  4. Magnetars and Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Bucciantini, N

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, evidences for a long-lived and sustained engine in Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have increased the attention to the so called millisecond-magnetar model, as a competitive alternative to the standard collapsar scenario. I will review here the key aspects of the {\\it millisecond magnetar} model for Long Duration Gamma Ray Bursts (LGRBs). I will briefly describe what constraints, present observations put on any engine model, both in term of energetic, outflow properties, and the relation with the associated Supernova (SN). For each of these I will show how the millisecond magnetar model satisfies the requirements, what are the limits of the model, how can it be further tested, and what observations might be used to discriminate against it. I will also discuss numerical results that show the importance of the confinement by the progenitor star in explaining the formation of a collimated outflow, how a detailed model for the evolution of the central engine can be built, and show that a wide varie...

  5. Fluctuating Inhibitory Inputs Promote Reliable Spiking at Theta Frequencies in Hippocampal Interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sritharan, Duluxan; Frances K Skinner

    2012-01-01

    Theta-frequency (4–12 Hz) rhythms in the hippocampus play important roles in learning and memory. CA1 interneurons located at the stratum lacunosum-moleculare and radiatum junction (LM/RAD) are thought to contribute to hippocampal theta population activities by rhythmically pacing pyramidal cells with inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. This implies that LM/RAD cells need to fire reliably at theta frequencies in vivo. To determine whether this could occur, we use biophysically based LM/RAD mo...

  6. Generation of non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ in broken $A_4$ neutrino mass model

    CERN Document Server

    Borah, Manikanta; Das, Mrinal Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Stability of neutrino masses and mixings with non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ is an important issue in recent neutrino physics. In context of this, a detail analysis on two-fold degenerate $(m_1=m_2, m_3)$ neutrino mass model is done with Renormaization Group Equation (RGE) in Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). Considering the input values of neutrino masses and mixing angles at high scale predictions are studied at low energy scale using RGE. We have also found that two-fold degenerate model with $\\theta_{13}=0$ can produce consistent results at low energy with non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ from the breaking of a generic $A_4$ model.

  7. Octant of $\\theta_{23}$ in danger with a light sterile neutrino

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Palazzo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Present global fits of world neutrino data hint towards non-maximal $\\theta_{23}$ with two nearly degenerate solutions, one in the lower octant ($\\theta_{23} \\pi/4$). This octant ambiguity of $\\theta_{23}$ is one of the fundamental issues in the neutrino sector, and its resolution is a crucial goal of next-generation long-baseline (LBL) experiments. In this letter, we address for the first time, the impact of a light eV-scale sterile neutrino towards such a measurement, taking the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) as a case study. In the so-called 3+1 scheme involving three active and one sterile neutrino, the $\

  8. Double Chooz: optimizing the sensitivity to {theta}{sub 13} with a multi-detector setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novella, P. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    The best upper limit to the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} is set by the CHOOZ experiment. The eventual measurement of {theta}{sub 13} in reactor neutrino experiments relies on a reduction of the CHOOZ systematics of about 1 order of magnitude, along with a major increase of the luminosity. Provided that enough statistics are achieved, fighting the systematics becomes the key towards {theta}{sub 13}. The Double Chooz experiment engages this fight with a multi-detector set up.

  9. Some theorems on the explicit evaluation of Ramanujan's theta-functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayandeep Deka Baruah

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bruce C. Berndt et al. and Soon-Yi Kang have proved many of Ramanujan's formulas for the explicit evaluation of the Rogers-Ramanujan continued fraction and theta-functions in terms of Weber-Ramanujan class invariants. In this note, we give alternative proofs of some of these identities of theta-functions recorded by Ramanujan in his notebooks and deduce some formulas for the explicit evaluation of his theta-functions in terms of Weber-Ramanujan class invariants.

  10. Developmental differences in beta and theta power during sentence processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M. Schneider

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although very young children process ongoing language quickly and effortlessly, research indicates that they continue to improve and mature in their language skills through adolescence. This prolonged development may be related to differing engagement of semantic and syntactic processes. This study used event related potentials and time frequency analysis of EEG to identify developmental differences in neural engagement as children (ages 10–12 and adults performed an auditory verb agreement grammaticality judgment task. Adults and children revealed very few differences in comprehending grammatically correct sentences. When identifying grammatical errors, however, adults displayed widely distributed beta and theta power decreases that were significantly less pronounced in children. Adults also demonstrated a significant P600 effect, while children exhibited an apparent N400 effect. Thus, when identifying subtle grammatical errors in real time, adults display greater neural activation that is traditionally associated with syntactic processing whereas children exhibit greater activity more commonly associated with semantic processing. These findings support previous claims that the cognitive and neural underpinnings of syntactic processing are still developing in adolescence, and add to them by more clearly identifying developmental changes in the neural oscillations underlying grammatical processing.

  11. Dissipation and {theta} {sub 13} in neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, R.L.N.; Guzzo, M.M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-05-15

    We obtain a complete survival and transition probability involving three neutrino flavors when dissipation effects in vacuum are taken into consideration. In an approach that presents decoherence and relaxation effects, we study the behavior of the probabilities obtained from complete positivity constraints. Making the von Neumann entropy increase in time, many cases can be obtained and studied with the Lindblad master equation with addition of only one or two parameters related to dissipation. New possibilities are obtained when we take into account two decoherence parameters with different magnitudes which are given by reactor and accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments. We also present a model with only one parameter that has an important symmetry property, which can be used when the effective matter potential is important. Furthermore, the dissipation effects can contribute to the appearance of neutrinos that can hide or imitate the {theta} {sub 13} effects and we study these possibilities showing that dissipative effects have an important role in three-neutrino oscillations. (orig.)

  12. GEOMETRIC CALIBRATION OF FULL SPHERICAL PANORAMIC RICOH-THETA CAMERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Aghayari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel calibration process of RICOH-THETA, full-view fisheye camera, is proposed which has numerous applications as a low cost sensor in different disciplines such as photogrammetry, robotic and machine vision and so on. Ricoh Company developed this camera in 2014 that consists of two lenses and is able to capture the whole surrounding environment in one shot. In this research, each lens is calibrated separately and interior/relative orientation parameters (IOPs and ROPs of the camera are determined on the basis of designed calibration network on the central and side images captured by the aforementioned lenses. Accordingly, designed calibration network is considered as a free distortion grid and applied to the measured control points in the image space as correction terms by means of bilinear interpolation. By performing corresponding corrections, image coordinates are transformed to the unit sphere as an intermediate space between object space and image space in the form of spherical coordinates. Afterwards, IOPs and EOPs of each lens are determined separately through statistical bundle adjustment procedure based on collinearity condition equations. Subsequently, ROPs of two lenses is computed from both EOPs. Our experiments show that by applying 3*3 free distortion grid, image measurements residuals diminish from 1.5 to 0.25 degrees on aforementioned unit sphere.

  13. Hardy-Petrovitch-Hutchinson's problem and partial theta function

    CERN Document Server

    Kostov, Vladimir Petrov

    2011-01-01

    In 1907 M.Petrovitch initiated the study of a class of entire functions all whose finite sections are real-rooted polynomials. An explicit description of this class in terms of the coefficients of a series is impossible since it is determined by an infinite number of discriminantal inequalities one for each degree. However, interesting necessary or sufficient conditions can be formulated. In particular, J.I.Hutchinson has shown that an entire function p(x)=a_0+a_1x+...+a_nx^n+... with strictly positive coefficients has the property that any its finite segment a_ix^i+...+a_jx^j has all real roots if and only if for all i=1,2,... one has a_i^2/a_{i-1}a_{i+1} is greater than or equal to 4. In the present paper we give sharp lower bounds on the ratios a_i^2/a_{i-1}a_{i+1} for the class considered by M.Petrovitch. In particular, we show that the limit of these minima when i tends to infinity equals the inverse of the maximal positive value of the parameter for which the classical partial theta function belongs to ...

  14. Non-Standard Models, Solar Neutrinos, and Large \\theta_{13}

    CERN Document Server

    Bonventre, R; Klein, J R; Gann, G D Orebi; Seibert, S; Wasalski, O

    2013-01-01

    Solar neutrino experiments have yet to see directly the transition region between matter-enhanced and vacuum oscillations. The transition region is particularly sensitive to models of non-standard neutrino interactions and propagation. We examine several such non-standard models, which predict a lower-energy transition region and a flatter survival probability for the ^{8}B solar neutrinos than the standard large-mixing angle (LMA) model. We find that while some of the non-standard models provide a better fit to the solar neutrino data set, the large measured value of \\theta_{13} and the size of the experimental uncertainties lead to a low statistical significance for these fits. We have also examined whether simple changes to the solar density profile can lead to a flatter ^{8}B survival probability than the LMA prediction, but find that this is not the case for reasonable changes. We conclude that the data in this critical region is still too poor to determine whether any of these models, or LMA, is the bes...

  15. Geometric Calibration of Full Spherical Panoramic Ricoh-Theta Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghayari, S.; Saadatseresht, M.; Omidalizarandi, M.; Neumann, I.

    2017-05-01

    A novel calibration process of RICOH-THETA, full-view fisheye camera, is proposed which has numerous applications as a low cost sensor in different disciplines such as photogrammetry, robotic and machine vision and so on. Ricoh Company developed this camera in 2014 that consists of two lenses and is able to capture the whole surrounding environment in one shot. In this research, each lens is calibrated separately and interior/relative orientation parameters (IOPs and ROPs) of the camera are determined on the basis of designed calibration network on the central and side images captured by the aforementioned lenses. Accordingly, designed calibration network is considered as a free distortion grid and applied to the measured control points in the image space as correction terms by means of bilinear interpolation. By performing corresponding corrections, image coordinates are transformed to the unit sphere as an intermediate space between object space and image space in the form of spherical coordinates. Afterwards, IOPs and EOPs of each lens are determined separately through statistical bundle adjustment procedure based on collinearity condition equations. Subsequently, ROPs of two lenses is computed from both EOPs. Our experiments show that by applying 3*3 free distortion grid, image measurements residuals diminish from 1.5 to 0.25 degrees on aforementioned unit sphere.

  16. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Theta Car

    CERN Document Server

    Naze, Yael

    2008-01-01

    Context : The peculiar hot star Theta Car in the open cluster IC2602 is a blue straggler as well as a single-line binary of short period (2.2d). Aims : Its high-energy properties are not well known, though X-rays can provide useful constraints on the energetic processes at work in binaries as well as in peculiar, single objects. Methods : We present the analysis of a 50ks exposure taken with the XMM-Newton observatory. It provides medium as well as high-resolution spectroscopy. Results : Our high-resolution spectroscopy analysis reveals a very soft spectrum with multiple temperature components (1--6MK) and an X-ray flux slightly below the `canonical' value (log[L_X(0.1-10.)/L_{BOL}] ~ -7). The X-ray lines appear surprisingly narrow and unshifted, reminiscent of those of beta Cru and tau Sco. Their relative intensities confirm the anomalous abundances detected in the optical domain (C strongly depleted, N strongly enriched, O slightly depleted). In addition, the X-ray data favor a slight depletion in neon and ...

  17. Revisiting Discrete Dark Matter Model:\\theta_{13}\

    CERN Document Server

    Hamada, Yuta; Ogasahara, Atsushi; Omura, Yuji; Takayama, Fumihiro; Yasuhara, Daiki

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the discrete dark matter model with $A_4$ flavor symmetry originally introduced by M.Hirsch {\\it et.al}. We show that radiative corrections can lead to non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ and non-zero mass for the lightest neutrino. We find an interesting relation among neutrino mixing parameters and it indicates the sizable deviation of $s_{23}$ from the maximal angle $s_{23}^2=1/2$ and the degenerate mass spectrum for neutrinos. Also we study the possibilities that the right-handed neutrino is a dark matter candidate. Assuming the thermal freeze-out explains observed dark matter abundance, TeV-scale right-handed neutrino and flavored scalar bosons are required. In such a case, flavor symmetry plays an important role for the suppression of lepton flavor violating processes as well as for the stability of dark matter. We show that this scenario can be viable against currently existing constraints from collider, low energy experiments and cosmological observations.

  18. Discrete Flavour Groups, \\theta_13 and Lepton Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Merlo, Luca; Stamou, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Discrete flavour groups have been studied in connection with special patterns of neutrino mixing suggested by the data, such as Tri-Bimaximal mixing (groups A4, S4...) or Bi-Maximal mixing (group S4...) etc. We review the predictions for sin(\\theta_13) in a number of these models and confront them with the experimental measurements. We compare the performances of the different classes of models in this respect. We then consider, in a supersymmetric framework, the important implications of these flavour symmetries on lepton flavour violating processes, like \\mu -> e gamma and similar processes. We discuss how the existing limits constrain these models, once their parameters are adjusted so as to optimize the agreement with the measured values of the mixing angles. In the simplified CMSSM context, adopted here just for indicative purposes, the small tan(beta) range and heavy SUSY mass scales are favoured by lepton flavour violating processes, which makes it even more difficult to reproduce the reported muon g-2...

  19. Modulation of EEG Theta Band Signal Complexity by Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Joydeep; Lee, Eun-Jeong

    The primary goal of this study was to investigate the impact of monochord (MC) sounds, a type of archaic sounds used in music therapy, on the neural complexity of EEG signals obtained from patients undergoing chemotherapy. The secondary goal was to compare the EEG signal complexity values for monochords with those for progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), an alternative therapy for relaxation. Forty cancer patients were randomly allocated to one of the two relaxation groups, MC and PMR, over a period of six months; continuous EEG signals were recorded during the first and last sessions. EEG signals were analyzed by applying signal mode complexity, a measure of complexity of neuronal oscillations. Across sessions, both groups showed a modulation of complexity of beta-2 band (20-29Hz) at midfrontal regions, but only MC group showed a modulation of complexity of theta band (3.5-7.5Hz) at posterior regions. Therefore, the neuronal complexity patterns showed different changes in EEG frequency band specific complexity resulting in two different types of interventions. Moreover, the different neural responses to listening to monochords and PMR were observed after regular relaxation interventions over a short time span.

  20. Production and Width of the Pentaquark Theta+(1540) in Strangeness Production in the Proton-Proton System

    CERN Document Server

    Dillig, M

    2006-01-01

    We analyze recent experimental information on the excitation of the Theta+(1540) pentaquark in the hadronic reaction pp -> p Sigma+ K0. Upon describing the conventional production process - which serves as a normalization - in a meson exchange model, we estimate the resonant Theta+ induced cross section and the width of the pentaquark via K - exchange in a meson-baryon and a quark-gluon model. From a comparison with experiment we extract information on the width of the Theta+, the p Theta+ K0 coupling constant in the meson exchange and the relative s or p wave function for a nucleon-kaon cluster in the Theta+.

  1. Measurement of the product branching fraction $B(c \\to \\Theta_{c}X) \\cdot B(\\Theta_{c} \\to \\LambdaX)$

    CERN Document Server

    Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Brabant, P; Bull, H; Davis, R; Holliday, J; Kotov, S A; Kravchenko, I V; Kwak, N; Robertson, I; Stutz, R P; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Mahmood, A H; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lorenc, J; Schwarthoff, H; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Bishai, M; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Menon, N; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Kwon, Y; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Lingel, K; Marsiske, H; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Ugolini, D W; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Korolkov, I Ya; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Dambasuren, E; Kopp, S E; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Titov, A; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Csorna, S E; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Pomianowski, P A; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Greene, R; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J; Chan, S; Eigen, G; Lipeles, E; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Urheim, J; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Sharma, V; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Gronberg, J B; Hill, T S; Lange, D J; Morrison, R J; Nelson, T K; Richman, J D; Briere, R A; Behrens, B H; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Krieg, H; Roy, J D; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Baker, R; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lee, T; Liu, Y; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Thies, P G; Valant-Spaight, B L; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Lohner, M; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J

    2000-01-01

    Based on an a high statistics e+e- -> ccbar data sample, we report on the inclusive rate for charmed baryons to decay into / particles using charm-event tagging. We select e+e- -> ccbar events which have a clear anti-charm tag and measure the / content in the hemisphere opposite the tag (charge conjugate modes are implicit). This allows us to determine the product branching fraction: B(/)=B(c->Theta_c)*B(Theta_c->/\\X), where Theta_c represents a sum over all charmed baryons produced in e+e- fragmentation at sqrt(s)=10.5 GeV, given our specific tags. We obtain B(/)=(1.87+/-0.03+/-0.33)%

  2. Coding Bounds for Multiple Phased-Burst Correction and Single Burst Correction Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Fong, Wai Han

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, two upper bounds on the achievable code rate of linear block codes for multiple phased-burst correction (MPBC) are presented. One bound is constrained to a maximum correctable cyclic burst length within every subblock, or equivalently a constraint on the minimum error free length or gap within every phased-burst. This bound, when reduced to the special case of a bound for single burst correction (SBC), is shown to be the Abramson bound when the cyclic burst length is less than half the block length. The second MPBC bound is developed without the minimum error free gap constraint and is used as a comparison to the first bound.

  3. Coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition in a parabolic bursting model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lin; Zhang, Jia; Lang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Xiuhui

    2013-03-01

    The transition from tonic spiking to bursting is an important dynamic process that carry physiologically relevant information. In this work, coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition is investigated in a parabolic bursting model with specific discussion on their cooperation effects. Fast/slow analysis shows that weak coupling may help to induce the bursting by changing the geometric property of the fast subsystem so that the original unstable periodical solution are stabilized. It turned out that noise can play the similar stabilization role and induce bursting at appropriate moderate intensity. However, their cooperation may either strengthen or weaken the overall effect depending on the choice of noise level.

  4. Relationship between regional hemodynamic activity and simultaneously recorded EEG-theta associated with mental arithmetic-induced workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammer, Gebhard; Blecker, Carlo; Gebhardt, Helge; Bischoff, Matthias; Stark, Rudolf; Morgen, Katrin; Vaitl, Dieter

    2007-08-01

    Theta increases with workload and is associated with numerous processes including working memory, problem solving, encoding, or self monitoring. These processes, in turn, involve numerous structures of the brain. However, the relationship between regional brain activity and the occurrence of theta remains unclear. In the present study, simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings were used to investigate the functional topography of theta. EEG-theta was enhanced by mental arithmetic-induced workload. For the EEG-constrained fMRI analysis, theta-reference time-series were extracted from the EEG, reflecting the strength of theta occurrence during the time course of the experiment. Theta occurrence was mainly associated with activation of the insular cortex, hippocampus, superior temporal areas, cingulate cortex, superior parietal, and frontal areas. Though observation of temporal and insular activation is in accord with the theory that theta specifically reflects encoding processes, the involvement of several other brain regions implies that surface-recorded theta represents comprehensive functional brain states rather than specific processes in the brain. The results provide further evidence for the concept that emergent theta band oscillations represent dynamic functional binding of widely distributed cortical assemblies, essential for cognitive processing. This binding process may form the source of surface-recorded EEG theta. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Using temporal bursts for query modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peetz, M.H.; Meij, E.; de Rijke, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach to query modeling that leverages the temporal distribution of documents in an initially retrieved set of documents. In news-related document collections such distributions tend to exhibit bursts. Here, we define a burst to be a time period where unusually many documents are pu

  6. Photospheric radius expansion during magnetar bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Watts; C. Kouveliotou; A.J. van der Horst; E. Göğüş; Y. Kaneko; M. van der Klis; R.A.M.J. Wijers; A.K. Harding; M.G. Baring

    2010-01-01

    On 2008 August 24 the new magnetar SGR 0501+4516 (discovered by Swift) emitted a bright burst with a pronounced double-peaked structure in hard X-rays, reminiscent of the double-peaked temporal structure seen in some bright thermonuclear bursts on accreting neutron stars. In the latter case this is

  7. Astronomy: Radio burst caught red-handed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcke, Heino

    2017-01-01

    For almost a decade, astronomers have observed intense bursts of radio waves from the distant cosmos whose origins were unknown. The source of one such burst has now been identified, but this has only deepened the mystery. See Letter p.58

  8. Effects of nicotine stimulation on spikes, theta frequency oscillations, and spike-theta oscillation relationship in rat medial septum diagonal band Broca slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong WEN; Ce PENG; Gao-xiang OU-YANG; Zainab HENDERSON; Xiao-li LI; Cheng-biao LU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:Spiking activities and neuronal network oscillations in the theta frequency range have been found in many cortical areas during information processing.The aim of this study is to determine whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate neuronal network activity in rat medial septum diagonal band Broca (MSDB) slices.Methods:Extracellular field potentials were recorded in the slices using an Axoprobe 1A amplifier.Data analysis was performed offline.Spike sorting and local field potential (LFP) analyses were performed using Spike2 software.The role of spiking activity in the generation of LFP oscillations in the slices was determined by analyzing the phase-time relationship between the spikes and LFP oscillations.Circular statistic analysis based on the Rayleigh test was used to determine the significance of phase relationships between the spikes and LFP oscillations.The timing relationship was examined by quantifying the spike-field coherence (SFC).Results:Application of nicotine (250 nmol/L) induced prominent LFP oscillations in the theta frequency band and both small-and large-amplitude population spiking activity in the slices.These spikes were phase-locked to theta oscillations at specific phases.The Rayleigh test showed a statistically significant relationship in phase-locking between the spikes and theta oscillations.Larger changes in the SFC were observed for large-amplitude spikes,indicating an accurate timing relationship between this type of spike and LFP oscillations.The nicotine-induced spiking activity (large-amplitude population spikes) was suppressed by the nAChR antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (0.3 μmol/L).Conclusion:The results demonstrate that large-amplitude spikes are phase-locked to theta oscillations and have a high spike-timing accuracy,which are likely a main contributor to the theta oscillations generated in MSDB during nicotine receptor activation.

  9. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-yang Dai

    2004-01-01

    Objective To review imaging use in the diagnosis ofthoracolumbar burst fractures and to determine the diagnostic value of different imaging methods.Methods One hundred and fourteen patients with 120 thoracolumbar burst fractures were retrospectively reviewed. Plain radiographs were available in all cases; CT scans and MRI were obtained in 96 and 74 cases, respectively.Results A total of 27 burst fractures were misdiagnosed as other types of fractures on radiographs alone, and accounted for 22.5% of all fractures. The results indicated that plain radiographs often fail to delineate the pathological features of thoracolumbar burst fractures, leading to delay in diagnosis.Conclusion In regard to thoracolumbar injury diagnosis, burst fractures should be differentiated from compression fractures. CT should be routinely indicated and MRI examination, when necessary, may be simultaneously considered.

  10. Bright 30 THz Impulsive Solar Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, P; Marcon, R; Kudaka, A S; Cabezas, D P; Cassiano, M M; Francile, C; Fernandes, L O T; Ramirez, R F Hidalgo; Luoni, M; Marun, A; Pereyra, P; de Souza, R V

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive 30 THz continuum bursts have been recently observed in solar flares, utilizing small telescopes with a unique and relatively simple optical setup concept. The most intense burst was observed together with a GOES X2 class event on October 27, 2014, also detected at two sub-THz frequencies, RHESSI X-rays and SDO/HMI and EUV. It exhibits strikingly good correlation in time and in space with white light flare emission. It is likely that this association may prove to be very common. All three 30 THz events recently observed exhibited intense fluxes in the range of 104 solar flux units, considerably larger than those measured for the same events at microwave and sub-mm wavelengths. The 30 THz burst emission might be part of the same spectral burst component found at sub-THz frequencies. The 30 THz solar bursts open a promising new window for the study of flares at their origin

  11. FRBCAT: The Fast Radio Burst Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroff, E.; Barr, E. D.; Jameson, A.; Keane, E. F.; Bailes, M.; Kramer, M.; Morello, V.; Tabbara, D.; van Straten, W.

    2016-09-01

    Here, we present a catalogue of known Fast Radio Burst sources in the form of an online catalogue, FRBCAT. The catalogue includes information about the instrumentation used for the observations for each detected burst, the measured quantities from each observation, and model-dependent quantities derived from observed quantities. To aid in consistent comparisons of burst properties such as width and signal-to-noise ratios, we have re-processed all the bursts for which we have access to the raw data, with software which we make available. The originally derived properties are also listed for comparison. The catalogue is hosted online as a Mysql database which can also be downloaded in tabular or plain text format for off-line use. This database will be maintained for use by the community for studies of the Fast Radio Burst population as it grows.

  12. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, 5-Day, Sigma-Theta

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has 5-day Sigma-Theta (Potential Density Anomaly) data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  13. How to implant a causal $\\Theta$ function into the tachyon field operator

    CERN Document Server

    Perepelitsa, Vassili

    2015-01-01

    A Lorentz-covariant introduction of a causal $\\Theta$ function into the tachyon quantum field operator is suggested. Some features of a Lorentz-violating (but Lorentz-covariant) tachyon Lagrangian are considered.

  14. Study of theta-Vacua in the 2-d O(3) Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bögli, Michael; Pepe, Michele; Wiese, Uwe-Jens

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the continuum limit of the step scaling function in the 2-d O(3) model with different theta-vacua. Since we find a different continuum value of the step scaling function for each value of theta, we can conclude that theta indeed is a relevant parameter of the theory and does not get renormalized non-perturbatively. Furthermore, we confirm the result of the conjectured exact S-matrix theory, which predicts the continuum value at theta = pi. To obtain high precision data, we use a modified Hasenbusch improved estimator and an action with an optimized constraint, which has very small cut-off effects. The optimized constraint action combines the standard action of the 2-d O(3) model with a topological action. The topological action constrains the angle between neighboring spins and is therefore invariant against small deformations of the field.

  15. $r$-Tuple Error Functions and Indefinite Theta Series of Higher-Depth

    CERN Document Server

    Nazaroglu, Caner

    2016-01-01

    Theta functions for definite signature lattices constitute a rich source of modular forms. A natural question is then their generalization to indefinite signature lattices. One way to ensure a convergent theta series while keeping the holomorphicity property of definite signature theta series is to restrict the sum over lattice points to a proper subset. Although such series do not have the modular properties that a definite signature theta function has, as shown by Zwegers for signature $(1,n-1)$ lattices, they can be completed to a function that has these modular properties by compromising on the holomorphicity property in a certain way. This construction has recently been generalized to signature $(2,n-2)$ lattices by Alexandrov, Banerjee, Manschot, and Pioline. A crucial ingredient in this work is the notion of double error functions which naturally lends itself to generalizations to higher dimensions. In this work we study the properties of such higher dimensional error functions which we will call $r$-t...

  16. Optical design of f-theta lens for dual wavelength selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lianhua; Cao, Hongzhong; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Xiping; Duan, Xuanming

    2016-10-01

    F-theta lens is an important unit for selective laser melting (SLM) manufacture. The dual wavelength f-theta lens has not been used in SLM manufacture. Here, we present the design of the f-theta lens which satisfies SLM manufacture with coaxial 532 nm and 1030 nm 1080 nm laser beams. It is composed of three pieces of spherical lenses. The focal spots for 532 nm laser and 1030 nm 1080 nm laser are smaller than 35 μm and 70 μm, respectively. The results meet the demands of high precision SLM. The chromatic aberration could cause separation between two laser focal spots in the scanning plane, so chromatic aberration correction is very important to our design. The lateral color of the designed f-theta lens is less than 11 μm within the scan area of 150 mm x 150 mm, which meet the application requirements of dual wavelength selective laser melting.

  17. A genome-wide linkage scan of theta band activity as an endophenotype for schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aukes, Maartje F.; Boks, Marco P.M.; Willems, Anne E.; Van Lutterveld, Remko; Sommer, Iris E.; Sitskoorn, Margriet M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Kahn, Rene S.

    Background: Deviant brain oscillations are candidate endophenotypes for schizophrenia. Our aim was to find new quantitative trait loci for brain oscillations and putatively schizophrenia. Methods: We systematically investigated the genetic characteristics of theta, alpha, and beta oscillations at

  18. The consequences of large \\theta_13 for the turbulence signatures in supernova neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Kneller, James P

    2013-01-01

    The set of transition probabilities for a single neutrino emitted from a point source after passage through a turbulent supernova density profile have been found to be random variates drawn from parent distributions whose properties depend upon the stage of the explosion, the neutrino energy and mixing parameters, the observed channel, and the properties of the turbulence such as the amplitude C*. In this paper we examine the consequences of the recently measured mixing angle \\theta_13 upon the neutrino flavor transformation in supernova when passing through turbulence. We find the measurements of a relatively large value of \\theta_13 means the neutrinos are relatively immune to small, C* 10% the turbulence effects in the high (H) density resonance mixing channels are independent of \\theta_13 but non-resonant mixing channels are more sensitive to turbulence when \\theta_13 is large.

  19. Status of the iota (1440) and theta (1640) as gluonium candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockman, W.S.

    1983-04-01

    A review of the experimental evidence for the iota (1440) and theta (1640) states is presented. The measured properties of these states are compared with various theoretical predictions. A likely interpretation is that these states contain a large gluonic admixture.

  20. Independent Measurement of Theta13 via Neutron Capture on Hydrogen at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    An, F P; Band, H R; Beriguete, W; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Butorov, I; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chasman, C; Chen, H; Chen, Q Y; Chen, S M; Chen, X; Chen, Y X; Chen, Y; Cheng, Y P; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; Deng, Z Y; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Draeger, E; Du, X F; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Ely, S R; Fu, J Y; Ge, L Q; Gill, R; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Gornushkin, Y A; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, X H; Hackenburg, R W; Han, G H; Hans, S; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Hinrichs, P; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, L M; Hu, L J; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E; Huang, H; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Hussain, G; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; Jen, K L; Jetter, S; Ji, X P; Ji, X L; Jiang, H J; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lai, W C; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Leung, A; Leung, J K C; Lewis, C A; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, P Y; Lin, S K; Lin, Y C; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, D W; Liu, H; Liu, J L; Liu, J C; Liu, S S; Liu, Y B; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Luk, K -B; Ma, Q M; Ma, X Y; Ma, X B; Ma, Y Q; McDonald, K T; McFarlane, M C; McKeown, R D; Meng, Y; Mitchell, I; Kebwaro, J Monari; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Nemchenok, I; Ngai, H Y; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevski, A; Patton, S; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Piilonen, L E; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Ren, B; Ren, J; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Shao, B B; Steiner, H; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Y,; Tam, H; Tang, X; Themann, H; Tsang, K V; Tsang, R H M; Tull, C E; Tung, Y C; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, L S; Wang, L Y; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, W W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Webber, D M; Wei, H Y; Wei, Y D; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Wise, T; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, Q; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xia, X; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J Y; Xu, J L; Xu, J; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yan, J; Yang, C C; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye, M; Yeh, M; Yeh, Y S; Young, B L; Yu, G Y; Yu, J Y; Yu, Z Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, B; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, F H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, Q; Zhang, S H; Zhang, Y C; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Y B; Zheng, L; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, Z Y; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2014-01-01

    A new measurement of the $\\theta_{13}$ mixing angle has been obtained at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment via the detection of inverse beta decays tagged by neutron capture on hydrogen. The antineutrino events for hydrogen capture are distinct from those for gadolinium capture with largely different systematic uncertainties, allowing a determination independent of the gadolinium-capture result and an improvement on the precision of $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. With a 217-day antineutrino data set obtained with six antineutrino detectors and from six 2.9 GW$_{th}$ reactors, the rate deficit observed at the far hall is interpreted as $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}=0.083\\pm0.018$ in the three-flavor oscillation model. When combined with the gadolinium-capture result from Daya Bay, we obtain $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}=0.089\\pm0.008$ as the final result for the six-antineutrino-detector configuration of the Daya Bay experiment.

  1. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Daily, Sigma-Theta

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has daily Sigma-Theta (Potential Density Anomaly) data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  2. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Quarterly, Sigma-Theta

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has quarterly Sigma-Theta (Potential Density Anomaly) data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  3. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Monthly, Sigma-Theta

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has monthly Sigma-Theta (Potential Density Anomaly) data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  4. Validation Study of CODES Dragonfly Network Model with Theta Cray XC System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarak, Misbah [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ross, Robert B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-05-31

    This technical report describes the experiments performed to validate the MPI performance measurements reported by the CODES dragonfly network simulation with the Theta Cray XC system at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF).

  5. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsat, Gary; Pollack, Gerald S

    2012-01-01

    Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes - bursts - that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing - the auditory receptor - already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2's sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  6. Methods of rock burst prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genkin, V.A.; Minin, Yu.Ya.; Morozov, G.D.; Proskuryakov, V.M.; Cmirnov, V.A.

    1979-07-01

    Some methods of predicting rock bursts in underground coal and iron ore mines are evaluated: using BP-18 indenters and the MGD indenter with automatic recording; seismic method consisting in measuring the speed of shock waves travelling through various layers (apparatus SB-20 is designed for use in coal mines); electrometric method (measuring resistance between two electrodes when electric currents flow through coal and rocks). The design of the AEhSSh-1 measuring instrument, used in the electrometric method in coal mines is also described. Each of the methods is described and mathematical fomulae used as their theoretical basis are presented. The calculating process is explained and brief information on the design and use of the measuring instrument is given. The methods are evaluated from the viewpoint of precision. (In Russian)

  7. A KCNJ6 gene polymorphism modulates theta oscillations during reward processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarajan, Chella; Pandey, Ashwini K; Chorlian, David B; Manz, Niklas; Stimus, Arthur T; Edenberg, Howard J; Wetherill, Leah; Schuckit, Marc; Wang, Jen-Chyong; Kuperman, Samuel; Kramer, John; Tischfield, Jay A; Porjesz, Bernice

    2016-12-16

    Event related oscillations (EROs) are heritable measures of neurocognitive function that have served as useful phenotype in genetic research. A recent family genome-wide association study (GWAS) by the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) found that theta EROs during visual target detection were associated at genome-wide levels with several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including a synonymous SNP, rs702859, in the KCNJ6 gene that encodes GIRK2, a G-protein inward rectifying potassium channel that regulates excitability of neuronal networks. The present study examined the effect of the KCNJ6 SNP (rs702859), previously associated with theta ERO to targets in a visual oddball task, on theta EROs during reward processing in a monetary gambling task. The participants were 1601 adolescent and young adult offspring within the age-range of 17-25years (800 males and 801 females) from high-dense alcoholism families as well as control families of the COGA prospective study. Theta ERO power (3.5-7.5Hz, 200-500ms post-stimulus) was compared across genotype groups. ERO theta power at central and parietal regions increased as a function of the minor allele (A) dose in the genotype (AA>AG>GG) in both loss and gain conditions. These findings indicate that variations in the KCNJ6 SNP influence magnitude of theta oscillations at posterior loci during the evaluation of loss and gain, reflecting a genetic influence on neuronal circuits involved in reward-processing. Increased theta power as a function of minor allele dose suggests more efficient cognitive processing in those carrying the minor allele of the KCNJ6 SNPs. Future studies are needed to determine the implications of these genetic effects on posterior theta EROs as possible "protective" factors, or as indices of delays in brain maturation (i.e., lack of frontalization).

  8. The electric dipole moment of the nucleon from simulations at imaginary vacuum angle theta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, S. [RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton (United States)]|[Tsukuba Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences; Horsley, R.; Zanotti, J. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics; Izubuchi, T. [RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton (United States)]|[Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Nakamura, Y.; Pleiter, D.; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Division. Dept. of Mathematical Sciences

    2008-07-15

    We compute the electric dipole moment of proton and neutron from lattice QCD simulations with N{sub f}=2 flavors of dynamical quarks at imaginary vacuum angle {theta}. The calculation proceeds via the CP odd form factor F{sub 3}. A novel feature of our calculation is that we use partially twisted boundary conditions to extract F{sub 3} at zero momentum transfer. As a byproduct, we test the QCD vacuum at nonvanishing {theta}. (orig.)

  9. Differentiating neutrino models on the basis of $\\theta_{13}$ and lepton flavor violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, Carl H.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2008-03-01

    The authors show how models of neutrino masses and mixings can be differentiated on the basis of their predictions for {theta}{sub 13} and lepton flavor violation in radiative charged lepton decays and {mu} - e conversion. They illustrate the lepton flavor violation results for five predictive SO(10) SUSY GUT models and point out the relative importance of their heavy right-handed neutrino mass spectra and {theta}{sub 13} predictions.

  10. Pentaquarks in a relativistic quark model and nature of Theta-states

    CERN Document Server

    Gerasyuta, S M

    2003-01-01

    The relativistic five-quark equations are found in the framework of the dispersion relation technique. The solutions of these equations using the method based on the extraction of the leading singularities of the amplitudes are obtained. The five-quark amplitudes for the low-lying pentaquarks including the u, d, s- quarks are calculated. The poles of these amplitudes determine the masses of Theta-pentaquarks. The mass spectra of the isotensor Theta-pentaquarks are calculated.

  11. QCD $\\theta$-vacua from the chiral limit to the quenched limit

    CERN Document Server

    Mameda, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the QCD vacuum structure on $\\theta$-angle and quark mass, using the Veneziano$-$Di-Vecchia model. Although the Veneziano$-$Di-Vecchia model is a chiral effective model, it contains the topological property of the pure Yang$-$Mills theory. It is shown that within this model, the ground state energies for all $\\theta$ are continuous functions of quark mass from the chiral limit to the quenched limit, including the first order phase transition at $\\theta = \\pi$ for arbitrary finite mass. Besides, based on this effective model, we discuss (i) how the ground state depends on quark mass, and (ii) why the phase transition at $\\theta = \\pi$ is caused both in the chiral and quenched limit. In order to analyze the relation between quark mass and $\\theta$-vacua, we calculate chiral condensate as a function of quark mass. We also give a unified understanding of the phase transitions at $\\theta = \\pi$ in the chiral and quenched limit, making reference to the metastable states included inn...

  12. Social exclusion modulates event-related frontal theta and tracks ostracism distress in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noordt, Stefon J R; White, Lars O; Wu, Jia; Mayes, Linda C; Crowley, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Social exclusion is a potent elicitor of distress. Previous studies have shown that medial frontal theta oscillations are modulated by the experience of social exclusion. Using the Cyberball paradigm, we examined event-related dynamics of theta power in the EEG at medial frontal sites while children aged 8-12 years were exposed to conditions of fair play and social exclusion. Using an event-related design, we found that medial frontal theta oscillations (4-8Hz) increase during both early (i.e., 200-400ms) and late (i.e., 400-800ms) processing of rejection events during social exclusion relative to perceptually identical "not my turn" events during inclusion. Importantly, we show that only for the later time window (400-800ms) slow-wave theta power tracks self-reported ostracism distress. Specifically, greater theta power at medial frontal sites to "rejection" events predicted higher levels of ostracism distress. Alpha and beta oscillations for rejection events were unrelated to ostracism distress at either 200-400ms or 400-800ms time windows. Our findings extend previous studies by showing that medial frontal theta oscillations for rejection events are a neural signature of social exclusion, linked to experienced distress in middle childhood.

  13. Frontal theta links prediction errors to behavioral adaptation in reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, James F; Frank, Michael J; Klein, Theresa J; Allen, John J B

    2010-02-15

    Investigations into action monitoring have consistently detailed a frontocentral voltage deflection in the event-related potential (ERP) following the presentation of negatively valenced feedback, sometimes termed the feedback-related negativity (FRN). The FRN has been proposed to reflect a neural response to prediction errors during reinforcement learning, yet the single-trial relationship between neural activity and the quanta of expectation violation remains untested. Although ERP methods are not well suited to single-trial analyses, the FRN has been associated with theta band oscillatory perturbations in the medial prefrontal cortex. Mediofrontal theta oscillations have been previously associated with expectation violation and behavioral adaptation and are well suited to single-trial analysis. Here, we recorded EEG activity during a probabilistic reinforcement learning task and fit the performance data to an abstract computational model (Q-learning) for calculation of single-trial reward prediction errors. Single-trial theta oscillatory activities following feedback were investigated within the context of expectation (prediction error) and adaptation (subsequent reaction time change). Results indicate that interactive medial and lateral frontal theta activities reflect the degree of negative and positive reward prediction error in the service of behavioral adaptation. These different brain areas use prediction error calculations for different behavioral adaptations, with medial frontal theta reflecting the utilization of prediction errors for reaction time slowing (specifically following errors), but lateral frontal theta reflecting prediction errors leading to working memory-related reaction time speeding for the correct choice.

  14. Principal and Boolean congruences on \\theta-valued Lukasiewicz-Moisil algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Figallo, A V

    2012-01-01

    The first system of many-valued logic was introduced by J. Lukasiewicz, his motivation was of philosophical nature as he was looking for an interpretation of the concepts of possibility and necessity. Since then, plenty of research has been developed in this area. In 1968, when Gr.C. Moisil came across Zadeh's fuzzy set theory he found the motivation he had been looking for in order to legitimate the introduction and study of infinitely-valued Lukasiewicz algebras, so he defined \\theta-valued Lukasiewicz algebras (or LM\\theta-algebras, for short) (without negation), where \\theta is the order type of a chain. In this article, our main interest is to investigate the principal and Boolean congruences and \\theta-congruences on LM\\theta-algebras. In order to do this we take into account a topological duality for these algebras obtained in (A.V. Figallo, I. Pascual, A. Ziliani, A Duality for \\theta-Valued Lukasiewicz-Moisil Algebras and Aplicattions. J. LMult- Valued Logic & Soft Computing. Vol. 16, pp 303-322....

  15. Developmental Changes in Hippocampal CA1 Single Neuron Firing and Theta Activity during Associative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangjin; Goldsberry, Mary E.; Harmon, Thomas C.; Freeman, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal development is thought to play a crucial role in the emergence of many forms of learning and memory, but ontogenetic changes in hippocampal activity during learning have not been examined thoroughly. We examined the ontogeny of hippocampal function by recording theta and single neuron activity from the dorsal hippocampal CA1 area while rat pups were trained in associative learning. Three different age groups [postnatal days (P)17-19, P21-23, and P24-26] were trained over six sessions using a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and a periorbital stimulation unconditioned stimulus (US). Learning increased as a function of age, with the P21-23 and P24-26 groups learning faster than the P17-19 group. Age- and learning-related changes in both theta and single neuron activity were observed. CA1 pyramidal cells in the older age groups showed greater task-related activity than the P17-19 group during CS-US paired sessions. The proportion of trials with a significant theta (4–10 Hz) power change, the theta/delta ratio, and theta peak frequency also increased in an age-dependent manner. Finally, spike/theta phase-locking during the CS showed an age-related increase. The findings indicate substantial developmental changes in dorsal hippocampal function that may play a role in the ontogeny of learning and memory. PMID:27764172

  16. What triggers $\\theta_{13}$ discrepancy between Daya Bay and T2K?

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Naoyuki; Shimada, Kyousuke; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    There seems to be a non-negligible discrepancy between Daya Bay and T2K experimental results of a neutrino mixing angle, $\\theta_{13}$ . We show the discrepancy can be simply passed away even in the standard three neutrinos framework by taking the same value of $\\Delta m^2_{32}$ with a normal neutrino mass hierarchy and Dirac CP phase $\\delta = -\\pi/ 2$, which is favorable in T2K experiment. For numerical analyses of neutrino oscillation probabilities, there are five independent parameters, $\\Delta m_{21}^2$, $\\Delta m_{32}^2$, $\\theta_{12}$, $\\theta_{23}$, and $\\delta$. We reevaluate $\\theta_{13}$ by scatter plots within $1 \\sigma$ range of five-dimensional parameters space suggested by PDG, T2K, and Daya Bay. We project onto $\\delta$-$\\sin^2 2 \\theta_{13}$ plane and find an overlap area of $\\theta_{13}$ suggested by T2K and Daya Bay. In the normal hierarchy case, the largest overlap area is given by parameters set suggested by T2K, and the overlap area becomes small in order of parameters sets suggested by ...

  17. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Unique Five-Week VLT Study of the Polarisation of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow "Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)" are certainly amongst the most dramatic events known in astrophysics. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays, first detected in the late 1960's by military satellites, last from less than one second to several minutes. GRBs have been found to be situated at extremely large ("cosmological") distances. The energy released in a few seconds during such an event is larger than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are indeed the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe, cf. ESO PR 08/99 and ESO PR 20/00. During the past years circumstantial evidence has mounted that GRBs signal the collapse of extremely massive stars, the so-called hypernovae. This was finally demonstrated some months ago when astronomers, using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), documented in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the light source ("the optical afterglow") of the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 (cf. ESO PR 16/03). A conclusive and direct link between cosmological gamma-ray bursts and explosions of very massive stars was provided on this occasion. Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030329 was discovered on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer spacecraft. Follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) showed the burst to have a redshift of 0.1685 [1]. This corresponds to a distance of about 2,650 million light-years, making GRB 030329 the second-nearest long-duration GRB ever detected. The proximity of GRB 030329 resulted in very bright afterglow emission, permitting the most extensive follow-up observations of any afterglow to date. A team of astronomers [2] led by Jochen Greiner of the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany) decided to make use of this unique opportunity to study the

  18. Observational properties of decameter type IV bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoly; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander; Briand, Carine; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Zarka, Philippe; Frantzusenko, Anatoly; Panchenko, Michael; Poedts, Stefan; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Shergelashvili, Bidzina

    2013-04-01

    Oscillations of decameter type IV bursts were registered during observations of solar radio emission by UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA in 2011-2012. Large majority of these bursts were accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were observed by SOHO and STEREO in the visible light. Only in some cases decameter type IV bursts were not associated with CMEs. The largest periods of oscillations P were some tens of minutes. There were some modes of long periods of oscillations simultaneously. Periods of oscillations in flux and in polarization profiles were close. Detailed properties of oscillations at different frequencies were analyzed on the example of two type IV bursts. One of them was observed on April 7, 2011 when a CME happened. Another one (August 1, 2011) was registered without any CME. The 7 April type IV burst had two periods in the frames 75-85 and 35-85 minutes. Interesting feature of these oscillations is decreasing periods with time. The observed decreasing rates dP/dt equaled 0.03-0.07. Concerning type IV burst observed on August 1, 2011 the period of its oscillations increases from 17 min. at 30 MHz to 44 min. at 10 MHz. Connection of type IV burst oscillations with oscillations of magnetic arches and CMEs at corresponding altitudes are discussed. The work is fulfilled in the frame of FP7 project "SOLSPANET".

  19. THETA-Rhythm Makes the World Go Round: Dissociative Effects of TMS Theta Versus Alpha Entrainment of Right pTPJ on Embodied Perspective Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding-Williams, Gerard; Wang, Hongfang; Kessler, Klaus

    2017-03-03

    Being able to imagine another person's experience and perspective of the world is a crucial human ability and recent reports suggest that humans "embody" another's viewpoint by mentally rotating their own body representation into the other's orientation. Our recent Magnetoencephalography (MEG) data further confirmed this notion of embodied perspective transformations and pinpointed the right posterior temporo-parietal junction (pTPJ) as the crucial hub in a distributed network oscillating at theta frequency (3-7 Hz). In a subsequent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) experiment we interfered with right pTPJ processing and observed a modulation of the embodied aspects of perspective transformations. While these results corroborated the role of right pTPJ, the notion of theta oscillations being the crucial neural code remained a correlational observation based on our MEG data. In the current study we therefore set out to confirm the importance of theta oscillations directly by means of TMS entrainment. We compared entrainment of right pTPJ at 6 Hz vs. 10 Hz and confirmed that only 6 Hz entrainment facilitated embodied perspective transformations (at 160° angular disparity) while 10 Hz slowed it down. The reverse was true at low angular disparity (60° between egocentric and target perspective) where a perspective transformation was not strictly necessary. Our results further corroborate right pTPJ involvement in embodied perspective transformations and highlight theta oscillations as a crucial neural code.

  20. Upsilon NU: Our chapter in Sigma Theta Tau Internacional Upsilon NU: nuestro capítulo en Sigma Theta Tau International

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GARZÓN ALARCÓN NELLY

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available ALa Sociedad de Honor de Enfermería, Sigma Theta Tau Internacional, es una organización que nace y vive para desarrollar el conocimiento y la ciencia de enfermería como fundamentos del liderazgo y la búsqueda de la excelencia en el cuidado de la persona, la familia y la comunidad.

  1. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  2. Frontal midline theta rhythm is correlated with cardiac autonomic activities during the performance of an attention demanding meditation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Y; Sato, W; Toichi, M; Murai, T; Okada, T; Hayashi, A; Sengoku, A

    2001-04-01

    Frontal midline theta rhythm (Fm theta), recognized as distinct theta activity on EEG in the frontal midline area, reflects mental concentration as well as meditative state or relief from anxiety. Attentional network in anterior frontal lobes including anterior cingulate cortex is suspected to be the generator of this activity, and the regulative function of the frontal neural network over autonomic nervous system (ANS) during cognitive process is suggested. However no studies have examined peripheral autonomic activities during Fm theta induction, and interaction of central and peripheral mechanism associated with Fm theta remains unclear. In the present study, a standard procedure of Zen meditation requiring sustained attention and breath control was employed as the task to provoke Fm theta, and simultaneous EEG and ECG recordings were performed. For the subjects in which Fm theta activities were provoked (six men, six women, 48% of the total subjects), peripheral autonomic activities were evaluated during the appearance of Fm theta as well as during control periods. Successive inter-beat intervals were measured from the ECG, and a recently developed method of analysis by Toichi et al. (J. Auton. Nerv. Syst. 62 (1997) 79-84) based on heart rate variability was used to assess cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic functions separately. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic indices were increased during the appearance of Fm theta compared with control periods. Theta band activities in the frontal area were correlated negatively with sympathetic activation. The results suggest a close relationship between cardiac autonomic function and activity of medial frontal neural circuitry.

  3. The Arecibo Fast Radio Burst: Dense Circum-burst Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, S R; Neill, J D

    2015-01-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRB) has been extensively debated. Here we investigate FRB121102, detected at Arecibo telescope and remarkable for its unusually large spectral index. After extensive study we conclude that the spectral index is caused by a nebula with free-free absorption. We find that putative nebula must lie beyond the Milky Way. We conclude that FRBs are of extra-galactic origin and that they arise in dense star-forming regions. The challenge with extra-galactic models is the the high volumetric rate of FRBs. This high rate allows us to eliminate all models of catastrophic stellar deaths. Hyper-giant flares from young magnetars emerge as the most likely progenitors. Some of the consequences are: (i) Intergalactic FRB models can be safely ignored. (ii) The rich ISM environment of young magnetars can result in significant contribution to DM, Rotation Measure (RM) and in some cases to significant free-free optical depth. (iii) The star-forming regions in the host galaxies can contribute signi...

  4. Ballerina - pirouettes in search of gamma bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Lund, Niels; Pedersen, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The cosmological origin of gamma ray bursts has now been established with reasonable certainty, Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large diversity in properties which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We are propo...... are proposing Ballerina, a small satellite to provide accurate positions and new data on the gamma-ray bursts. We anticipate a detection rate an order of magnitude larger than obtained from Beppo-SAX....

  5. ESTIMATE OF BURSTING PRESSURE OF MILD STEEL PRESSURE VESSEL AND PRESENTATION OF BURSTING FORMULA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Chuanxiang

    2006-01-01

    In order to get more precise bursting pressure formula of mild steel, hundreds of bursting experiments of mild steel pressure vessels such as Q235(Gr.D) and 20R(1020) are done. Based on statistical data of bursting pressure and modification of Faupel formula, a more precise modified formula is given out according to the experimental data. It is proved to be more accurate after examining other bursting pressure value presented in many references. This bursting formula is very accurate in these experiments using pressure vessels with different diameter and shell thickness.Obviously, this modified bursting formula can be used in mild steel pressure vessels with different diameter and thickness of shell.

  6. Evolution of the bursting-layer wave during a Type 1 X-ray burst

    CERN Document Server

    Berkhout, R G

    2007-01-01

    In a popular scenario due to Heyl, quasi periodic oscillations (QPOs) which are seen during type 1 X-ray bursts are produced by giant travelling waves in neutron-star oceans. Piro and Bildsten have proposed that during the burst cooling the wave in the bursting layer may convert into a deep crustal interface wave, which would cut off the visible QPOs. This cut-off would help explain the magnitude of the QPO frequency drift, which is otherwise overpredicted by a factor of several in Heyl's scenario. In this paper, we study the coupling between the bursting layer and the deep ocean. The coupling turns out to be weak and only a small fraction of the surface-wave energy gets transferred to that of the crustal-interface wave during the burst. Thus the crustal-interface wave plays no dynamical role during the burst, and no early QPO cut-off should occur.

  7. Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, Andrew; Crowther, Paul; de Grijs, Richard; Langer, Norbert; Xu, Dong; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-12-01

    We review our current understanding of the progenitors of both long and short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Constraints can be derived from multiple directions, and we use three distinct strands; (i) direct observations of GRBs and their host galaxies, (ii) parameters derived from modelling, both via population synthesis and direct numerical simulation and (iii) our understanding of plausible analog progenitor systems observed in the local Universe. From these joint constraints, we describe the likely routes that can drive massive stars to the creation of long GRBs, and our best estimates of the scenarios that can create compact object binaries which will ultimately form short GRBs, as well as the associated rates of both long and short GRBs. We further discuss how different the progenitors may be in the case of black hole engine or millisecond-magnetar models for the production of GRBs, and how central engines may provide a unifying theme between many classes of extremely luminous transient, from luminous and super-luminous supernovae to long and short GRBs.

  8. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; Chardonnet, Pascal; Cherubini, Christian; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Fraschetti, Federico; Geralico, Andrea; Guida, Roberto; Patricelli, Barbara; Rotondo, Michael; Hernandez, Jorge Armando Rueda; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    (Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the...

  9. Gamma-ray burst progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Levan, Andrew; de Grijs, Richard; Langer, Norbert; Xu, Dong; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    We review our current understanding of the progenitors of both long and short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Constraints can be derived from multiple directions, and we use three distinct strands; i) direct observations of GRBs and their host galaxies, ii) parameters derived from modeling, both via population synthesis and direct numerical simulation and iii) our understanding of plausible analog progenitor systems observed in the local Universe. From these joint constraints, we describe the likely routes that can drive massive stars to the creation of long GRBs, and our best estimates of the scenarios that can create compact object binaries which will ultimately form short GRBs, as well as the associated rates of both long and short GRBs. We further discuss how different the progenitors may be in the case of black hole engine or millisecond-magnetar models for the production of GRBs, and how central engines may provide a unifying theme between many classes of extremely luminous transient, from luminous an...

  10. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  11. Bursting Smoke as an Infrared Countermeasure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amarjit Singh; P. J. Kamale; S. A. Joshi; L. K. Bankar

    1998-01-01

    ...) using cadmium-mercury-telluride (CMI) detector cooled by liquid nitrogen. The particle size and shape of the powders used in the bursting smokes were determined microscopically using Carl Zeiss Jena Neophot- 21...

  12. Expected Performance of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Briggs, Michael; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; vonKienlin, Andreas; Diehl, Roland; Steinle, Helmut; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage from the LAT threshold down to approx. 8 kev, and will provide a trigger for re-orienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from selected bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM consists of twelve NaI scintillation detectors operating in the 8 kev to 1 MeV energy range and two BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 150 keV to 30 MeV energy range. Detector resolution, effective area, and angular response have been determined by calibrations. Analyses indicate that the on-board burst threshold will be approx. 0.7 photon/cm2/s and the on-board burst localization accuracy will typically be better than 8 degrees.

  13. Plasma Bursts in Deep Penetration Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrňa, L.; Šarbort, M.

    We present an experimental study of the deep penetration laser welding process which aims to analyze the plasma plume oscillations on a short time scale. Using the high-speed camera we show that the plasma comes out of the keyhole in the form of short bursts rather than the continuous flow. We detect these bursts as the short-time intensity oscillations of light emissions coming from the plasma plume. We determine the period of bursts using the statistical signal processing methods and the short-time frequency analysis. Finally, we compare the characteristics of plasma bursts and the geometry of resulting welds carried out on a 2 kW Yb:YAG laser welding machine for the steel workpiece and various welding parameters settings.

  14. Long Burst Error Correcting Codes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long burst error mitigation is an enabling technology for the use of Ka band for high rate commercial and government users. Multiple NASA, government, and commercial...

  15. GLAST Burst Monitor Trigger Classification Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, D. J.; Sidman, E. D.; Meegan, C. A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), currently set for launch in the first quarter of 2007, will consist of two instruments, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and the Large Area Telescope (LAT). One of the goals of the GBM is to identify and locate gamma-ray bursts using on-board software. The GLAST observatory can then be re-oriented to allow observations by the LAT. A Bayesian analysis will be used to distinguish gamma-ray bursts from other triggering events, such as solar flares, magnetospheric particle precipitation, soft gamma repeaters (SGRs), and Cygnus X-1 flaring. The trigger parameters used in the analysis are the burst celestial coordinates, angle from the Earth's horizon, spectral hardness, and the spacecraft geomagnetic latitude. The algorithm will be described and the results of testing will be presented.

  16. Bursts from the very early universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silk, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Stodolsky, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: les@mppmu.mpg.de

    2006-07-27

    Bursts of weakly interacting particles such as neutrinos or even more weakly interacting particles such as wimps and gravitons from the very early universe would offer a much deeper 'look back time' to early epochs than is possible with photons. We consider some of the issues related to the existence of such bursts and their detectability. Characterizing the burst rate by a probability P per Hubble four-volume we find, for events in the radiation-dominated era, that the natural unit of description is the present intensity of the CMB times P. The existence of such bursts would make the observation of pheno associated with very early times in cosmology at least conceptually possible. One might even hope to probe the transplanckian epoch if complexes more weakly interacting than the graviton can exist. Other conceivable applications include the potential detectability of the formation of 'pocket universes' in a multiverse.

  17. FRBCAT: The Fast Radio Burst Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Jameson, A; Keane, E F; Bailes, M; Kramer, M; Morello, V; Tabbara, D; van Straten, W

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a catalogue of known Fast Radio Burst (FRB) sources in the form of an online catalogue, FRBCAT. The catalogue includes information about the instrumentation used for the observations for each detected burst, the measured quantities from each observation, and model-dependent quantities derived from observed quantities. To aid in consistent comparisons of burst properties such as width and signal-to-noise ratios we have reprocessed all the bursts for which we have access to the raw data, with software which we make available. The originally derived properties are also listed for comparison. The catalogue is hosted online as a MySQL database which can also be downloaded in tabular or plain text format for off-line use. This database will be maintained for use by the community for studies of the FRB population as it grows.

  18. CMEs and frequency cutoff of solar bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, Al.; Konovalenko, Al.; Koval, Ar.; Volvach, Y.; Zarka, P.

    2016-05-01

    Radio observations of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff by the radio telescope UTR-2 (near Kharkiv, Ukraine) at 8-33 MHz on 17-19 August 2012 are presented. Such cutoff may be attributed to the emergence of the burst sources behind limb of the Sun with respect to an observer on the Earth. The events are strongly associated with solar eruptions occurred in a new active region. Ray tracing simulations show that the CMEs play a constructive role for the behind-limb bursts to be detected in ground-based observations. Likely, due to tunnel-like cavities with low density in CMEs, the radio emission of behind-limb solar bursts can be directed towards the Earth.

  19. Research on experiment and calculation of foam bursting device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This research presents experimental data on mechanical foam bursting device, based on the high speed of air fluid impinging insidethe foam bursting device, foam bubbles disrupted as a consequence of pressures changed very quickly as shear force and their impact forces. Experimental data on foam-bursting capacity have been presented. Designed device can provide effective foam bursting on collapse foam.

  20. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Collazzi; C. Kouveliotou; A.J. van der Horst; G.A. Younes; Y. Kaneko; E. Göğüş; L. Lin; J. Granot; M.H. Finger; V.L. Chaplin; D. Huppenkothen; A.L. Watts; A. von Kienlin; M.G. Baring; D. Gruber; P.N. Bhat; M.H. Gibby; N. Gehrels; J. Mcenery; M. van der Klis; R.A.M.J. Wijers

    2015-01-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present

  1. Different types of theta rhythmicity are induced by social and fearful stimuli in a network associated with social memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendler, Alex; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-02-16

    Rhythmic activity in the theta range is thought to promote neuronal communication between brain regions. In this study, we performed chronic telemetric recordings in socially behaving rats to monitor electrophysiological activity in limbic brain regions linked to social behavior. Social encounters were associated with increased rhythmicity in the high theta range (7-10 Hz) that was proportional to the stimulus degree of novelty. This modulation of theta rhythmicity, which was specific for social stimuli, appeared to reflect a brain-state of social arousal. In contrast, the same network responded to a fearful stimulus by enhancement of rhythmicity in the low theta range (3-7 Hz). Moreover, theta rhythmicity showed different pattern of coherence between the distinct brain regions in response to social and fearful stimuli. We suggest that the two types of stimuli induce distinct arousal states that elicit different patterns of theta rhythmicity, which cause the same brain areas to communicate in different modes.

  2. Optimal Codes for the Burst Erasure Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Deep space communications over noisy channels lead to certain packets that are not decodable. These packets leave gaps, or bursts of erasures, in the data stream. Burst erasure correcting codes overcome this problem. These are forward erasure correcting codes that allow one to recover the missing gaps of data. Much of the recent work on this topic concentrated on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. These are more complicated to encode and decode than Single Parity Check (SPC) codes or Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and so far have not been able to achieve the theoretical limit for burst erasure protection. A block interleaved maximum distance separable (MDS) code (e.g., an SPC or RS code) offers near-optimal burst erasure protection, in the sense that no other scheme of equal total transmission length and code rate could improve the guaranteed correctible burst erasure length by more than one symbol. The optimality does not depend on the length of the code, i.e., a short MDS code block interleaved to a given length would perform as well as a longer MDS code interleaved to the same overall length. As a result, this approach offers lower decoding complexity with better burst erasure protection compared to other recent designs for the burst erasure channel (e.g., LDPC codes). A limitation of the design is its lack of robustness to channels that have impairments other than burst erasures (e.g., additive white Gaussian noise), making its application best suited for correcting data erasures in layers above the physical layer. The efficiency of a burst erasure code is the length of its burst erasure correction capability divided by the theoretical upper limit on this length. The inefficiency is one minus the efficiency. The illustration compares the inefficiency of interleaved RS codes to Quasi-Cyclic (QC) LDPC codes, Euclidean Geometry (EG) LDPC codes, extended Irregular Repeat Accumulate (eIRA) codes, array codes, and random LDPC codes previously proposed for burst erasure

  3. Syudy of Token Generation for Burst Traffic Shaping in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Wan; So Won-ho; Lu Ji-guang; Kim Young-chon

    2004-01-01

    Traffic shaping is one of important control operation to guarantee the Quality of Service (QoS) in optical burst switching (OBS) networks. The efficiency of traffic shaping is mainly determined by token generation method. In this paper, token generation methods of traffic shaping are evaluated by using three kinds of probability distribution, and are analyzed in terms of burst blocking probability, throughput and correlation by simulation. The simulation results show that the token generation methods decrease the burst correlation of Label Switched Paths (LSPs), and solve traffic congestion as well. The different burst arrival processes have small impact on the blocking probability for OBS networks.

  4. QoS-guaranteed burst transmission for VoIP service over optical burst switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Takuji; Kasahara, Shoji

    2007-08-01

    We propose a burst transmission method that guarantees the voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) service. The proposed method consists of three techniques: round-robin burst assembly with slotted scheduling, priority control with void filling, and hop-based preemption. Each technique is utilized so that the burst loss probability and the burst transmission delay satisfy VoIP quality of service (QoS). We evaluate by simulation the performance of the proposed method in NSFNET with 14 nodes. Numerical examples show that our proposed method is effective for guaranteeing the VoIP QoS while accommodating a large number of VoIP users.

  5. Gamma-Ray Burst Class Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Meegan, Charles A.; Roiger, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    Guided by the supervised pattern recognition algorithm C4.5 developed by Quinlan in 1986, we examine the three gamma-ray burst classes identified by Mukherjee et al. in 1998. C4.5 provides strong statistical support for this classification. However, with C4.5 and our knowledge of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument, we demonstrate that class 3 (intermediate fluence, intermediate duration, soft) does not have to be a distinct source population: statistical/systematic errors in measuring burst attributes combined with the well-known hardness/intensity correlation can cause low peak flux class 1 (high fluence, long, intermediate hardness) bursts to take on class 3 characteristics naturally. Based on our hypothesis that the third class is not a distinct one, we provide rules so that future events can be placed in either class 1 or class 2 (low fluence, short, hard). We find that the two classes are relatively distinct on the basis of Band's work in 1993 on spectral parameters alpha, beta, and E (sub peak) alone. Although this does not indicate a better basis for classification, it does suggest that different physical conditions exist for class 1 and class 2 bursts. In the process of studying burst class characteristics, we identify a new bias affecting burst fluence and duration measurements. Using a simple model of how burst duration can be underestimated, we show how this fluence duration bias can affect BATSE measurements and demonstrate the type of effect it can have on the BATSE fluence versus peak flux diagram.

  6. Phase analysis method for burst onset prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellino, Flavio; Mazzoni, Alberto; Storace, Marco

    2017-02-01

    The response of bursting neurons to fluctuating inputs is usually hard to predict, due to their strong nonlinearity. For the same reason, decoding the injected stimulus from the activity of a bursting neuron is generally difficult. In this paper we propose a method describing (for neuron models) a mechanism of phase coding relating the burst onsets with the phase profile of the input current. This relation suggests that burst onset may provide a way for postsynaptic neurons to track the input phase. Moreover, we define a method of phase decoding to solve the inverse problem and estimate the likelihood of burst onset given the input state. Both methods are presented here in a unified framework, describing a complete coding-decoding procedure. This procedure is tested by using different neuron models, stimulated with different inputs (stochastic, sinusoidal, up, and down states). The results obtained show the efficacy and broad range of application of the proposed methods. Possible applications range from the study of sensory information processing, in which phase-of-firing codes are known to play a crucial role, to clinical applications such as deep brain stimulation, helping to design stimuli in order to trigger or prevent neural bursting.

  7. Median raphe stimulation-induced motor inhibition concurrent with suppression of type 1 and type 2 hippocampal theta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Brian H; Bland, Cheryl E; MacIver, M Bruce

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated behavioral, anatomical and electrophysiological effects produced by electrical stimulation of posterior hypothalamic (PH) or median raphe (MR) nuclei, independently and during combined stimulation of both PH and MR. These three stimulation conditions were applied during spontaneous behavior in an open field and during PH stimulation-induced wheel running, while simultaneously recording hippocampal (HPC) field activity. An additional objective was to determine the effects of MR stimulation on Type 1 movement related theta and Type 2 sensory processing related theta. To achieve the latter, when behavioral studies were completed we studied the same rats under urethane anesthesia and then during urethane anesthesia with the addition of atropine sulfate (ATSO4). Here we demonstrated that electrical stimulation of a localized region of the MR nucleus resulted in a profound inhibition of both spontaneously occurring theta related motor behaviors and the theta related motor behaviors induced by electrical stimulation of the PH nucleus. Furthermore, this motor inhibition occurred concurrently with strong suppression of hippocampal theta field oscillations in the freely moving rat, a condition where the theta recorded is Type 2 sensory processing theta occurring coincidently with Type 1 movement related theta (Bland, 1986). Our results indicate that motor inhibition resulted from stimulation of neurons located in the mid central region of the MR, while stimulation in adjacent regions produced variable responses, including movements and theta activity. The present study provided evidence that the pharmacological basis of the suppression of Type 2 sensory processing HPC theta was cholinergic. However, MR inhibition of PH-induced wheel running was not affected by cholinergic blockade, which blocks Type 2 theta, indicating that MR stimulation-induced motor inhibition also requires the suppression of Type 1 theta.

  8. The driving system for hippocampal theta in the brainstem: an examination by single neuron recording in urethane-anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yuji; Hanada, Yasuhiro

    2009-05-08

    The brainstem has been shown to be involved in generating hippocampal theta; however, which brainstem region plays the most important role in generating the rhythm has remained unclear. To reveal which brainstem region triggers the theta, the hippocampal local field potential was recorded simultaneously with single unit activity in the brainstem of urethane-anesthetized rat. The firing latencies before theta onset and offset were compared among recording sites (deep mesencephalic nucleus, DpMe; pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, PPT; nucleus pontis oralis, PnO). We examined the activities of 59 cells; PPT showed the highest proportion of neurons changing their firing rates at theta onset (14/16, 87.5%). The proportion in the PnO was 14/22 (63.6%), but the neurons in the PnO showed the earliest changes in latencies (0.57s before theta onset). The change in the PPT was 0.96s after theta onset. Regarding the theta offset, the PPT showed the highest proportion of neurons changing their firing rates at theta offset (9/16, 56.3%; the proportion in the PnO was 5/22, 22.7%), but the difference in latent time was not significant among recorded regions. The neurons in the DpMe did not show any remarkable firing tendency at theta onset and offset. From these results, we propose a driving system of hippocampal theta, in which neurons in the PnO first trigger the theta onset and then those in the PPT maintain the theta by activating broadly the brainstem areas for the wave.

  9. Solving the Puzzle of the Massive Star System Theta 2 Orionis A

    CERN Document Server

    Petit, V; Cohen, D H; Townsend, R H D; Leutenegger, M A; Savoy, M R; Fehon, G; Cartagena, C A

    2012-01-01

    The young O9.5 V spectroscopic binary Theta 2 Ori A shows moderately hard X-ray emission and relatively narrow X-ray lines, suggesting that it may be a Magnetically Confined Wind Shock (MCWS) source, similar to its more massive analogue Theta 1 Ori C. X-ray flares occurring near periastron led to the suggestion that the flares are produced via magnetic reconnection as magnetospheres on both components of the Theta 2 Ori A binary interact at closest approach. We use a series of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of Theta 2 Ori A to place an upper limit on the magnetic field strength of 135 G (95% credible region). Such a weak dipole field would not produce magnetic confinement, or a large magnetosphere. A sub-pixel analysis of the Chandra ACIS images of Theta 2 Ori A obtained during quiescence and flaring show that the hard, flaring X-rays are offset from the soft, quiescent emission by 0.4 arcsec. If the soft emission is associated with the A1/A2 spectroscopic binary, the offset and position ang...

  10. Trimaximal mixing with predicted {theta}{sub 13} from a new type of constrained sequential dominance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antusch, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.antusch@unibas.ch [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Muenchen (Germany); King, Stephen F., E-mail: king@soton.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom); Luhn, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.luhn@soton.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom); Spinrath, Martin, E-mail: spinrath@sissa.it [SISSA/ISAS and INFN, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy)

    2012-03-11

    Following the recent T2K indication of a sizeable reactor angle, we present a class of models which fix {theta}{sub 13} while preserving trimaximal solar mixing. The models are based on a new type of constrained sequential dominance involving new vacuum alignments, along the (1,2,0){sup T} or (1,0,2){sup T} directions in flavour space. We show that such alignments are easily achieved using orthogonality, and may replace the role of the subdominant flavon alignment (1,1,1){sup T} in constrained sequential dominance. In such models, with a normal hierarchical spectrum, the reactor angle is related to a ratio of neutrino masses by {theta}{sub 13}=({radical}(2))/3 (m{sub 2}{sup {nu}})/(m{sub 3}{sup {nu}}) , leading to {theta}{sub 13}{approx}5 Degree-Sign -6 Degree-Sign , while the atmospheric angle is given by the sum rule {theta}{sub 23} Almost-Equal-To 45 Degree-Sign +{radical}(2){theta}{sub 13}cos{delta}. We find that leptogenesis is unsuppressed due to the violation of form dominance and that the CP violating phase responsible for leptogenesis is precisely equal to the Dirac CP phase {delta}, providing a direct link between leptogenesis and neutrino mixing in this class of models.

  11. Mathematically gifted adolescents mobilize enhanced workspace configuration of theta cortical network during deductive reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Gan, J Q; Wang, H

    2015-03-19

    Previous studies have established the importance of the fronto-parietal brain network in the information processing of reasoning. At the level of cortical source analysis, this eletroencepalogram (EEG) study investigates the functional reorganization of the theta-band (4-8Hz) neurocognitive network of mathematically gifted adolescents during deductive reasoning. Depending on the dense increase of long-range phase synchronizations in the reasoning process, math-gifted adolescents show more significant adaptive reorganization and enhanced "workspace" configuration in the theta network as compared with average-ability control subjects. The salient areas are mainly located in the anterior cortical vertices of the fronto-parietal network. Further correlation analyses have shown that the enhanced workspace configuration with respect to the global topological metrics of the theta network in math-gifted subjects is correlated with the intensive frontal midline theta (fm theta) response that is related to strong neural effort for cognitive events. These results suggest that by investing more cognitive resources math-gifted adolescents temporally mobilize an enhanced task-related global neuronal workspace, which is manifested as a highly integrated fronto-parietal information processing network during the reasoning process.

  12. Patterns of Theta Activity in Limbic Anxiety Circuit Preceding Exploratory Behavior in Approach-Avoidance Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacinto, Luis R.; Cerqueira, João J.; Sousa, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Theta oscillations within the hippocampus-amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex (HPC-AMY-mPFC) circuit have been consistently implicated in the regulation of anxiety behaviors, including risk-assessment. To study if theta activity during risk-assessment was correlated with exploratory behavior in an approach/avoidance paradigm we recorded simultaneous local field potentials from this circuit in rats exploring the elevated-plus maze (EPM). Opposing patterns of power variations in the ventral hippocampus (vHPC), basolateral amygdala (BLA), and prelimbic (PrL) mPFC, but not in the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC), during exploratory risk-assessment of the open arms preceded further exploration of the open arms or retreat back to the safer closed arms. The same patterns of theta power variations in the HPC-BLA-mPFC(PrL) circuit were also displayed by animals submitted to chronic unpredictable stress protocol known to induce an anxious state. Diverging patterns of vHPC-mPFC(PrL) theta coherence were also significantly correlated with forthcoming approach or avoidance behavior in the conflict situation in both controls and stressed animals; interestingly, vHPC-BLA, and BLA-mPFC(PrL) theta coherence correlated with future behavior only in stressed animals, underlying the pivotal role of the amygdala on the stress response. PMID:27713693

  13. Patterns of Theta Activity in Limbic Anxiety Circuit Preceding Exploratory Behavior in Approach-Avoidance Conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis R Jacinto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Theta oscillations within the hippocampus-amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex (HPC-AMY-mPFC(PrL circuit have been consistently implicated in the regulation of anxiety behaviors, including risk-assessment. To study if theta activity during risk-assessment was correlated with exploratory behavior in an approach/avoidance paradigm we recorded simultaneous local field potentials from this circuit in rats exploring the elevated-plus maze (EPM. Opposing patterns of power variations in the ventral hippocampus (vHPC, basolateral amygdala (BLA and prelimbic (PrL mPFC, but not in the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC, during exploratory risk-assessment of the open arms preceded further exploration of the open arms or retreat back to the safer closed arms. The same patterns of theta power variations in the HPC-BLA-mPFC(PrL circuit were also displayed by animals submitted to chronic unpredictable stress protocol known to induce an anxious state. Diverging patterns of vHPC-mPFC(PrL theta coherence were also significantly correlated with forthcoming approach or avoidance behavior in the conflict situation in both controls and stressed animals; interestingly, vHPC-BLA and BLA-mPFC(PrL theta coherence correlated with future behavior only in stressed animals, underlying the pivotal role of the amygdala on the stress response.

  14. Exploring the sensitivity of current and future experiments to $\\theta_{\\odot}$

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, A; Goswami, S; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Choubey, Sandhya; Goswami, Srubabati

    2003-01-01

    The first results from the KamLAND experiment in conjunction with the global solar neutrino data has demonstrated striking ability to constrain the $\\Delta m^2_\\odot$ ($\\Delta m^2_{21}$) very precisely. However the allowed range of $\\theta_{\\odot}$ ($\\theta_{12}$) did not change much with the inclusion of the KamLAND results. In this paper we probe if future data from KamLAND can increase the accuracy of the allowed range in $\\theta_{\\odot}$ and conclude that even after 3 kton-year of statistics, KamLAND may find it hard to improve the bounds on the mixing angle obtained from the current solar neutrino data. We discuss the $\\theta_{12}$ sensitivity of the survival probabilities in matter (vacuum) as is relevant for the solar (KamLAND) experiments. We find that the presence of matter effects in the survival probabilities for $^8B$ neutrinos give the solar neutrino experiments SK and SNO an edge over KamLAND, as far as $\\theta_{12}$ sensitivity is concerned, particularly near maximal mixing. Among solar neutrin...

  15. Reevaluation of the role of DNA polymerase theta in somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martomo, Stella A; Saribasak, Huseyin; Yokoi, Masayuki; Hanaoka, Fumio; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2008-09-01

    DNA polymerase theta has been implicated in the process of somatic hypermutation in immunoglobulin variable genes based on several reports of alterations in the frequency and spectra of mutations from Polq(-/-) mice. However, these studies have contrasting results on mutation frequencies and the types of nucleotide substitutions, which question the role of polymerase theta in hypermutation. DNA polymerase eta has a dominant effect on mutation and may substitute in the absence of polymerase theta to affect the pattern. Therefore, we have examined mutation in mice deficient for both polymerases theta and eta. The mutation frequencies in rearranged variable genes from Peyer's patches were similar in wild type, Polq(-/-), Polh(-/-), and Polq(-/-)Polh(-/-) mice. The types of substitutions were also similar between wild type and Polq(-/-) clones, and between Polh(-/-) and Polq(-/-)Polh(-/-) clones. Furthermore, there was no difference in heavy chain class switching in splenic B cells from the four groups of mice. These results indicate that polymerase theta does not play a significant role in the generation of somatic mutation in immunoglobulin genes.

  16. Lepton mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} = 0 with a horizontal symmetry D{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimus, W. E-mail: walter.grimus@univie.ac.at; Joshipura, A.S.; Kaneko, S.; Lavoura, L.; Tanimoto, M

    2004-07-01

    We discuss a model for the lepton sector based on the seesaw mechanism and on a D{sub 4} family symmetry. The model predicts the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} to vanish. The solar mixing angle {theta}{sub 12} is free-it will in general be large if one does not invoke fine tuning. The model has an enlarged scalar sector with three Higgs doublets, together with two real scalar gauge singlets {chi}{sub i} (i = 1,2) which have vacuum expectation values {chi}{sub i0} at the seesaw scale. The atmospheric mixing angle {theta}{sub 23} is given by tan {theta}{sub 23} = X{sub 20}/{chi}{sub 10}, and it is maximal if the Lagrangian is D{sub 4}-invariant; but D{sub 4} may be broken softly, by a term of dimension two in the scalar potential, and then {chi}{sub 20} becomes different from {chi}{sub 10}. Thus, the strength of the soft D{sub 4} breaking controls the deviation of {theta}{sub 23} from {pi}/4. The model predicts a normal neutrino mass spectrum (m{sub 3} > m{sub 2} > m{sub 1}) and allows successful leptogenesis if m{sub 1} {approx} 4 x 10{sup -3}eV; these properties of the model are independent of the presence and strength of the soft D{sub 4} breaking. (author)

  17. Expectancy Effects in Feedback Processing are Explained Primarily by Time-frequency Delta not Theta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Adreanna T M; Bachman, Matthew D; Bernat, Edward M

    2017-08-30

    The roles of outcome valence and expectancy in feedback processing have been investigated as important factors modulating event-related potential (ERP) measures including the feedback negativity (FN) and P300, but results have been inconsistent. Recent work from our group has shown that processes underlying the FN and P300 are better represented as separable processes in the theta (3-7Hz) and delta (0-3Hz) ranges using time-frequency analysis. The current study evaluated the modulation of time-domain FN and P300 and time-frequency theta and delta to outcome valence and expectancy in a gambling feedback task paradigm.Results revealed that the FN was sensitive to valence but not expectancy, and that valence effects were driven by loss-sensitive theta and gain-sensitive delta. Alternatively, the P300 was sensitive to the expectedness of outcomes but only for gain trials, and these expectancy differences were explained by time-frequency delta not theta. These results add to a growing body of research showing that time-frequency measures reflect separable processes underlying time-domain components, where theta is more sensitive to primary task features and less sensitive to secondary features while delta is sensitive to primary and more complex, secondary task features. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Search for $\\Theta^{++}$ Pentaquarks in the Exclusive Reaction $\\gamma p\\to K^+K^-p$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Kubarovsky; Marco Battaglieri; Raffaella De Vita; John Goett; Lei Guo; Gordon Mutchler; Paul Stoler; Dennis Weygand; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Gegham Asryan; Harutyun AVAKIAN; Harutyun Avakian; H. Bagdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; V. Batourine; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Barry Berman; Angela Biselli; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Shifeng Chen; Eric Clinton; Philip Cole; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Donald Crabb; Hall Crannell; Volker Crede; John Cummings; Rita De Masi; Daniel Dale; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Alexandre Deur; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Paul Eugenio; Gleb Fedotov; Herbert Funsten; Marianna Gabrielyan; Liping Gan; Michel Garcon; Ashot Gasparian; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; Oleksandr Glamazdin; John Goetz; Evgueni Golovatch; Atilla Gonenc; Christopher Gordon; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Nevzat Guler; Vardan Gyurjyan; Cynthia Hadjidakis; Kawtar Hafidi; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Franz Klein; Friedrich Klein; Alexei Klimenko; Mikhail Kossov; Laird Kramer; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Tsung-shung Lee; Ji Li; Kenneth Livingston; Hai-jiang Lu; Marion MacCormick; Nikolai Markov; Bryan McKinnon; Bernhard Mecking; Joseph Melone; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Vasiliy Mochalov; Viktor Mokeev; Ludyvine Morand; Steven Morrow; Maryam Moteabbed; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; Itaru Nakagawa; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Sergey Pozdnyakov; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; Franck Sabatie; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Youri Sharabian; Nikolay Shvedunov; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Igor Strakovski; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; David Tedeschi; Aram Teymurazyan; Ulrike Thoma; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Luminita Todor; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Lawrence Weinstein; Michael Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao

    2006-04-28

    The reaction {gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}p was studied at Jefferson Lab with photon energies from 1.8 to 3.8 GeV using a tagged photon beam. The goal was to search for a {Theta}{sup ++} pentaquark, a narrow doubly charged baryon state having strangeness S = +1 and isospin I = 1, in the pK{sup +} invariant mass spectrum. No statistically significant evidence of a {Theta}{sup ++} was found. Upper limits on the total and differential production cross section for the reaction {gamma}p {yields} K{sup -}{Theta}{sup ++} were obtained in the mass range from 1.5 to 2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}, with an upper limit of about 0.15 nb, 95% C.L. for a narrow resonance with a mass M{sub {Theta}{sup ++}} = 1.54 GeV/c{sup 2}. This result places a very stringent upper limit on the {Theta}{sup ++} width.

  19. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Younes, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A.J.; Baring, M.G.; Granot, J.; Watts, A.L.; Bhat, P.N.; Collazzi, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gorgone, N.; Göğüş, E.; Gruber, D.; Grunblatt, S.; Huppenkothen, D.; Kaneko, Y.; von Kienlin, A.; van der Klis, M.; Lin, L.; Mcenery, J.; van Putten, T.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550-5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a

  20. The Mechanism of Abrupt Transition between Theta and Hyper-Excitable Spiking Activity in Medial Entorhinal Cortex Layer II Stellate Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kispersky, Tilman; White, John A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that stellate cells (SCs) of the medial entorhinal cortex become hyper-excitable in animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy. These studies have also demonstrated the existence of recurrent connections among SCs, reduced levels of recurrent inhibition in epileptic networks as compared to control ones, and comparable levels of recurrent excitation among SCs in both network types. In this work, we investigate the biophysical and dynamic mechanism of generation of the fast time scale corresponding to hyper-excitable firing and the transition between theta and fast firing frequency activity in SCs. We show that recurrently connected minimal networks of SCs exhibit abrupt, threshold-like transition between theta and hyper-excitable firing frequencies as the result of small changes in the maximal synaptic (AMPAergic) conductance. The threshold required for this transition is modulated by synaptic inhibition. Similar abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes can be observed in single, self-coupled SCs, which represent a network of recurrently coupled neurons synchronized in phase, but not in synaptically isolated SCs as the result of changes in the levels of the tonic drive. Using dynamical systems tools (phase-space analysis), we explain the dynamic mechanism underlying the genesis of the fast time scale and the abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes, their dependence on the intrinsic SC's currents and synaptic excitation. This abrupt transition is mechanistically different from others observed in similar networks with different cell types. Most notably, there is no bistability involved. ‘In vitro’ experiments using single SCs self-coupled with dynamic clamp show the abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes, and demonstrate that our theoretical predictions are not an artifact of the model. In addition, these experiments show that high-frequency firing is burst-like with a duration modulated by an M-current. PMID

  1. The mechanism of abrupt transition between theta and hyper-excitable spiking activity in medial entorhinal cortex layer II stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Kispersky

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that stellate cells (SCs of the medial entorhinal cortex become hyper-excitable in animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy. These studies have also demonstrated the existence of recurrent connections among SCs, reduced levels of recurrent inhibition in epileptic networks as compared to control ones, and comparable levels of recurrent excitation among SCs in both network types. In this work, we investigate the biophysical and dynamic mechanism of generation of the fast time scale corresponding to hyper-excitable firing and the transition between theta and fast firing frequency activity in SCs. We show that recurrently connected minimal networks of SCs exhibit abrupt, threshold-like transition between theta and hyper-excitable firing frequencies as the result of small changes in the maximal synaptic (AMPAergic conductance. The threshold required for this transition is modulated by synaptic inhibition. Similar abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes can be observed in single, self-coupled SCs, which represent a network of recurrently coupled neurons synchronized in phase, but not in synaptically isolated SCs as the result of changes in the levels of the tonic drive. Using dynamical systems tools (phase-space analysis, we explain the dynamic mechanism underlying the genesis of the fast time scale and the abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes, their dependence on the intrinsic SC's currents and synaptic excitation. This abrupt transition is mechanistically different from others observed in similar networks with different cell types. Most notably, there is no bistability involved. 'In vitro' experiments using single SCs self-coupled with dynamic clamp show the abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes, and demonstrate that our theoretical predictions are not an artifact of the model. In addition, these experiments show that high-frequency firing is burst-like with a duration modulated by an M-current.

  2. Multi-Angle Simulation of Flavor Evolution in the Neutrino Neutronization Burst From an O-Ne-Mg Core-Collapse Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, John F; Carlson, Joe; Duan, Huaiyu; Qian, Yong-Zong

    2010-01-01

    We report results of the first 3-by-3 "multi-angle" simulation of the evolution of neutrino flavor in the core collapse supernova environment. In particular, we follow neutrino flavor transformation in the neutronization neutrino burst of an O-Ne-Mg core collapse event. Though in qualitative sense our results are consistent with those obtained in 3-by-3 single-angle simulations, at least in terms of neutrino mass hierarchy dependence, performing multi-angle calculations is found to reduce the adiabaticity of flavor evolution in the normal neutrino mass hierarchy, resulting in lower swap energies. Our simulations also show that current uncertainties in the measured mass-squared and mixing angle parameters translate into uncertainties in neutrino swap energies. Our results show that at low theta-13 it may be difficult to resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy in the O-Ne-Mg neutronization neutrino burst.

  3. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxham, Amanda

    Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground to those who study them, from relativistic effects such as beaming, jets, shocks and blastwaves to radiation mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation to galatic and stellar populations and history. Through the Swift and Fermi space telescopes dedicated to observing GRBs over a wide range of energies (from keV to GeV), combined with accurate pinpointing that allows ground based follow-up observations in the optical, infrared and radio, a rich tapestry of GRB observations has emerged. The general picture is of a mysterious central engine (CE) probably composed of a black hole or neutron star that ejects relativistic shells of matter into intense magnetic fields. These shells collide and combine, releasing energy in "internal shocks" accounting for the prompt emission and flaring we see and the "external shock" or plowing of the first blastwave into the ambient surrounding medium has well-explained the afterglow radiation. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We have also included a blastwave model, which can constrain X-ray flares and explain the origin of high energy (GeV) emission seen by the Fermi telescope. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares. We calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary

  4. ASKAP Joins the Hunt for Mysterious Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    A new telescope, the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), has joined the search for energetic and elusive fast radio bursts. And in just a few days of looking, its already had success!Elusive TransientsThe Parkes radio telescope, which has detected all but five of the fast radio bursts published to date, has a very narrow field of view. [CSIRO]Fast radio bursts are mysterious millisecond-duration radio pulses that were first discovered around a decade ago. Since that time particularly in recent years weve made some progress toward the goal of localizing them. Were now fairly convinced that fast radio bursts come from outside of the galaxy, and yet theyre enormously bright orders of magnitude more luminous than any pulse seen from the Milky Way.Better identification of where these mysterious bursts come from would help us to determine what they are. But so far, weve discovered only around 30 such bursts, despite the fact that theyre estimated to occur at a rate of 3,000 events per day across the whole sky.Why are they so hard to find? Due to their short duration, effective detection would require instantaneous coverage of a very large fraction of the sky. The Parkes radio telescope which has detected all but five of the fast radio bursts published to date has a field of view spanning less than a square degree,significantly limiting our ability to rapidly survey for these transients.FRB 170107s band-averaged pulse (top) and dynamic spectrum (bottom). [Bannister et al. 2017]A New Array in TownA new player is now on the scene, however, and its already had huge success. ASKAP is a wide-field radio telescope made up of an array of 12-meter antennas. Using phased-array-feed technology, ASKAP is able to instantaneously observe an effective area of 160 square degrees an enormous field compared to Parkes 0.6 square degrees! This capability significantly increases our chances of being able to detect fast radio bursts.In a new study led by Keith Bannister

  5. First Measurement of \\theta_13 from Delayed Neutron Capture on Hydrogen in the Double Chooz Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Y; Anjos, J C dos; Barriere, J C; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bezerra, T J C; Bezrukhov, L; Blucher, E; Bowden, N S; Buck, C; Busenitz, J; Cabrera, A; Caden, E; Camilleri, L; Carr, R; Cerrada, M; Chang, P -J; Chimenti, P; Classen, T; Collin, A P; Conover, E; Conrad, J M; Crespo-Anadón, J I; Crum, K; Cucoanes, A; Damon, E; Dawson, J V; Dazeley, S; Dietrich, D; Djurcic, Z; Dracos, M; Durand, V; Ebert, J; Efremenko, Y; Elnimr, M; Erickson, A; Etenko, A; Fallot, M; Fechner, M; von Feilitzsch, F; Felde, J; Fernandes, S M; Fischer, V; Franco, D; Franke, A J; Franke, M; Furuta, H; Gama, R; Gil-Botella, I; Giot, L; Göger-Neff, M; Gonzalez, L F G; Goodenough, L; Goodman, M C; Goon, J TM; Greiner, D; Haag, N; Habib, S; Hagner, C; Hara, T; Hartmann, F X; Haser, J; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hayakawa, T; Hofmann, M; Horton-Smith, G A; Hourlier, A; Ishitsuka, M; Jochum, J; Jollet, C; Jones, C L; Kaether, F; Kalousis, L N; Kamyshkov, Y; Kaplan, D M; Kawasaki, T; Keefer, G; Kemp, E; de Kerret, H; Konno, T; Kryn, D; Kuze, M; Lachenmaier, T; Lane, C E; Langbrandtner, C; Lasserre, T; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Lima, H P; Lindner, M; López-Castaño, J M; LoSecco, J M; Lubsandorzhiev, B K; Lucht, S; McKee, D; Maeda, J; Maesano, C N; Mariani, C; Maricic, J; Martino, J; Matsubara, T; Mention, G; Meregaglia, A; Meyer, M; Miletic, T; Milincic, R; Miyata, H; Mueller, Th A; Nagasaka, Y; Nakajima, K; Novella, P; Obolensky, M; Oberauer, L; Onillon, A; Osborn, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Palomares, C; Pepe, I M; Perasso, S; Perrin, P; Pfahler, P; Porta, A; Potzel, W; Pronost, G; Reichenbacher, J; Reinhold, B; Remoto, A; Röhling, M; Roncin, R; Roth, S; Rybolt, B; Sakamoto, Y; Santorelli, R; Sato, F; Schönert, S; Schoppmann, S; Schwetz, T; Shaevitz, M H; Shimojima, S; Shrestha, D; Sida, J-L; Sinev, V; Skorokhvatov, M; Smith, E; Spitz, J; Stahl, A; Stancu, I; Stokes, L F F; Strait, M; Stüken, A; Suekane, F; Sukhotin, S; Sumiyoshi, T; Sun, Y; Svoboda, R; Terao, K; Tonazzo, A; Toups, M; Thi, H H Trinh; Valdiviesso, G; Veyssiere, C; Wagner, S; Watanabe, H; White, B; Wiebusch, C; Winslow, L; Worcester, M; Wurm, M; Yermia, F; Zimmer, V

    2013-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment has determined the value of the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\theta_{13}$ from an analysis of inverse beta decay interactions with neutron capture on hydrogen. This analysis uses a three times larger fiducial volume than the standard Double Chooz assessment, which is restricted to a region doped with gadolinium (Gd), yielding an exposure of 113.1 GW-ton-years. The data sample used in this analysis is distinct from that of the Gd analysis, and the systematic uncertainties are also largely independent, with some exceptions, such as the reactor neutrino flux prediction. A combined rate- and energy-dependent fit finds $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13}=0.097\\pm 0.034(stat.) \\pm 0.034 (syst.)$, excluding the no-oscillation hypothesis at 2.0 \\sigma. This result is consistent with previous measurements of $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13}$.

  6. Phase structure with nonzero $\\Theta_{\\rm QCD}$ and twisted mass fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Horkel, Derek P

    2015-01-01

    We determine the phase diagram and chiral condensate for lattice QCD with two flavors of twisted-mass fermions in the presence of nondegenerate up and down quarks, discretization errors and a nonzero value of $\\Theta_{\\rm QCD}$. Although such a theory has a complex action and cannot, at present, be simulated, the results are needed to understand how to tune to maximal twist in the presence of electromagnetism, a topic discussed in a companion paper. We find that, in general, the only phase structure is a first-order transition of finite length. Pion masses are nonvanishing throughout the phase plane except at the endpoints of the first-order line. Only for extremal values of the twist angle and $\\Theta_{\\rm QCD}$ ($\\omega=0$ or $\\pi/2$ and $\\Theta_{\\rm QCD}=0$ or $\\pi$) are there second-order transitions.

  7. Three-particle integrable systems with elliptic dependence on momenta and theta function identities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aminov, G., E-mail: aminov@itep.ru [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Mironov, A., E-mail: mironov@itep.ru [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Theory Department, Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Morozov, A., E-mail: morozov@itep.ru [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zotov, A., E-mail: zotov@itep.ru [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-04

    We claim that some non-trivial theta-function identities at higher genus can stand behind the Poisson commutativity of the Hamiltonians of elliptic integrable systems, which were introduced in [1,2] and are made from the theta-functions on Jacobians of the Seiberg–Witten curves. For the case of three-particle systems the genus-2 identities are found and presented in the Letter. The connection with the Macdonald identities is established. The genus-2 theta-function identities provide the direct way to construct the Poisson structure in terms of the coordinates on the Jacobian of the spectral curve and the elements of its period matrix. The Lax representations for the two-particle systems are also obtained.

  8. Three-particle Integrable Systems with Elliptic Dependence on Momenta and Theta Function Identities

    CERN Document Server

    Aminov, G; Morozov, A; Zotov, A

    2013-01-01

    We claim that some non-trivial theta-function identities at higher genus can stand behind the Poisson commutativity of the Hamiltonians of elliptic integrable systems, which are made from the theta-functions on Jacobians of the Seiberg-Witten curves. For the case of three-particle systems the genus-2 identities are found and presented in the paper. The connection with the Macdonald identities is established. The genus-2 theta-function identities provide the direct way to construct the Poisson structure in terms of the coordinates on the Jacobian of the spectral curve and the elements of its period matrix. The Lax representations for the two-particle systems are also obtained.

  9. The CP-odd sector and $\\theta$ dynamics in holographic QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Arean, Daniel; Jarvinen, Matti; Kiritsis, Elias

    2016-01-01

    The holographic model of V-QCD is used to analyze the physics of QCD in the Veneziano large-N limit. An unprecedented analysis of the CP-odd physics is performed going beyond the level of effective field theories. The structure of holographic saddle-points at finite $\\theta$ is determined, as well as its interplay with chiral symmetry breaking. Many observables (vacuum energy and higher-order susceptibilities, singlet and non-singlet masses and mixings) are computed as functions of $\\theta$ and the quark mass $m$. Wherever applicable the results are compared to those of chiral Lagrangians, finding agreement. In particular, we recover the Witten-Veneziano formula in the small $x\\to 0$ limit, we compute the $\\theta$-dependence of the pion mass and we derive the hyperscaling relation for the topological susceptibility in the conformal window in terms of the quark mass.

  10. Episodic sequence memory is supported by a theta-gamma phase code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Andrew C; Poeppel, David; Ezzyat, Youssef; Davachi, Lila

    2016-10-01

    The meaning we derive from our experiences is not a simple static extraction of the elements but is largely based on the order in which those elements occur. Models propose that sequence encoding is supported by interactions between high- and low-frequency oscillations, such that elements within an experience are represented by neural cell assemblies firing at higher frequencies (gamma) and sequential order is encoded by the specific timing of firing with respect to a lower frequency oscillation (theta). During episodic sequence memory formation in humans, we provide evidence that items in different sequence positions exhibit greater gamma power along distinct phases of a theta oscillation. Furthermore, this segregation is related to successful temporal order memory. Our results provide compelling evidence that memory for order, a core component of an episodic memory, capitalizes on the ubiquitous physiological mechanism of theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling.

  11. Topological insulators and the QCD vacuum: the theta parameter as a Berry phase

    CERN Document Server

    Thacker, H B

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable evidence, based on large $N_c$ chiral dynamics, holographic QCD, and Monte Carlo studies, that the QCD vacuum is permeated by discrete quasivacua separated by domain walls across which the local value of the topological $\\theta$ parameter jumps by $\\pm2\\pi$. In the 2-dimensional $CP^{N-1}$ sigma model, a pointlike charge is a domain wall, and $\\theta$ describes the background electric flux and the polarization of charged pairs in the vacuum. We show that the screening process, and the role of $\\theta$ as an order parameter describing electric polarization, are naturally formulated in terms of Bloch wave eigenstates of the Dirac Hamiltonian in the background gauge field. This formulation is similar to the Berry phase description of electric polarization and quantized charge transport in topological insulators. The Bloch waves are quasiperiodic superpositions of localized Dirac zero modes. They define a Berry connection around the Brillouin zone of the zero mode band which describes the lo...

  12. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.

    1998-04-28

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time. 12 figs.

  13. Efficient inhibition of bursts by bursts in the auditory system of crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsat, G; Pollack, G S

    2007-06-01

    In crickets, auditory information about ultrasound is carried bilaterally to the brain by the AN2 neurons. The ON1 neuron provides contralateral inhibitory input to AN2, thereby enhancing bilateral contrast between the left and right AN2s, an important cue for sound localization. We examine how the structures of the spike trains of these neurons affect this inhibitory interaction. As previously shown for AN2, ON1 responds to salient peaks in stimulus amplitude with bursts of spikes. Spike bursts, but not isolated spikes, reliably signal the occurrence of specific features of the stimulus. ON1 and AN2 burst at similar times relative to the amplitude envelope of the stimulus, and bursts are more tightly time-locked to stimulus feature than the isolated spikes. As a consequence, spikes that, in the absence of contralateral inhibition, would occur within AN2 bursts are more likely to be preceded by spikes in ON1 (mainly also in bursts) than are isolated AN2 spikes. This leads to a large decrease in the burst rate of the inhibited AN2. We conclude that the match in coding properties of ON1 and AN2 allows contralateral inhibition to be most efficient for those portions of the response that carry the behaviourally relevant information, i.e. for bursts.

  14. Self-regulation of frontal-midline theta facilitates memory updating and mental set shifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eEnriquez-Geppert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Frontal-midline (fm theta oscillations as measured via the electroencephalogram (EEG have been suggested as neural working language of executive functioning. Their power has been shown to increase when cognitive processing or task performance is enhanced. Thus, the question arises whether learning to increase fm-theta amplitudes would functionally impact the behavioral performance in tasks probing executive functions (EFs. Here, the effects of neurofeedback, a learning method to self-up-regulate fm-theta over frontal-midline electrodes, on the four most representative EFs, memory updating, set shifting, conflict monitoring, and motor inhibition are presented. Before beginning and after completing an individualized, eight-session gap-spaced neurofeedback intervention, the three-back, letter/number task-switching, Stroop, and stop-signal tasks were tested while measuring the EEG. Self-determined up-regulation of fm-theta and its putative role for executive functioning were compared to an active control group, the so-called pseudo-neurofeedback group. Task-related fm-theta activity after training differed significantly between groups. More importantly, though, after neurofeedback significantly enhanced behavioral performance was observed. The training group showed higher accuracy scores in the three-back task and reduced mixing and shifting costs in letter/number task-switching. However, this specific protocol type did not affect performance in tasks probing conflict monitoring and motor inhibition. Thus, our results suggest a modulation of proactive but not reactive mechanisms of cognitive control. In sum, the modulation of fm-theta via neurofeedback may serve as potent treatment approach for executive dysfunctions.

  15. Asymmetric function of theta and gamma activity in syllable processing: an intra-cortical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eMorillon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Low-gamma (25-45 Hz and theta (4-8 Hz oscillations are proposed to underpin the integration of phonemic and syllabic information, respectively. How these two scales of analysis split functions across hemispheres is unclear. We analyzed cortical responses from an epileptic patient with a rare bilateral electrode implantation (stereotactic EEG in primary (A1/BA41 and A2/BA42 and association auditory cortices (BA22. Using time-frequency analyses, we confirmed the dominance of a 5-6 Hz theta activity in right and of a low-gamma (25-45 Hz activity in left primary auditory cortices (A1/A2, during both resting state and syllable processing. We further detected high-theta (7-8 Hz resting activity in left primary, but also associative auditory regions. In left BA22, its phase correlated with high-gamma induced power. Such a hierarchical relationship across theta and gamma frequency bands (theta/gamma phase-amplitude coupling could index the process by which the neural code shifts from stimulus feature- to phonological- encoding, and is associated with the transition from evoked to induced power responses. These data suggest that theta and gamma activity in right and left auditory cortices bear different functions. They support a scheme where slow parsing of the acoustic information dominates in right-hemisphere at a syllabic (5-6 Hz rate, and left auditory cortex exhibits a more complex cascade of oscillations, reflecting the possible extraction of transient acoustic cues at a fast (~25-45 Hz rate, subsequently integrated at a slower, e.g. syllabic one. Slow oscillations could functionally participate to speech processing by structuring gamma activity in left BA22, where abstract percepts emerge.

  16. Frontoparietal theta activity supports behavioral decisions in movement-target selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eRawle

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available There is recent EEG evidence describing task-related changes of theta power in spatial attention and reaching/pointing tasks. Here, we aim to better characterize this theta activity and determine whether it is associated with visuospatial memory or with visuospatial selection functions of the frontoparietal cortex. We recorded EEG from 20 participants during a movement precuing task with centre-out joystick movements. Precues displayed 1, 2, or 4 potential targets and were followed (SOA 1.2 s by a central response cue indicating the movement target. Remembering the precued target location(s was mandatory in one and optional in a second version of the task. Analyses evaluated two slow brain potentials (CNV, contingent negative variation and CDA, contralateral delay activity and task-related power changes. Results showed a differential modulation of frontal CNV and parietal CDA, consistent with earlier described set-size effects on motor preparation and visual short-term memory. Short-lived phases of theta synchronization (ERS were found 150-500 ms after precue and response cue presentation, exhibiting parietal and frontal maxima. The increase of frontoparietal theta power following response cue presentation was strongly modulated by target load, i.e. absent for 1-target (when the movement target could be selected in advance, contrasting with a robust 20-50% ERS response in 2- and 4-target conditions. The scalp distribution, the timing, and the modulation by set-size suggest a role of theta activity in movement target selection. The results support a recently proposed view of theta as emerging around behavioral decision points, linked to the evaluation of choice-relevant information.

  17. Baryon resonances in the mean field approach and a simple explanation of the Theta+ pentaquark

    CERN Document Server

    Diakonov, Dmitri

    2008-01-01

    We suggest to classify baryon resonances as single-quark states in a mean field, and/or as its collective excitations. Identifying the Roper resonance N(1440), the nucleon resonance N(1535), and the singlet hyperon Lambda(1405) as single-quark excitations, we find that there must be an exotic S=+1 baryon resonance Theta+ (the "pentaquark") with a mass about 1440+1535-1405=1570 MeV and spin-parity one-half-plus. We argue that Theta+ is an analog of the Gamov--Teller excitation long known in nuclear physics.

  18. Transient loss of plasma from a theta pinch having an initially reversed magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the transient loss of plasma from a 25-cm-long theta pinch initially containing a reversed trapped magnetic field are presented. The plasma, amenable to MHD analyses, was a doubly ionized helium plasma characterized by an ion density N/sub i/ = 2 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and an ion temperature T/sub i/ = 15 eV at midcoil and by N/sub i/ = 0.5 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and T/sub i/ = 6 eV at a position 2.5 cm beyond the end of the theta coil.

  19. Study of the 2-d CP(N-1) models at \\theta=0 and \\pi

    CERN Document Server

    Beard, B B; Riederer, S; Wiese, U J

    2005-01-01

    We present numerical results for 2-d CP(N-1) models at \\theta=0 and \\pi obtained in the D-theory formulation. In this formulation we construct an efficient cluster algorithm and we show numerical evidence for a first order transition for CP(N-1\\geq 2) models at \\theta = \\pi. By a finite size scaling analysis, we also discuss the equivalence in the continuum limit of the D-theory formulation of the 2-d CP(N-1) models and the usual lattice definition.

  20. Sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/ and radiative corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Precision measurements of sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/ and the effects of radiative corrections are surveyed. A world average sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/ = 0.229 +- 0.004 is obtained. Comparison of deep-inelastic ..nu../sub ..mu../N scattering and m/sub W/ or m/sub Z/ is shown to test the standard model at the quantum loop level and constrain new physics. Implications for grand unified theories are briefly discussed.

  1. Present status of the nonstrange and other flavor partners of the exotic Theta+ baryon

    CERN Document Server

    Strakovsky, I I; Azimov, Ya I; Polyakov, M V; Workman, R L; Azimov, Ya. I.

    2005-01-01

    Given the existing empirical information about the exotic Theta+ baryon, we analyze possible properties of its SU(3)F-partners, paying special attention to the nonstrange member of the antidecuplet N*. The modified piN partial-wave analysis presents two candidate masses, 1680 MeV and 1730 MeV. In both cases, the N* should be rather narrow and highly inelastic. Our results suggest several directions for experimental studies that may clarify properties of the antidecuplet baryons, and structure of their mixing with other baryons. Recent experimental evidence from the GRAAL and STAR Collaborations could be interpreted as observations of a candidate for the Theta+ nonstrange partner.

  2. Search for the pentaquark candidate $\\Theta^+$(1540) in the hyperon beam experiment WA89

    CERN Document Server

    Adamovich, M I; Baranov, S P; Barberis, D; Beck, M; Bérat, C; Beusch, W; Boss, M; Brons, S; Brückner, W; Buénerd, M; Busch, C; Büscher, C; Charignon, F; Chauvin, J; Chudakov, E A; Dersch, U; Dropmann, F; Engelfried, J; Faller, F; Fournier, A; Gerassimov, S G; Godbersen, M; Grafström, P; Haller, T; Heidrich, M; Hubbard, E; Hurst, R B; Königsmann, K C; Konorov, I; Keller, N; Martens, K; Martin, P; Masciocchi, S; Michaels, R; Müller, U; Neeb, H; Newbold, D; Newsom, C; Paul, S; Pochodzalla, J; Potashnikova, I; Povh, B; Ransome, R; Ren, Z; Epherre-Rey-Campagnolle, Marcelle; Rosner, G; Rossi, L; Rudolph, H; Scheel, C; Schmitt, L; Siebert,H W; Simon, A; Smith, V J; Thilmann, O; Trombini, A; Vesin, E; Volkemer, B; Vorwalter, K; Walcher, T; Wälder, G; Werding, R; Wittmann, E; Zavertyaev, M V

    2005-01-01

    We report on a high-statistics search for the \\t1540 resonance in $\\Sigma^-$-nucleus collisions at 340 \\gevc1 . No evidence for this resonance was found in our data sample which contains 13 millions $K^0_s \\to \\pi^+\\pi^- $ decays above background. For the decay channel $\\Theta^+ \\to K^0_s p$ and the kinematic range $x_F>$ 0.05 we find the production cross section to be $BR(\\Theta^+ \\to K^0_s p)\\cdot \\sigma_0 <$ 1.8 $\\mu$b per nucleon at 99% CL.

  3. Nonzero theta(13) for neutrino mixing in the context of A(4) symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    In the original 2004 paper which first derived tribimaximal mixing in the context of A(4), i.e. the non-Abelian finite symmetry group of the tetrahedron (Plato's fire), as its simplest application, it was also pointed out how theta(13) nonzero may be accommodated. On the strength of the new T2K result that 0.03 (0.04) < sin^2 2 theta(13) < 0.28 (0.34) for delta(CP)=0 and normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, we perform a more detailed analysis of how this original idea may be realized in the context of A(4).

  4. A new burst assembly technique for supporting QoS in optical burst switching networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolong Yang(阳小龙); Mingrui Dang(党明瑞); Youju Mao(毛幼菊); Lemin Li(李乐民)

    2003-01-01

    This letter proposes a new burst assembly technique for supporting QoS in optical burst switching (OBS)networks. It consists of the adaptive-threshold burst assembly mechanism and QoS-based random offset-time scheme. The assembly mechanism, which is fit well to multi-class burst assembly, not only matcheswith IP QoS mechanism based on packet classification, and also utilizes fairly and efficiently assemblycapacity. Based on token-bucket model and burst segment selective discard (BSSD), the offset-time schemecan smooth the traffic to support OBS QoS. The simulation results show that the technique can improvethe performance in terms of packet loss probability (PLP).

  5. An Intelligent Segmented Burst Assembly Mechanism in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi-Yuan; ZHANG Jian-Guo

    2008-01-01

    We focus on the burst assembly mechanism and propose a new intelligent method in which the burst is assembled from several internet protocol (IP) packets in which the number of IP packets is changed according to the traffic load and the burst is segmented into several parts, called the ISOBS mechanism. The average burst assembly time of the ISOBS mechanism decreases as compared with the fixed-assembly-time and fixed-assembly-time-and-length mechanisms. The loss ratio decreases 50% as compared with the general optical burst switching (OBS) mechanism. The last segment can carry high quality of service (QOS) information. We can achieve that the loss ratio of the last segment is almost zero when the traffic load is less than 0.05. When the traffic load is 0.9, the loss ratio of the last segment is 0.0041. The ISOBS can support to transmit different QOS data.

  6. Bursting synchronization in clustered neuronal networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Hai-Tao; Wang Jiang; Deng Bin; Wei Xi-Le

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in the brain exhibit the modular (clustered) property,i.e.,they are composed of certain subnetworks with differential internal and external connectivity.We investigate bursting synchronization in a clustered neuronal network.A transition to mutual-phase synchronization takes place on the bursting time scale of coupled neurons,while on the spiking time scale,they behave asynchronously.This synchronization transition can be induced by the variations of inter-and intracoupling strengths,as well as the probability of random links between different subnetworks.Considering that some pathological conditions are related with the synchronization of bursting neurons in the brain,we analyze the control of bursting synchronization by using a time-periodic external signal in the clustered neuronal network.Simulation results show a frequency locking tongue in the driving parameter plane,where bursting synchronization is maintained,even in the presence of external driving.Hence,effective synchronization suppression can be realized with the driving parameters outside the frequency locking region.

  7. Diagnostics From Three Rising Submillimeter Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Ai-Hua; Wang, Xin-Dong

    2015-01-01

    In the paper we investigate three novel rising submillimeter (THz) bursts occurred sequentially in a super-Active Region NOAA 10486. The average rising rate of the flux density above 200 GHz is only 20 sfu/GHz (corresponding spectral index $\\alpha$ of 1.6) for the THz spectral components of 2003 October 28 and November 4 bursts, while it can attain values of 235 sfu/GHz ($\\alpha$=4.8) for 2003 November 2 burst. The steeply rising THz spectrum can be produced by a population of high relativistic electrons with a low-energy cutoff of 1 MeV , while it only requires a low-energy cutoff of 30 keV for the two slowly rising THz bursts, via gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation based on our numerical simulations of burst spectra in the magnetic dipole field case. The electron density variation is much larger in the THz source than that in microwave (MW) one. It is interesting that the THz source radius decreased by 20--50$\\%$ during the decay phase for the three events, but the MW one increased by 28$\\%$ for the 2003 Novemb...

  8. Olivary subthreshold oscillations and burst activity revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo eBazzigaluppi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The inferior olive forms one of the major gateways for information that travels to the cerebellar cortex. Olivary neurons process sensory and motor signals that are subsequently relayed to Purkinje cells. The intrinsic subthreshold membrane potential oscillations of the olivary neurons are thought to be important for gating this flow of information. In vitro studies have revealed that the phase of the subthreshold oscillation determines the size of the olivary burst and may gate the information flow or encode the temporal state of the olivary network. Here, we investigated whether the same phenomenon occurred in murine olivary cells in an intact olivocerebellar system using the in vivo whole-cell recording technique. Our in vivo findings revealed that the number of wavelets within the olivary burst did not encode the timing of the spike relative to the phase of the oscillation but was related to the amplitude of the oscillation. Manipulating the oscillation amplitude by applying Harmaline confirmed the inverse relationship between the amplitude of oscillation and the number of wavelets within the olivary burst. Furthermore, we demonstrated that electrotonic coupling between olivary neurons affect this modulation of the olivary burst size. Based on these results, we suggest that the olivary burst size might reflect the expectancy of a spike to occur rather than the spike timing, and that this process requires the presence of gap junction coupling.

  9. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Djorgovski, S G; Kulkarni, S R; Sari, R; Bloom, J S; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; Price, P A; Fox, D; Reichart, D; Yost, S; Berger, E; Diercks, A H; Goodrich, R; Chaffee, F H

    2001-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean gamma-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 10^51 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host gal...

  10. Meteor burst in the post 2000 era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, C.; Oduol, V.; Ghosh, A.; Tailor, B.

    In recent years a renewed interest has been shown in the possibility of using meteor burst links in tactical communications, both for networking and covert operations. Some of the applications that recent performance improvements would permit are evaluated. In evaluating the feasibility of a meteor burst implementation, certain technical and physical limitations are addressed. For the success of these applications, interoperability with other communication systems is necessary. The level of interoperability with other media, and the standards necessary to assure this interoperability are examined. Methods of minimizing and combating jamming are proposed. Meteor burst systems can be used in a large number of applications within a tactical environment. The principal disadvantage of the meteor burst medium is the problem of interference to other spectrum users from the probe end, and the interference from other users at the receiver end. The low throughput characteristic of meteor burst compares with some of the channel capacities used in other systems. Interoperability with other networks or communications links is relatively easy if certain straightforward protocols and standards are established.

  11. GRB Catalog: Bursts from Vela to Swift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, L.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma ray burst (GRB) astronomy started when the first event was recorded on July 2, 1967 by Vela 4a and 4b. Since then many missions have flown experiments capable of detecting GRBs. The events collected by these older experiments are mostly available in paper copy, each containing a few ten to a few hundred bursts. No systematic effort in cataloging of these bursts has been available. In some cases the information is unpublished and in others difficult to retrieve. The first major GRB catalog was obtained by GRO with the BATSE experiment. It contains more than 2000 bursts and includes homogeneous information for each of the bursts. With the launch of Swift, the first Gamma-ray/X-ray mission dedicated to the study of GRBs and their afterglows, a wealth of information is collected by the Swift instrument as well as from ground-based telescopes. This talk will describe the efforts to create a comprehensive GRBCAT and its current status and future prospective.

  12. Theta-alpha EEG phase distributions in the frontal area for dissociation of visual and auditory working memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Masakazu; Tero, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is known to be associated with synchronization of the theta and alpha bands observed in electroencephalograms (EEGs). Although frontal-posterior global theta synchronization appears in modality-specific WM, local theta synchronization in frontal regions has been found in modality-independent WM. How frontal theta oscillations separately synchronize with task-relevant sensory brain areas remains an open question. Here, we focused on theta-alpha phase relationships in frontal areas using EEG, and then verified their functional roles with mathematical models. EEG data showed that the relationship between theta (6 Hz) and alpha (12 Hz) phases in the frontal areas was about 1:2 during both auditory and visual WM, and that the phase distributions between auditory and visual WM were different. Next, we used the differences in phase distributions to construct FitzHugh-Nagumo type mathematical models. The results replicated the modality-specific branching by orthogonally of the trigonometric functions for theta and alpha oscillations. Furthermore, mathematical and experimental results were consistent with regards to the phase relationships and amplitudes observed in frontal and sensory areas. These results indicate the important role that different phase distributions of theta and alpha oscillations have in modality-specific dissociation in the brain. PMID:28266595

  13. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels;

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  14. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  15. A mechanism for fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E; Vieyro, Florencia L

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are mysterious transient sources likely located at cosmological distances. The derived brightness temperatures exceed by many orders of magnitude the self-absorption limit of incoherent synchrotron radiation, implying the operation of a coherent emission process. We propose a radiation mechanism for fast radio bursts where the emission arises from collisionless Bremsstrahlung in strong plasma turbulence excited by relativistic electron beams. We discuss possible astrophysical scenarios in which this process might operate. The emitting region is a turbulent plasma hit by a relativistic jet, where Langmuir plasma waves produce a concentration of intense electrostatic soliton-like regions (cavitons). The resulting radiation is coherent and, under some physical conditions, can be polarised and have a power-law distribution in energy. We obtain radio luminosities in agreement with the inferred values for fast radio bursts. The timescale of the radio flare in some cases can be extremely fast, of t...

  16. Study on fault induced rock bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-hua; DOU Lin-ming; LU Cai-ping; MU Zong-long; CAO An-ye

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the rules of rock bursts caused by faults by means of mechanical analysis of a roof rock-mass balanced structure and numerical simulation about fault slip destabilization, the effect of coal mining operation on fault plane stresses and slip displacement were studied. The results indicate that the slip displacement sharply increases due to the decrease of normal stress and the increase of shear stress at the fault plane when the working face advances from the footwall to the fault itself, which may induce a fault rock burst. However, this slip displacement will be very small due to the increase of normal stress and the decrease of shear stress when the working face advances from the hanging wall to the fault itself, which results in a very small risk of a fault rock burst.

  17. On the bursting of gene products

    CERN Document Server

    Yvinec, Romain

    2011-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate that the so-called bursting production of molecular species during gene expression may be an artifact caused by low time resolution in experimental data collection and not an actual burst in production. We reach this conclusion through an analysis of a two-stage and binary model for gene expression, and demonstrate that in the limit when mRNA degradation is much faster than protein degradation they are equivalent. The negative binomial distribution is shown to be a limiting case of the binary model for fast "on to off" state transitions and high values of the ratio between protein synthesis and degradation rates. The gene products population increases by unity but multiple times in a time interval orders of magnitude smaller than protein half-life or the precision of the experimental apparatus employed in its detection. This rare-and-fast one-by-one protein synthesis has been interpreted as bursting.

  18. Variable protostellar accretion with episodic bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, Eduard I

    2015-01-01

    We present the latest development of the disk gravitational instability and fragmentation model, originally introduced by us to explain episodic accretion bursts in the early stages of star formation. Using our numerical hydrodynamics model with improved disk thermal balance and star-disk interaction, we computed the evolution of protostellar disks formed from the gravitational collapse of prestellar cores. In agreement with our previous studies, we find that cores of higher initial mass and angular momentum produce disks that are more favorable to gravitational instability and fragmentation, while a higher background irradiation and magnetic fields moderate the disk tendency to fragment. The protostellar accretion in our models is time-variable, thanks to the nonlinear interaction between different spiral modes in the gravitationally unstable disk, and can undergo episodic bursts when fragments migrate onto the star owing to the gravitational interaction with other fragments or spiral arms. Most bursts occur...

  19. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  20. Bursting activity spreading through asymmetric interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Onaga, Tomokatsu

    2014-01-01

    People communicate with those who have the same background or share a common interest by using a social networking service (SNS). News or messages propagate through inhomogeneous connections in an SNS by sharing or facilitating additional comments. Such human activity is known to lead to endogenous bursting in the rate of message occurrences. We analyze a multi-dimensional self-exciting process to reveal dependence of the bursting activity on the topology of connections and the distribution of interaction strength on the connections. We determine the critical conditions for the cases where interaction strength is regulated at either the point of input or output for each person. In the input regulation condition, the network may exhibit bursting with infinitesimal interaction strength, if the dispersion of the degrees diverges as in the scale-free networks. In contrast, in the output regulation condition, the critical value of interaction strength, represented by the average number of events added by a single ...

  1. Study of CP(N-1) \\theta-Vacua by Cluster-Simulation of SU(N) Quantum Spin Ladders

    CERN Document Server

    Beard, B B; Riederer, S; Wiese, U J

    2005-01-01

    D-theory provides an alternative lattice regularization of the (1+1)-d CP(N-1) quantum field theory. In this formulation the continuous classical CP(N-1) fields emerge from the dimensional reduction of discrete SU(N) quantum spins. In analogy to Haldane's conjecture, ladders consisting of an even number of transversely coupled spin chains lead to a CP(N-1) model with vacuum angle \\theta = 0, while an odd number of chains yields \\theta = \\pi. In contrast to Wilson's formulation of lattice field theory, in D-theory no sign problem arises at \\theta = \\pi, and an efficient cluster algorithm is used to investigate the \\theta-vacuum effects. At \\theta = \\pi there is a first order phase transition with spontaneous breaking of charge conjugation symmetry for CP(N-1) models with N>2.

  2. Gamma-Ray Burst Early Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B

    2005-01-01

    The successful launch and operation of NASA's Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer open a new era for the multi-wavelength study of the very early afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GRB early afterglow information is essential to explore the unknown physical composition of GRB jets, the link between the prompt gamma-ray emission and the afterglow emission, the GRB central engine activity, as well as the immediate GRB environment. Here I review some of the recent theoretical efforts to address these problems and describe how the latest Swift data give answers to these outstanding questions.

  3. Distribution of whistler mode bursts at Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarf, F. L.; Jordan, K. F.; Russell, C. T.

    1987-01-01

    Several thousand impulsive whistler mode noise bursts were detected by the Pioneer Venus wave instrument during the first 10 seasons with nightside traversals at low altitudes. The altitude distribution for these events shows that essentially all of the bursts were detected when the orbiter was less than 2000 km above the planet, suggesting that the varying plasma conditions could not maintain coherent whistler mode field-aligned guidance over greater distances. Within the 2000-km range, the distribution of the number of events versus altitude shows that there are two distinct subregions. These results are interpreted in terms of two types of whistler mode propagation from sources below the ionosphere.

  4. A Burst Chasing X-ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the rationale, design, and importance of an X-Ray Polarimeter. There is a brief discussion of Gamma Ray Bursts, followed by a review of the theories of Gamma-Ray Bursts Polarization. This leads to the question of "How do we measure the polarization?" and a discussion of the GRB x-ray emission, the photoelectric effect and photoelectric polarimetry. The requirements for the work, can only be approached using a gas detector. This leads to a discussion of a Micropattern Gas Polarimeter, and the Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) X-ray Polarimeter.

  5. The Integral Burst Alert System (IBAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, S; Borkowski, J J; Walter, R; Pedersen, H

    2003-01-01

    We describe the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS): the automatic software for the rapid distribution of the coordinates of the Gamma-Ray Bursts detected by INTEGRAL. IBAS is implemented as a ground based system, working on the near-real time telemetry stream. During the first six months of operations, six GRB have been detected in the field of view of the INTEGRAL instruments and localized by IBAS. Positions with an accuracy of a few arcminutes are currently distributed by IBAS to the community for follow-up observations within a few tens of seconds of the event.

  6. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  7. Obtaining nonvanishing $\\theta_{13}$ with constrained neutrino Yukawa matrix and implications for flavor model buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Assuming a diagonal Majorana neutrino mass matrix, we investigate the neutrino Yukawa textures which lead to a non-zero reactor mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. The neutrino effective coupling matrix $\\kappa^{eff}$ is pre-diagonalized by a constant mixing pattern $V_{\

  8. White paper report on using nuclear reactors to search for a value of theta13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, K.; Anjos, J.C.; Ayres, D.; Beacom, J.; Bediaga, I.; de Bellefon, A.; Berger, B.E.; Bilenky, S.; Blucher, E.; Bolton, T.; Buck, C.; Bugg, W.; Busenitz, J.; Choubey, S.; Conrad, J.; Cribier, M.; Dadoun, O.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Decowski, M.; de Gouvea, Andre; Demutrh, D.; Dessages-Ardellier, F.; Efremenko, Y.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Finley, D.; Formaggio, J.A.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Garbini, M.; Giusti, P.; Goger-Neff, M.; Goodman, M.; Gray, F.; Grieb, C.; Grudzinski, J.J.; Guarino, V.J.; Hartmann, F.; Hagner, C.; Heeger, K.M.; Hofmann, W.; Horton-Smith, G.; Huber, P.; Inzhechik, L.; Jochum, J.; Jostlein, H.; Kadel, R.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kaplan, D.; Kasper, P.; de Kerret, H.; Kersten, J.; Klein, J.; Knopfle, K.T.; Kopeikin, V.; Kozlov, Yu.; Kryn, D.; Kuchler, V.; Kuze, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laughton, C.; Lendvai, C.; Li, J.; Lindner, M.; Link, J.; Longo, M.; Lu, Y.S.; Luk, K.B.; Ma, Y.Q.; Martemyanov, V.P.; Mauger, C.; Manghetti, H.; McKeown, R.; Mention, G.; Meyer, J.P.; Mikaelyan, L.; Minakata, H.; Naples, D.; Nunokawa, H.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Parke, S.; Petcov, S.T.; Peres, O.L.G.; Potzel, W.; Pilcher, J.; Plunkett, R.; Raffelt, G.; Rapidis, P.; Reyna, D.; Roe, B.; Rolinec, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sartorelli, G.; Schonert, S.; Schwertz, T.; Selvi, M.; Shaevitz, M.; Shellard, R.; Shrock, R.; Sidwell, R.; Sims, J.; Sinev, V.; Stanton, N.; Stancu, I.; Stefanski, R.; Seukane, F.; Sugiyama, H.; Sukhotin, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Svoboda, R.; Talaga, R.; Tamura, N.; Tanimoto, M.; Thron, J.; von Toerne, E.; Vignaud, D.; Wagner, C.; Wang, Y.F.; Wang, Z.; Winter, W.; Wong, H.; Yakushev, E.; Yang, C.G.; Yasuda, O.

    2004-02-26

    There has been superb progress in understanding the neutrino sector of elementary particle physics in the past few years. It is now widely recognized that the possibility exists for a rich program of measuring CP violation and matter effects in future accelerator {nu} experiments, which has led to intense efforts to consider new programs at neutrino superbeams, off-axis detectors, neutrino factories and beta beams. However, the possibility of measuring CP violation can be fulfilled only if the value of the neutrino mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13} is such that sin{sup 2} (2{theta}{sub 13}) greater than or equal to on the order of 0.01. The authors of this white paper are an International Working Group of physicists who believe that a timely new experiment at a nuclear reactor sensitive to the neutrino mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13} in this range has a great opportunity for an exciting discovery, a non-zero value to {theta}{sub 13}. This would be a compelling next step of this program. We are studying possible new reactor experiments at a variety of sites around the world, and we have collaborated to prepare this document to advocate this idea and describe some of the issues that are involved.

  9. Coherent theta oscillations and reorganization of spike timing in the hippocampal-prefrontal network upon learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benchenane, K.; Peyrache, A.; Khamassi, M.; Tierney, P.L.; Gioanni, Y.; Battaglia, F.P.; Wiener, S.I.

    2010-01-01

    To study the interplay between hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (Pfc) and its importance for learning and memory consolidation, we measured the coherence in theta oscillations between these two structures in rats learning new rules on a Y maze. Coherence peaked at the choice point, most stro

  10. Effective pathfinding for four-wheeled robot based on combining Theta* and hybrid A* algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Віталій Геннадійович Михалько

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effective pathfinding algorithm based on Theta* and Hybrid A* algorithms was developed for four-wheeled robot. Pseudocode for algorithm was showed and explained. Algorithm and simulator for four-wheeled robot were implemented using Java programming language. Algorithm was tested on U-obstacles, complex maps and for parking problem

  11. Corrections to Scaling Neutrino Mixing: Non-zero $\\theta_{13}, \\delta_{CP}$ and Baryon Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kalita, Rupam; Das, Mrinal Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We study a very specific type of neutrino mass and mixing structure based on the idea of Strong Scaling Ansatz (SSA) where the ratios of neutrino mass matrix elements belonging to two different columns are equal. There are three such possibilities, all of which are disfavored by the latest neutrino oscillation data. We focus on the specific scenario which predicts vanishing reactor mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ and inverted hierarchy with vanishing lightest neutrino mass. Motivated by several recent attempts to explain non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ by incorporating corrections to a leading order neutrino mass or mixing matrix giving $\\theta_{13}=0$, here we study the origin of non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ as well as leptonic Dirac CP phase $\\delta_{CP}$ by incorporating two different corrections to scaling neutrino mass and mixing: one where type II seesaw acts as a correction to scaling neutrino mass matrix and the other with charged lepton correction to scaling neutrino mixing. Although scaling neutrino mass matrix origina...

  12. Search for the {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle with the Double Chooz experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil-Botella, Ines, E-mail: ines.gil@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Basic Research Department, Avenida Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-11-01

    The Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment will search for a non vanishing {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle with unprecedented sensitivity, which might open the way to unveiling CP violation in the leptonic sector. The measurement of this angle will be based in a precise comparison of the antineutrino spectrum at two identical detectors located at different distances from the Chooz nuclear reactor cores in France. Double Chooz is particularly attractive because of its capability to measure sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) to 3{sigma} if sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) > 0.05 or to exclude sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) down to 0.03 at 90% C.L. for {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 31} = 2.5 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} in three years of data taking with both detectors. The installation of the far detector at 1 km from the reactors is almost completed and the first neutrino interactions are expected by end 2010.

  13. Aging affects medial but not anterior frontal learning-related theta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vijver, Irene; Cohen, Michael X; Ridderinkhof, K Richard

    2014-03-01

    Aging induces a decline in the ties that bind anatomical networks centered on the prefrontal cortex, which are critical for reinforcement learning and decision making. At the neurophysiological level, the prefrontal cortex may engage electrophysiological oscillatory synchronization to coordinate other brain systems during learning. We recorded scalp EEG from 21 older (mean age 69 years) and 20 young (mean age 22 years) healthy human adults while they learned stimulus-response mappings by trial-and-error using feedback. In young adults, theta-band (4-8 Hz) oscillatory power over medial frontal and anterior frontal cortex predicted learning after errors. Older adults demonstrated a decrease in the theta-band learning-predictive signals over medial frontal but not anterior frontal cortex. This age-related decrease in task-relevant medial frontal theta power may be related to the more general decrease in medial frontal theta power that we observed during rest. These results demonstrate a shift in cortical networks that support reinforcement learning in older adults, and shed new light on the changes in neurophysiological (oscillatory) mechanisms with neurocognitive aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chromosomal localization of the gene for the human Theta class glutathione transferase (GSTT1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.; Vaska, V. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Goggan, M.; Board, P. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)

    1996-04-01

    Two loci encoding Theta class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been identified in humans. In situ hybridization studies have localized the GSTT1 gene to 22q11.2. This is the same band to which we previously localized the GSTT2 gene. This finding confirms the trend for human GST genes to be found in class-specific clusters. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Seasonal variation of Sigma sub(Theta) with wind speed, direction and stability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    For an airport site near Visakhapatnam, India, and based on 10 years of data for the months of January, April, August and October, values of Sigma sub(Theta) are given as a function of wind speed, wind direction and Pasquill diffusion category...

  16. Changes in absolute theta power in bipolar patients during a saccadic attention task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Consuelo; Diniz, Claudia; Di Girogio, Luiza; Bittencourt, Juliana; Gongora, Mariana; Ken Tanaka, Guaraci; Teixeira, Silmar; Basile, Luis F; Novis, Fernanda; Angélica Silveira, Luciana; da Silva, Rafael de Assis; Cagy, Mauricio; Cheniaux, Elie; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna

    2015-08-30

    The present study analyzed absolute theta power (ATP) in brain areas involved with attention in the three phase of BD while the patients performing a saccadic attention task. We hypothesized that patients in depression and mania states show a higher ATP compared to euthymic patients, since a higher ATP is indicative of attention deficit. We analyzed the frontal (F7, F3, Fz, F4 and F8) and central (C3, Cz and C4) areas. Thirty bipolar patients were enrolled in this study. The subjects performed a saccadic attention task while their brain activity pattern was recorded using quantitative electroencephalography (20 channels). Our results showed a main effect for group over C3, C4, Cz, F7, F4, F8 electrodes, and a main effect for moment over Cz, F7, F8 electrodes. These results indicate that both task and groups produce changes in theta activity in distinct cortical areas that participate in the organization of attention. Our results therefore demonstrate that, although it is well established in the literature that theta has a relevant role in the attention process, it is necessary to deepen the investigations to better understand the specifics of theta during visual processing tasks that have a demand for attention.

  17. The Psychological Reality of Grammar : the Theta Principle in Parsing Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeh-Leicht, O.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation presents evidence for the psychological reality of a grammatical principle, the Theta Principle. It adopts a grammar-derived theory of human natural language processing ? the thematic parser. Parsing phenomena such as garden path effects (The horse raced past the barn fell) and cen

  18. Periods of hyperelliptic integrals expressed in terms of theta-constants by means of Thomae formulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enolski, Victor; Richter, Peter

    2008-03-28

    Expressions for the periods of first- and second-kind integrals on hyperelliptic curves are given in terms of theta-constants. They are derived with the help of Thomae's classical formulae and Picard-Fuchs equations for complete integrals as functions of the parameters of the curves. The example of genus 2 is considered in detail.

  19. The effects of theta transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on fluid intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahor, Anja; Jaušovec, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to explore the influence of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on resting brain activity and on measures of fluid intelligence. Theta tACS was applied to the left parietal and left frontal brain areas of healthy participants after which resting electroencephalogram (EEG) data was recorded. Following sham/active stimulation, the participants solved two tests of fluid intelligence while their EEG was recorded. The results showed that active theta tACS affected spectral power in theta and alpha frequency bands. In addition, active theta tACS improved performance on tests of fluid intelligence. This influence was more pronounced in the group of participants that received stimulation to the left parietal area than in the group of participants that received stimulation to the left frontal area. Left parietal tACS increased performance on the difficult test items of both tests (RAPM and PF&C) whereas left frontal tACS increased performance only on the easy test items of one test (RAPM). The observed behavioral tACS influences were also accompanied by changes in neuroelectric activity. The behavioral and neuroelectric data tentatively support the P-FIT neurobiological model of intelligence.

  20. Measuring $\\theta_{13}$ via Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Ruth B. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Pembroke College

    2011-01-01

    One of the primary goals in neutrino physics at the present moment is to make a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\theta_{13}$. This parameter, in addition to being unknown, could potentially allow for the introduction of CP violation into the lepton sector. The MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment has the ability to make a measurement of this parameter, by looking for the oscillation of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos between a Near and Far Detector over a distance of 735 km. This thesis discusses the development of an analysis framework to search for this oscillation mode. Two major improvements to pre-existing analysis techniques have been implemented by the author. First, a novel particle ID technique based on strip topology, known as the Library Event Matching (LEM) method, is optimized for use in MINOS. Second, a multiple bin likelihood method is developed to fit the data. These two improvements, when combined, increase MINOS' sensitivity to $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})$ by 27\\% over previous analyses. This thesis sees a small excess over background in the Far Detector. A Frequentist interpretation of the data rules out $\\theta_{13}=0$ at 91\\%. A Bayesian interpretation of the data is also presented, placing the most stringent upper boundary on the oscillation parameter to date, at $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})<0.09(0.015)$ for the Normal (Inverted) Hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}=0$.

  1. The theta parameter in loop quantum gravity: effects on quantum geometry and black hole entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Rezende, Danilo Jimenez

    2007-01-01

    The precise analog of the theta-quantization ambiguity of Yang-Mills theory exists for the real SU(2) connection formulation of general relativity. As in the former case theta labels representations of large gauge transformations, which are super-selection sectors in loop quantum gravity. We show that unless theta=0, the (kinematical) geometric operators such as area and volume are not well defined on spin network states. More precisely the intersection of their domain with the dense set Cyl in the kinematical Hilbert space H of loop quantum gravity is empty. The absence of a well defined notion of area operator acting on spin network states seems at first in conflict with the expected finite black hole entropy. However, we show that the black hole (isolated) horizon area--which in contrast to kinematical area is a (Dirac) physical observable--is indeed well defined, and quantized so that the black hole entropy is proportional to the area. The effect of theta is negligible in the semiclassical limit where pro...

  2. Lepton mixing angle $\\theta_{13} = 0$ with a horizontal symmetry $D_4$

    CERN Document Server

    Grimus, Walter; Kaneko, S; Lavoura, L; Tanimoto, M

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a model for the lepton sector based on the seesaw mechanism and on a $D_4$ family symmetry. The model predicts the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ to vanish. The solar mixing angle $\\theta_{12}$ is free--it will in general be large if one does not invoke finetuning. The model has an enlarged scalar sector with three Higgs doublets, together with two real scalar gauge singlets $\\chi_i$ ($ i = 1, 2$) which have vacuum expectation values _0$ at the seesaw scale. The atmospheric mixing angle $\\theta_{23}$ is given by $\\tan \\theta_{23} = _0$ /_0$, and it is maximal if the Lagrangian is $D_4$-invariant; but $D_4$ may be broken softly, by a term of dimension two in the scalar potential, and then m_2 > m_1$) and allows successful leptogenesis if $m_1 \\sim 4 \\times 10^{-3} \\mathrm{eV}$; these properties of the model are independent of the presence and strength of the soft $D_4$ breaking.

  3. Phantom bursting is highly sensitive to noise and unlikely to account for slow bursting in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells show bursting electrical activity with a wide range of burst periods ranging from a few seconds, often seen in isolated cells, over tens of seconds (medium bursting), usually observed in intact islets, to several minutes. The phantom burster model [Bertram, R., Previte, J...... and lowers the burst period dramatically in phantom bursters. It is therefore unlikely that slow bursting in single cells is driven by the slow phantom bursting mechanism, but could instead be driven by oscillations in glycolysis, which we show are stable to random ion channel fluctuations. Moreover, so...

  4. Enhanced Constraints on theta13 from A Three-Flavor Oscillation Analysis of Reactor Antineutrinos at KamLAND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The KamLAND Collaboration; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yabumoto, H.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Enomoto, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; Kadel, R.; O' Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Dwyer, D. A.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Efremenko, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Decowski, M. P.

    2010-09-24

    We present new constraints on the neutrino oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2}, {theta}{sub 12}, and {theta}{sub 13} from a three-flavor analysis of solar and KamLAND data. The KamLAND data set includes data acquired following a radiopurity upgrade and amounts to a total exposure of 3.49 x 10{sup 32} target-proton-year. Under the assumption of CPT invariance, a two-flavor analysis ({theta}{sub 13} = 0) of the KamLAND and solar data yields the best-fit values tan{sup 2} {theta}{sub 12} = 0.444{sub -0.030}{sup +0.036} and {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} = 7.50{sub -0.20}{sup +0.19} x 10{sup -5} eV{sup 2}; a three-flavor analysis with {theta}{sub 13} as a free parameter yields the best-fit values tan{sup 2} {theta}{sub 12} = 0.452{sub -0.033}{sup +0.035}, {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} = 7.50{sub -0.20}{sup +0.19} x 10{sup -5}eV{sup 2}, and sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 13} = 0.020{sub -0.016}{sup +0.016}. This {theta}{sub 13} interval is consistent with other recent work combining the CHOOZ, atmospheric and long-baseline accelerator experiments. We also present a new global {theta}{sub 13} analysis, incorporating the CHOOZ, atmospheric and accelerator data, which indicates sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 13} = 0.017{sub -0.009}{sup +0.010}, a nonzero value at the 93% C.L. This finding will be further tested by upcoming accelerator and reactor experiments.

  5. A Reconnection Switch to Trigger gamma-Ray Burst Jet Dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2012-03-14

    Prompt gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission requires some mechanism to dissipate an ultrarelativistic jet. Internal shocks or some form of electromagnetic dissipation are candidate mechanisms. Any mechanism needs to answer basic questions, such as what is the origin of variability, what radius does dissipation occur at, and how does efficient prompt emission occur. These mechanisms also need to be consistent with how ultrarelativistic jets form and stay baryon pure despite turbulence and electromagnetic reconnection near the compact object and despite stellar entrainment within the collapsar model. We use the latest magnetohydrodynamical models of ultrarelativistic jets to explore some of these questions in the context of electromagnetic dissipation due to the slow collisional and fast collisionless reconnection mechanisms, as often associated with Sweet-Parker and Petschek reconnection, respectively. For a highly magnetized ultrarelativistic jet and typical collapsar parameters, we find that significant electromagnetic dissipation may be avoided until it proceeds catastrophically near the jet photosphere at large radii (r {approx} 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14}cm), by which the jet obtains a high Lorentz factor ({gamma} {approx} 100-1000), has a luminosity of L{sub j} {approx} 10{sup 50}-10{sup 51} erg s{sup -1}, has observer variability timescales of order 1s (ranging from 0.001-10s), achieves {gamma}{theta}{sub j} {approx} 10-20 (for opening half-angle {theta}{sub j}) and so is able to produce jet breaks, and has comparable energy available for both prompt and afterglow emission. A range of model parameters are investigated and simplified scaling laws are derived. This reconnection switch mechanism allows for highly efficient conversion of electromagnetic energy into prompt emission and associates the observed prompt GRB pulse temporal structure with dissipation timescales of some number of reconnecting current sheets embedded in the jet. We hope this work helps motivate the

  6. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Astronomers studying archival data from an Australian radio telescope have discovered a powerful, short-lived burst of radio waves that they say indicates an entirely new type of astronomical phenomenon. Region of Strong Radio Burst Visible-light (negative greyscale) and radio (contours) image of Small Magellanic Cloud and area where burst originated. CREDIT: Lorimer et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file ( 114 KB) "This burst appears to have originated from the distant Universe and may have been produced by an exotic event such as the collision of two neutron stars or the death throes of an evaporating black hole," said Duncan Lorimer, Assistant Professor of Physics at West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The research team led by Lorimer consists of Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University in Australia, Maura McLaughlin of WVU and NRAO, David Narkevic of WVU, and Fronefield Crawford of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The astronomers announced their findings in the September 27 issue of the online journal Science Express. The startling discovery came as WVU undergraduate student David Narkevic re-analyzed data from observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud made by the 210-foot Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The data came from a survey of the Magellanic Clouds that included 480 hours of observations. "This survey had sought to discover new pulsars, and the data already had been searched for the type of pulsating signals they produce," Lorimer said. "We re-examined the data, looking for bursts that, unlike the usual ones from pulsars, are not periodic," he added. The survey had covered the Magellanic Clouds, a pair of small galaxies in orbit around our own Milky Way Galaxy. Some 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Magellanic Clouds are prominent features in the Southern sky. Ironically, the new discovery is not part of these galaxies, but rather is much more distant

  7. Learning to learn: theta oscillations predict new learning, which enhances related learning and neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam S Nokia

    Full Text Available Animals in the natural world continuously encounter learning experiences of varying degrees of novelty. New neurons in the hippocampus are especially responsive to learning associations between novel events and more cells survive if a novel and challenging task is learned. One might wonder whether new neurons would be rescued from death upon each new learning experience or whether there is an internal control system that limits the number of cells that are retained as a function of learning. In this experiment, it was hypothesized that learning a task that was similar in content to one already learned previously would not increase cell survival. We further hypothesized that in situations in which the cells are rescued hippocampal theta oscillations (3-12 Hz would be involved and perhaps necessary for increasing cell survival. Both hypotheses were disproved. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on two similar hippocampus-dependent tasks, trace and very-long delay eyeblink conditioning, while recording hippocampal local-field potentials. Cells that were generated after training on the first task were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine and quantified after training on both tasks had ceased. Spontaneous theta activity predicted performance on the first task and the conditioned stimulus induced a theta-band response early in learning the first task. As expected, performance on the first task correlated with performance on the second task. However, theta activity did not increase during training on the second task, even though more cells were present in animals that had learned. Therefore, as long as learning occurs, relatively small changes in the environment are sufficient to increase the number of surviving neurons in the adult hippocampus and they can do so in the absence of an increase in theta activity. In conclusion, these data argue against an upper limit on the number of neurons that can be rescued from death by learning.

  8. Selective theta-synchronization of choice-relevant information subserves goal-directed behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilo eWomelsdorf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Theta activity reflects a state of rhythmic modulation of excitability at the level of single neuron membranes, within local neuronal groups and between distant nodes of a neuronal network. A wealth of evidence has shown that during theta states distant neuronal groups synchronize, forming networks of spatially confined neuronal clusters at specific time periods during task performance. Here, we show that a functional commonality of networks engaging in theta rhythmic states is that they emerge around decision points, reflecting rhythmic synchronization of choice-relevant information. Decision points characterize a point in time shortly before a subject chooses to select one action over another, i.e. when automatic behavior is terminated and the organism reactivates multiple sources of information to evaluate the evidence for available choices. As such, decision processes require the coordinated retrieval of choice-relevant information including (i the retrieval of stimulus evaluations (stim.-reward associations and reward expectancies about future outcomes, (ii the retrieval of past and prospective memories (e.g. stim.-stim. associations, (iii the reactivation of contextual task rule representations (e.g. stim.-response mappings, along with (iv an ongoing assessment of sensory evidence. An increasing number of studies reveal that retrieval of these multiple types of information proceeds within few theta cycles through synchronized spiking activity across limbic, striatal and cortical processing nodes. The outlined evidence suggests that evolving spatially and temporally specific theta synchronization could serve as the critical correlate underlying the selection of a choice during goal-directed behavior.

  9. Stress affects theta activity in limbic networks and impairs novelty-induced exploration and familiarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis eJacinto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to a novel environment triggers the response of several brain areas that regulate emotional behaviors. Here, we studied theta oscillations within the hippocampus (HPC-amygdala (AMY-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC network in exploration of a novel environment and subsequent familiarization through repeated exposures to that same environment; in addition, we assessed how concomitant stress exposure could disrupt this activity and impair both behavioral processes. Local field potentials were simultaneously recorded from dorsal and ventral hippocampus (dHPC and vHPC respectively, basolateral amygdala (BLA and mPFC in freely behaving rats while they were exposed to a novel environment, then repeatedly re-exposed over the course of 3 weeks to that same environment and, finally, on re-exposure to a novel unfamiliar environment. A longitudinal analysis of theta activity within this circuit revealed a reduction of vHPC and BLA theta power and vHPC-BLA theta coherence through familiarization which was correlated with a return to normal exploratory behavior in control rats. In contrast, a persistent over-activation of the same brain regions was observed in stressed rats that displayed impairments in novel exploration and familiarization processes. Importantly, we show that stress also affected intra-hippocampal synchrony and heightened the coherence between vHPC and BLA. In summary, we demonstrate that modulatory theta activity in the aforementioned circuit, namely in the vHPC and BLA, is correlated with the expression of anxiety in novelty-induced exploration and familiarization in both normal and pathological conditions.

  10. Simultaneous activation of gamma and theta network oscillations in rat hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Yacov; Wittner, Lucia; Freund, Tamas F; Gähwiler, Beat H

    2002-03-15

    Hippocampal activity in vivo is characterized by concurrent oscillations at theta (4-15 Hz) and gamma (20-80 Hz) frequencies. Here we show that cholinergic receptor activation (methacholine 10-20 nm) in hippocampal slice cultures induces an oscillatory mode of activity, in which the intrinsic network oscillator (located in the CA3 area) expresses simultaneous theta and gamma network oscillations. Pyramidal cells display synaptic theta oscillations, characterized by cycles consisting of population EPSP-IPSP sequences that are dominated by population IPSPs. These rhythmic IPSPs most probably result from theta-modulated spiking activity of several interneurons. At the same time, the majority of interneurons consistently display synaptic gamma oscillations. These oscillatory cycles consist of fast depolarizing rhythmic events that are likely to reflect excitatory input from CA3 pyramidal cells. Interneurons comprising this functional group were identified morphologically. They include four known types of interneurons (basket, O-LM, bistratified and str. lucidum-specific cells) and one new type of CA3 interneuron (multi-subfield cell). The oscillatory activity of these interneurons is only weakly correlated between neighbouring cells, and in about half of these (44 %) is modulated by depolarizing theta rhythmicity. The overall characteristics of acetylcholine-induced oscillations in slice cultures closely resemble the rhythmicity observed in hippocampal field and single cell recordings in vivo. Both rhythmicities depend on intrinsic synaptic interactions, and are expressed by different cell types. The fact that these oscillations persist in a network lacking extra-hippocampal connections emphasizes the importance of intrinsic mechanisms in determining this form of hippocampal activity.

  11. Nicotine induction of theta frequency oscillations in rodent medial septal diagonal band in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-biao LU; Cheng-zhang LI; Dong-liang LI; Zaineb HENDERSON

    2013-01-01

    Aim:This study aimed to examine the role of the nicotinic receptor (nAChR) in the generation of theta oscillations (4-12 Hz) in vitro.Methods:Electrophysiological studies were performed on medial septal diagonal band area (MSDB) slices to measure theta oscillation.Immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy studies were carried out to detect α4 nAChR and β2 nAChR subunits in perfused-fixed tissue from VGluT2-GFP and GAD67-GFP transgenic mice.Results:Application of nicotine to MSDB slices produced persistent theta oscillations in which area power increased in a doseresponsive manner.This activity was inhibited by GABAA receptor antagonists and partially by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists,indicating the involvement of local GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in the production of the rhythmic activity.The nicotineinduced theta activity was also inhibited selectively by non-α7*nAChR antagonists,suggesting the presence of these receptor types on GABAergic and glutamatergic neuron populatjons in the MSDB.This was confirmed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy studies in transgenic mice in which the GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons express green fluorescent protein (GFP),showing Iocalisation of β2 nAChR and α4 nAChR subunits,the most common constituents of non-α7*nAChRs,in both cell types in the MSDB.Conclusion:Theta activity in the MSDB may be generated by tonic stimulation of non-α7*nAChRs.

  12. Power Enhancement Cavity for Burst-Mode Laser Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical cavity scheme and locking method that can realize the power enhancement of picosecond UV laser pulses operating at a burst mode with arbitrary burst (macropulse) lengths and repetition rates.

  13. THE FIVE YEAR FERMI/GBM MAGNETAR BURST CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collazzi, A. C. [SciTec, Inc., 100 Wall Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Kouveliotou, C.; Horst, A. J. van der; Younes, G. A. [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Göğüş, E. [Sabancı University, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Lin, L. [François Arago Centre, APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris (France); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Raanana 43537 (Israel); Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Chaplin, V. L. [School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Avenue S, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Huppenkothen, D. [Center for Data Science, New York University, 726 Broadway, 7th Floor, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Watts, A. L. [Anton Pannekoek Institute, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kienlin, A. von [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H., E-mail: acollazzi@scitec.com [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550–5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  14. A Study of the Gamma-Ray Burst Fundamental Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainotti, Maria; Gilbertson, Christian; Postnikov, Sergey; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Willingale, Richard

    2017-01-01

    A class of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a plateau phase in their X-ray afterglows obeys a three dimensional (3D) relation (Dainotti et al. 2016), between the rest-frame time at the end of the plateau, $T_a$, its corresponding X-ray luminosity, $L_{a}$, and the peak luminosity in the prompt emission, $L_{peak}$, which is an extension of the two dimensional Dainotti relation. This 3D relation identifies a GRB fundamental plane whose existence we confirmed. We extended the original analysis with X-ray data from July 2014 to July 2016 achieving a total sample of 183 {\\it Swift} GRBs with afterglow plateaus and known redshifts. We added the most recent GRBs to the previous `gold sample' (now including 45 GRBs) and obtained an intrinsic scatter compatible within one $\\sigma$ with the previous result. We compared several GRB categories, such as short with extended emission, X-ray Flashes, GRBs associated with SNe, a sample of only long duration GRBs (132), selected from the total sample by excluding GRBs of the previous categories, and the gold sample, composed only by GRBs with light curves with good data coverage and relatively flat plateaus. We evaluated the relation planes for each of the mentioned categories and showed that they are not statistically different from the plane derived from the gold sample and that the fundamental plane derived from the gold sample has an intrinsic scatter smaller than any plane derived from the other sample categories. We compared the jet opening angles tabulated in literature with the angles derived using the $E_{iso}-E_{gamma}$ relation of the method in Pescalli et al. (2015) and calculated the relation plane for a sample of long GRBs accounting for the different jet opening angles. We observed that this correction does not significantly reduce the scatter. In an extended analysis, we found that the fundamental plane is independent from several prompt and afterglow parameters, such as the jet opening angle, $\\theta

  15. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M.J. Wijers

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive stars

  16. Ceruloplasmin decreases respiratory burst reaction during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeeva, Elena Y; Semenova, Elena V; Sokolov, Alexey V; Aplin, Kirill D; Timofeeva, Kseniya E; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Filatov, Michael V

    2016-08-01

    Testing of pregnant women reveals weakening of neutrophil-mediated effector functions, such as reactive oxygen species generation. This study provides data confirming the phenomenon, gained through application of the flow cytometry technique. Key factors influencing neutrophil functional activity in blood plasma of pregnant women have not been detected so far. At the same time, concentration of ceruloplasmin - a copper-containing glycoprotein - is known to increase in blood significantly during pregnancy. We observed the negative correlation between ceruloplasmin concentration in blood plasma of pregnant women and the intensity of respiratory burst of neutrophils. Fractionation of plasma using gel-filtration revealed that ceruloplasmin-containing fraction demonstrated suppression of the respiratory burst reaction. Partial elimination of ceruloplasmin from the blood of pregnant women, performed with the help of specific antibodies and followed by immunoprecipitation, leads to an increased respiratory burst reaction. On the contrary, addition of ceruloplasmin to blood samples of healthy donors noticeably decreases the respiratory burst reaction. The results presented prove that change in ceruloplasmin level in plasma is necessary and sufficient for modulating the ability of neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species during pregnancy.

  17. Fast Radio Bursts: Searches, Sensitivities & Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration transient signals discovered over the past decade. Here we describe the scientific usefulness of FRBs, consider ongoing work at the Parkes telescope, and examine some relevant search sensitivity and completeness considerations. We also look ahead to the results from ongoing and future planned studies in the field.

  18. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive stars

  19. IPN localizations of Konus short gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pal'shin, V D; Svinkin, D S; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Mazets, E P; Oleynik, P P; Ulanov, M V; Cline, T; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Trombka, J; McClanahan, T; Starr, R; Goldsten, J; Gold, R; Rau, A; von Kienlin, A; Savchenko, V; Smith, D M; Hajdas, W; Barthelmy, S D; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Palmer, D; Yamaoka, K; Ohno, M; Fukazawa, Y; Hanabata, Y; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Briggs, M S; Kippen, R M; Kouveliotou, C; Meegan, C; Fishman, G; Connaughton, V; Boer, M; Guidorzi, C; Frontera, F; Montanari, E; Rossi, F; Feroci, M; Amati, L; Nicastro, L; Orlandini, M; Monte, Del; Costa, E; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Pacciani, L; Rapisarda, M; Soffitta, P; Di Cocco, G; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Labanti, C; Marisaldi, M; Atteia, J -L; Vanderspek, R; Ricker, G

    2013-01-01

    Between the launch of the GGS Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 314 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 24 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the IPN consisted of up to eleven spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 276 bursts were obtained. We present the IPN localization data on these events.

  20. BurstMem: A High-Performance Burst Buffer System for Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Wang, Yandong [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Atchley, Scott [ORNL; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

    2014-01-01

    The growth of computing power on large-scale sys- tems requires commensurate high-bandwidth I/O system. Many parallel file systems are designed to provide fast sustainable I/O in response to applications soaring requirements. To meet this need, a novel system is imperative to temporarily buffer the bursty I/O and gradually flush datasets to long-term parallel file systems. In this paper, we introduce the design of BurstMem, a high- performance burst buffer system. BurstMem provides a storage framework with efficient storage and communication manage- ment strategies. Our experiments demonstrate that BurstMem is able to speed up the I/O performance of scientific applications by up to 8.5 on leadership computer systems.