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Sample records for high volume fly

  1. Durability properties of high volume fly ash self compacting concretes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dinakar; K.G. Babu; Manu Santhanam [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai (India). Building Technology Division

    2008-11-15

    This paper presents an experimental study on the durability properties of self compacting concretes (SCCs) with high volume replacements of fly ash. Eight fly ash self compacting concretes of various strength grades were designed at desired fly ash percentages of 0, 10, 30, 50, 70 and 85%, in comparison with five different mixtures of normal vibrated concretes (NCs) at equivalent strength grades. The durability properties were studied through the measurement of permeable voids, water absorption, acid attack and chloride permeation. The results indicated that the SCCs showed higher permeable voids and water absorption than the vibrated normal concretes of the same strength grades. However, in acid attack and chloride diffusion studies the high volume fly ash SCCs had significantly lower weight losses and chloride ion diffusion.

  2. SCC with high volume of fly ash content

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    Bakhrakh Anton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-compacting concrete is a very perspective building material. It provides great benefits during the construction of heavily reinforced buildings. SCC has outstanding properties such as high flowability, dense structure and high strength due to specific quality of aggregates, fillers, their proportion in mix, use of polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers. Main disadvantages of SCC are high price and the difficulty of obtaining a proper mix. Use of fillers, such as fly ash type F, is a way to make SCC cheaper by replacing part of cement. Fly ash also provides some technological and operating advantages. In this paper the influence of high volume (60% from cement fly ash type F on the properties of concrete mixture and hardened concrete is investigated. The result of the work shows the possibility of reduction the cost of SCC using ordinary fillers and high amount of fly ash. The investigated SCC has low speed of hardening (7-day compressive strength at the range of 41.8 MPa and high volume of entrained air content (3.5%.

  3. Self compacting concrete incorporating high-volumes of fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzoubaa, N. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). International Centre for Sustainable Development of Cement and Concrete; Lachemi, M. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Self-compacting concrete (SCC) is now widely used in reinforced concrete structures. Fine materials such as fly ash ensure that the concrete has the necessary properties of high fluidity and cohesiveness. An experimental study was conducted in which 9 SCC mixtures and one control concrete were produced in order to evaluate SCC made with high-volumes of fly ash. The content of the cementitious materials remained constant at 400 kg/cubic metre, but the ratio of water to cementitious material ranged from 0.35 to 0.45. The viscosity and stability of the fresh concrete was determined for self-compacting mixtures of 40, 50 and 60 per cent Class F fly ash. The compressive strength and drying shrinkage were also determined for the hardened concretes. Results showed that the SCCs developed a 28-day compressive strength ranging from 26 to 48 MPa. It was concluded that high-volumes of Class F fly ash could offer the following advantages to an SCC: reduced construction time and labour cost; eliminate the need for vibration; reduce noise pollution; improve the filling capacity of highly congested structural members; and, ensure good structural performance. 19 refs., 8 tabs., 2 figs.

  4. Radiological and material characterization of high volume fly ash concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignjatović, I; Sas, Z; Dragaš, J; Somlai, J; Kovács, T

    2017-03-01

    The main goal of research presented in this paper was the material and radiological characterization of high volume fly ash concrete (HVFAC) in terms of determination of natural radionuclide content and radon emanation and exhalation coefficients. All concrete samples were made with a fly ash content between 50% and 70% of the total amount of cementitious materials from one coal burning power plant in Serbia. Physical (fresh and hardened concrete density) and mechanical properties (compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and modulus of elasticity) of concrete were tested. The radionuclide content (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) and radon massic exhalation of HVFAC samples were determined using gamma spectrometry. Determination of massic exhalation rates of HVFAC and its components using radon accumulation chamber techniques combined with a radon monitor was performed. The results show a beneficial effect of pozzolanic activity since the increase in fly ash content resulted in an increase in compressive strength of HVFAC by approximately 20% for the same mass of cement used in the mixtures. On the basis of the obtained radionuclide content of concrete components the I -indices of different HVFAC samples were calculated and compared with measured values (0.27-0.32), which were significantly below the recommended 1.0 index value. The prediction was relatively close to the measured values as the ratio between the calculated and measured I-index ranged between 0.89 and 1.14. Collected results of mechanical and radiological properties and performed calculations clearly prove that all 10 designed concretes with a certain type of fly ash are suitable for structural and non-structural applications both from a material and radiological point of view. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. An Experimental Study of High Strength-High Volume Fly Ash Concrete for Sustainable Construction Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kate, Gunavant K.; Thakare, Sunil B., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Concrete is the most widely used building material in the construction of infrastructures such as buildings, bridges, highways, dams, and many other facilities. This paper reports the development, the basic idea, the main properties of high strength-high volume fly ash with application in concrete associated with the development and implementation of Sustainable Properties of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete (HVFAC) Mixtures and Early Age Shrinkage and mechanical properties of concrete for 7,28,56 and 90days. Another alternative to make environment-friendly concrete is the development of high strength-high-volume fly ash concrete which is an synthesized from materials of geological origin or by-product materials such as fly ash which is rich in silicon and aluminum. In this paper 6 concrete mixtures were produced to evaluate the effect of key parameters on the mechanical properties of concrete and its behavior. The study key parameters are; binder material content, cement replacement ratios, and the steel fibers used to High Volume Fly Ash mixtures for increasing performance of concrete.

  6. Mechanical behaviour and durability of high volume fly ash cementitious composites

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    Usman Haider

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to separate different morphological particles of ASTM class F fly ash, and study their effect on mechanical behaviour and durability of high volume cementitious mixtures. In this research wet separation of raw fly ash is carried out, which resulted in three layers of different morphological particles. The first layer of particles float, comprise of about 1-5% of fly ash, is identified as cenospheres or hollow spheres. The second layer of particles is measured to be 55-60% of raw fly ash and consisting of porous spherical and rounded particles rich in Si and Al. The third layer particles is measured to be about 35-40% of raw fly ash. High volume fly ash cementitious composites containing second or third layer particles are tested under compression and bending, highlighting a higher strength and ductility in comparison to cementitious ones containing raw fly ash particles

  7. The Effects of Design Strength, Fly Ash Content and Curing Method on Compressive Strength of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete: A Design of Experimental

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mochamad Solikin; Budi Setiawan

    2017-01-01

    ...) and the its durability increases significantly. This paper reports investigation on the effect of design strength, fly ash content and curing method on compressive strength of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete...

  8. Properties of High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete Reinforced with Natural Fibres

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    Rafat SIDDIQUE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Properties of high-volume fly ash concrete incorporating san fibres are presented in this paper. For this investigation, initially, three concrete mixtures were made with 35%, 45%, and 55% of Class F fly as partial replacement of cement. After this, three percentages (0.25, 0.50, and 0.75% of san fibres (25 mm length were added in each of the fly ash concrete mixtures. San is a natural bast fibre, and is also known as Sunn Hemp (Botanical name: Crotalaria Juncea. It is grown in Indian Sub-Continent, Brazil, Eastern and Southern Africa, and also in some parts of U.S.A. Tests were performed for compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, flexural strength, and impact strength at the ages of 28, 91 and 365 days. Tests were also performed for fresh concrete properties. 28 days test results indicated that san fibres reduced the compressive strength of high-volume fly ash concrete by 2 to 13%, increased splitting tensile strength by 6 to 26%, flexural strength by 5 to 14%, and enhanced impact strength tremendously (by 100 to 300% depending upon the fly ash content and fibre percentage. Later age (91 and 365 days results showed continuous increase in strength properties of high-volume fly ash concrete. This was probably be possible due to the pozzolanic action of fly ash, leading to more densification of the concrete matrix, and development of more effective bond between fibres and fly ash concrete matrix.

  9. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash

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    Isamu Yoshitake

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability.

  10. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Isamu; Ishida, Takeo; Fukumoto, Sunao

    2015-08-21

    Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability.

  11. The Effects of Design Strength, Fly Ash Content and Curing Method on Compressive Strength of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete: A Design of Experimental

    OpenAIRE

    Solikin Mochamad; Setiawan Budi

    2017-01-01

    High volume fly ash concrete becomes one of alternatives to produce green concrete as it uses waste material and significantly reduces the utilization of Portland cement in concrete production. Although using less cement, its compressive strength is comparable to ordinary Portland cement (hereafter OPC) and the its durability increases significantly. This paper reports investigation on the effect of design strength, fly ash content and curing method on compressive strength of High Volume Fly ...

  12. A Study on the Evaluation of Field Application of High-Fluidity Concrete Containing High Volume Fly Ash

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    Yun-Wang Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent concrete industry, high-fluidity concrete is being widely used for the pouring of dense reinforced concrete. Normally, in the case of high-fluidity concrete, it includes high binder contents, so it is necessary to replace part of the cement through admixtures such as fly ash to procure economic feasibility and durability. This study shows the mechanical properties and field applicability of high-fluidity concrete using mass of fly ash as alternative materials of cement. The high-fluidity concrete mixed with 50% fly ash was measured to manufacture concrete that applies low water/binder ratio to measure the mechanical characteristics as compressive strength and elastic modulus. Also, in order to evaluate the field applicability, high-fluidity concrete containing high volume fly ash was evaluated for fluidity, compressive strength, heat of hydration, and drying shrinkage of concrete.

  13. Optimisation of nano-silica modified self-compacting high-Volume fly ash mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achara, Bitrus Emmanuel; Mohammed, Bashar S.; Fadhil Nuruddin, Muhd

    2017-05-01

    Evaluation of the effects of nano-silica amount and superplasticizer (SP) dosage on the compressive strength, porosity and slump flow on high-volume fly ash self-consolidating mortar was investigated. Multiobjective optimisation technique using Design-Expert software was applied to obtain solution based on desirability function that simultaneously optimises the variables and the responses. A desirability function of 0.811 gives the optimised solution. The experimental and predicted results showed minimal errors in all the measured responses.

  14. Statistical evaluation of the mechanical properties of high-volume class F fly ash concretes

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Seyoon

    2014-03-01

    High-Volume Fly Ash (HVFA) concretes are seen by many as a feasible solution for sustainable, low embodied carbon construction. At the moment, fly ash is classified as a waste by-product, primarily of thermal power stations. In this paper the authors experimentally and statistically investigated the effects of mix-design factors on the mechanical properties of high-volume class F fly ash concretes. A total of 240 and 32 samples were produced and tested in the laboratory to measure compressive strength and Young\\'s modulus respectively. Applicability of the CEB-FIP (Comite Euro-international du Béton - Fédération Internationale de la Précontrainte) and ACI (American Concrete Institute) Building Model Code (Thomas, 2010; ACI Committee 209, 1982) [1,2] to the experimentally-derived mechanical property data for HVFA concretes was established. Furthermore, using multiple linear regression analysis, Mean Squared Residuals (MSRs) were obtained to determine whether a weight- or volume-based mix proportion is better to predict the mechanical properties of HVFA concrete. The significance levels of the design factors, which indicate how significantly the factors affect the HVFA concrete\\'s mechanical properties, were determined using analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests. The results show that a weight-based mix proportion is a slightly better predictor of mechanical properties than volume-based one. The significance level of fly ash substitution rate was higher than that of w/b ratio initially but reduced over time. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of Utilization of High-Volumes of Class F Fly Ash on the Abrasion Resistance of Concrete

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    William PRINCE

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of large volumes of fly ash in various concrete applications is a becoming a more general practice in an efforts towards using large quantities of fly ash. Around the world, Class C or Class F or both as available have been used in high volumes in cement-based materials. In India, majority of fly generated is of Class F type as per ASTM C 618. Yearly fly ash generation in India is approximately 95 million tonnes. Out of which around 15-20% is utilized in cement production and cement/concrete related activities. In order to increase its percentage utilization, an investigation was carried out to use it in concrete.In this paper, abrasion resistance of high volume fly ash (HVFA concretes made with 35, 45, 55, and 65% of cement replacement was evaluated in terms of its relation with compressive strength. Comparison was made between ordinary Portland cement and fly ash concrete. Test results indicated that abrasion resistance of concrete having cement replacement up to 35 percent was comparable to the normal concrete mix with out fly ash. Beyond 35% cement replacement, fly ash concretes exhibited slightly lower resistance to abrasion relative to non-fly ash concretes. Test results further indicated that abrasion resistance of concrete is closely related with compressive strength, and had a very good correlation between abrasion resistance and compressive strength (R2 value between 0.9018 and 0.9859 depending upon age.

  16. A comparative study of self-consolidating concretes incorporating high-volume natural pozzolan or high-volume fly ash

    KAUST Repository

    Celik, Kemal

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of Portland cement replacement on the strength and durability of self-consolidating concretes (SSC). The two replacement materials used are high-volume natural pozzolan (HVNP), a Saudi Arabian aluminum-silica rich basaltic glass and high-volume Class-F fly ash (HVFAF), from Jim Bridger Power Plant, Wyoming, US. As an extension of the study, limestone filler (LF) is also used to replace Portland cement, alongside HVNP or HVFAF, forming ternary blends. Along with compressive strength tests, non-steady state chloride migration and gas permeability tests were performed, as durability indicators, on SCC specimens. The results were compared to two reference concretes; 100% ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and 85% OPC - 15% LF by mass. The HVNP and HVFAF concrete mixes showed strength and durability results comparable to those of the reference concretes; identifying that both can effectively be used to produce low-cost and environmental friendly SCC. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Compression Behavior of Confined Columns with High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete

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    Sung-Won Yoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of fly ash in ordinary concrete provides practical benefits to concrete structures, such as a gain in long-term strength, reduced hydration heat, improved resistance to chloride, and enhanced workability. However, few studies with high-volume fly ash (HVFA concrete have been conducted that focus on the structural applications such as a column. Thus, there is a need to promote field applications of HVFA concrete as a sustainable construction material. To this end, this study investigated the compressive behavior of reinforced concrete columns that contain HVFA with a 50 percent replacement rate. Six columns were fabricated for this study. The study variables were the HVFA replacement rate, tied steel ratio, and tie steel spacing. The computed ultimate strength by the American Concrete Institute (ACI code conservatively predicted the measured values, and, thus, the existing equation in the ACI code is feasible for confined RC columns that contain HVFA. In addition, an analysis model was calibrated based on the experimental results and is recommended for predicting the stress-strain relationship of confined reinforced concrete columns that contain HVFA.

  18. Impact of Micro Silica on the properties of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete (HVFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripragadeesh, R.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Pugazhmani, G.; Ramasundram, S.; Muthu, D.; Venkatasubramanian, C.

    2017-07-01

    In the current situation, to overcome the difficulties of feasible construction, concrete made with various mixtures of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and diverse mineral admixtures, is the wise choice for engineering construction. Mineral admixtures viz. Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS), Meta kaolin (MK), Fly Ash (FA) and Silica Fume (SF) etc. are used as Supplementary Cementitious Materials (SCM) in binary and ternary blend cement system to enhance the mechanical and durability properties. Investigation on the effect of different replacement levels of OPC in M25 grade with FA + SF in ternary cement blend on the strength characteristics and beam behavior was studied. The OPC was partially replaced (by weight) with different combinations of SF (5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25%) and FA as 50% (High Volume Fly Ash - HVFA). The amount of FA addition is kept constant at 50% for all combinations. The compressive strength and tensile strength tests on cube and cylinder specimens, at 7 and 28 days were carried out. Based on the compressive strength results, optimum mix proportion was found out and flexural behaviour was studied for the optimum mix. It was found that all the mixes (FA + SF) showed improvement in compressive strength over that of the control mix and the mix with 50% FA + 10% SF has 20% increase over the control mix. The tensile strength was also increased over the control mix. Flexural behaviour also showed a significant improvement in the mix with FA and SF over the control mix.

  19. Fracture Toughness and Impact Strength of High-Volume Class-F Fly Ash Concrete Reinforced with Natural San Fibres

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    Rafat SIDDIQUE

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of experimental investigation carried out to study the effects of addition of natural san fibres on the fracture toughness and impact strength of high-volume fly ash concrete are presented in this paper. San fibres belong to the category of ‘Natural Bast Fibres’, also known as ‘Sunn Hemp’. Its scientific (botanical name is Crotalaria Juncea. It is mostly grown in the Indian Sub-Continent, Brazil, Eastern and Southern Africa, and in some parts of the U.S.A. Initially, a control mixture without fly ash was designed. Then, cement was replaced with three percentages (30, 40 and 50% of low-calcium (Class F fly ash. Three percentages of san fibres (0.30, 0.60 and 0.90%, having 25 mm length, were used. Tests were performed for compressive strength, fracture toughness, and impact strength at the ages of 28 and 91 days.The test results indicated that the replacement of cement with fly ash decreased the compressive strength and fracture toughness, and had no significant effect on the impact strength of plain (control concrete. Addition of san fibres did not affect significantly the compressive strength, increased the fracture toughness and impact strength of high-volume fly ash concrete as the percentage of fibres increased.

  20. A brief on high-volume Class F fly ash as cement replacement – A guide for Civil Engineer

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    Alaa M. Rashad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Disposal of fly ash (FA resulting from the combustion of coal-fired electric power stations is one of the major environmental challenges. This challenge continues to increase with increasing the amount of FA and decreasing the capacity of landfill space. Therefore, studies have been carried out to re-use high-volumes of fly ash (HVFA as cement replacement in building materials. This paper presents an overview of the previous studies carried out on the use of high volume Class F FA as a partial replacement of cement in traditional paste/mortar/concrete mixtures based on Portland cement (PC. Fresh properties, mechanical properties, abrasion resistance, thermal properties, drying shrinkage, porosity, water absorption, sorptivity, chemical resistance, carbonation resistance and electrical resistivity of paste/mortar/concrete mixtures containing HVFA (⩾45% as cement replacement have been reviewed. Furthermore, additives used to improve some properties of HVFA system have been reviewed.

  1. Properties of concrete incorporating high volumes of class F fly ash and san fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafat Siddique [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, UWM Center for By-Products Utilization, College of Engineering and Applied Science

    2004-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation to study the effects of replacement of cement (by mass) with three percentages of fly ash and the effects of addition of natural san fibers on the slump, Vebe time, compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, flexural strength and impact strength of fly ash concrete are presented. San fibers belong to the category of 'natural bast fibers.' It is also known as 'sunn hemp.' Its scientific (botanical) name is Crotalaria juncea. A control mixture of proportions 1:1.4:2.19 with W/Cm of 0.47 and superplasticizer/cementitious ratio of 0.015 was designed. Cement was replaced with three percentages (35%, 45% and 55%) of class F fly ash. Three percentages of san fibers (0.25%, 0.50% and 0.75%) having 25-mm length were used. The test results indicated that the replacement of cement with fly ash increased the workability (slump and Vebe time), decreased compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength and had no significant effect on the impact strength of plain (control) concrete. Addition of san fibers reduced the workability, did not significantly affect the compressive strength, increased the splitting tensile strength and flexural strength and tremendously enhanced the impact strength of fly ash concrete as the percentage of fibers increased.

  2. Effect of Copolymer Latexes on Physicomechanical Properties of Mortar Containing High Volume Fly Ash as a Replacement Material of Cement

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    El-Sayed Negim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the physicomechanical properties of mortar containing high volume of fly ash (FA as partial replacement of cement in presence of copolymer latexes. Portland cement (PC was partially replaced with 0, 10, 20, 30 50, and 60% FA. Copolymer latexes were used based on 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (2-HEA and 2-hydroxymethylacrylate (2-HEMA. Testing included workability, setting time, absorption, chemically combined water content, compressive strength, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The addition of FA to mortar as replacement of PC affected the physicomechanical properties of mortar. As the content of FA in the concrete increased, the setting times (initial and final were elongated. The results obtained at 28 days of curing indicate that the maximum properties of mortar occur at around 30% FA. Beyond 30% FA the properties of mortar reduce and at 60% FA the properties of mortar are lower than those of the reference mortar without FA. However, the addition of polymer latexes into mortar containing FA improved most of the physicomechanical properties of mortar at all curing times. Compressive strength, combined water, and workability of mortar containing FA premixed with latexes are higher than those of mortar containing FA without latexes.

  3. Effect of copolymer latexes on physicomechanical properties of mortar containing high volume fly ash as a replacement material of cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negim, El-Sayed; Kozhamzharova, Latipa; Gulzhakhan, Yeligbayeva; Khatib, Jamal; Bekbayeva, Lyazzat; Williams, Craig

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the physicomechanical properties of mortar containing high volume of fly ash (FA) as partial replacement of cement in presence of copolymer latexes. Portland cement (PC) was partially replaced with 0, 10, 20, 30 50, and 60% FA. Copolymer latexes were used based on 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (2-HEA) and 2-hydroxymethylacrylate (2-HEMA). Testing included workability, setting time, absorption, chemically combined water content, compressive strength, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of FA to mortar as replacement of PC affected the physicomechanical properties of mortar. As the content of FA in the concrete increased, the setting times (initial and final) were elongated. The results obtained at 28 days of curing indicate that the maximum properties of mortar occur at around 30% FA. Beyond 30% FA the properties of mortar reduce and at 60% FA the properties of mortar are lower than those of the reference mortar without FA. However, the addition of polymer latexes into mortar containing FA improved most of the physicomechanical properties of mortar at all curing times. Compressive strength, combined water, and workability of mortar containing FA premixed with latexes are higher than those of mortar containing FA without latexes.

  4. Degradation of self-compacting concrete (SCC) due to sulfuric acid attack: Experiment investigation on the effect of high volume fly ash content

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    Kristiawan, S. A.; Sunarmasto; Tyas, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Concrete is susceptible to a variety of chemical attacks. In the sulfuric acid environment, concrete is subjected to a combination of sulfuric and acid attack. This research is aimed to investigate the degradation of self-compacting concrete (SCC) due to sulfuric acid attack based on measurement of compressive strength loss and diameter change. Since the proportion of SCC contains higher cement than that of normal concrete, the vulnerability of this concrete to sulfuric acid attack could be reduced by partial replacement of cement with fly ash at high volume level. The effect of high volume fly ash at 50-70% cement replacement levels on the extent of degradation owing to sulfuric acid will be assessed in this study. It can be shown that an increase in the utilization of fly ash to partially replace cement tends to reduce the degradation as confirmed by less compressive strength loss and diameter change. The effect of fly ash to reduce the degradation of SCC is more pronounced at a later age.

  5. Experimental Study on Volume for Fly Ash of Building Block

    OpenAIRE

    Ling Wang; He Sun; Zhihui Sun; Enqing Ma

    2013-01-01

    Fly ash is a waste substance from thermal power plants, steel mills, etc. That is found in abundance in the world. It has polluted the environment, wasting the cultivated land. This study introduces an experimental research on fly ash being reused effectively, the study introduces raw materials of fly ash brick, production process and product inspection, fly ash content could be amounted to 40%~75%. High doping fly ash bricks are manufactured, which selects wet fly ash from the power plants, ...

  6. Effect of Climate Change on Service Life of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete Subjected to Carbonation—A Korean Case Study

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    Ki-Bong Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in CO2 concentrations and global warming will increase the carbonation depth of concrete. Furthermore, temperature rise will increase the rate of corrosion of steel rebar after carbonation. On the other hand, compared with normal concrete, high volume fly ash (HVFA concrete is more vulnerable to carbonation-induced corrosion. Carbonation durability design with climate change is crucial to the rational use of HVFA concrete. This study presents a probabilistic approach that predicts the service life of HVFA concrete structures subjected to carbonation-induced corrosion resulting from increasing CO2 concentrations and temperatures. First, in the corrosion initiation stage, a hydration-carbonation integration model is used to evaluate the contents of the carbonatable material, porosity, and carbonation depth of HVFA concrete. The Monte Carlo method is adopted to determine the probability of corrosion initiation. Second, in the corrosion propagation stage, an updated model is proposed to evaluate the rate of corrosion, degree of corrosion for cover cracking of concrete, and probability of corrosion cracking. Third, the whole service life is determined considering both corrosion initiation stage and corrosion propagation stage. The analysis results show that climate change creates a significant impact on the service life of durable concrete.

  7. Design and evaluation of high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete mixes, report E : hardened mechanical properties and durability performance of HVFA concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    A rising concern in todays construction industry is environmental responsibility. : The addition of fly ash is a leading innovation in sustainable design of concrete. Fly ash, : a waste by-product of coal burning power plants, can be used to repla...

  8. Respiration in High Flying: (United Services Section).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, G S

    1937-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure falls, as height increases, to about one-ninth of its sea-level value at 50,000 feet. The intake of oxygen into the blood depends on the partial pressure of oxygen in the inspired air, which is about one-fifth of the atmospheric pressure. But since the gaseous content of the lungs is saturated with water vapour at body temperature, 47 mm. Hg. of the atmospheric pressure in the lungs is due to water vapour and is therefore not available for oxygen or other gases, while the alveolar air contains also an almost constant pressure of 40 mm. CO(2).Mental and physical output demand an adequate partial pressure of O(2); they begin to be limited as soon as this falls, and at heights above 18,000 feet are seriously reduced. Consequently in order to fly higher than about 15,000 feet it is necessary to increase the partial pressure of oxygen in the inspired air. Up to about 44,000 feet this can be done by merely raising the percentage of oxygen, usually by allowing a regulated stream of oxygen to enter a small naso-buccal mask, but preferably by a closed system in which the negative pressure of inspiration opens a valve and allows oxygen to enter a bag from which it is inspired.Beyond 44,000 feet as a limit (and a lesser height for safety) it is necessary to create a local atmospheric pressure around the pilot higher than that of the surrounding air, by enclosing him in an airtight sit or cabin in which a relatively increased pressure with a maximum value of about 2(1/2) lb. per square inch is maintained, while he breathes pure oxygen. This device was used in the recent British world record high flight, when a height of 50,000 feet was attained. The pressure-suit used by the pilot on this occasion and the decompression chamber recently built at Farnborough are described in detail.

  9. Size fraction characterization of highly-calcareous fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itskos, Grigorios; Koukouzas, Nikolaos [Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, 357-359 Mesogeion Avenue, GR-152 31, Halandri, Athens (Greece); Itskos, Socrates [Department of Chemical Technology and the Environment, Steam Electric Station of Amynteon-Filotas, Public Power Corporation of Greece, GR-532 00, Amynteon (Greece)

    2010-11-15

    The chemical and mineralogical composition of lignite fly ash (FA) varies as a function of the prevalent conditions in both the processes of power production and lignite mining. The differentiation of the qualitative and quantitative composition of the highly-calcareous lignite fly ash, as a function of its particle size distribution, is verified in this paper. According to the results of the conducted research, a fine-grained fraction of considerable amount presents properties that obstruct the sustainable exploitation of calcareous lignite fly ash in cement industry applications. On the other hand, the same grain fraction (because of its hydraulic properties) can be utilized in other sort of applications, based on different criteria, i.e. in road constructions. The coarse-grained fraction (which reflects a low proportion to the total fly ash output) presents the same undesired characteristics as well. Rather, the intermediate grain fraction (75-150 {mu}m) presents the highly desirable properties when fly ash is utilized as a pozzolanic additive. In addition, the mechanism of the formation of the intermediate grain fraction strongly prevents the factors that cause the variation of fly ash-quality. It is therefore the optimum part of the whole amount of lignite FA, to be utilized as additive in cement manufacturing. The outcomes of this paper will hopefully contribute towards the crucial goal of the expansion of the utilization of calcareous lignite fly ash by proposing a more effective way of using this material, basically by taking advantage of its fundamental chemical and mineralogical properties. (author)

  10. HYDRA: High Speed Simulation Architecture for Precision Spacecraft Formation Flying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Bryan J.; Sohl, Garett A.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes HYDRA, which is architecture to facilitate high-fidelity and real-time simulation of formation flying missions. The contents include: 1) Motivation; 2) Objective; 3) HYDRA-Description and Overview; 4) HYDRA-Hierarchy; 5) Communication in HYDRA; 6) Simulation Specific Concerns in HYDRA; 7) Example application (Formation Acquisition); and 8) Sample Problem Results.

  11. The High Flying Leadership Qualities: What Matters the Most

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    which is an important leadership quality … If it’s important to the supervisor to develop skills and education in both them- selves and employees, it...IATIO N THE HIGH FLYING Leadership Qualities: What Matters the Most? Col Robert L. Tremaine, USAF (Ret.) Like many U.S. companies, the Department...every DoD organization invests in leadership development the same way. The ones that do think more deeply about their future have thoughtful and

  12. Aluminum recovery from coal fly ash by high temperature chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijatno, Hendra [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1977-10-01

    A study of aluminum recovery from power plant fly ash by high temperature chlorination was undertaken to demonstrate that fly ash could be a potential source of aluminum, iron and possibly silicon. Magnetic separation of the iron oxide served as a first step to alleviate the iron contamination problem. However, the agglomeration of some iron oxide with alumina and silica made it difficult to completely separate the iron from the fly ash. Further iron separation was achieved by chlorinating the nonmagnetic ash fraction at 550°C for 30 minutes. This reduced the iron oxide content to less than 4 percent by weight. Chlorine flow rates affected the reaction rate much more drastically than temperatures. This suggested that diffusion was the major rate-controlling step. Besides Fe2O3, Al2O3 and SiO2, other oxides such as CaO, K2O, Na2O and MgO might have complicated the alumina recovery by forming individual chlorides or complexes. Investigating methods for separating more Fe2O3, and possibly CaO, K2O, Na2O and MgO from the nonmagnetic ash fraction before chlorinating it is highly recommended.

  13. Fly Eye radar: detection through high scattered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanov, Pavlo; Gorwara, Ashok

    2017-05-01

    Longer radio frequency waves better penetrating through high scattered media than millimeter waves, but imaging resolution limited by diffraction at longer wavelength. Same time frequency and amplitudes of diffracted waves (frequency domain measurement) provides information of object. Phase shift of diffracted waves (phase front in time domain) consists information about shape of object and can be applied for reconstruction of object shape or even image by recording of multi-frequency digital hologram. Spectrum signature or refracted waves allows identify the object content. Application of monopulse method with overlap closely spaced antenna patterns provides high accuracy measurement of amplitude, phase, and direction to signal source. Digitizing of received signals separately in each antenna relative to processor time provides phase/frequency independence. Fly eye non-scanning multi-frequency radar system provides simultaneous continuous observation of multiple targets and wide possibilities for stepped frequency, simultaneous frequency, chaotic frequency sweeping waveform (CFS), polarization modulation for reliable object detection. Proposed c-band fly eye radar demonstrated human detection through 40 cm concrete brick wall with human and wall material spectrum signatures and can be applied for through wall human detection, landmines, improvised explosive devices detection, underground or camouflaged object imaging.

  14. High volume Pozzolan concrete:three years of industrial experience in Texas with CemPozz

    OpenAIRE

    Pike, Clinton W; Ronin, Vladimir; Elfgren, Lennart

    2009-01-01

    High Volume Pozzolan Concrete (HVPC) can be manufactured with low carbon dioxide footprint and energy consumption with the help of a new technology based on Energetically Modified Cement (EMC). The technology consists of mechanical processing a blend of ordinary portland cement (PC) and a pozzolan (Class F fly ash) through multiple high intensity grinding mills. The process imparts an increased surface activation of the PC and the pozzolan particles. Fly ash may be processed with all cements ...

  15. Thermal stability of nano structured fly ash synthesized by high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The size, shape and texture of the fresh as well as nano structured fly ash were studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The fresh ... The shape of the 30h milled particles is irregular and the surface morphology is rough. Isothermal ... Keywords: Nano materials, Particulates and Powders, XRD- analysis; Fly ash.

  16. Visualization of Projectile Flying at High Speed in Dusty Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Chihiro; Watanabe, Yasumasa; Suzuki, Kojiro

    2017-10-01

    Considering a spacecraft that encounters particle-laden environment, such as dust particles flying up over the regolith by the jet of the landing thruster, high-speed flight of a projectile in such environment was experimentally simulated by using the ballistic range. At high-speed collision of particles on the projectile surface, they may be reflected with cracking into smaller pieces. On the other hand, the projectile surface will be damaged by the collision. To obtain the fundamental characteristics of such complicated phenomena, a projectile was launched at the velocity up to 400 m/s and the collective behaviour of particles around projectile was observed by the high-speed camera. To eliminate the effect of the gas-particle interaction and to focus on only the effect of the interaction between the particles and the projectile's surface, the test chamber pressure was evacuated down to 30 Pa. The particles about 400μm diameter were scattered and formed a sheet of particles in the test chamber by using two-dimensional funnel with a narrow slit. The projectile was launched into the particle sheet in the tangential direction, and the high-speed camera captured both projectile and particle motions. From the movie, the interaction between the projectile and particle sheet was clarified.

  17. Workability and strength of coarse high calcium fly ash geopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Chindaprasirt; T. Chareerat; V. Sirivivatnanon [Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen (Thailand). Department of Civil Engineering

    2007-03-15

    In this paper, the basic properties viz., workability and strength of geopolymer mortar made from coarse lignite high calcium fly ash were investigated. The geopolymer was activated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium silicate and heat. The results revealed that the workable flow of geopolymer mortar was in the range of 110 {+-}5%-135 {+-}5% and was dependent on the ratio by mass of sodium silicate to NaOH and the concentration of NaOH. The obtained compressive strength was in the range of 10-65 MPa. The optimum sodium silicate to NaOH ratio to produce high strength geopolymer was 0.67-1.0. The concentration variation of NaOH between 10 M and 20 M was found to have a small effect on the strength. The geopolymer samples with high strength were obtained with the following practices: the delay time after moulding and before subjecting the sample to heat was 1 h and the optimum curing temperature in the oven was 75{sup o}C with the curing duration of not less than two days.

  18. Durability Study on High Calcium Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesan Lavanya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an investigation into the durability of geopolymer concrete prepared using high calcium fly ash along with alkaline activators when exposed to 2% solution of sulfuric acid and 5% magnesium sulphate for up to 45 days. The durability was also assessed by measuring water absorption and sorptivity. Ordinary Portland cement concrete was also prepared as control concrete. The grades chosen for the investigation were M20, M40, and M60. The alkaline solution used for present study is the combination of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solution with the ratio of 2.50. The molarity of sodium hydroxide was fixed as 12. The test specimens were 150×150×150 mm cubes, 100×200 mm cylinders, and 100×50 mm discs cured at ambient temperature. Surface deterioration, density, and strength over a period of 14, 28, and 45 days were observed. The results of geopolymer and ordinary Portland cement concrete were compared and discussed. After 45 days of exposure to the magnesium sulfate solution, the reduction in strength was up to 12% for geopolymer concrete and up to 25% for ordinary Portland cement concrete. After the same period of exposure to the sulphuric acid solution, the compressive strength decrease was up to 20% for geopolymer concrete and up to 28% for ordinary Portland cement concrete.

  19. A volume of intersection approach for on-the-fly system matrix calculation in 3D PET image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougovski, A.; Hofheinz, F.; Maus, J.; Schramm, G.; Will, E.; van den Hoff, J.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of on-the-fly volume of intersection computation for system’s geometry modelling in 3D PET image reconstruction. For this purpose we propose a simple geometrical model in which the cubic image voxels on the given Cartesian grid are approximated with spheres and the rectangular tubes of response (ToRs) are approximated with cylinders. The model was integrated into a fully 3D list-mode PET reconstruction for performance evaluation. In our model the volume of intersection between a voxel and the ToR is only a function of the impact parameter (the distance between voxel centre to ToR axis) but is independent of the relative orientation of voxel and ToR. This substantially reduces the computational complexity of the system matrix calculation. Based on phantom measurements it was determined that adjusting the diameters of the spherical voxel size and the ToR in such a way that the actual voxel and ToR volumes are conserved leads to the best compromise between high spatial resolution, low noise, and suppression of Gibbs artefacts in the reconstructed images. Phantom as well as clinical datasets from two different PET systems (Siemens ECAT HR+ and Philips Ingenuity-TF PET/MR) were processed using the developed and the respective vendor-provided (line of intersection related) reconstruction algorithms. A comparison of the reconstructed images demonstrated very good performance of the new approach. The evaluation showed the respective vendor-provided reconstruction algorithms to possess 34-41% lower resolution compared to the developed one while exhibiting comparable noise levels. Contrary to explicit point spread function modelling our model has a simple straight-forward implementation and it should be easy to integrate into existing reconstruction software, making it competitive to other existing resolution recovery techniques.

  20. Adaptive-Repetitive Visual-Servo Control of Low-Flying Aerial Robots via Uncalibrated High-Flying Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dejun; Bourne, Joseph R.; Wang, Hesheng; Yim, Woosoon; Leang, Kam K.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an adaptive-repetitive visual-servo control system for a moving high-flying vehicle (HFV) with an uncalibrated camera to monitor, track, and precisely control the movements of a low-flying vehicle (LFV) or mobile ground robot. Applications of this control strategy include the use of high-flying unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) with computer vision for monitoring, controlling, and coordinating the movements of lower altitude agents in areas, for example, where GPS signals may be unreliable or nonexistent. When deployed, a remote operator of the HFV defines the desired trajectory for the LFV in the HFV's camera frame. Due to the circular motion of the HFV, the resulting motion trajectory of the LFV in the image frame can be periodic in time, thus an adaptive-repetitive control system is exploited for regulation and/or trajectory tracking. The adaptive control law is able to handle uncertainties in the camera's intrinsic and extrinsic parameters. The design and stability analysis of the closed-loop control system is presented, where Lyapunov stability is shown. Simulation and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method for controlling the movement of a low-flying quadcopter, demonstrating the capabilities of the visual-servo control system for localization (i.e.,, motion capturing) and trajectory tracking control. In fact, results show that the LFV can be commanded to hover in place as well as track a user-defined flower-shaped closed trajectory, while the HFV and camera system circulates above with constant angular velocity. On average, the proposed adaptive-repetitive visual-servo control system reduces the average RMS tracking error by over 77% in the image plane and over 71% in the world frame compared to using just the adaptive visual-servo control law.

  1. Cellular lightweight concrete containing high-calcium fly ash and natural zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitchaiyaphum, Khamphee; Sinsiri, Theerawat; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2013-05-01

    Cellular lightweight concrete (CLC) with the controlled density of approximately 800 kg/m3 was made from a preformed foam, Type-I Portland cement (OPC), fly ash (FA), or natural zeolite (NZ), and its compressive strength, setting time, water absorption, and microstructure of were tested. High-calcium FA and NZ with the median particle sizes of 14.52 and 7.72 μm, respectively, were used to partially replace OPC at 0, 10wt%, 20wt%, and 30wt% of the binder (OPC and pozzolan admixture). A water-to-binder mass ratio (W/B) of 0.5 was used for all mixes. The testing results indicated that CLC containing 10wt% NZ had the highest compressive strength. The replacement of OPC with NZ decreased the total porosity and air void size but increased the capillary porosity of the CLC. The incorporation of a suitable amount of NZ decreased the setting time, total porosity, and pore size of the paste compared with the findings with the same amount of FA. The total porosity and cumulative pore volume decreased, whereas the gel and capillary pores increased as a result of adding both pozzolans at all replacement levels. The water absorption increased as the capillary porosity increased; this effect depended on the volume of air entrained and the type or amount of pozzolan.

  2. The High Teperature Influence on Geopolymer Fly Ash Mixture’s Compressisive Strength with Insudtrial Waste Material Substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuaji, R.; Wibowo, B.; Subekti, S.; Santoso, S. E.; Hardiyanto, E.; Kaelani, Y.; Mallu, L. L.

    2017-11-01

    This research aimed to figure out the influence of fly ash mixture from the industrial waste at the temperatures of 150°C, 450°C, 750°C viewed from the strength and resistance of geopolymer paste. As a result, cement will be substituted by industrial waste like fly ash. This experimental research was conducted on the mix design of geopolymer concrete which was made by dimension with 2.5 cm in diameter and 5 cm in height from four mixture composition of fly ash and industrial waste i.e. 100% fly ash, 50% fly ash+50% bottom ash, 50% fly ash+50% sandblast, and 50% fly ash+50% carbide waste. Each mixture was tested in terms of porosity and compressive strength. In conclusion, in the mixture of 50% fly ash+50% Sandblast and 50% fly ash+50% bottom ash in 12 molars, 1.5 activator comparison can be used to substitute fly ash at high temperature. Meanwhile, the mixture of 50% fly ash+50% carbide waste in 8 molars, 0.5 activator comparison has very small strength remaining if it is compared to the mixture of fly ash and other industrial waste (Bottom ash and Sandblast). The performance of mixture paste of 50% fly ash+50% carbide waste was very vulnerable after being burnt. Consequently, it cannot be used as the main structure at high temperature.

  3. Zeolite synthesis from a high Si-Al fly ash from East China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, R.; Umana, J.C.; Querol, X.; Lopez-Soler, A.; Plana, F.; Zhuang, X. [CAS, Beijing (China). Inst. of Geology & Geophysics

    2002-07-01

    A high Al-Si Chinese fly ash from Dou He power plant (Tangshan city, Hebei Province, Eastern China) was selected as starting material of the zeolitisation process. Zeolitic material was obtained by conventional alkaline activation using NaOH and KOH solutions. The process of synthesis was optimised by applying a wide range of reaction temperature, time and activation reagent concentrations. A high solution/fly ash ratio was used in order to dissolve highly resistant Al-Si phases such as mullite. High yields were obtained with both KOH and NaOH solutions. Final products reached a cation exchange capacity (CEC) of up to 2.3 meq g{sup 3}. Major zeolites obtained with a high CEC were: NaP1, KM and F-linde zeolite. The low contents of major impurities of this fly ash enhance the potential application for the synthesis of zeolites for waste-water treatment.

  4. High Production Volume Information System (HPVIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The High Production Volume Information System (HPVIS) provides access to select health and environmental effect information on chemicals that are manufactured in...

  5. Fly ash mixtures as flexible structural materials for low-volume roads

    OpenAIRE

    Lahtinen, Pentti

    2001-01-01

    Extensive research and several studies have been carried out on the recycling of industrial by-products in soil construction in Finland in the 1990's. The research and studies have been made mainly in the laboratory of SCC Viatek Ltd SGT in cooperation with the public research institutes. The main beneficiaries have been the industry, the national road administration and the municipalities. The Doctoral Thesis focuses on the versatile usage opportunities of the fly ashes (FA) from the com...

  6. Prediction of the Chloride Resistance of Concrete Modified with High Calcium Fly Ash Using Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Michał; Glinicki, Michał A; Gibas, Karolina

    2015-12-11

    The aim of the study was to generate rules for the prediction of the chloride resistance of concrete modified with high calcium fly ash using machine learning methods. The rapid chloride permeability test, according to the Nordtest Method Build 492, was used for determining the chloride ions' penetration in concrete containing high calcium fly ash (HCFA) for partial replacement of Portland cement. The results of the performed tests were used as the training set to generate rules describing the relation between material composition and the chloride resistance. Multiple methods for rule generation were applied and compared. The rules generated by algorithm J48 from the Weka workbench provided the means for adequate classification of plain concretes and concretes modified with high calcium fly ash as materials of good, acceptable or unacceptable resistance to chloride penetration.

  7. High-Resolution Remotely Sensed Small Target Detection by Imitating Fly Visual Perception Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengchen Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty and limitation of small target detection methods for high-resolution remote sensing data have been a recent research hot spot. Inspired by the information capture and processing theory of fly visual system, this paper endeavors to construct a characterized model of information perception and make use of the advantages of fast and accurate small target detection under complex varied nature environment. The proposed model forms a theoretical basis of small target detection for high-resolution remote sensing data. After the comparison of prevailing simulation mechanism behind fly visual systems, we propose a fly-imitated visual system method of information processing for high-resolution remote sensing data. A small target detector and corresponding detection algorithm are designed by simulating the mechanism of information acquisition, compression, and fusion of fly visual system and the function of pool cell and the character of nonlinear self-adaption. Experiments verify the feasibility and rationality of the proposed small target detection model and fly-imitated visual perception method.

  8. High-resolution remotely sensed small target detection by imitating fly visual perception mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fengchen; Xu, Lizhong; Li, Min; Tang, Min

    2012-01-01

    The difficulty and limitation of small target detection methods for high-resolution remote sensing data have been a recent research hot spot. Inspired by the information capture and processing theory of fly visual system, this paper endeavors to construct a characterized model of information perception and make use of the advantages of fast and accurate small target detection under complex varied nature environment. The proposed model forms a theoretical basis of small target detection for high-resolution remote sensing data. After the comparison of prevailing simulation mechanism behind fly visual systems, we propose a fly-imitated visual system method of information processing for high-resolution remote sensing data. A small target detector and corresponding detection algorithm are designed by simulating the mechanism of information acquisition, compression, and fusion of fly visual system and the function of pool cell and the character of nonlinear self-adaption. Experiments verify the feasibility and rationality of the proposed small target detection model and fly-imitated visual perception method.

  9. Utilize Cementitious High Carbon Fly Ash (CHCFA) to Stabilize Cold In-Place Recycled (CIR) Asphalt Pavement as Base Coarse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Haifang; Li, Xiaojun; Edil, Tuncer; O' Donnell, Jonathan; Danda, Swapna

    2011-02-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cementitious high carbon fly ash (CHCFA) stabilized recycled asphalt pavement as a base course material in a real world setting. Three test road cells were built at MnROAD facility in Minnesota. These cells have the same asphalt surface layers, subbases, and subgrades, but three different base courses: conventional crushed aggregates, untreated recycled pavement materials (RPM), and CHCFA stabilized RPM materials. During and after the construction of the three cells, laboratory and field tests were carried out to characterize the material properties. The test results were used in the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) to predict the pavement performance. Based on the performance prediction, the life cycle analyses of cost, energy consumption, and greenhouse gasses were performed. The leaching impacts of these three types of base materials were compared. The laboratory and field tests showed that fly ash stabilized RPM had higher modulus than crushed aggregate and RPM did. Based on the MEPDG performance prediction, the service life of the Cell 79 containing fly ash stabilized RPM, is 23.5 years, which is about twice the service life (11 years) of the Cell 77 with RPM base, and about three times the service life (7.5 years) of the Cell 78 with crushed aggregate base. The life cycle analysis indicated that the usage of the fly ash stabilized RPM as the base of the flexible pavement can significantly reduce the life cycle cost, the energy consumption, the greenhouse gases emission. Concentrations of many trace elements, particularly those with relatively low water quality standards, diminish over time as water flows through the pavement profile. For many elements, concentrations below US water drinking water quality standards are attained at the bottom of the pavement profile within 2-4 pore volumes of flow.

  10. Immobilization and volume reduction of heavy metals in municipal solid waste fly ash using nano-size calcium and iron-dispersed reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Simion, Cristian; Lee, Byoung Ho

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to examine the synthesis and application of novel nano-size calcium/iron-based composite material as an immobilizing and separation treatment of the heavy metals in fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration. After grinding with nano-Fe/Ca/CaO and with nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO₄], approximately 30 wt% and 25 wt% of magnetic fraction fly ash were separated. The highest amount of entrapped heavy metals was found in the lowest weight of the magnetically separated fly ash fraction (i.e., 91% in 25% of treated fly ash). Heavy metals in the magnetic or nonmagnetic fly ash fractions were about 98% and 100% immobilized, respectively. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) observations indicate that the main fraction of enclosed/bound materials on treated fly ash includes Ca/PO₄-associated crystalline complexes. After nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO₄] treatment, the heavy metal concentrations in the fly ash leachate were much lower than the Japan standard regulatory limit for hazardous waste landfills. These results appear to be extremely promising. The addition of a nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/PO₄mixture with simple grinding technique is potentially applicable for the remediation and volume reduction of fly ash contaminated by heavy metals. After grinding with nano-Fe/Ca/CaO and nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO₄], approximately 30 wt% and 25 wt% of magnetic fraction fly ash were separated. The highest amount of entrapped heavy metals was found in the lowest weight of the magnetically separated fly ash fraction (i.e., 91% in 25% of treated fly ash), whereas heavy metals either in the magnetic or nonmagnetic fly ash fractions were about 98% and 100% immobilized. These results appear to be very promising, and the addition of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/PO₄mixture with simple grinding technique may be considered potentially applicable for the remediation and volume reduction of contaminated fly ash by heavy metals.

  11. High-speed laser microsurgery of alert fruit flies for fluorescence imaging of neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Supriyo; Liang, Liang; Ho, Eric T W; Urbanek, Karel E; Luo, Liqun; Baer, Thomas M; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2013-11-12

    Intravital microscopy is a key means of monitoring cellular function in live organisms, but surgical preparation of a live animal for microscopy often is time-consuming, requires considerable skill, and limits experimental throughput. Here we introduce a spatially precise (laser and the fruit fly as a model, we created observation windows (12- to 350-µm diameters) in the exoskeleton. Through these windows we used two-photon microscopy to image odor-evoked Ca(2+) signaling in projection neuron dendrites of the antennal lobe and Kenyon cells of the mushroom body. The impact of a laser-cut window on fly health appears to be substantially less than that of conventional manual dissection, for our imaging durations of up to 18 h were ∼5-20 times longer than prior in vivo microscopy studies of hand-dissected flies. This improvement will facilitate studies of numerous questions in neuroscience, such as those regarding neuronal plasticity or learning and memory. As a control, we used phototaxis as an exemplary complex behavior in flies and found that laser microsurgery is sufficiently gentle to leave it intact. To demonstrate that our techniques are applicable to other species, we created microsurgical openings in nematodes, ants, and the mouse cranium. In conjunction with emerging robotic methods for handling and mounting flies or other small organisms, our rapid, precisely controllable, and highly repeatable microsurgical techniques should enable automated, high-throughput preparation of live animals for optical experimentation.

  12. High-speed laser microsurgery of alert fruit flies for fluorescence imaging of neural activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Supriyo; Liang, Liang; Ho, Eric T. W.; Urbanek, Karel E.; Luo, Liqun; Baer, Thomas M.; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is a key means of monitoring cellular function in live organisms, but surgical preparation of a live animal for microscopy often is time-consuming, requires considerable skill, and limits experimental throughput. Here we introduce a spatially precise (laser and the fruit fly as a model, we created observation windows (12- to 350-µm diameters) in the exoskeleton. Through these windows we used two-photon microscopy to image odor-evoked Ca2+ signaling in projection neuron dendrites of the antennal lobe and Kenyon cells of the mushroom body. The impact of a laser-cut window on fly health appears to be substantially less than that of conventional manual dissection, for our imaging durations of up to 18 h were ∼5–20 times longer than prior in vivo microscopy studies of hand-dissected flies. This improvement will facilitate studies of numerous questions in neuroscience, such as those regarding neuronal plasticity or learning and memory. As a control, we used phototaxis as an exemplary complex behavior in flies and found that laser microsurgery is sufficiently gentle to leave it intact. To demonstrate that our techniques are applicable to other species, we created microsurgical openings in nematodes, ants, and the mouse cranium. In conjunction with emerging robotic methods for handling and mounting flies or other small organisms, our rapid, precisely controllable, and highly repeatable microsurgical techniques should enable automated, high-throughput preparation of live animals for optical experimentation. PMID:24167298

  13. Lateral-Directional Eigenvector Flying Qualities Guidelines for High Performance Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, John B.; Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the development of lateral-directional flying qualities guidelines with application to eigenspace (eigenstructure) assignment methods. These guidelines will assist designers in choosing eigenvectors to achieve desired closed-loop flying qualities or performing trade-offs between flying qualities and other important design requirements, such as achieving realizable gain magnitudes or desired system robustness. This has been accomplished by developing relationships between the system's eigenvectors and the roll rate and sideslip transfer functions. Using these relationships, along with constraints imposed by system dynamics, key eigenvector elements are identified and guidelines for choosing values of these elements to yield desirable flying qualities have been developed. Two guidelines are developed - one for low roll-to-sideslip ratio and one for moderate-to-high roll-to-sideslip ratio. These flying qualities guidelines are based upon the Military Standard lateral-directional coupling criteria for high performance aircraft - the roll rate oscillation criteria and the sideslip excursion criteria. Example guidelines are generated for a moderate-to-large, an intermediate, and low value of roll-to-sideslip ratio.

  14. MANAGING HIGH-END, HIGH-VOLUME INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gembong Baskoro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discuses the concept of managing high-end, high-volume innovative products. High-end, high-volume consumer products are products that have considerable influence to the way of life. Characteristic of High-end, high-volume consumer products are (1 short cycle time, (2 quick obsolete time, and (3 rapid price erosion. Beside the disadvantages that they are high risk for manufacturers, if manufacturers are able to understand precisely the consumer needs then they have the potential benefit or success to be the market leader. High innovation implies to high utilization of the user, therefore these products can influence indirectly to the way of people life. The objective of managing them is to achieve sustainability of the products development and innovation. This paper observes the behavior of these products in companies operated in high-end, high-volume consumer product.

  15. Extraction and recovery of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from highly sorptive matrices such as fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W. H.; Caton, J. E.; Guerin, M. R.; Yeatts, Jr., L. B.; Higgins, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The highly sorptive nature of some potentially environmentally significant materials such as fly ash may seriously hinder quantitative extraction of their sorbed organic content. Radiolabeled tracers offer a convenient means of probing the sorptive nature of such matrices and of obtaining the corrections for extraction and handling recoveries which are necessary to quantitative analysis.

  16. Hydrophobic high surface area zeolites derived from fly ash for oil spill remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, Tamilselvan; Reid, David L; Goldstein, Ian; Hench, Larry; Seal, Sudipta

    2013-06-04

    Fly ash, a coal combustion byproduct with a predominantly aluminosilicate composition, is modified to develop an inexpensive sorbent for oil spill remediation. The as-produced fly ash is a hydrophilic material with poor sorption capacity. A simple two-step chemical modification process is designed to improve the oil sorption capacity. First, the fly ash was transformed to a zeolitic material via an alkali treatment, which increased the specific surface area up to 404 m(2) g(-1). Then, the material was surface functionalized to form a hydrophobic material with high contact angle up to 147° that floats on the surface of an oil-water mixture. The reported oil sorption capacities of X-type zeolite sorbent with different surface functionalization (propyl-, octyl-, octadecyl-trimethoxysilane and esterification) were estimated to 1.10, 1.02, 0.86, and 1.15 g g(-1), respectively. Oil sorption was about five times higher than the as-received fly ash (0.19 g g(-1)) and also had high buoyancy critical for economic cleanup of oil over water.

  17. Effect of adding acid solution on setting time and compressive strength of high calcium fly ash based geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Herianto, Jason Ghorman; Anastasia, Evelin; Hardjito, Djwantoro

    2017-09-01

    Fly ash with high calcium oxide content when used as the base material in geopolymer concrete could cause flash setting or rapid hardening. However, it might increase the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete. This rapid hardening could cause problems if the geopolymer concrete is used on a large scale casting that requires a long setting time. CaO content can be indicated by pH values of the fly ash, while higher pH is correlated with the rapid setting time of fly ash-based geopolymer. This study investigates the addition of acid solution to reduce the initial pH of the fly ash and to prolong the setting time of the mixture. The acids used in this study are hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfuric acid (H2 SO4), nitric acid (HNO3) and acetic acid (CH3 COOH). It was found that the addition of acid solution in fly ash was able to decrease the initial pH of fly ash, however, the initial setting time of geopolymer was not reduced. It was even faster than that of the control mixture. The acid type causes various influence, depending on the fly ash properties. In addition, the use of acid solution in fly ash reduces the compressive strength of geopolymer mortar. It is concluded that the addition of acid solution cannot prolong the rapid hardening of high calcium fly ash geopolymer, and it causes adverse effect on the compressive strength.

  18. Fresh properties and compressive strength of high calcium alkali activated fly ash mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslam Gomaa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the fresh properties and compressive strength of high calcium alkali-activated fly ash (AAFA mortar. Two different sources of class C fly ash, with different chemical compositions were used to prepare alkali-activated mortar mixtures. Four different sodium silicate to sodium hydroxide (SS/SH ratios of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.5 were used as alkaline activators with a constant sodium hydroxide concentration of 10 M. Two curing regimes were also applied, oven curing at 70 °C for 24 h, and ambient curing at 23 ± 2 °C. The rest time, i.e., the time between casting the mortar cubes and starting the oven curing was 2 h. The results revealed that the setting time, and workability of mortar decreased with increasing the alkali to fly ash ratio, and decreasing the water to fly ash ratio. The optimum sodium silicate to sodium hydroxide ratio was 1.0, which showed the highest compressive strength and setting time. An increase of sodium silicate to sodium hydroxide ratio to 2.5 led to a significant reduction in the setting time, and workability of mortar. The 7-day compressive strength of the mortar approached 20.80 MPa for ambient cured regime and 41.10 for oven cured regime.

  19. Mechanically activated fly ash as a high performance binder for civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, D.; Kullová, L.; Čekalová, M.; Novotný, P.; Pola, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study is aimed for investigation of fly ash binder with suitable properties for civil engineering needs. The fly ash from Czech brown coal power plant Prunerov II was used and mechanically activated to achieve suitable particle size for alkaline activation of hardening process. This process is driven by dissolution of aluminosilicate content of fly ash and by subsequent development of inorganic polymeric network called geopolymer. Hardening kinetics at 25 and 30 °C were measured by strain controlled small amplitude oscillatory rheometry with strain of 0.01 % and microstructure of hardened binder was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Strength development of hardened binder was investigated according to compressional and flexural strength for a period of 180 days. Our investigation finds out, that mechanically activated fly ash can be comparable to metakaolin geopolymers, according to setting time and mechanical parameters even at room temperature curing. Moreover, on the bases of long time strength development, achieved compressional strength of 134.5 after 180 days is comparable to performance of high grade Portland cement concretes.

  20. Effects of fly ash fineness on the mechanical properties of concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1. Introduction. Fly ash is an industrial waste and a material of puzzolanic characteristic occurring due to burn- ... important factor affecting index of puzzolanic activity was fineness of the fly ash, not its chemical composition. ..... Siddique R 2003 Performance characteristics of high-volume class f fly ash concrete. Cement and ...

  1. High tidal volume ventilation in infant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizzaro, Vincenzo; Zosky, Graeme R; Hantos, Zoltán; Turner, Debra J; Sly, Peter D

    2008-06-30

    Infant mice were ventilated with either high tidal volume (V(T)) with zero end-expiratory pressure (HVZ), high V(T) with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (HVP), or low V(T) with PEEP. Thoracic gas volume (TGV) was determined plethysmographically and low-frequency forced oscillations were used to measure the input impedance of the respiratory system. Inflammatory cells, total protein, and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum were measured as markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammatory response, respectively. Coefficients of tissue damping and tissue elastance increased in all ventilated mice, with the largest rise seen in the HVZ group where TGV rapidly decreased. BALF protein levels increased in the HVP group, whereas serum IL-6 rose in the HVZ group. PEEP keeps the lungs open, but provides high volumes to the entire lungs and induces lung injury. Compared to studies in adult and non-neonatal rodents, infant mice demonstrate a different response to similar ventilation strategies underscoring the need for age-specific animal models.

  2. Equilibrium and kinetic mechanism for Reactive Black 5 sorption onto high lime Soma fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Zeynep; Acar, Filiz Nuran

    2007-05-08

    Batch adsorption studies were carried out for the sorption of C.I. Reactive Black 5, a reactive dye, onto high lime fly ash, obtained from Soma Thermal Power Plant (Turkey), to be low cost adsorbent. The effect of various experimental parameters such as contact time, adsorbent dose and initial dye concentration were investigated. Determination of the adsorption equilibrium concentrations was determined by UV-vis spectrophotometry analytical method. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm equations and the equilibrium data were found to be well represented by the Freundlich isotherm equation. The adsorption kinetics of C.I. Reactive Black 5 onto high lime fly ash were also studied to characterize of the surface complexation reaction. A pseudo-second-order mechanism has been developed to predict the rate constant of the adsorption, the equilibrium capacity and initial adsorption rate with the effect of initial concentration. A single-stage batch adsorber design of the adsorption of C.I. Reactive Black 5 onto high lime fly ash has been studied based on the Freundlich isotherm equation.

  3. High dynamic, low volume GPS receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A new GPS receiver concept and design are presented to meet the high dynamic and low volume requirements for range applications in missiles and drones. The receiver has the potential to satisfy all range requirements with one basic receiver, which has significant potential economic benefit over the alternate approach of using a family of receivers, each tailored for specific applications. The main new concept is to use approximate maximum likelihood estimates of pseudo range and range-rate, rather than tracking with carrier phase locked loops and code delay locked loops. Preliminary analysis indicates that receivers accelerating at 50 g or more can track with position errors due to acceleration of approximately 0.2 m/g, or 10 m at 50 g. Implementation is almost entirely digital to meet the low volume requirements.

  4. High throughput preparation of fly genomic DNA in 96-well format using a paint-shaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Michael; Nagy, Olga; Lang, Claus; Orgogozo, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Sample homogenization is an essential step for genomic DNA extraction, with multiple downstream applications in Molecular Biology. Genotyping hundreds or thousands of samples requires an automation of this homogenization step, and high throughput homogenizer equipment currently costs 7000 euros or more. We present an apparatus for homogenization of individual Drosophila adult flies in 96-well micro-titer dishes, which was built from a small portable paint-shaker (F5 portable paint-shaker, Ushake). Single flies are disrupted in each well that contains extraction buffer and a 4-mm metal ball. Our apparatus can hold up to five 96-well micro-titer plates. Construction of the homogenizer apparatus takes about 3-4 days, and all equipment can be obtained from a home improvement store. The total material cost is approximately 700 euros including the paint-shaker. We tested the performance of our apparatus using the ZR-96 Quick-gDNA™ kit (Zymo Research) homogenization buffer and achieved nearly complete tissue homogenization after 15 minutes of shaking. PCR tests did not detect any cross contamination between samples of neighboring wells. We obtained on average 138 ng of genomic DNA per fly, and DNA quality was adequate for standard PCR applications. In principle, our tissue homogenizer can be used for isolation of DNA suitable for library production and high throughput genotyping by Multiplexed Shotgun Genotyping (MSG), as well as RNA isolation from single flies. The sample adapter can also hold and shake other items, such as centrifuge tubes (15-50 mL) or small bottles.

  5. High volume production of nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Morrell, Jonathan S [Knoxville, TN; Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-13

    A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

  6. Testing candidate genes for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in fruit flies using a high throughput assay for complex behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Madsen, Lisbeth Strøm; Arvidson, Sandra Marie Neumann

    2016-01-01

    Fruit flies are important model organisms for functional testing of candidate genes in multiple disciplines, including the study of human diseases. Here we use a high-throughput locomotor activity assay to test the response on activity behavior of gene disruption in Drosophila melanogaster. The aim...... was to investigate the impact of disruption of 14 candidate genes for human attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on fly behavior. By obtaining a range of correlated measures describing the space of variables for behavioral activity we show, that some mutants display similar phenotypic responses...... in fruit flies. Results provide additional support for the investigated genes being risk candidate genes for ADHD in humans....

  7. High data volume seismology: Surviving the avalanche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotwell, Henry Philip

    Seismic data volumes have increased in the past twenty years with the Incorporated Research Institutes for Seismology's Data Management Center currently archiving upwards of 14 terabytes per year and this trend will continue (Ahern, 2006). Data volumes are quickly reaching the point at which the individual seismologist can be overwhelmed with the avalanche of data. We present three studies at the intersection of seismology and software development that aim to enable more efficient use of data by practicing seismologists. The first is the TauP Toolkit which calculates the travel times of seismic waves through custom one dimensional earth models. TauP also allows almost arbitrary phases to be used and is incorporated into a wide variety of seismology software. TauP is available at http://www.seis.sc.edu/TauP. The second is a study of the compression of seismic data, allowing more efficient storage and transmission. We find that the predictive operator used can have a significant effect on the compression used, and in many cases second differencing can be noticeably better than first differencing. The last is the EarthScope Automated Receiver Survey, which aims to calculate bulk crustal properties for all three component broadband seismic stations available in the US in a highly automated manner. Because of the high degree of automation, the project has been extended to calculated crustal thickness and Vp/V s for global stations as well. Results are available at http://www.seis.sc.edu/ears.

  8. High Strength Lightweight Concrete Made with Ternary Mixtures of Cement-Fly Ash-Silica Fume and Scoria as Aggregate

    OpenAIRE

    Yaşar, Ergül; ATIŞ, Cengiz Duran; KILIÇ, Alaettin

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents part of the results of an ongoing laboratory study carried out to design a structural lightweight high strength concrete (SLWHSC) made with and without ternary mixtures of cement-fly ash-silica fume. In the mixtures, lightweight basaltic-pumice (scoria) aggregate was used. A concrete mixture made with lightweight scoria, and another lightweight scoria concrete mixture incorporating 20% fly ash and 10% silica fume as a cement replacement, were prepared. Two normal...

  9. High tensile strength fly ash based geopolymer composite using copper coated micro steel fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mehdi; Mehrali, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    As a ceramic-like material, geopolymers show a high quasi-brittle behavior and relatively low fracture energy. To overcome this, the addition of fibers to a brittle matrix is a well-known method to improve the flexural strength. Moreover, the success of the reinforcements is dependent on the fiber...... of 56 days. Test results confirmed that MSF additions could significantly improve both ultimate flexural capacity and ductility of fly ash based geopolymer, especially at early ages without an adverse effect on ultimate compressive strength....

  10. Influence of high volumes of ultra-fine additions on self-compacting concrete[ACI SP-239

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cioffi, R. [Naples Univ., Naples (Italy). Faculty of Engineering; Colangelo, F. [Naples Univ., Naples (Italy). Dept. of Technologies; Caputo, D.; Liguori, B. [Naples Univ., Naples (Italy). Dept. of Materials and Production Engineering

    2006-07-01

    The addition of fine minerals can reduce water demand and increase the slump characteristics of concrete. This paper examined the influence of high volumes of ultra-fine fly ash, raw fly ash, silica fume and natural zeolites on the properties of self-compacting concrete (SCC). Three samples of SCC were prepared using various mineral additions to determine normal slump and J-ring slump flows of fresh concrete as well as the compressive strength and elastic modulus properties of hardened concrete. Cement and crushed limestone natural aggregates were used. The fly ash, silica fume and natural zeolites were subjected to wet high energy milling. The rotating speed, milling time, water-to-solid ratio, and size of milling media were optimized to obtain powders with varying qualities. Results of the study showed that values for the normal slump flow ranged between 604 and 785 mm, while the differences with the J-ring slump flow were less than 30 mm. The samples were then tested to evaluate the mechanical properties of the hardened concrete after 7 and 28 curing days. The modulus of elasticity and compressive strength showed improvements in the concretes containing the ultra-fine fly ash. No segregation phenomena were observed in the case of the cylindrical column specimens. It was concluded that all the specimens provided environmentally sustainable, high workability concretes which can be successfully prepared with the addition of high volumes of minerals. 17 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs.

  11. Semi-analytical method for calculating aeroelastic effect of profiled rod flying at high velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-jun Ning

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The key technique of a kinetic energy rod (KER warhead is to control the flight attitude of rods. The rods are usually designed to different shapes. A new conceptual KER named profiled rod which has large L/D ratio is described in this paper. The elastic dynamic equations of this profiled rod flying at high velocity after detonation are set up on the basis of Euler-Bernoulli beam, and the aeroelastic deformation of profiled rod is calculated by semi-analytical method for calculating the vibration characteristics of variable cross-section beam. In addition, the aeroelastic deformation of the undeformed profiled rod and the aeroelastic deformation of deformed profiled rod which is caused by the detonation of explosive are simulated by computational fluid dynamic and finite element method (CFD/FEM, respectively. A satisfactory agreement of these two methods is obtained by the comparison of two methods. The results show that the semi-analytical method for calculating the vibration characteristics of variable cross-section beam is applied to analyze the aeroelastic deformation of profiled rod flying at high velocity.

  12. High Temperature Fission Chamber for He- and FLiBe-cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Zane W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giuliano, Dominic R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lance, Michael J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warmack, Robert J. Bruce [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated candidate technologies for in-core fission chambers for high-temperature reactors to monitor power level via measurements of neutron flux from start-up through full power at up to 800°C. This research is important because there are no commercially available instruments capable of operating above 550 °C. Component materials and processes were investigated for fission chambers suitable for operation at 800 °C in reactors cooled by molten fluoride salt (FLiBe) or flowing He, with an emphasis placed on sensitivity (≥ 1 cps/nv), service lifetime (2 years at full power), and resistance to direct immersion in FLiBe. The latter gives the instrument the ability to survive accidents involving breach of a thimble. The device is envisioned to be a two-gap, three-electrode instrument constructed from concentric nickel-plated alumina cylinders and using a noble gas–nitrogen fill-gas. We report the results of measurements and calculations of the response of fill gasses, impurity migration in nickel alloy, brazing of the alumina insulator, and thermodynamic calculations.

  13. Properties of high calcium fly ash geopolymer pastes with Portland cement as an additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoo-ngernkham, Tanakorn; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Sata, Vanchai; Pangdaeng, Saengsuree; Sinsiri, Theerawat

    2013-02-01

    The effect of Portland cement (OPC) addition on the properties of high calcium fly ash geopolymer pastes was investigated in the paper. OPC partially replaced fly ash (FA) at the dosages of 0, 5%, 10%, and 15% by mass of binder. Sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions were used as the liquid portion in the mixture: NaOH 10 mol/L, Na2SiO3/NaOH with a mass ratio of 2.0, and alkaline liquid/binder (L/B) with a mass ratio of 0.6. The curing at 60°C for 24 h was used to accelerate the geopolymerization. The setting time of all fresh pastes, porosity, and compressive strength of the pastes at the stages of 1, 7, 28, and 90 d were tested. The elastic modulus and strain capacity of the pastes at the stage of 7 d were determined. It is revealed that the use of OPC as an additive to replace part of FA results in the decreases in the setting time, porosity, and strain capacity of the paste specimens, while the compressive strength and elastic modulus seem to increase.

  14. High-resolution gene expression data from blastoderm embryos of the scuttle fly Megaselia abdita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotton, Karl R; Jiménez-Guri, Eva; Crombach, Anton; Cicin-Sain, Damjan; Jaeger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Gap genes are involved in segment determination during early development in dipteran insects (flies, midges, and mosquitoes). We carried out a systematic quantitative comparative analysis of the gap gene network across different dipteran species. Our work provides mechanistic insights into the evolution of this pattern-forming network. As a central component of our project, we created a high-resolution quantitative spatio-temporal data set of gap and maternal co-ordinate gene expression in the blastoderm embryo of the non-drosophilid scuttle fly, Megaselia abdita. Our data include expression patterns in both wild-type and RNAi-treated embryos. The data-covering 10 genes, 10 time points, and over 1,000 individual embryos-consist of original embryo images, quantified expression profiles, extracted positions of expression boundaries, and integrated expression patterns, plus metadata and intermediate processing steps. These data provide a valuable resource for researchers interested in the comparative study of gene regulatory networks and pattern formation, an essential step towards a more quantitative and mechanistic understanding of developmental evolution.

  15. Ultrasonic characterization of GRC with high percentage of fly ash substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovés, V; Gosálbez, J; Miralles, R; Bonilla, M; Payá, J

    2015-07-01

    New applications of non-destructive techniques (NDT) with ultrasonic tests (attenuation and velocity by means of ultrasonic frequency sweeps) have been developed for the characterization of fibre-reinforced cementitious composites. According to new lines of research on glass-fibre reinforced cement (GRC) matrix modification, two similar GRC composites with high percentages of fly ash and different water/binder ratios will be studied. Conventional techniques have been used to confirm their low Ca(OH)(2) content (thermogravimetry), fibre integrity (Scanning Electron Microscopy), low porosity (Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry) and good mechanical properties (compression and four points bending test). Ultrasound frequency sweeps allowed the estimation of the attenuation and pulse velocity as functions of frequency. This ultrasonic characterization was correlated successfully with conventional techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Observations of movement dynamics of flying insects using high resolution lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Carsten Thure; Wellenreuther, Maren; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Insects are fundamental to ecosystem functioning and biodiversity, yet the study of insect movement, dispersal and activity patterns remains a challenge. Here we present results from a novel high resolution laser-radar (lidar) system for quantifying flying insect abundance recorded during one...... insects (wing size insects (wing size >2.5 mm2 in cross-section) were most abundant near the lidar beam before 22:00 and then moved towards the light trap between 22:00 and 23:30. We...... summer night in Sweden. We compare lidar recordings with data from a light trap deployed alongside the lidar. A total of 22808 insect were recorded, and the relative temporal quantities measured matched the quantities recorded with the light trap within a radius of 5 m. Lidar records showed that small...

  17. Influence of portland cement replacement in high calcium fly ash geopolymer paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanakorn Phoo-ngernkham

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the influence of ordinary Portland cement (OPC replacement in high calcium fly ash (FA geopolymer paste. FA was used to replace OPC at the rate of 5, 10 and 15% by mass of binder. Sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 and 10 molar sodium hydroxide (NaOH solutions were used as the alkaline solution in the reaction. The Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio of 2.0 and the liquid/binder (L/B ratio of 0.60 were used in all mixtures. The results of increase OPC replacement, the setting time and compressive strain capacity decreased while the compressive strength and modulus of elasticity increased. The compressive strength and modulus of elasticity at 28 days of geopolymer pastes with 15% OPC replacement were 36.7 MPa and 13,300 MPa, respectively.

  18. The maximum percentage of fly ash to replace part of original Portland cement (OPC) in producing high strength concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallisa, Harun; Turuallo, Gidion

    2017-11-01

    This research investigates the maximum percent of fly ash to replace part of Orginal Portland Cement (OPC) in producing high strength concrete. Many researchers have found that the incorporation of industrial by-products such as fly ash as in producing concrete can improve properties in both fresh and hardened state of concrete. The water-binder ratio was used 0.30. The used sand was medium sand with the maximum size of coarse aggregate was 20 mm. The cement was Type I, which was Bosowa Cement produced by PT Bosowa. The percentages of fly ash to the total of a binder, which were used in this research, were 0, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30%; while the super platicizer used was typed Naptha 511P. The results showed that the replacement cement up to 25 % of the total weight of binder resulted compressive strength higher than the minimum strength at one day of high-strength concrete.

  19. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnquist, Norman [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Qi, Xuele [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Raminosoa, Tsarafidy [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Salas, Ken [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Samudrala, Omprakash [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Shah, Manoj [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Van Dam, Jeremy [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Yin, Weijun [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Zia, Jalal [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany)

    2013-12-20

    This report summarizes the progress made during the April 01, 2010 – December 30, 2013 period under Cooperative Agreement DE-EE0002752 for the U.S. Department of Energy entitled “High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems.” The overall objective of this program is to advance the technology for well fluids lifting systems to meet the foreseeable pressure, temperature, and longevity needs of the Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) industry for the coming ten years. In this program, lifting system requirements for EGS wells were established via consultation with industry experts and site visits. A number of artificial lift technologies were evaluated with regard to their applicability to EGS applications; it was determined that a system based on electric submersible pump (ESP) technology was best suited to EGS. Technical barriers were identified and a component-level technology development program was undertaken to address each barrier, with the most challenging being the development of a power-dense, small diameter motor that can operate reliably in a 300°C environment for up to three years. Some of the targeted individual component technologies include permanent magnet motor construction, high-temperature insulation, dielectrics, bearings, seals, thrust washers, and pump impellers/diffusers. Advances were also made in thermal management of electric motors. In addition to the overall system design for a full-scale EGS application, a subscale prototype was designed and fabricated. Like the full-scale design, the subscale prototype features a novel “flow-through-the-bore” permanent magnet electric motor that combines the use of high temperature materials with an internal cooling scheme that limits peak internal temperatures to <330°C. While the full-scale high-volume multi-stage pump is designed to lift up to 80 kg/s of process water, the subscale prototype is based on a production design that can pump 20 kg/s and has been modified

  20. Elevated performance: the unique physiology of birds that fly at high altitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Graham R

    2011-08-01

    Birds that fly at high altitudes must support vigorous exercise in oxygen-thin environments. Here I discuss the characteristics that help high fliers sustain the high rates of metabolism needed for flight at elevation. Many traits in the O(2) transport pathway distinguish birds in general from other vertebrates. These include enhanced gas-exchange efficiency in the lungs, maintenance of O(2) delivery and oxygenation in the brain during hypoxia, augmented O(2) diffusion capacity in peripheral tissues and a high aerobic capacity. These traits are not high-altitude adaptations, because they are also characteristic of lowland birds, but are nonetheless important for hypoxia tolerance and exercise capacity. However, unique specializations also appear to have arisen, presumably by high-altitude adaptation, at every step in the O(2) pathway of highland species. The distinctive features of high fliers include an enhanced hypoxic ventilatory response, an effective breathing pattern, larger lungs, haemoglobin with a higher O(2) affinity, further augmentation of O(2) diffusion capacity in the periphery and multiple alterations in the metabolic properties of cardiac and skeletal muscle. These unique specializations improve the uptake, circulation and efficient utilization of O(2) during high-altitude hypoxia. High-altitude birds also have larger wings than their lowland relatives to reduce the metabolic costs of staying aloft in low-density air. High fliers are therefore unique in many ways, but the relative roles of adaptation and plasticity (acclimatization) in high-altitude flight are still unclear. Disentangling these roles will be instrumental if we are to understand the physiological basis of altitudinal range limits and how they might shift in response to climate change.

  1. The FlyCatwalk: a high-throughput feature-based sorting system for artificial selection in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Vasco; Vonesch, Sibylle Chantal; Fry, Steven N; Hafen, Ernst

    2015-01-02

    Experimental evolution is a powerful tool for investigating complex traits. Artificial selection can be applied for a specific trait and the resulting phenotypically divergent populations pool-sequenced to identify alleles that occur at substantially different frequencies in the extreme populations. To maximize the proportion of loci that are causal to the phenotype among all enriched loci, population size and number of replicates need to be high. These requirements have, in fact, limited evolution studies in higher organisms, where the time investment required for phenotyping is often prohibitive for large-scale studies. Animal size is a highly multigenic trait that remains poorly understood, and an experimental evolution approach may thus aid in gaining new insights into the genetic basis of this trait. To this end, we developed the FlyCatwalk, a fully automated, high-throughput system to sort live fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) based on morphometric traits. With the FlyCatwalk, we can detect gender and quantify body and wing morphology parameters at a four-old higher throughput compared with manual processing. The phenotyping results acquired using the FlyCatwalk correlate well with those obtained using the standard manual procedure. We demonstrate that an automated, high-throughput, feature-based sorting system is able to avoid previous limitations in population size and replicate numbers. Our approach can likewise be applied for a variety of traits and experimental settings that require high-throughput phenotyping. Copyright © 2015 Medici et al.

  2. The FlyCatwalk: A High-Throughput Feature-Based Sorting System for Artificial Selection in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Vasco; Vonesch, Sibylle Chantal; Fry, Steven N.; Hafen, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evolution is a powerful tool for investigating complex traits. Artificial selection can be applied for a specific trait and the resulting phenotypically divergent populations pool-sequenced to identify alleles that occur at substantially different frequencies in the extreme populations. To maximize the proportion of loci that are causal to the phenotype among all enriched loci, population size and number of replicates need to be high. These requirements have, in fact, limited evolution studies in higher organisms, where the time investment required for phenotyping is often prohibitive for large-scale studies. Animal size is a highly multigenic trait that remains poorly understood, and an experimental evolution approach may thus aid in gaining new insights into the genetic basis of this trait. To this end, we developed the FlyCatwalk, a fully automated, high-throughput system to sort live fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) based on morphometric traits. With the FlyCatwalk, we can detect gender and quantify body and wing morphology parameters at a four-old higher throughput compared with manual processing. The phenotyping results acquired using the FlyCatwalk correlate well with those obtained using the standard manual procedure. We demonstrate that an automated, high-throughput, feature-based sorting system is able to avoid previous limitations in population size and replicate numbers. Our approach can likewise be applied for a variety of traits and experimental settings that require high-throughput phenotyping. PMID:25556112

  3. Pulse volume discharges in high pressure gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamshchikov, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    New approach for suppression of plasma inhomogeneities and instabilities in the volume self-sustained discharge is offered. The physical model is offered and conditions of obtaining extremely homogeneous self-sustained discharge are defined (with full suppression of plasma inhomogeneity and instability). Results of calculations agree with experiments.

  4. High stenghth concrete with high cement substitution by adding fly ash, CaCO3, silica sand, and superplasticizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicaksono, Muchammad Ridho Sigit; Qoly, Amelia; Hidayah, Annisaul; Pangestuti, Endah Kanti

    2017-03-01

    Concrete is a mixture of cement, fine aggregate, coarse aggregate and water with or without additives. Concrete can be made with substitution of cement with materials like Fly Ash, CaCO3 and silica sand that can increase the binding on pasta and also increase the compressive strength of concrete. The Superplasticizer on a mixture is used to reduce the high water content, improve concrete durability, low permeability concrete by making it more resilient, and improve the quality of concrete. The combination between Fly Ash (30% of cement required), CaCO3 (10% of cement required) and silica sand (5% of cement required) with added MasterGlenium ACE 8595 as much as 1,2% from total cement will produces compressive strength of up to 1080 kN/cm2 or 73,34 Mpa when the concrete is aged at 28 day. By using this technique and innovation, it proves that the cost reduction is calculated at 27%, which is much more efficient. While the strength of the concrete is increased at 5% compared with normal mixture.

  5. Turbulence and Flying Machines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 11. Turbulence and Flying Machines. Rama Govindarajan. General Article Volume 4 Issue 11 November 1999 pp 54-62. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/11/0054-0062 ...

  6. Design of a high altitude long endurance flying-wing solar-powered unmanned air vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahlani, A. A.; Johnston, L. J.; Atcliffe, P. A.

    2017-06-01

    The low-Reynolds number environment of high-altitude §ight places severe demands on the aerodynamic design and stability and control of a high altitude, long endurance (HALE) unmanned air vehicle (UAV). The aerodynamic efficiency of a §ying-wing configuration makes it an attractive design option for such an application and is investigated in the present work. The proposed configuration has a high-aspect ratio, swept-wing planform, the wing sweep being necessary to provide an adequate moment arm for outboard longitudinal and lateral control surfaces. A design optimization framework is developed under a MATLAB environment, combining aerodynamic, structural, and stability analysis. Low-order analysis tools are employed to facilitate efficient computations, which is important when there are multiple optimization loops for the various engineering analyses. In particular, a vortex-lattice method is used to compute the wing planform aerodynamics, coupled to a twodimensional (2D) panel method to derive aerofoil sectional characteristics. Integral boundary-layer methods are coupled to the panel method in order to predict §ow separation boundaries during the design iterations. A quasi-analytical method is adapted for application to flyingwing con¦gurations to predict the wing weight and a linear finite-beam element approach is used for structural analysis of the wing-box. Stability is a particular concern in the low-density environment of high-altitude flight for flying-wing aircraft and so provision of adequate directional stability and control power forms part of the optimization process. At present, a modified Genetic Algorithm is used in all of the optimization loops. Each of the low-order engineering analysis tools is validated using higher-order methods to provide con¦dence in the use of these computationally-efficient tools in the present design-optimization framework. This paper includes the results of employing the present optimization tools in the design of a

  7. Evaluation of the Chemical and Mechanical Properties of Hardening High-Calcium Fly Ash Blended Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Yong; Park, Ki-Bong

    2015-09-07

    High-calcium fly ash (FH) is the combustion residue from electric power plants burning lignite or sub-bituminous coal. As a mineral admixture, FH can be used to produce high-strength concrete and high-performance concrete. The development of chemical and mechanical properties is a crucial factor for appropriately using FH in the concrete industry. To achieve sustainable development in the concrete industry, this paper presents a theoretical model to systematically evaluate the property developments of FH blended concrete. The proposed model analyzes the cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of phases in FH other than free CaO. The mutual interactions among cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of other phases in FH are also considered through the calcium hydroxide contents and the capillary water contents. Using the hydration degree of cement, the reaction degree of free CaO in FH, and the reaction degree of other phases in FH, the proposed model evaluates the calcium hydroxide contents, the reaction degree of FH, chemically bound water, porosity, and the compressive strength of hardening concrete with different water to binder ratios and FH replacement ratios. The evaluated results are compared to experimental results, and good consistencies are found.

  8. To fly or not to fly: high flight costs in a large sea duck do not imply an expensive lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, David; Guillemette, Magella; Grandbois, Jean-Marc; Butler, Patrick J

    2008-09-22

    A perennial question in ornithology is whether flight has evolved mostly to facilitate access to food or as an anti-predator strategy. However, flight is an expensive mode of locomotion and species using flight regularly are associated with an expensive lifestyle. Using heart rate (HR) data loggers implanted in 13 female common eiders (Somateria mollissima), our objective was to test the hypothesis that a high level of flight activity increases their energy budget. We used the long-term recording (seven months) of HR as an index of energy expenditure and the HR flight signature to compile all flight events. Our results indicate that the eider is one of the thriftiest volant birds with only 10 minutes of flight time per day. Consequently, we were not able to detect any effect of flight activity on their energy budget despite very high flight costs (123-149 W), suggesting that flight was controlled by energy budget limitations. However, the low flight activity of that species may also be related to their prey landscape requiring few or no large-scale movements. Nevertheless, we suggest that the (fitness) benefits of keeping flight ability in this species exceed the costs by allowing a higher survival in relation to predation and environmental harshness.

  9. The high strain rate compressive response of Mg-Al alloy/fly Ash cenosphere composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Dung D.; Gupta, Nikhil; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2011-02-01

    The strain rate dependence of mechanical properties of AZ91D alloy composites filled with 5 wt.% hollow fly ash cenosphere is examined in the strain rate range of 630-1,203 s-1 using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar system. In addition, a test scheme is designed to study the intermediate strain rate response of the material. Addition of fly ash caused grain refinement and finer precipitates in the matrix alloy. Compared to the matrix alloy, the energy absorption is higher in AZ91D/fly ash cenosphere composites at comparable strain rates. In addition, the yield strength is found to be about 19-41% higher in the composites containing fly ash cenospheres.

  10. Applying GIS and high performance agent-based simulation for managing an Old World Screwworm fly invasion of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M C; Kwan, P W; Sajeev, A S M

    2014-10-01

    Agent-based modelling has proven to be a promising approach for developing rich simulations for complex phenomena that provide decision support functions across a broad range of areas including biological, social and agricultural sciences. This paper demonstrates how high performance computing technologies, namely General-Purpose Computing on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU), and commercial Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be applied to develop a national scale, agent-based simulation of an incursion of Old World Screwworm fly (OWS fly) into the Australian mainland. The development of this simulation model leverages the combination of massively data-parallel processing capabilities supported by NVidia's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) and the advanced spatial visualisation capabilities of GIS. These technologies have enabled the implementation of an individual-based, stochastic lifecycle and dispersal algorithm for the OWS fly invasion. The simulation model draws upon a wide range of biological data as input to stochastically determine the reproduction and survival of the OWS fly through the different stages of its lifecycle and dispersal of gravid females. Through this model, a highly efficient computational platform has been developed for studying the effectiveness of control and mitigation strategies and their associated economic impact on livestock industries can be materialised. Copyright © 2014 International Atomic Energy Agency 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. High-speed volume measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Michael H.; Doyle, Jr., James L.; Brinkman, Michael J.

    2018-01-30

    Disclosed is a volume sensor having a first axis, a second axis, and a third axis, each axis including a laser source configured to emit a beam; a parallel beam generating assembly configured to receive the beam and split the beam into a first parallel beam and a second parallel beam, a beam-collimating assembly configured to receive the first parallel beam and the second parallel beam and output a first beam sheet and a second beam sheet, the first beam sheet and the second beam sheet being configured to traverse the object aperture; a first collecting lens and a second collecting lens; and a first photodetector and a second photodetector, the first photodetector and the second photodetector configured to output an electrical signal proportional to the object; wherein the first axis, the second axis, and the third axis are arranged at an angular offset with respect to each other.

  12. Assessment of fly ash-aided phytostabilisation of highly contaminated soils after an 8-year field trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourrut, Bertrand [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Groupe ISA, Equipe Sols et Environnement, Laboratoire Genie Civil et geoEnvironnement (LGCgE) Lille Nord de France EA 4515, 48 boulevard Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France); Lopareva-Pohu, Alena [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Groupe ISA, Equipe Sols et Environnement, Laboratoire Genie Civil et geoEnvironnement (LGCgE) Lille Nord de France EA 4515, 48 boulevard Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France); Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, Unite de Chimie Environnementale et Interaction sur le Vivant (UCEIV), EA 4492, Maison de la Recherche en Environnement Industriel de Dunkerque 2, avenue Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Pruvot, Christelle [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Groupe ISA, Equipe Sols et Environnement, Laboratoire Genie Civil et geoEnvironnement (LGCgE) Lille Nord de France EA 4515, 48 boulevard Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France); Garcon, Guillaume; Verdin, Anthony [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, Unite de Chimie Environnementale et Interaction sur le Vivant (UCEIV), EA 4492, Maison de la Recherche en Environnement Industriel de Dunkerque 2, avenue Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Waterlot, Christophe; Bidar, Geraldine [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Groupe ISA, Equipe Sols et Environnement, Laboratoire Genie Civil et geoEnvironnement (LGCgE) Lille Nord de France EA 4515, 48 boulevard Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France); Shirali, Pirouz [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, Unite de Chimie Environnementale et Interaction sur le Vivant (UCEIV), EA 4492, Maison de la Recherche en Environnement Industriel de Dunkerque 2, avenue Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); and others

    2011-10-01

    Aided phytostabilisation is a cost-efficient technique to manage metal-contaminated areas, particularly in the presence of extensive pollution. Plant establishment and survival in highly metal-contaminated soils are crucial for phytostabilisation success, as metal toxicity for plants is widely reported. A relevant phytostabilisation solution must limit metal transfer through the food chain. Therefore, this study aimed at evaluating the long-term efficiency of aided phytostabilisation on former agricultural soils highly contaminated by cadmium, lead, and zinc. The influence of afforestation and fly ash amendments on reducing metal phytoavailability was investigated as were their effects on plant development. Before being planted with a tree mix, the site was divided into three plots: a reference plot with no amendment, a plot amended with silico-aluminous fly ash and one with sulfo-calcic fly ash. Unlike Salix alba and Quercus robur, Alnus glutinosa, Acer pseudoplatanus and Robinia pseudoacacia grew well on the site and accumulated, overall, quite low concentrations of metals in their leaves and young twigs. This suggests that these three species have an excluder phenotype for Cd, Zn and Pb. After 8 years, metal availability to A. glutinosa, A. pseudoplatanus and R. pseudoacacia, and translocation to their above-ground parts, strongly decreased in fly ash-amended soils. Such decreases fit well together with the depletion of CaCl{sub 2}-extractable metals in amended soils. Although both fly ashes were effective to decrease Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations in above-ground parts of trees, the sulfo-calcic ash was more efficient.

  13. R&D of Novel Materials for Animal Litters Using High Carbon Fly Ash Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boxley, Chett J. [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kadota, Rod [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-10-29

    This research program performed by Ceramatec may significantly increase the beneficial utilization of fly ash, and improve the overall performance of high quality animal litter products. Ceramatec has developed a novel high surface area material, which is capable of ammonia adsorption. High surface area zeolites when combined with agglomerated fly ash can significantly reduce the use of naturally mined materials (i.e. clay bentonite) for animal litter manufacture. This not only preserves natural resources and the natural environment, but it also will reduce CO2 emissions, via the reduced need for heavy mining equipment. This novel animal litter is made with over 85% of recycled materials, thus preventing their disposition to landfills. The novel litter material is similar to traditional clay-like litters, and it is clumpable and has superior odor control properties.

  14. Thaumasite formation in concrete and mortars containing fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Mulenga; J. Stark; P. Nobst [Bauhaus-University, Weimar (Germany). F.A. Finger-Institute of Material Sciences

    2003-12-01

    Due to recent reports on deterioration of concrete structures, the thaumasite form of sulfate attack has become a subject of study and close investigation. This paper investigates the formation of thaumasite in concrete and mortars containing fly ash. The results show that thaumasite formation can occur within 84 days of exposure to sulfate solutions. High volumes of fly ash can limit or promote thaumasite formation depending on the type of cement used. Thaumasite and ettringite were found among the deterioration products. However, the thaumasite formation in the specimen prepared from sulfate resisting Portland cement was not accompanied by deterioration, except by 50% fly ash addition. The mixtures of Portland limestone cement with 40% fly ash exhibited a very limited thaumasite formation while the mixtures with 50% had no thaumasite at all. It is concluded that thaumasite can also be formed in mixtures incorporating fly ash.

  15. Flying Things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cermak, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Daniel Cermak-Sassenrath. Flying Things. Installation. Kulturnatten 2016, Danish Science Ministry, Copenhagen, DK, Oct 14, 2016.......Daniel Cermak-Sassenrath. Flying Things. Installation. Kulturnatten 2016, Danish Science Ministry, Copenhagen, DK, Oct 14, 2016....

  16. A high unburned carbon fly ash concrete’s performance characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Patricia Valderrama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering today requires that structures are strong and durable; the latter concept is a decisive factor in their design and construction. The scientific community continues developing new cementitious materials and improving tra-ditional concrete’s properties, specifically reducing permeability by incorporating materials such as pozzolans. This paper analyses the effect of fly ash (FA added to concrete on mechanical strength regarding compression, capillary absorption and chloride permeability and their behaviour compared to concrete containing silica fume (SF. An optimum 10% mechanical strength was found for fly ash; however, this increased with addition, resulting in positive effects on durability. Fly ash had lower performance for all properties evaluated when compared to silica fume.

  17. Fly ash porous material using geopolymerization process for high temperature exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Jamaludin, Liyana; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ghazali, Che Mohd Ruzaidi; Ahmad, Mohd Izzat

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of temperature on geopolymers manufactured using pozzolanic materials (fly ash). In this paper, we report on our investigation of the performance of porous geopolymers made with fly ash after exposure to temperatures from 600 °C up to 1000 °C. The research methodology consisted of pozzolanic materials (fly ash) synthesized with a mixture of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solution as an alkaline activator. Foaming agent solution was added to geopolymer paste. The geopolymer paste samples were cured at 60 °C for one day and the geopolymers samples were sintered from 600 °C to 1000 °C to evaluate strength loss due to thermal damage. We also studied their phase formation and microstructure. The heated geopolymers samples were tested by compressive strength after three days. The results showed that the porous geopolymers exhibited strength increases after temperature exposure.

  18. Fly Ash Porous Material using Geopolymerization Process for High Temperature Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Izzat Ahmad

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of temperature on geopolymers manufactured using pozzolanic materials (fly ash. In this paper, we report on our investigation of the performance of porous geopolymers made with fly ash after exposure to temperatures from 600 °C up to 1000 °C. The research methodology consisted of pozzolanic materials (fly ash synthesized with a mixture of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solution as an alkaline activator. Foaming agent solution was added to geopolymer paste. The geopolymer paste samples were cured at 60 °C for one day and the geopolymers samples were sintered from 600 °C to 1000 °C to evaluate strength loss due to thermal damage. We also studied their phase formation and microstructure. The heated geopolymers samples were tested by compressive strength after three days. The results showed that the porous geopolymers exhibited strength increases after temperature exposure.

  19. High-resolution nanoprobe X-ray fluorescence characterization of heterogeneous calcium and heavy metal distributions in alkali-activated fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provis, John L; Rose, Volker; Bernal, Susan A; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2009-10-06

    The nanoscale distribution of elements within fly ash and the aluminosilicate gel products of its alkaline activation ("fly ash geopolymers") are analyzed by means of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence using a hard X-ray Nanoprobe instrument. The distribution of calcium within a hydroxide-activated (fly ash/KOH solution) geopolymer gel is seen to be highly heterogeneous, with these data providing for the first time direct evidence of the formation of discrete high-calcium particles within the binder structure of a geopolymer synthesized from a low-calcium (geopolymer gel binder structure surrounding the unreacted fly ash particles. This has important implications for the understanding of calcium chemistry within aluminosilicate geopolymer gel phases. Additionally, chromium and iron are seen to be very closely correlated within the structures of both fly ash and the geopolymer product and remain within the regions of the geopolymer which can be identified as unreacted fly ash particles. Given that the potential for chromium release has been one of the queries surrounding the widespread utilization of construction materials derived from fly ash, the observation that this element appears to be localized within the fly ash rather than dispersed throughout the gel binder indicates that it is unlikely to be released problematically into the environment.

  20. Sustainable concrete with high volume GGBFS to build Masdar City in the UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elchalakani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Masdar City (MC is leading the Middle East in the development of energy and resource efficient low-carbon construction in the United Arab Emirates (UAE. One of its major goals is to develop and specify materials and processes that will help reducing its environmental footprint through resource and energy conservation, as well as renewable energy generation. In 2010 MC announced on its website a prized-competition for the best proposal of “Sustainable Concrete” and “Lowest Carbon Footprint” to build MC with a total of two million cubic meter of concrete on 4 years period. This paper presents the experimental test results of 13 types of concrete mixes made with high volume of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS cement with 50%, 60%, 70% and 80% replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC to reduce the carbon emissions. A fly ash-blended mix made with 30% fly ash was also tested. The paper provides more information on the mix design parameter, full justification of CO2 footprint, and cost reduction for each concrete type. The hardened and plastic properties and durability test parameters for each mix are presented. The results show that the slag concrete mixes significantly reduce the carbon footprint and meet the requirements of MC. An economical mix with 80% GGBFS and 20% OPC was nominated for use in the future construction of MC with 154 kg/m3 carbon foot print.

  1. Ternary Blends of High Aluminate Cement, Fly ash and Blast-furnace slag for Sewerage Lining Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, L. C.; Kuo, C. P.

    2018-01-01

    High aluminate cement (HAC), fly ash (FA) and blast-furnace slag (BFS) have been treated sustainable materials for the use of cement products for wastewater infrastructure due to their capabilities of corrosion resistance. The purpose of this study is to optimize a ternary blend of above mentioned materials for a special type of mortar for sewerage lining. By the using of Taguchi method, four control parameters including water/cementitious material ratio, mix water content, fly ash content and blast-furnace slag content were considered in nine trial mix designs in this study. By evaluating target properties including (1) maximization of compressive strength, (2) maximization of electricity resistance and (3) minimization of water absorption rate, the best possible levels for each control parameter were determined and the optimal mix proportions were verified. Through the implementation of the study, a practical and completed idea for designing corrosion resistive mortar comprising HAC, FA and BSF is provided.

  2. Review: Potential Strength of Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Paste with Substitution of Local Waste Materials with High-Temperature Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subekti, S.; Bayuaji, R.; Darmawan, M. S.; Husin, N. A.; Wibowo, B.; Anugraha, B.; Irawan, S.; Dibiantara, D.

    2017-11-01

    This research provided an overview of the potential fly ash based geopolymer paste for application in building construction. Geopolymer paste with various variations of fly ash substitution with local waste material and high-temperature influence exploited with the fresh and hardened condition. The local waste material which utilized for this study were sandblasting waste, carbide waste, shell powder, bagasse ash, rice husk and bottom ash. The findings of this study indicated that fly-based geopolymer paste with local waste material substitution which had high-temperature influence ash showed a similar nature of OPC binders potentially used in civil engineering applications.

  3. High energy gain by volume ignition-A tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliezer, S.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Piera, M. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Polytechnical University of Madrid (Spain); Hora, H. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Polytechnical University of Madrid (Spain)]|[Theoretical Physics Department, University of New South Wales, Kensington (Australia)

    1994-10-05

    Ignition models for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are analyzed on the basis of fuel energy balances. Spark ignition models are in general identified as more effective alternatives than raw volume ignition. Nevertheless, it is demonstrated that volume ignition can yield very high energy gains comparable to spark ignition if the whole picture is properly taken into account. References are made to some outstanding experiments and to numerical simulations which support this tutorial explanation. {copyright} 1994 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  4. Characteristics and the behavior in electrostatic precipitators of high-alumina coal fly ash from the Jungar power plant, Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Liqiang; Yuan, Yongtao

    2011-08-15

    In China, flue gases emitted by coal-fired power plants are mainly cleaned using electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). However, based on observations, there is a decrease in the collection efficiency of ESPs in some power plants after burning Jungar coal in Inner Mongolia. In order to find the mechanism of coal fly ash escaping from ESPs, the size distribution, resistivity, and cohesive force of particulate matter samples from Jungar coal-fired power plants in China were measured using a Bahco centrifuge, a dust electrical resistivity test instrument, and a cohesive force test apparatus invented by the authors. Experiments were carried out to determine the chemical composition and current-voltage curve of fly ash under operating ESPs. The Al(2)O(3) content in fly ash was found to reach more than 50%, with the size distribution showing a higher content of PM2.5 and PM10 in high-alumina coal fly ash than in other coal fly ashes. The resistivity of high-alumina coal fly ash was recorded at over 10(12)Ω cm, but this did not result in a clear back corona. The cohesive force of high-alumina coal fly ash was very little. It was sensitive to smoke speed in the electric field, facilitating dust re-entrainment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of Temperature on Workability and Compressive Strength of Ordinary Concrete with High Calcium Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gołaszewski Jacek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of fresh ordinary concrete are closely affected by temperature and time. The paper presents the study of consistency of fresh concrete mixtures made with Portland cement and cement with calcareous fly ash. Two types of admixtures were used. It was proven that the temperature has a clear effect on workability and compressive strength concrete. Influence on workability can be reduced by selecting the appropriate superplasticizer and cement.

  6. Synthesis of granular zeolitic materials with high cation exchange capacity from agglomerated coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto Juan; Susana Hernandez; Jose Manuel Andres; Carmen Ruiz [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-08-15

    Fly ash from coal combustion is a potential source of pollution and there is continuous interest in its recycling by converting it into products such as zeolitic materials for use in retaining pollutants. In this paper, production of granular zeolitic material from a commercially-unusable fine-fraction of a lightweight aggregate (LA) building material made from coal fly ash agglomerated with lime, by conventional alkaline activation is described. NaP1 zeolite, K-F zeolite, K-Phillipsite and K-Chabazite were synthesised. The process was optimised by combining four reaction parameters (temperature, alkali concentration, solution/fly ash ratio and reaction time). Zeolitic materials with the highest zeolite yields and cation exchange capacities were selected for future application in environmental processes. End-product zeolitic materials maintain its granular form and this could favour their use in some particular applications for environmental waste treatment (e.g. ionic exchange in column) without any further transformation stages. 21 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Bacterial diversity of the American sand fly Lutzomyia intermedia using high-throughput metagenomic sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Carolina Cunha; Villegas, Luis Eduardo Martinez; Campolina, Thais Bonifácio; Pires, Ana Clara Machado Araújo; Miranda, Jose Carlos; Pimenta, Paulo Filemon Paolucci; Secundino, Nagila Francinete Costa

    2016-08-31

    Parasites of the genus Leishmania cause a broad spectrum of diseases, collectively known as leishmaniasis, in humans worldwide. American cutaneous leishmaniasis is a neglected disease transmitted by sand fly vectors including Lutzomyia intermedia, a proven vector. The female sand fly can acquire or deliver Leishmania spp. parasites while feeding on a blood meal, which is required for nutrition, egg development and survival. The microbiota composition and abundance varies by food source, life stages and physiological conditions. The sand fly microbiota can affect parasite life-cycle in the vector. We performed a metagenomic analysis for microbiota composition and abundance in Lu. intermedia, from an endemic area in Brazil. The adult insects were collected using CDC light traps, morphologically identified, carefully sterilized, dissected under a microscope and the females separated into groups according to their physiological condition: (i) absence of blood meal (unfed = UN); (ii) presence of blood meal (blood-fed = BF); and (iii) presence of developed ovaries (gravid = GR). Then, they were processed for metagenomics with Illumina Hiseq Sequencing in order to be sequence analyzed and to obtain the taxonomic profiles of the microbiota. Bacterial metagenomic analysis revealed differences in microbiota composition based upon the distinct physiological stages of the adult insect. Sequence identification revealed two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria), 11 families and 15 genera; 87 % of the bacteria were Gram-negative, while only one family and two genera were identified as Gram-positive. The genera Ochrobactrum, Bradyrhizobium and Pseudomonas were found across all of the groups. The metagenomic analysis revealed that the microbiota of the Lu. intermedia female sand flies are distinct under specific physiological conditions and consist of 15 bacterial genera. The Ochrobactrum, Bradyrhizobium and Pseudomonas were the common genera. Our results detailing

  8. High lung volume increases stress failure in pulmonary capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Z.; Costello, M. L.; Tsukimoto, K.; Prediletto, R.; Elliott, A. R.; Mathieu-Costello, O.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We previously showed that when pulmonary capillaries in anesthetized rabbits are exposed to a transmural pressure (Ptm) of approximately 40 mmHg, stress failure of the walls occurs with disruption of the capillary endothelium, alveolar epithelium, or sometimes all layers. The present study was designed to test whether stress failure occurred more frequently at high than at low lung volumes for the same Ptm. Lungs of anesthetized rabbits were inflated to a transpulmonary pressure of 20 cmH2O, perfused with autologous blood at 32.5 or 2.5 cmH2O Ptm, and fixed by intravascular perfusion. Samples were examined by both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results were compared with those of a previous study in which the lung was inflated to a transpulmonary pressure of 5 cmH2O. There was a large increase in the frequency of stress failure of the capillary walls at the higher lung volume. For example, at 32.5 cmH2O Ptm, the number of endothelial breaks per millimeter cell lining was 7.1 +/- 2.2 at the high lung volume compared with 0.7 +/- 0.4 at the low lung volume. The corresponding values for epithelium were 8.5 +/- 1.6 and 0.9 +/- 0.6. Both differences were significant (P less than 0.05). At 52.5 cmH2O Ptm, the results for endothelium were 20.7 +/- 7.6 (high volume) and 7.1 +/- 2.1 (low volume), and the corresponding results for epithelium were 32.8 +/- 11.9 and 11.4 +/- 3.7. At 32.5 cmH2O Ptm, the thickness of the blood-gas barrier was greater at the higher lung volume, consistent with the development of more interstitial edema. Ballooning of the epithelium caused by accumulation of edema fluid between the epithelial cell and its basement membrane was seen at 32.5 and 52.5 cmH2O Ptm. At high lung volume, the breaks tended to be narrower and fewer were oriented perpendicular to the axis of the pulmonary capillaries than at low lung volumes. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy measurements agreed well. Our findings provide a physiological

  9. Dust separation at high temperatures a method for cleaning fly ashes? Final report; Stoftavskiljning vid hoeg temperatur en metod foer rening av flygaska? Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zintl, Frank [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    An experimental study of separation of fly ashes by a filter at high temperatures, 300-650 deg C, with the purpose to study: Capture of heavy metals (Cd, Hg, Pb, Zn) in the fly ash; Relation between heavy metal capture and temperature; Relation between heavy metal capture and the availability of fuel chlorine. Pelletized forestry waste fuel was doped with heavy metals in two different forms. Pelletized Salix was also used, without doping. The study shows that: There is a strong inverse relation between the capture of heavy metals and the filter temperature; There is a strong relation between the availability of chlorine and the capture of heavy metals. Separation at 300-650 deg C gives much less heavy metals in the fly ash, however the ash is not clean enough to allow disposal in ordinary landfills. Thus, high temperature filtering does not seem to be a promising solution for producing 'clean' fly ash.

  10. The use of a non-standard high calcium fly ash in concrete and its response to accelerated curing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atis, C. D.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available An experimental work was carried out to investigate the use of a non-standard high calcium fly ash in concrete. The response of the same fly ash to the accelerated curing was also explored. With three different cementitious material contents, a total of 48 concretes were produced. The water/ cement ratios were varied from 0.40 to 0.87. Compressive strengths of the moist cured cube specimens cast from the concrete mixtures made with 0%, 15%, 30% and 45% replacement of normal Portland cement with fly ash were measured at 28 days and 3 months. Accelerated compressive strengths were also measured using warmwater method and boiling-water method in accordance with the relevant ASTM and Turkish Standards. Despite the fact that the fly ash used was a non-standard, the laboratory test results showed that it could be utilized in concrete production at a replacement level between 15% and 30% by weight basis because fly ash concrete developed comparable or higher compressive strength than that of corresponding normal Portland cement concrete. The laboratory test results also indicated that the accelerated curing could be used to predict the compressive strength of fly ash concrete with 85% correlation coefficient. The amount of fly ash was found to be immaterial in the strength prediction. The relation between warm-water method and boiling-water method was of linear form with 93% correlation coefficient.

    Se llevó a cabo un trabajo experimental para investigar el uso de una ceniza volante de alto contenido en cal en el hormigón, la cual no cumple las especificaciones recogidas en norma. También, se estudió el comportamiento de la ceniza bajo un curado acelerado. Se elaboraron un total de 48 hormigones con tres proporciones diferentes de material cementante. Las relaciones agua/cemento (a/c usadas estaban comprendidas entre 0,40 y 0,87. A 28 días y 3 meses de curado, se determinaron las resistencias a compresión de probetas cúbicas de hormig

  11. FIELD EVALUATION OF A HIGH-VOLUME DICHOTOMOUS SAMPLER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study presents the field evaluation of a high-volume dichotomous sampler that collects coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter. The key feature of this device is the utilization of a round-nozzle virtual impactor with a 50% cutpoint at 2.5 5m to split PM10 into...

  12. High-volume recycled materials for sustainable pavement construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this research is to evaluate the feasibility of using high-volume recycled materials for concrete production in rigid pavement. The goal was to replace 50% of the solids with recycled materials and industrial by-products. The pe...

  13. High-Volume Repeaters of Self-Harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Jennifer; Hawton, Keith; Bergen, Helen; Waters, Keith; Kapur, Navneet; Cooper, Jayne; Steeg, Sarah; Clarke, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Repetition of self-harm is common and is strongly associated with suicide. Despite this, there is limited research on high-volume repetition. To investigate individuals with high-volume repeat self-harm attendances to the emergency department (ED), including their patterns of attendance and mortality. Data from the Multicentre Study of Self-Harm in England were used. High-volume repetition was defined as ⩾15 attendances within 4 years. An attendance timeline was constructed for each high-volume repeater (HVR) and the different patterns of attendance were explored using an executive sorting task and hierarchical cluster analysis. A small proportion of self-harm patients are HVRs (0.6%) but they account for a large percentage of self-harm attendances (10%). In this study, the new methodological approach resulted in three types of attendance patterns. All of the HVRs had clusters of attendance and a greater proportion died from external causes compared with non-HVRs. The approach used in this study offers a new method for investigating this problem that could have both clinical and research benefits. The need for early intervention is highlighted by the large number of self-harm episodes per patient, the clustered nature of attendances, and the higher prevalence of death from external causes.

  14. Three-dimensional reconstruction for high-speed volume measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dah-Jye; Lane, Robert M.; Chang, Guang-Hwa

    2001-02-01

    Volume measurement is an important process for various industries such as food processing, fruit and vegetable grading, etc. Value or price is often determined by the size of product. In seafood industry, for example, oyster meat is separated into four grades before being packaged. Large size grade means higher selling price than small size. More consistent packaging size is also an indication of high quality. Product size can be measured optically with machine vision technology for on-line inspection and grading systems. Most optical grading techniques use a two-dimensional area projection or the weight of the product to estimate the actual product volume. These methods are subject to measurement inaccuracy because of the missing thickness information. An algorithm combines laser triangulation technique with two-dimensional measurement to reconstruct a three-dimensional surface for volume measurement is introduced in this paper. The result of this technique shows a significant accuracy improvement from the area-projection method

  15. Access to high-volume surgeons and the opportunity cost of performing radical prostatectomy by low-volume providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzi, Afsaneh; Klein, Eric A; Daneshmand, Siamak; Gill, Inderbir; Quinn, David I; Sadeghi, Sarmad

    2017-07-01

    Evidence suggests that redirecting surgeries to high-volume providers may be associated with better outcomes and significant societal savings. Whether such referrals are feasible remains unanswered. Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data, SEER 18, and US Incidence data were used to determine the geographic distribution and radical prostatectomy volume for providers. Access was defined as availability of a high-volume provider within driving distance of 100 miles. The opportunity cost was defined as the value of benefits achievable by performing the surgery by a high-volume provider that was forgone by not making a referral. The savings per referral were derived from a published Markov model for radical prostatectomy. A total of 14% of providers performed>27% of the radical prostatectomies with>30 cases per year and were designated high-volume providers. Providers with below-median volume (≤16 prostatectomies per year) performed>32% of radical prostatectomies. At least 47% of these were within a 100-mile driving distance (median = 22 miles), and therefore had access to a high-volume provider (>30 prostatectomies per year). This translated into a discounted savings of more than $24 million per year, representing the opportunity cost of not making a referral. The average volume for high- and low-volume providers was 55 and 13, respectively, resulting in an annual experience gap of 43 and a cumulative gap of 125 surgeries over 3 years. In 2014, the number of surgeons performing radical prostatectomy decreased by 5% while the number of high- and low-volume providers decreased by 25% and 11% showing a faster decline in the number of high-volume providers compared with low-volume surgeons. About half of prostatectomies performed by surgeons with below-median annual volume were within a 100-mile driving distance (median of 22 miles) of a high-volume surgeon. Such a referral may result in minimal additional costs and substantially improved outcomes. Copyright

  16. Flexural toughness of steel fiber reinforced high performance concrete containing nano-SiO2 and fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Ya-Nan; Li, Qing-Fu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Tian-Hang

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the effect of steel fiber on the flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2. The flexural toughness was evaluated by two methods, which are based on ASTM C1018 and DBV-1998, respectively. By means of three-point bending method, the flexural toughness indices, variation coefficients of bearing capacity, deformation energy, and equivalent flexural strength of the specimen were measured, respectively, and the relational curves between the vertical load and the midspan deflection (P(V)-δ) were obtained. The results indicate that steel fiber has great effect on the flexural toughness parameters and relational curves (P(V)-δ) of the three-point bending beam specimen. When the content of steel fiber increases from 0.5% to 2%, the flexural toughness parameters increase gradually and the curves are becoming plumper and plumper with the increase of steel fiber content, respectively. However these flexural toughness parameters begin to decrease and the curves become thinner and thinner after the steel fiber content exceeds 2%. It seems that the contribution of steel fiber to the improvement of flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2 is well performed only when the steel fiber content is less than 2%.

  17. Flexural Toughness of Steel Fiber Reinforced High Performance Concrete Containing Nano-SiO2 and Fly Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-Nan; Li, Qing-Fu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Tian-Hang

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the effect of steel fiber on the flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2. The flexural toughness was evaluated by two methods, which are based on ASTM C1018 and DBV-1998, respectively. By means of three-point bending method, the flexural toughness indices, variation coefficients of bearing capacity, deformation energy, and equivalent flexural strength of the specimen were measured, respectively, and the relational curves between the vertical load and the midspan deflection (P V-δ) were obtained. The results indicate that steel fiber has great effect on the flexural toughness parameters and relational curves (P V-δ) of the three-point bending beam specimen. When the content of steel fiber increases from 0.5% to 2%, the flexural toughness parameters increase gradually and the curves are becoming plumper and plumper with the increase of steel fiber content, respectively. However these flexural toughness parameters begin to decrease and the curves become thinner and thinner after the steel fiber content exceeds 2%. It seems that the contribution of steel fiber to the improvement of flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2 is well performed only when the steel fiber content is less than 2%. PMID:24883395

  18. Peculiar high temperature corrosion of martensite alloy under impact of Estonian oil shale fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H.; Klevtsov, I. [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The superheaters` surfaces of oil shale steam boiler made of pearlitic and austenitic alloys, are subject to intensive corrosion, mainly due to presence of chlorine in external deposits. The applicability of martensitic alloys X1OCrMoVNb91 and X20CrMoV121 for superheaters is examined here and empirical equations allowing to predict alloys` corrosion resistance in the range of operational temperatures are established. Alloy X1OCrMoVNb91 is found been most perspective for superheaters of boilers firing fossil fuel that contain alkaline metals and chlorine. The abnormal dependence of corrosion resistance of martensitic alloys on temperature is revealed, namely, corrosion at 580 deg C in presence of oil shale fly ash is more intensive than at 620 deg C. (orig.) 2 refs.

  19. Classification of Flying Insects with high performance using improved DTW algorithm based on hidden Markov model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Arif Abdul Rahuman

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Insects play significant role in the human life. And insects pollinate major food crops consumed in the world. Insect pests consume and destroy major crops in the world. Hence to have control over the disease and pests, researches are going on in the area of entomology using chemical, biological and mechanical approaches. The data relevant to the flying insects often changes over time, and classification of such data is a central issue. And such time series mining tasks along with classification is critical nowadays. Most time series data mining algorithms use similarity search and hence time taken for similarity search is the bottleneck and it does not produce accurate results and also produces very poor performance. In this paper, a novel classification method that is based on the dynamic time warping (DTW algorithm is proposed. The dynamic time warping algorithm is deterministic and lacks in modeling stochastic signals. The dynamic time warping (DTW algorithm is improved by implementing a nonlinear median filtering (NMF. Recognition accuracy of conventional DTW algorithms is less than that of the hidden Markov model (HMM by same voice activity detection (VAD and noise-reduction. With running spectrum filtering (RSF and dynamic range adjustment (DRA. NMF seek the median distance of every reference of time series data and the recognition accuracy is much improved. In this research work, optical sensors are used to record the sound of insect flight, with invariance to interference from ambient sounds. The implementation of our tool includes two parts, an optical sensor to record the "sound" of insect flight, and a software that leverages on the sensor information, to automatically detect and identify flying insects.

  20. Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-04-01

    This report documents the development, execution outcomes and lessons learned of the Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase (WVP) Program carried out over a three-year period from 2009 through 2012. The primary goals of the program were met: 1) reduce the incremental cost of highly insulating windows compared to ENERGY STAR windows; and 2) raise the public and potential buyers’ awareness of highly insulating windows and their benefits. A key outcome of the program is that the 2013 ENERGY STAR Most Efficient criteria for primary residential windows were adopted from the technical specifications set forth in the WVP program.

  1. Read-only high accuracy volume holographic optical correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian; Li, Jingming; Cao, Liangcai; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2011-10-01

    A read-only volume holographic correlator (VHC) is proposed. After the recording of all of the correlation database pages by angular multiplexing, a stand-alone read-only high accuracy VHC will be separated from the VHC recording facilities which include the high-power laser and the angular multiplexing system. The stand-alone VHC has its own low power readout laser and very compact and simple structure. Since there are two lasers that are employed for recording and readout, respectively, the optical alignment tolerance of the laser illumination on the SLM is very sensitive. The twodimensional angular tolerance is analyzed based on the theoretical model of the volume holographic correlator. The experimental demonstration of the proposed read-only VHC is introduced and discussed.

  2. Tropical tephritid fruit fly community with high incidence of shared Wolbachia strains as platform for horizontal transmission of endosymbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, J L; Frommer, M; Shearman, D C A; Riegler, M

    2014-12-01

    Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria that infect 40-65% of arthropod species. They are primarily maternally inherited with occasional horizontal transmission for which limited direct ecological evidence exists. We detected Wolbachia in 8 out of 24 Australian tephritid species. Here, we have used multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to further characterize these Wolbachia strains, plus a novel quantitative polymerase chain reaction method for allele assignment in multiple infections. Based on five MLST loci and the Wolbachia surface protein gene (wsp), five Bactrocera and one Dacus species harboured two identical strains as double infections; furthermore, Bactrocera neohumeralis harboured both of these as single or double infections, and sibling species B. tryoni harboured one. Two Bactrocera species contained Wolbachia pseudogenes, potentially within the fruit fly genomes. A fruit fly parasitoid, Fopius arisanus shared identical alleles with two Wolbachia strains detected in one B. frauenfeldi individual. We report an unprecedented high incidence of four shared Wolbachia strains in eight host species from two trophic levels. This suggests frequent exposure to Wolbachia in this tropical tephritid community that shares host plant and parasitoid species, and also includes species that hybridize. Such insect communities may act as horizontal transmission platforms that contribute to the ubiquity of the otherwise maternally inherited Wolbachia. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Volume analysis of supercooled water under high pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Duki, Solomon F.; Tsige, Mesfin

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental findings on the volume of supercooled water at high pressure [O. Mishima, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 144503 (2010)] we performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations study of bulk water in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. Cooling and heating cycles at different isobars and isothermal compression at different temperatures are performed on the water sample with pressures that range from 0 to 1.0 GPa. The cooling simulations are done at temperatures that range from...

  4. Structural basis of FliG-FliM interaction in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kwok-Ho; Lam, Wendy Wai Ling; Wong, Jase Yan-Kit; Chan, Ling-Chim; Kotaka, Masayo; Ling, Thomas Kin-Wah; Jin, Dong-Yan; Ottemann, Karen M; Au, Shannon Wing-Ngor

    2013-05-01

    FliG and FliM are switch proteins that regulate the rotation and switching of the flagellar motor. Several assembly models for FliG and FliM have recently been proposed; however, it remains unclear whether the assembly of the switch proteins is conserved among different bacterial species. We applied a combination of pull-down, thermodynamic and structural analyses to characterize the FliM-FliG association from the mesophilic bacterium Helicobacter pylori. FliM binds to FliG with micromolar binding affinity, and their interaction is mediated through the middle domain of FliG (FliGM ), which contains the EHPQR motif. Crystal structures of the middle domain of H. pylori FliM (FliM(M)) and FliG(M) -FliM(M) complex revealed that FliG binding triggered a conformational change of the FliM α3-α1' loop, especially Asp130 and Arg144. We furthermore showed that various highly conserved residues in this region are required for FliM-FliG complex formation. Although the FliM-FliG complex structure displayed a conserved binding mode when compared with Thermotoga maritima, variable residues were identified that may contribute to differential binding affinities across bacterial species. Comparison of the thermodynamic parameters of FliG-FliM interactions between H. pylori and Escherichia coli suggests that molecular basis and binding properties of FliM to FliG is likely different between these two species. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Assessment and comparison of three high-aluminum fly ash utilization scenarios in Inner Mongolia, China using an eco-efficiency indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Lin, Ling; Li, Shao Peng; Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiu Teng; Sun, Liang

    2017-05-01

    Utilization of fly ash is of great importance in China in the context of resource and environmental crises. Different fly ash utilization processes are proposed, and some have been practically applied. However, none of these fly ash utilization pathways has been evaluated comprehensively by integrating both environmental and economic perspectives. In this study, three high-aluminum fly ash utilization methods in Mongolia were assessed and compared based on the concept of eco-efficiency. The environmental assessment was conducted in accordance with life-cycle assessment principles, and a monetization-weighting approach was applied to obtain social willingness-to-pay as a reflection of environmental impact. The environmental assessment results revealed that the reuse of fly ash had significant advantage for saving primary resource, while solid waste, depletion of water, and global warming were the three highest environmental impacts from the life cycle perspective. The economic performance assessment showed positive net profits for fly ash utilization, but high value-added products were not necessarily indicative of better economic performance due to the relatively high operation cost. Comparison of the eco-efficiency indicators (EEIs) implied that the process of scenario 1#, which produced mullite ceramic and active calcium silicate, was the most recommended out of the three scenarios on the present scale. This judgment was consistent with the evaluation of the resource utilization rate. The present study showed that the EEI could be used to compare different fly ash utilization processes in a comprehensive and objective manner, thus providing definitive and insightful suggestions for decision-making and technical improvement.

  6. The impacts of coal refuse/fly ash bulk bends on water quality and plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewar, B.R.; Daniels, W.L. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    There is considerable interest in the beneficial reuse of coal fly ash as a soil amendment on coal refuse piles. One method of application would be to blend the coal refuse and the fly ash before deposition in a refuse pile. A field experiment was initiated to measure the effects of bulk blending fly ash with coal refuse on water quality and plant growth parameters. Fly ash (class F) from three sources were used in the experiment. Two of the fly ashes were acidic and the third was alkaline. Trenches were excavated in a coal refuse pile to a depth of 2 m and the refuse was blended with fly ash and then returned to the trench. In other plots the ash was applied as a surface amendment. A treatment of a bulk blend of 5% (w/w) rock phosphate was also included in the experiment. Large volume lysimeters were installed in some trenches to collect the leachates. The fly ash treatments appear to improve the quality of the leachates when compared to the leachates from the untreated plots. The fly ash amended treatments have lower leachate concentrations of Fe and Al. Initially the fly ash treatments showed high levels of leachate B, however those levels have decreased with time. Millet (Setaria italica) yields from the first year of the experiment were highest n the alkaline fly ash and rock phosphate blended plots. In the second growing season, the two bulk blends with alkaline fly ash had the highest yields. In the third growing season all treatments had higher yield levels than the untreated control plots. The positive effects of the fly ash on leachate quality were attributed to the alkalinity of the ash, and the increase in yield was attributed to the increases in water holding capacity due to fly ash treatments.

  7. Verification and validation guidelines for high integrity systems. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Dinsmore, G.; Hecht, S.; Tang, D. [SoHaR, Inc., Beverly Hills, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    High integrity systems include all protective (safety and mitigation) systems for nuclear power plants, and also systems for which comparable reliability requirements exist in other fields, such as in the process industries, in air traffic control, and in patient monitoring and other medical systems. Verification aims at determining that each stage in the software development completely and correctly implements requirements that were established in a preceding phase, while validation determines that the overall performance of a computer system completely and correctly meets system requirements. Volume I of the report reviews existing classifications for high integrity systems and for the types of errors that may be encountered, and makes recommendations for verification and validation procedures, based on assumptions about the environment in which these procedures will be conducted. The final chapter of Volume I deals with a framework for standards in this field. Volume II contains appendices dealing with specific methodologies for system classification, for dependability evaluation, and for two software tools that can automate otherwise very labor intensive verification and validation activities.

  8. Efficient high-quality volume rendering of SPH data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraedrich, Roland; Auer, Stefan; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    High quality volume rendering of SPH data requires a complex order-dependent resampling of particle quantities along the view rays. In this paper we present an efficient approach to perform this task using a novel view-space discretization of the simulation domain. Our method draws upon recent work on GPU-based particle voxelization for the efficient resampling of particles into uniform grids. We propose a new technique that leverages a perspective grid to adaptively discretize the view-volume, giving rise to a continuous level-of-detail sampling structure and reducing memory requirements compared to a uniform grid. In combination with a level-of-detail representation of the particle set, the perspective grid allows effectively reducing the amount of primitives to be processed at run-time. We demonstrate the quality and performance of our method for the rendering of fluid and gas dynamics SPH simulations consisting of many millions of particles.

  9. Freeze-Thaw Resistance of Normal and High Strength Concretes Produced with Fly Ash and Silica Fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Karakurt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on determination of the freeze-thaw resistance of air-entrained and non-air-entrained normal strength concrete (NC and high strength concrete (HSC produced with fly ash and silica fume according to surface scaling. The procedure allows us to measure the amount of scaling per unit surface area due to a number of well defined freezing and thawing cycles in the presence of deicing salt. The weight loss, surface scaling, moisture uptake, and internal damage were measured after 0 and after every 4th freeze-thaw cycle. The test results showed that the freeze-thaw resistance is influenced directly by the compressive strength property of the concrete. Silica fume significantly reduced the resistance of normal strength concrete against freeze-thaw effect without plasticizing agent. The surface scaling of silica fume concrete without admixture was 22% higher than reference normal concrete.

  10. Ternary blends containing demercurated lighting phosphor and MSWI fly ash as high-performance binders for stabilizing and recycling electroplating sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wu-Jang; Wu, Chia-Teng; Wu, Chang-En; Hsieh, Lin-Huey; Li, Chang-Chien; Lain, Chi-Yuan; Chu, Wei

    2008-08-15

    This paper describes the solidification and stabilization of electroplating sludge treated with a high-performance binder made from portland type-I cement, municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, and lighting phosphor powder (called as cement-fly ash-phosphor binder, CFP). The highest 28-day unconfined compressive strength of the CFP-treated paste was 816 kg/cm(2) at a ratio of cement to fly ash to lighting phosphor powder of 90:5:5; the strength of this composition also fulfilled the requirement of a high-strength concrete (>460 kg/cm(2) at 28 days). The CFP-stabilized sludge paste samples passed the Taiwanese EPA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test and, therefore, could be used either as a building material or as a controlled low-strength material, depending on the sludge-to-CFP binder ratio.

  11. A high-throughput detection method for invasive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) species based on microfluidic dynamic array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fan; Fu, Wei; Clarke, Anthony R; Schutze, Mark Kurt; Susanto, Agus; Zhu, Shuifang; Li, Zhihong

    2016-11-01

    Invasive species can be detrimental to a nation's ecology, economy and human health. Rapid and accurate diagnostics are critical to limit the establishment and spread of exotic organisms. The increasing rate of biological invasions relative to the taxonomic expertise available generates a demand for high-throughput, DNA-based diagnostics methods for identification. We designed species-specific qPCR primer and probe combinations for 27 economically important tephritidae species in six genera (Anastrepha, Bactrocera, Carpomya, Ceratitis, Dacus and Rhagoletis) based on 935 COI DNA barcode haplotypes from 181 fruit fly species publically available in BOLD, and then tested the specificity for each primer pair and probe through qPCR of 35 of those species. We then developed a standardization reaction system for detecting the 27 target species based on a microfluidic dynamic array and also applied the method to identify unknown immature samples from port interceptions and field monitoring. This method led to a specific and simultaneous detection for all 27 species in 7.5 h, using only 0.2 μL of reaction system in each reaction chamber. The approach successfully discriminated among species within complexes that had genetic similarities of up to 98.48%, while it also identified all immature samples consistent with the subsequent results of morphological examination of adults which were reared from larvae of cohorts from the same samples. We present an accurate, rapid and high-throughput innovative approach for detecting fruit flies of quarantine concern. This is a new method which has broad potential to be one of international standards for plant quarantine and invasive species detection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Regulation of blood volume in lowlanders exposed to high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Robach, Paul; Lundby, Carsten

    2017-10-01

    Humans ascending to high altitude (HA) experience a reduction in arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation and, as a result, arterial O2 content ([Formula: see text]). As HA exposure extends, this reduction in [Formula: see text] is counteracted by an increase in arterial hemoglobin concentration. Initially, hemoconcentration is exclusively related to a reduction in plasma volume (PV), whereas after several weeks a progressive expansion in total red blood cell volume (RCV) contributes, although often to a modest extent. Since the decrease in PV is more rapid and usually more pronounced than the expansion in RCV, at least during the first weeks of exposure, a reduction in circulating blood volume is common at HA. Although the regulation of hematological responses to HA has been investigated for decades, it remains incompletely understood. This is not only related to the large number of mechanisms that could be involved and the complexity of their interplay but also to the difficulty of conducting comprehensive experiments in the often secluded HA environment. In this review, we present our understanding of the kinetics, the mechanisms and the physiological relevance of the HA-induced reduction in PV and expansion in RCV. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. High Performance GPU-Based Fourier Volume Rendering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Abdellah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourier volume rendering (FVR is a significant visualization technique that has been used widely in digital radiography. As a result of its O(N2log⁡N time complexity, it provides a faster alternative to spatial domain volume rendering algorithms that are O(N3 computationally complex. Relying on the Fourier projection-slice theorem, this technique operates on the spectral representation of a 3D volume instead of processing its spatial representation to generate attenuation-only projections that look like X-ray radiographs. Due to the rapid evolution of its underlying architecture, the graphics processing unit (GPU became an attractive competent platform that can deliver giant computational raw power compared to the central processing unit (CPU on a per-dollar-basis. The introduction of the compute unified device architecture (CUDA technology enables embarrassingly-parallel algorithms to run efficiently on CUDA-capable GPU architectures. In this work, a high performance GPU-accelerated implementation of the FVR pipeline on CUDA-enabled GPUs is presented. This proposed implementation can achieve a speed-up of 117x compared to a single-threaded hybrid implementation that uses the CPU and GPU together by taking advantage of executing the rendering pipeline entirely on recent GPU architectures.

  14. High Performance GPU-Based Fourier Volume Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Marwan; Eldeib, Ayman; Sharawi, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Fourier volume rendering (FVR) is a significant visualization technique that has been used widely in digital radiography. As a result of its (N (2)log⁡N) time complexity, it provides a faster alternative to spatial domain volume rendering algorithms that are (N (3)) computationally complex. Relying on the Fourier projection-slice theorem, this technique operates on the spectral representation of a 3D volume instead of processing its spatial representation to generate attenuation-only projections that look like X-ray radiographs. Due to the rapid evolution of its underlying architecture, the graphics processing unit (GPU) became an attractive competent platform that can deliver giant computational raw power compared to the central processing unit (CPU) on a per-dollar-basis. The introduction of the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) technology enables embarrassingly-parallel algorithms to run efficiently on CUDA-capable GPU architectures. In this work, a high performance GPU-accelerated implementation of the FVR pipeline on CUDA-enabled GPUs is presented. This proposed implementation can achieve a speed-up of 117x compared to a single-threaded hybrid implementation that uses the CPU and GPU together by taking advantage of executing the rendering pipeline entirely on recent GPU architectures.

  15. Flying Scared

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Sie, Marco; Josiassen, Alexander

    In light of the burgeoning growth of long-haul LCCs in Southeast Asia, the study constructs a model aimed at comprehending which factors lead passengers to choose full-service rather than no-frills carriers on long-range flights. In particular, the research aims at determining to what extent...... service quality expectations and fear of flying affect travellers' flight choices on long-haul flights. The study was set in Bangkok and primary data were obtained from a large sample of travelers departing from Suvarnabhumi Airport. While service quality emerged as a relevant factor, fear of flying didn...

  16. High-volume infiltration analgesia in bilateral hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse Ø; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl; Husted, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    was instituted preoperatively with a multimodal regimen (gabapentin, celecoxib, and acetaminophen). Pain was assessed repeatedly for 48 hours postoperatively, at rest and with 45° hip flexion. Results Pain scores were low and similar between ropivacaine and saline administration. Median hospital stay was 4...... (range 2-7) days. Interpretation Intraoperative high-volume infiltration with 0.2% ropivacaine with repeated intraarticular injections postoperatively may not give a clinically relevant analgesic effect in THA when combined with a multimodal oral analgesic regimen with gabapentin, celecoxib...

  17. High-volume infiltration analgesia in bilateral hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse Ø; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl; Husted, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    bilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA) in a fast-track setting, saline or high-volume (170 mL) ropivacaine (0.2%) with epinephrine (1:100,000) was administered to the wound intraoperatively along with supplementary postoperative injections via an intraarticular epidural catheter. Oral analgesia...... was instituted preoperatively with a multimodal regimen (gabapentin, celecoxib, and acetaminophen). Pain was assessed repeatedly for 48 hours postoperatively, at rest and with 45° hip flexion. Results Pain scores were low and similar between ropivacaine and saline administration. Median hospital stay was 4...

  18. Methods for high volume production of nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Morrell, Jonathan S [Knoxville, TN; Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ludtka, Gerald M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-03-22

    A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

  19. Detection of Onchocerca volvulus in Latin American black flies for pool screening PCR using high-throughput automated DNA isolation for transmission surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; Gopal, Hemavathi; Adeleke, Monsuru Adebayo; De Luna-Santillana, Erick Jesús; Gurrola-Reyes, J Natividad; Guo, Xianwu

    2013-11-01

    The posttreatment entomological surveillance (ES) of onchocerciasis in Latin America requires quite large numbers of flies to be examined for parasite infection to prove that the control strategies have worked and that the infection is on the path of elimination. Here, we report a high-throughput automated DNA isolation of Onchocerca volvulus for PCR using a major Latin American black fly vector of onchocerciasis. The sensitivity and relative effectiveness of silica-coated paramagnetic beads was evaluated in comparison with phenol chloroform (PC) method which is known as the gold standard of DNA extraction for ES in Latin America. The automated method was optimized in the laboratory and validated in the field to detect parasite DNA in Simulium ochraceum sensu lato flies in comparison with PC. The optimization of the automated method showed that it is sensitive to detect O. volvulus with a pool size of 100 flies as compared with PC which utilizes 50 flies pool size. The validation of the automated method in comparison with PC in an endemic community showed that 5/67 and 3/134 heads pools were positive for the two methods, respectively. There was no statistical variation (P < 0.05) in the estimation of transmission indices generated by automated method when compared with PC method. The fact that the automated method is sensitive to pool size up to 100 confers advantage over PC method and can, therefore, be employed in large-scale ES of onchocerciasis transmission in endemic areas of Latin America.

  20. Unsupervised Learning Through Randomized Algorithms for High-Volume High-Velocity Data (ULTRA-HV).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinar, Ali [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kolda, Tamara G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carlberg, Kevin Thomas [Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, MA (United States); Ballard, Grey [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mahoney, Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Through long-term investments in computing, algorithms, facilities, and instrumentation, DOE is an established leader in massive-scale, high-fidelity simulations, as well as science-leading experimentation. In both cases, DOE is generating more data than it can analyze and the problem is intensifying quickly. The need for advanced algorithms that can automatically convert the abundance of data into a wealth of useful information by discovering hidden structures is well recognized. Such efforts however, are hindered by the massive volume of the data and its high velocity. Here, the challenge is developing unsupervised learning methods to discover hidden structure in high-volume, high-velocity data.

  1. Study on solidification for municipal solid waste incineration fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, C.; Liu, Q.; Yang, J.; Xi, W. [Chongqing Univ., Chongqing (China); Huang, B. [Southwest Petroleum Univ., Chengdu (China)

    2008-07-01

    The appropriate management of municipal solid waste (MSW) is a major environmental issues, despite the significant efforts to prevent, reduce, reuse and recycle waste. Two primary options can be used for managing MSW incineration fly ash. These are landfill disposal or incineration. Incineration is effective in toxic substance destruction, waste volume reduction and energy recovery, as compared with landfill. MSW fly ash generally contains higher content of easily leachable heavy metals such as lead, cadmium, and zinc. In China, source separation of municipal solid wastes is not well practiced and has resulted in high concentrations of heavy metals being detected in the MSW fly ash. This paper presented a preliminary study to examine the properties of MSW fly ash and the fixing abilities of ordinary Portland cement and hydrated time on heavy metals. The paper discussed the effects of experimental parameters on the properties of solidified fly ash and the optimal technology conditions. The fly ash used in the study was collected from solid waste incineration plants in Shenzhen, Shanghai, and Chongqing, China. It was concluded that the effect on solidification got better and the leaching quantities of heavy metals such as zinc, lead, cadmium, or chromium decreased with the addition of cement used as adhesive. The optimal proportion of cement was 8 per cent. 14 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs.

  2. Photogrammetry and ballistic analysis of a high-flying projectile in the STS-124 space shuttle launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Carilli, Robert A.; Long, Jason M.; Shawn, Kathy L.

    2010-07-01

    A method combining photogrammetry with ballistic analysis is demonstrated to identify flying debris in a rocket launch environment. Debris traveling near the STS-124 Space Shuttle was captured on cameras viewing the launch pad within the first few seconds after launch. One particular piece of debris caught the attention of investigators studying the release of flame trench fire bricks because its high trajectory could indicate a flight risk to the Space Shuttle. Digitized images from two pad perimeter high-speed 16-mm film cameras were processed using photogrammetry software based on a multi-parameter optimization technique. Reference points in the image were found from 3D CAD models of the launch pad and from surveyed points on the pad. The three-dimensional reference points were matched to the equivalent two-dimensional camera projections by optimizing the camera model parameters using a gradient search optimization technique. Using this method of solving the triangulation problem, the xyz position of the object's path relative to the reference point coordinate system was found for every set of synchronized images. This trajectory was then compared to a predicted trajectory while performing regression analysis on the ballistic coefficient and other parameters. This identified, with a high degree of confidence, the object's material density and thus its probable origin within the launch pad environment. Future extensions of this methodology may make it possible to diagnose the underlying causes of debris-releasing events in near-real time, thus improving flight safety.

  3. Reusing fly ash in glass fibre reinforced cement: a new generation of high-quality GRC composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payá, J; Bonilla, M; Borrachero, M V; Monzó, J; Peris-Mora, E; Lalinde, L F

    2007-01-01

    New composite materials based on an alkali-resistant glass-fibre reinforced cement (AR-GRC) system are being developed by using fly ash (FA) produced at coal thermoelectric power plants, and fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R) from the petrol industry as cement replacement materials. These wastes are reactive from the pozzolanic viewpoint, and modify the nature and the microstructure of the cement matrix when a part of the Portland cement is replaced in the formulation of GRC. Several microstructural and mechanical aspects are being studied for AR-GRC systems. The behaviour of composites exposed to ageing shows that the pozzolanic activity of the ground FA added in high amounts and its mixture with the FC3R increase the flexural strength and no evidences of strength decay are observed. Additionally, the fibres due to the high alkalinity of the cementing matrix can be deteriorated. Fibres in the control (only Portland cement) and FC3R containing composites were attacked, whereas composites with FA and their mixture with FC3R show that the fibres have not been attacked, due to the pozzolanic activity of replacing materials that reduce the calcium hydroxide content in the cementing matrix.

  4. Reusing fly ash in glass fibre reinforced cement: A new generation of high-quality GRC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paya, J.; Bonilla, M.; Borrachero, N.; Monzo, J.; Peris-Mora, E.; Lalinde, L.F.

    2007-07-01

    New composite materials based on an alkali-resistant glass-fibre reinforced cement (AR-GRC) system are being developed by using fly ash (FA) produced at coal thermoelectric power plants, and fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R) from the petrol industry as cement replacement materials. These wastes are reactive from the pozzolanic viewpoint, and modify the nature and the microstructure of the cement matrix when a part of the Portland cement is replaced in the formulation of GRC. Several microstructural and mechanical aspects are being studied for AR-GRC systems. The behaviour of composites exposed to ageing shows that the pozzolanic activity of the ground FA added in high amounts and its mixture with the FOR increase the flexural strength and no evidences of strength decay are observed. Additionally, the fibres due to the high alkalinity of the cementing matrix can be deteriorated. Fibres in the control (only Portland cement) and FOR containing composites were attacked, whereas composites with FA and their mixture with FC3R show that the fibres have not been attacked, due to the pozzolanic activity of replacing materials that reduce the calcium hydroxide content in the cementing matrix.

  5. High-gain volume ignition for inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hora, H. [University of New South Wales, Kensington 2033 (Australia); Eliezer, S. [University of New South Wales, Kensington 2033 (Australia)]|[SOREQ Nuclear Research Centre, Yavne (Israel); Martinez-Val, J.M. [University of New South Wales, Kensington 2033 (Australia)]|[Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, ETSI Industriales, Madrid (Spain); Miley, G.H. [University of New South Wales, Kensington 2033 (Australia)]|[Fusion Studies Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois (United States)

    1994-10-05

    Since 1976, volume ignition calculations of pellet-fueled inertial confinement fusion have shown very high fusion gains due to the strong temperature increases caused by self-heating. This phenomenon was first reported in 1978 (Hora & Ray) and subsequently named the ``Wheeler modes.`` The very low optimum initial temperatures ({approx}1 keV) and the fuel burn of up to 80% permit gains of {gt}100, for compression of D-T to 2000--10,000 times the solid state for total input driver energy of a few MJ per pulse. The simple, smooth density and temperature profiles---unlike those of spark ignition---indicate it may be a faster and easier route to pellet fueling for a fusion power reactor capable of low-cost energy production. {copyright} 1994 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  6. A high volume, batch mode {sup 129}Xe polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojna-Pelczar, Anna, E-mail: anna.wojna.pelczar@mail.muni.cz [Central European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University, Brno (Czech Republic); Formerly: Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Kraków (Poland); Pałasz, Tadeusz [Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Kraków (Poland)

    2017-06-01

    Numerous designs of optical gas polarizers have been proposed, broadening possible applications of the hyperpolarized gases as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. We present a home–made {sup 129}Xe polarizer based on the spin exchange optical pumping method. The polarizer operates under 1 bar of the gas mixture (at the maximum temperature of 160 °C) in a high volume optical cell (5025 cm{sup 3}). Approximately 100 cm{sup 3} of {sup 129}Xe polarized at 1.50±0.37% is produced in a single cycle of polarization. Operation under standard pressure imposes polarization transfer mainly via van der Waals molecules, resulting in the efficient spin exchange between rubidium and {sup 129}Xe atoms. The design, construction and operation of the polarizer are described in details.

  7. Flying Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbelin, Bruno; Lasserre, Sebastien; Ciger, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Flying Cities is an artistic installation which generates imaginary cities from the speech of its visitors. Thanks to an original interactive process analyzing people's vocal input to create 3D graphics, a tangible correspondence between speech and visuals opens new possibilities of interaction. ...... and a potential application. We believe that it could become a new medium for creativity, and a way to visually perceive a vocal performance in the context of the rehabilitation of people with reduced mobility or language impairments....

  8. Training for intense exercise performance: high-intensity or high-volume training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, P B

    2010-10-01

    Performance in intense exercise events, such as Olympic rowing, swimming, kayak, track running and track cycling events, involves energy contribution from aerobic and anaerobic sources. As aerobic energy supply dominates the total energy requirements after ∼75s of near maximal effort, and has the greatest potential for improvement with training, the majority of training for these events is generally aimed at increasing aerobic metabolic capacity. A short-term period (six to eight sessions over 2-4 weeks) of high-intensity interval training (consisting of repeated exercise bouts performed close to or well above the maximal oxygen uptake intensity, interspersed with low-intensity exercise or complete rest) can elicit increases in intense exercise performance of 2-4% in well-trained athletes. The influence of high-volume training is less discussed, but its importance should not be downplayed, as high-volume training also induces important metabolic adaptations. While the metabolic adaptations that occur with high-volume training and high-intensity training show considerable overlap, the molecular events that signal for these adaptations may be different. A polarized approach to training, whereby ∼75% of total training volume is performed at low intensities, and 10-15% is performed at very high intensities, has been suggested as an optimal training intensity distribution for elite athletes who perform intense exercise events. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Ribbon scanning confocal for high-speed high-resolution volume imaging of brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Watson

    Full Text Available Whole-brain imaging is becoming a fundamental means of experimental insight; however, achieving subcellular resolution imagery in a reasonable time window has not been possible. We describe the first application of multicolor ribbon scanning confocal methods to collect high-resolution volume images of chemically cleared brains. We demonstrate that ribbon scanning collects images over ten times faster than conventional high speed confocal systems but with equivalent spectral and spatial resolution. Further, using this technology, we reconstruct large volumes of mouse brain infected with encephalitic alphaviruses and demonstrate that regions of the brain with abundant viral replication were inaccessible to vascular perfusion. This reveals that the destruction or collapse of large regions of brain micro vasculature may contribute to the severe disease caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Visualization of this fundamental impact of infection would not be possible without sampling at subcellular resolution within large brain volumes.

  10. Flying High or Crashing Down: Girls' Accounts of Trying Out for Cheerleading and Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Lynn A.

    2006-01-01

    Largely absent from the literature on adolescent girls' extracurricular activities is exploration of the process and effects of vying for entry to extracurricular activities that are competitive and selective. This qualitative study contrasted the immediate and longer term effects of auditioning for two high school extracurricular activities…

  11. Characterization of segmented large volume, high purity germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruyneel, B. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2006-07-01

    {gamma}-ray tracking in future HPGe arrays like AGATA will rely on pulse shape analysis (PSA) of multiple {gamma}-interactions. For this purpose, a simple and fast procedure was developed which enabled the first full characterization of a segmented large volume HPGe detector. An analytical model for the hole mobility in a Ge crystal lattice was developed to describe the hole drift anisotropy with experimental velocity values along the crystal axis as parameters. The new model is based on the drifted Maxwellian hole distribution in Ge. It is verified by reproducing successfully experimental longitudinal hole anisotropy data. A comparison between electron and hole mobility shows large differences for the longitudinal and tangential velocity anisotropy as a function of the electrical field orientation. Measurements on a 12 fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by {gamma}-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60 keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356 keV rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and the digital electronics

  12. Pure, single phase, high crystalline, chamfered-edge zeolite 4A synthesized from coal fly ash for use as a builder in detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, K S; Chao, C Y H

    2006-09-01

    Single phase chamfered-edge zeolite 4A samples in pure form with a high crystallinity were synthesized by applying step-change of synthesis temperature during hydrothermal treatment of coal fly ash. The calcium binding capacity of these zeolite 4A samples (prepared from coal fly ash) and the commercial detergent grade zeolite 4A were tested for usage as a detergent builder. The results show that these zeolite 4A samples behaved similarly as the commercial one in removing calcium ions during the washing cycle. Moreover, from the leaching tests (evaluation of toxicological safety), the results show that these zeolite 4A samples leached the same elements (Sb, As, Se and Tl) as the commercial one with the concentrations in the same order of magnitude. This shows that the toxicological effect of the coal fly ash converted zeolite 4A was not worse than that of the commercial sample. Finally, economic and environmental aspects of converting coal fly ash to useful products were discussed.

  13. Evolution, Fruit Flies and Gerontology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 11. Evolution, Fruit Flies and Gerontology Evolutionary Biology Helps Unravel the ... Author Affiliations. Amitabh Joshi1. Animal Behaviour Unit Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research Jakkur P.O. Bangalore 560 064, India ...

  14. Susceptibility of low-chill blueberry cultivars to Mediterranean fruit fly, oriental fruit fly, and melon fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Peter A; Zee, Francis T; Hamasaki, Randall T; Hummer, Kim; Nakamoto, Stuart T

    2011-04-01

    No-choice tests were conducted to determine whether fruit of southern highbush blueberry, Vaccinium corymbosum L., hybrids are hosts for three invasive tephritid fruit flies in Hawaii. Fruit of various blueberry cultivars was exposed to gravid female flies of Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel (oriental fruit fly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Mediterranean fruit fly), or Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillet (melon fly) in screen cages outdoors for 6 h and then held on sand in the laboratory for 2 wk for pupal development and adult emergence. Each of the 15 blueberry cultivars tested were infested by oriental fruit fly and Mediterranean fruit fly, confirming that these fruit flies will oviposit on blueberry fruit and that blueberry is a suitable host for fly development. However, there was significant cultivar variation in susceptibility to fruit fly infestation. For oriental fruit fly, 'Sapphire' fruit produced an average of 1.42 puparia per g, twice as high as that of the next most susceptible cultivar 'Emerald' (0.70 puparia per g). 'Legacy', 'Biloxi', and 'Spring High' were least susceptible to infestation, producing only 0.20-0.25 oriental fruit fly puparia per g of fruit. For Mediterranean fruit fly, 'Blue Crisp' produced 0.50 puparia per g of fruit, whereas 'Sharpblue' produced only 0.03 puparia per g of fruit. Blueberry was a marginal host for melon fly. This information will aid in development of pest management recommendations for blueberry cultivars as planting of low-chill cultivars expands to areas with subtropical and tropical fruit flies. Planting of fruit fly resistant cultivars may result in lower infestation levels and less crop loss.

  15. Total flying hours and risk of high systolic blood pressure in the civilian pilot in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdi Afian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Latar belakang: Tekanan darah sistolik tinggi di antara pilot sipil antara lain akan menyebabkan gangguan kardiovaskular sehingga akan mengganggu kelancaran penerbangan. Tujuan penelitian ini ialah untuk mengetahui faktor-faktor dominan terhadap tekanan darah sistolik tinggi pada pilot sipil. Metode: Penelitian potong lintang dengan metode sampling purposif pada pilot yang melakukan pemeriksaan kesehatan berkala di Balai Kesehatan Penerbangan pada tanggal 18-29 Mei 2015. Data yang dikumpulkan adalah karakteristik demografi dan pekerjaan, klinis, kebiasaan olahraga, kebiasaan makan, indeks massa tubuh dan riwayat penyakit. Tekanan darah sistolik tinggi ialah tekanan darah sistolik140 mmHg atau lebih. Hasil: Dari 690 pilot yang melakukan pemeriksaan kesehatan berkala, 428 pilot laki-laki bersedia berpartisipasi mengikuti penelitian ini. Usia dan riwayat penyakit hipertensi merupakan faktor risiko dominan yang berhubungan dengan tekanan darah sistolik tinggi. Jika dibandingkan dengan pilot usia 19-39 tahun, yang berusia 40-65 tahun mempunyai 15,1 kali lipat lebih besar risiko terkena tekanan darah sistolik tinggi [rasio odds suaian (ORa= 15,12; p= 0,001]. Pilot dengan riwayat penyakit hipertensi dibandingkan dengan yang tidak ada riwayat memiliki risiko tekanan darah sistolik tinggi 93,2 kali lipat lebih besar (ORa= 93,21; p= 0,001 Kesimpulan: Usia 40-65 tahun dan memiliki riwayat hipertensi meningkatkan risiko tekanan darah sistolik tinggi di antara pilot sipil di Indonesia. Kata kunci: tekanan darah sistolik, total jam terbang, pilot sipil, Indonesia.  Abstract Background: Systolic high blood pressure among civilian pilots among others will cause cardiovascular disease and this condition will disrupt the flight.The purpose of this study was to identified the dominant factors related to high systolic blood pressure in the civilian pilots. Methods: A cross-sectional study with a purposive sampling method on a pilot who performed periodic

  16. Flying Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciger, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The Flying Cities artistic installation brings to life imaginary cities made from the speech input of visitors. In this article we describe the original interactive process generating real time 3D graphics from spectators' vocal inputs. This example of cross-modal interaction has the nice property...... of providing a tangible correspondence between the two spaces. This interaction mean has proved to suit the artistic expression well but it also aims at providing anyone with a pleasant and stimulating feedback from speech activity, a new medium for creativity and a way to visually perceive a vocal performance...

  17. Open Repair of AAA in a High Volume Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovic, Lazar B; Maksic, Milanko; Koncar, Igor; Ilic, Nikola; Dragas, Marko; Fatic, Nikola; Markovic, Miroslav; Banzic, Igor; Mutavdzic, Perica

    2017-03-01

    To assess results of open repair (OR) of AAA in a single high volume center. We analyzed prospectively collected data of 450 patients who underwent elective OR of AAA at the Clinic for Vascular and Endovascular Surgery of the Serbian Clinical Centre in the period between January 2013 and September 2014. Postoperative death occurred in seven patients (1. 55%) during the first 30 postoperative days. The mortality was caused by: uncontrolled bleeding-1, acute myocardial infarction-1, ischemic colitis-2, MOFS-2, sepsis due to infection and dehiscence of laparotomy wound-1. Coronary artery disease (OR 3.89; CI 0.85-17.7; p = 0.0058), postoperative acute myocardial infarction (OR 29.9; CI 2.56-334.95; p = 0.0053), chronic renal failure (OR 7.5; CI 1.35-8.5; p = 0.0073), colonic necrosis (OR 88.2; CI 4.77-1629.69; p = 0.0026), occlusion of the both hypogastric arteries and the inability to preserve at least one hypogastric artery (OR 17.4; CI 1.99-178.33; p = 0.0230), aortobifemoral reconstruction (OR 9.06; CI 1.76-46.49; p = 0.016), significant perioperative bleeding (>2 L) (OR 7.32; CI 1.31-10.79; p = 0.0001), hostile abdomen (OR 5.25; CI 1.3-21.1; p = 0.0055), inflammatory aneurysm (OR 13.99; CI 2.88-65.09; p = 0.0002), supraceliac aortic cross-clamping (OR 18.7; CI 3.8-90.6; p = 0.0003), prolonged aortic cross-clamping (>60 min) (OR 14.25; CI 2.75-64.5; p = 0.0003), the intraoperative hypotension (OR 6.61; CI 0.71-61.07; p = 0.0545), the prolonged operation (>240 min) (OR 8.66; CI 0.91-81.56; p = 0.0585) and complete dehiscence of the laparotomy (OR 44.1; CI 3.39-572.78; p = 0.0396) increased the 30-day mortality in our study. Early mortality after open repair of AAA in high volume center might be very low due to experienced multidisciplinary team. Centralized open aortic surgery might be solution for effective treatment of patients with unsuitable anatomy or for young patients with long life expectancy.

  18. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH BELITE SULFOALUMINATE CEMENT THROUGH RICH ALUMINA FLY ASH AND DESULFURIZATION GYPSUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BING MA,

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was the preparation and characterization of high belite sulfoaluminate cement (HBSC from industrial residues. HBSC promises eco-friendly building materials with great mechanical performance at earlier ages than Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC. Preliminary results show the formation of main phase dicalcium silicate (C2S and ye’elimite (C4A3$ at 1250°C, as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD, are promising. The formation of minerals in the clinker was analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry-thermogravimetry (DSC–TG. Likewise, Scanning electron microscope (SEM and XRD were used to carry out the analysis of the micro-structural and hydration products. The main HBSC hydration products, Ettringite and amorphous Al(OH3, were formed in the early stages; however, during the later stages, monosulfate and Strätlingite were formed. Isothermal conduction calorimetry measurements indicate that hydration properties of the cements are comparable to OPC; the total hydration heat after 3 days was 438 J/g. The optimum compressive strength values of the mortars after 1-, 3-, 7-, and 28-days were 24.9 MPa, 33.2 MPa, 35.6 MPa and 52.8 MPa which can meet the requirement of special structures.

  19. Orbit Control of Fly-around Satellite with Highly Eccentric Orbit Using Solar Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-gang, Hou; Chang-yin, Zhao; Ming-jiang, Zhang; Rong-yu, Sun

    2017-01-01

    The method of controlling highly eccentric accompanying flight orbit using the solar wing is proposed in this paper. The formation is maintained by controlling the orbit of the accompanying satellite (follower). The accompanying satellite rotates around its inertial principal axis with a constant angular velocity. The control on the accompanying satellite is divided into the in-plane control and out-of-plane control. The in-plane control is superior to the out-of-plane control. The out-of-plane control force is applied when the in-plane error is eliminated or the in-plane control force can not be supplied due to some geometrical factors. By the sliding mode control method, the magnitude and direction of the control force required by the in-plane orbit control are calculated. Then accordingly, the expression of the solar wing orientation with respect to the satellite body in the control process is derived, so that by adjusting the orientation of the solar wing, the required control force can be obtained. Finally, the verification on this method is performed by numerical simulations, including the orbit adjustment, error elimination, and the orbit maintenance. It is shown that this method can keep the error less than 5 m, and it is feasible for the space formation flight.

  20. Volumizing effects of a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid volumizing filler: prospective European study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Klaus

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facial volume loss contributes significantly to facial aging. The 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid (HA formulation used in this study is a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, fully reversible, volumizing filler indicated to restore facial volume. This first prospective study evaluated use in current aesthetic clinical practice. Methods A pan-European evaluation conducted under guidelines of the World Association of Opinion and Marketing Research, the trial comprised a baseline visit (visit 1 and a follow-up (visit 2 at 14 ± 7 days posttreatment. Physicians photographed patients at each visit. Each patient was treated with the 20-mg/mL HA volumizing filler as supplied in standard packaging. Procedural details, aesthetic outcomes, safety, and physician and patient ratings of their experience were recorded. Results Fifteen physicians and 70 patients (91% female; mean age: 50 years participated. Mean volume loss at baseline was 3.7 (moderate on the Facial Volume Loss Scale. Local anesthesia was used in 64.3% of cases. Most injections (85% were administered with needles rather than cannulas. Of the 208 injections, 59% were in the malar region, primarily above the periosteum. Subcutaneous injections were most common for other sites. The mean total injection volume per patient was 4.6 mL. The mean volume loss score declined significantly (P Conclusion The 20-mg/mL smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, volumizing HA filler was effective, well tolerated, and easy to use in current clinical practice. Participants were very likely to recommend this product to colleagues and friends, and patients would be very or quite likely to request this product for future treatments.

  1. Falling, flapping, flying, swimming,...: High-Re fluid-solid interactions with vortex shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelin, Sebastien Honore Roland

    The coupling between the motion of a solid body and the dynamics of the surrounding flow is essential to the understanding of a large number of engineering and physical problems, from the stability of a slender structure exposed to the wind to the locomotion of insects, birds and fishes. Because of the strong coupling on a moving boundary of the equations for the solid and fluid, the simulation of such problems is computationally challenging and expensive. This justifies the development of simplified models for the fluid-solid interactions to study their physical properties and behavior. This dissertation proposes a reduced-order model for the interaction of a sharp-edged solid body with a strongly unsteady high Reynolds number flow. In such a case, viscous forces in the fluid are often negligible compared to the fluid inertia or the pressure forces, and the thin boundary layers separate from the solid at the edges, leading to the shedding of large and persistent vortices in the solid's wake. A general two-dimensional framework is presented based on complex potential flow theory. The formation of the solid's vortical wake is accounted for by the shedding of point vortices with unsteady intensity from the solid's sharp edges, and the fluid-solid problem is reformulated exclusively as a solid-vortex interaction problem. In the case of a rigid solid body, the coupled problem is shown to reduce to a set of non-linear ordinary differential equations. This model is used to study the effect of vortex shedding on the stability of falling objects. The solid-vortex model is then generalized to study the fluttering instability and non-linear flapping dynamics of flexible plates or flags. The uttering instability and resulting flapping motion result from the competing effects of the fluid forcing and of the solid's flexural rigidity and inertia. Finally, the solid-vortex model is applied to the study of the fundamental effect of bending rigidity on the flapping performance of

  2. Quantitative proteomics on the fly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouw, J.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837377

    2009-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms is characterized by complex processes that progressively transform essentially a single cell into a creature with complicated structures and highly specialized functions. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides an excellent model system to

  3. Volume Based DTM Generation from Very High Resolution Photogrammetric Dsms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltz, B.; Bayer, S.; Poznanska, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a new algorithm for digital terrain (DTM) model reconstruction from very high spatial resolution digital surface models (DSMs). It represents a combination of multi-directional filtering with a new metric which we call normalized volume above ground to create an above-ground mask containing buildings and elevated vegetation. This mask can be used to interpolate a ground-only DTM. The presented algorithm works fully automatically, requiring only the processing parameters minimum height and maximum width in metric units. Since slope and breaklines are not decisive criteria, low and smooth and even very extensive flat objects are recognized and masked. The algorithm was developed with the goal to generate the normalized DSM for automatic 3D building reconstruction and works reliably also in environments with distinct hillsides or terrace-shaped terrain where conventional methods would fail. A quantitative comparison with the ISPRS data sets Potsdam and Vaihingen show that 98-99% of all building data points are identified and can be removed, while enough ground data points (~66%) are kept to be able to reconstruct the ground surface. Additionally, we discuss the concept of size dependent height thresholds and present an efficient scheme for pyramidal processing of data sets reducing time complexity to linear to the number of pixels, O(WH).

  4. Shooting Performance and Fly Time in Highly Trained Wing Handball Players: Not Everything Is as It Seems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Claude; Buchheit, Martin

    2017-03-01

    To (1) assess the usefulness of countermovement jump (CMJ) testing to predict handball-specific jumping ability and (2) examine the acute effect of transiently modified jumping ability (ie, flight time) on shooting efficiency in wing players. Eleven young highly trained wing players performed 3 CMJs and 10 typical wing jump shots with 3 different modalities: without any constraint (CONTROL), while stepping on a 14-cm step (STEP), and wearing a weighted vest (VEST, 5% of body mass). Flight time and the associated scoring efficiency during the jump shots were recorded. There was no clear correlation between jump shot and CMJ flight time, irrespective of the condition (r = .04-.18). During jump shots, flight time was most likely longer (effect size [ES] = 1.42-1.97) with VEST (635.4 ± 31 ms) and STEP (615.3 ± 32.9 ms) than CONTROL (566 ± 30.5 ms) and very likely longer with VEST than with STEP (ES = 0.6). The correlation between scoring efficiency and jump-shot flight time was not substantial either in each modality or for all shots pooled. The difference in scoring efficiency between the 3 jumps with the longest vs shortest flight times was either small (VEST, 48% vs 42%) or nonsubstantial (2 other conditions). The use of CMJ as a predictor of handball-specific jumping ability is questioned given the dissociation between CMJ and jump-shot flying time. These results also show that transiently affected flight time may not affect scoring efficiency, which questions the importance of jumping ability for success in wing players.

  5. Graphitization of unburned carbon from oil-fired fly ash applied for anode materials of high power lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Tzoo-Shing [Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Wu, Yu-Shiang, E-mail: yswu@cc.cust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, China University of Science and Technology, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuan-Haun [Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {center_dot} From TEM observations, the graphitization treatment samples had annular microstructure. {center_dot} Sample with heat treatment at 2300 deg. C is a suitable material for the higher C-rate region. {center_dot} Sample with heat treatment at 2700 deg. C yields the first columbic efficiency of about 93.6%. - Abstract: Unburned carbon is an industrial waste product of oil-fired fly ash. From the viewpoint of waste recycling, using ground unburned carbon with an average size of 6 {mu}m heat treatment at 2700 deg. C, and both charge and discharge at 0.1 C, yields the first columbic efficiency of about 93.6%. Moreover, after 50 cycles, the discharge capacity is 325.5 mAh g{sup -1}, and the capacity retention is about 97.5%. The two conditions tested for rate capability are as follows: First, a charge at 0.2 C rate and discharge at variable C-rates in which the unburned carbon after heat treatment at higher temperature exhibits a higher capacity in the 0.2-3 C region. However, unburned carbon with heat treatment at 2300 deg. C is a suitable material for the higher C-rate region (5-10 C). Second, for both charge and discharge at the same C-rate, the unburned carbon after heat treatment at higher temperature exhibits a higher capacity in the 0.2-0.5 C region; however, unburned carbon without graphitization treatment is a suitable material for the higher C-rate region (3-10 C). Based on TEM observations, the graphitization treatment samples had annular microstructure which has many active sites, improving the intercalation/deintercalation of lithium ions. Therefore, these results show that compared to natural graphite, graphitization of unburned carbon is more suitable for the anode materials of a high power battery.

  6. Synthesis of high-purity Na-A and Na-X zeolite from coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitchakarn, Panu; Laosiripojana, Navadol; Viriya-Umpikul, Nawin; Pavasant, Prasert

    2014-05-01

    Coal fly ash (CFA) was used as a raw material for the synthesis of zeolite molecular sieve. The synthesis began with the pretreatment of CFA to remove impurities (e.g., Fe2O3, CaO, etc.) under various acid types (HCl, H2SO4, and HNO3) and acid/CFA ratios (5-25 mL(acid)/g(CFA)). High product purity (up to 97%) was achieved with HCl (20%wt), and acid/CFA ratio of 20 mL(HCl)/g(CFA). The treated CFA was then converted to zeolite by the fusion reaction under various Si/Al molar ratios (0.54-1.84). Zeolite type A was synthesized when the Si/Al molar ratios were lower than 1, whereas sodium aluminum silicate hydrate was formed when the Si/Al molar ratio were higher than 1. The highest water adsorption performance of the zeolite product, i.e., the outlet ethanol concentration of 99.9%wt and the specific adsorption capacity of 2.31 x 10(-2) g(water)/g(zeolite), was observed with the Si/Al molar ratio of 0.82. The zeolite was tested for its water adsorption capacity repeatedly 10 times without deactivation. This work evaluated the technical feasibility in the conversion of CFA to zeolite, which would help reduce the quantity of waste needed to be landfilled. This adds value to the unwanted material by converting it into something that can be further used. The synthesized products were shown to be quite stable as water adsorbent for the dehydration of ethanol solution.

  7. Most clinical laboratory testing in Kampala occurs in high-volume, high-quality laboratories or low-volume, low-quality laboratories. A tale of two cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amukele, Timothy K; Schroeder, Lee F; Jackson, J Brooks; Elbireer, Ali

    2015-01-01

    To describe key characteristics (laboratory quality, test volumes, and complexity) of clinical laboratories in Kampala, Uganda (population ~1.7 million). Cross-sectional survey using a standard questionnaire to document laboratory type and quality, as well as test menus and volumes. Quality was based on the World Health Organization-Africa Region checklist. Of the 954 laboratories identified (a density of one laboratory per 1,781 persons), 779 (82%) performed only simple kit tests or light microscope examinations. The 95% (907/954) of laboratories for whom volumes were obtained performed an average aggregate of 13,189 tests daily, for a test utilization rate of around 2 tests per individual per year. Laboratories could be segregated into eight groups based on quality, test volume, and complexity. However, 90% of the testing was performed by just two groups: (1) low-volume (≤100 tests daily), low-quality laboratories performing simple tests or (2) high-volume (>100 tests daily), high-quality laboratories. Each of these two groups did 45% of the daily testing volume (90% combined). Clinical laboratory density in Kampala (1/1,781 persons) is high, approaching that in the United States (1/1,347 persons). Low-volume/low-quality and high-volume/high-quality laboratories do 90% of the daily aggregate testing. Quality improvement (QI) schemes for Africa must be appropriate to low-volume laboratories as well as to the large laboratories that have been the focus of previous QI efforts. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  8. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  9. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boxley, Chett [Park City, UT

    2012-05-15

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  10. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boxley, Chett [Park City, UT; Akash, Akash [Salt lake City, UT; Zhao, Qiang [Natick, MA

    2012-05-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  11. High Reliability, High Mix, Ultralow Volume Surface Mount Technology for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barela, P.; Bonner, K.; Cornford, S.; Wen, A.

    1995-01-01

    For the past two years, JPL has been working to introduce surface mount technology (SMT) for high reliability space applications. The thrust has centered around four research and development projects, the aim of which is to facilitate the use of SMT for designing, producing, inspecting, and quantifying surface mount printed wiring assemblies for ultralow volume, long life space applications. This paper explores the current approach being pursued at JPL and some of the problems peculiar to applying SMT to spacecraft applications.

  12. High brightness diode lasers controlled by volume Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebov, Leonid

    2017-02-01

    Volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) recorded in photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass are holographic optical elements that are effective spectral and angular filters withstanding high power laser radiation. Reflecting VBGs are narrow-band spectral filters while transmitting VBGs are narrow-band angular filters. The use of these optical elements in external resonators of semiconductor lasers enables extremely resonant feedback that provides dramatic spectral and angular narrowing of laser diodes radiation without significant power and efficiency penalty. Spectral narrowing of laser diodes by reflecting VBGs demonstrated in wide spectral region from near UV to 3 μm. Commercially available VBGs have spectral width ranged from few nanometers to few tens of picometers. Efficient spectral locking was demonstrated for edge emitters (single diodes, bars, modules, and stacks), vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), grating coupled surface emitting lasers (GCSELs), and interband cascade lasers (ICLs). The use of multiplexed VBGs provides multiwavelength emission from a single emitter. Spectrally locked semiconductor lasers demonstrated CW power from milliwatts to a kilowatt. Angular narrowing by transmitting VBGs enables single transverse mode emission from wide aperture diode lasers having resonators with great Fresnel numbers. This feature provides close to diffraction limit divergence along a slow axis of wide stripe edge emitters. Radiation exchange between lasers by means of spatially profiled or multiplexed VBGs enables coherent combining of diode lasers. Sequence of VBGs or multiplexed VBGs enable spectral combining of spectrally narrowed diode lasers or laser modules. Thus the use of VBGs for diode lasers beam control provides dramatic increase of brightness.

  13. Indicators of optimal lung volume during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingay, David G; Mills, John F; Morley, Colin J; Pellicano, Anastasia; Dargaville, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    During high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, an understanding of the relationship between lung volume and lung mechanics may help clinicians better apply ventilation. The objectives of this study were: 1) to describe the relationship between lung volume and lung function parameters during mapping of the deflation limb of the pressure-volume relationship in infants receiving high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, and 2) to determine whether these parameters might be useful in targeting an optimal volume to apply ventilation. Observational physiological study. Tertiary neonatal intensive care unit in a pediatric hospital. Fifteen infants receiving high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and muscle relaxants. The deflation limb of the pressure-volume relationship was mapped in each infant, after recruitment to total lung capacity, using stepwise airway pressure decrements. Total lung capacity and closing volume were defined by oxygenation response. Lung volume (respiratory inductive plethysmography), oxygen saturation, transcutaneous carbon dioxide, and indicators of lung mechanics were recorded at each pressure. A distinct bell-shaped relationship between lung volume and carbon dioxide, minute ventilation, and tidal volume (both at airway opening and by inductive plethysmography) could be identified on the deflation limb, with an improvement of 21.6 mm Hg (CO2), 168 mL/sec (minute ventilation), 0.25 mL/kg (airway opening tidal volume), and 13.7% (plethysmography tidal volume) compared with total lung capacity levels. The mean (SD) optimal volumes and pressures for these parameters were significantly lower than total lung capacity, occurring at volumes between 38.6 (39.8)% and 62.8 (31.1)% of total lung capacity, and 28 (36.3)% and 41.3 (38.7)% of pressure at total lung capacity (p volumes that maintained the oxygenation benefit of recruitment. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide, tidal volume, and minute ventilation may assist in refining strategies to identify optimal

  14. Wolbachia association with the tsetse fly, Glossina fuscipes fuscipes, reveals high levels of genetic diversity and complex evolutionary dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Symula Rebecca E

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolbachia pipientis, a diverse group of α-proteobacteria, can alter arthropod host reproduction and confer a reproductive advantage to Wolbachia-infected females (cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI. This advantage can alter host population genetics because Wolbachia-infected females produce more offspring with their own mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplotypes than uninfected females. Thus, these host haplotypes become common or fixed (selective sweep. Although simulations suggest that for a CI-mediated sweep to occur, there must be a transient phase with repeated initial infections of multiple individual hosts by different Wolbachia strains, this has not been observed empirically. Wolbachia has been found in the tsetse fly, Glossina fuscipes fuscipes, but it is not limited to a single host haplotype, suggesting that CI did not impact its population structure. However, host population genetic differentiation could have been generated if multiple Wolbachia strains interacted in some populations. Here, we investigated Wolbachia genetic variation in G. f. fuscipes populations of known host genetic composition in Uganda. We tested for the presence of multiple Wolbachia strains using Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST and for an association between geographic region and host mtDNA haplotype using Wolbachia DNA sequence from a variable locus, groEL (heat shock protein 60. Results MLST demonstrated that some G. f. fuscipes carry Wolbachia strains from two lineages. GroEL revealed high levels of sequence diversity within and between individuals (Haplotype diversity = 0.945. We found Wolbachia associated with 26 host mtDNA haplotypes, an unprecedented result. We observed a geographical association of one Wolbachia lineage with southern host mtDNA haplotypes, but it was non-significant (p = 0.16. Though most Wolbachia-infected host haplotypes were those found in the contact region between host mtDNA groups, this association was non

  15. Low-volume PEG plus ascorbic acid versus high-volume PEG as bowel preparation for colonoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corporaal, Sietske; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Koornstra, Jan J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. High volumes of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based solutions as bowel preparation for colonoscopy are effective, but often poorly tolerated. To compare a 2 l PEG-based solution combined with ascorbic acid (PEG + Asc) with 4 l PEG-based solution (PEG). Methods. In a single blind,

  16. High-Volume Utilization of Cotton in Nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article briefly explores possible utilization of cotton in volume in the traditional textile sector and in the growing nontraditional nonwovens sector and covers the challenges and opportunities that may exist on the way. Some new concepts in the development of predominantly cotton-based textil...

  17. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography with High-Contrast Dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) system has been designed to complement the tools created to sense the presence of water in nonconductive spacecraft materials, by helping to not only find the approximate location of moisture but also its quantity and depth. The ECVT system has been created for use with a new image reconstruction algorithm capable of imaging high-contrast dielectric distributions. Rather than relying solely on mutual capacitance readings as is done in traditional electrical capacitance tomography applications, this method reconstructs high-resolution images using only the self-capacitance measurements. The image reconstruction method assumes that the material under inspection consists of a binary dielectric distribution, with either a high relative dielectric value representing the water or a low dielectric value for the background material. By constraining the unknown dielectric material to one of two values, the inverse math problem that must be solved to generate the image is no longer ill-determined. The image resolution becomes limited only by the accuracy and resolution of the measurement circuitry. Images were reconstructed using this method with both synthetic and real data acquired using an aluminum structure inserted at different positions within the sensing region. The cuboid geometry of the system has two parallel planes of 16 conductors arranged in a 4 4 pattern. The electrode geometry consists of parallel planes of copper conductors, connected through custom-built switch electronics, to a commercially available capacitance to digital converter. The figure shows two 4 4 arrays of electrodes milled from square sections of copper-clad circuit-board material and mounted on two pieces of glass-filled plastic backing, which were cut to approximately square shapes, 10 cm on a side. Each electrode is placed on 2.0-cm centers. The parallel arrays were mounted with the electrode arrays approximately 3 cm apart. The open ends

  18. Can E. coli fly?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindeberg, Yrja Lisa; Egedal, Karen; Hossain, Zenat Zebin

    2017-01-01

    -landings, the average CFU per fly-landing was > 0·6 x 103 CFU. Genes of diarrheagenic E. coli and Shigella species were detected in 39 of 60 (65%) of exposed rice samples. Two fly species were identified; the common housefly (Musca domestica) and the oriental latrine fly (Chrysomya megacephala). CONCLUSION: Flies may...

  19. Effects of high and low volume of strength training on muscle strength, muscle volume and lipid profile in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleiton Silva Correa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in lipid profile are considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, especially in postmenopausal woman who have been associated with age-related loss of muscle mass. The beneficial role of aerobic exercise in the prevention of CVD has been well documented. However, the effect of strength training has not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine the changes of lipoprotein levels after 12 weeks of different volumes of strength training and its correlation with strength and muscle volume in postmenopausal women. The participants were randomized into three groups: low volume (LVST; n = 12, 1 set and high volume of strength training (HVST; n = 11, 3 sets, or control group (n = 12. Training groups performed 12 weeks of supervised strength exercises, 15 maximum repetitions, five times a week, 20 minutes for LVST and 40 minutes for HVST for each training session. Measurements included body composition, strength and muscle volume, as well as blood analysis (glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein pre- and post-training. The HVST and LVST improved the one-repetition maximum knee extension strength (p < 0.001, maximal dynamic strength (p < 0.001, and muscle volume (p = 0.048. Post-training triglyceride was lower in HVST when compared to LVST and the control group (p = 0.047. Even though they present the same neuromuscular and morphological adaptations in postmenopausal women, the HVST is more effective than LVST in improving the lipid profile of postmenopausal woman, and can be considered as an ideal program of intervention to reverse changes in lipid metabolism commonly found in this group.

  20. Abundances and distribution of minerals and elements in high-alumina coal fly ash from the Jungar Power Plant, Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Zhao, L.; Peng, S.; Chou, C.-L.; Wang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Li, D.; Sun, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The fly ash from the Jungar Power Plant, Inner Mongolia, China, is unique because it is highly enriched in alumina (Al2O3>50%). The fly ash mainly consists of amorphous glass and mullite and trace amounts of corundum, quartz, char, calcite, K-feldspar, clay minerals, and Fe-bearing minerals. The mullite content in fly ash is as high as 37.4% because of high boehmite and kaolinite contents in feed coal. Corundum is a characteristic mineral formed during the combustion of boehmite-rich coal.Samples from the economizer were sieved into six size fractions (500 mesh) and separated into magnetic, mullite+corundum+quartz (MCQ) and glass phases for mineralogical and chemical analysis. The corundum content increases but amorphous glass decreases with decreasing particle size. Fractions of small particle sizes are relatively high in mullite, probably because mullite was formed from fine clay mineral particles under high-temperature combustion condition. Similarly, fine corundum crystals formed in the boiler from boehmite in feed coal. The magnetic phase consists of hematite, magnetite, magnesioferrite, and MgFeAlO4 crystals. The MCQ phase is composed of 89% mullite, 6.1% corundum, 4.5% quartz, and 0.5% K-feldspar.Overall, the fly ash from the power plant is significantly enriched in Al2O3 with an average of 51.9%, but poor in SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, Na2O, P2O5, and As. Arsenic, TiO2, Th, Al2O3, Bi, La, Ga, Ni, and V are high in mullite, and the magnetic matter is enriched in Fe2O3, CaO, MnO, TiO2, Cs, Co, As, Cd, Ba, Ni, Sb, MgO, Zn, and V. The remaining elements are high in the glass fraction. The concentration of K2O, Na2O, P2O5, Nb, Cr, Ta, U, W, Rb, and Ni do not clearly vary with particle size, while SiO2 and Hg decrease and the remaining elements clearly increase with decreasing particle size. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  1. High-Volume Production of Lightweight Multijunction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youtsey, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    MicroLink Devices, Inc., has transitioned its 6-inch epitaxial lift-off (ELO) solar cell fabrication process into a manufacturing platform capable of sustaining large-volume production. This Phase II project improves the ELO process by reducing cycle time and increasing the yield of large-area devices. In addition, all critical device fabrication processes have transitioned to 6-inch production tool sets designed for volume production. An emphasis on automated cassette-to-cassette and batch processes minimizes operator dependence and cell performance variability. MicroLink Devices established a pilot production line capable of at least 1,500 6-inch wafers per month at greater than 80 percent yield. The company also increased the yield and manufacturability of the 6-inch reclaim process, which is crucial to reducing the cost of the cells.

  2. The effect of chronic erythrocytic polycythemia and high altitude upon plasma and blood volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of two kinds of physiological chronic erythrocytic polycythemias in order to differentiate the specific effect of erythrocytic polycythemia from the general effects of high altitude upon the plasma volume. The two kinds were produced hormonally in female chickens, at sea level, or by protracted high-altitude exposures. It appears that the vascular system of the body may account for an increase in red blood cell mass either by reduction in plasma volume, or by no change in plasma volume, resulting in differential changes in total blood volumes.

  3. Evaluation of ultra low volume and thermal fog pesticide applications against Old World Phlebotomine sand fly vectors of Leishmania in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    One component of the Department of Defense (DoD) pest management system is ultra-low volume (ULV) and/or thermal fog aerosol pesticide application. Despite widespread implementations of this and other components of the system, such as use of repellents and permethrin, US military operations in hot-a...

  4. Self-consolidating concrete (SCC) and high-volume fly ash concrete (HVFAC) for infrastructure elements: implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Myers, John J.: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5269-8218 : Because of its unique nature, self-consolidating concrete (SCC) has the potential to significantly reduce costs associated with transportation-related infrastructure, benefiting both MoDOT and th...

  5. Going the Extra Mile: Improved Survival for Pancreatic Cancer Patients Traveling to High-volume Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidsky, Michael E; Sun, Zhifei; Nussbaum, Daniel P; Adam, Mohamed A; Speicher, Paul J; Blazer, Dan G

    2017-08-01

    This study compares outcomes following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for patients treated at local, low-volume centers and those traveling to high-volume centers. Although outcomes for PD are superior at high-volume institutions, not all patients live in proximity to major medical centers. Theoretical advantages for undergoing surgery locally exist. The 1998 to 2012 National Cancer Data Base was queried for T1-3N0-1M0 pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients who underwent PD. Travel distances to treatment centers were calculated. Overlaying the upper and lower quartiles of travel distance with institutional volume established short travel/low-volume (ST/LV) and long travel/high-volume (LT/HV) cohorts. Overall survival was evaluated. Of 7086 patients, 773 ST/LV patients traveled ≤6.3 (median 3.2) miles to centers performing ≤3.3 PDs yearly, and 758 LT/HV patients traveled ≥45 (median 97.3) miles to centers performing ≥16 PDs yearly. LT/HV patients had higher stage disease (P travel to a high-volume center remained associated with reduced long-term mortality (hazard ratio 0.75, P travel burden, patients treated at high-volume centers had improved perioperative outcomes, short-term mortality, and overall survival. These data support ongoing efforts to centralize care for patients undergoing PD.

  6. Blood Volume, Plasma Volume and Circulation Time in a High-Energy-Demand Teleost, the Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brill, R.W.; Cousins, K.L.; Jones, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    We measured red cell space with 51Cr-labeled red blood cells, and dextran space with 500 kDa fluorescein-isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (FITC-dextran), in two groups of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares). Red cell space was 13.8+/-0.7 ml kg-1 (mean +/- s.e.m.) Assuming a whole- body hematocrit...... that the volume of the secondary circulatory system of yellowfin tuna is small, and its exact volume is not measurable by our methods. Although blood volume is not exceptional, circulation time (blood volume/cardiac output) is clearly shorter in yellowfin tuna than in other active teleosts. In a 1 kg yellowfin...... tuna, circulation time is approximately 0.4 min (47 ml kg-1/115 ml min-1 kg- 1) compared with 1.3 min (46 ml kg-1/35 ml min-1 kg-1) in yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata) and 1.9 min (35 ml kg-1/18 ml min-1 kg-1) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In air-breathing vertebrates, high metabolic rates...

  7. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  8. High-speed volume measurement system and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Michael H.; Doyle, Jr., James L.; Brinkman, Michael J.

    2017-12-12

    Disclosed is a volume sensor having first, second, and third laser sources emitting first, second, and third laser beams; first, second, and third beam splitters splitting the first, second, and third laser beams into first, second, and third beam pairs; first, second, and third optical assemblies expanding the first, second, and third beam pairs into first, second, and third pairs of parallel beam sheets; fourth, fifth, and sixth optical assemblies focusing the first, second, and third beam sheet pairs into fourth, fifth, and sixth beam pairs; and first, second, and third detector pairs receiving the fourth, fifth, and sixth beam pairs and converting a change in intensity of at least one of the beam pairs resulting from an object passing through at least one of the first, second, and third parallel beam sheets into at least one electrical signal proportional to a three-dimensional representation of the object.

  9. Achieving high convection volumes in postdilution online hemodiafiltration : a prospective multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roij van Zuijdewijn, Camiel L M; Chapdelaine, Isabelle; Nubé, Menso J.; Blankestijn, Peter J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/086704850; Bots, Michiel L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/110610032; Konings, Constantijn J A M; Kremer Hovinga, Ton K; Molenaar, Femke M; van der Weerd, Neelke C.; Grooteman, Muriel P C

    2017-01-01

    Background. Available evidence suggests a reduced mortality risk for patients treated with high-volume postdilution hemodiafiltration (HDF) when compared with hemodialysis (HD) patients. As the magnitude of the convection volume depends on treatment-related factors rather than patient-related

  10. Optimising Ambient Setting Bayer Derived Fly Ash Geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Jamieson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Bayer process utilises high concentrations of caustic and elevated temperature to liberate alumina from bauxite, for the production of aluminium and other chemicals. Within Australia, this process results in 40 million tonnes of mineral residues (Red mud each year. Over the same period, the energy production sector will produce 14 million tonnes of coal combustion products (Fly ash. Both industrial residues require impoundment storage, yet combining some of these components can produce geopolymers, an alternative to cement. Geopolymers derived from Bayer liquor and fly ash have been made successfully with a compressive strength in excess of 40 MPa after oven curing. However, any product from these industries would require large volume applications with robust operational conditions to maximise utilisation. To facilitate potential unconfined large-scale production, Bayer derived fly ash geopolymers have been optimised to achieve ambient curing. Fly ash from two different power stations have been successfully trialled showing the versatility of the Bayer liquor-ash combination for making geopolymers.

  11. Optimising Ambient Setting Bayer Derived Fly Ash Geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Evan; Kealley, Catherine S.; van Riessen, Arie; Hart, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    The Bayer process utilises high concentrations of caustic and elevated temperature to liberate alumina from bauxite, for the production of aluminium and other chemicals. Within Australia, this process results in 40 million tonnes of mineral residues (Red mud) each year. Over the same period, the energy production sector will produce 14 million tonnes of coal combustion products (Fly ash). Both industrial residues require impoundment storage, yet combining some of these components can produce geopolymers, an alternative to cement. Geopolymers derived from Bayer liquor and fly ash have been made successfully with a compressive strength in excess of 40 MPa after oven curing. However, any product from these industries would require large volume applications with robust operational conditions to maximise utilisation. To facilitate potential unconfined large-scale production, Bayer derived fly ash geopolymers have been optimised to achieve ambient curing. Fly ash from two different power stations have been successfully trialled showing the versatility of the Bayer liquor-ash combination for making geopolymers. PMID:28773513

  12. Current Methods to Detoxify Fly Ash from Waste Incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallgren, Christine; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    Fly ash from waste incineration contains large amounts of heavy metals and dioxins, which will cause a significant disposal problem within the coming years. The amount of fly ash produced in Sweden is currently approximately 60,000 tons/y. New technological options for the decontamination and/or inertization of incinerator fly ash are being developed with the objective of rendering a product that can be reused or, at least, be deposited at standard landfill sites with no risk. Many of these technologies have been tested at industrial scale or in pilot projects. The proposed alternatives include: Thermal treatments; Immobilization/stabilization by cement based techniques; Wet chemical treatments (extractions, immobilizations); Microbiological treatments. Of these, thermal treatments are the most promising solution. Depending on the temperature thermal treatments are classified in two main types: 1) low temperature (below 600 deg C) thermal treatments and 2) high temperature (above 1200 deg C) thermal treatments (vitrification). Most dioxins can be successfully destroyed at temperatures up to 400 deg C under oxygen deficient conditions and at temperatures up to 600 deg C under oxidising conditions. However most heavy metals remain in the fly ash after low temperature treatment. At a temperature of 900 deg C most heavy metals can also be removed in a 10% HCl atmosphere by forming volatile metal chlorides (CT-Fluapur process). During vitrification processes the fly ash melts and forms an inert glassy slag. The product does not leach any significant amount of heavy metals and is free from dioxin. The volume of the fly ash is significantly reduced. The product can be land filled at low costs or used as construction material. The properties of the product depend on the cooling process and on additives such as sand, limestone or waste glass. A series of vitrification methods at industrial size or in pilot scale using different furnaces are studied. Among these, plasma

  13. Physicochemical characterization of Spanish fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Querol, X.; Umana, J.C.; Alastuey, A.; Bertrana, C.; Lopez-Soler, A.; Plana, F.

    1999-12-01

    This article summarizes the results obtained from the physical, chemical, and mineralogical characterization of 14 fly ash samples. Major features that influence the utilization of each fly ash for zeolite synthesis are evidenced, and several fly ash types were selected as potential high-quality starting material for zeolite synthesis and ceramic applications. The main parameters influencing this selection were relatively small grain size; high Al and Si contents; high glass content; low CaO, S, and Fe contents; and relatively low heavy metal concentration. The Compostilla and Cou He fly ashes have high potential applications because of the low content of major impurities (such as Ca, Fe, and S) and the low content of soluble hazardous elements. The Espiel, Escucha, Los Barrios, As Pontes, Soto de Ribera, Meirama, Narcea, and Teruel fly ashes have important application potential, but this potential is slightly limited by the intermediate content of nonreactive impurities, such as Fe and Ca. The La Robla fly ash is of moderate interest, since the relatively high Ca and Fe oxide contents may reduce its potential applications. Finally, the Puertollano fly ash also has limited application because of the very high concentration of some heavy metals such as As, Cd, Ge, Hg, Pb, and Zn. From a mineralogical point of view, the Compostilla, Espiel, and Soto de Ribera fly ashes show the highest aluminum-silicate glass content and, consequently, the highest industrial application potential.

  14. Physiochemical characterization of Spanish fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Querol, X.; Umana, J.C.; Alastuey, A.; Bertrana, C.; Lopez Soler, A.; Plana, F.

    1999-12-01

    This article summarizes the results obtained from the physical, chemical, and mineralogical characterization of 14 fly ash samples. Major features that influence the utilization of each fly ash for zeolite synthesis are evidenced, and several fly ash types were selected as potential high-quality starting material for zeolite synthesis and ceramic applications. The main parameters influencing this selection were relatively small grain size; high Al and Si contents; high glass content; low CaO, S, and Fe contents; and relatively low heavy metal concentration. The Compostilla and Dou He fly ashes have high potential applications because of the low content of major impurities (such as Ca, Fe, and S) and the low content of soluble hazardous elements. The Espiel, Escucha, Los Barrios, As Pontes, Soto de Ribera, Meirama, Narcea, and Teruel fly ashes have important application potential, but this potential is slightly limited by the intermediate content of nonreactive impurities, such as Fe and Ca. The La Robla fly ash is of moderate interest, since the relatively high Ca and Fe oxide contents may reduce its potential applications. Finally, the Puertollano fly ash also has limited application because of the very high concentration of some heavy metals such as As, Cd, Ge, Hg, Pb, and Zn. From a mineralogical point of view, the Compostilla, Espiel, and Soto de Ribera fly ashes show the highest aluminum-silicate glass content and, consequently, the highest industrial application potential. (author)

  15. Improved Short-Term Outcomes following Orthognathic Surgery Are Associated with High-Volume Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Nicholas L; Tuggle, Charles T; Steinbacher, Derek M

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies assessing outcomes following orthognathic surgery rely primarily on single-center/surgeon experience. In addition to issues of generalizability, these studies are limited in evaluating the effect of operative volume on patient outcomes. Orthognathic procedures were identified in the 1999 to 2011 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Outcomes included occurrence of any in-hospital complication, extended length of stay (>2 days), and increased costs (>$10,784). High-volume hospitals were defined as the 90th percentile of case volume or higher (>31 cases/year). Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify independent predictors of outcomes. Trend analyses were performed to assess changes in the annual rate of patients treated at high-volume hospitals over the study period. Among 101,692 orthognathic surgery patients, 19.6 percent underwent concurrent ancillary procedures (i.e., genioplasty, rhinoplasty, or septoplasty), and 37.6 percent underwent double-jaw surgery. Fifty-three percent were treated at high-volume hospitals. High-volume hospitals more often performed ancillary procedures (21.4 percent versus 17.4 percent; p surgery (41.3 percent versus 33.4 percent; p orthognathic cases nationwide are performed at a small number of high-volume hospitals. These hospitals discharge patients earlier, perform more complex procedures, and have fewer complications. Risk, III.

  16. Assessment Alternatives for a High Skill MOS. Volume I. Problem Procedures and Results. Volume II. Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, Edward W.; And Others

    The development and evaluation of prototype hands-on equipment, job sample performance tests for a high skilled technical Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) are described. An electronic maintenance MOS (26C20) was used as the research vehicle. The results led to the conclusion that valid and reliable performance tests could be constructed, but…

  17. The Oxford unicompartmental knee fails at a high rate in a high-volume knee practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, William C; Barnes, C Lowry; Diesfeld, Paul; LeMarr, Angela; Ingrassia, Rachel; Morton, Diane J; Reedy, Mary

    2013-11-01

    The Oxford knee is a unicompartmental implant featuring a mobile-bearing polyethylene component with excellent long-term survivorship results reported by the implant developers and early adopters. By contrast, other studies have reported higher revision rates in large academic practices and in national registries. Registry data have shown increased failure with this implant especially by lower-volume surgeons and institutions. In the setting of a high-volume knee arthroplasty practice, we sought to determine (1) the failure rate of the Oxford unicompartmental knee implant using a failure definition for aseptic loosening that combined clinical features, plain radiographs, and scintigraphy, and (2) whether increased experience with this implant would decrease failure rate, if there is a learning curve effect. Eighty-three Oxford knee prostheses were implanted between September 2005 and July 2008 by the principal investigator. Radiographic and clinical data were available for review for all cases. A failed knee was defined as having recurrent pain after an earlier period of recovery from surgery, progressive radiolucent lines compared with initial postoperative radiographs, and a bone scan showing an isolated area of uptake limited to the area of the replaced compartment. Eleven knees in this series failed (13%); Kaplan-Meier survivorship was 86.5% (95% CI, 78.0%-95.0%) at 5 years. Failure occurrences were distributed evenly over the course of the study period. No learning curve effect was identified. Based on these findings, including a high failure rate of the Oxford knee implant and the absence of any discernible learning curve effect, the principal investigator no longer uses this implant.

  18. In-volume heating using high-power laser diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denisenkov, V.S.; Kiyko, V.V.; Vdovin, G.V.

    2015-01-01

    High-power lasers are useful instruments suitable for applications in various fields; the most common industrial applications include cutting and welding. We propose a new application of high-power laser diodes as in-bulk heating source for food industry. Current heating processes use surface

  19. The Praeger Handbook of American High Schools. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Kathryn M., Ed.; Cahill, Spencer E., Ed.; Cotner, Bridget A., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The Praeger Handbook of American High Schools contains entries that explore the topic of secondary schools in the United States. Entries are arranged alphabetically and cover topics as varied as assessment to the history of the American high school, from attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder to gay and straight student alliances, from the No…

  20. Miniaturized, High Flow, Low Dead Volume Preconcentrator for Trace Contaminants in Water under Microgravity Conditions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thorleaf Research, Inc. has demonstrated feasibility in Phase I and now proposes a Phase II effort to develop a miniaturized high flow, low dead-volume...

  1. High Resolving Power Volume Diffractive Gratings for 400-2700 nm Spectral Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main purpose of this NASA SBIR Phase II proposal is development of a novel type of high resolving power diffraction gratings based on volume Bragg gratings...

  2. High Resolving Power Volume Diffractive Gratings for 400-2700 nm Spectral Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this NASA SBIR Phase I proposal is to develop a novel type of high resolving power diffraction gratings based on volume Bragg gratings technology. The...

  3. Proceedings of the 1984 workshop on high-energy excitations in condensed matter. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, R.N. (comp.)

    1984-12-01

    This volume covers electronic excitations, momentum distributions, high energy photons, and a wrap-up session. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  4. Possibilities of utilizing power plant fly ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezencevová Andrea

    2003-09-01

    mechanical action. It is known, that performance of fly ash in concrete improves with its increased fineness. Intensive milling of fly ash leads to the increasing fly ash fineness and to the enhancement of its hydration activity. The cement-fly ash composites with 25 wt.% of activated fly ash as cement replacement have exhibited a higher 28-day compressive strength in comparison with a reference concrete sample without fly ash. An unfavorable effect in milling process is the agglomeration of fine particles of fly ash. By high-energy milling of fly ash with addition of surfactants, the ultrafine products can be prepared. Concrete samples containing such fly ash have achieved higher compressive strengths than the reference sample without fly ash or with addition of non-milled fly ash. The considerable physical effect of ultrafine fly ash consists in superior filling of spaces between coarser cement particles and in the favorable influence of hardness of the mixtures at setting.The current research activities in mechanochemistry are oriented to the mechanical activation of poly-component systems. The knowledge in this field indicate that by high-energy milling of fly ash as a poly-component system and following heating of prepared metastable precursors, the cement minerals could be prepared.

  5. Functionality and Performance Visualization of the Distributed High Quality Volume Renderer (HVR)

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara

    2012-07-01

    Volume rendering systems are designed to provide means to enable scientists and a variety of experts to interactively explore volume data through 3D views of the volume. However, volume rendering techniques are computationally intensive tasks. Moreover, parallel distributed volume rendering systems and multi-threading architectures were suggested as natural solutions to provide an acceptable volume rendering performance for very large volume data sizes, such as Electron Microscopy data (EM). This in turn adds another level of complexity when developing and manipulating volume rendering systems. Given that distributed parallel volume rendering systems are among the most complex systems to develop, trace and debug, it is obvious that traditional debugging tools do not provide enough support. As a consequence, there is a great demand to provide tools that are able to facilitate the manipulation of such systems. This can be achieved by utilizing the power of compute graphics in designing visual representations that reflect how the system works and that visualize the current performance state of the system.The work presented is categorized within the field of software Visualization, where Visualization is used to serve visualizing and understanding various software. In this thesis, a number of visual representations that reflect a number of functionality and performance aspects of the distributed HVR, a high quality volume renderer system that uses various techniques to visualize large volume sizes interactively. This work is provided to visualize different stages of the parallel volume rendering pipeline of HVR. This is along with means of performance analysis through a number of flexible and dynamic visualizations that reflect the current state of the system and enables manipulation of them at runtime. Those visualization are aimed to facilitate debugging, understanding and analyzing the distributed HVR.

  6. Development of alkali activated cements and concrete mixture design with high volumes of red mud

    OpenAIRE

    KRIVENKO PAVEL; Kovalchuk, O; PASKO ANTON; CROYMANS TOM; HULT MIKAEL; LUTTER GUILLAUME; VANDEVENNE N.; Schreurs, S.; SCHROEYERS W.

    2017-01-01

    Dedicated cement compositions were formulated to enable the incorporation of large volume fractions of red mud in alkali activated cements, taking into account the role of the aluminosilicate phase in the processes of hydration and hardening. High volume red mud alkali activated cements were synthesized using a proper combination of red mud, low basic aluminosilicate compounds with a glass phase (blast-furnace slag) and additives selected from high-basic Ca-containing cements with a crystalli...

  7. High-Frequency Percussive Ventilation: Pneumotachograph Validation and Tidal Volume Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    percussive ventilation (HFPV) is an increasingly used mode of mechanical ventilation , for which there is no proven real-time means of measuring delivered... mechanical ventilation ; tidal volume; VT; pneumotachography. [Respir Care 2010;55(6):734–740] Introduction Clinical application of high-frequency percussive...conventional mechanical ventilation (Fig. 1). How- ever, neither the low-frequency nor the high-frequency volumes administered by HFPV are measured by the

  8. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

  9. Electrodialytic upgrading of municipal waste incineration fly ash for reuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2012-01-01

    content of water soluble, mobile salts and heavy metals. It was shown that the mobility of salts and toxic elements can be significantly reduced by extraction with electrodialysis in stack [1, 2]; and that treated MSWI fly ash may potentially be utilized as a substitute for cement in concrete [3......As incineration becomes a more widespread means of waste treatment, volumes of incineration residues increase and new means of handling become a demand. Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) fly ash is hazardous material, which is presently disposed off as such; primarily due to its high...... to investigate the leachability of salts and toxic elements as a function of treatment time and current density. Results show that a delicate balance between pH and treatment-time exist and that continuous monitoring of pH and conductivity may be used for controlling of the process at an industrial scale...

  10. Use Of Fly Iarvae In Space Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Naomi; Mitsuhashi, Jun; Hachiya, Natumi; Miyashita, Sachiko; Hotta, Atuko

    The concept of space agriculture is full use of biological and ecological components ot drive materials recycle loop. In an ecological system, producers, consumers and decomposers are its member. At limited resources acailable for space agriculture, full use of members' function is required to avoid food shortage and catastrophe.Fly is categrized to a decomposer at its eating excreta and rotten materials. However, is it could be edible, certainly it is eaten in several food culture of the world, it functions as a converter of inedible biomass ot edible substance. This conversion enhances the efficiency of usage of resource that will be attributed to space agriculture. In this context, we examine the value of melon fly, Dacus cucurbitae, as a candidate fly species ofr human food. Nutrients in 100g of melon fly larvae were protein 12g, lipid 4.6g Fe 4.74mg, Ca 275mg, Zn 6.37mg, Mn 4.00mg. Amino acids compositon in 100g of larvae was glutamic acid 1.43g and aspartic acid 1.12g. Because of high contents of these amino acids taste of fly larva might be good. Life time of adult melon fly is one to two month, and lays more than 1,000 eggs in total during the life. Larvae hatch after one to two days, and metamorphose after 8 to 15 days to pupae. Srxual maturity is reached after 22 days the earliest from it egg. Sixteen generations could be succeeded in a year for melon fly at maximum. The rate of proliferation of fly is quite high compared to silkworm that can have 8.7 generations per year. The wide food habit of fly, compared to mulberry leaf for silkworm, is another advantage to choose fly for entomophage. Rearing technology of melon fly is well established, since large scaled production of sterile male fly has been conducted in order ot exterminate melon fly in the field. Feeding substance for melon fly larvae in production line is a mixture of wheat, bran, raw sugar, olara, beer yeast, tissue paper, and additive chemicals. A 1 kg of feed substance can be converted to

  11. Performance enhancement of direct ethanol fuel cell using Nafion composites with high volume fraction of titania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, B. R.; Isidoro, R. A.; Santiago, E. I.; Fonseca, F. C.

    2014-12-01

    The present study reports on the performance enhancement of direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) at 130 °C with Nafion-titania composite electrolytes prepared by sol-gel technique and containing high volume fractions of the ceramic phase. It is found that for high volume fractions of titania (>10 vol%) the ethanol uptake of composites is largely reduced while the proton conductivity at high-temperatures is weakly dependent on the titania content. Such tradeoff between alcohol uptake and conductivity resulted in a boost of DEFC performance at high temperatures using Nafion-titania composites with high fraction of the inorganic phase.

  12. Influence of fly ash aided phytostabilisation of Pb, Cd and Zn highly contaminated soils on Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens metal transfer and physiological stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopareva-Pohu, A.; Verdin, A.; Garcon, G.; Sahraoui, A.L.H.; Pourrut, B.; Debiane, D.; Waterlot, C.; Laruelle, F.; Bidar, G.; Douay, F.; Shirali, P. [University of Lille Nord France, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    Due to anthropogenic activities, large extends of soils are highly contaminated by Metal Trace Element (MTE). Aided phytostabilisation aims to establish a vegetation cover in order to promote in situ immobilisation of trace elements by combining the use of metal-tolerant plants and inexpensive mineral or organic soil amendments. Eight years after Coal Fly Ash (CFA) soil amendment, MTE bioavailability and uptake by two plants, Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens, were evaluated, as some biological markers reflecting physiological stress. Results showed that the two plant species under study were suitable to reduce the mobility and the availability of these elements. Moreover, the plant growth was better on CFA amended MTE-contaminated soils, and the plant sensitivity to MTE-induced physiological stress, as studied through photosynthetic pigment contents and oxidative damage was lower or similar. In conclusion, these results supported the usefulness of aided phytostabilisation of MTE-highly contaminated soils.

  13. Why choose high volume online post-dilution hemodiafiltration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basile, Carlo; Davenport, Andrew; Blankestijn, Peter J.

    The mortality rate of patients on maintenance dialysis remains alarmingly high, at approximately 15–20 % per year. Increasing dialyzer urea clearance has not been shown to improve survival and hence interest has shifted towards convective therapies, such as hemodiafiltration (HDF) which can remove

  14. Delayed High School Starting Times. Information Capsule. Volume 0908

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Christie

    2009-01-01

    Educators around the nation are considering pushing high school starting times back until later in the morning, based on evidence suggesting that amount of sleep and circadian rhythms play a part in adolescents' academic performance. While research confirms that adolescents do not get enough sleep and that insufficient sleep can negatively…

  15. Regulation of blood volume in lowlanders exposed to high altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Robach, Paul; Lundby, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Humans ascending to high altitude (HA) experience a reduction in arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation and, as a result, arterial O2 content ([Formula: see text]). As HA exposure extends, this reduction in [Formula: see text] is counteracted by an increase in arterial hemoglobin concentration. Initia...

  16. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for High Volume Composite Part Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, Chad E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kunc, Vlastimil [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lokitz, Bradley S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Springfield, Robert M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-01

    ORNL worked with TruDesign, LLC to develop viable coating solutions to enable the use of large scale 3D printing for both low-temperature and high-temperature composite molds. This project resulted in two commercial products and successfully demonstrated the use of printed molds for autoclave processing for the first time.

  17. Testing of Dependencies between Stock Returns and Trading Volume by High Frequency Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Gurgul

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with a dependence analysis of returns, return volatility and trading volume for five companies listed on the Vienna Stock Exchange and five from theWarsaw Stock Exchange. Taking into account high frequency data for these companies, tests based on a comparison of Bernstein copula densities using the Hellinger distance were conducted. The paper presents some patterns of causal and other relationships between stock returns, realized volatility and expected and unexpected trading volume. There is a linear causality running from realized volatility to expected trading volume, and a lack of nonlinear dependence in the opposite direction. The authors detected strong linear and nonlinear causality from stock returns to expected trading volume. They did not find causality running in the opposite direction. In addition, the existence of fractional cointegration was examined. Despite the equality of the long memory parameters of realized volatility and trading volumes, they do not move together in the long term horizon.

  18. Association of high-volume hospitals with greater likelihood of discharge to home following colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balentine, Courtney J; Naik, Aanand D; Robinson, Celia N; Petersen, Nancy J; Chen, G John; Berger, David H; Anaya, Daniel A

    2014-03-01

    Discharge disposition is a patient-centered quality metric that reflects differences in quality of life and recovery following surgery. The effect of hospital volume on quality of recovery measured by rates of successful discharge to home remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that patients having colorectal surgery at high-volume hospitals would more likely be discharged to home rather than discharged to skilled rehabilitation facilities to complete recovery. Longitudinal analysis of 2008 hospital inpatient data to identify patients undergoing colorectal surgery who survived to discharge. The setting was the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, the largest all-payer inpatient care database, containing data from more than 1000 hospitals. Participants were 280,644 patients (≥ 18 years) who underwent colorectal resections for benign or malignant disease and survived to discharge. The primary end point was discharge to home (with or without home health care) vs discharge to skilled facilities (skilled nursing, short-term recovery, or rehabilitation hospitals or other institutions). The secondary end point was discharge to home with home health care rather than to a skilled facility for patients with postdischarge care needs. Multiple logistic regression using robust standard errors was used to compute the odds ratios of each outcome based on hospital volume, while adjusting for other important variables. The odds of discharge to home vs discharge to skilled facilities were significantly greater in high-volume hospitals compared with low-volume hospitals (odds ratio, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.70-2.56), with an absolute increase of 9%. For patients with postdischarge care needs, high-volume hospitals were less likely than low-volume hospitals to use skilled facilities rather than home health care (odds ratio, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.27-0.45), with an absolute difference of 10%. Patients having colorectal surgery at high-volume hospitals are significantly more likely to recover and return home

  19. Trends in hospital volume and operative mortality for high-risk surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finks, Jonathan F; Osborne, Nicholas H; Birkmeyer, John D

    2011-06-02

    There were numerous efforts in the United States during the previous decade to concentrate selected surgical procedures in high-volume hospitals. It remains unknown whether referral patterns for high-risk surgery have changed as a result and how operative mortality has been affected. We used national Medicare data to study patients undergoing one of eight different cancer and cardiovascular operations from 1999 through 2008. For each procedure, we examined trends in hospital volume and market concentration, defined as the proportion of Medicare patients undergoing surgery in the top decile of hospitals by volume per year. We used regression-based techniques to assess the effects of volume and market concentration on mortality over time, adjusting for case mix. Median hospital volumes of four cancer resections (lung, esophagus, pancreas, and bladder) and of repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rose substantially. Depending on the procedure, higher hospital volumes were attributable to an increasing number of cases nationwide, an increasing market concentration, or both. Hospital volumes rose slightly for aortic-valve replacement but fell for coronary-artery bypass grafting and carotid endarterectomy. Operative mortality declined for all eight procedures, ranging from a relative decline of 8% for carotid endarterectomy (1.3% mortality in 1999 and 1.2% in 2008) to 36% for AAA repair (4.4% in 1999 and 2.8% in 2008). Higher hospital volumes explained a large portion of the decline in mortality for pancreatectomy (67% of the decline), cystectomy (37%), and esophagectomy (32%), but not for the other procedures. Operative mortality with high-risk surgery fell substantially during the previous decade. Although increased market concentration and hospital volume have contributed to declining mortality with some high-risk cancer operations, declines in mortality with other procedures are largely attributable to other factors. (Funded by the National Institute on Aging.).

  20. High-Volume Airborne Fluids Handling Technologies to Fight Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Mark; Cox, Timothy; Hale, Cliff; Hatton, Rick

    2010-01-01

    specific wildfire situation. The system was manufactured by Jordan Air of Central Point, OR, and was installed by Victorville Aerospace in Victorville, CA. It can deliver 12,000 gallons (45.4 kL) of retardant in as little as eight seconds. The aircraft can deliver a partial load of retardant and make multiple drops on the same flight, or the entire load can be rapidly delivered in one pass if required for maximum coverage. The Evergreen 747 uses internal tankage and a pressurized delivery system to enable volume and coverage levels that also meet USFS requirements, but enables computer control of flow for desired precision. This system was designed and built by Adaptive Aerospace of Tehachapi, CA and can deliver about 20,000 gallons (75.7 kL) of retardant in approximately ten seconds. The 747 can also make multiple independent drops, or deliver the entire load at once. NASA found that both of these VLAT aircraft are compatible with the wildfire suppression mission when used to supplement other aerial retardant delivery platforms. The major recommendations for deployment that resulted from this study relate to terrain clearance, the type of terrain in the drop area, availability of qualified lead planes to guide the VLAT approach to the drop area, and low-altitude maneuvering limitations. NASA s analysis suggests that with the appropriate flight procedures, these aircraft will provide a powerful set of tools to fight wildfires.

  1. Characterisation of Turkish fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayat, O. [Cukurova University, Adana (Turkey). Mining Engineering Dept.

    1998-07-01

    The mineralogical, morphological, physical and chemical properties of 7 fly ashes from coal fields in Turkey are compared. The mineral matter in the fly ashes, determined by X-ray diffraction, is dominated by anhydride, lime, quartz and hematite + ferrite spinel. The three low-calcium ashes have the typical, relatively simple, crystalline phase Q, M, H and FS. The high-calcium fly ashes have the most complex assemblage of crystalline phases. The much higher calcium concentrations in these samples result in the formation of lime (CaO), melilite ((Ca, Na){sub 2}(Mg,Al,Fe)(Si,Al){sub 2}O{sub 7}) and merwinite. The presence of anhydride in all samples indicates that the high activity of calcium not only promotes the formation of sulfates from calcite but also the dehydration of gypsum during and after combustion, which occurs at temperatures above 400-500{degree}C. It is important to understand the interaction of high-calcium fly ashes with water occurring in Portland cement (C{sub 3}A,C{sub 2}S), Ah, which hydrates to give gypsum and lime, with the latter hydrating to give the Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions that promote pozzolonic reactions. Some of the particles comprised irregularly formed, vesicular particles with some well-formed individual spheres in Catalagzi and Tuncbilek fly ashes. About 55-80 wt% was less than 45 {mu}m in size for Yatagan, Soma, Yenikoy and Afsin-Elbistan fly ashes. The fly ashes were mainly composed of CaO, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. They have a potential use in wastewater treatment since they can be easily obtained in large quantities at low price or even free. The chemical and mineralogical compositions of the high-calcium Turkish fly ashes investigated make them a good binding agent and a possible substitute for slags, pozzolana and gypsum in the amelioration of clinker. 53 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. High-precision, large-volume, particle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Bratzler, U

    1998-01-01

    Muon measurement in the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to be built at the European Center for Particle Physics, CERN, requires a tracking precision of 50 mu m along particle trajectories of typical path lengths of $9 5-20 m. The overall active area to be covered by the tracking devices, so-called Monitored Drift Tube Chambers, is 5,500 m/sup 2/. Requirements on fabrication, chamber alignment and operation are, in many respects, unprecedented and $9 can only be met by a combination of novel optical monitoring devices and a high-precision chamber construction technique. (1 refs).

  3. Finite volume analysis and optimisation of a high pressure homogeniser

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    The homogeniser is a machine that is mostly used to change the appearance and rheological properties of a fluid by means of a high pressure radial gap. It can be implemented to kill off harmful bacteria and organisms as well as reduce the size of individual components or particles to increase the shelf live of many products. The homogeniser can be used to release useful organic materials from within cells or microbes. The homogeniser can be found in small scale production and large scale prod...

  4. Production and engineering application of C60 high-performance pump pebble concrete containing ultra-fine fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Y.L. [Changsha Univ. of Science and Technology, Changsha (China). College of Highway Engineering; Ma, B.G. [Wuhan Univ. of Technology, Wuhan (China). Key Laboratory for Silicate Materials Science and Engineering

    2008-08-15

    Ultra-fine fly ash (UFA) is commonly used as an additive to concrete in the place of Portland cement due to its durability, and the environmental benefits associated with recycling waste materials. This study examined the workability, mechanical properties, and durability of a 30 per cent UFA addition to pump pebble concrete with a C60 strength grade. The concrete was designed for use in the reinforced concrete short columns of an underground structure at a power plant in China. River pebbles were used as a coarse aggregate for the pump concrete. Ordinary Portland cement and class F UFA were used in the concrete mixes. Sulphonated naphthalene superplasticizers were used to reduce water demands for the materials. River sand was used as a fine aggregate. Slump and slump losses estimated for the UFA concrete were studied in a laboratory. Results showed that slump and slump losses after 1 hour with the UFA concrete were 254 and 590 mm, and 205, and 405 mm, respectively. Compressive strength tests met requirements for C60 strength grade concretes. Tests conducted to measure resistance-chloride ion penetrability showed that penetration rates for the UFA concrete were excellent due to the concrete's particle size distribution; pozzolanic reaction; changes in pore solution chemistry; and more refined capillary pores. Dry shrinkage rates were reduced with the application of UFA, and crack resistance rates were also improved. It was concluded that the use of UFA resulted in significant cost savings. 10 refs., 7 tabs., 8 figs.

  5. High calcium fly ash geopolymer stabilized lateritic soil and granulated blast furnace slag blends as a pavement base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phummiphan, Itthikorn; Horpibulsuk, Suksun; Rachan, Runglawan; Arulrajah, Arul; Shen, Shui-Long; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2018-01-05

    Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GBFS) was used as a replacement material in marginal lateritic soil (LS) while class C Fly Ash (FA) was used as a precursor for the geopolymerization process to develop a low-carbon pavement base material at ambient temperature. Unconfined Compression Strength (UCS) tests were performed to investigate the strength development of geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends. Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Diffraction analysis were undertaken to examine the role of the various influencing factors on UCS development. The influencing factors studied included GBFS content, Na2SiO3:NaOH ratio (NS:NH) and curing time. The 7-day soaked UCS of FA geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends at various NS:NH ratios tested was found to satisfy the specifications of the Thailand national road authorities. The GBFS replacement was found to be insignificant for the improvement of the UCS of FA geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends at low NS:NH ratio of 50:50. Microstructural analysis indicated the coexistence of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (CSH) and Sodium Alumino Silicate Hydrate products in FA geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends. This research enables GBFS, which is traditionally considered as a waste material, to be used as a replacement and partially reactive material in FA geopolymer pavement applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tumour volume and high grade tumour volume are the best predictors of pathologic stage and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Felix K-H; Briganti, Alberto; Jeldres, Claudio; Gallina, Andrea; Erbersdobler, Andreas; Schlomm, Thorsten; Walz, Jochen; Eichelberg, Christian; Salomon, Georg; Haese, Alexander; Currlin, Eike; Ahyai, Sascha A; Bénard, François; Huland, Hartwig; Graefen, Markus; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2007-02-01

    Our goal was to examine to what extent tumour volume (TV) and percentage of high grade tumour volume (%HGTV) affect the rate of positive surgical margins and the rate of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. TV and %HGTV were routinely planimetrically quantified in a cohort of 780 consecutive patients. Mean follow-up was 46.7 months. Multivariable regression models addressed two separate endpoints: positive surgical margins and biochemical recurrence. The increase in model predictive accuracy related to the addition of TV and %HGTV to radical prostatectomy stage and grade was assessed, after 200 bootstrap resamples to reduce overfit bias. In multivariable logistic regression models addressing positive surgical margins rate, predictive accuracy increased by 1.9% (p<0.001) when TV was added to other covariates. No further increment was noted when %HGTV was added (p=0.3). In multivariable Cox regression models addressing biochemical recurrence, accuracy increased by 0.6% (p=0.002) when TV was added and an additional increase of 0.7% was recorded when %HGTV (p<0.001) was added. Tumour bulk reflected by TV affects local cancer control rate, which is reflected in the rate of positive surgical margins. Conversely, high grade cancer determines the rate of biochemical recurrence. These two variables represent the most powerful predictors of cancer control in men treated for localised prostate cancer. Moreover, they increase the ability of established predictors to predict the outcomes of interest. In consequence, they warrant consideration in future predictive and prognostic tools.

  7. Impact of cannabis use on thalamic volume in people at familial high risk of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Killian A; Stanfield, Andrew C; McIntosh, Andrew M; Whalley, Heather C; Job, Dominic E; Moorhead, Thomas W; Owens, David G C; Lawrie, Stephen M; Johnstone, Eve C

    2011-11-01

    No longitudinal study has yet examined the association between substance use and brain volume changes in a population at high risk of schizophrenia. To examine the effects of cannabis on longitudinal thalamus and amygdala-hippocampal complex volumes within a population at high risk of schizophrenia. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained from individuals at high genetic risk of schizophrenia at the point of entry to the Edinburgh High-Risk Study (EHRS) and approximately 2 years later. Differential thalamic and amygdala-hippocampal complex volume change in high-risk individuals exposed (n = 25) and not exposed (n = 32) to cannabis in the intervening period was investigated using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Cannabis exposure was associated with bilateral thalamic volume loss. This effect was significant on the left (F = 4.47, P = 0.04) and highly significant on the right (F= 7.66, P= 0.008). These results remained significant when individuals using other illicit drugs were removed from the analysis. These are the first longitudinal data to demonstrate an association between thalamic volume loss and exposure to cannabis in currently unaffected people at familial high risk of developing schizophrenia. This observation may be important in understanding the link between cannabis exposure and the subsequent development of schizophrenia.

  8. Geotechnical characterization of some Indian fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.K.; Yudhbir [Indian Institute for Technology, Kanpur (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports the findings of experimental studies with regard to some common engineering properties (e.g., grain size, specific gravity, compaction characteristics, and unconfined compression strength) of both low and high calcium fly ashes, to evaluate their suitability as embankment materials and reclamation fills. In addition, morphology, chemistry, and mineralogy of fly ashes are studied using scanning electron microscope, electron dispersive x-ray analyzer, x-ray diffractometer, and infrared absorption spectroscopy. In high calcium fly ash, mineralogical and chemical differences are observed for particles, {gt}75 {mu} m and the particles of {lt} 45 {mu} m size. The mode and duration of curing significantly affect the strength and stress-strain behavior of fly ashes. The geotechnical properties of fly ash are governed by factors like lime content (CaO), iron content (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and loss on ignition. The distinct difference between self-hardening and pozzolanic reactivity has been emphasized.

  9. Physics between a Fly's Ears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A novel method of localizing the direction of a source of sound has evolved in the auditory system of certain small parasitic flies. A mechanical model of this design has been shown to describe the system well. Here, a simplified version of this mechanical model is presented which demonstrates the key feature: direction estimates of high accuracy…

  10. Predictors of individual adaptation to high-volume or high-intensity endurance training in recreational endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, V; Häkkinen, K; Laine, T; Hynynen, E; Mikkola, J; Nummela, A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate factors that can predict individual adaptation to high-volume or high-intensity endurance training. After the first 8-week preparation period, 37 recreational endurance runners were matched into the high-volume training group (HVT) and high-intensity training group (HIT). During the next 8-week training period, HVT increased their running training volume and HIT increased training intensity. Endurance performance characteristics, heart rate variability (HRV), and serum hormone concentrations were measured before and after the training periods. While HIT improved peak treadmill running speed (RSpeak ) 3.1 ± 2.8% (P endurance training in recreational runners. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. High-Q Fabry–Pérot Micro-Cavities for High-Sensitivity Volume Refractometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Gaber

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports a novel structure for a Fabry–Pérot micro cavity that combines the highest reported quality factor for an on-chip Fabry–Pérot resonator that exceeds 9800, and a very high sensitivity for an on-chip volume refractometer based on a Fabry–Pérot cavity that is about 1000 nm/refractive index unit (RIU. The structure consists of two cylindrical Bragg micromirrors that achieve confinement of the Gaussian beam in the plan parallel to the chip substrate, while for the perpendicular plan, external fiber rod lenses (FRLs are placed in the optical path of the input and the output of the cavity. This novel structure overcomes number of the drawbacks presented in previous designs. The analyte is passed between the mirrors, enabling its detection from the resonance peak wavelengths of the transmission spectra. Mixtures of ethanol and deionized (DI-water with different ratios are used as analytes with different refractive indices to exploit the device as a micro-opto-fluidic refractometer. The design criteria are detailed and the modeling is based on Gaussian-optics equations, which depicts a scenario closer to reality than the usually used ray-optics modeling.

  12. High-performance technology for indexing of high volumes of Earth remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strotov, Valery V.; Taganov, Alexander I.; Kolesenkov, Aleksandr N.; Kostrov, Boris V.

    2017-10-01

    The present paper has suggested a technology for search, indexing, cataloging and distribution of aerospace images on the basis of geo-information approach, cluster and spectral analysis. It has considered information and algorithmic support of the system. Functional circuit of the system and structure of the geographical data base have been developed on the basis of the geographical online portal technology. Taking into account heterogeneity of information obtained from various sources it is reasonable to apply a geoinformation platform that allows analyzing space location of objects and territories and executing complex processing of information. Geoinformation platform is based on cartographic fundamentals with the uniform coordinate system, the geographical data base, a set of algorithms and program modules for execution of various tasks. The technology for adding by particular users and companies of images taken by means of professional and amateur devices and also processed by various software tools to the array system has been suggested. Complex usage of visual and instrumental approaches allows significantly expanding an application area of Earth remote sensing data. Development and implementation of new algorithms based on the complex usage of new methods for processing of structured and unstructured data of high volumes will increase periodicity and rate of data updating. The paper has shown that application of original algorithms for search, indexing and cataloging of aerospace images will provide an easy access to information spread by hundreds of suppliers and allow increasing an access rate to aerospace images up to 5 times in comparison with current analogues.

  13. Simultaneous removal of aqueous Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) by zeolites synthesized from low-calcium and high-calcium fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, X D; Ma, Y Y; Peng, S H; Gong, Y Y; Zhang, F

    2017-10-01

    In this study, zeolites were synthesized from low-calcium (LCZ) and high-calcium (HCZ) fly ash, respectively. Subsequently, the zeolites were tested for their removal effectiveness for four aqueous cations, namely, Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+), as a function of contact time, pH value, adsorbent dosage, and initial concentration of heavy metals. Both zeolites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, specific surface area, and cation exchange capacity. The results show that HCZ mainly consists of an unnamed zeolite (Na6[AlSiO4]6·4H2O), whereas LCZ mainly consists of faujasite-type zeolite. The optimum sorption conditions were pH = 6.0; adsorbent dosage = 1.0 g·L(-1); temperature = 25 °C; contact time = 100 min; and initial heavy metal concentration = 100 mg·L(-1). The sorption kinetics of the four aqueous cations on both LCZ and HCZ followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the sorption isotherm data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. For LCZ, the maximum adsorption capacities of Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) were 155.76, 197.86, 123.76, and 186.22 mg·g(-1), respectively. For HCZ, the values were 154.08, 183.15, 118.91, and 191.94 mg·g(-1), respectively. The zeolites were regenerated by NaCl solution (1 mol·L(-1)) and showed high removal efficiency. In conclusion, zeolites produced by fly ash are promising materials for removing Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) from wastewater.

  14. De novo Transcriptome Analysis of Chinese Citrus Fly, Bactrocera minax (Diptera: Tephritidae, by High-Throughput Illumina Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wang

    Full Text Available The Chinese citrus fly, Bactrocera minax (Enderlein, is one of the most devastating pests of citrus in the temperate areas of Asia. So far, studies involving molecular biology and physiology of B. minax are still scarce, partly because of the lack of genomic information and inability to rear this insect in laboratory. In this study, de novo assembly of a transcriptome was performed using Illumina sequencing technology. A total of 20,928,907 clean reads were obtained and assembled into 33,324 unigenes, with an average length of 908.44 bp. Unigenes were annotated by alignment against NCBI non-redundant protein (Nr, Swiss-Prot, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG, Gene Ontology (GO, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway (KEGG database. Genes potentially involved in stress tolerance, including 20 heat shock protein (Hsps genes, 26 glutathione S-transferases (GSTs genes, and 2 ferritin subunit genes, were identified. These genes may play roles in stress tolerance in B. minax diapause stage. It has previously been found that 20E application on B. minax pupae could avert diapause, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Thus, genes encoding enzymes in 20E biosynthesis pathway, including Neverland, Spook, Phantom, Disembodied, Shadow, Shade, and Cyp18a1, and genes encoding 20E receptor proteins, ecdysone receptor (EcR and ultraspiracle (USP, were identified. The expression patterns of 20E-related genes among developmental stages and between 20E-treated and untreated pupae demonstrated their roles in diapause program. In addition, 1,909 simple sequence repeats (SSRs were detected, which will contribute to molecular marker development. The findings in this study greatly improve our genetic understanding of B. minax, and lay the foundation for future studies on this species.

  15. De novo Transcriptome Analysis of Chinese Citrus Fly, Bactrocera minax (Diptera: Tephritidae), by High-Throughput Illumina Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Xiong, Ke-Cai; Liu, Ying-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese citrus fly, Bactrocera minax (Enderlein), is one of the most devastating pests of citrus in the temperate areas of Asia. So far, studies involving molecular biology and physiology of B. minax are still scarce, partly because of the lack of genomic information and inability to rear this insect in laboratory. In this study, de novo assembly of a transcriptome was performed using Illumina sequencing technology. A total of 20,928,907 clean reads were obtained and assembled into 33,324 unigenes, with an average length of 908.44 bp. Unigenes were annotated by alignment against NCBI non-redundant protein (Nr), Swiss-Prot, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG), Gene Ontology (GO), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway (KEGG) database. Genes potentially involved in stress tolerance, including 20 heat shock protein (Hsps) genes, 26 glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) genes, and 2 ferritin subunit genes, were identified. These genes may play roles in stress tolerance in B. minax diapause stage. It has previously been found that 20E application on B. minax pupae could avert diapause, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Thus, genes encoding enzymes in 20E biosynthesis pathway, including Neverland, Spook, Phantom, Disembodied, Shadow, Shade, and Cyp18a1, and genes encoding 20E receptor proteins, ecdysone receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP), were identified. The expression patterns of 20E-related genes among developmental stages and between 20E-treated and untreated pupae demonstrated their roles in diapause program. In addition, 1,909 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected, which will contribute to molecular marker development. The findings in this study greatly improve our genetic understanding of B. minax, and lay the foundation for future studies on this species.

  16. High-Flux Hemodialysis and High-Volume Hemodiafiltration Improve Serum Calcification Propensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke Dekker

    Full Text Available Calciprotein particles (CPPs may play an important role in the calcification process. The calcification propensity of serum (T50 is highly predictive of all-cause mortality in chronic kidney disease patients. Whether T50 is therapeutically improvable, by high-flux hemodialysis (HD or hemodiafiltration (HDF, has not been studied yet.We designed a cross-sectional single center study, and included stable prevalent in-center dialysis patients on HD or HDF. Patients were divided into two groups based on dialysis modality, were on a thrice-weekly schedule, had a dialysis vintage of > 3 months and vascular access providing a blood flow rate > 300 ml/min. Calcification propensity of serum was measured by the time of transformation from primary to secondary CPP (T50 test, by time-resolved nephelometry.We included 64 patients, mean convective volume was 21.7L (SD 3.3L. In the pooled analysis, T50 levels increased in both the HD and HDF group with pre- and post-dialysis (mean (SD of 244(64 - 301(57 and 253(55 - 304(61 min respectively (P = 0.43(HD vs. HDF. The mean increase in T50 was 26.29% for HD and 21.97% for HDF patients (P = 0.61 (HD vs. HDF. The delta values (Δ of calcium, phosphate and serum albumin were equal in both groups. Baseline T50 was negatively correlated with phosphate, and positively correlated with serum magnesium and fetuin-A. The ΔT50 was mostly influenced by Δ phosphate (r = -0.342; P = 0.002 HD and r = -0.396; P<0.001 HDF in both groups.HD and HDF patients present with same baseline T50 calcification propensity values pre-dialysis. Calcification propensity is significantly improved during both HD and HDF sessions without significant differences between both modalities.

  17. Perioperative mortality in cats and dogs undergoing spay or castration at a high-volume clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J K; Bard, K M; Tucker, S J; Diskant, P D; Dingman, P A

    2017-06-01

    High volume spay-neuter (spay-castration) clinics have been established to improve population control of cats and dogs to reduce the number of animals admitted to and euthanazed in animal shelters. The rise in the number of spay-neuter clinics in the USA has been accompanied by concern about the quality of animal care provided in high volume facilities, which focus on minimally invasive, time saving techniques, high throughput and simultaneous management of multiple animals under various stages of anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine perioperative mortality for cats and dogs in a high volume spay-neuter clinic in the USA. Electronic medical records and a written mortality log were used to collect data for 71,557 cats and 42,349 dogs undergoing spay-neuter surgery from 2010 to 2016 at a single high volume clinic in Florida. Perioperative mortality was defined as deaths occurring in the 24h period starting with the administration of the first sedation or anesthetic drugs. Perioperative mortality was reported for 34 cats and four dogs for an overall mortality of 3.3 animals/10,000 surgeries (0.03%). The risk of mortality was more than twice as high for females (0.05%) as for males (0.02%) (P=0.008) and five times as high for cats (0.05%) as for dogs (0.009%) (P=0.0007). High volume spay-neuter surgery was associated with a lower mortality rate than that previously reported in low volume clinics, approaching that achieved in human surgery. This is likely to be due to the young, healthy population of dogs and cats, and the continuous refinement of techniques based on experience and the skills and proficiency of teams that specialize in a limited spectrum of procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Communications Strategies on Alcohol and Highway Safety. Volume II. High School Youth. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey Advertising, Inc., New York, NY.

    The second part of a two-part, two volume study deals with high school youth and identifies target populations and communications strategies for encouraging personal action steps to prevent drunk driving. Data, collected from interviews and questionnaires, are summarized and presented in tabular form. One fourth of high schoolers in a…

  19. Crumpled nitrogen-doped graphene nanosheets with ultrahigh pore volume for high-performance supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Zhenhai [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3200 North Cramer Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Wang, Xinchen [Colloid Chemistry, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam/Golm (Germany); Mao, Shun; Bo, Zheng; Kim, Haejune; Cui, Shumao; Lu, Ganhua; Chen, Junhong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3200 North Cramer Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Feng, Xinliang [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2012-11-02

    A reliable route for preparing highly crumpled nitrogen-doped graphene nanosheets (C-NGNSs) with ultrahigh pore volume was developed. The unique electrochemical properties of C-NGNSs make them a promising electrode for supercapacitors with high capacity, excellent rate capability, and long-term stability. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. The whole genome sequence of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), reveals insights into the biology and adaptive evolution of a highly invasive pest species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, Alexie; Schetelig, Marc F; Arensburger, Peter; Atkinson, Peter W; Benoit, Joshua B; Bourtzis, Kostas; Castañera, Pedro; Cavanaugh, John P; Chao, Hsu; Childers, Christopher; Curril, Ingrid; Dinh, Huyen; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Dolan, Amanda; Dugan, Shannon; Friedrich, Markus; Gasperi, Giuliano; Geib, Scott; Georgakilas, Georgios; Gibbs, Richard A; Giers, Sarah D; Gomulski, Ludvik M; González-Guzmán, Miguel; Guillem-Amat, Ana; Han, Yi; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G; Hernández-Crespo, Pedro; Hughes, Daniel S T; Jones, Jeffery W; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Koskinioti, Panagiota; Lee, Sandra L; Malacrida, Anna R; Manni, Mosè; Mathiopoulos, Kostas; Meccariello, Angela; Murali, Shwetha C; Murphy, Terence D; Muzny, Donna M; Oberhofer, Georg; Ortego, Félix; Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Poelchau, Monica; Qu, Jiaxin; Reczko, Martin; Robertson, Hugh M; Rosendale, Andrew J; Rosselot, Andrew E; Saccone, Giuseppe; Salvemini, Marco; Savini, Grazia; Schreiner, Patrick; Scolari, Francesca; Siciliano, Paolo; Sim, Sheina B; Tsiamis, George; Ureña, Enric; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Werren, John H; Wimmer, Ernst A; Worley, Kim C; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Richards, Stephen; Handler, Alfred M

    2016-09-22

    The Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata, is a major destructive insect pest due to its broad host range, which includes hundreds of fruits and vegetables. It exhibits a unique ability to invade and adapt to ecological niches throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world, though medfly infestations have been prevented and controlled by the sterile insect technique (SIT) as part of integrated pest management programs (IPMs). The genetic analysis and manipulation of medfly has been subject to intensive study in an effort to improve SIT efficacy and other aspects of IPM control. The 479 Mb medfly genome is sequenced from adult flies from lines inbred for 20 generations. A high-quality assembly is achieved having a contig N50 of 45.7 kb and scaffold N50 of 4.06 Mb. In-depth curation of more than 1800 messenger RNAs shows specific gene expansions that can be related to invasiveness and host adaptation, including gene families for chemoreception, toxin and insecticide metabolism, cuticle proteins, opsins, and aquaporins. We identify genes relevant to IPM control, including those required to improve SIT. The medfly genome sequence provides critical insights into the biology of one of the most serious and widespread agricultural pests. This knowledge should significantly advance the means of controlling the size and invasive potential of medfly populations. Its close relationship to Drosophila, and other insect species important to agriculture and human health, will further comparative functional and structural studies of insect genomes that should broaden our understanding of gene family evolution.

  1. I-PFO: the new technology for simple and flexible implementation of high productive on-the-fly remote processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllegger, Andreas; Ryba, Tracey

    2017-02-01

    Standardized production systems which can be implemented, programmed, maintained and sourced in a simple and efficient way are key for a successful global production of automobiles or related parts at component suppliers. This is also valid for systems, which are built by laser based processes. One of the key applications is remote laser welding (RLW) of "Body in White" (BIW) parts (such as hang-on parts, B-Pillars, side frames, etc.), but also builtin components (such as car seats, batteries, etc.). The majority of RLW applications are based on the implementation of a 3-D scanner optic (e.g. the PFO 3D from TRUMPF) which positions the laser beam on the various component surfaces to be welded. Over the past 10 years it has been proven that the most efficient way to build up the RLW process is to have a system where an industrial robot and a scanner optic are combined in one production cell. They usually cooperate within an "On-The-Fly" (OTF) process as this ensures minimum cycle times. Until now there are several technologies on the market which can coordinate both the robot and scanner in the OTF mode. But none of them meet all requirements of global standardized production solutions. With the introduction of the I-PFO (Intelligent Programmable Focusing Optics) technology the situation has changed. It is now possible to program or adopt complex remote processes in a fast and easy way by the "Teach-in" function via the robot teach pendant. Additionally a 3D offline designer software is an option for this system. It automatically creates the ideal remote process based on the part, fixture, production cell and required process parameters. The I-PFO technology doesn't need additional hardware due to the fact that it runs on the controller within the PFO 3D. Furthermore it works together with different types of industrial robots (e.g. ABB, Fanuc and KUKA) which allow highest flexibility for the production planning phase. Finally a single TRUMPF laser source can supply

  2. Forearm Muscle Volumes Can Be Accurately Quantified From High Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Carolyn M.; Abrams, Geoff D.; Smallwood, Laura R.; Lieber, Richard L.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2007-01-01

    Upper extremity musculoskeletal modeling is becoming increasingly sophisticated, creating a growing need for subject-specific muscle size parameters. One method for determining subject-specific muscle volume is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of MRI-derived muscle volumes in the human forearm across a variety of muscle sizes and shapes. Seventeen cadaveric forearms were scanned using a fast spoiled gradient echo pulse sequence with high isotropic spatial resolution (1 mm3 voxels) on a 3T MR system. Pronator teres (PT), extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU), and brachioradialis (BR) muscles were manually segmented allowing volume to be calculated. Forearms were then dissected, muscles isolated, and muscle masses obtained, which allowed computation of muscle volume. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,1) and absolute volume differences were used to compare measurement methods. There was excellent agreement between the anatomical and MRI-derived muscle volumes (ICC = 0.97, relative error = 12.8%) when all 43 muscles were considered together. When individual muscles were considered, there was excellent agreement between measurement methods for PT (ICC = 0.97, relative error = 8.4%), ECRB (ICC = 0.93, relative error = 7.7%), and FCU (ICC = 0.91, relative error = 9.8%), and fair agreement for EPL (ICC = 0.68, relative error = 21.6%) and BR (ICC = 0.93, relative error = 17.2%). Thus, while MRI-based measurements of muscle volume produce relatively small errors in some muscles, muscles with high surface area-to-volume ratios may predispose them to segmentation error, and, therefore, the accuracy of these measurements may be unacceptable. PMID:17521657

  3. Impact of stapling devices on radical cystectomy: comparative study between low- and high-volume surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortzis, Vassilios; Gravas, Stavros; Mitsogiannis, Iraklis C; Moutzouris, Georgios; Karatzas, Anastasios; Leventis, Angelos; Mpouzalas, Ioannis; Melekos, Michael D

    2008-02-01

    To compare effectiveness in terms of blood loss and operative time of stapling devices among surgeons with different levels of surgical volume. We evaluated a group of 29 male patients with invasive bladder cancer who underwent radical cystectomy by two groups of surgeons. The first group included two high-volume surgeons, and the second group two low-volume surgeons. All cystectomies were performed using the multifire autosuture articulated vascular Endo-GIA. We compared patients with a series of 28 patients who had undergone radical cystectomy during the same period using standard technique by the same surgeons. Blood loss was defined as the difference between the hemoglobin at the beginning and at the end of cystectomy. In the group of high-volume surgeons, the mean operative time was 81.4 +/- 17 minutes and 79.3 +/- 20 minutes for the classical and stapler arm, respectively (P = 0.551). In the low-volume surgeons group, the mean operative time was 114.3 +/- 22 minutes and 92.4 +/- 12 minutes for the two methods (P = 0.003). The mean intraoperative blood loss in the experienced surgeons was 2.3 +/- 0.82 g/dL and 1.49 +/- 0.66 g/dL for the classical and stapler arm, respectively (P = 0.008). In the group of low-volume surgeons, the difference in hemoglobin was 3.02 +/- 0.84 g/dL and 1.91 +/- 0.6 g/dL for the two methods (P = 0.02). Stapling devices seem to make cystectomy safer and faster in surgeons with different surgical volumes. The group of low-volume surgeons benefited more.

  4. Flying insects and Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Skovgård, Henrik

    organisms, which may collect on their bodies or survive passage through the fly gut. Campylobacter and other pathogens are then easily transferred to other surfaces, for instance peoples food – or to broiler houses where they may be swallowed by chickens or contaminate the environment. On a large material......Campylobacter in flies Flies of the Muscidae family forage on all kind of faeces – various fly species have different preferences. M domestica prefer pigs, horses and cattle faeces, animals which are all known to frequently excrete Campylobacter. As a result, the insects pick up pathogenic micro...

  5. How flies are flirting on the fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichorn, Courtney; Hrabar, Michael; Van Ryn, Emma C; Brodie, Bekka S; Blake, Adam J; Gries, Gerhard

    2017-02-14

    Flies have some of the most elaborate visual systems in the Insecta, often featuring large, sexually dimorphic eyes with specialized "bright zones" that may have a functional role during mate-seeking behavior. The fast visual system of flies is considered to be an adaptation in support of their advanced flight abilities. Here, we show that the immense processing speed of the flies' photoreceptors plays a crucial role in mate recognition. Video-recording wing movements of abdomen-mounted common green bottle flies, Lucilia sericata, under direct light at 15,000 frames per second revealed that wing movements produce a single, reflected light flash per wing beat. Such light flashes were not evident when we video-recorded wing movements under diffuse light. Males of L. sericata are strongly attracted to wing flash frequencies of 178 Hz, which are characteristic of free-flying young females (prospective mates), significantly more than to 212, 235, or 266 Hz, characteristic of young males, old females, and old males, respectively. In the absence of phenotypic traits of female flies, and when given a choice between light emitting diodes that emitted either constant light or light pulsed at a frequency of 110, 178, 250, or 290 Hz, males show a strong preference for the 178-Hz pulsed light, which most closely approximates the wing beat frequency of prospective mates. We describe a previously unrecognized visual mate recognition system in L. sericata. The system depends upon the sex- and age-specific frequencies of light flashes reflecting off moving wings, and the ability of male flies to distinguish between the frequency of light flashes produced by rival males and prospective mates. Our findings imply that insect photoreceptors with fast processing speed may not only support agile flight with advanced maneuverability but may also play a supreme role in mate recognition. The low mating propensity of L. sericata males on cloudy days, when light flashes from the wings of

  6. Sound radiation around a flying fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Jérôme; Tuck, Elizabeth J.; Robert, Daniel

    2005-07-01

    Many insects produce sounds during flight. These acoustic emissions result from the oscillation of the wings in air. To date, most studies have measured the frequency characteristics of flight sounds, leaving other acoustic characteristics-and their possible biological functions-unexplored. Here, using close-range acoustic recording, we describe both the directional radiation pattern and the detailed frequency composition of the sound produced by a tethered flying (Lucilia sericata). The flapping wings produce a sound wave consisting of a series of harmonics, the first harmonic occurring around 190 Hz. In the horizontal plane of the fly, the first harmonic shows a dipolelike amplitude distribution whereas the second harmonic shows a monopolelike radiation pattern. The first frequency component is dominant in front of the fly while the second harmonic is dominant at the sides. Sound with a broad frequency content, typical of that produced by wind, is also recorded at the back of the fly. This sound qualifies as pseudo-sound and results from the vortices generated during wing kinematics. Frequency and amplitude features may be used by flies in different behavioral contexts such as sexual communication, competitive communication, or navigation within the environment.

  7. Service expectations from high- and low-volume customers in the alcoholic beverage industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Beukes

    2013-08-01

    Research purpose: This research study investigated the relationship between the volume a customer buys from an alcoholic beverage supply company and what influence this volume has on their customer service expectations. Motivation for the study: The main purpose of this study was to evaluate what influence the volume an organisation buys from alcoholic beverage suppliers has on their service quality expectations. Research design, approach and method: A non-probability judgement sample method was used, with a sample size of 220 respondents. The questionnaire requested respondents (high- and low-volume to rank their customer service expectations and opinions with reference to Parasuraman’s service delivery dimensions. Ranking was done using a five-point Likert scale. Main findings: The findings of the study indicated that both the high- and low-volume customers felt that alcoholic beverage supply companies had to deliver on all five service delivery dimensions but failed to do so to full satisfaction. Practical and managerial implications: It is recommended that the alcoholic beverage supply companies should address the problem areas identified in this study to avoid defection of customers. Contribution and value add: This may assist alcoholic beverage supply companies to better understand the customers’ demographic profiles. The study also revealed that the satisfaction level experienced by customers in both sections of the study (high- and low-demand, with a considerable gap between expectations and opinions within the empathy dimension.

  8. Using a Flying Thing in the Sky to See How Much Water is in the Cover of Tiny Ice Pieces in the High Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, M.

    2016-12-01

    Groups of tiny ice pieces fall from the sky in the cold times and cover the high places. Later, the tiny ice pieces become water that moves to the lower places, where people can use it for drinking and stuff. The time when the tiny ice pieces turn to water is controlled by the sun. New tiny ice pieces from the sky, which are very white and don't take up much sun, group up and grow tall. When they become dark from getting old and large, and from getting covered in tiny dark bits from the sky, they take up more sun and turn to water. The more tiny dark bits, the faster they become water. Using a flying thing over the high places we can see how much water will come from the cover of tiny ice pieces by using ground looking things to see how tall it is, and and when it will become water by using picture taking things to see how much sun is taken up. The low places are happy to know how much water is in the high places.

  9. Turbulence and Flying Machines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Newton's laws of motion. Leonardo da Vinci in the early 1500's had already realised that "a bird flies according to mathematical principles". Thus, if an aircraft is flying at constant altitude and constant speed, i.e., 'cruising', the upward force, or 'lift' L acting on it must balance its weight, W. In the line of motion of the airplane ...

  10. A flexible and accurate digital volume correlation method applicable to high-resolution volumetric images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bing; Wang, Bo

    2017-10-01

    Digital volume correlation (DVC) is a powerful technique for quantifying interior deformation within solid opaque materials and biological tissues. In the last two decades, great efforts have been made to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the DVC algorithm. However, there is still a lack of a flexible, robust and accurate version that can be efficiently implemented in personal computers with limited RAM. This paper proposes an advanced DVC method that can realize accurate full-field internal deformation measurement applicable to high-resolution volume images with up to billions of voxels. Specifically, a novel layer-wise reliability-guided displacement tracking strategy combined with dynamic data management is presented to guide the DVC computation from slice to slice. The displacements at specified calculation points in each layer are computed using the advanced 3D inverse-compositional Gauss-Newton algorithm with the complete initial guess of the deformation vector accurately predicted from the computed calculation points. Since only limited slices of interest in the reference and deformed volume images rather than the whole volume images are required, the DVC calculation can thus be efficiently implemented on personal computers. The flexibility, accuracy and efficiency of the presented DVC approach are demonstrated by analyzing computer-simulated and experimentally obtained high-resolution volume images.

  11. Evaluation of ULV applications against Old World sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) species in equatorial Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britch, Seth C; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Walker, Todd W; Farooq, Muhammad; Gordon, Scott W; Clark, Jeffrey W; Ngere, Francis; Ngonga, Daniel; Chepchieng, Clifford

    2011-11-01

    Reducing populations of phlebotomine sand flies in areas prevalent for human leishmaniases is of ongoing importance to United States military operations and civilian populations in endemic regions. However, not enough is known regarding the efficacy of Department of Defense-approved pesticides and equipment against sand flies; specifically, the potential for ultra-low volume (ULV) pesticide applications to control Old World sand fly vectors. In this study we examine two sprayers, the Terminator ULV and the Grizzly ULV, with UV-labeled Duet and Fyfanon in four combinations against caged Phlebotomus duboscqi (Neveu-Lemaire) and wild sand fly populations in a natural environment in western Kenya. All equipment and Fyfanon have United States military National Stock Numbers and both pesticides are registered with the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Caged sand flies were reared from local P. duboscqi and the area has long been studied because of high incidences of human cutaneous and visceral Leishmania. Patterns of mortality across grids of caged sand flies showed greater efficacy from the Grizzly ULV regardless of chemical. The Terminator ULV performed well with Duet but with a less uniform and overall lower rate of mortality across the spray grid. Sampling of wild populations before and after treatments suggested local population suppression from ULV treatments, as well as a possible repellent effect in nearby untreated areas. Surprisingly, ULV active ingredient deposition inferred from patterns of UV-labeled droplets captured on cotton ribbons adjacent to sand fly cages in spray plots did not match patterns of mortality. We discuss the implications of this study, the first of its kind, for future military preventive medicine activities, including relative performance costs and benefits of larger or smaller sprayers, and the relative stability of ULV-induced mortality patterns in varied or sub-optimal conditions.

  12. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Volume I. Description of the facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains a comprehensive description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Facility. Its primary purpose is to supplement the detailed operating procedures, providing the reactor operators with background information on the various HFIR systems. The detailed operating procdures are presented in another report.

  13. Adoption of Lean Principles in a High-Volume Molecular Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, P. Shawn; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are constantly facing challenges to do more with less, enhance quality, improve test turnaround time, and reduce operational expenses. Experience with adopting and applying lean concepts and tools used extensively in the manufacturing industry is described for a high-volume clinical molecular microbiology laboratory, illustrating how operational success and benefits can be achieved. PMID:24829247

  14. Thermosetting resins with high fractions of free volume and inherently low dielectric constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang-Kai; Hu, Chien-Chieh; Su, Wen-Chiung; Liu, Ying-Ling

    2015-08-18

    This work demonstrates a new class of thermosetting resins, based on Meldrum's acid (MA) derivatives, which have high fractions of free volume and inherently low k values of about 2.0 at 1 MHz. Thermal decomposition of the MA groups evolves CO2 and acetone to create air-trapped cavities so as to reduce the dielectric constants.

  15. High-volume plasma exchange in patients with acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Fin Stolze; Schmidt, Lars Ebbe; Bernsmeier, Christine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Acute liver failure (ALF) often results in cardiovascular instability, renal failure, brain oedema and death either due to irreversible shock, cerebral herniation or development of multiple organ failure. High-volume plasma exchange (HVP), defined as exchange of 8-12 or 15...... organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores fell in the treated group compared to control group, over the study period (p

  16. High-energy molecular lasers self-controlled volume-discharge lasers and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonov, V V

    2016-01-01

    This book displays the physics and design of high-power molecular lasers. The lasers described are self-controlled volume-discharge lasers. The book explains self-sustained discharge lasers, self-initiated discharge lasers and technical approaches to laser design. Important topics discussed are laser efficiency, laser beam quality and electric field homogeneity. The book contains many new innovative applications.

  17. A lean production control system for high-variety/low-volume environments : a case study implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slomp, J.; Bokhorst, J.A.C.; Germs, R.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the success of lean manufacturing, many companies are interested in implementing a lean production control system. Lean production control principles include the levelling of production, the use of pull mechanisms and takt time control. These principles have mainly been applied in high volume

  18. Effects of 12 weeks high-intensity & reduced-volume training in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilen, Anders; Larsson, Tanja Hultengren; Jørgensen, Majke

    2014-01-01

    It was investigated if high-intensity interval training (HIT) at the expense of total training volume improves performance, maximal oxygen uptake and swimming economy. 41 elite swimmers were randomly allocated to a control (CON) or HIT group. For 12 weeks both groups trained ∼12 h per week. HIT...

  19. Heavy metals in MSW incineration fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2003-01-01

    is characterized regarding its physical-chemical properties: pH, solubility, chemical composition, and leaching, amongst others. Results indicate a high alkalinity and the presence of large amounts of calcium, chlorides, sulfates, carbonates, sodium and potassium. Metal concentrations in fly ash are: 6,2 g....../kg for zinc, 2,4 g/kg for lead, 1,7 g/kg for iron, and 7,9 g/kg for magnesium. Copper, manganese, chromium and cadmium are also present with 546, 338, 104 and 91 mg/kg of fly ash, respectively. These results are extremely important in subsequent studies on the treatment of fly ash....

  20. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II.

  1. Early Fluid Resuscitation and High Volume Hemofiltration Decrease Septic Shock Progression in Swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the effects of early fluid resuscitation (EFR combined with high volume hemofiltration (HVHF on the cardiopulmonary function and removal of inflammatory mediators in a septic shock swine model. Eighteen swine were randomized into three groups: control (n=6 (extracorporeal circulating blood only, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT (n=6; ultrafiltration volume = 25 mL/Kg/h, and HVHF (n=6; ultrafiltration volume = 85 mL/Kg/h. The septic shock model was established by intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharides (50 µg/kg/h. Hemodynamic parameters (arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume variability, left ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and central venous pressure, vasoactive drug parameters (dose and time of norepinephrine and hourly fluid intake, pulmonary function (partial oxygen pressure and vascular permeability, and cytokines (interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 were observed. Treatment resulted in significant changes at 4–6 h. HVHF was beneficial, as shown by the dose of vasoactive drugs, fluid intake volume, left ventricular contractility index, and partial oxygen pressure. Both CRRT and HVHF groups showed improved removal of inflammatory mediators compared with controls. In conclusion, EFR combined with HVHF improved septic shock in this swine model. The combination decreased shock progression, reduced the need for vasoactive drugs, and alleviated the damage to cardiopulmonary functions.

  2. Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volume and associated mortality in the cardiac intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorofsky, Matthew; Jayaraman, Dev; Lellouche, Francois; Husa, Regina; Lipes, Jed

    2014-03-01

    Use of protective ventilation has been shown to decrease mortality in medical-surgical ICUs. There is limited data on tidal volume use in ventilated patients in the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU). We hypothesized that large tidal volumes are used in the CICU and that they could contribute to an increase in morbidity and mortality. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all mechanically ventilated patients with congestive heart failure or cardiac arrest in a single tertiary care CICU between April 2010 and February 2012. Ventilator settings were analyzed and tidal volume for predicted body weight (VT/PBW) was calculated for 51 patients. The median initial tidal volume was 525 ml (IQR: 500-600) and median VT/PBW was 9.3 ml/kg (IQR: 8.3-10.1). Overall mortality was 29.4%. On univariate analysis, patients that received a VT/PBW below the median, mortality was 23.1% (95% CI: 7.9-39.3) compared to 36.0% (95% CI: 17.2-55.0) in patients that received a VT/PBW above themedian (P = 0.31). On multivariate analysis, the OR for death was 9.0 (95% CI: 1.3-62.0, P = 0.03) with VT/PBW above the median. Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes was associated with increased mortality in patients with congestive heart failure and post cardiac arrest in our CICU.

  3. Low-load high volume resistance exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis more than high-load low volume resistance exercise in young men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Burd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine the effect of resistance exercise intensity (%1 repetition maximum-1RM and volume on muscle protein synthesis, anabolic signaling, and myogenic gene expression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fifteen men (21+/-1 years; BMI=24.1+/-0.8 kg/m2 performed 4 sets of unilateral leg extension exercise at different exercise loads and/or volumes: 90% of repetition maximum (1RM until volitional failure (90FAIL, 30% 1RM work-matched to 90%FAIL (30WM, or 30% 1RM performed until volitional failure (30FAIL. Infusion of [ring-13C6] phenylalanine with biopsies was used to measure rates of mixed (MIX, myofibrillar (MYO, and sarcoplasmic (SARC protein synthesis at rest, and 4 h and 24 h after exercise. Exercise at 30WM induced a significant increase above rest in MIX (121% and MYO (87% protein synthesis at 4 h post-exercise and but at 24 h in the MIX only. The increase in the rate of protein synthesis in MIX and MYO at 4 h post-exercise with 90FAIL and 30FAIL was greater than 30WM, with no difference between these conditions; however, MYO remained elevated (199% above rest at 24 h only in 30FAIL. There was a significant increase in AktSer473 at 24h in all conditions (P=0.023 and mTORSer2448 phosphorylation at 4 h post-exercise (P=0.025. Phosporylation of Erk1/2Tyr202/204, p70S6KThr389, and 4E-BP1Thr37/46 increased significantly (P<0.05 only in the 30FAIL condition at 4 h post-exercise, whereas, 4E-BP1Thr37/46 phosphorylation was greater 24 h after exercise than at rest in both 90FAIL (237% and 30FAIL (312% conditions. Pax7 mRNA expression increased at 24 h post-exercise (P=0.02 regardless of condition. The mRNA expression of MyoD and myogenin were consistently elevated in the 30FAIL condition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that low-load high volume resistance exercise is more effective in inducing acute muscle anabolism than high-load low volume or work matched resistance exercise modes.

  4. Whole-Body High-Pitch CT Angiography: Strategies to Reduce Radiation Dose and Contrast Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manneck, Sebastian; Hurwitz, Lynne M; Seaman, Danielle M; Heye, Tobias; Boll, Daniel T

    2017-10-05

    The purpose of this study was to assess the noninferiority of dual-source high-pitch CT angiography (CTA) performed with high-concentration (iopamidol 370) low-volume (60 mL) iodinated contrast material at low voltage (100 kVp) in comparison with dual-source high-pitch CTA with standard-of-care low-concentration (iopamidol 300) standard-volume (75 mL) iodinated contrast material at high voltage (120 kVp) to determine whether use of the high-concentration low-volume method would afford a reduction in radiation dose and contrast volume without negatively affecting vascular opacification. This study had three arms. A phantom was used to assess vascular contrast enhancement at different iodine and saline solution dilutions with iopamidol 300 or 370 to compare lower-iodination (iopamidol 300) high-voltage (120 kVp) high-pitch (120 kVp, 250 mAs) imaging with higher-iodination (iopamidol 370) low-voltage (100 kVp) high-pitch (100 kVp, 100-240 mAs) acquisition. Metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors were placed in an anthropomorphic phantom to extract organ-based radiation profiles, and ANOVA was performed. The study prospectively enrolled 150 patients: 50 patients received 75 mL iopamidol 300, and image acquisition was performed at 120 kVp and 250 mAs; 50 patients received 75 mL iopamidol 370, and acquisition was performed at 100 kVp and 240 mAs; and 50 patients received 60 mL iopamidol, and acquisition was performed at 370 at 100 kVp and 240 mAs. Vascular signal-to-noise ratio was evaluated at 18 anatomic locations. Longitudinal signal-to-noise ratio was used to assess homogeneity of contrast enhancement. Size-specific dose estimates were calculated. Statistical analyses were performed by ANOVA. Noninferiority of high-concentration (iopamidol 370) low-voltage (100 kVp) high-pitch acquisitions compared with low-concentration (iopamidol 300) high-voltage (120 kVp) high-pitch acquisition was achieved at 170 mAs in vitro. Radiation assessment showed significant

  5. Power and pulse energy scaling for high-volume UV-laser microprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; Haupt, Oliver; Bragin, Igor; Albrecht, Hans-Stephan

    2017-02-01

    In industrial laser micro processing, throughput is as important as process quality. Treating large areas in minimum time is pivotal in achieving reduced unit costs in high-volume production. Excimer lasers meet the requirements for clean and precise structuring and enable the smallest structures in an efficient way. The latest technical developments in high power excimer lasers is bound to take cost-efficient UV-laser micro processing to the next level and bridges the gap between achievable precision and achievable throughput. New excimer laser developments and beam concepts together with latest performance data for upscaling both UV power and UV pulse energy will be the topic of this paper against the background of upcoming market trends and high volume applications.

  6. ESTIMATION OF STAND HEIGHT AND FOREST VOLUME USING HIGH RESOLUTION STEREO PHOTOGRAPHY AND FOREST TYPE MAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional field methods for measuring tree heights are often too costly and time consuming. An alternative remote sensing approach is to measure tree heights from digital stereo photographs which is more practical for forest managers and less expensive than LiDAR or synthetic aperture radar. This work proposes an estimation of stand height and forest volume(m3/ha using normalized digital surface model (nDSM from high resolution stereo photography (25cm resolution and forest type map. The study area was located in Mt. Maehwa model forest in Hong Chun-Gun, South Korea. The forest type map has four attributes such as major species, age class, DBH class and crown density class by stand. Overlapping aerial photos were taken in September 2013 and digital surface model (DSM was created by photogrammetric methods(aerial triangulation, digital image matching. Then, digital terrain model (DTM was created by filtering DSM and subtracted DTM from DSM pixel by pixel, resulting in nDSM which represents object heights (buildings, trees, etc.. Two independent variables from nDSM were used to estimate forest stand volume: crown density (% and stand height (m. First, crown density was calculated using canopy segmentation method considering live crown ratio. Next, stand height was produced by averaging individual tree heights in a stand using Esri’s ArcGIS and the USDA Forest Service’s FUSION software. Finally, stand volume was estimated and mapped using aerial photo stand volume equations by species which have two independent variables, crown density and stand height. South Korea has a historical imagery archive which can show forest change in 40 years of successful forest rehabilitation. For a future study, forest volume change map (1970s–present will be produced using this stand volume estimation method and a historical imagery archive.

  7. Estimation of Stand Height and Forest Volume Using High Resolution Stereo Photography and Forest Type Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. M.

    2016-06-01

    Traditional field methods for measuring tree heights are often too costly and time consuming. An alternative remote sensing approach is to measure tree heights from digital stereo photographs which is more practical for forest managers and less expensive than LiDAR or synthetic aperture radar. This work proposes an estimation of stand height and forest volume(m3/ha) using normalized digital surface model (nDSM) from high resolution stereo photography (25cm resolution) and forest type map. The study area was located in Mt. Maehwa model forest in Hong Chun-Gun, South Korea. The forest type map has four attributes such as major species, age class, DBH class and crown density class by stand. Overlapping aerial photos were taken in September 2013 and digital surface model (DSM) was created by photogrammetric methods(aerial triangulation, digital image matching). Then, digital terrain model (DTM) was created by filtering DSM and subtracted DTM from DSM pixel by pixel, resulting in nDSM which represents object heights (buildings, trees, etc.). Two independent variables from nDSM were used to estimate forest stand volume: crown density (%) and stand height (m). First, crown density was calculated using canopy segmentation method considering live crown ratio. Next, stand height was produced by averaging individual tree heights in a stand using Esri's ArcGIS and the USDA Forest Service's FUSION software. Finally, stand volume was estimated and mapped using aerial photo stand volume equations by species which have two independent variables, crown density and stand height. South Korea has a historical imagery archive which can show forest change in 40 years of successful forest rehabilitation. For a future study, forest volume change map (1970s-present) will be produced using this stand volume estimation method and a historical imagery archive.

  8. Açai Palm Fruit (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) Pulp Improves Survival of Flies on a High Fat Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xiaoping; Seeberger, Jeanne; Alberico, Thomas; Wang, Chunxu; Wheeler, Charles T.; Schauss, Alexander G.; Zou, Sige

    2010-01-01

    Reducing oxidative damage is thought to be an effective aging intervention. Açai, a fruit indigenous to the Amazon, is rich in phytochemicals that possesses high anti-oxidant activities, and has anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and anti-cardiovascular disease properties. However, little is known about its potential anti-aging properties especially at the organismal level. Here we evaluated the effect of açai pulp on modulating lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that açai supplementat...

  9. A Microchannel Inlet to Reduce High-Velocity Impact Fragmentation of Molecules in Orbital and Fly-by Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brandon; Anupriya, Anupriya; Sevy, Eric; Austin, Daniel E.

    2017-10-01

    Closed source neutral mass spectrometers are often used on flyby missions to characterize the molecular components of planetary exospheres. In a typical closed source, neutrals are thermalized as they deflect off the walls within a spherical antechamber prior to ionization and mass analysis. However, the high kinetic energy of each molecule as it impacts the chamber can lead to fragmentation before the ionization region is reached. Due to this fragmentation, the original composition of the molecule can be altered, leading to ambiguous identification.Even knowing the fragmentation pathways that occur may not allow deconvolution of data to give the correct composition. Only stable, volatile fragments will be observed in the subsequent mass spectrometer and different organic compounds likely give similar fragmentation products. Simply detecting these products will not lead to unambiguous identication of the precursor molecules. Here, we present a hardware solution to this problem—an inlet that reduces the fragmentation of molecules that impact at high velocities.We present a microchannel inlet that reduces the impact fragmentation by allowing the molecules to dissipate kinetic energy faster than their respective dissociation lifetimes. Preliminary calculations indicate that impact-induced fragmentation will be reduced up to three orders of magnitude compared with conventional closed sources by using this inlet. The benefits of such an inlet apply to any orbital or flyby velocity. The microchannel inlet enables detection of semi-volatile molecules that were previously undetectable due to impact fragmentation.

  10. Frequency dependence of lung volume changes during superimposed high-frequency jet ventilation and high-frequency jet ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sütterlin, R; Priori, R; Larsson, A; LoMauro, A; Frykholm, P; Aliverti, A

    2014-01-01

    Superimposed high-frequency jet ventilation (SHFJV) has proved to be safe and effective in clinical practice. However, it is unclear which frequency range optimizes ventilation and gas exchange. The aim of this study was to systematically compare high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) with HFJV by assessing chest wall volume variations (ΔEEV(CW)) and gas exchange in relation to variable high frequency. SHFJV or HFJV were used alternatively to ventilate the lungs of 10 anaesthetized pigs (21-25 kg). The low-frequency component was kept at 16 min(-1) in SHFJV. In both modes, high frequencies ranging from 100 to 1000 min(-1) were applied in random order and ventilation was maintained for 5 min in all modalities. Chest wall volume variations were obtained using opto-electronic plethysmography. Airway pressures and arterial blood gases were measured repeatedly. SHFJV increased ΔEEV(CW) compared with HFJV; the difference ranged from 43 to 68 ml. Tidal volume (V(T)) was always >240 ml during SHFJV whereas during HFJV ranged from 92 ml at the ventilation frequency of 100 min(-1) to negligible values at frequencies >300 min(-1). We observed similar patterns for Pa(O₂) and Pa(CO₂). SHFJV provided generally higher, frequency-independent oxygenation (Pa(O₂) at least 32.0 kPa) and CO₂ removal (Pa(CO₂) ∼5.5 kPa), whereas HFJV led to hypoxia and hypercarbia at higher rates (Pa(O₂) 10 kPa at f(HF)>300 min(-1)). In a porcine model, SHFJV was more effective in increasing end-expiratory volume than single-frequency HFJV, but both modes may provide adequate ventilation in the absence of airway obstruction and respiratory disease, except for HFJV at frequencies ≥300 min(-1).

  11. Mitochondrial adaptations to high-volume exercise training are rapidly reversed after a reduction in training volume in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Cesare; Oliveira, Rodrigo S F; Little, Jonathan P; Renner, Kathrin; Bishop, David J

    2016-10-01

    Increased mitochondrial content and respiration have both been reported after exercise training. However, no study has directly compared how different training volumes influence mitochondrial respiration and markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. Ten healthy men performed high-intensity interval cycling during 3 consecutive training phases; 4 wk of normal-volume training (NVT; 3/wk), followed by 20 d of high-volume training (HVT; 2/d) and 2 wk of reduced-volume training (RVT; 5 sessions). Resting biopsy samples (vastus lateralis) were obtained at baseline and after each phase. No mitochondrial parameter changed after NVT. After HVT, mitochondrial respiration and citrate synthase activity (∼40-50%), as well as the protein content of electron transport system (ETS) subunits (∼10-40%), and that of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), NRF1, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), PHF20, and p53 (∼65-170%) all increased compared to baseline; mitochondrial specific respiration remained unchanged. After RVT, all the mitochondrial parameters measured except citrate synthase activity (∼36% above initial) were not significantly different compared to baseline (all P > 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that training volume is an important determinant of training-induced mitochondrial adaptations and highlight the rapid reversibility of human skeletal muscle to a reduction in training volume.-Granata, C., Oliveira, R. S. F., Little, J. P., Renner, K., Bishop, D. J. Mitochondrial adaptations to high-volume exercise training are rapidly reversed after a reduction in training volume in human skeletal muscle. © FASEB.

  12. Flying Insects and Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Floreano, Dario; Zufferey, Jean-Christophe; Srinivasan, Mandyam V.; Ellington, Charlie

    2009-01-01

    Flying insects are intelligent micromachines capable of exquisite maneuvers in unpredictable environments. Understanding these systems advances our knowledge of flight control, sensor suites, and unsteady aerodynamics, which is of crucial interest to engineers developing intelligent flying robots or micro air vehicles (MAVs). The insight we gain from synthesizing bioinspired systems can in turn benefit the fields of neurophysiology, ethology and zoology by providing real-life tests of t...

  13. The Fly Printer - Extended

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beloff, Laura; Klaus, Malena

    2016-01-01

    Artist talk / Work-in-progress What is the purpose of a machine or an artifact, like the Fly Printer, that is dislocated, that produces images that have no meaning, no instrumentality, that depict nothing in the world? The biological and the cultural are reunited in this apparatus as a possibilit...... the results. The extended version of the Fly Printer containing the technological perception and DNNs is a collaboration between Laura Beloff and Malene Theres Klaus...

  14. How Birds Fly Together: The Dynamics of Flocking

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 12. How Birds Fly Together: The Dynamics of Flocking. Kishore Dutta. General Article Volume 15 Issue 12 December 2010 pp 1097-1110. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Explaining Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Use of High-Volume Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Kronebusch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Racial/ethnic minorities are less likely to use higher-quality hospitals than whites. We propose that a higher level of information-related complexity in their local hospital environments compounds the effects of discrimination and more limited access to services, contributing to racial/ethnic disparities in hospital use. While minorities live closer than whites to high-volume hospitals, minorities also face greater choice complexity and live in neighborhoods with lower levels of medical experience. Our empirical results reveal that it is generally the overall context associated with proximity, choice complexity, and local experience, rather than differential sensitivity to these factors, that provides a partial explanation of the disparity gap in high-volume hospital use.

  16. Explaining Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Use of High-Volume Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Bradford H.; Schlesinger, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Racial/ethnic minorities are less likely to use higher-quality hospitals than whites. We propose that a higher level of information-related complexity in their local hospital environments compounds the effects of discrimination and more limited access to services, contributing to racial/ethnic disparities in hospital use. While minorities live closer than whites to high-volume hospitals, minorities also face greater choice complexity and live in neighborhoods with lower levels of medical experience. Our empirical results reveal that it is generally the overall context associated with proximity, choice complexity, and local experience, rather than differential sensitivity to these factors, that provides a partial explanation of the disparity gap in high-volume hospital use. PMID:25316717

  17. A comparison of low volume 'high-intensity-training' and high volume traditional resistance training methods on muscular performance, body composition, and subjective assessments of training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessing, J; Eichmann, B; Steele, J; Fisher, J

    2016-09-01

    Most studies of resistance training (RT) examine methods that do not resemble typical training practices of persons participating in RT. Ecologically valid RT programs more representative of such practices are seldom compared. This study compared two such approaches to RT. Thirty participants (males, n = 13; females, n = 17) were randomised to either a group performing low volume 'High Intensity Training' (HIT; n = 16) or high volume 'Body-building' (3ST; n = 14) RT methods 2x/week for 10 weeks. Outcomes included muscular performance, body composition, and participant's subjective assessments. Both HIT and 3ST groups improved muscular performance significantly (as indicated by 95% confidence intervals) with large effect sizes (ES; 0.97 to 1.73 and 0.88 to 1.77 respectively). HIT had significantly greater muscular performance gains for 3 of 9 tested exercises compared with 3ST (p < 0.05) and larger effect sizes for 8 of 9 exercises. Body composition did not significantly change in either group. However, effect sizes for whole body muscle mass changes were slightly more favourable in the HIT group compared with the 3ST group (0.27 and -0.34 respectively) in addition to whole body fat mass (0.03 and 0.43 respectively) and whole body fat percentage (-0.10 and -0.44 respectively). Significant muscular performance gains can be produced using either HIT or 3ST. However, muscular performance gains may be greater when using HIT. Future research should look to identify which components of ecologically valid RT programs are primarily responsible for these differences in outcome.

  18. Comparison of Outcomes for Off-Pump Versus On-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Low-Volume and High-Volume Centers and by Low-Volume and High-Volume Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Umberto; Lau, Christopher; Caputo, Massimo; Kim, Luke; Feldman, Dmitriy N; Ohmes, Lucas B; Di Franco, Antonino; Soletti, Giovanni; Angelini, Gianni D; Girardi, Leonard N; Gaudino, Mario

    2018-03-01

    In terms of in-hospital outcomes, controversy still remains whether off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting is superior to on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. We investigated whether the volume of off-pump coronary artery bypass procedures by hospital and individual surgeon influences patient outcomes when compared with on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. Discharge records from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample were retrospectively reviewed for in-hospital admissions from 2003 to 2011, including 999 hospitals in 44 states. A total of 2,094,094 patients undergoing on- and off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery were included. In patients requiring 2 or more grafts, off-pump coronary artery bypass compared with on-pump coronary artery bypass was associated with increased risk-adjusted mortality when performed in low-volume centers (pump coronary artery bypass centers (≥164 cases per year) and surgeons (≥48 cases per year), off-pump coronary artery bypass reduced mortality compared with on-pump coronary artery bypass in cases requiring a single graft (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.89 and OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.47, respectively) or 2 or more grafts (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.99 and OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.81, respectively). In conclusion, the outcome of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting procedures is dependent on volume at both the institution and the individual surgeon level. Off-pump coronary artery bypass should not be performed at low-volume centers and by low-volume surgeons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. VOLUME STUDY WITH HIGH DENSITY OF PARTICLES BASED ON CONTOUR AND CORRELATION IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Yu. Nikolaeva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The subject of study is the techniques of particle statistics evaluation, in particular, processing methods of particle images obtained by coherent illumination. This paper considers the problem of recognition and statistical accounting for individual images of small scattering particles in an arbitrary section of the volume in case of high concentrations. For automatic recognition of focused particles images, a special algorithm for statistical analysis based on contouring and thresholding was used. By means of the mathematical formalism of the scalar diffraction theory, coherent images of the particles formed by the optical system with high numerical aperture were simulated. Numerical testing of the method proposed for the cases of different concentrations and distributions of particles in the volume was performed. As a result, distributions of density and mass fraction of the particles were obtained, and the efficiency of the method in case of different concentrations of particles was evaluated. At high concentrations, the effect of coherent superposition of the particles from the adjacent planes strengthens, which makes it difficult to recognize images of particles using the algorithm considered in the paper. In this case, we propose to supplement the method with calculating the cross-correlation function of particle images from adjacent segments of the volume, and evaluating the ratio between the height of the correlation peak and the height of the function pedestal in the case of different distribution characters. The method of statistical accounting of particles considered in this paper is of practical importance in the study of volume with particles of different nature, for example, in problems of biology and oceanography. Effective work in the regime of high concentrations expands the limits of applicability of these methods for practically important cases and helps to optimize determination time of the distribution character and

  20. Estimating the extent of the health hazard posed by high-production volume chemicals.

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, A.R.; Rosenkranz, H S

    2001-01-01

    We used structure-activity relationship modeling to estimate the number of toxic chemicals among the high-production volume (HPV) group. We selected 200 chemicals from among the HPV chemical list and predicted the potential of each for its ability to induce a variety of adverse effects including genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, developmental, and systemic toxicity. We found a significantly less than expected proportion of toxic chemicals among the HPV sample when compared to a reference set of ...

  1. Pozzolanic Activity Assessment of LUSI (LUmpur SIdoarjo) Mud in Semi High Volume Pozzolanic Mortar

    OpenAIRE

    Danny Christianto; Wibowo, Gunadi M.; Djwantoro Hardjito; , Antoni

    2012-01-01

    LUSI mud obtained from the mud volcano in Sidoarjo, Indonesia, is a viable aluminosilicate material to be utilized as pozzolanic material. LUSI is an abbreviation of the local name of the mud, i.e., Lumpur Sidoarjo, meaning Sidoarjo mud. This paper reports the results of an investigation to assess the pozzolanic activity of LUSI mud, especially in semi high volume pozzolanic mortar. In this case, the amount of mud incorporated is between 30% to 40% of total cementitious material, by mass. The...

  2. Testing of Dependencies between Stock Returns and Trading Volume by High Frequency Data

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Gurgul; Robert Syrek

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a dependence analysis of returns, return volatility and trading volume for five companies listed on the Vienna Stock Exchange and five from the Warsaw Stock Exchange. Taking into account high frequency data for these companies, tests based on a comparison of Bernstein copula densities using the Hellinger distance were conducted. The paper presents some patterns of causal and other relationships between stock returns, realized volatility and expected and unexpected...

  3. Animal Use and Lessons Learned in the U.S. High Production Volume Chemicals Challenge Program

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Patricia L.; Manuppello, Joseph R.; Willett, Catherine E.; Sandler, Jessica T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Launched by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1998, the High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program was developed to address the perceived gap in basic hazard information for the 2,800 chemicals produced or imported into the United States in quantities of ? 1 million pounds per year. Health and environmental effects data obtained from either existing information or through new vertebrate animal testing were voluntarily submitted by chemical companies (sponsors) ...

  4. A new black fly isolate of Bacillus thuringiensis autoagglutinating strain highly toxic to Simulium pertinax (Kollar (Diptera, Simuliidae larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara FG Cavados

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Formulations containing the entomopathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis strain IPS-82 has been widely applied for mosquito control around the world. Strain IPS-82 is highly active against Aedes aegypti but less active against other well-known vectors such as Culex quinquefasciatus and Simulium spp. larvae. Eighteen strains of B. thuringiensis were isolated from Simulium pertinax larvae naturally occurring in rivers of Southeast Brazil with one demonstrating special toxic effects. Simulated field tests against S. pertinax larvae showed that the native Brazilian autoagglutinanting B. thuringiensis (LFB-FIOCRUZ 1035 has an LC50 at least 25 times lower than the standard IPS-82 strain. The same bacterial preparation was also tested against Ae. aegypti larvae in laboratory trials and the LC50 values obtained with LFB-FIOCRUZ 1035 were at least three times lower than the one for the IPS 82 strain. The results indicate that this strain is more toxic than the standard B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis (H14 in the two Dipteran species tested. It is noteworthy that differences between LC50 values were more pronounced in S. pertinax larvae, the source of the original isolation.

  5. O fly, where art thou?

    OpenAIRE

    Grover, Dhruv; Tower, John; Tavaré, Simon

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a real-time image acquisition system for tracking the movement of Drosophila in three-dimensional space is presented. The system uses three calibrated and synchronized cameras to detect multiple flies and integrates the detected fly silhouettes to construct the three-dimensional visual hull models of each fly. We used an extended Kalman filter to estimate the state of each fly, given past positions from the reconstructed fly visual hulls. The results show that our...

  6. High field volume coil with unbalance current distribution for MRI applications of rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrufo, O. R.; Hernández, J.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2010-12-01

    The development of transceiver volume coils for high field MRI is still a very dynamic field of investigation and development Temnikov has been recently proposed a new volume coil design, similar to the to the gradiometer coil. It is also claimed that it is possible to individually tune it with a single chip capacitor. This motivated the development of a coil prototype based on this idea for whole-body MRI of rodents at 7 Tesla. Electromagnetic simulations of the RF field generated by this coil design were previously performed to study its properties. Electromagnetic simulations were also conducted for a standard birdcage coil with similar dimensions for fare comparison. In all numerical simulations, an unbalanced currents distribution was assumed by applying half the current intensity to designated legs. This coil design operated in the transceiver mode and was linear-driven. The coil size was manufactured to accommodate small rodents. Numerical simulations showed a field uniformity improvement of our coil over the standard birdcage coil. A popular birdcage coil was also constructed to compare their performances. Phantom and rat images were acquired for both volume coils to prove the viability of this coil design for high field MRI applications and standard spin echo pulse sequences Thus, these preliminary results make this coil design a good candidate for MRI and MRS applications of high magnetic fields.

  7. Feasibility Tests on Concrete with Very-High-Volume Supplementary Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun-Hyeok Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to examine the compressive strength and durability of very high-volume SCM concrete. The prepared 36 concrete specimens were classified into two groups according to their designed 28-day compressive strength. For the high-volume SCM, the FA level was fixed at a weight ratio of 0.4 and the GGBS level varied between the weight ratio of 0.3 and 0.5, which resulted in 70–90% replacement of OPC. To enhance the compressive strength of very high-volume SCM concrete at an early age, the unit water content was controlled to be less than 150 kg/m3, and a specially modified polycarboxylate-based water-reducing agent was added. Test results showed that as SCM ratio (RSCM increased, the strength gain ratio at an early age relative to the 28-day strength tended to decrease, whereas that at a long-term age increased up to RSCM of 0.8, beyond which it decreased. In addition, the beneficial effect of SCMs on the freezing-and-thawing and chloride resistances of the concrete decreased at RSCM of 0.9. Hence, it is recommended that RSCM needs to be restricted to less than 0.8–0.85 in order to obtain a consistent positive influence on the compressive strength and durability of SCM concrete.

  8. Quality characteristics of Greek fly ashes and potential uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skodras, G.; Grammelis, P.; Kakaras, E. [Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Ptolemais (Greece); Karangelos, D.; Anagnostakis, M.; Hinis, E. [Nuclear Engineering Section, Mechanical Engineering Department, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2007-01-15

    The main characteristics of fly ash from Greek coal-fired boilers are presented in this paper in relation to its exploitation potential. Both fuel and fly ash samples were collected and analyzed according to the ASTM Standards. Apart from the typical analyses (proximate, ultimate, ash analysis and calorific value), an ICP-AES spectrometer was used for the analysis of heavy metals in the ash. Experimental measurements in order to determine the radioactivity content of raw fuel and the fly ash were carried out as well. A representative fly ash sample from Ptolemais power plant was evaluated and tested as filler in Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC). Ashes from the Greek brown coal are classified in type C, most of the fly ash being produced in Ptolemais of Northern Greece, while the rest in Megalopolis. Ptolemais fly ash is rich in calcium compounds, while Megalopolis fly ash contains more pyrite. Increased heavy metal concentrations are observed in the fly ash samples of Greek coal. Greek fly ash appears to have not only pozzolanic but also hydraulic behaviour. Furthermore, Greek fly ash, depending on its origin, may have relatively high natural radioactivity content, reaching in the case of Megalopolis fly ash 1 kBq kg{sup -1} of {sup 226}Ra. The laboratory results showed that fly ashes can be a competitive substitute to conventional limestone filler material in SCC. Fly ash is mostly used in Greece in cement industry replacing cement clinker and aiming to the production of special types of Portland cements. However, a more aggressive utilisation strategy should be developed, since low quantities of the total produced fly ash are currently further utilised. (author)

  9. Ecology, feeding and natural infection by Leishmania spp. of phlebotomine sand flies in an area of high incidence of American tegumentary leishmaniasis in the municipality of Rio Branco, Acre, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ávila, Márcia Moreira; Brilhante, Andreia Fernandes; de Souza, Cristian Ferreira; Bevilacqua, Paula Dias; Galati, Eunice Aparecida Bianchi; Brazil, Reginaldo Peçanha

    2018-01-26

    = 1). Only Ps. ayrozai possessed a sequence similar to that of L. (V.) guyanensis (99%). Through microscopic analysis, five specimens of Ev. saulensis were found to possess flagellate forms in the hindgut, with an infection rate of 2.4%. Samples from 33 fed females were submitted to cytb gene amplification, for which sequencing determined that all were similar to the sequence deposited on GenBank for Gallus gallus (domestic chicken). The high abundance of Trichophoromyia auraensis and Ev. saulensis, and the detection of L. (V.) braziliensis DNA, suggests that both species may be vectors of American tegumentary leishmaniasis. Psychodopygus ayrozai was found to be infected by L. (V) braziliesnsis and L. (V.) guyanensis, and although collected in low abundance, it may be a potential vector in the region. The sand fly fauna was found to be rich and diverse with predominance of the genus Psychodopygus. Identification of food sources of fed females showed that 100% amplified a gene region compatible with the domestic chicken, which although considered refractory in the disease transmission cycle, may have an influence on the population dynamics of sand flies.

  10. Ureteroscopy for Stone Disease in Paediatric Population is Safe and Effective in Medium-Volume and High-Volume Centres: Evidence from a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rob, Shazna; Jones, Patrick; Pietropaolo, Amelia; Griffin, Stephen; Somani, Bhaskar K

    2017-10-18

    The incidence of urinary stone disease among the paediatric population is increasing. Whilst there has been a rise in the number of original studies published on ureteroscopy (URS) in children, critical review still remains under-reported. A Cochrane style systematic review was performed to identify all original articles on URS (minimum of 25 cases) for stone disease in paediatric patients between Jan. 1996 and Dec. 2016. Based on the number of reported cases, centres were divided into medium (25-49 cases) and high (≥ 50 cases) volume studies. Thirty-four studies (2758 children) satisfied our search criteria and were included in this review. The mean stone size was 8.6 mm with an overall stone-free rate (SFR) of 90.4% (range 58-100). Medium-volume centres reported a mean SFR of 94.1% (range 87.5-100), whilst high-volume centres reported a mean SFR of 88.1% (range 58-98.5). Mean number of sessions to achieve stone-free status in medium-volume and high-volume groups was 1.1 and 1.2 procedures/patient respectively. The overall complication rate was 11.1% (327/2994). Breakdown by Clavien grade was as follows: Clavien I 69% and Clavien II/III 31%. There were no Clavien IV/V complications, and no mortality was recorded across any of the studies. The overall failure to access rate was 2.5% (76/2944). Medium-volume and high-volume studies had overall complication rates of 6.9% (37/530) and 12.1% (287/2222) respectively, but there was no significant difference in major or minor complications between these two groups. Ureteroscopy is a safe and effective treatment for paediatric stone disease. Medium-volume centres can achieve equally high SFRs and safety profiles as high-volume centres. Despite the rarity of paediatric stone disease, our findings might increase the uptake of paediatric URS procedures.

  11. Volume server: A scalable high speed and high capacity magnetic tape archive architecture with concurrent multi-host access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybczynski, Fred

    1993-01-01

    A major challenge facing data processing centers today is data management. This includes the storage of large volumes of data and access to it. Current media storage for large data volumes is typically off line and frequently off site in warehouses. Access to data archived in this fashion can be subject to long delays, errors in media selection and retrieval, and even loss of data through misplacement or damage to the media. Similarly, designers responsible for architecting systems capable of continuous high-speed recording of large volumes of digital data are faced with the challenge of identifying technologies and configurations that meet their requirements. Past approaches have tended to evaluate the combination of the fastest tape recorders with the highest capacity tape media and then to compromise technology selection as a consequence of cost. This paper discusses an architecture that addresses both of these challenges and proposes a cost effective solution based on robots, high speed helical scan tape drives, and large-capacity media.

  12. PIEZOELECTRIC WAVEGUIDE SENSOR FOR MEASURING PULSE PRESSURE IN CLOSED LIQUID VOLUMES AT HIGH VOLTAGE ELECTRIC DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Zhekul

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Investigations of the characteristics of pressure waves presuppose the registration of the total profile of the pressure wave at a given point in space. For these purposes, various types of «pressure to the electrical signal» transmitters (sensors are used. Most of the common sensors are unsuitable for measuring the pulse pressure in a closed water volume at high hydrostatic pressures, in particular to study the effect of a powerful high-voltage pulse discharge on increasing the inflow of minerals and drinking water in wells. The purpose of the work was to develop antijamming piezoelectric waveguide sensor for measuring pulse pressure at a close distance from a high-voltage discharge channel in a closed volume of a liquid. Methodology. We have applied the calibration method as used as a secondary standard, the theory of electrical circuits. Results. We have selected the design and the circuit solution of the waveguide pressure sensor. We have developed a waveguide pulse-pressure sensor DTX-1 with a measuring loop. This sensor makes it possible to study the spectral characteristics of pressure waves of high-voltage pulse discharge in closed volumes of liquid at a hydrostatic pressure of up to 20 MPa and a temperature of up to 80 °C. The sensor can be used to study pressure waves with a maximum amplitude value of up to 150 MPa and duration of up to 80 µs. According to the results of the calibration, the sensitivity of the developed sensor DTX-1 with a measuring loop is 0.0346 V/MPa. Originality. We have further developed the theory of designing the waveguide piezoelectric pulse pressure sensors for measuring the pulse pressure at a close distance from a high-voltage discharge channel in a closed fluid volume by controlling the attenuation of the amplitude of the pressure signal. Practical value. We have developed, created, calibrated, used in scientific research waveguide pressure pulse sensors DTX-1. We propose sensors DTX-1 for sale

  13. Is the Distance Worth It? Patients With Rectal Cancer Traveling to High-Volume Centers Experience Improved Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaomin; Becerra, Adan Z; Justiniano, Carla F; Boodry, Courtney I; Aquina, Christopher T; Swanger, Alex A; Temple, Larissa K; Fleming, Fergal J

    2017-12-01

    It is unclear whether traveling long distances to high-volume centers would compensate for travel burden among patients undergoing rectal cancer resection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether operative volume outweighs the advantages of being treated locally by comparing the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer treated at local, low-volume centers versus far, high-volume centers. This was a population-based study. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with rectal cancer. Patients with stage II or III rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection between 2006 and 2012 were included. The outcomes of interest were margins, lymph node yield, receipt of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, adjuvant chemotherapy, readmission within 30 days, 30-day and 90-day mortality, and 5-year overall survival. A total of 18,605 patients met inclusion criteria; 2067 patients were in the long-distance/high-volume group and 1362 in the short-distance/low-volume group. The median travel distance was 62.6 miles for the long-distance/high-volume group and 2.3 miles for the short-distance/low-volume group. Patients who were younger, white, privately insured, and stage III were more likely to have traveled to a high-volume center. When controlled for patient factors, stage, and hospital factors, patients in the short-distance/low-volume group had lower odds of a lymph node yield ≥12 (OR = 0.51) and neoadjuvant chemoradiation (OR = 0.67) and higher 30-day (OR = 3.38) and 90-day mortality (OR = 2.07) compared with those in the long-distance/high-volume group. The short-distance/low-volume group had a 34% high risk of overall mortality at 5 years compared with the long-distance/high-volume group. We lacked data regarding patient and physician decision making and surgeon-specific factors. Our results indicate that when controlled for patient, tumor, and hospital factors, patients who traveled a long distance to a high-volume center had improved lymph node yield

  14. Blood and plasma treatments: the rationale of high-volume hemofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honoré, Patrick M; Joannes-Boyau, Olivier; Gressens, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, experts in the field have thought that a reduction in cytokines in the blood compartment could, in theory, reduce mortality, but this is perhaps too naive as the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of cytokines throughout the body are not well known and are probably much more complicated than previously thought. This ha now led to three leading theories and concepts. Ronco and Bellomo conceived the peak concentration hypothesis in which clinicians concentrate their efforts to remove mediators and cytokines from the blood compartment at the proinflammatory phase of sepsis. By reducing the amount of free cytokines, it is hoped that the level of remote organ (associated) damages can be dramatically decreased and, as a consequence, the overall death rate. In this regard, it is still not known what will happen at the interstitial and tissue level with regard to mediators and cytokines which are obviously the most important part in terms of consequences at the tissue level. In this setting, techniques that can more rapidly and substantially remove great amounts of cytokines or mediators are privileged. Among these, there is high-volume and very high-volume hemofiltration and a number of hybrid therapies encompassing high-permeability hemofiltration, super high-flux hemofiltration, hemo-adsorption or coupled filtration and adsorption and other types of adsorption using physical or chemical forces rather than driving forces as used normally in hemofiltration-derived techniques. The second concept is called the threshold immunomodulation hypothesis, also called the Honoré concept. In this concept the view of the system is much more dynamic. In experiments when removal is occurring on the blood compartment side, the level on the interstitial side and the tissue side is also changing and, because not only mediators but also pro-mediators are being removed, some pathways have really stopped when enough pro-mediators have been removed by this technique

  15. Reduced-volume antennas with integrated high-impedance electromagnetic surfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forman, Michael A.

    2006-11-01

    Several antennas with integrated high-impedance surfaces are presented. The high-impedance surface is implemented as a composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial fabricated from a periodic structure characterized by a substrate, filled with an array of vertical vias and capped by capacitive patches. Omnidirectional antennas placed in close proximity to the high-impedance surface radiate hemispherically with an increase in boresight far-field pattern gain of up to 10 dB and a front-to-back ratio as high as 13 dB at 2.45 GHz. Several TEM rectangular horn antennas are realized by replacing conductor walls with high-impedance surfaces. The TEM horn antennas are capable of operating below the TE{sub 1,0} cutoff frequency of a standard all-metal horn antenna, enabling a reduction in antenna volume. Above the cutoff frequency the TEM horn antennas function similarly to standard rectangular horn antennas.

  16. Thermal tuning of volume Bragg gratings for spectral beam combining of high-power fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachenberg, Derrek R; Andrusyak, Oleksiy; Venus, George; Smirnov, Vadim; Glebov, Leonid B

    2014-02-20

    High-radiance lasers are desired for many applications in defense and manufacturing. Spectral beam combining (SBC) by volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) is a very promising method for high-radiance lasers that need to achieve 100 kW level power. Laser-induced heating of VBGs under high-power radiation presents a challenge for maintaining Bragg resonance at various power levels without mechanical realignment. A novel thermal tuning technique and apparatus is presented that enables maintaining peak efficiency operation of the SBC system at various power levels without any mechanical adjustment. The method is demonstrated by combining two high-power ytterbium fiber lasers with high efficiency from low power to full combined power of 300 W (1.5 kW effective power), while maintaining peak combining efficiency within 0.5%.

  17. High intensity and reduced volume training attenuates stress and recovery levels in elite swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbe, Anne-Marie; Rasmussen, Camilla P; Nielsen, Glen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of increased high-intensity interval training (HIT) at the expense of total training volume on the stress and recovery levels of elite swimmers. Forty-one elite swimmers participated in the study and were randomly assigned to either a HIT or a control group (CON...... for baseline values. No significant effects could be observed in sports-specific stress or sports-specific recovery. The results indicate that increasing training intensity and reducing training volume for 12 weeks can reduce general stress and increase general recovery levels in competitive swimmers.......). Eleven swimmers did not complete the questionnaires. For 12 weeks both groups trained ~12 h per week. The amount of HIT was ~5 h vs. 1 h, and total distance was ~17 km vs. ~35 km per week for HIT and CON, respectively. HIT was performed as 6-10 × 10-30 s maximal effort interspersed by 2-4 min of rest...

  18. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  19. Scattering and Physical Aging in High-Free-Volume Polymeric Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Amanda G.; Budd, Peter M.; McKeown, Neil B.; Colina, Coray M.; Runt, James

    2013-03-01

    Polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) form glassy, rigid membranes featuring a large concentration of pores smaller than 1 nm, large internal surface area, and high gas permeability and selectivity. Porosity in these materials--equivalent to free volume--arises from an unusual chain structure combining rigid segments with sites of contortion. Like other glasses, PIMs are subject to physical aging, which reduces the permeability of films over time. Although it is possible to derive useful information such as surface areas and pore sizes from the scattering patterns of many porous materials, scattering from PIMs includes some unusual features. A robust interpretation of these features is presented with support from molecular dynamics simulations. The sensitivity of PIM SAXS/WAXS patterns to time, temperature and film thickness is shown to be qualitatively consistent with physical aging. Models for extracting quantitative information about changes in the sizes and volume fraction of pores are also discussed. Supported by NSF

  20. Three-Dimensional High-Order Spectral Volume Method for Solving Maxwell's Equations on Unstructured Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel; Wang, Z. J.

    2004-01-01

    A three-dimensional, high-order, conservative, and efficient discontinuous spectral volume (SV) method for the solutions of Maxwell's equations on unstructured grids is presented. The concept of discontinuous 2nd high-order loca1 representations to achieve conservation and high accuracy is utilized in a manner similar to the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method, but instead of using a Galerkin finite-element formulation, the SV method is based on a finite-volume approach to attain a simpler formulation. Conventional unstructured finite-volume methods require data reconstruction based on the least-squares formulation using neighboring cell data. Since each unknown employs a different stencil, one must repeat the least-squares inversion for every cell at each time step, or to store the inversion coefficients. In a high-order, three-dimensional computation, the former would involve impractically large CPU time, while for the latter the memory requirement becomes prohibitive. In the SV method, one starts with a relatively coarse grid of triangles or tetrahedra, called spectral volumes (SVs), and partition each SV into a number of structured subcells, called control volumes (CVs), that support a polynomial expansion of a desired degree of precision. The unknowns are cell averages over CVs. If all the SVs are partitioned in a geometrically similar manner, the reconstruction becomes universal as a weighted sum of unknowns, and only a few universal coefficients need to be stored for the surface integrals over CV faces. Since the solution is discontinuous across the SV boundaries, a Riemann solver is thus necessary to maintain conservation. In the paper, multi-parameter and symmetric SV partitions, up to quartic for triangle and cubic for tetrahedron, are first presented. The corresponding weight coefficients for CV face integrals in terms of CV cell averages for each partition are analytically determined. These discretization formulas are then applied to the integral form of

  1. Blood-meal identification in phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from Valle Hermoso, a high prevalence zone for cutaneous leishmaniasis in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaguano, David F; Ponce, Patricio; Baldeón, Manuel E; Santander, Stephanie; Cevallos, Varsovia

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand flies of the genus Lutzomyia. In South America, cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic in the majority of countries. There are no previous reports of phlebotomine sand fly host feeding sources in Ecuador. We identified blood meal sources for phlebotomine sand fly species in Valle Hermoso, a hyper endemic area for leishmaniasis in Ecuador. Phlebotomine sand fly collections were carried out during the dry and rainy seasons. PCR and multiplex PCR were performed from DNA extracted from the abdomens of blood-fed females to specifically identify the avian and mammalian blood meal sources. Avian-blood (77%), mammalian-blood (16%) and mixed avian-mammalian blood (7%) were found in the samples. At the species level, blood from chickens (35.5%), humans (2.8%), cows (2.8%) and dogs (1.9%) was specifically detected. Nyssomyia trapidoi was the most common species of Lutzomyia found that fed on birds. The present results may aid the development of effective strategies to control leishmaniasis in Ecuador. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The whole genome sequence of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedmann), reveals insights into the biology and adaptive evolution of a highly invasive pest species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mediterranean fruit fly is one of the most destructive agricultural pests throughout the world due to its broad host plant range that includes more than 260 different fruits, flowers, vegetables, and nuts. Host preferences vary in different regions of the world, which can be associated with its ...

  3. High Volume Manufacturing of NanoEngineered High ZT Thermoelectrics for Multiple Energy Generation Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SMI has teamed with a leading thermoelectric (TE) research group in order to optimize and convert high-performance TE materials developed in laboratory-scale into...

  4. Cell-centered high-order hyperbolic finite volume method for diffusion equation on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Euntaek; Ahn, Hyung Taek; Luo, Hong

    2018-02-01

    We apply a hyperbolic cell-centered finite volume method to solve a steady diffusion equation on unstructured meshes. This method, originally proposed by Nishikawa using a node-centered finite volume method, reformulates the elliptic nature of viscous fluxes into a set of augmented equations that makes the entire system hyperbolic. We introduce an efficient and accurate solution strategy for the cell-centered finite volume method. To obtain high-order accuracy for both solution and gradient variables, we use a successive order solution reconstruction: constant, linear, and quadratic (k-exact) reconstruction with an efficient reconstruction stencil, a so-called wrapping stencil. By the virtue of the cell-centered scheme, the source term evaluation was greatly simplified regardless of the solution order. For uniform schemes, we obtain the same order of accuracy, i.e., first, second, and third orders, for both the solution and its gradient variables. For hybrid schemes, recycling the gradient variable information for solution variable reconstruction makes one order of additional accuracy, i.e., second, third, and fourth orders, possible for the solution variable with less computational work than needed for uniform schemes. In general, the hyperbolic method can be an effective solution technique for diffusion problems, but instability is also observed for the discontinuous diffusion coefficient cases, which brings necessity for further investigation about the monotonicity preserving hyperbolic diffusion method.

  5. High level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 6) outlines the standards and requirements for the sections on: Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Research and Development and Experimental Activities, and Nuclear Safety.

  6. High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 4) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Radiation Protection and Operations.

  7. High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 2) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Quality Assurance, Training and Qualification, Emergency Planning and Preparedness, and Construction.

  8. Changes in lung volume and ventilation during lung recruitment in high-frequency ventilated preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Martijn; de Jongh, Frans H.; Frerichs, Inez; van Veenendaal, Mariëtte B.; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2011-01-01

    To assess global and regional changes in lung volume and ventilation during lung recruitment in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Using electrical impedance tomography, changes in lung volume and ventilation were measured in 15 high-frequency oscillatory ventilated preterm infants

  9. Low-volume high-intensity interval training rapidly improves cardiopulmonary function in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonizakis, Markos; Moss, James; Gilbert, Stephen; Broom, David; Foster, Jeff; Tew, Garry A

    2014-10-01

    This study compared the effects of a 2-week program of low-volume high-intensity interval training (HIT) with the effects of higher-volume moderate-intensity continuous training (CT) on cardiopulmonary and vascular functions in postmenopausal women. Twenty-two postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to undertake six HIT (n = 12) or CT (n = 10) sessions for 2 weeks. HIT sessions consisted of ten 1-minute intervals of cycling exercise at 100% of peak power output separated by 1 minute of active recovery. CT sessions involved 40 minutes of continuous cycling at 65% of peak power output. Variables assessed at baseline and 2 weeks included cardiopulmonary function (ventilatory threshold, peak oxygen uptake), macrovascular endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery), and microvascular function (reactive hyperemia and local thermal hyperemia of forearm skin). Eighteen participants completed the study (HIT, 11; CT, 7). Adherence to the exercise programs was excellent, with 107 of 108 sessions completed. Despite substantially lower total time commitment (∼2.5 vs. ∼5 h) and training volume (558 vs. 1,237 kJ) for HIT versus CT, increases from baseline in peak oxygen uptake achieved significance (P = 0.01) for the HIT group only (Δ = 2.2 mL kg min; P for interaction = 0.688). Improvements in exercise test duration were observed in both groups (HIT, 13%; CT, 5%; P for interaction = 0.194). There were no significant changes in macrovascular or microvascular function in either group. The findings suggest that low-volume HIT is feasible and can lead to rapid improvements in cardiopulmonary function in postmenopausal women.

  10. High intensity focused ultrasound induced in vivo large volume hyperthermia under 3D MRI temperature control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillander, Matti; Hokland, Steffen; Koskela, Julius; Dam, Høgni; Andersen, Niels Peter; Pedersen, Michael; Tanderup, Kari; Ylihautala, Mika; Köhler, Max

    2016-03-01

    Mild hyperthermia can be used as an adjuvant therapy to enhance radiation therapy or chemotherapy of cancer. However, administering mild hyperthermia is technically challenging due to the high accuracy required of the temperature control. MR guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a technology that can address this challenge. In this work, accurate and spatially uniform mild hyperthermia is demonstrated for deep-seated clinically relevant heating volumes using a HIFU system under MR guidance. Mild hyperthermia heating was evaluated for temperature accuracy and spatial uniformity in 11 in vivo porcine leg experiments. Hyperthermia was induced with a commercial Philips Sonalleve MR-HIFU system embedded in a 1.5T Ingenia MR scanner. The operating software was modified to allow extended duration mild hyperthermia. Heating time varied from 10 min up to 60 min and the assigned target temperature was 42.5 °C. Electronic focal point steering, mechanical transducer movement, and dynamic transducer element switch-off were exploited to enlarge the heated volume and obtain uniform heating throughout the acoustic beam path. Multiple temperature mapping images were used to control and monitor the heating. The magnetic field drift and transducer susceptibility artifacts were compensated to enable accurate volumetric MR thermometry. The obtained mean temperature for the target area (the cross sectional area of the heated volume at focal depth primarily used to control the heating) was on average 42.0 ± 0.6 °C. Temperature uniformity in the target area was evaluated using T10 and T90, which were 43.1 ± 0.6 and 40.9 ± 0.6 °C, respectively. For the near field, the corresponding temperatures were 39.3 ± 0.8 °C (average), 40.6 ± 1.0 °C (T10), and 38.0 ± 0.9 °C (T90). The sonications resulted in a concise heating volume, typically in the shape of a truncated cone. The average depth reached from the skin was 86.9 mm. The results show that the heating

  11. High-volume hemofiltration for septic acute kidney injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Edward; Molnar, Amber O; Joannes-Boyau, Olivier; Honoré, Patrick M; Sikora, Lindsey; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2014-01-08

    High-volume hemofiltration (HVHF) is an attractive therapy for the treatment of septic acute kidney injury (AKI). Small experimental and uncontrolled studies have suggested hemodynamic and survival benefits at higher doses of HVHF than those used for the high-intensity arms of the RENAL and ATN studies. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of high-volume hemofiltration (HVHF) compared with standard-volume hemofiltration (SVHF) for septic AKI. A systematic review and meta-analysis of publications between 1966 and 2013 was performed. The review was limited to randomized-controlled trials that compared HVHF (effluent rate greater than 50 ml/kg per hour) versus SVHF in the treatment of sepsis and septic shock. The primary outcome assessed was 28-day mortality. Other outcomes assessed were recovery of kidney function, lengths of ICU and hospital stays, vasopressor dose reduction, and adverse events. Four trials, including 470 total participants, were included. Pooled analysis for 28-day mortality did not show any meaningful difference between HVHF compared with SVHF (OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.45 to 1.29). No included studies reported statistically significant differences between groups for any of the secondary outcomes. Adverse events, including hypophosphatemia and hypokalemia, were more commonly observed in HVHF-treated patients, although reporting was inconsistent across studies. Insufficient evidence exists of a therapeutic benefit for routine use of HVHF for septic AKI, other than on an experimental basis. Given the logistic challenges related to patient recruitment along with an incomplete understanding of the biologic mechanisms by which HVHF may modify outcomes, further trials should focus on alternative extracorporeal therapies as an adjuvant therapy for septic AKI rather than HVHF.

  12. A regional-scale estimation of ice wedge ice volumes in the Canadian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, M.; Pollard, W. H.; Grand'Maison, C. B.

    2016-12-01

    Ice wedges are both prominent and environmentally vulnerable features in continuous permafrost environments. As the world's Arctic regions begin to warm, concern over the potential effects of ice wedge melt out has become an immediate issue, receiving much attention in the permafrost literature. In this study we estimate the volume of ice wedge ice for large areas in the Canadian High Arctic through the use of high resolution satellite imagery and the improved capabilities of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The methodology used for this study is similar to that of one performed in Siberia and Alaska by Ulrich et al, in 2014. Utilizing Ulrich's technique, this study detected ice wedge polygons from satellite imagery using ArcGIS. The average width and depth of these ice wedges were obtained from a combination of field data and long-term field studies for the same location. The assumptions used in the analysis of ice wedge volume have been tested, including trough width being representative of ice wedge width, and ice wedge ice content (Pollard and French 1980). This study used specific field sites located near Eureka on Ellesmere Island (N80°01', W85°43') and at Expedition Fiord on Axel Heiberg Island (N79°23', W90°59'). The preliminary results indicate that the methodology used by Ulrich et al, 2014 is transferrable to the Canadian High Arctic, and that ice wedge volumes range between 3-10% of the upper part of permafrost. These findings are similar to previous studies and their importance is made all the more evident by the dynamic nature of ice wedges where it could be argued that they are a key driver of thermokarst terrain. The ubiquitous nature of ice wedges across arctic terrain highlights the importance and the need to improve our understanding of ice wedge dynamics, as subsidence from ice wedge melt-out could lead to large scale landscape change.

  13. Modeling Atmospheric Emissions and Calculating Mortality Rates Associated with High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Alyssa

    Emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are a growing pollution concern throughout the global community, as they have been linked to numerous health issues. The freight transportation sector is a large source of these emissions and is expected to continue growing as globalization persists. Within the US, the expanding development of the natural gas industry is helping to support many industries and leading to increased transportation. The process of High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing (HVHF) is one of the newer advanced extraction techniques that is increasing natural gas and oil reserves dramatically within the US, however the technique is very resource intensive. HVHF requires large volumes of water and sand per well, which is primarily transported by trucks in rural areas. Trucks are also used to transport waste away from HVHF well sites. This study focused on the emissions generated from the transportation of HVHF materials to remote well sites, dispersion, and subsequent health impacts. The Geospatial Intermodal Freight Transport (GIFT) model was used in this analysis within ArcGIS to identify roadways with high volume traffic and emissions. High traffic road segments were used as emissions sources to determine the atmospheric dispersion of particulate matter using AERMOD, an EPA model that calculates geographic dispersion and concentrations of pollutants. Output from AERMOD was overlaid with census data to determine which communities may be impacted by increased emissions from HVHF transport. The anticipated number of mortalities within the impacted communities was calculated, and mortality rates from these additional emissions were computed to be 1 in 10 million people for a simulated truck fleet meeting stricter 2007 emission standards, representing a best case scenario. Mortality rates due to increased truck emissions from average, in-use vehicles, which represent a mixed age truck fleet, are expected to be higher (1 death per 341,000 people annually).

  14. High internal free volume compositions for low-k dielectric and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swager, Timothy M. (Inventor); Bouffard, Jean (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides materials, devices, and methods involving new heterocyclic, shape-persistent monomeric units with internal free volume. In some cases, materials the present invention may comprise monomers, oligomers, or polymers that incorporate a heterocyclic, shape-persistent iptycene. The present invention may provide materials having low dielectric constants and improved stability at high operating temperatures due to the electron-poor character of materials. In addition, compositions of the invention may be easily synthesized and readily modified to suit a particular application.

  15. Quantification of cerebral lateral ventricular volume in cats by low- and high-field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyborowska, Paulina; Adamiak, Zbigniew; Zhalniarovich, Yauheni

    2017-10-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate variations in lateral ventricles in the examined feline population with the use of quantitative analysis methods to determine whether sex or body weight influenced the size of the ventricles, and to identify any significant differences in the results of low- and high-field MRI. Methods Twenty healthy European Shorthair cats, aged 1-3 years, with body weights ranging from 2.85-4.35 kg, were studied. MRI of brain structures was performed in a low- and a high-field MRI system. The height of the brain and lateral ventricles at the level of the interthalamic adhesion, and volume of the lateral ventricles were determined in T2-weighted images in the transverse plane. The degree of symmetry of lateral ventricles was analysed based on the ratio of right to left ventricular volume. The measured parameters were processed statistically to determine whether sex and body weight were significantly correlated with variations in ventricular anatomy. The results of low- and high-field MRI were analysed to evaluate for any significant differences. Results The average brain height was determined to be 27.79 mm, and the average height of the left and right ventricles were 2.98 mm and 2.89 mm, respectively. The average ventricle/brain height ratio was 10.61%. The average volume of the left ventricle was 134.12 mm3 and the right ventricle was 130.49 mm3. Moderately enlarged ventricles were observed in two cats. Moderate ventricular asymmetry was described in four cats. Sex and body weight had no significant effect on the evaluated parameters. The differences in the results of low- and high-field MRI were not statistically significant. Conclusions and relevance This study has determined reference intervals for ventricular volume in a population of European Shorthair cats without brain disease, which will facilitate the interpretation of MRI images and the characterisation of brain abnormalities in cats with neurological disease. Further

  16. Spatiotemporal Trends in the Timing and Volume of Snowfall in High Mountain Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Taylor; Bookhagen, Bodo

    2017-04-01

    High Mountain Asia, which encompasses the Himalaya, Karakoram, Pamir, Tien Shan, and the Tibetan Plateau, is the primary 'water tower' for much of Asia, serving more than a billion downstream users. Many catchments receive the majority of their yearly water budget in the form of snow - the vast majority of which is not monitored by sparse weather networks in the region. We leverage passive microwave data, flown on five sensors (SSMI, AMSR-E, SSMIS, AMSR2, and GPM, 1987-2016), to examine trends in the timing, volume, and spatial distribution of snowfall. While the total volume of water stored in snowpack has decreased over the study period, this large-scale water-storage loss hides small-scale and seasonal complexities. Some regions, such as the high Tien Shan and Kunlun Shan, have seen increased snow-water storage. Other regions, such as the Pamir and Karakorum, have seen increases in winter snow-water storage, coupled with decreases in summer snow-water storage, implying an intensification of winter storms alongside more rapid spring and summer snowmelt. We also note a non-linear elevation trend, where the mid-elevation zones show the largest negative snow-water storage trends, implying that these areas are the most strongly impacted by increasing temperatures in the region. Our study provides a first-order examination of snow-water trends in High Mountain Asia, and highlights that both small and large-scale snow trends must be considered for effective water planning.

  17. Snow cover volumes dynamic monitoring during melting season using high topographic accuracy approach for a Lebanese high plateau witness sinkhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Chakra, Charbel; Somma, Janine; Elali, Taha; Drapeau, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Climate change and its negative impact on water resource is well described. For countries like Lebanon, undergoing major population's rise and already decreasing precipitations issues, effective water resources management is crucial. Their continuous and systematic monitoring overs long period of time is therefore an important activity to investigate drought risk scenarios for the Lebanese territory. Snow cover on Lebanese mountains is the most important water resources reserve. Consequently, systematic observation of snow cover dynamic plays a major role in order to support hydrologic research with accurate data on snow cover volumes over the melting season. For the last 20 years few studies have been conducted for Lebanese snow cover. They were focusing on estimating the snow cover surface using remote sensing and terrestrial measurement without obtaining accurate maps for the sampled locations. Indeed, estimations of both snow cover area and volumes are difficult due to snow accumulation very high variability and Lebanese mountains chains slopes topographic heterogeneity. Therefore, the snow cover relief measurement in its three-dimensional aspect and its Digital Elevation Model computation is essential to estimate snow cover volume. Despite the need to cover the all lebanese territory, we favored experimental terrestrial topographic site approaches due to high resolution satellite imagery cost, its limited accessibility and its acquisition restrictions. It is also most challenging to modelise snow cover at national scale. We therefore, selected a representative witness sinkhole located at Ouyoun el Siman to undertake systematic and continuous observations based on topographic approach using a total station. After four years of continuous observations, we acknowledged the relation between snow melt rate, date of total melting and neighboring springs discharges. Consequently, we are able to forecast, early in the season, dates of total snowmelt and springs low

  18. Annual Hospital Volume of High Dose Interleukin-2 and Inpatient Mortality in Melanoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathan Mehta

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy using high dose interleukin-2 (HD IL2 in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC and melanoma is associated with severe toxicities. The association between annual hospital volume of HD IL2 and inpatient mortality is not well studied. In this study we aim to quantify the impact of annual hospital volume of HD IL2 on inpatient mortality using National Inpatient Sample (NIS data.We did a cross-sectional study using NIS, one of the largest inpatient datasets in United States, from 2003 to 2011. Patients with melanoma and RCC receiving HD IL2 were identified by ICD9 procedure code 00.15. The primary outcome was inpatient mortality. Using Joinpoint regression, which detects change in trend of inpatient mortality with change in annual volume, the hospitals were classified in three volume categories (low: 1-40, medium: 41-120, high: >120. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictors of inpatient mortality controlling for confounders.From 2003 to 2011, 29,532 patients with RCC or melanoma who received HD IL2 were identified, and 124 died during the hospitalization (0.4%. The hospitals with low, medium and high annual volume had significant difference in inpatient mortality (0.83%, 0.29% and 0.13% respectively, p = 0.0003. On multivariate analysis, low volume hospitals were associated with significantly higher odds of inpatient mortality (OR 6.1, 95% CI 1.6-23.2, p = 0.003 as compared to high volume hospitals. Additionally, the hospitals with annual volume of 1-20 had even higher rates (1.31% vs. 0.13%, p<0.0001 and multivariate odds (OR 8.9, 95% CI 2.4-33.2, p = 0.0006 of inpatient mortality as compared to high volume hospitals.Lower annual hospital volume of HD IL2 is associated with worse outcomes. Annual hospital volume of 1-40 and 1-20 treatments per year is associated with 6 and 9 times higher odds of inpatient mortality respectively as compared to high volume hospitals. Our findings provide preliminary evidence for

  19. Lasershot(sm) marking system: high-volume labeling for safety-critical parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dane, C B; Hackel, L; Honig, J; Halpin, J; Chen, H-L; Mendieta, F; Harris, F; Lane, L; Daly, J; Harrison, J

    2001-02-16

    The Lasershot Marking System uses laser pulses to safely and permanently impress identification markings on metal components. This process does not remove material or change surface chemistry and actually increases the marked area's resistance to fatigue and corrosion failure. Lasershot marking is ideally suited for marking parts used in situations where safety is critical--from hip-joint replacements to commercial airliner components. The minimum size of the mark is limited only by the resolution of the reading system, allowing manufacturers to mark parts which, up to now, have been too small to label with mechanical peening techniques. The high resolution of the Lasershot marks makes them difficult to reproduce, providing a solution to the ongoing problem of inferior, counterfeited parts. The high marking rate of up to six marks per second makes this system practical and cost-effective for marking high-volume components.

  20. Highly efficient waveguide display with space-variant volume holographic gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Peng, Yifan; Zhao, Qing; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu

    2017-12-01

    We propose a highly efficient waveguide display based on space-variant volume holographic gratings (SVVHGs). The local period and slant angle of the SVVHG vary along the tangential direction, enabling variant incident angles to satisfy the Bragg condition of the local gratings. As a result, we enlarge the field of view (FOV) without using the conventional multiplexing scheme, while achieving high efficiency and large FOV at the same time. We experimentally record the SVVHGs on Bayfol HX200 films. We demonstrate that the proposed display can achieve 31.9% system efficiency for a broadband light source and 52.3% for a coherent light source, 20° FOV, and high brightness uniformity, making it a promising candidate for widespread applications in the augmented reality (AR) industry.

  1. Microstructural and compositional change of NaOH-activated high calcium fly ash by incorporating Na-aluminate and co-existence of geopolymeric gel and C–S–H(I)

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Jae Eun

    2012-05-01

    This study explores the reaction products of alkali-activated Class C fly ash-based aluminosilicate samples by means of high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (HSXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and compressive strength tests to investigate how the readily available aluminum affects the reaction. Class C fly ash-based aluminosilicate raw materials were prepared by incorporating Na-aluminate into the original fly ashes, then alkali-activated by 10 M NaOH solution. Incorporating Na-aluminate reduced the compressive strength of samples, with the reduction magnitude relatively constant regardless of length of curing period. The HSXRD provides evidence of the co-existence of C-S-H with geopolymeric gels and strongly suggests that the C-S-H formed in the current system is C-S-H(I). The back-scattered electron images suggest that the C-S-H(I) phase exists as small grains in a finely intermixed form with geopolymeric gels. Despite providing extra source of aluminum, adding Na-aluminate to the mixes did not decrease the Si/Al ratio of the geopolymeric gel. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Physiology Flies with Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Amita

    2017-11-30

    The 2017 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology has been awarded to Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young for elucidating molecular mechanisms of the circadian clock. From studies beginning in fruit flies, we now know that circadian regulation pervades most biological processes and has strong ties to human health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fly ash for defluoridation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzimou-Tsitouridou, R.

    1985-05-01

    The authors report a study of the use of a lignite fly ash to retain fluoride ions and remove them from their solutions, with a view to the use of this process for the defluoridation of water. Results are presented and the chemistry of the process is examined.

  4. 'Information on the fly': Challenges in professional communication in high technological nursing. A focus group study from a radiotherapy department in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmark, Catarina; Tishelman, Carol; Gustafsson, Helena; Sharp, Lena

    2012-07-23

    Radiotherapy (RT) units are high-tech nursing environments. In Sweden, RT registered nurses (RNs) provide and manage RT in close collaboration with other professional groups, as well as providing nursing care for patients with cancer. Communication demands on these RNs are thus particularly complex. In this study, we aimed to better understand problems, strengths and change needs related to professional communication with and within the RT department, as a basis for developing a situation-specific intervention. Focus groups discussions (FGDs) were conducted with different professional (RNs, assistant nurses, physicians, engineers and physicists) and user stakeholders. Transcripts of the FGDs were inductively analyzed by a team of researchers, to generate clinically relevant and useful data. These findings give insight into RT safety climate and are presented under three major headings: Conceptualization of professional domains; Organization and leadership issues; and Communication forms, strategies and processes. The impact of existing hierarchies, including how they are conceptualized and acted out in practice, was noted throughout these data. Despite other differences, participating professionals agreed about communication problems related to RT, i.e. a lack of systems and processes for information transfer, unclear role differentiation, a sense of mutual disrespect, and ad hoc communication taking place 'on the fly'. While all professional groups recognized extensive communication problems, none acknowledged the potential negative effects on patient safety or care described in the FGD with patient representatives. While RNs often initially denied the existence of a hierarchy, they placed themselves on a hierarchy in their descriptions, describing their own role as passive, with a sense of powerlessness. Potential safety hazards described in the FGDs include not reporting medical errors and silently ignoring or actively opposing new guidelines and regulations

  5. Stabilize ash using Clemson`s sintering process (Part 1 -- Phase 1 results): Mixed waste fly ash stabilization. Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1998-12-01

    Incineration of applicable Department of Energy (DOE) mixed wastes has produced a secondary waste stream of radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous fly ash that also requires treatment before land disposal. Unlike bottom ash, fly ash usually contains constituents making efficient stabilization difficult. For example, fly ash from the DOE Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains volatile metals, metal salts, high concentrations of zinc, and unburned organic residues. All of these constituents can effect the stabilization process. The Department of Energy, and in particular the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) of EM-50, has stated the need for improved stabilization methods would accept a higher ash waste loading while meeting waste form disposal criteria. These alternative stabilization technologies should include delivery systems to minimize worker exposure and minimize secondary waste generation, while maximizing operational flexibility and radionuclide containment. Currently, the standard practice for stabilizing ash is mixing with Portland cement at room temperature. This standard practice produces a significant increase of waste material volume or has difficulty in adequately stabilizing the components in the fly ash to ensure regulatory requirements are consistently satisfied. To address these fly ash stabilization shortcomings, the MWFA, a DOE/EM-50 program, invested in the development of several fly ash stabilization alternatives, including the Clemson University sintering method.

  6. Miniaturized, High Flow, Low Dead Volume Pre-Concentrator for Trace Contaminants in Water under Microgravity Conditions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thorleaf Research, Inc. proposes to develop a miniaturized high flow, low dead-volume pre-concentrator for monitoring trace levels of contaminants in water under...

  7. Pozzolanic Activity Assessment of LUSI (LUmpur SIdoarjo) Mud in Semi High Volume Pozzolanic Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardjito, Djwantoro; Antoni; Wibowo, Gunadi M.; Christianto, Danny

    2012-01-01

    LUSI mud obtained from the mud volcano in Sidoarjo, Indonesia, is a viable aluminosilicate material to be utilized as pozzolanic material. LUSI is an abbreviation of the local name of the mud, i.e., Lumpur Sidoarjo, meaning Sidoarjo mud. This paper reports the results of an investigation to assess the pozzolanic activity of LUSI mud, especially in semi high volume pozzolanic mortar. In this case, the amount of mud incorporated is between 30% to 40% of total cementitious material, by mass. The content of SiO2 in the mud is about 30%, whilst the total content of SiO2, Fe2O3 and Al2O3 is more than 70%. Particle size and degree of partial cement replacement by treated LUSI mud affect the compressive strength, the strength activity index (SAI), the rate of pozzolanic activity development, and the workability of mortar incorporating LUSI mud. Manufacturing semi high volume LUSI mud mortar, up to at least 40% cement replacement, is a possibility, especially with a smaller particle size of LUSI mud, less than 63 μm. The use of a larger percentage of cement replacement by LUSI mud does not show any adverse effect on the water demand, as the flow of the fresh mortar increased with the increase of percentage of LUSI mud usage.

  8. Fast High Resolution Volume Carving for 3D Plant Shoot Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanno Scharr

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Volume carving is a well established method for visual hull reconstruction and has been successfully applied in plant phenotyping, especially for 3d reconstruction of small plants and seeds. When imaging larger plants at still relatively high spatial resolution (≤1 mm, well known implementations become slow or have prohibitively large memory needs. Here we present and evaluate a computationally efficient algorithm for volume carving, allowing e.g., 3D reconstruction of plant shoots. It combines a well-known multi-grid representation called “Octree” with an efficient image region integration scheme called “Integral image.” Speedup with respect to less efficient octree implementations is about 2 orders of magnitude, due to the introduced refinement strategy “Mark and refine.” Speedup is about a factor 1.6 compared to a highly optimized GPU implementation using equidistant voxel grids, even without using any parallelization. We demonstrate the application of this method for trait derivation of banana and maize plants.

  9. Conformal surface coatings to enable high volume expansion Li-ion anode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Leah A; Cavanagh, Andrew S; George, Steven M; Jung, Yoon Seok; Yan, Yanfa; Lee, Se-Hee; Dillon, Anne C

    2010-07-12

    An alumina surface coating is demonstrated to improve electrochemical performance of MoO(3) nanoparticles as high capacity/high-volume expansion anodes for Li-ion batteries. Thin, conformal surface coatings were grown using atomic layer deposition (ALD) that relies on self-limiting surface reactions. ALD coatings were tested on both individual nanoparticles and prefabricated electrodes containing conductive additive and binder. The coated and non-coated materials were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling. Importantly, increased stability and capacity retention was only observed when the fully fabricated electrode was coated. The alumina layer both improves the adhesion of the entire electrode, during volume expansion/contraction and protects the nanoparticle surfaces. Coating the entire electrode also allows for an important carbothermal reduction process that occurs during electrode pre-heat treatment. ALD is thus demonstrated as a novel and necessary method that may be employed to coat the tortuous network of a battery electrode.

  10. Total pancreatectomy: Short- and long-term outcomes at a high-volume pancreas center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Hazem M; Stauffer, John A; Raimondo, Massimo; Woodward, Timothy A; Wallace, Michael B; Asbun, Horacio J

    2016-09-27

    To identify the current indications and outcomes of total pancreatectomy at a high-volume center. A single institutional retrospective study of patients undergoing total pancreatectomy from 1995 to 2014 was performed. One hundred and three patients underwent total pancreatectomy for indications including: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n = 42, 40.8%), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (n = 40, 38.8%), chronic pancreatitis (n = 8, 7.8%), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (n = 7, 6.8%), and miscellaneous (n = 6, 5.8%). The mean age was 66.2 years, and 59 (57.3%) were female. Twenty-four patients (23.3%) underwent a laparoscopic total pancreatectomy. Splenic preservation and portal vein resection and reconstruction were performed in 24 (23.3%) and 18 patients (17.5%), respectively. The 90 d major complications, readmission, and mortality rates were 32%, 17.5%, and 6.8% respectively. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-year survival for patients with benign indications were 84%, 82%, 79.5%, and 75.9%, and for malignant indications were 64%, 40.4%, 34.7% and 30.9%, respectively. Total pancreatectomy, including laparoscopic total pancreatectomy, appears to be an appropriate option for selected patients when treated at a high-volume pancreatic center and through a multispecialty approach.

  11. High Center Volume Does Not Mitigate Risk Associated with Using High Donor Risk Organs in Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Eliza W; Black, Sylvester M; Mumtaz, Khalid; Hayes, Don; El-Hinnawi, Ashraf; Washburn, Kenneth; Tumin, Dmitry

    2017-09-01

    High-risk donor allografts increase access to liver transplant, but potentially reduce patient and graft survival. It is unclear whether the risk associated with using marginal donor livers is mitigated by increasing center experience. The United Network for Organ Sharing registry was queried for adult first-time liver transplant recipients between 2/2002 and 12/2015. High donor risk was defined as donor risk index >1.9, and 1-year patient and graft survival were compared according to donor risk index in small and large centers. Multivariable Cox regression estimated the hazard ratio (HR) associated with using high-risk donor organs, according to a continuous measure of annual center volume. The analysis included 51,770 patients. In 67 small and 67 large centers, high donor risk index predicted increased mortality (p = 0.001). In multivariable analysis, high-donor risk index allografts predicted greater mortality hazard at centers performing 20 liver transplants per year (HR 1.35; 95% CI 1.22, 1.49; p transplant. Specific strategies to mitigate the risk of liver transplant involving high-risk donors are needed, in addition to accumulation of center expertise.

  12. Effect of additional materials on the properties of glass-ceramic produced from incinerator fly ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T W

    2004-07-01

    There are 21 Metro-waste incinerators in Taiwan under construction and are expected to be finished at year 2003. It is estimated that these incinerators will produce about two million tons of incinerator ash. In order to reduce the volume and eliminate contamination problems, high temperature molten technology studies have been conducted. The purpose of this research was that of trying to control the chemical composition of the glass-ceramic produced from incinerator fly ash, in order to improve the characteristics of the glass-ceramic. The experimental results showed that the additional materials, Mg(OH)2 and waste glass cullet, can change glass-ceramic phases from gehlenite to augite, pigeonite, and diopside. The physical, mechanical and chemical resistance properties of the glass-ceramic also showed much better characteristics than prepared glass-ceramic using incinerator fly ash alone.

  13. High-Throughput Spheroid Screens Using Volume, Resazurin Reduction, and Acid Phosphatase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Grabowska, Anna M; Garnett, Martin C

    2017-01-01

    Mainstream adoption of physiologically relevant three-dimensional models has been slow in the last 50 years due to long, manual protocols with poor reproducibility, high price, and closed commercial platforms. This chapter describes high-throughput, low-cost, open methods for spheroid viability assessment which use readily available reagents and open-source software to analyze spheroid volume, metabolism, and enzymatic activity. We provide two ImageJ macros for automated spheroid size determination-for both single images and images in stacks. We also share an Excel template spreadsheet allowing users to rapidly process spheroid size data, analyze plate uniformity (such as edge effects and systematic seeding errors), detect outliers, and calculate dose-response. The methods would be useful to researchers in preclinical and translational research planning to move away from simplistic monolayer studies and explore 3D spheroid screens for drug safety and efficacy without substantial investment in money or time.

  14. Eating disorders, energy intake, training volume, and menstrual function in high-level modern rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundgot-Borgen, J

    1996-06-01

    This study examined clinical and subclinical eating disorders (EDs) in young Norwegian modern rhythmic gymnasts. Subjects were 12 members of the national team, age 13-20 years, and individually matched nonathletic controls. All subjects participated in a structured clinical interview for EDs, medical examination, and dietary analysis. Two of the gymnasts met the DSM-III-R criteria for anorexia nervosa, and 2 met the criteria for anorexia athletica (a subclinical ED). All the gymnasts were dieting in spite of the fact that they were all extremely lean. The avoidance of maturity, menstrual irregularities, energy deficit, high training volume, and high frequency of injuries were common features among the gymnasts. Ther is a need to learn more about risk factors and the etiology of EDs in different sports. Coaches, parents, and athletes need more information about principles of proper nutrition and methods to achieve ideal body composition for optional health and athletic performance.

  15. Middleware Proxy: A Request-Driven Messaging Broker For High Volume Data Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Sliwinski, W; Dworak, A

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, all major infrastructures and data centres (commercial and scientific) make an extensive use of the publish-subscribe messaging paradigm, which helps to decouple the message sender (publisher) from the message receiver (consumer). This paradigm is also heavily used in the CERN Accelerator Control system, in Proxy broker - critical part of the Controls Middleware (CMW) project. Proxy provides the aforementioned publish-subscribe facility and also supports execution of synchronous read and write operations. Moreover, it enables service scalability and dramatically reduces the network resources and overhead (CPU and memory) on publisher machine, required to serve all subscriptions. Proxy was developed in modern C++, using state of the art programming techniques (e.g. Boost) and following recommended software patterns for achieving low-latency and high concurrency. The outstanding performance of the Proxy infrastructure was confirmed during the last 3 years by delivering the high volume of LHC equipment...

  16. Return to sport after hip arthroscopy: aggregate recommendations from high-volume hip arthroscopy centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domb, Benjamin G; Stake, Christine E; Finch, Nathan A; Cramer, T Luke

    2014-10-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical technique often performed in athletes who want an expeditious return to sport. To the authors' knowledge, no studies in the literature provide a time frame or criteria for return to sport after hip arthroscopy. The purpose of this study was to develop an aggregate recommendation for return to sport after hip arthroscopy based on data assimilated from high-volume hip arthroscopy centers. Twenty-seven orthopedic surgeons from high-volume hip arthroscopy centers completed a survey regarding return to sport after hip arthroscopy. The questionnaire asked surgeons to give a time frame for return to sport and to choose meaningful criteria that an athlete must meet prior to return to sport. Surgeons were asked to categorize various common sports as high, medium, or low risk with regard to the hip. The aggregate results were used to create standardized recommendations for time, criteria, and risk for return to competitive sports. Regarding time frame for return to sport, 70% of surgeons recommended 12 to 20 weeks. In addressing criteria for return to sport, 85% of surgeons recommended that patients need to be able to reproduce all motions involved in their sport without pain. A majority of surgeons recommended criteria of pain-free running, jumping, lateral agility drills, and single-leg squats. Finally, surgeons categorized sports requiring the most movement and impact of the hip joint (football, basketball, wrestling, and martial arts) as high-risk sports. Sports with less impact on the hip, such as golf, were ranked as low risk. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Biodiversity and Bionomics for Fruit Flies ( Diptera: Tephritidae ) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The invasive fruit fly, Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta and White is the key pest in the low and medium altitude areas. On the other hand, the Natal fruit fly, Ceratitis rosa Karsch is the key frugivorous pest in the high altitude areas. Other native species like C. capitata (Wiedemann) and Ceratitis cosyra (Walker) were less ...

  18. An annotated checklist of the horse flies, deer flies, and yellow flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The family Tabanidae includes the horse flies, deer flies, and yellow flies and is considered a significant pest of livestock throughout the United States, including Florida. Tabanids can easily become a major pest of man, especially salt marsh species which are known to readily feed on humans and o...

  19. Association of Competition Volume, Club Sports, and Sport Specialization With Sex and Lower Extremity Injury History in High School Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Eric G; Bell, David R; Trigsted, Stephanie M; Pfaller, Adam Y; Hetzel, Scott J; Brooks, M Alison; McGuine, Timothy A

    High school athletes are increasingly encouraged to participate in 1 sport year-round to increase their sport skills. However, no study has examined the association of competition volume, club sport participation, and sport specialization with sex and lower extremity injury (LEI) in a large sample of high school athletes. Increased competition volume, participating on a club team outside of school sports, and high levels of specialization will all be associated with a history of LEI. Girls will be more likely to engage in higher competition volume, participate on a club team, and be classified as highly specialized. Cross-sectional study. Level 3. High school athletes completed a questionnaire prior to the start of their competitive season regarding their sport participation and previous injury history. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to investigate associations of competition volume, club sport participation, and sport specialization with history of LEI, adjusting for sex. A cohort of 1544 high school athletes (780 girls; grades 9-12) from 29 high schools completed the questionnaire. Girls were more likely to participate at high competition volume (23.2% vs 11.0%, χ 2 = 84.7, P < 0.001), participate on a club team (61.2% vs 37.2%, χ 2 = 88.3, P < 0.001), and be highly specialized (16.4% vs 10.4%, χ 2 = 19.7, P < 0.001). Athletes with high competition volume, who participated in a club sport, or who were highly specialized had greater odds of reporting a previous LEI than those with low competition volume (odds ratio [OR], 2.08; 95% CI, 1.55-2.80; P < 0.001), no club sport participation (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.20-1.88; P < 0.001), or low specialization (OR, 2.58; 95% CI, 1.88-3.54; P < 0.001), even after adjusting for sex. Participating in high sport volume, on a club team, or being highly specialized was associated with history of LEI. Girls were more likely to participate at high volumes, be active on club teams, or be highly specialized

  20. Flying Focus: Spatiotemporal Control of the Laser Beam Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froula, D. H.; Turnbull, D.; Kessler, T. J.; Haberberger, D.; Bahk, S.-W.; Begishev, I. A.; Boni, R.; Bucht, S.; Davies, A.; Katz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Shaw, J. L.

    2017-10-01

    A ``flying focus'' is presented: this advanced focusing scheme provides unprecedented spatiotemporal control over the laser focal volume. A chromatic focusing system combined with chirped laser pulses enabled the speed of a small-diameter laser focus to propagate over nearly 100 × its Rayleigh length. Furthermore, the flying focus decouples the speed at which the peak intensity propagates from the group velocity of the laser pulse, allowing the laser focus to co- or counter-propagate along its axis at any velocity. Experiments have demonstrated a nearly constant intensity over 4.5 mm while the velocity of the focus ranged from subluminal (0.01 c) to superluminal (15 c) . These properties could provide the opportunity to overcome current fundamental limitations in laser-plasma amplifiers, laser-wakefield accelerators, photon accelerators, ion accelerators, and high-order frequency conversion. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  1. Strength properties of fly ash based controlled low strength materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkel, S

    2007-08-25

    Controlled low strength material (CLSM) is a flowable mixture that can be used as a backfill material in place of compacted soils. Flowable fill requires no tamping or compaction to achieve its strength and typically has a load carrying capacity much higher than compacted soils, but it can still be excavated easily. The selection of CLSM type should be based on technical and economical considerations for specific applications. In this study, a mixture of high volume fly ash (FA), crushed limestone powder (filler) and a low percentage of pozzolana cement have been tried in different compositions. The amount of pozzolana cement was kept constant for all mixes as, 5% of fly ash weight. The amount of mixing water was chosen in order to provide optimum pumpability by determining the spreading ratio of CLSM mixtures using flow table method. The shear strength of the material is a measure of the materials ability to support imposed stresses on the material. The shear strength properties of CLSM mixtures have been investigated by a series of laboratory tests. The direct shear test procedure was applied for determining the strength parameters Phi (angle of shearing resistance) and C(h) (cohesion intercept) of the material. The test results indicated that CLSM mixtures have superior shear strength properties compared to compacted soils. Shear strength, cohesion intercept and angle of shearing resistance values of CLSM mixtures exceeded conventional soil materials' similar properties at 7 days. These parameters proved that CLSM mixtures are suitable materials for backfill applications.

  2. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems; Volume 6 Building America Best Practices Series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-06-01

    The sixth volume of the Building America Best Practices Series presents information that is useful throughout the U.S. for enhancing the energy efficiency practices in the specific climate zones that are presented in each of the volumes.

  3. Primary uterine cancer in Maryland: impact of distance on access to surgical care at high-volume hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Camille C; Tergas, Ana I; Fleury, Aimee C; Diaz-Montes, Teresa P; Giuntoli, Robert L

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the influence of distance on access to high-volume surgical treatment for patients with uterine cancer in Maryland. The Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission database was retrospectively searched to identify primary uterine cancer surgical cases from 1994 to 2010. Race, type of insurance, year of surgery, community setting, and both surgeon and hospital volume were collected. Geographical coordinates of hospital and patient's zip code were used to calculate primary independent outcomes of distance traveled and distance from nearest high-volume hospital (HVH). Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and confidence intervals. From 1994 to 2010, 8529 women underwent primary surgical management of uterine cancer in Maryland. Multivariable analysis demonstrated white race, rural residence, surgery by a high-volume surgeon and surgery from 2003 to 2010 to be associated with both travel 50 miles or more to the treating hospital and residence 50 miles or more from the nearest HVH (all P Maryland, 50 miles or more from residence to the nearest HVH is a barrier to high-volume care. However, patients who travel 50 miles or more seem to do so to receive care by a high-volume surgeon at an HVH. In Maryland, Nonwhites are more likely to live closer to an HVH and more likely to use these services.

  4. WAYS OF ACQUIRING FLYING PHOBIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Bettina; Vriends, Noortje; Margraf, Jürgen; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    The few studies that have explored how flying phobia is acquired have produced contradictory results. We hypothesized that classical conditioning plays a role in acquiring flying phobia and investigated if vicarious (model) learning, informational learning through media, and experiencing stressful life events at the time of onset of phobia also play a role. Thirty patients with flying phobia and thirty healthy controls matched on age, sex, and education were interviewed with the Mini-DIPS, the short German version of the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (DSM-IV diagnostic criteria) and the Fear-of-Flying History Interview. Fifty Percent of patients with flying phobia and 53% of healthy controls reported frightening events in the air. There was no significant difference between the two samples. Thus there were not more classical conditioning events for patients with flying phobia. There also was no significant difference between the two samples for vicarious (model) learning: 37% of flying phobia patients and 23% of healthy controls felt influenced by model learning. The influence of informational learning through media was significantly higher for the clinical sample (70%) than for the control group (37%). Patients with flying phobia experienced significantly more stressful life events in the period of their frightening flight experience (60%) than healthy controls (19%). Frightening experiences while flying are quite common, but not everybody develops a flying phobia. Stressful life events and other factors might enhance conditionability. Informational learning through negative media reports probably reinforces the development of flying phobia. Clinical implications are discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. High intensity and reduced volume training attenuates stress and recovery levels in elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbe, Anne-Marie; Rasmussen, Camilla P; Nielsen, Glen; Nordsborg, Nikolai B

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of increased high-intensity interval training (HIT) at the expense of total training volume on the stress and recovery levels of elite swimmers. Forty-one elite swimmers participated in the study and were randomly assigned to either a HIT or a control group (CON). Eleven swimmers did not complete the questionnaires. For 12 weeks both groups trained ~12 h per week. The amount of HIT was ~5 h vs. 1 h, and total distance was ~17 km vs. ~35 km per week for HIT and CON, respectively. HIT was performed as 6-10 × 10-30 s maximal effort interspersed by 2-4 min of rest. The Recovery Stress Questionnaire - Sport was used to measure the swimmers' stress and recovery levels. After the 12 week intervention, the general stress level was 16.6% (2.6-30.7%; mean and 95% CI) lower and the general recovery level was 6.5% (0.7-12.4%) higher in HIT compared to the CON, after adjusting for baseline values. No significant effects could be observed in sports-specific stress or sports-specific recovery. The results indicate that increasing training intensity and reducing training volume for 12 weeks can reduce general stress and increase general recovery levels in competitive swimmers.

  6. CHANGES IN ROWING TECHNIQUE OVER A ROUTINE ONE HOUR LOW INTENSITY HIGH VOLUME TRAINING SESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh A.M. Mackenzie

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High volume low intensity training sessions such as one hour rowing ergometer sessions are frequently used to improve the fitness of elite rowers. Early work has suggested that technique may decline over this time period. This study sought to test the hypothesis that "elite rowers can maintain technique over a one hour rowing ergometer session". An electromagnetic device, in conjunction with a load cell, was used to assess rowing technique in terms of force generation and spinal kinematics in six male elite sweep oarsmen (two competed internationally and the remainder at a club senior level. All subjects performed one hour of rowing on a Concept II indoor rowing ergometer using a stroke rate of 18-20 strokes per minute and a heart rate ranging between 130-150 beats per minute, following a brief 5 minute warm- up. Recordings of rowing technique and force were made every 10 minutes. The elite group of rowers were able to sustain their rowing technique and force parameters over the hour session. Subtle changes in certain parameters were observed including a fall in force output of approximately 10N after the first seven minutes of rowing, and a change in leg compression of three degrees at the end of the one hour rowing piece which corresponded with a small increase in anterior rotation of the pelvis. However, it is unclear if such changes reflect a "warm-up" effect or if they are indicative of early signs of fatigue. These findings suggest that low intensity high volume ergometer rowing sessions do not have a detrimental effect on the technique of a group of experienced and highly trained rowers

  7. Desorption of Herbicides from Atmospheric Particulates During High-Volume Air Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwight V. Quiring

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides can be present in the atmosphere either as vapours and/or in association with suspended particles. High-volume air sampling, in which air is aspirated first through a glass fibre filter to capture pesticides associated with atmospheric particulates and then polyurethane foam (PUF, often in combination with an adsorbent resin such as XAD-2, to capture pesticides present as vapours, is generally employed during atmospheric monitoring for pesticides. However, the particulate fraction may be underestimated because some pesticides may be stripped or desorbed from captured particulates due to the pressure drop created by the high flow of air through the filter. This possibility was investigated with ten herbicide active ingredients commonly used on the Canadian prairies (dimethylamine salts of 2,4-D, MCPA and dicamba, 2,4-D 2-ethylhexyl ester, bromoxynil octanoate, diclofop methyl ester, fenoxaprop ethyl ester, trifluralin, triallate and ethalfluralin and seven hydrolysis products (2,4-D, MCPA, dicamba, bromoxynil, diclofop, clopyralid and mecoprop. Finely ground heavy clay soil fortified with active ingredients/hydrolysis products was evenly distributed on the glass fibre filters of high-volume air samplers and air aspirated through the samplers at a flow rate of 12.5 m3/h for a 7-day period. The proportion desorbed as vapour from the fortified soil was determined by analysis of the PUF/XAD-2 resin composite cartridges. The extent of desorption from the fortified soil applied to the filters varied from 0% for each of the dimethylamine salts of 2,4-D, MCPA and dicamba to approximately 50% for trifluralin, triallate and ethalfluralin.

  8. O fly, where art thou?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Dhruv; Tower, John; Tavaré, Simon

    2008-10-06

    In this paper, the design of a real-time image acquisition system for tracking the movement of Drosophila in three-dimensional space is presented. The system uses three calibrated and synchronized cameras to detect multiple flies and integrates the detected fly silhouettes to construct the three-dimensional visual hull models of each fly. We used an extended Kalman filter to estimate the state of each fly, given past positions from the reconstructed fly visual hulls. The results show that our approach constructs the three-dimensional visual hull of each fly from the detected image silhouettes and robustly tracks them at real-time rates. The system is suitable for a more detailed analysis of fly behaviour.

  9. Accurately determining log and bark volumes of saw logs using high-resolution laser scan data

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward Thomas; Neal D. Bennett

    2014-01-01

    Accurately determining the volume of logs and bark is crucial to estimating the total expected value recovery from a log. Knowing the correct size and volume of a log helps to determine which processing method, if any, should be used on a given log. However, applying volume estimation methods consistently can be difficult. Errors in log measurement and oddly shaped...

  10. Pigments of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stintzing, Florian; Schliemann, Willibald

    2007-01-01

    The complex pigment pattern of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) cap skins has been studied by LC-DAD and mass spectrometry. Among the betaxanthins the corresponding derivatives of serine, threonine, ethanolamine, alanine, Dopa, phenylalanine and tryptophan are reported for the first time to contribute to the pigment pattern of fly agarics. Betalamic acid, the chromophoric precursor of betaxanthins and betacyanins, muscaflavin and seco-dopas were also detected. Furthermore, the red-purple muscapurpurin and the red muscarubrin were tentatively assigned while further six betacyanin-like components could not be structurally allocated. Stability studies indicated a high susceptibility of pigment extracts to degradation which led to rapid colour loss thus rendering a complete characterization of betacyanin-like compounds impossible at present. Taking into account these difficulties the presented results may be a starting point for a comprehensive characterization of the pigment composition of fly agarics.

  11. Comparison of high-intensity vs. high-volume resistance training on the BDNF response to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, David D; Hoffman, Jay R; Mangine, Gerald T; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Beyer, Kyle S; Wang, Ran; La Monica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    This study compared the acute and chronic response of circulating plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to high-intensity low-volume (HI) and low-intensity high volume (HV) resistance training. Twenty experienced resistance-trained men (23.5 ± 2.6 y, 1.79 ± 0.05 m, 75.7 ± 13.8 kg) volunteered for this study. Before the resistance training program (PRE), participants performed an acute bout of exercise using either the HI [3-5 reps; 90% of one repetition maximum (1RM)] or HV (10-12 reps; 70% 1RM) training paradigm. The acute exercise protocol was repeated after 7 wk of training (POST). Blood samples were obtained at rest (BL), immediately (IP), 30 min (30P), and 60 min (60P) post exercise at PRE and POST. A three-way repeated measure ANOVA was used to analyze acute changes in BDNF concentrations during HI and HV resistance exercise and the effect of 7 wk of training. No training × time × group interaction in BDNF was noted (P = 0.994). Significant main effects for training (P = 0.050) and time (P training interaction (P = 0.342), training (P = 0.105), or group (P = 0.238) effect were noted in the BDNF area under the curve response. Results indicate that BDNF concentrations are increased after an acute bout of resistance exercise, regardless of training paradigm, and are further increased during a 7-wk training program in experienced lifters. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Using very high frequencies with very low lung volumes during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation to protect the immature lung. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pacheco, N; Sánchez-Luna, M; Ramos-Navarro, C; Navarro-Patiño, N; de la Blanca, A R-S

    2016-04-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) has been described as a rescue therapy in severe respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with a potential protective effect in immature lungs. In recent times, HFOV combined with the use of volume guarantee (VG) strategy has demonstrated an independent effect of the frequency on tidal volume to increase carbon-dioxide (CO2) elimination. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using the lowest tidal volume on HFOV+VG to prevent lung damage, maintaining a constant CO2 elimination by increasing the frequency. Newborn infants with RDS on HFOV were prospectively included. After adequate and stable ventilation using a standard HFOV strategy, the tidal volume was fixed using VG and decreased while the frequency was increased to the highest possible to maintain a constant CO2 elimination. Pre- and post-PCO2, delta pressure and tidal volume obtained in each situation were compared. Twenty-three newborn infants were included. It was possible to increase the frequency while decreasing the tidal volume in all patients, maintaining a similar CO2 elimination, with a tendency to a lower mean PCO2 after reaching the highest frequency. High-frequency tidal volume was significantly lower, 2.20 ml kg(-1) before vs 1.59 ml kg(-1) at the highest frequency. It is possible to use lower delivered tidal volumes during HFOV combined with VG and higher frequencies with adequate ventilation to allow minimizing lung injury.

  13. Decreased contralateral breast volume after mastectomy, adjuvant chemotherapy, and anti-estrogen therapy, in particular in breasts with high density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Naohiro; Ando, Jiro; Harao, Michiko; Takemae, Masaru; Kishi, Kazuo

    2017-10-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy and anti-estrogenic therapy can result in decreased volume of the contralateral breast, following mastectomy for the treatment of breast cancer. However, no data on the effect of adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast volume have previously been reported. We aimed to evaluate the extent to which adjuvant therapy and differences in breast density contribute to decreased breast volume. We conducted a prospective cohort study, selecting 40 nonconsecutive patients who underwent immediate breast reconstruction with mastectomy and expander insertion followed by expander replacement. We measured the contralateral breast volume before each procedure. The extent of the change was analyzed with respect to adjuvant therapy and breast density measured by preoperative mammography. The greatest decrease in breast volume was 135.1 cm3. The decrease in breast volume was significantly larger in the adjuvant therapy (+) group, particularly in patients with high breast density, than in the adjuvant therapy (-) group. Significant differences between the chemotherapy (+), tamoxifen (+) group and the chemotherapy (-), tamoxifen (+) group were not found. Breast density scores had a range of 2.0-3.3 (mean: 2.8). In breast reconstruction, particularly when performed in one stage, preoperative mammography findings are valuable to plastic surgeons, and possible decreases in the contralateral breast volume due to adjuvant therapy, particularly in patients with high breast density, should be considered carefully. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High-order conservative reconstruction schemes for finite volume methods in cylindrical and spherical coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Mignone, A

    2014-01-01

    High-order reconstruction schemes for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are revised in the finite volume approach. The formulation employs a piecewise polynomial approximation to the zone-average values to reconstruct left and right interface states from within a computational zone to arbitrary order of accuracy by inverting a Vandermonde-like linear system of equations with spatially varying coefficients. The approach is general and can be used on uniform and non-uniform meshes although explicit expressions are derived for polynomials from second to fifth degree in cylindrical and spherical geometries with uniform grid spacing. It is shown that, in regions of large curvature, the resulting expressions differ considerably from their Cartesian counterparts and that the lack of such corrections can severely degrade the accuracy of the solution close to the coordinate origin. Limiting techniques and monotonicity constraints are revised for conventional reconstruct...

  15. High production volume chemical Amine Oxide [C8-C20] category environmental risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderson, Hans; Tibazarwa, Caritas; Greggs, William

    2009-01-01

    States from manufacturing facilities and from municipal facilities resulting from consumer product uses. Reasonable worst-case ratios of predicted environmental concentration (PEC) to predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) range from 0.04 to 0.003, demonstrating that these chemicals are a low risk......An environmental assessment of amine oxides has been conducted under the OECD SIDS High Production Volume (HPV) Program via the Global International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) Amine Oxides Consortium. Amine oxides are primarily used in conjunction with surfactants in cleaning...... and personal care products. Given the lack of persistence or bioaccumulation, and the low likelihood of these chemicals partitioning to soil, the focus of the environmental assessment is on the aquatic environment. In the United States, the E-FAST model is used to estimate effluent concentrations in the United...

  16. High volume hydraulic fracturing operations: potential impacts on surface water and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrdjen, Igor; Lee, Jiyoung

    2016-08-01

    High volume, hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) processes, used to extract natural gas and oil from underground shale deposits, pose many potential hazards to the environment and human health. HVHF can negatively affect the environment by contaminating soil, water, and air matrices with potential pollutants. Due to the relatively novel nature of the process, hazards to surface waters and human health are not well known. The purpose of this article is to link the impacts of HVHF operations on surface water integrity, with human health consequences. Surface water contamination risks include: increased structural failure rates of unconventional wells, issues with wastewater treatment, and accidental discharge of contaminated fluids. Human health risks associated with exposure to surface water contaminated with HVHF chemicals include increased cancer risk and turbidity of water, leading to increased pathogen survival time. Future research should focus on modeling contamination spread throughout the environment, and minimizing occupational exposure to harmful chemicals.

  17. Cross-education after high-frequency versus low-frequency volume-matched handgrip training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Natasha G; Yee, Peter; Lanovaz, Joel L; Farthing, Jonathan P

    2017-10-01

    Cross-education training programs cause interlimb asymmetry of strength and hypertrophy. We examined the cross-education effects from a high-frequency (HF) versus a low-frequency (LF) volume-matched handgrip training program on interlimb asymmetry. Right-handed participants completed either HF (n = 10; 2 × 6 repetitions 10 times per week) or LF (n = 9; 5 × 8 repetitions 3 times per week) training. Testing occurred twice before and once after 4 weeks of right-handed isometric handgrip training totaling 120 weekly repetitions. Measures were maximal isometric handgrip and wrist flexion torque, muscle thickness, and muscle activation (electromyography; EMG). Grip strength was greater in both limbs posttraining, pooled across groups (P 0.103). Both LF and HF induced cross-education of grip strength to the untrained limb, but HF did not reduce asymmetry. These findings have implications for injury rehabilitation. Muscle Nerve 56: 689-695, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Training as a Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, C; Ramirez-Campillo, R; Martinez-Salazar, C; Mancilla, R; Flores-Opazo, M; Cano-Montoya, J; Ciolac, E G

    2016-08-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the effects of low-volume, high-intensity interval training (HIT) on cardiometabolic risk and exercise capacity in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sedentary overweight/obese T2DM women (age=44.5±1.8 years; BMI=30.5±0.6 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to a tri-weekly running-based HIT program (n=13) or non-exercise control follow-up (CON; n=10). Glycemic control, lipid and blood pressure levels, endurance performance, and anthropometry were measured before and after the follow-up (16 weeks) in both groups. Medication intake was also assessed throughout the follow-up. Improvements (Pvolume HIT may be a time-efficient intervention to treat T2DM women. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Differential control of respiratory frequency and tidal volume during high-intensity interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolò, Andrea; Marcora, Samuele M; Bazzucchi, Ilenia; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2017-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? By manipulating recovery intensity and exercise duration during high-intensity interval training (HIIT), we tested the hypothesis that fast inputs contribute more than metabolic stimuli to respiratory frequency (fR ) regulation. What is the main finding and its importance? Respiratory frequency, but not tidal volume, responded rapidly and in proportion to changes in workload during HIIT, and was dissociated from some markers of metabolic stimuli in response to both experimental manipulations, suggesting that fast inputs contribute more than metabolic stimuli to fR regulation. Differentiating between fR and tidal volume may help to unravel the mechanisms underlying exercise hyperpnoea. Given that respiratory frequency (fR ) has been proposed as a good marker of physical effort, furthering the understanding of how fR is regulated during exercise is of great importance. We manipulated recovery intensity and exercise duration during high-intensity interval training (HIIT) to test the hypothesis that fast inputs (including central command) contribute more than metabolic stimuli to fR regulation. Seven male cyclists performed an incremental test, a 10 and a 20 min continuous time trial (TT) as preliminary tests. Subsequently, recovery intensity and exercise duration were manipulated during HIIT (30 s work and 30 s active recovery) by performing four 10 min and one 20 min trial (recovery intensities of 85, 70, 55 and 30% of the 10 min TT mean workload; and 85% of the 20 min TT mean workload). The work intensity of the HIIT sessions was self-paced by participants to achieve the best performance possible. When manipulating recovery intensity, fR , but not tidal volume (VT ), showed a fast response to the alternation of the work and recovery phases, proportional to the extent of workload variations. No association between fR and gas exchange responses was observed. When manipulating exercise duration, fR and rating of

  20. Nanoimprint system development and status for high-volume semiconductor manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Tsuneo; Takabayashi, Yukio; Nishimura, Naosuke; Emoto, Keiji; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Kimura, Atsushi; Choi, Jin; Schumaker, Philip

    2016-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash* Imprint Lithography (J-FIL*) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed, leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. Criteria specific to any lithographic process for the semiconductor industry include overlay, throughput and defectivity. The purpose of this paper is to describe the technology advancements made overlay, throughput and defectivity and to introduce the FPA-1200NZ2C cluster system designed for high volume manufacturing of semiconductor devices. in the reduction of particle adders in an imprint tool and introduce the new mask replication tool that will enable the fabrication of replica masks with added residual image placement errors suitable for memory devices with half pitches smaller than 15nm. Overlay results better than 5nm 3sigma have been demonstrated. To further enhance overlay, wafer chucks with improved flatness have been implemented to reduce distortion at the wafer edge. To address higher order corrections, a two part solution is discussed. An array of piezo actuators can be applied to enable linear corrections. Additional reductions in distortion can then be addressed by the local heating of a wafer field. The NZ2C cluster platform for high volume manufacturing is also discussed. System development continues this year with a target for introduction later in 2016. The first application is likely to be NAND Flash memory, and eventual use for DRAM and logic devices as both overlay and defectivity improve.

  1. Flow rates of large animal fluid delivery systems used for high-volume crystalloid resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolen-Walston, Rose D

    2012-12-01

    Large animal species in states of shock can require particularly high flow rates for volume resuscitation and the ability to deliver adequate volumes rapidly may be a rate-limiting step. The objective of this study was to determine the maximum flow rates of common combinations of IV catheter, extension set, and fluid administration sets. University veterinary teaching hospital. In vitro experimental study. Maximum flow rates were measured using combinations of 4 IV catheters (3 14-Ga and a single 10-Ga), 2 IV catheter extension sets (small bore and large bore), and 2 types of fluid administration sets (standard 2-lead large animal coiled IV set and nonpressurized 4-lead arthroscopic irrigation set). The catheter, extension sets, and administration sets were arranged in 16 configurations, and flow rates measured in triplicate using tap water flowing into an open receptacle. Flow rates ranged from 7.4 L/h with an over-the-wire 14-Ga catheter, small-bore extension, and coil set, to 51.2 L/h using a 10-Ga catheter, no extension, and arthroscopic irrigation set. There was an increase of 1.3-8.9% in flow rates between the large- versus small-bore extension sets. Crystalloid delivery in vivo to an adult horse was 21% slower (9.1 L/h versus 11.5 L/h) than the corresponding in vitro measurement. Extremely high flow rates can be achieved in vitro using large-bore catheters and delivery systems, although the clinical necessity for rates >50 L/h has not been determined. The use of large-bore extension sets resulted in only a minimal increase in flow rate. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2012.

  2. Low-volume high-intensity swim training is superior to high-volume low-intensity training in relation to insulin sensitivity and glucose control in inactive middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Luke J; Nordsborg, Nikolai B; Nyberg, Michael; Weihe, Pál; Krustrup, Peter; Mohr, Magni

    2016-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that low-volume high-intensity swimming has a larger impact on insulin sensitivity and glucose control than high-volume low-intensity swimming in inactive premenopausal women with mild hypertension. Sixty-two untrained premenopausal women were randomised to an inactive control (n = 20; CON), a high-intensity low-volume (n = 21; HIT) or a low-intensity high-volume (n = 21; LIT) training group. During the 15-week intervention period, HIT performed 3 weekly 6-10 × 30-s all-out swimming intervals (average heart rate (HR) = 86 ± 3 % HRmax) interspersed by 2-min recovery periods and LIT swam continuously for 1 h at low intensity (average HR = 73 ± 3 % HRmax). Fasting blood samples were taken and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was conducted pre- and post-intervention. After HIT, resting plasma [insulin] was lowered (17 ± 34 %; P volume high-intensity intermittent swimming is an effective and time-efficient training strategy for improving insulin sensitivity, glucose control and biomarkers of vascular function in inactive, middle-aged mildly hypertensive women.

  3. Self-renewal in the fly kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, Markus; Barde, Yves

    2007-09-01

    Tissue stem cells are typically rare and located in niches that prescribe low rates of cell division and survival. In the latest issue of Cell Stem Cell, Singh et al. (2007) demonstrate that, in the adult fly, epithelial cells exist that are neither in niches nor in small numbers, divide at high rates, and are multipotent.

  4. Surgical outcomes for low-volume vs high-volume surgeons in gynecology surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowat, Alex; Maher, Christopher; Ballard, Emma

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of gynecological surgeon volumes on patient outcomes. Eligible studies were selected through an electronic literature search from database inception up until September 2015 and references in published studies. Search terms included surgical volume, surgeon volume, low-volume or high-volume, and gynecology or hysterectomy or sling or pelvic floor repair or continence procedure. The literature search was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. We defined a low-volume surgeon (LVS) as one performing the procedure once a month or less, and studies were excluded if their definition of LVS was > ±33% of our definition. Primary outcomes were total complications, intraoperative complications, and postoperative complications. All outcome data for individual studies were entered into systematic review software. When 2 or more studies evaluated a designated outcome, a meta-analysis of the entered data was undertaken as per the Cochrane database methodology. Data analysis was entered into a software product, which generated a summary of findings table that included structured and qualified grading (very low to high) of the quality for the evidence of the individual outcomes and provided a measure of effect. Fourteen peer-reviewed studies with 741,760 patients were included in the systematic review. For gynecology the LVS group had an increased rate of total complications (odds ratio [OR], 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.5), intraoperative complications (OR, 1.6, 95% CI, 1.2-2.1), and postoperative complications (OR, 1.4 95% CI, 1.3-1.4). In gynecological oncology, the LVS group had higher mortality (OR, 1.9, 95% CI, 1.3-2.6). In the urogynecology group, a single study reported that the LVS group had a higher rate of any complication (risk ratio [RR], 1.4, 95% CI, -1.2-1.6). Another single study found that LVS had higher rates of

  5. prevalence of biting and non-biting flies in relation to species in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Version 2.9.2). Flies proportions were compared using Chi-square test. Statistical significance was achieved if P < 0.05. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. An overall total of 3,032 flies were trapped at the end of this study. The high abundance of flies.

  6. A design study for a simple-to-fly, constant attitude light aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, F. O.; Humphreys, D. E.; Montoya, R. J.; Rickard, W. W.; Wilkinson, I. E.

    1973-01-01

    The activities during a four-year study by doctoral students to evolve in detail a design for a simple-to-fly, constant attitude light airplane are described. The study indicated that such aircraft could materially reduce the hazards to light airplane occupants which arise from the high pilot work load and poor visibility that occur during landing. Preliminary cost studies indicate that in volume production this system would increase the cost of the aircraft in roughly the same fashion that automatic transmission, power steering, power brakes, and cruise control increase the cost of a compact car.

  7. Strength and workability characteristics of fly ash-based natural fibre reinforced mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrisha, G.; Sundararajan, T. [Pondicherry Engineering College, Pondicherry (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Fly ash from Neyveli thermal power station was used as replacement for ordinary Portland cement in high-volumes in coir fibre reinforced mortar to study its influence on the modification of the matrix, improvement in workability and strength characteristics. Four aspect ratios (15, 30, 50 and 70); four levels of fibre contents (0.2%, 0.3%, 0.4%, 0.5% - by weight of cement) were considered to highlight the positive influence of flyash in improving the workability and strength characteristics of flyash based coir fibre reinforced mortar. 3 refs., 9 tabs.

  8. Spatial filter with volume gratings for high-peak-power multistage laser amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yi-zhou; Yang, Yi-sheng; Zheng, Guang-wei; Shen, Ben-jian; Pan, Heng-yue; Liu, Li

    2010-08-01

    The regular spatial filters comprised of lens and pinhole are essential component in high power laser systems, such as lasers for inertial confinement fusion, nonlinear optical technology and directed-energy weapon. On the other hand the pinhole is treated as a bottleneck of high power laser due to harmful plasma created by the focusing beam. In this paper we present a spatial filter based on angular selectivity of Bragg diffraction grating to avoid the harmful focusing effect in the traditional pinhole filter. A spatial filter consisted of volume phase gratings in two-pass amplifier cavity were reported. Two-dimensional filter was proposed by using single Pi-phase-shifted Bragg grating, numerical simulation results shown that its angular spectrum bandwidth can be less than 160urad. The angular selectivity of photo-thermorefractive glass and RUGATE film filters, construction stability, thermal stability and the effects of misalignments of gratings on the diffraction efficiencies under high-pulse-energy laser operating condition are discussed.

  9. High-Dimensional Function Approximation With Neural Networks for Large Volumes of Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andras, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Approximation of high-dimensional functions is a challenge for neural networks due to the curse of dimensionality. Often the data for which the approximated function is defined resides on a low-dimensional manifold and in principle the approximation of the function over this manifold should improve the approximation performance. It has been show that projecting the data manifold into a lower dimensional space, followed by the neural network approximation of the function over this space, provides a more precise approximation of the function than the approximation of the function with neural networks in the original data space. However, if the data volume is very large, the projection into the low-dimensional space has to be based on a limited sample of the data. Here, we investigate the nature of the approximation error of neural networks trained over the projection space. We show that such neural networks should have better approximation performance than neural networks trained on high-dimensional data even if the projection is based on a relatively sparse sample of the data manifold. We also find that it is preferable to use a uniformly distributed sparse sample of the data for the purpose of the generation of the low-dimensional projection. We illustrate these results considering the practical neural network approximation of a set of functions defined on high-dimensional data including real world data as well.

  10. Moderate Recovery Unnecessary to Sustain High Stroke Volume during Interval Training. A Brief Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Stanley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that the time spent at a high stroke volume (SV is important for improving maximal cardiac function. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of recovery intensity on cardiovascular parameters during a typical high-intensity interval training (HIIT session in fourteen well-trained cyclists. Oxygen consumption (VO2, heart rate (HR, SV, cardiac output (Qc, and oxygenation of vastus lateralis (TSI were measured during a HIIT (3×3-min work period, 2 min of recovery session on two occasions. VO2, HR and Qc were largely higher during moderate-intensity (60% compared with low-intensity (30% (VO2, effect size; ES = +2.6; HR, ES = +2.8; Qc, ES = +2.2 and passive (HR, ES = +2.2; Qc, ES = +1.7 recovery. By contrast, there was no clear difference in SV between the three recovery conditions, with the SV during the two active recovery periods not being substantially different than during exercise (60%, ES = −0.1; 30%, ES = −0.2. To conclude, moderate-intensity recovery may not be required to maintain a high SV during HIIT.

  11. A high-throughput platform for low-volume high-temperature/pressure sealed vessel solvent extractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damm, Markus [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microwave Chemistry (CDLMC) and Institute of Chemistry, Karl-Franzens-University Graz, Heinrichstrasse 28, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Kappe, C. Oliver, E-mail: oliver.kappe@uni-graz.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microwave Chemistry (CDLMC) and Institute of Chemistry, Karl-Franzens-University Graz, Heinrichstrasse 28, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parallel low-volume coffee extractions in sealed-vessel HPLC/GC vials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extractions are performed at high temperatures and pressures (200 Degree-Sign C/20 bar). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapid caffeine determination from the liquid phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Headspace analysis of volatiles using solid-phase microextraction (SPME). - Abstract: A high-throughput platform for performing parallel solvent extractions in sealed HPLC/GC vials inside a microwave reactor is described. The system consist of a strongly microwave-absorbing silicon carbide plate with 20 cylindrical wells of appropriate dimensions to be fitted with standard HPLC/GC autosampler vials serving as extraction vessels. Due to the possibility of heating up to four heating platforms simultaneously (80 vials), efficient parallel analytical-scale solvent extractions can be performed using volumes of 0.5-1.5 mL at a maximum temperature/pressure limit of 200 Degree-Sign C/20 bar. Since the extraction and subsequent analysis by either gas chromatography or liquid chromatography coupled with mass detection (GC-MS or LC-MS) is performed directly from the autosampler vial, errors caused by sample transfer can be minimized. The platform was evaluated for the extraction and quantification of caffeine from commercial coffee powders assessing different solvent types, extraction temperatures and times. For example, 141 {+-} 11 {mu}g caffeine (5 mg coffee powder) were extracted during a single extraction cycle using methanol as extraction solvent, whereas only 90 {+-} 11 were obtained performing the extraction in methylene chloride, applying the same reaction conditions (90 Degree-Sign C, 10 min). In multiple extraction experiments a total of {approx}150 {mu}g caffeine was extracted from 5 mg commercial coffee powder. In addition to the quantitative caffeine determination, a comparative qualitative analysis of the liquid phase coffee

  12. Finite volume schemes of very high order of accuracy for stiff hyperbolic balance laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbser, Michael; Enaux, Cedric; Toro, Eleuterio F.

    2008-04-01

    In this article, we propose a new class of finite volume schemes of arbitrary accuracy in space and time for systems of hyperbolic balance laws with stiff source terms. The new class of schemes is based on a three stage procedure. First a high-order WENO reconstruction procedure is applied to the cell averages at the current time level. Second, the temporal evolution of the reconstruction polynomials is computed locally inside each cell using the governing equations. In the original ENO scheme of Harten et al. and in the ADER schemes of Titarev and Toro, this time evolution is achieved via a Taylor series expansion where the time derivatives are computed by repeated differentiation of the governing PDE with respect to space and time, i.e. by applying the so-called Cauchy-Kovalewski procedure. However, this approach is not able to handle stiff source terms. Therefore, we present a new strategy that only replaces the Cauchy-Kovalewski procedure compared to the previously mentioned schemes. For the time-evolution part of the algorithm, we introduce a local space-time discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element scheme that is able to handle also stiff source terms. This step is the only part of the algorithm which is locally implicit. The third and last step of the proposed ADER finite volume schemes consists of the standard explicit space-time integration over each control volume, using the local space-time DG solutions at the Gaussian integration points for the intercell fluxes and for the space-time integral over the source term. We will show numerical convergence studies for nonlinear systems in one space dimension with both non-stiff and with very stiff source terms up to sixth order of accuracy in space and time. The application of the new method to a large set of different test cases is shown, in particular the stiff scalar model problem of LeVeque and Yee [R.J. LeVeque, H.C. Yee, A study of numerical methods for hyperbolic conservation laws with stiff source

  13. Diet Modification and Metformin Have a Beneficial Effect in a Fly Model of Obesity and Mucormycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuanqing; Albert, Nathaniel; Kim-Anh, Do; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2014-01-01

    In an experimental model of obesity and hyperglycemia in Drosophila melanogaster we studied the effect of diet modification and administration of metformin on systemic infection with Rhizopus, a common cause of mucormycosis in diabetic patients. Female Wt-type Drosophila flies were fed regular (RF) or high-fat diet (HFD; 30% coconut oil) food with or without metformin for 48 h and then injected with R. oryzae. Survival rates, glucose and triglyceride levels were compared between 1) normal-weight flies (RF), 2) obese flies (HFD), 3) obese flies fed with RF, 4) flies continuously on HFD + metformin, 5) flies fed on HFD + metformin, then transferred to RF, and 6) obese flies administered metformin after infection. Glucose levels were compared across groups of non-infected flies and across groups of infected flies. Survival was significantly decreased (P = 0.003) in obese flies, while post-infection glucose levels were significantly increased (P = 0.0001), compared to normal-weight flies. Diet and administration of metformin led to weight loss, normalized glucose levels during infection, and were associated with decreased mortality and tissue fungal burden. In conclusion, diet and metformin help control infection-associated hyperglycemia and improve survival in Drosophila flies with mucormycosis. Fly models of obesity bear intriguing similarities to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and diabetes in humans, and can provide new insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of infections in obese and diabetic patients. PMID:25268492

  14. Diet modification and metformin have a beneficial effect in a fly model of obesity and mucormycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal Shirazi

    Full Text Available In an experimental model of obesity and hyperglycemia in Drosophila melanogaster we studied the effect of diet modification and administration of metformin on systemic infection with Rhizopus, a common cause of mucormycosis in diabetic patients. Female Wt-type Drosophila flies were fed regular (RF or high-fat diet (HFD; 30% coconut oil food with or without metformin for 48 h and then injected with R. oryzae. Survival rates, glucose and triglyceride levels were compared between 1 normal-weight flies (RF, 2 obese flies (HFD, 3 obese flies fed with RF, 4 flies continuously fed on HFD + metformin, 5 flies fed on HFD + metformin, then transferred to RF, and 6 obese flies administered metformin after infection [corrected].Glucose levels were compared across groups of non-infected flies and across groups of infected flies. Survival was significantly decreased (P = 0.003 in obese flies, while post-infection glucose levels were significantly increased (P = 0.0001, compared to normal-weight flies. Diet and administration of metformin led to weight loss, normalized glucose levels during infection, and were associated with decreased mortality and tissue fungal burden. In conclusion, diet and metformin help control infection-associated hyperglycemia and improve survival in Drosophila flies with mucormycosis. Fly models of obesity bear intriguing similarities to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and diabetes in humans, and can provide new insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of infections in obese and diabetic patients.

  15. Intensive care units with low versus high volume of myocardial infarction: clinical outcomes, resource utilization, and quality metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolker, Joshua M; Badawi, Omar; Spertus, John A; Nasir, Ammar; Kennedy, Kevin F; Harris, Ilene H; Franey, Christine S; Hsu, Van Doren; Ripple, Gary R; Howell, Gregory H; Lem, Vincent M; Chan, Paul S

    2015-06-11

    The volume-outcome relationship associated with intensive care unit (ICU) experience with managing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains inadequately understood. Within a multicenter clinical ICU database, we identified patients with a primary ICU admission diagnosis of AMI between 2008 and 2010 to evaluate whether annual AMI volume of an individual ICU is associated with mortality, length-of-stay, or quality indicators. Patients were categorized into those treated in ICUs with low-annual-AMI volume (≤50th percentile, ICU. When compared with high-AMI-volume, patients admitted to low-AMI-volume ICUs had substantially more medical comorbidities, higher in-hospital mortality (11% versus 4%, PICU was no longer an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (relative risk 1.17 [0.87 to 1.56]) or hospital length-of-stay (relative risk 1.01 [0.94 to 1.08]). Similar findings were noted in secondary analyses of ICU mortality and ICU length-of-stay. Admission to an ICU with lower annual AMI volume is associated with higher in-hospital mortality, longer hospitalization, and lower use of evidence-based therapies for AMI. However, the relationship between low-AMI-volume and outcomes is no longer present after accounting for the higher-risk medical comorbidities and clinical characteristics of patients admitted to these ICUs. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. Chemosensory processing in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 30; Issue 5. Chemosensory processing in the fruit fly, ... B C Chandra1 Sandeep Singh2. Department of Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences, Roosevelt University, Chicago, IL 60605, USA; Department of Entomology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA ...

  17. Polarized training has greater impact on key endurance variables than threshold, high intensity, or high volume training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, Thomas; Sperlich, Billy

    2014-01-01

    Endurance athletes integrate four conditioning concepts in their training programs: high-volume training (HVT), “threshold-training” (THR), high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and a combination of these aforementioned concepts known as polarized training (POL). The purpose of this study was to explore which of these four training concepts provides the greatest response on key components of endurance performance in well-trained endurance athletes. Methods: Forty eight runners, cyclists, triathletes, and cross-country skiers (peak oxygen uptake: (VO2peak): 62.6 ± 7.1 mL·min−1·kg−1) were randomly assigned to one of four groups performing over 9 weeks. An incremental test, work economy and a VO2peak tests were performed. Training intensity was heart rate controlled. Results: POL demonstrated the greatest increase in VO2peak (+6.8 ml·min·kg−1 or 11.7%, P HIIT (+5.6%, P HIIT, with no changes in the other groups. With the exception of slight improvements in work economy in THR, both HVT and THR had no further effects on measured variables of endurance performance (P > 0.05). Conclusion: POL resulted in the greatest improvements in most key variables of endurance performance in well-trained endurance athletes. THR or HVT did not lead to further improvements in performance related variables. PMID:24550842

  18. Polarized training has greater impact on key endurance variables than threshold, high intensity or high volume training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eStöggl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Endurance athletes integrate four conditioning concepts in their training programs: high-volume training (HVT, ‘threshold-training’ (THR, high-intensity interval training (HIIT and a combination of these aforementioned concepts known as polarized training (POL. The purpose of this study was to explore which of these four training concepts provides the greatest response on key components of endurance performance in well-trained endurance athletes. Methods: Forty eight runners, cyclists, triathletes and cross-country skiers (peak oxygen uptake: (VO2peak: 62.6±7.1 mL∙min-1∙kg-1 were randomly assigned to one of four groups performing over nine weeks. An incremental test, work economy and a VO2peak tests were performed. Training intensity was heart rate controlled. Results: POL demonstrated the greatest increase in VO2peak (+6.8 ml∙min∙kg-1 or 11.7%, P0.05. Conclusion: POL resulted in the greatest improvements in most key variables of endurance performance in well-trained endurance athletes. THR or HVT did not lead to further improvements in performance related variables.

  19. Polarized training has greater impact on key endurance variables than threshold, high intensity, or high volume training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, Thomas; Sperlich, Billy

    2014-01-01

    ENDURANCE ATHLETES INTEGRATE FOUR CONDITIONING CONCEPTS IN THEIR TRAINING PROGRAMS: high-volume training (HVT), "threshold-training" (THR), high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and a combination of these aforementioned concepts known as polarized training (POL). The purpose of this study was to explore which of these four training concepts provides the greatest response on key components of endurance performance in well-trained endurance athletes. Forty eight runners, cyclists, triathletes, and cross-country skiers (peak oxygen uptake: (VO2peak): 62.6 ± 7.1 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) were randomly assigned to one of four groups performing over 9 weeks. An incremental test, work economy and a VO2peak tests were performed. Training intensity was heart rate controlled. POL demonstrated the greatest increase in VO2peak (+6.8 ml·min·kg(-1) or 11.7%, P 0.05). POL resulted in the greatest improvements in most key variables of endurance performance in well-trained endurance athletes. THR or HVT did not lead to further improvements in performance related variables.

  20. Trabecular bone volume and osteoprotegerin expression in uremic rats given high calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianthavorn, Pornpimol; Ettenger, Robert B; Salusky, Isidro B; Kuizon, Beatriz D

    2010-11-01

    Calcium (Ca)-containing phosphate binders have been recommended for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in children with chronic kidney disease. To study the effects of high Ca levels on trabecular bone volume (BV) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression in uremic young rats, a model of marked overcorrection of secondary hyperparathyroidism was created by providing a diet of high Ca to 5/6 nephrectomized young rats (Nx-Ca) for 4 weeks. The results of chondrocyte proliferation and apoptosis, osteoclastic activity, OPG expression and BV were compared among intact rats given the control diet, intact rats given a high Ca diet and 5/6 nephrectomized rats given the control diet (Nx-Control) and the high Ca diet (Nx-Ca). Ionized Ca levels were higher and parathyroid hormone levels were lower in Nx-Ca rats than in the other groups. Final weight, final length and final tibial length of Nx-Ca rats were significantly less than those of the other groups, although the length gain did not differ among the groups. The hypertrophic zone width was markedly enlarged in Nx-Ca rats. Chondrocyte proliferation rates did not differ among the groups, whereas osteoclastic activity was decreased in Nx-Ca rats compared with the Nx-Control animals. The OPG expression and BV were increased in Nx-Ca rats compared with the Nx-Control rats. Increased BV should improve bone strength, whereas disturbance of osteoclastogenesis interferes with bone remodeling. Bone quality has yet to be determined in high Ca-fed uremic young rats.

  1. Myocardial Extracellular Volume Is not Associated With Malignant Ventricular Arrhythmias in High-risk Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirelis, Jesús G; Sánchez-González, Javier; Zorio, Esther; Ripoll-Vera, Tomas; Salguero-Bodes, Rafael; Filgueiras-Rama, David; González-López, Esther; Gallego-Delgado, María; Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Soleto, María Jesús; Núñez, Juana; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Sanz, Javier; Fuster, Valentín; García-Pavía, Pablo; Ibáñez, Borja

    2017-03-21

    Myocardial interstitial fibrosis, a hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), has been proposed as an arrhythmic substrate. Fibrosis is associated with increased extracellular volume (ECV), which can be quantified by computed tomography (CT). We aimed to analyze the association between CT-determined ECV and malignant ventricular arrhythmias. A retrospective case-control observational study was conducted in HCM patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, undergoing a CT-protocol with continuous iodine contrast infusion to determine equilibrium ECV. Left ventricular septal and lateral CT-determined ECV was compared between prespecified cases (malignant arrhythmia any time before CT scan) and controls (no prior malignant arrhythmias) and among ECV tertiles. A total of 78 implantable cardioverter-defibrillator HCM patients were included; 24 were women, with a mean age of 52.1 ± 15.6 years. Mean ECV ± standard deviation in the septal left ventricular wall and was 29.8% ± 6.3% in cases (n = 24) vs 31.9% ± 8.5% in controls (n = 54); P = .282. Mean ECV in the lateral wall was 24.5% ± 6.8% in cases vs 28.2% ± 7.4% in controls; P = .043. On comparison of the entire population according to septal ECV tertiles, no significant differences were found in the number of patients receiving appropriate shocks. Conversely, we found a trend (P = .056) for a higher number of patients receiving appropriate shocks in the lateral ECV lowest tertile. Extracellular volume was not increased in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator HCM patients with malignant ventricular arrhythmias vs those without arrhythmias. Our findings do not support the use of ECV (a surrogate of diffuse fibrosis) as a predictor of arrhythmias in high-risk HCM patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrafast high-resolution in vivo volume-CTA of mice cerebral vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schambach, Sebastian J; Bag, Simona; Steil, Volker; Isaza, Cristina; Schilling, Lothar; Groden, Christoph; Brockmann, Marc A

    2009-04-01

    Animal models developed in rats and mice have become indispensable in preclinical cerebrovascular research. Points of interest include the investigation of the vascular bed and the morphology and function of the arterial, capillary, and venous vessels. Because of their extremely small caliber, in vivo examination of these vessels is extremely difficult. In the present study we have developed a method to provide fast 3D in vivo analysis of cerebral murine vessels using volume computed tomography-angiography (vCTA). Using an industrial X-ray inspection system equipped with a multifocus cone beam X-ray source and a 12-bit direct digital flatbed detector, high-speed vCTA (180 degrees rotation in 40 s. at 30 fps) was performed in anesthetized mice. During the scan an iodinated contrast agent was infused via a tail vein. Images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm. Image analysis was performed by maximum intensity projection (MIP) and 3D volume reconstruction. All mice tolerated i.v. injection of the iodinated contrast agent well. Smallest achievable voxel size of raw data while scanning the whole neurocranium was 16 mum. Anatomy of cerebral vessels was assessable in all animals, and anatomic differences between mouse strains could easily be detected. Mean vessel diameter was measured in C57BL/6 and BALBc mice. Changes of vessel caliber were assessable by repeated vCTA. Ultra fast in vivo vCTA of murine cerebral vasculature is feasible at resolutions down to 16 mum. The technique allows the assessment of vessel caliber changes in living mice, thus providing an interesting tool to monitor different features such as vasospasm or vessel patency.

  3. Low-volume, high-intensity interval training in patients with CAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Katharine D; Dubberley, Jonathan B; McKelvie, Robert S; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2013-08-01

    Isocaloric interval exercise training programs have been shown to elicit improvements in numerous physiological indices in patients with CAD. Low-volume high-intensity interval exercise training (HIT) is effective in healthy populations; however, its effectiveness in cardiac rehabilitation has not been established. This study compared the effects of 12-wk of HIT and higher-volume moderate-intensity endurance exercise (END) on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2 peak) in patients with CAD. Twenty-two patients with documented CAD were randomized into HIT (n = 11) or END (n = 11) based on pretraining FMD. Both groups attended two supervised sessions per week for 12 wk. END performed 30-50 min of continuous cycling at 58% peak power output (PPO), whereas HIT performed ten 1-min intervals at 89% PPO separated by 1-min intervals at 10% PPO per session. Relative FMD was increased posttraining (END, 4.4% ± 2.6% vs 5.9% ± 3.6%; HIT, 4.6% ± 3.6% vs 6.1% ± 3.4%, P ≤ 0.001 pre- vs posttraining) with no differences between groups. A training effect was also observed for relative VO2 peak (END, 18.7 ± 5.7 vs 22.3 ± 6.1 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1); HIT, 19.8 ± 3.7 vs 24.5 ± 4.5 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1), P cardiac rehabilitation. HIT elicited similar improvements in fitness and FMD as END, despite differences in exercise duration and intensity.

  4. Gas Transport and Optical Properties of High Free Volume Silicon-or Fluorine-containing Polymer Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 修一

    2012-01-01

    The high free volume polymer membrane has the potential to be an important membrane gas separation material due to the fact that it has the highest gas permeability among all polymeric membranes. Additionally, the optic device application has been expected because these polymers show high transparency.

  5. 77 FR 21065 - Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Test Rule and Significant New Use Rule; Fourth Group of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 721 and 799 RIN 2070-AJ66 Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Test Rule and..., 2012, to give the public an opportunity to comment on a proposed test rule for 23 high production... opportunity to present oral comment was offered in the proposed rule and, in response to that offer, a request...

  6. Pest Control on the "Fly"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    FlyCracker(R), a non-toxic and environmentally safe pesticide, can be used to treat and control fly problems in closed environments such as milking sheds, cattle barns and hutches, equine stables, swine pens, poultry plants, food-packing plants, and even restaurants, as well as in some outdoor animal husbandry environments. The product can be applied safely in the presence of animals and humans, and was recently permitted for use on organic farms as livestock production aids. FlyCracker's carbohydrate technology kills fly larvae within 24 hours. By killing larvae before they reach the adult stages, FlyCracker eradicates another potential breeding population. Because the process is physical-not chemical-flies and other insects never develop resistance to the treatment, giving way to unlimited use of product, while still keeping the same powerful effect.

  7. Low-volume high-intensity swim training is superior to high-volume low-intensity training in relation to insulin sensitivity and glucose control in inactive middle-aged women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Luke J; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Nyberg, Michael Permin

    2016-01-01

    adhesion molecule 1 had decreased (P intermittent swimming is an effective and time-efficient training strategy for improving insulin sensitivity, glucose control and biomarkers of vascular function...... to an inactive control (n = 20; CON), a high-intensity low-volume (n = 21; HIT) or a low-intensity high-volume (n = 21; LIT) training group. During the 15-week intervention period, HIT performed 3 weekly 6-10 × 30-s all-out swimming intervals (average heart rate (HR) = 86 ± 3 % HRmax) interspersed by 2-min...

  8. High intensity interval training vs. high-volume running training during pre-season conditioning in high-level youth football: a cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faude, Oliver; Schnittker, Reinhard; Schulte-Zurhausen, Roman; Müller, Florian; Meyer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    We aimed at comparing the endurance effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with high-volume running training (HVT) during pre-season conditioning in 20 high-level youth football players (15.9 (s 0.8) years). Players either conducted HVT or HIIT during the summer preparation period. During winter preparation they performed the other training programme. Before and after each training period several fitness tests were conducted: multi-stage running test (to assess the individual anaerobic threshold (IAT) and maximal running velocity (Vmax)), vertical jumping height, and straight sprinting. A significant increase from pre- to post-test was observed in IAT velocity (P training periods (P training programmes seem to be promising means to improve endurance capacity in high-level youth football players during pre-season conditioning.

  9. Surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Dharmalingam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fly ash, an inorganic alumino silicate has been used as filler in epoxy matrix, but it reduces the mechanical properties due to its poor dispersion and interfacial bonding with the epoxy matrix. To improve its interfacial bonding with epoxy matrix, surface treatment of fly ash was done using surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate and silane coupling agent glycidoxy propyl trimethoxy silane. An attempt is also made to reduce the particle size of fly ash using high pressure pulverizer. To improve fly ash dispersion in epoxy matrix, the epoxy was modified by mixing with amine containing liquid silicone rubber (ACS. The effect of surface treated fly ash with varying filler loadings from 10 to 40% weight on the mechanical, morphological and thermal properties of modified epoxy composites was investigated. The surface treated fly ash was characterized by particle size analyzer and FTIR spectra. Morphological studies of surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites indicate good dispersion of fillers in the modified epoxy matrix and improves its mechanical properties. Impact strength of the surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites show more improvement than unmodified composites.

  10. Image guided, adaptive, accelerated, high dose brachytherapy as model for advanced small volume radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haie-Meder, Christine; Siebert, Frank-André; Pötter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Brachytherapy has consistently provided a very conformal radiation therapy modality. Over the last two decades this has been associated with significant improvements in imaging for brachytherapy applications (prostate, gynecology), resulting in many positive advances in treatment planning, application techniques and clinical outcome. This is emphasized by the increased use of brachytherapy in Europe with gynecology as continuous basis and prostate and breast as more recently growing fields. Image guidance enables exact knowledge of the applicator together with improved visualization of tumor and target volumes as well as of organs at risk providing the basis for very individualized 3D and 4D treatment planning. In this commentary the most important recent developments in prostate, gynecological and breast brachytherapy are reviewed, with a focus on European recent and current research aiming at the definition of areas for important future research. Moreover the positive impact of GEC-ESTRO recommendations and the highlights of brachytherapy physics are discussed what altogether presents a full overview of modern image guided brachytherapy. An overview is finally provided on past and current international brachytherapy publications focusing on "Radiotherapy and Oncology". These data show tremendous increase in almost all research areas over the last three decades strongly influenced recently by translational research in regard to imaging and technology. In order to provide high level clinical evidence for future brachytherapy practice the strong need for comprehensive prospective clinical research addressing brachytherapy issues is high-lighted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Indications and Early Outcomes for Total Pancreatectomy at a High-Volume Pancreas Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, Monika S.; Belyaev, Orlin; Kersting, Sabine; Chromik, Ansgar M.; Seelig, Matthias H.; Sülberg, Dominique; Mittelkötter, Ulrich; Uhl, Waldemar H.

    2010-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to analyse the most common current indications for total pancreatectomy (TP) at a high-volume pancreas center. Method. Prospectively collected data on indications and short-term outcome of all TP's performed from January 2004 until June 2008 were analysed. Results. The total pancreatectomies (TP) were 63, i.e., 6.7% of all pancreatic procedures (n = 948). Indications for TP were classified into 4 groups: tumors of advanced stage, n = 23 (36.5%), technical problems due to soft pancreatic tissue, n = 18 (28.6%), troubles due to perioperative surgical complications, n = 15 (23.8%), and therapy-resistant pain due to chronic pancreatitis, n = 7 (11.1%). Surgical complications occurred in 23 patients (36.5%). The mortality in elective TP was 6.25%. Median postoperative stay was 21 days. Mortality, morbidity and the other perioperative parameters differed substantially according to the indication for pancreatectomy. Conclusion. Total pancreatectomy is definitely indicated for a limited range of elective and emergency situations. Indications can be: size or localisation of pancreatic tumor, trouble, technical diffuculties and therapy-refractory pain in chronic pancreatitis. A TP due to perioperative complications (troubles) after pancreatic resections is doomed by extremely high morbidity and mortality and should be avoided. PMID:20689708

  12. Indications and Early Outcomes for Total Pancreatectomy at a High-Volume Pancreas Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika S. Janot

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to analyse the most common current indications for total pancreatectomy (TP at a high-volume pancreas center. Method. Prospectively collected data on indications and short-term outcome of all TP's performed from January 2004 until June 2008 were analysed. Results. The total pancreatectomies (TP were 63, i.e., 6.7% of all pancreatic procedures (=948. Indications for TP were classified into 4 groups: tumors of advanced stage, =23 (36.5%, technical problems due to soft pancreatic tissue, =18 (28.6%, troubles due to perioperative surgical complications, =15 (23.8%, and therapy-resistant pain due to chronic pancreatitis, =7 (11.1%. Surgical complications occurred in 23 patients (36.5%. The mortality in elective TP was 6.25%. Median postoperative stay was 21 days. Mortality, morbidity and the other perioperative parameters differed substantially according to the indication for pancreatectomy. Conclusion. Total pancreatectomy is definitely indicated for a limited range of elective and emergency situations. Indications can be: size or localisation of pancreatic tumor, trouble, technical diffuculties and therapy-refractory pain in chronic pancreatitis. A TP due to perioperative complications (troubles after pancreatic resections is doomed by extremely high morbidity and mortality and should be avoided.

  13. High Order Finite Volume Nonlinear Schemes for the Boltzmann Transport Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bihari, B L; Brown, P N

    2005-03-29

    The authors apply the nonlinear WENO (Weighted Essentially Nonoscillatory) scheme to the spatial discretization of the Boltzmann Transport Equation modeling linear particle transport. The method is a finite volume scheme which ensures not only conservation, but also provides for a more natural handling of boundary conditions, material properties and source terms, as well as an easier parallel implementation and post processing. It is nonlinear in the sense that the stencil depends on the solution at each time step or iteration level. By biasing the gradient calculation towards the stencil with smaller derivatives, the scheme eliminates the Gibb's phenomenon with oscillations of size O(1) and reduces them to O(h{sup r}), where h is the mesh size and r is the order of accuracy. The current implementation is three-dimensional, generalized for unequally spaced meshes, fully parallelized, and up to fifth order accurate (WENO5) in space. For unsteady problems, the resulting nonlinear spatial discretization yields a set of ODE's in time, which in turn is solved via high order implicit time-stepping with error control. For the steady-state case, they need to solve the non-linear system, typically by Newton-Krylov iterations. There are several numerical examples presented to demonstrate the accuracy, non-oscillatory nature and efficiency of these high order methods, in comparison with other fixed-stencil schemes.

  14. Methodology of VFR night flying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubomír Stanko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Night is defined, for aviation purposes, as the period of darkness from the end of evening civil twilight to the beginning of morning civil twilight. Night flying is risky and more dangerous, comparing with flying during daylight, so it is essential to seek training with a flight instructor specifically for night flying. This article looks briefly at some underlying principles and practices, including: illusions, planning considerations, and handling emergencies.

  15. Tsunami wave propagation using a high-order well-balanced finite volume scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Cristóbal E.

    2010-05-01

    In this work we present a new numerical tool suitable for tsunami wave propagation simulations. We developed a finite volume high-order well-balanced numerical method on unstructured meshes based on the ADER-FV scheme [1]. We use the ADER-FV[2,3] scheme to solve with arbitrary accuracy in space and time the shallow water equation with non-constant bathymetry. In order to properly simulate a tsunami wave propagation we introduce the well-balanced or C-property[4] in the high-order numerical solution. In this presentation we address two important issues that appear when one tries to solve a tsunami propagation problem. First, when small gravity waves are propagated for hundred of wave-lengths, the accuracy in space and time of the numerical method is fundamental to preserve the amplitude. In this presentation we study the propagation of small perturbations over long distances, relating the order of accuracy, the mesh dimension and the wave amplitude. Second, as we deal with high-order schemes we can naturally use polynomial representation of the bathymetry. Here we try to understand the influence of the bathymetry representation in the final solution. [1] C. E. Castro et al. "ADER scheme on unstructured meshes for shallow water: simulation of tsunami waves", submitted [2] E. F. Toro et al. "Towards very high order godunov schemes". In E. F. Toro, editor, Godunov methods; Theory and applications, pages 907--940, Oxford, 2001. Kluwer Academic Plenum Publishers. [3] E. F. Toro and V. A. Titarev. "Solution of the generalized Riemann problem for advection-reaction equations". Proc. Roy. Soc. London, pages 271--281, 2002. [4] A. Bermúdez and M. E. Vázquez. "Upwind methods for hyperbolic conservation laws with source terms". Computer and Fluids, 23(8):1049--1071, 1994.

  16. High-volume resistance training reduces postprandial lipaemia in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Cleiton Silva; Teixeira, Bruno Costa; Cobos, Roberto Carlos Rebolledo; Macedo, Rodrigo Cauduro Oliveira; Kruger, Renata Lopes; Carteri, Randall Bruce Kreismann; Radaelli, Régis; Gross, Julia Silveira; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Reischak-Oliveira, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 11 weeks of low-volume resistance training (LVRT) and high-volume resistance training (HVRT) on muscle strength, muscle thickness (MT), and postprandial lipaemia (PPL) in postmenopausal women. Thirty-six healthy and untrained postmenopausal women (age, 58.9 ± 5.8 years; 68.6 ± 10.3 kg; and BMI, 26.9 ± 4.8 kg · m(-2)) participated in resistance training 3× per week for 11 weeks (HVRT = 12; LVRT = 13; and control group = 11). Biochemical variables, both pretraining and post-training, were evaluated 16 h after the administration of an oral fat tolerance test (OFTT) and metabolic variable during [energy expenditure (EE)] and after training session [excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC)]. Muscle strength (1 RM) and MT were also calculated, and no significant differences were observed between the groups for PPL (mmol · L(-1) per 5 h) as measured by glucose, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol. EE total (EE + EPOC; 6.12 ± 1.21 MJ vs. 2.26 ± 0.85 MJ), resting fat oxidation (5.52 ± 1.69 g · h(-1) vs. 4.11 ± 1.12 g · h(-1)); MT (vastus medialis, 21.4 ± 1.8 mm vs. 18.4 ± 1.2 mm and vastus lateralis 22.3 ± 1.2 mm vs. 20.8 ± 1.3 mm); triacylglycerol (TAG) 0, 1, 2, 4; and 5 h after OFTT, TAG area under the curve (AUC) (5.79 ± 0.42 vs. 7.78 ± 0.68), and incremental AUC (-46.21 ± 14.42% vs. 7.78 ± 4.68%) were all significantly different post-training for HVRT versus LVRT, respectively (P < 0.05). The results of this investigation suggest that HVRT reduces PPL in postmenopausal women.

  17. Potential use of fly ash to soil treatment in the Morava region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulíková, Lucia; Kresta, František; Rochovanský, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Soil treatment by binders is a standard technology and leads to optimal utilization of excavated soils in road constructions. Soil treatment is controlled in the Czech Republic by EN 14227-15 and Technical Requirement TP 94. Soil treatment using fly ash has not been performed in the Czech Republic, although there is a sufficient normative base. Fly ash produced by burning of hard coal in the Moravian region was tested as a potential binder. Fly ash samples were mixed with loess loams (CI). Tested siliceous fly ash of class F (ASTM C618) did not showed hydraulic properties but it showed positive effect on reducing maximum dry density of mixtures, increasing the IBI value (Immediate bearing index) and decreasing tendency to volume changes when the amount of fly ash was increased. The results of laboratory tests demonstrate the possibility of using fly ashes as a binder for soil treatment.

  18. Waste Minimization Protocols for the Process of Synthesizing Zeolites from South African Coal Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie F. Petrik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Production of a high value zeolite from fly ash has been shown to be an avenue for the utilization of South African fly ash which presently constitutes a huge disposal problem. The synthesis of zeolites Na-P1 and analcime on a micro-scale has been successful and preliminary investigation shows that scale-up synthesis is promising. However, the post-synthesis supernatant waste generated contains high levels of NaOH that may constitute a secondary disposal problem. A waste minimization protocol was developed to reduce the volume of waste generated with a view to enhancing the feasibility of the scale synthesis. Series of experiments were conducted in 100 mL jacketed batch reactors. Fly ash was reacted with 5 Mol NaOH on a 1:1 mass basis during the aging step, followed by hydrothermal treatment in which ultrapure water was added to the slurry. This study shows that by re-introducing the supernatant waste into the experiments in such a way that it supplies the required reagent (NaOH for the zeolite synthesis, zeolite Na-P1 and analcime can be synthesized. It also shows that the synthesis process can be altered to allow up to 100% re-use of the supernatant waste to yield high value zeolitic products. This study effectively constructed two protocols for the minimization of waste generated during the synthesis of zeolites from South African coal fly ash. This result could be used to establish a basis for legal and environmental aspects involved in the commission of a full-scale plant synthesizing zeolites NaP1 and analcime.

  19. Waste Minimization Protocols for the Process of Synthesizing Zeolites from South African Coal Fly Ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessis, Pieter W Du; Ojumu, Tunde V; Petrik, Leslie F

    2013-04-29

    Production of a high value zeolite from fly ash has been shown to be an avenue for the utilization of South African fly ash which presently constitutes a huge disposal problem. The synthesis of zeolites Na-P1 and analcime on a micro-scale has been successful and preliminary investigation shows that scale-up synthesis is promising. However, the post-synthesis supernatant waste generated contains high levels of NaOH that may constitute a secondary disposal problem. A waste minimization protocol was developed to reduce the volume of waste generated with a view to enhancing the feasibility of the scale synthesis. Series of experiments were conducted in 100 mL jacketed batch reactors. Fly ash was reacted with 5 Mol NaOH on a 1:1 mass basis during the aging step, followed by hydrothermal treatment in which ultrapure water was added to the slurry. This study shows that by re-introducing the supernatant waste into the experiments in such a way that it supplies the required reagent (NaOH) for the zeolite synthesis, zeolite Na-P1 and analcime can be synthesized. It also shows that the synthesis process can be altered to allow up to 100% re-use of the supernatant waste to yield high value zeolitic products. This study effectively constructed two protocols for the minimization of waste generated during the synthesis of zeolites from South African coal fly ash. This result could be used to establish a basis for legal and environmental aspects involved in the commission of a full-scale plant synthesizing zeolites NaP1 and analcime.

  20. Reduced Volume of the Arcuate Fasciculus in Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Rachel L.; Correia, Marta M.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Shtyrov, Yury; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Mohr, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Atypical language is a fundamental feature of autism spectrum conditions (ASC), but few studies have examined the structural integrity of the arcuate fasciculus, the major white matter tract connecting frontal and temporal language regions, which is usually implicated as the main transfer route used in processing linguistic information by the brain. Abnormalities in the arcuate have been reported in young children with ASC, mostly in low-functioning or non-verbal individuals, but little is known regarding the structural properties of the arcuate in adults with ASC or, in particular, in individuals with ASC who have intact language, such as those with high-functioning autism or Asperger syndrome. We used probabilistic tractography of diffusion-weighted imaging to isolate and scrutinize the arcuate in a mixed-gender sample of 18 high-functioning adults with ASC (17 Asperger syndrome) and 14 age- and IQ-matched typically developing controls. Arcuate volume was significantly reduced bilaterally with clearest differences in the right hemisphere. This finding remained significant in an analysis of all male participants alone. Volumetric reduction in the arcuate was significantly correlated with the severity of autistic symptoms as measured by the Autism-Spectrum Quotient. These data reveal that structural differences are present even in high-functioning adults with ASC, who presented with no clinically manifest language deficits and had no reported developmental language delay. Arcuate structural integrity may be useful as an index of ASC severity and thus as a predictor and biomarker for ASC. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:27242478

  1. Self-heating probe instrument and method for measuring high temperature melting volume change rate of material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junwei; Wang, Zhiping; Lu, Yang; Cheng, Bo

    2013-03-01

    The castings defects are affected by the melting volume change rate of material. The change rate has an important effect on running safety of the high temperature thermal storage chamber, too. But the characteristics of existing measuring installations are complex structure, troublesome operation and low precision. In order to measure the melting volume change rate of material accurately and conveniently, a self-designed measuring instrument, self-heating probe instrument, and measuring method are described. Temperature in heating cavity is controlled by PID temperature controller; melting volume change rate υ and molten density are calculated based on the melt volume which is measured by the instrument. Positive and negative υ represent expansion and shrinkage of the sample volume after melting, respectively. Taking eutectic LiF+CaF2 for example, its melting volume change rate and melting density at 1 123 K are -20.6% and 2 651 kg·m-3 measured by this instrument, which is only 0.71% smaller than literature value. Density and melting volume change rate of industry pure aluminum at 973 K and analysis pure NaCl at 1 123 K are detected by the instrument too. The measure results are agreed with report values. Measuring error sources are analyzed and several improving measures are proposed. In theory, the measuring errors of the change rate and molten density which are measured by the self-designed instrument is nearly 1/20-1/50 of that measured by the refitted mandril thermal expansion instrument. The self-designed instrument and method have the advantages of simple structure, being easy to operate, extensive applicability for material, relatively high accuracy, and most importantly, temperature and sample vapor pressure have little effect on the measurement accuracy. The presented instrument and method solve the problems of complicated structure and procedures, and large measuring errors for the samples with high vapor pressure by existing installations.

  2. Time flies when we read taboo words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipples, Jason

    2010-08-01

    Does time fly or stand still when one is reading highly arousing words? A temporal bisection task was used to test the effects of sexual taboo words on time perception. Forty participants judged the duration of sexual taboo, high-arousal negative, high-arousal positive, low-arousal negative, low-arousal positive, and category-related neutral words. The results support the hypothesis that sexual taboo stimuli receive more attention and reduce the perceived time that has passed ("time flies")-the duration of high sexual taboo words was underestimated for taboo-word stimuli relative to all other word types. The findings are discussed in the context of internal clock theories of time perception.

  3. High-intensity high-volume swimming induces more robust signaling through PGC-1α and AMPK activation than sprint interval swimming in m. triceps brachii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casuso, Rafael A; Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to test whether high-intensity high-volume training (HIHVT) swimming would induce more robust signaling than sprint interval training (SIT) swimming within the m. triceps brachii due to lower metabolic and oxidation. Nine well-trained swimmers performed the two training procedures...

  4. Fly ash quality and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B. [Inst. for Energy, Budapest (Hungary); Beer, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  5. Physics of flying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrone, Jim

    2015-05-01

    Column editor's note: As the school year comes to a close, it is important to start thinking about next year. One area that you want to consider is field trips. Many institutions require that teachers plan for a field trip well in advance. Keeping that in mind, I asked Jim Vetrone to write an article about the fantastic field trip he takes his AP Physics students on. I had the awesome opportunity to attend a professional development day that Jim arranged at iFLY in the Chicago suburbs. The experience of "flying" in a wind tunnel was fabulous. Equally fun was watching the other physics teachers come up with experiments to have the professional "flyers" perform in the tube. I could envision my students being similarly excited about the experience and about the development of their own experiments. After I returned to school, I immediately began the process of trying to get this field trip approved for the 2015-16 school year. I suggest that you start your process as well if you hope to try a new field trip next year. The key to getting the approval, in my experience, is submitting a proposal early that includes supporting documentation from sources. Often I use NGSS or state standards as justifications for my field trips. I have also quoted College Board expectations for AP Physics 1 and 2 in my documents when requesting an unusual field trip.

  6. The Flying University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Catherine

    The Flying University is solo theater performance framed as an academic lecture about Marie Curie and her discovery of radium, delivered to a group of women who have gathered in secret to further their education. As the lecture proceeds, the professor brings in her own research based on a study of Esther Horsch (1905-1991) who lived on a farm in central Illinois. She introduces data from Esther's journals, personal memories, and dreams about Esther's life. The professor's investigation of radium plays at the intersections of magical and mundane, decay and the transformation of life, and the place of ambition in these two women's lives. The intention of this piece is to explore these themes, which are full of mystery, through the traces of the daily lives of Mme. Curie and Esther. Their words and photos are used as roots from which to imagine the things that echo beyond their familiar work; elemental and also fantastically radiant. The Flying University was written and performed by Catherine Friesen April 27-29, 2012 in the Center for Performance Experiment at Hamilton College as part of the University of South Carolina MFA Acting Class of 2013 showcase, Pieces of Eight.

  7. High volume image guided injections and structured rehabilitation in shoulder impingement syndrome: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Sarah; Chan, Otto; Ghozlan, Asser; Price, Jessica; Perry, John; Morrissey, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background the aim was to establish the effect of a high volume-image guided injection and structured rehabilitation (HVIGI&SR) on both pain and function in shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Methods 44 participants treated between January 2008 and January 2012 with a >3 month history of recalcitrant ultrasound-confirmed SIS were sent a retrospective questionnaire. All participants had received a HVIGI under ultrasound-guidance consisting of 20 mls of Marcaine with 50 mg of hydrocortisone, followed by a period of physiotherapist-led rehabilitation. The validated Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) score was used to establish the change in the score between 1 week pre-injection and 3 weeks post-injection, along with an 11-point pain scale. Results 59% of participants responded. There was a clinically and statistically significant decrease in the SPADI score of 58.7 ± 29.9 (p<0.01). 76% of participants had an improvement in their score of over 50% from their initial score. There was a clinically and statistically significant improvement in pain of 5.19 ± 2.62 (p<0.01) on the numerical rating scale of pain. Conclusion HVIGI&SR should be considered for short-term treatment of SIS as it showed a significant improvement in both pain and function. A prolonged period of physiotherapist-led rehabilitation can then be undertaken for long term benefits. PMID:26605194

  8. Sublingual microcirculatory changes during high-volume hemofiltration in hyperdynamic septic shock patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Carolina; Hernandez, Glenn; Godoy, Cristian; Downey, Patricio; Andresen, Max; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) may contribute to revert hypotension in severe hyperdynamic septic shock patients. However, arterial pressure stabilization occurs due to an increase in systemic vascular resistance, which could eventually compromise microcirculatory blood flow and perfusion. The goal of this study was to determine if HVHF deteriorates sublingual microcirculation in severe hyperdynamic septic shock patients. This was a prospective, non-randomized study at a 16-bed, medical-surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital. We included 12 severe hyperdynamic septic shock patients (norepinephrine requirements > 0.3 μg/kg/min and cardiac index > 3.0 L/min/m2) who underwent a 12-hour HVHF as a rescue therapy according to a predefined algorithm. Sublingual microcirculation (Microscan for NTSC, Microvision Medical), systemic hemodynamics and perfusion parameters were assessed at baseline, at 12 hours of HVHF, and 6 hours after stopping HVHF. Microcirculatory flow index increased after 12 hours of HVHF and this increase persisted 6 hours after stopping HVHF. A similar trend was observed for the proportion of perfused microvessels. The increase in microcirculatory blood flow was inversely correlated with baseline levels. There was no significant change in microvascular density or heterogeneity during or after HVHF. Mean arterial pressure and systemic vascular resistance increased while lactate levels decreased after the 12-hour HVHF. The use of HVHF as a rescue therapy in patients with severe hyperdynamic septic shock does not deteriorate sublingual microcirculatory blood flow despite the increase in systemic vascular resistance.

  9. Effects of Low-Volume, High-Intensity Whole-Body Calisthenics on Army ROTC Cadets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gist, Nicholas H; Freese, Eric C; Ryan, Terence E; Cureton, Kirk J

    2015-05-01

    Our objective was to determine the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIT) on fitness in Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps cadets. Twenty-six college-aged (20.5 ± 1.7 years) participants completed 4 weeks of exercise training 3 days · wk(-1) consisting of either approximately 60 minutes of typical physical training or HIT whole-body calisthenics involving 4 to 7 sets of 30-second "all out" burpees separated by 4 minutes of active recovery. Several pre- and postintervention fitness variables were compared. We observed no changes across time or differences between groups in aerobic capacity, anaerobic capacity, or Army Physical Fitness Test performance (p > 0.05). However, there was a significant Group × Time interaction (p = 0.015) for skeletal muscle mitochondrial function (Tc: time constant of recovery). For the typical physical training group, we observed improved mitochondrial function (Tc decreased 2.4 ± 4.6 seconds; Cohen's d = -0.51); whereas, mitochondrial function decreased in HIT (Tc increased 2.4 ± 4.6 seconds; d = 0.50). HIT sustained fitness despite the short duration and reduced volume of activity. A program that includes HIT as part of a larger program may be well suited for maintaining fitness in moderately trained armed forces personnel without access to equipment. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  10. Plasma volume reduction and hematological fluctuations in high-level athletes after an increased training load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejder, J; Andersen, A B; Goetze, J P; Aachmann-Andersen, N J; Nordsborg, N B

    2017-12-01

    The time course of plasma volume (PV) reduction following an increased training load period is unknown and was investigated. The accompanying fluctuations in [Hb] and OFF-hr score were analyzed in the Athlete Biological Passport. Further, whether fluctuations in plasma albumin, soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR), and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (proANP) concentrations correlate with PV fluctuations was investigated. Eleven high-level competitive cyclists were investigated for 3 weeks. After initial measurements in week 1, training load was increased ~250% in week 2 followed by a reversion to baseline training load in week 3. PV and hematological variables were determined frequently during all weeks. The higher training load in week 2 increased (Ptraining load period were reverted within 2 and 4 days after returning to baseline training load, respectively, while OFF-hr remained altered for 6 days. Furthermore, some atypical blood profiles were induced during and subsequent to the increased training load, demonstrating the importance of knowledge on naturally occurring hematological fluctuations. Finally, concentrations of albumin, sTfR, and proANP could not explain PV fluctuations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Finite volume simulation of 2-D steady square lid driven cavity flow at high reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yapici

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, computer simulation results of steady incompressible flow in a 2-D square lid-driven cavity up to Reynolds number (Re 65000 are presented and compared with those of earlier studies. The governing flow equations are solved by using the finite volume approach. Quadratic upstream interpolation for convective kinematics (QUICK is used for the approximation of the convective terms in the flow equations. In the implementation of QUICK, the deferred correction technique is adopted. A non-uniform staggered grid arrangement of 768x768 is employed to discretize the flow geometry. Algebraic forms of the coupled flow equations are then solved through the iterative SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equation algorithm. The outlined computational methodology allows one to meet the main objective of this work, which is to address the computational convergence and wiggled flow problems encountered at high Reynolds and Peclet (Pe numbers. Furthermore, after Re > 25000 additional vortexes appear at the bottom left and right corners that have not been observed in earlier studies.

  12. Replicable Interprofessional Competency Outcomes from High-Volume, Inter-Institutional, Interprofessional Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Bambini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There are significant limitations among the few prior studies that have examined the development and implementation of interprofessional education (IPE experiences to accommodate a high volume of students from several disciplines and from different institutions. The present study addressed these gaps by seeking to determine the extent to which a single, large, inter-institutional, and IPE simulation event improves student perceptions of the importance and relevance of IPE and simulation as a learning modality, whether there is a difference in students’ perceptions among disciplines, and whether the results are reproducible. A total of 290 medical, nursing, pharmacy, and physical therapy students participated in one of two large, inter-institutional, IPE simulation events. Measurements included student perceptions about their simulation experience using the Attitude Towards Teamwork in Training Undergoing Designed Educational Simulation (ATTITUDES Questionnaire and open-ended questions related to teamwork and communication. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement across all ATTITUDES subscales, while time management, role confusion, collaboration, and mutual support emerged as significant themes. Results of the present study indicate that a single IPE simulation event can reproducibly result in significant and educationally meaningful improvements in student perceptions towards teamwork, IPE, and simulation as a learning modality.

  13. Volume Attenuation and High Frequency Loss as Auditory Depth Cues in Stereoscopic 3D Cinema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolas, Christos; Pauletto, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Assisted by the technological advances of the past decades, stereoscopic 3D (S3D) cinema is currently in the process of being established as a mainstream form of entertainment. The main focus of this collaborative effort is placed on the creation of immersive S3D visuals. However, with few exceptions, little attention has been given so far to the potential effect of the soundtrack on such environments. The potential of sound both as a means to enhance the impact of the S3D visual information and to expand the S3D cinematic world beyond the boundaries of the visuals is large. This article reports on our research into the possibilities of using auditory depth cues within the soundtrack as a means of affecting the perception of depth within cinematic S3D scenes. We study two main distance-related auditory cues: high-end frequency loss and overall volume attenuation. A series of experiments explored the effectiveness of these auditory cues. Results, although not conclusive, indicate that the studied auditory cues can influence the audience judgement of depth in cinematic 3D scenes, sometimes in unexpected ways. We conclude that 3D filmmaking can benefit from further studies on the effectiveness of specific sound design techniques to enhance S3D cinema.

  14. Plasma metabolites, volume and electrolytes following 30-s high-intensity exercise in boys and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebestreit, H; Meyer, F; Htay-Htay; Heigenhauser, G J; Bar-Or, O

    1996-01-01

    It has been shown that boys recover faster than men following brief, high-intensity exercise. Better to understand this difference, plasma metabolite concentration, volume, electrolyte concentration [electrolyte], and hydrogen ion concentration [H+] changes were compared in five prepubescent boys [mean age 9.6 (SD 0.9) years] and 5 men [mean age 24.9 (SD 4.3) years] following 30-s, all-out cycling. Blood was collected prior to, at the end, and at the 1st, 3rd and 10th min following exercise. At the 10th min of recovery, the men's lactate concentration was 14.2 (SD 1.8) mmol.l-1 and [H+] was 66.1 (SD 5.9) nmol.l-1, compared with 5.7 (SD 0.7) mmol.l-1 and 47.5 (SD 1.2) nmol.l-1 respectively, in the boys (P electrolyte] increased after exercise, tending to be higher in the men. Recovery of plasma [electrolyte] and PV started earlier in the boys (1st min) than in the men (3rd min). These findings would support the notion of a lesser reliance on glycolytic energy pathways in children and may explain the faster recovery of muscle power in boys compared to men.

  15. High Volume Pulsed EPC for T/R Modules in Satellite Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarianni, Michael; Maynadier, Paul; Marin, Marc

    2014-08-01

    In the frame of Iridium Next business, a mobile satellite service, Thales Alenia Space (TAS) has to produce more than 2400 x 65W and 162 x 250W pulsed Electronic Power Conditioners (EPC) to supply the RF transmit/receive modules that compose the active antenna of the satellites.The company has to deal with mass production constraints where cost, volume and performances are crucial factors. Compared to previous constellations realized by TAS, the overall challenge is to make further improvements in a short time:- Predictable electrical models- Deeper design-to-cost approach- Streamlining improvements and test coverageAs the active antenna drives the consumption of the payload, accurate performances have been evaluated early owing to the use of simulation (based on average model) and breadboard tests at the same time.The necessary cost reduction has been done owing to large use of COTS (Components Off The Shelf). In order to secure cost and schedule, each manufacturing step has been optimized to maximize test coverage in order to guarantee high reliability.At this time, more than 200 flight models have already been manufactured, validating this approach.This paper is focused on the 65W EPC but the same activities have been led on the 250W EPC.

  16. Pediatric thyroidectomy in a high volume thyroid surgery center: Risk factors for postoperative hypocalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yufei; Masiakos, Peter T; Gaz, Randall D; Hodin, Richard A; Parangi, Sareh; Randolph, Gregory W; Sadow, Peter M; Stephen, Antonia E

    2015-08-01

    Hypocalcemia is a common complication following thyroid surgery. We seek to report on our experience in pediatric thyroidectomy in a high volume thyroid surgery center and accurately assess the incidence of postoperative hypocalcemia. A retrospective review of patients aged 18 and younger who underwent thyroid surgery between 1992 and 2013. The primary endpoints were the occurrence of postoperative hypocalcemia as by defined as a nadir calcium oral calcium supplementation, need for intravenous calcium and the occurrence of permanent hypoparathyroidism. 171 patients who underwent 186 thyroid operations were analyzed. The average age was 15.4years with 82.3% female. The most common indications for surgery were nodular disease (74.7%) and hyperthyroidism (12.4%). 24 patients (12.9%) experienced postoperative hypocalcemia with 13 (7.0%) requiring intravenous calcium infusion. One patient (0.9%) experienced permanent hypoparathyroidism. Risk factors for postoperative hypocalcemia included total thyroidectomy (OR 7.39, prisk of developing this postoperative hypocalcemia. These patients may benefit from more vigilant preoperative preparation and postoperative calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. HIGH-RESOLUTION DEBRIS FLOW VOLUME MAPPING WITH UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS (UAS AND PHOTOGRAMMETRIC TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Adams

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Debris flows cause an average € 30 million damages and 1-2 fatalities every year in Austria. Detailed documentation of their extent and magnitude is essential for understanding, preventing and mitigating these natural hazard events. The recent development of unmanned aerial systems (UAS has provided a new possibility for on-demand high-resolution monitoring and mapping. Here, we present a study, where the spatial extent and volume of a large debris flow event were mapped with different UAS, fitted with commercial off-the-shelf sensors. Orthophotos and digital terrain models (DTM were calculated using structure-from-motion photogrammetry software. Terrain height differences caused by the debris flow in the catchment and valley floor were derived by subtracting the pre-event airborne laser scanning (ALS DTM from a post-event UAS-DTM. The analysis of the volumetric sediment budget showed, that approximately 265,000 m³ material was mobilised in the catchment, of which 45,000 m³ settled there; of the material, which reached the valley floor, 120,000 m³ was deposited, while another 10,000 m³ was eroded from there. The UAS-results were validated against ALS data and imagery from a traditional manned-aircraft photogrammetry campaign. In conclusion, the UAS-data can reach an accuracy and precision comparable to manned aircraft data, but with the added benefits of higher flexibility, easier repeatability, less operational constraints and higher spatial resolution.

  18. Animal use and lessons learned in the U.S. High Production Volume Chemicals Challenge Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Patricia L; Manuppello, Joseph R; Willett, Catherine E; Sandler, Jessica T

    2012-12-01

    Launched by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1998, the High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program was developed to address the perceived gap in basic hazard information for the 2,800 chemicals produced or imported into the United States in quantities of ≥ 1 million pounds per year. Health and environmental effects data obtained from either existing information or through new vertebrate animal testing were voluntarily submitted by chemical companies (sponsors) to the U.S. EPA. Despite the potential for extensive animal testing, animal welfare guidelines were not provided until after the start of the program. We evaluated compliance with the animal welfare principles that arose from an agreement reached between the U.S. EPA and animal protection organizations and tracked the HPV program's use of animals for testing. Under a worst-case scenario, the HPV program had the potential to consume 3.5 million animals in new testing. After application of animal-saving measures, approximately 127,000 were actually used. Categorization of chemicals based on similar structure-activity and application of read-across, along with use of existing test data, were the most effective means of reducing animal testing. However, animal-saving measures were inconsistently used by both sponsors and the U.S. EPA. Lessons learned from the HPV program can be applied to future programs to minimize animal testing and promote more human-relevant chemical risk assessment.

  19. Impact of fly ash composition upon shaker baghouse efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, R.; Miller, S.J.

    1984-03-01

    Many parameters can have major effects on fabric filter performance. The most extensively published research in fabric filtration has concentrated on baghouse related parameters such as fabric type, cleaning mode, cleaning cycle, and air-to-cloth ratio. To a lesser extent studies have considered ash characteristics such as particle size distribution and specific filter resistance coefficient, K/sub 2/. Little research has been reported relating coal or ash properties to fabric filter performance. This paper deals with penetration from a shaker chamber with one specific fabric. The independent variable is major element concentration in fly ash. Air-to-cloth ratios varied only because combustion conditions control flue gas volumes. Results indicate that first, fabric filter performance is indeed coal specific with large differences in removal efficiency with different ashes. Second, the results reveal a definite inverse correlation between penetration and sodium concentration in the fly ash for the fabric and cleaning configuration considered. For the ashes that demonstrate poor performance in tests, careful selection of the correct fabric together with a conservative air-to-cloth ratio and the optimum cleaning cycle may all be necessary in order to maintain an adequate residual dust cake and bring the efficiency up to an acceptable level. Heavy dust cake formation may be necessary to achieve high efficiencies with these coals. Residual dust cake for the coals that showed high efficiencies in these tests may not be important, since North Dakota lignites give excellent efficiencies immediately after starting with new bags. Apparently the latter ashes build up on the woven fabric layer in such a way that openings in the weave and pinholes are immediately bridged over. These coals may then be candidates for high ratio filtration with conventional, economical woven fabric. 28 references, 10 figures, 4 tables.

  20. High-order accurate finite-volume formulations for the pressure gradient force in layered ocean models

    CERN Document Server

    Engwirda, Darren; Marshall, John

    2016-01-01

    The development of a set of high-order accurate finite-volume formulations for evaluation of the pressure gradient force in layered ocean models is described. A pair of new schemes are presented, both based on an integration of the contact pressure force about the perimeter of an associated momentum control-volume. The two proposed methods differ in their choice of control-volume geometries. High-order accurate numerical integration techniques are employed in both schemes to account for non-linearities in the underlying equation-of-state definitions and thermodynamic profiles, and details of an associated vertical interpolation and quadrature scheme are discussed in detail. Numerical experiments are used to confirm the consistency of the two formulations, and it is demonstrated that the new methods maintain hydrostatic and thermobaric equilibrium in the presence of strongly-sloping layer-wise geometry, non-linear equation-of-state definitions and non-uniform vertical stratification profiles. Additionally, one...

  1. Rectal dose-volume constraints in high-dose radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Cozzarini, Cesare; Fellin, Gianni; Foppiano, Franca; Menegotti, Loris; Piazzolla, Anna; Vavassori, Vittorio; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2003-11-15

    To investigate the relationship between rectal bleeding and dosimetric-clinical parameters in patients receiving three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for localized prostate cancer. In a retrospective national study (AIROPROS01-01, AIRO: Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica), planning/clinical data for 245 consecutive patients with stage T1-4N0-x prostate carcinoma who underwent 3D-CRT to 70-78 Gy (ICRU point) were pooled from four Italian institutions. The correlation between late rectal bleeding and rectal dose-volume data (the percentage of rectum receiving more than 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, and 75 Gy [V(50-70)]) and other dosimetric and clinical parameters were investigated in univariate (log-rank) and multivariate (Cox regression model) analyses. Median follow-up was 2 years. Twenty-three patients were scored as late bleeders according to a modified RTOG definition (Grade 2: 16; Grade 3: 7); the actuarial 2-year rate was 9.2%. Excepting V75, all median and third quartile V(50-70) values were found to be significantly correlated with late bleeding at univariate analysis. The smallest p value was seen for V(50) below/above the third quartile value (66%). The V70 (cut-off value: 30%) was found to be also predictive for late bleeding. In the high-dose subgroup (74-78 Gy), Grade 3 bleeding was highly correlated with this constraint. The predictive value of both V(50) and V(70) was confirmed by multivariate analyses. The present article provides evidence for correlation between rectal DVH parameters and late rectal bleeding in patients treated with curative intent with 3D-CRT. To keep the rate of moderate/severe rectal bleeding below 5-10%, it seems advisable to limit V(50) to 60-65%, V(60) to 45-50%, and V70 to 25-30%.

  2. Dielectric properties of fly ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. This paper reports the dielectric properties of fly ash. The dielectric measurements were performed as a function of frequency and temperature. The sample of fly ash shows almost similar behaviour in the frequency and temperature range studied. The large value of dielectric constant in the typical frequency range.

  3. Learning from the Fruit Fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierema, Andrea; Schwartz, Renee

    2016-01-01

    The fruit fly ("Drosophila melanogaster") is an ideal subject for studying inheritance patterns, Mendel's laws, meiosis, Punnett squares, and other aspects of genetics. Much of what we know about genetics dates to evolutionary biologist Thomas Hunt Morgan's work with mutated fruit flies in the early 1900s. Many genetic laboratories…

  4. Evolution, Fruit Flies and Gerontology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Evolution, Fruit Flies and Gerontology. Evolutionary Biology Helps Unravel the Mysteries of Ageing. Amitabh Joshi. In the past decade or so, genetic theories of the evolution of ageing and studies on populations of fruit flies (Dro- sophila spp.) in the laboratory have provided a new per- spective on the phenomenon of ageing ...

  5. Refractive Index of Fly Rhabdomeres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.

    1974-01-01

    The refractive index reported previously for the rhabdomeres of flies (1.349) has been corrected for waveguide effects. The presented correction method has yielded n1 = 1.365 ± 0.006. It is argued that an acceptable estimate for the refractive index of the inhomogeneous surroundings of fly

  6. Survival rate in nasopharyngeal carcinoma improved by high caseload volume: a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou Pesus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Positive correlation between caseload and outcome has previously been validated for several procedures and cancer treatments. However, there is no information linking caseload and outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC treatment. We used nationwide population-based data to examine the association between physician case volume and survival rates of patients with NPC. Methods Between 1998 and 2000, a total of 1225 patients were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Survival analysis, the Cox proportional hazards model, and propensity score were used to assess the relationship between 10-year survival rates and physician caseloads. Results As the caseload of individual physicians increased, unadjusted 10-year survival rates increased (p p = 0.001 after adjusting for comorbidities, hospital, and treatment modality. When analyzed by propensity score, the adjusted 10-year survival rate differed significantly between patients treated by high-volume physicians and patients treated by low/medium-volume physicians (75% vs. 61%; p Conclusions Our data confirm a positive volume-outcome relationship for NPC. After adjusting for differences in the case mix, our analysis found treatment of NPC by high-volume physicians improved 10-year survival rate.

  7. Classical olfactory conditioning in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li Liu

    Full Text Available The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a serious pest of fruits and vegetables. Methyl eugenol (ME, a male attractant, is used to against this fly by mass trapping. Control effect may be influenced by learning, which could modify the olfactory response of the fly to this attractant. To collect the behavioral evidence, studies on the capability of this fly for olfactory learning are necessary. We investigated olfactory learning in male flies with a classical olfactory conditioning procedure using restrained individuals under laboratory conditions. The acquisition of the proboscis extension reflex was used as the criterion for conditioning. A high conditioned response level was found in oriental fruit flies when an odor was presented in paired association with a sucrose reward but not when the odor and sucrose were presented unpaired. We also found that the conditioning performance was influenced by the odor concentration, intertrial interval, and starvation time. A slight sensitization elicited by imbibing sucrose was observed. These results indicate that oriental fruit flies have a high capacity to form an olfactory memory as a result of classical conditioning.

  8. Low variation and high reproducibility in plaque volume with intravascular ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Thayssen, Per; Pedersen, Knud Erik

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) has several advantages compared to angiography when evaluating coronary atherosclerosis in the vessel wall. METHODS: The accuracy, reproducibility, and short-time spontaneous variation in volume of vessel, plaque and lumen were studied by electrocardiog...

  9. High Power Compact Single-Frequency Volume Bragg Er-Doped Fiber Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is based on successful results of Phase I project where it was shown that the use of volume Bragg gratings in PTR glass as selectors of transverse and...

  10. Investigation of Self Consolidating Concrete Containing High Volume of Supplementary Cementitious Materials and Recycled Asphalt Pavement Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patibandla, Varun chowdary

    The use of sustainable technologies such as supplementary cementitiuous materials (SCMs), and/or recycled materials is expected to positively affect the performance of concrete mixtures. However, it is important to study and qualify such mixtures and check if the required specifications of their intended application are met before they can be implemented in practice. This study presents the results of a laboratory investigation of Self Consolidating concrete (SCC) containing sustainable technologies. A total of twelve concrete mixtures were prepared with various combinations of fly ash, slag, and recycled asphalt pavement (RAP). The mixtures were divided into three groups with constant water to cementitiuous materials ratio of 0.37, and based on the RAP content; 0, 25, and 50% of coarse aggregate replaced by RAP. All mixtures were prepared to achieve a target slump flow equal to or higher than 500 mm (24in). A control mixture for each group was prepared with 100% Portland cement whereas all other mixtures were designed to have up to 70% of portland cement replaced by a combination of supplementary cementitiuous materials (SCMs) such as class C fly ash and granulated blast furnace slag. The properties of fresh concrete investigated in this study include flowability, deformability; filling capacity, and resistance to segregation. In addition, the compressive strength at 3, 14, and 28 days, the tensile strength, and the unrestrained shrinkage up to 80 days was also investigated. As expected the inclusion of the sustainable technologies affected both fresh and hardened concrete properties. Analysis of the experimental data indicated that inclusion of RAP not only reduces the ultimate strength, but it also affected the compressive strength development rate. Moreover, several mixes satisfied compressive strength requirements for pavements and bridges; those mixes included relatively high percentages of SCMs and RAP. Based on the results obtained in this study, it is not

  11. Forearm Muscle Volumes Can Be Accurately Quantified From High Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Eng, Carolyn M.; Abrams, Geoff D.; Smallwood, Laura R.; Lieber, Richard L.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2007-01-01

    Upper extremity musculoskeletal modeling is becoming increasingly sophisticated, creating a growing need for subject-specific muscle size parameters. One method for determining subject-specific muscle volume is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of MRI-derived muscle volumes in the human forearm across a variety of muscle sizes and shapes. Seventeen cadaveric forearms were scanned using a fast spoiled gradient echo pulse sequence with hig...

  12. High procedure volume is strongly associated with improved survival after lung cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Riaz, Sharma P; Coupland, Victoria H

    2013-01-01

    Studies have reported an association between hospital volume and survival for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We explored this association in England, accounting for case mix and propensity to resect.......Studies have reported an association between hospital volume and survival for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We explored this association in England, accounting for case mix and propensity to resect....

  13. Low volume highway-rail grade crossing treatments for the Oregon high speed rail corridor : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This study defines how to gather information and how to obtain the communication and response necessary for safety at highway-rail crossings. It examines technologies for low-cost, high-safety treatments for low volume (less than 200 ADT) highway cro...

  14. 3D highly heterogeneous thermal model of pineal gland in-vitro study for electromagnetic exposure using finite volume method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Wei; Hoppe, Ralph; Lu, Rongbo; Cai, Zhaoquan; Gu, Ning

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the relationship between electromagnetic power absorption and temperature distributions inside highly heterogeneous biological samples was accurately determinated using finite volume method. An in-vitro study on pineal gland that is responsible for physiological activities was for the first time simulated to illustrate effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. One-Lung Ventilation with Additional Ipsilateral Ventilation of Low Tidal Volume and High Frequency in Lung Lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yong; Wang, Jianyue; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Shiduan

    2016-05-11

    BACKGROUND To investigate the protective effects of additional ipsilateral ventilation of low tidal volume and high frequency on lung functions in the patients receiving lobectomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty patients receiving lung lobectomy were randomized into the conventional one-lung ventilation (CV) group (n=30) and the ipsilateral low tidal volume high frequency ventilation (LV) group (n=30). In the CV group, patients received only contralateral OLV. In the LV group, patients received contralateral ventilation and additional ipsilateral ventilation of low tidal volume of 1-2 ml/kg and high frequency of 40 times/min. Normal lung tissues were biopsied for the analysis of lung injury. Lung injury was scored by evaluating interstitial edema, alveolar edema, neutrophil infiltration, and alveolar congestion. RESULTS At 30 min and 60 min after the initiation of one-lung ventilation and after surgery, patients in the LV group showed significantly higher ratio of the partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen than those in the CV group (PLung injury was significantly less severe (2.7±0.7) in the LV group than in the CV group (3.1±0.7) (P=0.006). CONCLUSIONS Additional ipsilateral ventilation of low tidal volume and high frequency can decrease the risk of hypoxemia and alleviate lung injury in patients receiving lobectomy.

  16. Exploring the relation between process design and efficiency in high-volume cataract pathways from a lean thinking perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Ellen J.; Bredenhoff, E.; Bredenhoff, Eelco; Sermeus, Walter; Kop, Lucas M.; Sol, Johannes C.A.; van Harten, Willem H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare process designs of three high-volume cataract pathways in a lean thinking framework and to explore how efficiency in terms of lead times, hospital visits and costs is related to process design. Design: International retrospective comparative benchmark study with a mixed-method

  17. Water Stress from High-Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Potentially Threatens Aquatic Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Arkansas, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entrekin, Sally; Trainor, Anne; Saiers, James; Patterson, Lauren; Maloney, Kelly; Fargione, Joseph; Kiesecker, Joseph; Baruch-Mordo, Sharon; Konschnik, Katherine; Wiseman, Hannah; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Ryan, Joseph N

    2018-01-31

    Demand for high-volume, short duration water withdrawals could create water stress to aquatic organisms in Fayetteville Shale streams sourced for hydraulic fracturing fluids. We estimated potential water stress using permitted water withdrawal volumes and actual water withdrawals compared to monthly median, low, and high streamflows. Risk for biological stress was considered at 20% of long-term median and 10% of high- and low-flow thresholds. Future well build-out projections estimated potential for continued stress. Most water was permitted from small, free-flowing streams and "frack" ponds (dammed streams). Permitted 12-h pumping volumes exceeded median streamflow at 50% of withdrawal sites in June, when flows were low. Daily water usage, from operator disclosures, compared to median streamflow showed possible water stress in 7-51% of catchments from June-November, respectively. If 100% of produced water was recycled, per-well water use declined by 25%, reducing threshold exceedance by 10%. Future water stress was predicted to occur in fewer catchments important for drinking water and species of conservation concern due to the decline in new well installations and increased use of recycled water. Accessible and precise withdrawal and streamflow data are critical moving forward to assess and mitigate water stress in streams that experience high-volume withdrawals.

  18. Trapping tsetse flies on water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laveissière C.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Riverine tsetse flies such as Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. tachinoides are the vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses in West Africa. Despite intimate links between tsetse and water, to our knowledge there has never been any attempt to design trapping devices that would catch tsetse on water. In mangrove (Guinea one challenging issue is the tide, because height above the ground for a trap is a key factor affecting tsetse catches. The trap was mounted on the remains of an old wooden dugout, and attached with rope to nearby branches, thereby allowing it to rise and fall with the tide. Catches showed a very high density of 93.9 flies/”water-trap”/day, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05 than all the catches from other habitats where the classical trap had been used. In savannah, on the Comoe river of South Burkina Faso, the biconical trap was mounted on a small wooden raft anchored to a stone, and catches were compared with the classical biconical trap put on the shores. G. p. gambiensis and G. tachinoides densities were not significantly different from those from the classical biconical one. The adaptations described here have allowed to efficiently catch tsetse on the water, which to our knowledge is reported here for the first time. This represents a great progress and opens new opportunities to undertake studies on the vectors of trypanosomoses in mangrove areas of Guinea, which are currently the areas showing the highest prevalences of sleeping sickness in West Africa. It also has huge potential for tsetse control using insecticide impregnated traps in savannah areas where traps become less efficient in rainy season. The Guinean National control programme has already expressed its willingness to use such modified traps in its control campaigns in Guinea, as has the national PATTEC programme in Burkina Faso during rainy season.

  19. Trapping tsetse flies on water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laveissière, C; Camara, M; Rayaisse, J B; Salou, E; Kagbadouno, M; Solano, P

    2011-05-01

    Riverine tsetse flies such as Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. tachinoides are the vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses in West Africa. Despite intimate links between tsetse and water, to our knowledge there has never been any attempt to design trapping devices that would catch tsetse on water. In mangrove (Guinea) one challenging issue is the tide, because height above the ground for a trap is a key factor affecting tsetse catches. The trap was mounted on the remains of an old wooden dugout, and attached with rope to nearby branches, thereby allowing it to rise and fall with the tide. Catches showed a very high density of 93.9 flies/"water-trap"/day, which was significantly higher (p biconical trap was mounted on a small wooden raft anchored to a stone, and catches were compared with the classical biconical trap put on the shores. G. p. gambiensis and G. tachinoides densities were not significantly different from those from the classical biconical one. The adaptations described here have allowed to efficiently catch tsetse on the water, which to our knowledge is reported here for the first time. This represents a great progress and opens new opportunities to undertake studies on the vectors of trypanosomoses in mangrove areas of Guinea, which are currently the areas showing the highest prevalences of sleeping sickness in West Africa. It also has huge potential for tsetse control using insecticide impregnated traps in savannah areas where traps become less efficient in rainy season. The Guinean National control programme has already expressed its willingness to use such modified traps in its control campaigns in Guinea, as has the national PATTEC programme in Burkina Faso during rainy season.

  20. BRICKS WITH TOTAL REPLACEMENT OF CLAY BY FLY ASH MIXED WITH DIFFERENT MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    J.N Akhtar; Alam, J; M.N Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    Fly ash is a powdery substance obtained from the dust collectors in the Thermal power plants that use coal as fuel. From the cement point of view the mineralogy of Fly ash is important as it contains 80% - 90% of glass. The impurities in coal-mostly clays, shale’s, limestone & dolomite; they cannot be burned so they turn up as ash. The Fly ash of class C category was used as a raw material to total replacement of clay for making Fly ash bricks. In present study the effect of Fly ash with high...

  1. Importance of prostate volume for detection of prostate cancer by first sextant biopsy in high-risk patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vaičiūnas, Kęstutis; Auškalnis, Stasys; Matjošaitis, Aivaras Jonas; Trumbeckas, Darius; Jievaltas, Mindaugas

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relevance of prostate gland volume, transitional zone volume, and transitional zone index for the detection of prostate cancer by the first sextant biopsy. Material and methods. A total of 121 men with high risk of prostate cancer were included in our study (prostate-specific antigen level higher than 4 ng/mL and/or pathological digital rectal examination). We consulted the patients in Outpatient Department of Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital du...

  2. Pure zeolite synthesis from silica extracted from coal fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, N.; Querol, X.; Plana, F.; Andres, J.M.; Janssen, M.; Nugteren, H. [CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Inst. Earth Science ' Jaume Almera'

    2002-07-01

    Pure zeolites can be synthesised from silica extracted from fly ash by alkaline leaching. If the process is optimised the solid residue arising from this extraction may also contain a relatively high content of zeolitic material mixed with residual fly ash components. Both the pure and the impure zeolitic material have a high potential for application in waste-water and flue gas-cleaning technologies. The silica extraction potential of 23 European coal fly ashes covering most of the possible fly ash types is investigated in this study. Optimisation of leaching processes, by varying temperature, time and alkali/fly ash rates, permitted extraction yields up to 140 g of SiO{sub 2} per kg using a single step process, but the extraction yields may reach up to 210 g kg{sup -1} by applying thermal pre-treatments prior to the extraction. The solid residue arising from the silica extraction experiments shows a high NaP1 zeolite content. A high Si/Al ratio of the glass matrix, the occurrence of easily soluble silica phases in the original fly ash and a high reactive surface area were found to be the major parameters influencing silica extraction. High purity 4A and X zeolitic material was obtained by combining the silica extracts from the Meirama fly ash and a waste solution from the Al-anodising industry. The results allowed conversion of the silica extraction yields to an equivalent 630 g of pure 4A-X zeolite per kg of fly ash with a cation exchange capacity of 4.7 meq g{sup -1}.

  3. An analysis of surgical and nonsurgical operating room times in high-volume shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padegimas, Eric M; Hendy, Benjamin A; Lawrence, Cassandra; Devasagayaraj, Richard; Zmistowski, Benjamin M; Abboud, Joseph A; Lazarus, Mark D; Williams, Gerald R; Namdari, Surena

    2017-06-01

    A significant portion of operating room time in shoulder arthroplasty is devoted to nonsurgical tasks. To maximize efficiency and to increase access to care, it is important to accurately quantify surgical and nonsurgical time for shoulder arthroplasty. This study aimed to evaluate surgical vs. nonsurgical time and to assess the viability of using a 1-surgeon, 2-operating room model. An institutional database was used to identify all primary and revision shoulder arthroplasty cases from February 2011 through December 2013. Time intervals were analyzed, including anesthesia and positioning time, surgical time, conclusion time, and turnover time. We identified 1062 shoulder arthroplasties. The average anesthesia and positioning time was 48.2 ± 11.7 minutes, surgical time was 122.7 ± 36.4  minutes, and conclusion time was 10.5 ± 7.0  minutes. Average turnover time at our institution was 40 minutes. An average of 58.8 ± 13.8 minutes (33.2%) of the patient's time in the operating room was not surgical. A 1-room surgical model, with each case following the next, would allow 3 arthroplasties to be performed in a 10-hour surgical day. A 2-room model would allow 4 cases to be performed in a 9-hour surgical day or 5 in an 11-hour day. In this 2-room model, there would be no time in which the surgeon is absent for any surgical portion of the case. For a high-volume shoulder arthroplasty practice, a 2-room model leads to greater efficiency and patient access to care without sacrificing the surgeon's presence during surgical portions of the case. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of equilibrium volume and magnetism on the stability of iron phases at high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnemrat, S; Hooper, J P; Vasiliev, I; Kiefer, B

    2014-01-29

    The present study provides new insights into the pressure dependence of magnetism by tracking the hybridization between crystal orbitals for pressures up to 600 GPa in the known hcp, bcc and fcc iron. The Birch-Murnaghan equation of state parameters are; bcc: V0 = 11.759 A(3)/atom, K0 = 177.72 GPa; hcp: V0 = 10.525 A(3)/atom, K0 = 295.16 GPa; and fcc: V0 = 10.682 A(3)/atom, K0 = 274.57 GPa. These parameters compare favorably with previous studies. Consistent with previous studies we find that the close-packed hcp and fcc phases are non-magnetic at pressures above 50 GPa and 60 GPa, respectively. The principal features of magnetism in iron are predicted to be invariant, at least up to ∼6% overextension of the equilibrium volume. Our results predict that magnetism for overextended fcc iron disappears via an intermediate spin state. This feature suggests that overextended lattices can be used to stabilize particular magnetic states. The analysis of the orbital hybridization shows that the magnetic bcc structure at high pressures is stabilized by splitting the majority and minority spin bands. The bcc phase is found to be magnetic at least up to 600 GPa; however, magnetism is insufficient to stabilize the bcc phase itself, at least at low temperatures. Finally, the analysis of the orbital contributions to the total energy provides evidence that non-magnetic hcp and fcc phases are likely more stable than bcc at core earth pressures.

  5. High-volume plasma exchange in patients with acute liver failure: An open randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Fin Stolze; Schmidt, Lars Ebbe; Bernsmeier, Christine; Rasmussen, Allan; Isoniemi, Helena; Patel, Vishal C; Triantafyllou, Evangelos; Bernal, William; Auzinger, Georg; Shawcross, Debbie; Eefsen, Martin; Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Clemmesen, Jens Otto; Hockerstedt, Krister; Frederiksen, Hans-Jørgen; Hansen, Bent Adel; Antoniades, Charalambos G; Wendon, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) often results in cardiovascular instability, renal failure, brain oedema and death either due to irreversible shock, cerebral herniation or development of multiple organ failure. High-volume plasma exchange (HVP), defined as exchange of 8-12 or 15% of ideal body weight with fresh frozen plasma in case series improves systemic, cerebral and splanchnic parameters. In this prospective, randomised, controlled, multicentre trial we randomly assigned 182 patients with ALF to receive either standard medical therapy (SMT; 90 patients) or SMT plus HVP for three days (92 patients). The baseline characteristics of the groups were similar. The primary endpoint was liver transplantation-free survival during hospital stay. Secondary-endpoints included survival after liver transplantation with or without HVP with intention-to-treat analysis. A proof-of-principle study evaluating the effect of HVP on the immune cell function was also undertaken. For the entire patient population, overall hospital survival was 58.7% for patients treated with HVP vs. 47.8% for the control group (hazard ratio (HR), with stratification for liver transplantation: 0.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.36-0.86; p=0.0083). HVP prior to transplantation did not improve survival compared with patients who received SMT alone (CI 0.37 to 3.98; p=0.75). The incidence of severe adverse events was similar in the two groups. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores fell in the treated group compared to control group, over the study period (pHVP improves outcome in patients with ALF by increasing liver transplant-free survival. This is attributable to attenuation of innate immune activation and amelioration of multi-organ dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Importance of prostate volume for detection of prostate cancer by first sextant biopsy in high-risk patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiciūnas, Kestutis; Auskalnis, Stasys; Matjosaitis, Aivaras; Trumbeckas, Darius; Jievaltas, Mindaugas

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relevance of prostate gland volume, transitional zone volume, and transitional zone index for the detection of prostate cancer by the first sextant biopsy. A total of 121 men with high risk of prostate cancer were included in our study (prostate-specific antigen level higher than 4 ng/mL and/or pathological digital rectal examination). We consulted the patients in Outpatient Department of Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital during 2003-2006. Total prostate volume and transition zone volume were measured, and all patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided sextant biopsy of the prostate. According to histological results of prostate biopsy, patients were divided into two groups: benign group (benign prostate hyperplasia and high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia) and prostate cancer group. Statistical analysis was made by SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) 12.0.1 for Windows. After histological examination, prostate cancer was detected in 20.7% of patients (n=25). Prostate cancer was found in 24.6% of patients with a total prostate volume of less than 60 cm3 and only in 8.2% of patients with a total prostate volume greater than 60 cm3 (P=0.026). Prostate cancer was found in 27.1% of patients with transition zone volume smaller than 30 cm3 and only in 7.5% of patients with transition zone volume greater than 30 cm3 (P=0.007). A statistically significant difference was found when patients were divided into the groups according to transition zone index: when transition zone index was lower than 0.45, prostate cancer was detected in 37.1% of patients, and when transition zone index was higher than 0.45, prostate cancer was observed in 9.1% of patients (P=0.001). The possibility to detect prostate cancer was 5.9 times higher in patients with transition zone index lower than 0.45. Prostate cancer detection rate by first sextant prostate biopsy in patients with elevated prostate-specific antigen level and

  7. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (IV) The Volume Dependence of the Light Hadron Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, S R; Detmold, W; Lin, H W; Luu, T C; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Savage, M J; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2011-07-01

    The volume dependence of the octet baryon masses and relations among them are explored with Lattice QCD. Calculations are performed with nf = 2 + 1 clover fermion discretization in four lattice volumes, with spatial extent L ? 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 4.0 fm, with an anisotropic lattice spacing of b_s ? 0.123 fm in the spatial direction, and b_t = b_s/3.5 in the time direction, and at a pion mass of m_\\pi ? 390 MeV. The typical precision of the ground-state baryon mass determination is volume dependence of the masses, the Gell-Mann Okubo mass-relation, and of other mass combinations. A comparison with the predictions of heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory is performed in both the SU(2)L ? SU(2)R and SU(3)L ? SU(3)R expansions. Predictions of the three-flavor expansion for the hadron masses are found to describe the observed volume dependences reasonably well. Further, the ?N? axial coupling constant is extracted from the volume dependence of the nucleon mass in the two-flavor expansion, with only small modifications in the three-flavor expansion from the inclusion of kaons and eta's. At a given value of m?L, the finite-volume contributions to the nucleon mass are predicted to be significantly smaller at m_\\pi ? 140 MeV than at m_\\pi ? 390 MeV due to a coefficient that scales as ? m_\\pi^3. This is relevant for the design of future ensembles of lattice gauge-field configurations. Finally, the volume dependence of the pion and kaon masses are analyzed with two-flavor and three-flavor chiral perturbation theory.

  8. Tsetse fly saliva: Could it be useful in fly infection when feeding in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemotaxis of tsetse saliva may perhaps stimulate movement of Trypanosoma brucei parasites from tissues to the bloodstream and via the vascular to the tsetse feeding site, and could explain the relatively high infection rate of tsetse flies feeding on chronically infected animals. This review paper looks into the possible role ...

  9. Risk for postpartum hemorrhage, transfusion, and hemorrhage-related morbidity at low, moderate, and high volume hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Audrey A; Wright, Jason D; Siddiq, Zainab; D'Alton, Mary E; Friedman, Alexander M; Ananth, Cande V; Bateman, Brian T

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize risk for and temporal trends in postpartum hemorrhage across hospitals with different delivery volumes. This study used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) to characterize risk for postpartum hemorrhage from 1998 to 2011. Hospitals were classified as having either low, moderate or high delivery volume (≤1000, 1001 to 2000, >2000 deliveries per year, respectively). The primary outcomes included postpartum hemorrhage, transfusion, and related severe maternal morbidity. Adjusted models were created to assess factors associated with hemorrhage and transfusion. Of 55,140,088 deliveries included for analysis 1,512,212 (2.7%) had a diagnosis of postpartum hemorrhage and 361,081 (0.7%) received transfusion. Risk for morbidity and transfusion increased over the study period, while the rate of hemorrhage was stable ranging from 2.5 to 2.9%. After adjustment, hospital volume was not a major risk factor for transfusion or hemorrhage. While obstetric volume does not appear to be a major risk factor for either transfusion or hemorrhage, given that transfusion and hemorrhage-related maternal morbidity are increasing across hospital volume categories, there is an urgent need to improve obstetrical care for postpartum hemorrhage. Those risk factors are able to discriminate women at increased risk supports routine use of hemorrhage risk assessment.

  10. Development of Classified Fly Ash as a Pozzolanic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukzon, Sumrerng; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    This research studies the potential for using classified fly ash from Mae Moh power plant in Thailand as a pozzolanic material. Three different fly ash finenesses viz., coarse Original Fly Ash (OFA), Medium Fly Ash (MFA) and Fine Fly Ash (FFA) were used for the study. Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was partially replaced with fly ash at 20 and 40% by weight of binder. The water to binder ratio was kept constant at 0.5 and the flow of mortar was maintained at 110±5% with the aid of superplasticizer (SP). Compressive strength, carbonation depth and porosity test of mortars were determined. FFA has a high potential to be used as a good pozzolanic material. The use of FFA produces mortars with good strength and low porosity. The resistance to carbonation of mortar improves with partial replacement of FFA in comparison with the normal coarse fly ash. The use of FFA results in a strong and dense mortar which is due to better dispersion and filling effect as well as an increase in the pozzolanic reaction.

  11. Effect of High-Temperature Curing Methods on the Compressive Strength Development of Concrete Containing High Volumes of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonsuk Jung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of the high-temperature curing methods on the compressive strength of concrete containing high volumes of ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS. GGBS was used to replace Portland cement at a replacement ratio of 60% by binder mass. The high-temperature curing parameters used in this study were the delay period, temperature rise, peak temperature (PT, peak period, and temperature down. Test results demonstrate that the compressive strength of the samples with PTs of 65°C and 75°C was about 88% higher than that of the samples with a PT of 55°C after 1 day. According to this investigation, there might be optimum high-temperature curing conditions for preparing a concrete containing high volumes of GGBS, and incorporating GGBS into precast concrete mixes can be a very effective tool in increasing the applicability of this by-product.

  12. Steel Fibre Reinforcing Characteristics on the Size Reduction of Fly Ash Based Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sounthararajan Vallarasu Manoharan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of glued steel fibres in high strength concrete with size reduction properties of concrete has been attempted. Glued steel fibres with both ends hooked having length to diameter ratio of 70 was added at a dosage level of 0.5% to 1.5% by volume fraction. The study was carried out to analyze the effects of fibre addition on the thickness reduction of concrete element. A high strength concrete mixture was designed and various thicknesses of concrete prisms were casted for different volume fraction of steel fibres. The hardened concrete properties were determined based on the mix constituents such as water to binder ratio 0.3 (w/b, superplasticizer dosage, fine to coarse aggregate ratio 0.6 (F/c, and fly ash replacement level at 25% and 50% by weight of binder content. The experimental test results showed that the flexural strength varies with respect to the depth of concrete specimen. It can be observed that the reduction in size up to 10% size containing 25% fly ash with 1.5% steel fibres showed better strength enhancement of 4.70 MPa and 6.69 MPa for 7 days and 28 days, respectively. Also, the addition of steel fibres at higher percentage of fly ash containing 50% showed better improvement in the flexural strength for the size reduction at 5%, when compared to plain concrete beam which exhibited higher stress carrying capacity of 6.08 MPa at 28 days and showed an increase of 7.99%.

  13. Treatment of MSW fly ashes using the electrodialytic remediation technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present work the electrodialytic remediation technique is applied for the treatment of fly ash, a hazardous by-product resulting from the incineration of municipal solid waste. Results are presented for an experiment conducted for 40 days at 38 mA, with a continuously stirred cell....... Experimental parameters monitored include voltage drop, pH and electrolyte's volumes. Evolution of heavy metal concentration with time in the different compartments is analysed. The performance of sodium gluconate for heavy metals extraction from fly ash in different pH conditions is evaluated in batch...... separating chambers III and IV and the dissolution of a large percentage of sample during the treatment. 39% of zinc, 14% of lead, 18% of copper and 60% of cadmium were removed from fly ash using the electrodialytic technique and these results are compared with previously reported experiments on similar...

  14. Unconventional lift-generating mechanisms in free-flying butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srygley, R B; Thomas, A L R

    2002-12-12

    Flying insects generate forces that are too large to be accounted for by conventional steady-state aerodynamics. To investigate these mechanisms of force generation, we trained red admiral butterflies, Vanessa atalanta, to fly freely to and from artificial flowers in a wind tunnel, and used high-resolution, smoke-wire flow visualizations to obtain qualitative, high-speed digital images of the air flow around their wings. The images show that free-flying butterflies use a variety of unconventional aerodynamic mechanisms to generate force: wake capture, two different types of leading-edge vortex, active and inactive upstrokes, in addition to the use of rotational mechanisms and the Weis-Fogh 'clap-and-fling' mechanism. Free-flying butterflies often used different aerodynamic mechanisms in successive strokes. There seems to be no one 'key' to insect flight, instead insects rely on a wide array of aerodynamic mechanisms to take off, manoeuvre, maintain steady flight, and for landing.

  15. Variation in neoadjuvant chemotherapy utilization for epithelial ovarian cancer at high volume hospitals in the United States and associated survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Emma L; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Rossi, Emma C; Gehrig, Paola A; Boggess, John F; Garrett, Joanne M

    2017-06-01

    To estimate variation in the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy by high volume hospitals and to determine the association between hospital utilization of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival. We identified incident cases of stage IIIC or IV epithelial ovarian cancer in the National Cancer Database from 2006 to 2012. Inclusion criteria were treatment at a high volume hospital (>20 cases/year) and treatment with both chemotherapy and surgery. A logistic regression model was used to predict receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on case-mix predictors (age, comorbidities, stage etc). Hospitals were categorized by the observed-to-expected ratio for neoadjuvant chemotherapy use as low, average, or high utilization hospitals. Survival analysis was performed. We identified 11,574 patients treated at 55 high volume hospitals. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was used for 21.6% (n=2494) of patients and use varied widely by hospital, from 5%-55%. High utilization hospitals (n=1910, 10 hospitals) had a median neoadjuvant chemotherapy rate of 39% (range 23-55%), while low utilization hospitals (n=2671, 14 hospitals) had a median rate of 10% (range 5-17%). For all ovarian cancer patients adjusting for clinical and socio-demographic factors, treatment at a hospital with average or high neoadjuvant chemotherapy utilization was associated with a decreased rate of death compared to treatment at a low utilization hospital (HR 0.90 95% CI 0.83-0.97 and HR 0.85 95% CI 0.75-0.95). Wide variation exists in the utilization of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to treat stage IIIC and IV epithelial ovarian cancer even among high volume hospitals. Patients treated at hospitals with low rates of neoadjuvant chemotherapy utilization experience decreased survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Susceptibility of black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae and adults to four insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Sheppard, D Craig; Joyce, John A

    2002-06-01

    Dosage-mortality regressions were determined for black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), larvae fed cyromazine or pyriproxifen treated media. Cyromazine LC50 for larvae dying before becoming prepupae ranged from 0.25 to 0.28 ppm with dosage-mortality regression slopes between 5.79 and 12.04. Cyromazine LC50s for larvae dying before emergence ranged from 0.13 to 0.19 ppm with dosage-mortality regression slopes between 3.94 and 7.69. Pyriproxifen dosage-mortality regressions were not generated for larvae failing to become prepupae since <32% mortality was recorded at the highest concentration of 1,857 ppm. LC50s for larvae failing to become adults ranged from 0.10 to 0.12 ppm with dosage mortality-regression slopes between 1.67 and 2.32. Lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin dosage-mortality regressions were determined for wild adult black soldier flies and house flies, Musca domestica L., and for susceptible house flies. Our results indicate that the wild house fly, unlike the black soldier fly, population was highly resistant to each of these pyrethroids. Regression slopes for black soldier flies exposed to lambda-cyhalothrin were twice as steep as those determined for the wild house fly strain. Accordingly, LC50s for the black soldier fly and susceptible house fly were 10- to 30-fold lower than those determined for wild house flies. The differential sensitivity between wild black soldier flies and house flies might be due to behavioral differences. Adult house flies usually remain in animal facilities with the possibility of every adult receiving pesticide exposure, while black soldier fly adults are typically present only during emergence and oviposition thereby limiting their exposure.

  17. High-Throughput Micro-Debubblers for Bubble Removal with Sub-Microliter Dead Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Renaud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the fabrication and evaluation of microdebubblers that are able to remove large bubbles while keeping a very low dead volume. The devices use a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane that is permeable to air in order to filter air bubbles out of an aqueous sample. The dead volume of the devices is less than one microliter, but bubbles as large as 60 microliters can be removed. This simple solution can be very useful for microfluidic devices for chemical or biological analysis that suffer from channel clogging due to the presence of bubbles in their sample. One embodiment is particularly suited for buffer solutions with living cells.

  18. The influence of sex and fly species on the development of trypanosomes in tsetse flies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Peacock

    Full Text Available Unlike other dipteran disease vectors, tsetse flies of both sexes feed on blood and transmit pathogenic African trypanosomes. During transmission, Trypanosoma brucei undergoes a complex cycle of proliferation and development inside the tsetse vector, culminating in production of infective forms in the saliva. The insect manifests robust immune defences throughout the alimentary tract, which eliminate many trypanosome infections. Previous work has shown that fly sex influences susceptibility to trypanosome infection as males show higher rates of salivary gland (SG infection with T. brucei than females. To investigate sex-linked differences in the progression of infection, we compared midgut (MG, proventriculus, foregut and SG infections in male and female Glossina morsitans morsitans. Initially, infections developed in the same way in both sexes: no difference was observed in numbers of MG or proventriculus infections, or in the number and type of developmental forms produced. Female flies tended to produce foregut migratory forms later than males, but this had no detectable impact on the number of SG infections. The sex difference was not apparent until the final stage of SG invasion and colonisation, showing that the SG environment differs between male and female flies. Comparison of G. m. morsitans with G. pallidipes showed a similar, though less pronounced, sex difference in susceptibility, but additionally revealed very different levels of trypanosome resistance in the MG and SG. While G. pallidipes was more refractory to MG infection, a very high proportion of MG infections led to SG infection in both sexes. It appears that the two fly species use different strategies to block trypanosome infection: G. pallidipes heavily defends against initial establishment in the MG, while G. m. morsitans has additional measures to prevent trypanosomes colonising the SG, particularly in female flies. We conclude that the tsetse-trypanosome interface works

  19. A highly addressable static droplet array enabling digital control of a single droplet at pico-volume resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heon-Ho; Lee, Byungjin; Jin, Si Hyung; Jeong, Seong-Geun; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-04-26

    Droplet-based microfluidics enabling exquisite liquid-handling has been developed for diagnosis, drug discovery and quantitative biology. Compartmentalization of samples into a large number of tiny droplets is a great approach to perform multiplex assays and to improve reliability and accuracy using a limited volume of samples. Despite significant advances in microfluidic technology, individual droplet handling in pico-volume resolution is still a challenge in obtaining more efficient and varying multiplex assays. We present a highly addressable static droplet array (SDA) enabling individual digital manipulation of a single droplet using a microvalve system. In a conventional single-layer microvalve system, the number of microvalves required is dictated by the number of operation objects; thus, individual trap-and-release on a large-scale 2D array format is highly challenging. By integrating double-layer microvalves, we achieve a "balloon" valve that preserves the pressure-on state under released pressure; this valve can allow the selective releasing and trapping of 7200 multiplexed pico-droplets using only 1 μL of sample without volume loss. This selectivity and addressability completely arranged only single-cell encapsulated droplets from a mixture of droplet compositions via repetitive selective trapping and releasing. Thus, it will be useful for efficient handling of miniscule volumes of rare or clinical samples in multiplex or combinatory assays, and the selective collection of samples.

  20. Echolocation intensity and directionality of perching and flying fringe-lipped bats, Trachops cirrhosus (Phyllostomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie eSurlykke

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Neotropical frog-eating bat, Trachops cirrhosus, primarily hunts stationary prey, either by gleaning on the wing, or in a sit-and-wait mode hanging from a perch. It listens passively for prey-generated sounds, but uses echolocation in all stages of the hunt. Like other bats in the family Phyllostomidae, T.cirrhosus has a conspicuous nose leaf, hypothesized to direct and focus echolocation calls emitted from the nostrils. T. cirrhosus is highly flexible in its cognitive abilities and its use of sensory strategies for prey detection. Additionally, T. cirrhosus has been observed to echolocate both with closed and open mouth. We hypothesize that its flexibility extends to echolocation call design. We investigated the effect of hunting mode, perching or flying, as well as the effect of mouth opening, on the acoustic parameters and directionality of the echolocation call. We used a multi-microphone array, a high-speed video camera, and a microphone-diode-video system to directly visualize the echolocation sound beam synchronized with the bat’s behavior. We found that T. cirrhosus emits a highly directional sound beam with HAM (half amplitude angle of 12o-18o and DI (directionality index of ~17 dB, among the most directional bat sonar beams measured to date. The directionality was high both when flying and when perching. The emitted intensity was low, around 88 dB SPL at10 cm from the mouth, when hanging, but higher, around 100 dB SPL at10 cm, when flying or just before take-off.Our data suggests that the limited search volume of T.cirrhosus’ sonar beam, defined by the high directionality and the rather low intensity of its echolocation calls, is adapted to the highly cluttered hunting habitat and to the perch hunting mode.

  1. Effects of 12 weeks high-intensity & reduced-volume training in elite athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Kilen

    Full Text Available It was investigated if high-intensity interval training (HIT at the expense of total training volume improves performance, maximal oxygen uptake and swimming economy. 41 elite swimmers were randomly allocated to a control (CON or HIT group. For 12 weeks both groups trained ∼12 h per week. HIT comprised ∼5 h vs. 1 h and total distance was ∼17 km vs. 35 km per week for HIT and CON, respectively. HIT was performed as 6-10×10-30 s maximal effort interspersed by 2-4 minutes of rest. Performance of 100 m all-out freestyle and 200 m freestyle was similar before and after the intervention in both HIT (60.4±4.0 vs. 60.3±4.0 s; n = 13 and 133.2±6.4 vs. 132.6±7.7 s; n = 14 and CON (60.2±3.7 vs. 60.6±3.8 s; n = 15 and 133.5±7.0 vs. 133.3±7.6 s; n = 15. Maximal oxygen uptake during swimming was similar before and after the intervention in both the HIT (4.0±0.9 vs. 3.8±1.0 l O2×min-1; n = 14 and CON (3.8±0.7 vs. 3.8±0.7 l O2×min-1; n = 11 group. Oxygen uptake determined at fixed submaximal speed was not significantly affected in either group by the intervention. Body fat % tended to increase (P = 0.09 in the HIT group (15.4±1.6% vs. 16.3±1.6%; P = 0.09; n = 16 and increased (P<0.05 in the CON group (13.9±1.5% vs. 14.9±1.5%; n = 17. A distance reduction of 50% and a more than doubled HIT amount for 12 weeks did neither improve nor compromise performance or physiological capacity in elite swimmers.

  2. TestSmart-high production volume chemicals: an approach to implementing alternatives into regulatory toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, S; Goldberg, A; Zurlo, J

    2001-09-01

    This article examines the status and application of alternatives defined as replacements, refinements, and reduction for screening high production volume (HPV) chemicals. It specifically focuses on the Screening Information Data Set (SIDS), a series of toxicological tests recommended by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development to screen such chemicals. Alternative tests associated with acute, repeat-dose, genetic, and reproductive and developmental toxicity were examined at 2 meetings of academic, industry, and regulatory scientists and their status determined. Tests were placed in 1 of 3 categories: ready for immediate use, in need of or currently undergoing validation, or needing research/developmental work. With respect to traditional acute toxicity testing, the basal cytotoxicity approach was placed in the category of research with the up-and-down, fixed-dose, limit test, and the acute toxic class categorized as available for immediate use and the neutral red assay under validation. Cell culture methods that could provide information on acute target organ toxicity were all categorized in the research stage. Studies of the Ah receptor were placed under validation. All alternative tests for repeat-dose toxicity were placed in the category of research. With regard to genetic toxicity, the Ames, mouse lymphoma, and Chinese hamster ovary methods were considered ready for immediate use, while the in vitro micronucleus and Syrian hamster ovary assays were placed in the validation category. All alternatives for developmental toxicity, with the exception of gene chip technology, were placed in the category of validation. Gene chip technology is considered to be in the research stage. For reproductive toxicity, sperm motility and morphology were considered as ready for immediate use, with the other assays categorized as needing validation or in the research stage. Follow-up to these results is obvious. Work needs to be conducted to move those tests from

  3. Central Issues in the Use of Computer-Based Materials for High Volume Entrepreneurship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Billy

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses issues relating to the use of computer-based learning (CBL) materials for entrepreneurship education at university level. It considers CBL as a means of addressing the increased volume and range of provision required in the current context. The issues raised in this article have importance for all forms of computer-based…

  4. High Training Volumes are Associated with a Low Number of Self-Reported Sick Days in Elite Endurance Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mårtensson, Kristina Nordebo, Christer Malm

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that high exercise loads increase the risk of infection, most frequently reported as upper respiratory tract infections, by suppressing the immune system. Most athletes will not train when experiencing sickness due to the fear of health complications. However, high training volumes are incompatible with high rates of non-training days, regardless of the cause. The purpose of this observational study was to examine the relationship between self-reported, exercise-constraining days of sickness (days when the athlete decided not to train due to symptoms of disease, either self-reported or by a physician and the volumes of exercise training in elite endurance athletes by analyzing data from training logs kept for several years. The subjects included 11 elite endurance athletes (8 male, 3 female competing at national and international levels in cross-country skiing, biathlon and long-distance running. Training logs available from these 11 subjects added to a total of 61 training years. The number of training hours per year (462, 79-856; median, range was significantly and negatively correlated to the reported number of days not training due to sickness (15, 0-164 by a 3rd degree polynomial regression (R2 = 0.48, F ratio = 18, p < 0.0001. We conclude that elite endurance athletes can achieve high training volumes only if they also experience few sick-days.

  5. High-volume ovarian cancer care: survival impact and disparities in access for advanced-stage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Robert E; Chang, Jenny; Ziogas, Argyrios; Randall, Leslie M; Anton-Culver, Hoda

    2014-02-01

    To characterize the impact of hospital and physician ovarian cancer case volume on survival for advanced-stage disease and investigate socio-demographic variables associated with access to high-volume providers. Consecutive patients with stage IIIC/IV epithelial ovarian cancer (1/1/96-12/31/06) were identified from the California Cancer Registry. Disease-specific survival analysis was performed using Cox-proportional hazards model. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate for differences in access to high-volume hospitals (HVH) (≥20 cases/year), high-volume physicians (HVP) (≥10 cases/year), and cross-tabulations of high- or low-volume hospital (LVH) and physician (LVP) according to socio-demographic variables. A total of 11,865 patients were identified. The median ovarian cancer-specific survival for all patients was 28.2 months, and on multivariate analysis the HVH/HVP provider combination (HR = 1.00) was associated with superior ovarian cancer-specific survival compared to LVH/LVP (HR = 1.31, 95%CI = 1.16-1.49). Overall, 2119 patients (17.9%) were cared for at HVHs, and 1791 patients (15.1%) were treated by HVPs. Only 4.3% of patients received care from HVH/HVP, while 53.1% of patients were treated by LVH/LVP. Both race and socio-demographic characteristics were independently associated with an increased likelihood of being cared for by the LVH/LVP combination and included: Hispanic race (OR = 1.72, 95%CI = 1.22-2.42), Asian/Pacific Islander race (OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 1.07-2.32), Medicaid insurance (OR = 2.51, 95%CI = 1.46-4.30), and low socioeconomic status (OR = 2.84, 95%CI = 1.90-4.23). Among patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer, the provider combination of HVH/HVP is an independent predictor of improved disease-specific survival. Access to high-volume ovarian cancer providers is limited, and barriers are more pronounced for patients with low socioeconomic status, Medicaid insurance, and racial minorities. Copyright © 2013

  6. The Hungry Fly: Hydrodynamics of feeding in the common house fly

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Manu

    2010-01-01

    A large number of insect species feed primarily on a fluid diet. To do so, they must overcome the numerous challenges that arise in the design of high-efficiency, miniature pumps. Although the morphology of insect feeding structures has been described for decades, their dynamics remain largely unknown even in the most well studied species (e.g. fruit fly). Here, in the fluid dynamics video, we demonstrate in-vivo imaging and microsurgery to elucidate the design principles of feeding structures of the common house fly. Using high-resolution X-ray absorption microscopy, we record in-vivo flow of sucrose solutions through the body over many hours during fly feeding. Borrowing from microsurgery techniques common in neurophysiology, we are able to perturb the pump to a stall position and thus evaluate function under load conditions. Furthermore, fluid viscosity-dependent feedback is observed for optimal pump performance. As the gut of the fly starts to fill up, feedback from the stretch receptors in the cuticle di...

  7. Flying in Two Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Manu

    2011-01-01

    Diversity and specialization of behavior in insects is unmatched. Insects hop, walk, run, jump, row, swim, glide and fly to propel themselves in a variety of environments. We have uncovered an unusual mode of propulsion of aerodynamic flight in two dimensions in Waterlilly Beetles \\emph{(Galerucella)}. The adult beetles, often found in water lilly ponds, propel themselves strictly in a two-dimensional plane on the surface of water via flapping wing flight. Here we analyze the aerodynamics of this peculiar flight mode with respect to forces exerted on the organism during flight. The complexity of 2-D flight is captured by accounting for additional forces beyond gravitational, thrust, lift and drag, exerted on the insect body in 3D flight. Understanding this constrained propulsion mode requires accounting for viscous drag, surface tension, buoyancy force, and capillary-wave drag. Moreover, dramatic differences exist in the magnitude of the resultant forces in 2D vs. 3D flight. Here, in this fluid dynamics video...

  8. Fly motion vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Alexander; Haag, Juergen; Reiff, Dierk F

    2010-01-01

    Fly motion vision and resultant compensatory optomotor responses are a classic example for neural computation. Here we review our current understanding of processing of optic flow as generated by an animal's self-motion. Optic flow processing is accomplished in a series of steps: First, the time-varying photoreceptor signals are fed into a two-dimensional array of Reichardt-type elementary motion detectors (EMDs). EMDs compute, in parallel, local motion vectors at each sampling point in space. Second, the output signals of many EMDs are spatially integrated on the dendrites of large-field tangential cells in the lobula plate. In the third step, tangential cells form extensive interactions with each other, giving rise to their large and complex receptive fields. Thus, tangential cells can act as matched filters tuned to optic flow during particular flight maneuvers. They finally distribute their information onto postsynaptic descending neurons, which either instruct the motor centers of the thoracic ganglion for flight and locomotion control or act themselves as motor neurons that control neck muscles for head movements.

  9. Final Report - Advanced MEA's for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Amenable to High Volume Manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debe, Mark K.

    2007-09-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under a 3M/DOE contract directed at advancing the key fuel cell (FC) components most critical for overcoming the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance, durability & cost barriers. This contract focused on the development of advanced ion exchange membranes & electrocatalysts for PEMFCs that will enable operation under ever more demanding automotive operating conditions & the use high volume compatible processes for their manufacture. Higher performing & more durable electrocatalysts must be developed for PEMFCs to meet the power density & lifetime hours required for FC vehicles. At the same time the amount of expensive Pt catalyst must be reduced to lower the MEA costs. While these two properties are met, the catalyst must be made resistant to multiple degradation mechanisms to reach necessary operating lifetimes. In this report, we present the work focused on the development of a completely new approach to PEMFC electrocatalyts, called nanostructured thin film (NSTF) catalysts. The carbon black supports are eliminated with this new approach which eliminates the carbon corrosion issue. The thin film nature of the catalyst significantly improves its robustness against dissolution & grain growth, preserving the surface area. Also, the activity of the NSTF for oxygen reduction is improved by over 500% compared to dispersed Pt catalyts. Finally, the process for fabricating the NSTF catalysts is consistent with high volume roll-good manufacturing & extremely flexible towards the introduction of new catalyst compositions & structures. This report documents the work done to develop new multi-element NSTF catalysts with properties that exceed pure Pt, that are optimized for use with the membranes discussed below, & advance the state-of-the-art towards meeting the DOE 2010 targets for PEMFC electrocatalysts. The work completed advances the understanding of the NSTF catalyst technology, identifies new NSTF

  10. Thank You for Flying the Vomit Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Robert; Dilisi, Gregory A.; Dilisi, Lori A.; Santo, Gretchen

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes our flight aboard NASA's C9 ``Weightless Wonder,'' an aircraft that creates multiple periods of microgravity by conducting a series of parabolic maneuvers over the Gulf of Mexico. Because passengers often develop motion sickness during these parabolic maneuvers, the C9 is more affectionately known as the ``Vomit Comet.'' To celebrate the 2005 World Year of Physics, AAPT, APS, and NASA co-sponsored a contest in which teams of high school students and their mentors could fly an experiment aboard the Vomit Comet. If selected, students would develop their experiment and travel to Houston to serve as ``ground crew'' while the mentors would actually fly aboard the C9 to perform the experiment.

  11. Oestrid flies: eradication and extinction versus biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Douglas D; Otranto, Domenico; Stevens, Jamie R

    2009-11-01

    Larvae of oestrid flies are obligate parasites of mammals. This article focuses on two potential drivers that could be forcing these flies into extinction: (i) the highly effective and widespread use of anti-parasitic drugs for domestic livestock; and (ii) the co-extinction of oestrids associated with non-domestic hosts that are endangered. Other oestrid species could be the victims of benign neglect in that they are so poorly studied that their disappearance might go unnoticed. In addition, we explore current knowledge in each of these categories of vulnerability for oestrids, and address the potential impacts of their disappearance. Finally, we examine the potential consequences of eradicating a group of livestock parasites, and ask what possibilities for improvement of the health of humans and animals might also be lost.

  12. Subtropical Fruit Fly Invasions into Temperate Fruit Fly Territory in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subtropical fruit fly species including peach fruit fly, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders); melon fly, B. cucurbitae (Coquillett); oriental fruit fly, B. dorsalis (Hendel); and Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata Weidemann, have been detected in the past decade in the San Joaquin Valley of Califo...

  13. Fly ash. Quality recycling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomster, D.; Leisio, C.

    1996-11-01

    Imatran Voima`s coal-fired power plants not only generate power and heat but also produce fly ash which is suitable raw material for recycling. This material for recycling is produced in the flue gas cleaning process. It is economical and, thanks to close quality control, is suitable for use as a raw material in the building materials industry, in asphalt production, and in earthworks. Structures made from fly ash are also safe from an environmental point of view. (orig.)

  14. Overexpression of Fli-1 in astrocytoma is associated with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hung-Pei; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Hsieh, Ya-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ting; Lee, Chih-Ling; Tsai, Yi-Cheng; She, Ting-Chang; Lin, Chih-Lung; Chai, Chee-Yin; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2017-04-25

    Astrocytoma, a common and highly malignant type of brain tumor, is associated with poor overall survival despite advances in surgical treatment, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The nuclear transcription factor Fli-1 has been shown to increase cellular proliferation and tumorigenesis in many types of cancer; however, previous reports have not described a correlation between clinical outcomes and Fli-1 in astrocytoma patients. The present study aimed to elucidate the clinical role of Fli-1 in astrocytoma. High-level of Fli-1 protein expression was significantly association with World Health Organization (WHO) high grade and poor prognosis. A multivariate analysis revealed that the WHO grade and Fli-1 protein expression were independent factor of prognostic factors of patients with astrocytoma. In addition, Fli-1 silencing inhibited proliferation, migration, and invasion and led to the downregulation of Ki-67, VEGF, and cyclin D1 expression in the astrocytoma cells. Fli-1 protein expression in astrocytoma tissue samples were detected via immunohistochemistry, and potential correlations between clinical parameters and Fli-1 expression were assessed in patients with astrocytoma. Additionally, proliferation, invasion, and migration assays of astrocytoma cell lines were conducted to evaluate the effects of short interfering RNA (siRNA) on these processes; in addition, these cells were subjected to western blotting to detect the expression levels of Fli-1, Ki-67, VEGF, and Cyclin D1. Fli-1 shows promise as a potential prognostic biomarker and therapeutic molecular target for astrocytoma patients.

  15. Fate of pharmaceuticals and pesticides in fly larvae composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalander, C; Senecal, J; Gros Calvo, M; Ahrens, L; Josefsson, S; Wiberg, K; Vinnerås, B

    2016-09-15

    A novel and efficient organic waste management strategy currently gaining great attention is fly larvae composting. High resource recovery efficiency can be achieved in this closed-looped system, but pharmaceuticals and pesticides in waste could potentially accumulate in every loop of the treatment system and spread to the environment. This study evaluated the fate of three pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, roxithromycin, trimethoprim) and two pesticides (azoxystrobin, propiconazole) in a fly larvae composting system and in a control treatment with no larvae. It was found that the half-life of all five substances was shorter in the fly larvae compost (<10% of control) and no bioaccumulation was detected in the larvae. Fly larvae composting could thus impede the spread of pharmaceuticals and pesticides into the environment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pitch Perfect: How Fruit Flies Control their Body Pitch Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Whitehead, Samuel C; Canale, Luca; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Flapping insect flight is a complex and beautiful phenomenon that relies on fast, active control mechanisms to counter aerodynamic instability. To directly investigate how freely-flying D. melanogaster control their body pitch angle against such instability, we perturb them using impulsive mechanical torques and film their corrective maneuvers with high-speed video. Combining experimental observations and numerical simulation, we find that flies correct for pitch deflections of up to 40 degrees in 29 +/- 8 ms by bilaterally modulating their wings' front-most stroke angle in a manner well-described by a linear proportional-integral (PI) controller. Flies initiate this corrective process after only 10 +/- 2 ms, indicating that pitch stabilization involves a fast reflex response. Remarkably, flies can also correct for very large-amplitude pitch perturbations--greater than 150 degrees--providing a regime in which to probe the limits of the linear-response framework. Together with previous studies regarding yaw an...

  17. Chemical and Physical Characterization of Fly Ash as Geopolymer Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risdanareni Puput

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on finding suitable cement substitute material becomes massive due to environmental effect. Geopolymer as inorganic material is potential to be the smart solution to overcome global warming issue. Fly ash is a waste material rich in silica and alumina becomes popular raw material to produce geopolymer. The best properties ofgeopolymer paste come from the high quality of fly ash. Therefore, it is important to investigate various types of fly ash and geopolymer properties. Their chemical and physical properties characterized by XRF, pH value, XRD and SEM. The results showed that type of fly ash depended on amount of Si-based of Ca-based compound which consisted of spherical morphology. Geopolymer paste produced from the ash with different compound has bulky and irregular shape morphology. The pH value of each ash has also a correlation with the setting time of fresh paste.

  18. Volume Stability of Bitumen Bound Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanaya I.N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper covers results of laboratory investigations on the volume stability of masonry units incorporating waste materials bound with bitumen (Bitublocks, due to moisture adsorption, thermal exposure and vacuum saturation. The materials used were steel slag, crushed glass, coal fly ash, and 50 pen bitumen. The samples were produced in hot mix method, compacted, then exposed to moist and temperature. It was found that moisture adsorption from the environment caused the Bitublock to expand. The samples with less intense curing regime experienced lower expansion and became stable faster, and vice versa. Under thermal condition (at 70°C, the samples with less intense curing regime underwent higher expansion, and vice versa. They were also highly reversible. Their volume stability was found unique under water exposure. The expansion on first vacuum saturation cycle was irreversible, then largely reversible on the following cycles.

  19. Disposable photonic integrated circuits for evanescent wave sensors by ultra-high volume roll-to-roll method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikio, Sanna; Hiltunen, Jussi; Hiitola-Keinänen, Johanna; Hiltunen, Marianne; Kontturi, Ville; Siitonen, Samuli; Puustinen, Jarkko; Karioja, Pentti

    2016-02-08

    Flexible photonic integrated circuit technology is an emerging field expanding the usage possibilities of photonics, particularly in sensor applications, by enabling the realization of conformable devices and introduction of new alternative production methods. Here, we demonstrate that disposable polymeric photonic integrated circuit devices can be produced in lengths of hundreds of meters by ultra-high volume roll-to-roll methods on a flexible carrier. Attenuation properties of hundreds of individual devices were measured confirming that waveguides with good and repeatable performance were fabricated. We also demonstrate the applicability of the devices for the evanescent wave sensing of ambient refractive index. The production of integrated photonic devices using ultra-high volume fabrication, in a similar manner as paper is produced, may inherently expand methods of manufacturing low-cost disposable photonic integrated circuits for a wide range of sensor applications.

  20. Efficacy of High-volume Evacuator in Aerosol Reduction: Truth or Myth? A Clinical and Microbiological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Desarda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Basic periodontal treatment aims at eliminating supra- and sub-gingival plaque and establishing conditions which will allow effective self-performed plaque control. This aim is primarily achieved with sonic and ultrasonic scalers. However, generation of bacterial aerosols during these procedures is of great concern to patients, the dentist and the dental assistant. The aim of this study was to compare the reduction in aerosol with and without high-volume evacuator through a microbiological study. Materials and methods. For this clinical study a fumigated closed operatory was selected. Maxillary incisors and canines were selected as an area for scaling. Piezoelectric ultrasonic scaling was performed in the absence and in the presence of a high-volume evacuator at 12 and 20 inches from the patient's oral cavity. In both groups scaling was carried out for 10 minutes. Nutrient agar plates were exposed for a total of 20 minutes. After this procedure, nutrient agar plates were incubated in an incubator at 37°C for 24 hours. The next day the nutrient agar plates were examined for colony forming units by a single microbiologist. Results. The results showed no statistically significant differences in colony forming units (CFU with and without the use of a high-volume evacuator either at 12 or 20 inches from the patient’s oral cavity. Conclusion. It was concluded that high-volume evacuator, when used as a separate unit without any modification, is not effective in reducing aerosol counts and environmental contamination.

  1. Interaction between Lung Mechanics and Gas Exchange by Low Volume High Frequency Pulmonary Ventilation in Patients with Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-21

    Mechanics and Gas Exchange by Low Volume High Frequency Pulmonary Ventilation in Patients with Respiratory Failure 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Jeffrey M. Drazen...15 06 Mechanical Ventilation 06 11 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) The factors influencing both dynamic...LL II,,,~ 1111.2 HIIIH 111.- MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHARi 1 I., m P.’N I. AD-A193 073 g’ Fi AD _ _ _ Interaction between Lung Mechanics and Gas

  2. Aggravation of pulmonary diffusing capacity in highly trained athletes by 6 weeks of low-volume, low-intensity training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, Olivier; Maimoun, Laurent; Coste, Olivier; Manetta, Jérôme; Boussana, Alain; Préfaut, Christian; Hue, Olivier

    2013-11-01

    Postexercise alveolar-capillary membrane-diffusing capacity (DLco) often decreases in highly trained endurance athletes and seems linked to their training status. To test the hypothesis that training status influences postexercise DLco, 13 male and 2 female triathletes (20.2 ± 4.4 y old, 175.2 ± 6.7 cm tall; weight in a range of 66.6 ± 7.4 kg to 67.4 ± 7.8 kg during the 1-y study) were randomized into experimental (n = 7) and control (n = 8) groups and performed VO(2max) cycle tests and simulated cycle-run successions (CR) of 30 min + 20 min after 3 periods in the competitive season. Both groups were tested before (pre- HTP) and after a 30-wk high-training period (HTP) with high training volume, intensity, and frequency. The experimental group was then also tested after a 6-wk low-training period (LTP) with low training volume, intensity, and frequency, while the control group continued training according to the HTP schedule for these 6 wk. Ventilatory data were collected continuously. DLco testing was performed before and 30, 60, and 120 min after the CR trials. Whatever the period or group, DLco was significantly decreased 30 min after CR, with a significantly greater decrease in the experimental group than the control group in LTP (-15.7% and -9.3% of DLco, respectively). Six weeks of low training volume and intensity were sufficient to reverse the effects of high training volume and intensity on the alveolar-capillary membrane after a CR succession in competitive triathletes.

  3. Telemedicine: an important aid to perform high-quality endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in low-volume centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Påhlsson, H I; Groth, K; Permert, J; Swahn, F; Löhr, M; Enochsson, L; Lundell, L; Arnelo, U

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether telemedicine can help to ensure high-quality endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients living in rural areas. The study was conducted by investigators from two centers: the Karolinska University Hospital, a high-volume center which provided the teleguided support, and the Visby District Hospital, a low-volume center. From September 2010 to August 2011, 26 ERCP procedures performed at a district hospital were teleguided by an experienced endoscopist at the Karolinska University Hospital. To ensure patient data protection, all communication went through a network (Sjunet) that was separate from the Internet and open only to accredited users. The indications for ERCP were common bile duct stones (n = 12), malignant strictures (n = 12), and benign biliary strictures (n = 2). In 15 cases, this was the patient's first ERCP procedure. The common bile duct was successfully cannulated in all 26 teleguided procedures. The local endoscopist scored the teleguided support as crucial for the successful outcome in 8 /26 cases, as an important factor in 8, and as being of less importance in the remaining 10. In the eight cases where the teleguided support was judged to be crucial, six subsequent percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography procedures and two repeat ERCPs were avoided. The overall cannulation rate at the district hospital improved from 85 % to 99 % after teleguided support was introduced. No procedure-related complications occurred. Distant guidance of advanced ERCP procedures in a low-volume center, through teleguided support from a high-volume center, has the potential to improve the quality of care, as reflected in high cannulation rates and the ability to complete the scheduled interventions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Temporal dynamics of the circadian heart rate following low and high volume exercise training in sedentary male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Herbert F; Karmakar, C; Kiviniemi, A M; Hautala, A J; Tulppo, M P; Mäkikallio, T H; Huikuri, H V; Khandoker, A H; Palaniswami, M

    2015-10-01

    Increased risk of arrhythmic events occurs at certain times during the circadian cycle with the highest risk being in the second and fourth quarter of the day. Exercise improves treatment outcome in individuals with cardiovascular disease. How different exercise protocols affect the circadian rhythm and the associated decrease in adverse cardiovascular risk over the circadian cycle has not been shown. Fifty sedentary male participants were randomized into an 8-week high volume and moderate volume training and a control group. Heart rate was recorded using Polar Electronics and investigated with Cosinor analysis and by Poincaré plot derived features of SD1, SD2 and the complex correlation measure (CCM) at 1-h intervals over the 24-h period. Moderate exercise significantly increased vagal modulation and the temporal dynamics of the heart rate in the second quarter of the circadian cycle (p = 0.004 and p = 0.007 respectively). High volume exercise had a similar effect on vagal output (p = 0.003) and temporal dynamics (p = 0.003). Cosinor analysis confirms that the circadian heart rate displays a shift in the acrophage following moderate and high volume exercise from before waking (1st quarter) to after waking (2nd quarter of day). Our results suggest that exercise shifts vagal influence and increases temporal dynamics of the heart rate to the 2nd quarter of the day and suggest that this may be the underlying physiological change leading to a decrease in adverse arrhythmic events during this otherwise high-risk period.

  5. Evolving progress in oncologic and operative outcomes for esophageal and junctional cancer: lessons from the experience of a high-volume center.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reynolds, John V

    2012-05-01

    Modern series from high-volume esophageal centers report an approximate 40% 5-year survival in patients treated with curative intent and postoperative mortality rates of less than 4%. An objective analysis of factors that underpin current benchmarks within high-volume centers has not been performed.

  6. From Research to Practice: Which Research Strategy Contributes More to Clinical Excellence? Comparing High-Volume versus High-Quality Biomedical Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Tchetchik

    Full Text Available The question when and to what extent academic research can benefit society is of great interest to policy-makers and the academic community. Physicians in university hospitals represent a highly relevant test-group for studying the link between research and practice because they engage in biomedical academic research while also providing medical care of measurable quality. Physicians' research contribution to medical practice can be driven by either high-volume or high-quality research productivity, as often pursuing one productivity strategy excludes the other. To empirically examine the differential contribution to medical practice of the two strategies, we collected secondary data on departments across three specializations (Cardiology, Oncology and Orthopedics in 50 U.S.-based university hospitals served by 4,330 physicians. Data on volume and quality of biomedical research at each department was correlated with publicly available ratings of departments' quality of care, demonstrating that high-quality research has significantly greater contribution to quality of care than high-volume research.

  7. From Research to Practice: Which Research Strategy Contributes More to Clinical Excellence? Comparing High-Volume versus High-Quality Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchetchik, Anat; Grinstein, Amir; Manes, Eran; Shapira, Daniel; Durst, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    The question when and to what extent academic research can benefit society is of great interest to policy-makers and the academic community. Physicians in university hospitals represent a highly relevant test-group for studying the link between research and practice because they engage in biomedical academic research while also providing medical care of measurable quality. Physicians' research contribution to medical practice can be driven by either high-volume or high-quality research productivity, as often pursuing one productivity strategy excludes the other. To empirically examine the differential contribution to medical practice of the two strategies, we collected secondary data on departments across three specializations (Cardiology, Oncology and Orthopedics) in 50 U.S.-based university hospitals served by 4,330 physicians. Data on volume and quality of biomedical research at each department was correlated with publicly available ratings of departments' quality of care, demonstrating that high-quality research has significantly greater contribution to quality of care than high-volume research.

  8. Highly efficient volume hologram multiplexing in thick dye-doped jelly-like gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katarkevich, Vasili M; Rubinov, Anatoli N; Efendiev, Terlan Sh

    2014-08-01

    Dye-doped jelly-like gelatin is a thick-layer self-developing photosensitive medium that allows single and multiplexed volume phase holograms to be successfully recorded using pulsed laser radiation. In this Letter, we present a method for multiplexed recording of volume holograms in a dye-doped jelly-like gelatin, which provides significant increase in their diffraction efficiency. The method is based on the recovery of the photobleached dye molecule concentration in the hologram recording zone of gel, thanks to molecule diffusion from other unexposed gel areas. As an example, an optical recording of a multiplexed hologram consisting of three superimposed Bragg gratings with mean values of the diffraction efficiency and angular selectivity of ∼75% and ∼21', respectively, is demonstrated by using the proposed method.

  9. Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. M. Suubert; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R.H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

    1997-05-01

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  10. Fundamental Study of Low-Nox Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. M. Suuberg; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R. H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

    1997-11-01

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  11. Cardiac size of high-volume resistance trained female athletes: shaping the body but not the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venckunas, T; Simonavicius, J; Marcinkeviciene, J E

    2016-03-01

    Introduction Exercise training, besides many health benefits, may result in cardiac remodelling which is dependent on the type and amount of exercise performed. It is not clear, however, whether significant adaptation in cardiac structure is possible in females undergoing resistance type of exercise training. Rigorous high volume training of most muscle groups emphasising resistance exercises are being undertaken by athletes of some aesthetic sports such as female fitness (light bodybuilding). The impact of this type of training on cardiac adaptation has not been investigated until now. The aim of the current study was to disclose the effect of high volume resistance training on cardiac structure and function. Methods 11 top-level female fitness athletes and 20 sedentary age-matched controls were recruited to undergo two-dimensional echocardiography. Results Cardiac structure did not differ between elite female fitness athletes and controls (p > 0.05), and fitness athletes had a tendency for a smaller (p = 0.07) left ventricular (LV) mass indexed to lean body mass. Doppler diastolic function index (E/A ratio) and LV ejection fraction were similar between the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions Elite female fitness athletes have normal cardiac size and function that do not differ from matched sedentary controls. Consequently, as high volume resistance training has no easily observable effect on adaptation of cardiac structure, when cardiac hypertrophy is present in young resistance-trained lean female, other reasons such as inherited cardiac disease are to be considered carefully.

  12. High spatiotemporal resolution measurement of regional lung air volumes from 2D phase contrast x-ray images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leong, Andrew F. T.; Islam, M. Sirajul; Kitchen, Marcus J. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Fouras, Andreas [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Wallace, Megan J.; Hooper, Stuart B. [Ritchie Centre and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash University, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Described herein is a new technique for measuring regional lung air volumes from two-dimensional propagation-based phase contrast x-ray (PBI) images at very high spatial and temporal resolution. Phase contrast dramatically increases lung visibility and the outlined volumetric reconstruction technique quantifies dynamic changes in respiratory function. These methods can be used for assessing pulmonary disease and injury and for optimizing mechanical ventilation techniques for preterm infants using animal models. Methods: The volumetric reconstruction combines the algorithms of temporal subtraction and single image phase retrieval (SIPR) to isolate the image of the lungs from the thoracic cage in order to measure regional lung air volumes. The SIPR algorithm was used to recover the change in projected thickness of the lungs on a pixel-by-pixel basis (pixel dimensions {approx}16.2 {mu}m). The technique has been validated using numerical simulation and compared results of measuring regional lung air volumes with and without the use of temporal subtraction for removing the thoracic cage. To test this approach, a series of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups mechanically ventilated at different frequencies was employed. Results: Regional lung air volumes measured from PBI images of newborn rabbit pups showed on average an improvement of at least 20% in 16% of pixels within the lungs in comparison to that measured without the use of temporal subtraction. The majority of pixels that showed an improvement was found to be in regions occupied by bone. Applying the volumetric technique to sequences of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups, it is shown that lung aeration at birth can be highly heterogeneous. Conclusions: This paper presents an image segmentation technique based on temporal subtraction that has successfully been used to isolate the lungs from PBI chest images, allowing the change in lung air volume to be measured over regions as small as the pixel size. Using

  13. Survival of the House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) on Truvia and Other Sweeteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Michael L; Fowler, Fallon E; Denning, Steven S; Watson, David W

    2017-07-01

    The house fly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), is a disease vector of mechanically transmitted pathogens including bacteria, viruses, and protozoans. Opportunities for pathogen transmission can increase as fly longevity increases. Dietary preferences play an important role in insect longevity; therefore, we investigated house fly preferences, sucrose availability, and caloric constraints on house fly longevity. Experimental goals were: 1) to test the effects of calorie restriction on survival of house flies by manipulating concentrations of erythritol (low caloric content) and sucrose (high caloric content), and comparing commercial sweeteners of differing calorie content, 2) to identify house fly preferences for either erythritol or sucrose, and 3) to evaluate the insecticidal activity or toxicity of erythritol on house flies. Our data show that house flies may prefer high calorie options when given a choice and that house fly longevity likely increases as calorie content increases. Additionally, no significant differences in longevity were observed between the water only control (zero calories) and erythritol treatments. This suggests that decreased survival rates and death could be the result of starvation rather than insecticidal activity. This research furthers our understanding of house fly survival and sugar-feeding behavior. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A new model for volume recombination in plane-parallel chambers in pulsed fields of high dose-per-pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotz, M.; Karsch, L.; Pawelke, J.

    2017-11-01

    In order to describe the volume recombination in a pulsed radiation field of high dose-per-pulse this study presents a numerical solution of a 1D transport model of the liberated charges in a plane-parallel ionization chamber. In addition, measurements were performed on an Advanced Markus ionization chamber in a pulsed electron beam to obtain suitable data to test the calculation. The experiment used radiation pulses of 4 μs duration and variable dose-per-pulse values up to about 1 Gy, as well as pulses of variable duration up to 308 μs at constant dose-per-pulse values between 85 mGy and 400 mGy. Those experimental data were compared to the developed numerical model and existing descriptions of volume recombination. At low collection voltages the observed dose-per-pulse dependence of volume recombination can be approximated by the existing theory using effective parameters. However, at high collection voltages large discrepancies are observed. The developed numerical model shows much better agreement with the observations and is able to replicate the observed behavior over the entire range of dose-per-pulse values and collection voltages. Using the developed numerical model, the differences between observation and existing theory are shown to be the result of a large fraction of the charge being collected as free electrons and the resultant distortion of the electric field inside the chamber. Furthermore, the numerical solution is able to calculate recombination losses for arbitrary pulse durations in good agreement with the experimental data, an aspect not covered by current theory. Overall, the presented numerical solution of the charge transport model should provide a more flexible tool to describe volume recombination for high dose-per-pulse values as well as for arbitrary pulse durations and repetition rates.

  15. Low- and high-volume strength training induces similar neuromuscular improvements in muscle quality in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, Regis; Botton, Cíntia E; Wilhelm, Eurico N; Bottaro, Martim; Lacerda, Fabiano; Gaya, Anelise; Moraes, Kelly; Peruzzolo, Amanda; Brown, Lee E; Pinto, Ronei Silveira

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of low- and high-volume strength training on strength, muscle activation and muscle thickness (MT) of the lower- and upper-body, and on muscle quality (MQ) of the lower-body in older women. Twenty apparently healthy elderly women were randomly assigned into two groups: low-volume (LV, n=11) and high-volume (HV, n=9). The LV group performed one-set of each exercise, while the HV group performed three-sets of each exercise, twice weekly for 13 weeks. MQ was measured by echo intensity obtained by ultrasonography (MQEI), strength per unit of muscle mass (MQST), and strength per unit of muscle mass adjusted with an allometric scale (MQAS). Following training, there was a significant increase (p≤0.001) in knee extension 1-RM (31.8±20.5% for LV and 38.3±7.3% for HV) and in elbow flexion 1-RM (25.1±9.5% for LV and 26.6±8.9% for HV) and in isometric maximal strength of the lower-body (p≤0.05) and upper-body (p≤0.001), with no difference between groups. The maximal electromyographic activation for both groups increased significantly (p≤0.05) in the vastus medialis and biceps brachii, with no difference between groups. All MT measurements of the lower- and upper-body increased similarly in both groups (p≤0.001). Similar improvements were also observed in MQEI (p≤0.01), MQST, and MQAS (p≤0.001) for both groups. These results demonstrate that low- and high-volume strength training promote similar increases in neuromuscular adaptations of the lower- and upper-body, and in MQ of the lower-body in elderly women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The constraints of body size on aerodynamics and energetics in flying fruit flies: an integrative view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2002-01-01

    Reynolds number and thus body size may potentially limit aerodynamic force production in flying insects due to relative changes of viscous forces on the beating wings. By comparing four different species of fruit flies similar in shape but with different body mass, we have investigated how small insects cope with changes in fluid mechanical constraints on power requirements for flight and the efficiency with which chemical energy is turned into aerodynamic flight forces. The animals were flown in a flight arena in which stroke kinematics, aerodynamic force production, and carbon dioxide release were measured within the entire working range of the flight motor. The data suggest that during hovering performance mean lift coefficient for flight is higher in smaller animals than in their larger relatives. This result runs counter to predictions based on conventional aerodynamic theory and suggests subtle differences in stroke kinematics between the animals. Estimates in profile power requirements based on high drag coefficient suggest that among all tested species of fruit flies elastic energy storage might not be required to minimize energetic expenditures during flight. Moreover, muscle efficiency significantly increases with increasing body size whereas aerodynamic efficiency tends to decrease with increasing size or Reynolds number. As a consequence of these two opposite trends, total flight efficiency tends to increase only slightly within the 6-fold range of body sizes. Surprisingly, total flight efficiency in fruit flies is broadly independent of different profile power estimates and typically yields mean values between 2-4%.

  17. Fly's Eye GLM Simulator (FEGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, M.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Corredor, D.; Podgorny, S.

    2016-12-01

    In anticipation of the launch of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) onboard GOES-R that will provide continuous real time observations of total (both cloud and ground) lightning, the Fly's Eye GLM Simulator (FEGS) has been developed. FEGS is an airborne instrument designed to provide cal/val measurements for GLM from high altitude aircraft. It consists of a 5 x 5 array of telescopes each with a narrow passband filter to isolate the 777.4 nm neutral oxygen emission triplet radiated by lightning. The telescopes will measure the optical radiance emitted by lightning that is transmitted through the cloud top with a temporal resolution of 10 μs. When integrated on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, the FEGS array with its 90° field-of-view will observe a cloud top area nearly equal to a single GLM pixel. This design will allow FEGS to determine the temporal and spatial variation of light that contributes to a GLM event detection. In addition to the primary telescope array, the instrument includes 5 supplementary optical channels that observe alternate spectral emission features and will enable the use of FEGS for interesting lightning physics applications. Here we present a summary of the instrument development, calibration, and aircraft integration.

  18. Regional Prefrontal Cortex Gray Matter Volumes in Youth at Familial Risk for Schizophrenia from the Harvard Adolescent High Risk Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Isabelle M.; Makris, Nikos; Thermenos, Heidi W.; Hodge, Steven M.; Brown, Ariel; Kennedy, David; Caviness, Verne S.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Seidman, Larry J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Regional prefrontal cortex gray matter reductions have been identified in schizophrenia, likely reflecting a combination of genetic vulnerability and disease effects. Few morphometric studies to date have examined regional prefrontal abnormalities in non-psychotic biological relatives who have not passed through the age range of peak risk for onset of psychosis. We conducted a region-of-interest morphometric study of prefrontal subregions in adolescent and young adult relatives of schizophrenia patients. Methods Twenty-seven familial high-risk (FHR) first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients and forty-eight control subjects without a family history of psychosis (ages 13–28) underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla. The prefrontal cortex was parcellated into polar, dorsolateral, ventrolateral, ventromedial and orbital subregions. The Chapman scales measured subpsychotic symptoms. General linear models examined associations of prefrontal subregion volumes with familial risk and subpsychotic symptoms. Results FHR subjects had significantly reduced bilateral ventromedial prefrontal and frontal pole gray matter volumes compared with controls. Ventromedial volume was significantly negatively correlated with magical ideation and anhedonia scores in FHR subjects. Conclusions Selective, regional prefrontal gray matter reductions may differentially mark genetic vulnerability and early symptom processes among non-psychotic young adults at familial risk for schizophrenia. PMID:20705433

  19. High sulfur loading cathodes fabricated using peapodlike, large pore volume mesoporous carbon for lithium-sulfur battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo; Han, Fei; Wang, Shuai; Cheng, Fei; Sun, Qiang; Li, Wen-Cui

    2013-03-01

    Porous carbon materials with large pore volume are crucial in loading insulated sulfur with the purpose of achieving high performance for lithium-sulfur batteries. In our study, peapodlike mesoporous carbon with interconnected pore channels and large pore volume (4.69 cm(3) g(-1)) was synthesized and used as the matrix to fabricate carbon/sulfur (C/S) composite which served as attractive cathodes for lithium-sulfur batteries. Systematic investigation of the C/S composite reveals that the carbon matrix can hold a high but suitable sulfur loading of 84 wt %, which is beneficial for improving the bulk density in practical application. Such controllable sulfur-filling also effectively allows the volume expansion of active sulfur during Li(+) insertion. Moreover, the thin carbon walls (3-4 nm) of carbon matrix not only are able to shorten the pathway of Li(+) transfer and conduct electron to overcome the poor kinetics of sulfur cathode, but also are flexible to warrant structure stability. Importantly, the peapodlike carbon shell is beneficial to increase the electrical contact for improving electronic conductivity of active sulfur. Meanwhile, polymer modification with polypyrrole coating layer further restrains polysulfides dissolution and improves the cycle stability of carbon/sulfur composites.

  20. High-order accurate finite-volume formulations for the pressure gradient force in layered ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwirda, Darren; Kelley, Maxwell; Marshall, John

    2017-08-01

    Discretisation of the horizontal pressure gradient force in layered ocean models is a challenging task, with non-trivial interactions between the thermodynamics of the fluid and the geometry of the layers often leading to numerical difficulties. We present two new finite-volume schemes for the pressure gradient operator designed to address these issues. In each case, the horizontal acceleration is computed as an integration of the contact pressure force that acts along the perimeter of an associated momentum control-volume. A pair of new schemes are developed by exploring different control-volume geometries. Non-linearities in the underlying equation-of-state definitions and thermodynamic profiles are treated using a high-order accurate numerical integration framework, designed to preserve hydrostatic balance in a non-linear manner. Numerical experiments show that the new methods achieve high levels of consistency, maintaining hydrostatic and thermobaric equilibrium in the presence of strongly-sloping layer geometries, non-linear equations-of-state and non-uniform vertical stratification profiles. These results suggest that the new pressure gradient formulations may be appropriate for general circulation models that employ hybrid vertical coordinates and/or terrain-following representations.