WorldWideScience

Sample records for high tensile strength

  1. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  2. Correlation of high-speed tensile strength with collagen content in control and lathyritic rat skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombi, G W; Haut, R C; Sullivan, W G

    1993-01-01

    Severity of lacerative skin injury depends on the applied load and the resistance of the tissue. At low (static) rates of loading there is a high degree of correlation between skin tensile strength and the degree of collagen crosslinking, with little added strength due to collagen interactions with the glycosaminoglycan matrix. We examined the effects of high (ballistic) rates of loading in order to determine the contributions to strength made by both the degree of collagen crosslinking and the collagen-matrix interaction. Tensile failure experiments were conducted using the dorsal skin of rats 1.5-6 months of age. Test specimen orientations were cut parallel and transverse to the body axis at cephalad and caudad locations on the dorsum. Tensile strength was measured at nominal strain rates of 30%/sec (low speed) and 6000%/sec (high speed) using both control and lathyrogen fed rats. Biochemical analyses were conducted to determine the amount of total and crosslinked (insoluble) collagen. In low-speed tests, there was a significant correlation (r > or = 0.900) between collagen content and skin tensile strength measured both transverse and parallel to the spine. The degree of correlation was higher with insoluble (r = 0.973) collagen content than with total (r = 0.901) collagen. The effect of a lathyrogen diet produced a significant (P collagen content (r > or = 0.858).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. High efficient and continuous surface modification of carbon fibers with improved tensile strength and interfacial adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingfeng; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Yue; Jin, Zhen; Liu, Xu; Huang, Yudong

    2017-08-01

    Most of the surface modification technologies for carbon fibers, no matter in laboratory scale or for commercial manufacture, are accompanied by a simultaneous decrease in tensile strength. In this paper, a feasible and high efficient strategy for carbon fiber treatment which could obviously improve both tensile strength and interfacial adhesion was proposed. Continuously moving carbon fibers were treated with atmospheric helium plasma for 1 min, followed by a 5 min pyrolytic carbon deposition using ethanol as precursor at 800 °C. The effects of the new approach were characterized by SEM, AFM, nanoindentation, XPS, Raman, wettability analysis, single fiber tensile strength testing and single fiber pull-out testing. After modification, pyrolytic carbon coating was deposited on the fiber surface uniformly, and the roughness and surface energy increased significantly. The single fiber tensile testing results indicate that the resulting fiber strength increased 15.7%, rising from 3.13 to 3.62 GPa. Meanwhile, the interfacial shear strength of its epoxy composites increased from 65.3 to 83.5 MPa. The comparative studies of carbon fibers modified with commercial anodic oxidation and sizing were also carried out. The results demonstrate that the new method can be utilized in the carbon fiber manufacture process and is more efficient than the traditional approaches.

  4. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K C; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-06-16

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19' phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties.

  5. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang; Yan Ma; Muxin Yang; Ping Jiang; Fuping Yuan; Xiaolei Wu

    2017-01-01

    The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS) with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been ...

  6. Mechanical Behavior of DP980 High Strength Steel Under Dynamic Tensile Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIAN Wen-yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior and fracture modes of DP980 high strength steels were studied by comparing the results of dynamic tensile tests at strain rates from 10-3s-1 to 103s-1. The results show that the strength of DP980 steel remains almost unchanged and the plasticity decreases by 7.5% as the strain rate increasing from quasi-static(10-3s-1 to 100s-1. When the strain rate increases from 100s-1 to 103s-1, the strength keeps increasing, while the plasticity increases by 14% at the strain rate ranging from 100s-1 to 102s-1, but then follows by a decrease of 24.7% in the range of 102s-1 to 103s-1. The strain rate sensitivity coefficient m increases with the increasing of the strain rate. During the plastic deformation, the multiplication reinforcement of dislocation and the motion resistance due to the acceleration of dislocation in ferrite matrix are the main reasons for the strength enhancement. The plastic deformation concentrates in the ferrite, and the microvoids and cracks propagate along the martensite-ferrite interface. In the thickness direction of specimen, the macrographs of fracture are "V" shape cups when strain rate is lower than 101s-1, but the pure sheer shape with 45° to the tensile direction when strain rate is over 101s-1.

  7. TENSILE DEFORMATION OF HIGH-STRENGTH AND HIGH MODULUS POLYETHYLENE FIBERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERWERFF, H; PENNINGS, AJ

    The influence of tensile deformation on gel-spun and hot-drawn ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene fibers has been investigated. In high modulus polyethylene fibers no deformation energy is used to break chemical bonds during deformation, and flow is predominantly present next to elastic

  8. Tensile and electrical properties of high-strength high-conductivity copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Electrical conductivity and tensile properties have been measured on an extruded and annealed CuCrNb dispersion strengthened copper alloy which has been developed for demanding aerospace high heat flux applications. The properties of this alloy are somewhat inferior to GlidCop dispersion strengthened copper and prime-aged CuCrZr over the temperature range of 20--500 C. However, if the property degradation in CuCrZr due to joining operations and the anisotropic properties of GlidCop in the short transverse direction are taken into consideration, CuCrNb may be a suitable alternative material for high heat flux structural applications in fusion energy devices. The electrical conductivity and tensile properties of CuCrZr that was solution annealed and then simultaneously aged and diffusion bonded are also summarized. A severe reduction in tensile elongation is observed in the diffusion bonded joint, particularly if a thin copper shim is not placed in the diffusion bondline.

  9. High-temperature tensile strength of near-stoichiometric SiC/SiC composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hironaka, K.; Nozawa, T.; Hinoki, T.; Igawa, N.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Kohyama, A.

    2002-12-01

    In an attempt to characterize mechanical properties of near-stoichiometric SiC/SiC composites, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in air and at elevated temperature under mild oxidizing gases atmosphere. SiC/SiC composites were fabricated by forced-flow chemical vapor infiltration method using two-dimensional fabrics of carbon coated near-stoichiometric Tyranno™SA fibers. Tensile tests were conducted on composites with two types of lay-up schemes using edge-loading small specimens. The effect of lay-up orientation on the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of composites were also examined. Tensile strength of composite was slightly decreased at 1573 K, while it retained approximately 80% of the strength at room temperature. Porosity dependence on elastic modulus was clearly exhibited.

  10. High-temperature tensile strength of near-stoichiometric SiC/SiC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hironaka, K. E-mail: keisuke@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Nozawa, T.; Hinoki, T.; Igawa, N.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L.L.; Kohyama, A

    2002-12-01

    In an attempt to characterize mechanical properties of near-stoichiometric SiC/SiC composites, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in air and at elevated temperature under mild oxidizing gases atmosphere. SiC/SiC composites were fabricated by forced-flow chemical vapor infiltration method using two-dimensional fabrics of carbon coated near-stoichiometric Tyranno SA fibers. Tensile tests were conducted on composites with two types of lay-up schemes using edge-loading small specimens. The effect of lay-up orientation on the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of composites were also examined. Tensile strength of composite was slightly decreased at 1573 K, while it retained approximately 80% of the strength at room temperature. Porosity dependence on elastic modulus was clearly exhibited.

  11. Effect of High Temperature on Mineralogy, Microstructure, Shear Stiffness and Tensile Strength of Two Australian Mudstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianfeng; Zhang, Chonglei; Yuan, Shengyang; Fityus, Stephen; Sloan, Scott William; Buzzi, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    This study aims at providing quality experimental data on the effects of temperature on tensile strength and small strain shear stiffness of two Australian mudstones. The objective is to provide multiscale data in view of developing a numerical model that can capture and simulate the complex multiphysics of underground coal fire propagation. Two mudstones were collected in the Hunter Valley, close to a known underground coal fire, referred to as "Burning Mountain." The rock specimens were heated to a range of temperatures (maximum of 900 °C) for 24 h, and the materials were comprehensively characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analyses, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, mercury intrusion porosimetry was used in order to track changes in pore size distribution with temperature. Investigations at microscale were complemented by testing at the macroscale. In particular, the paper focuses on the evolution of the tensile strength and small strain shear stiffness as the materials are subjected to heating treatment. Results show that both parameters evolve in a non-monotonic manner with temperature. The observed mechanical responses are fully explained and corroborated by microstructural observations.

  12. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been found to play an important role for this HSSS due to load transfer and strain partitioning between two phases, and a higher strain rate could cause even higher strain partitioning in the softer austenite grains, delaying the deformation instability. Deformation twins are observed in the austenite grains at all strain rates to facilitate the uniform tensile deformation. The B2 phase (FeAl intermetallic compound is less deformable at higher strain rates, resulting in easier brittle fracture in B2 particles, smaller dimple size and a higher density of phase interfaces in final fracture surfaces. Thus, more energy need be consumed during the final fracture for the experiments conducted at higher strain rates, resulting in better tensile toughness.

  13. Statistical Analysis and Prediction on Tensile Strength of 316L-SS Joints at High Temperature Based on Weibull Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Z. L.; Chen, T.; Cheng, D. L.; Chen, T. H.; Y Wang, Z.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the prediction on average tensile strength of 316L stainless steel is statistically analyzed by Weibull distribution method. Direct diffusion bonding of 316L-SS was performed at high temperature of 550°C and 8 tension tests were carried out. The results obtained vary between 87.8MPa and 160.8MPa. The probability distribution of material failure is obtained by using the Weibull distribution.

  14. Unexpectedly low tensile strength in concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemes, A.J.M.; Han, N.; Visser, J.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    During an extensive investigation of some 25 concrete bridges and other structures suffering from alkali-silica reaction it has been found that the uniaxial tensile strength of the concrete was extremely low in relation to both the compressive strength and the splitting tensile strength. It is known

  15. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  16. High tensile strength fly ash based geopolymer composite using copper coated micro steel fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mehdi; Mehrali, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    As a ceramic-like material, geopolymers show a high quasi-brittle behavior and relatively low fracture energy. To overcome this, the addition of fibers to a brittle matrix is a well-known method to improve the flexural strength. Moreover, the success of the reinforcements is dependent on the fiber...... of 56 days. Test results confirmed that MSF additions could significantly improve both ultimate flexural capacity and ductility of fly ash based geopolymer, especially at early ages without an adverse effect on ultimate compressive strength....

  17. Degradation of Peel and Tensile Strength of Bonded Panels Exposed to High Humidity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rider, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    .... The work presented in this report summarizes honeycomb studies undertaken in AIR task 98/186 that were designed to examine the influence that environmental exposure would have on the peel and tensile...

  18. CORRELATION BETWEEN HARDNESS AND TENSILE PROPERTIES IN ULTRA-HIGH STRENGTH DUAL PHASE STEELS – SHORT COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gaško

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to predict yield strength, strength limit, fatigue live estimation as well as other mechanical properties depending on values of materials hardness is commonly known and it is often used in practice. The main aim of this contribution is to review the possibilities of application of correlation relationships between hardness and ultimate tensile strength of steel sheets in various structural states. The experiments were performed on advanced steels with structure which is composed from ferrite and martensite (dual phase steels.

  19. CORRELATION BETWEEN HARDNESS AND TENSILE PROPERTIES IN ULTRA-HIGH STRENGTH DUAL PHASE STEELS ��� SHORT COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gejza Rosenberg

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to predict yield strength, strength limit, fatigue live estimation as well as other mechanical properties depending on values of materials hardness is commonly known and it is often used in practice. The main aim of this contribution is to review the possibilities of application of correlation relationships between hardness and ultimate tensile strength of steel sheets in various structural states. The experiments were performed on advanced steels with structure which is composed from ferrite and martensite (dual phase steels.

  20. Infliximab treatment reduces tensile strength in intestinal anastomosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Sanberg; Petersen, Nacie Bello; Biagini, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    :1) to receive either repeated IFX treatment or placebo. On day 15, three separate end-to-end anastomoses were performed on the jejunum. On postoperative day 5, tensile strength and bursting pressure for the anastomoses were tested and histologic changes examined. RESULTS: We found a significantly reduced...... tensile strength in the IFX group (1.94 +/- 0.44 N) compared with the placebo group (3.33 +/- 0.39 N), (P tensile strength and serum values of IFX (coefficient = -0.63; P = 0.003) as well...... as number of sutures in the tested anastomosis (coefficient = 0.51; P = 0.024). The general histologic score was significantly higher in the placebo group (5.00 +/- 1.26 versus 3.31 +/- 1.65, P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Repeated high-dose IFX treatment reduces tensile strength significantly in rabbits...

  1. Effect of different stages of tensile deformation on micromagnetic parameters in high-strength, low-alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Moorthy, V.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, B. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group

    1999-08-01

    The influence of tensile deformation on the magnetic Barkhausen emissions (MBE) and hysteresis loop has been studied in a high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA) and its weldment. The magnetic measurements were made both in loaded and unloaded conditions for different stress levels. The root-mean-square (RMS) voltage of the MBE has been used for analysis. This study shows that the preyield and postyield deformation can be identified from the change in the MBE profile. The initial elastic deformation showed a linear increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition, and the MBE level remained constant in the unloaded condition. The microplastic yielding, well below the macroyield stress, significantly reduces the MBE, indicating the operation of grain-boundary dislocation sources below the macroyield stress. This is indicated by the slow increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition and the decrease in the MBE level in the unloaded condition. The macroyielding resulted in a significant increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition and, more clearly, in the unloaded condition. The increase in the MBE level during macroyielding has been attributed to the grain rotation phenomenon, in order to maintain the boundary integrity between adjacent grains, which would preferentially align the magnetic domains along the stress direction. This study shows that MBE during tensile deformation can be classified into four stages: (1) perfectly elastic, (2) microplastic yielding, (3) macroyielding, and (4) progressive plastic deformation. A multimagnetic parameter approach, combining the hysteresis loop and MBE, has been suggested to evaluate the residual stresses.

  2. Effect of discrete fibre reinforcement on soil tensile strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The tensile behaviour of soil plays a significantly important role in various engineering applications. Compacted soils used in geotechnical constructions such as dams and clayey liners in waste containment facilities can suffer from cracking due to tensile failure. In order to increase soil tensile strength, discrete fibre reinforcement technique was proposed. An innovative tensile apparatus was developed to determine the tensile strength characteristics of fibre reinforced soil. The effects of fibre content, dry density and water content on the tensile strength were studied. The results indicate that the developed test apparatus was applicable in determining tensile strength of soils. Fibre inclusion can significantly increase soil tensile strength and soil tensile failure ductility. The tensile strength basically increases with increasing fibre content. As the fibre content increases from 0% to 0.2%, the tensile strength increases by 65.7%. The tensile strength of fibre reinforced soil increases with increasing dry density and decreases with decreasing water content. For instance, the tensile strength at a dry density of 1.7 Mg/m3 is 2.8 times higher than that at 1.4 Mg/m3. It decreases by 30% as the water content increases from 14.5% to 20.5%. Furthermore, it is observed that the tensile strength of fibre reinforced soil is dominated by fibre pull-out resistance, depending on the interfacial mechanical interaction between fibre surface and soil matrix.

  3. Tensile bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement to microabraded and silica-coated or tin-plated high noble ceramic alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, J M; Davis, R D; Overton, J D

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of alloy surface microabrasion, silica coating, or microabrasion plus tin plating on the tensile bond strengths between a resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cement and a high-noble alloy. Bond strength between the microabraded alloy specimens and conventional glass-ionomer cement or resin cement were included for comparison. One hundred twenty uniform size, disk-shaped specimens were cast in a noble metal alloy and divided into 6 groups (n = 10 pairs/group). The metal surfaces of the specimens in each group were treated and cemented as follows. Group 1: No surface treatment (as cast, control), cemented with a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 2: Microabrasion with 50-microm aluminum oxide particles, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 3: A laboratory microabrasion and silica coating system, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 4: Microabrasion and tin-plating, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 5: Microabrasion only, conventional glass-ionomer cement. Group 6: Microabrasion and tin-plating, conventional resin cement. The uniaxial tensile bond strength for each specimen pair was determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine (Instron Corp, Canton, MA). Results were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (alpha = 0.05) and a Tukey post-hoc analysis. Mean bond strength: Group 1: 3.6 (+/- 1.5) MPa. Group 2: 4.2 (+/-0.5) MPa. Group 3: 6.7 (+/- 0.9) MPa. Group 4: 10.6 (+/- 1.8) MPa. Group 5: 1.1 (+/- 0.4) MPa. Group 6: 14.6 (+/- 2.3) MPa. Group 6 was significantly stronger than Group 4. The bond strength of specimens cemented with the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using microabrasion and tin-plating (Group 4) was significantly stronger than all other groups except the resin cement with microabrasion and tin-plating (Group 6). Microabraded and tin-plated alloy specimens luted with the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement resulted in the greatest mean tensile strengths

  4. Relation between incremental lines and tensile strength of coronal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Toshiko; Saito, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masato; Nishimura, Fumio; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In one aspect, this study examined the tensile strength of coronal dentin, as a function of the location of incremental lines, in two types of teeth: human molar versus bovine incisor. In another aspect, tensile strength in coronal dentin was examined with tensile loading in two different orientations to the incremental lines: parallel versus perpendicular. There were four experimental groups in this study: HPa, human molar dentin with tensile orientation parallel to the incremental lines; HPe, human molar dentin with tensile orientation perpendicular to the incremental lines; BPa, bovine incisor dentin with tensile orientation parallel to the incremental lines; BPe, bovine incisor dentin with tensile orientation perpendicular to the incremental lines. Tensile strengths of the parallel group (HPa and BPa) were significantly higher (pdentin. However, there were no differences in anisotropy effect between the two tooth types.

  5. Dataset of tensile strength development of concrete with manufactured sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunbo Zhao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents 755 groups splitting tensile strength tests data of concrete with manufactured sand (MSC in different curing age ranged from 1 day to 388 days related to the research article “Experimental study on tensile strength development of concrete with manufactured sand” (Zhao et al., 2017 [1]. These data were used to evaluate the precision of the prediction formulas of tensile strength of MSC, and can be applied as dataset for further studies.

  6. Tensile Strength of GFRP Reinforcing Bars with Hollow Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jun You

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP has been proposed to replace steel as a reinforcing bar (rebar due to its high tensile strength and noncorrosive material properties. One obstacle in using FRP rebars is high price. Generally FRP is more expensive than conventional steel rebar. There are mainly two ways to reduce the cost. For example, one is making the price of each composition cost of FRP rebar (e.g., fibers, resin, etc. lower than steel rebar. Another is making an optimized design for cross section and reducing the material cost. The former approach is not easy because the steel price is very low in comparison with component materials of FRP. For the latter approach, the cost could be cut down by reducing the material cost. Therefore, an idea of making hollow section over the cross section of FRP rebar was proposed in this study by optimizing the cross section design with acceptable tensile performance in comparison with steel rebar. In this study, glass reinforced polymer (GFRP rebars with hollow section and 19 mm of outer diameter were manufactured and tested to evaluate the tensile performance in accordance with the hollowness ratio. From the test results, it was observed that the tensile strength decreased almost linearly with increase of hollowness ratio and the elastic modulus decreased nonlinearly.

  7. On the tensile strength distribution of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Asa H.; Andrews, Rodney; Schadler, Linda S.; Wagner, H. Daniel

    2005-11-01

    Individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were tensile tested within the chamber of an electron microscope using an atomic force microscope-based technique. Weibull-Poisson statistics could accurately model the nanotube tensile strength data. Weibull shape and scale parameters of 1.7 and 109GPa were obtained. The former reflects a wide variability in strength similar to that observed for high-modulus graphite fibers, while the latter indicates that the irregular CVD-grown tube wall structure requires, in some cases, higher breaking forces than more regular tube wall structures. This apparent strengthening mechanism is most likely caused by an enhanced interaction between the walls of the nanotube.

  8. Hybrid filler composition optimization for tensile strength of jute fibre ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of weight content of bagasse fibre, carbon black and calcium carbonate on tensile strength of pultruded GFRP composite is evaluated and the optimum hybrid filler composition for maximizing the tensile strength is determined. Different compositions of hybrid filler are prepared by mixing three fillers using Taguchi ...

  9. Sterilization effects on tensile strength of non-conventional suture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was carried out to determine the tensile strength of embroidery, braiding, cobbler's thread and nylon mono-filament fishing line (NMFL) use as non-conventional suture material. Their tensile strength were determined pre- sterilization using various calibrated weights (50gm, 100gm, 500gm).

  10. Effect of Temperature on the Tensile Strength and Thermoelectric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tensile strength and thermoelectric e.m.f. values of 6063 aluminum alloy quenched at different temperatures from 2500C to 6000C were investigated. The result empirically confirmed that a perfect correlation exists between the tensile strength and thermoelectric e.m.f. values with concurrent minimum temperature ...

  11. THE EFFECT OF PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS ON THE TENSILE STRENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERROELEN Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available PCM’s need some important properties to have use such as high heat storage capacity, easy availability and low cost and can have different effects such as flavour, softness or exchange of heat. They are put inside of microcapsules, so they can be inbedded inside the strain, otherwise it wouldn’t be so effective. So basically the microcapsules consist of a core that’s the PCM and a polymer shell. This shell needs to be strong enough to hold the PCM and also withstand up to a certain level of heat and mechanical damage. This study investigates the tensile strength of fabrics composed by fibres, some of these fibres have benn inbedded phase change microcapsules (PCM’s. The investigated fabrics are divided by composition and by structure. By knitting the fabrics in different structures you could be able to investigate which knitting way could be the most effective to have a high tensile strength. Tensile strength tests are performed on specimens with different structures but also with different compositions which could indicate that some strains are tougher then others and more specifically if the PCM’s have a different effect on them.

  12. Tensile Strength of Water Exposed to Pressure Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2012-01-01

    at an extended water-solid interface by imposing a tensile stress pulse which easily causes cavitation. Next, a compressive pulse of duration ~1 ms and a peak intensity of a few bar is imposed prior to the tensile stress pulse. A dramatic increase of the tensile strength is observed immediately after...... the compressive pulse, but the effect is shortlived. We presume that diffusion of non-condensable gas from the cavitation nuclei into the liquid at compression, and back again later, is responsible for the changes of tensile strength....

  13. Biodegradable vascular stents with high tensile and compressive strength: a novel strategy for applying monofilaments via solid-state drawing and shaped-annealing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Seung Hyuk; Kim, Chang Yong; Jung, Youngmee; Jang, Yangsoo; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2017-02-28

    Monofilaments such as those consisting of polyamide (PA), polydioxanone (PDS), and poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), have been commonly used in various industries. However, most are non-biodegradable, which is unfavorable for many biomedical applications. Although biodegradable polymers offer significant benefits, they are still limited by their weak mechanical properties, which is an obstacle for use as a biomaterial that requires high strength. To overcome the current limitations of biodegradable monofilaments, a novel solid-state drawing (SSD) process was designed to significantly improve the mechanical properties of both PA and poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) monofilaments in this study. Both PA and PLLA monofilaments exhibited more than two-fold increased tensile strength and a highly reduced thickness using SSD. In X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses, it was determined that SSD could not only promote the α-crystal phase, but also smoothen the surface of PLLA monofilaments. To apply SSD-monofilaments with superior properties to cardiovascular stents, a shaped-annealing (SA) process was designed as the follow-up process after SSD. Using this process, three types of vascular stents could be fabricated, composed of SSD-monofilaments: double-helix, single-spring and double-spring shaped stents. The annealing temperature was optimized at 80 °C to minimize the loss of mechanical and physical properties of SSD-monofilaments for secondary processing. All three types of vascular stents were tested according to ISO 25539-2. Consequently, it was confirmed that spring-shaped stents had good recovery rate values and a high compressive modulus. In conclusion, this study showed significantly improved mechanical properties of both tensile and compressive strength simultaneously and extended the potential for biomedical applications of monofilaments.

  14. Influece of the austempering temperature on the tensile strength of the austempered ductile iron (ADI samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Savićević

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI is a class of ductile iron subjected to a two-step heat treatment process – austenitization and austempering. The heat treatment gives to ADI a high value of tensile strength and an especially good strength-to-weight ratio. However, designers in most cases are unfamiliar with this material that can compete favorably with steel and aluminum castings, weldments and forgings. The high tensile strength of ADI is the result of its unique ausferrite microstructure. In this paper, an investigation of the influence of the austempering temperature on the tensile strength of the ADI samples is presented.

  15. Investigation of anistropic behavior of Montney Shale under indirect tensile strength test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keneti, S.A.R.; Wong, R.C.K. [Calgary Univ., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The Montney Shale Formation is located near the British Columbia and Alberta borders and is one of the largest economically feasible resource plays in North America. Hydraulic fracturing is used to enhance the gas production. Initiation and propagation of hydraulically induced fracture is controlled by in-situ stresses magnitude and orientation and the reservoir tensile strength. The tensile strength becomes one of the most important parameters in governing hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir if the in-situ stresses composing one vertical and two horizontal stresses are comparable or lie within a narrow range. Different point and line load tests were used in this study to determine the tensile strength of Montney shale cores in two perpendicular directions. The paper discussed image analysis of Montney shale cores and tensile strength tests, including Brazilian tests for measuring tensile strength in the horizontal direction and point load tests for measuring tensile strength in the vertical direction. The effect of anisotropic tensile strength on hydraulic fracturing of Montney shale was also presented. It was concluded from the test results that the Montney shale exhibits a high anisotropy in tensile strength. 11 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  16. The tensile strength properties of CFRPs and GRRPs for Unnes electric car body material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumaedi, Muhammad; Sumbodo, Wirawan; Widodo, Rahmat Doni

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes composite materials tensile testing of electric car body material. The UNNES electric car body must be developed using a high strength and lightweight material. A fiber-reinforced plastic composite is widely used for the concerned objective. Selection of the type of composites, variations in fiber orientation, and the number of fiber layers will affect the tensile strength of the material. Composite materials use Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRPs) and glass-fiber-reinforced plastics (GFRPs) variation to the fiber areal weight, variations in fiber orientation and the number of fiber layers. The CFRPs areal weight consists of 230 gsm and 400 gsm. The GFRPsareal weight consists of 400 gsm and 600 gsm. Fibre orientationsconsist of 0° and 45°. Number of fiber layers consists of one layer and two layers. Various variations were then tested to figure out their tensile to get ultimate tensile strength of materials. Standard test method for tensile test was conducted using ASTM D3039. Tensile specimen geometry used a type of balanced and symmetric fiber orientation, with 25mm in width, 250 mm in length, and 2.5 mm in thickness. The result shows that the more fiber areal weight and the layer number were used, the more its tensile strength would increase, beside it increased the ultimate tensile strength of the material for both glass and carbon fiber with 0o and 45o fiber arientation. Fiber plain wave with 45o has greater tensile strength compared to any other variation.

  17. Strain rate effects on tensile strength of iron green bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact tensile strength of iron green bodies with densities of 7.2 and 7.4 g/cm3 was examined by Brazilian test using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky bar method. The powder material used for the experiments was a press-ready premix containing Distaloy AE, graphite, and lubricant. During dynamic compression, the failure behavior of specimens was observed using a high-speed video camera. The failure stress and failure behavior of dynamic compressive tests were compared with those of static compressive tests.

  18. Tensile strength of glulam laminations of Nordic spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben; Bräuner, Lise; Boström, Lars

    1999-01-01

    Design of glulam according to the European timber code Eurocode 5 is based on the standard document prEN1194 , according to which glulam beam strength is to be established either by full scale testing or by calculation. The calculation must be based on a knowledge of lamination tensile strength....... This knowledge may be obtained either by adopting a general rule that the characteristic tensile strength is sixty percent of the characteristic bending strength, or by performing tensile tests on an adequate number of laminations representative of the whole population. The present paper presents...... an investigation aimed at establishing such an adequate experimental background for the assignment of strength classes for glulam made of visually strength graded laminations from Nordic sawmills. The investigation includes more than 1800 boards (laminations) of Norway spruce (Picea abies) sampled from eight...

  19. Analysis of tensile bond strengths using Weibull statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow, Michael F; Thomas, David; Swain, Mike V; Tyas, Martin J

    2004-09-01

    Tensile strength tests of restorative resins bonded to dentin, and the resultant strengths of interfaces between the two, exhibit wide variability. Many variables can affect test results, including specimen preparation and storage, test rig design and experimental technique. However, the more fundamental source of variability, that associated with the brittle nature of the materials, has received little attention. This paper analyzes results from micro-tensile tests on unfilled resins and adhesive bonds between restorative resin composite and dentin in terms of reliability using the Weibull probability of failure method. Results for the tensile strengths of Scotchbond Multipurpose Adhesive (3M) and Clearfil LB Bond (Kuraray) bonding resins showed Weibull moduli (m) of 6.17 (95% confidence interval, 5.25-7.19) and 5.01 (95% confidence interval, 4.23-5.8). Analysis of results for micro-tensile tests on bond strengths to dentin gave moduli between 1.81 (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V) and 4.99 (Gluma One Bond, Kulzer). Material systems with m in this range do not have a well-defined strength. The Weibull approach also enables the size dependence of the strength to be estimated. An example where the bonding area was changed from 3.1 to 1.1 mm diameter is shown. Weibull analysis provides a method for determining the reliability of strength measurements in the analysis of data from bond strength and tensile tests on dental restorative materials.

  20. Correlation between flexural and indirect tensile strength of resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassina, Gianluca; Fischer, Jens; Rohr, Nadja

    2016-11-04

    To evaluate a potential correlation between flexural strength and indirect tensile strength in assessing the mechanical strength of resin composite cements. Flexural strength (n = 5) and indirect tensile strength (n = 5) of 7 resin composite cements (RelyX Unicem 2 Automix [RXU], Panavia SA [PSA], Clearfil SA [CSA], Panavia F2.0 [PF2], Multilink Implant [MLI], DuoCem [DCM], Panavia 21 [P21]) were determined. Specimens were either auto-polymerized or dual-cured (except P21) and stored in water at 37 °C for 1 day prior to measurement. Flexural and indirect tensile strength of 4 cements (RXU, PSA, PF2, MLI) was additionally measured directly after curing and after 96 h water storage at 37 °C. Except for PF2, dual-cured specimens achieved higher flexural strength than auto-polymerized specimens. In the indirect tensile strength test differences in auto-polymerized and dual-cured specimens were only detected for RXU and DCM. A general non-linear correlation was found between flexural and indirect tensile strength values. However, strength values of auto-polymerized and dual-cured specimens did not generally correlate. Flexural strength and indirect tensile strength of resin composite cements are correlated. At high strength values the indirect tensile test is less sensitive than the flexural test. The results suggest that the indirect tensile test may only be recommended as a screening test especially for low or medium strength resin composite cements.

  1. Compressive and Tensile Strength of Expanded Polystyrene Beads Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Subhan, Tengku Fitriani L

    2005-01-01

    Penelitian ini betujuan untuk mempelajari property dari beton ringan yang mengandung expanded polystyrene beads, yaitu kuat tekan (compressive strength) dan kuat tarik (tensile strength). Property tersebut kemudian dibandingkan dengan beton normal (beton tanpa expanded polystyrene beads) sebagai campuran pengontrol. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa jumlah polystyrene beads yang dimasukkan sebagai campuran beton mempengaruhi property beton; yaitu dapat menurunkan kuat tekan beton. Tetapi...

  2. Effects of interacting variables on the tensile strength and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... which represented the “high” level, was used as binding agent at concentrations of 0.5% and 4%w/w in a paracetamol tablet formulation. The tensile strength, which is a measure of the bond strength of tablets, and the release properties of the tablets- measured by the disintegration and the dissolution times, were used as ...

  3. Increased Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotube Yarns and Sheets through Chemical Modification and Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Baker, James S.; Sola, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of carbon nanotube (CNT) forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading; and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated to macro-scale CNT forms where bulk material strength is limited by inter-tube electrostatic attraction and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess post processing of CNT sheet and yarn to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small molecule functionalization and e-beam irradiation was evaluated as a means to enhance tensile strength and Youngs modulus of the bulk CNT material. Mechanical testing results revealed a tensile strength increase in CNT sheets by 57 when functionalized, while an additional 48 increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated; compared to unfunctionalized sheets. Similarly, small molecule functionalization increased yarn tensile strength up to 25, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88 beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  4. High temperature tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Stevens, C.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests have been performed on V-4Cr-4Ti at 750 and 800 C in order to extend the data base beyond the current limit of 700 C. From comparison with previous measurements, the yield strength is nearly constant and tensile elongations decrease slightly with increasing temperature between 300 and 800 C. The ultimate strength exhibits an apparent maximum near 600 C (attributable to dynamic strain aging) but adequate strength is maintained up to 800 C. The reduction in area measured on tensile specimens remained high ({approximately}80%) for test temperatures up to 800 C, in contrast to previous reported results.

  5. A Modified Constitutive Model for Tensile Flow Behaviors of BR1500HS Ultra-High-Strength Steel at Medium and Low Temperature Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Quan, Guo-Zheng; Pan, Jia; Wang, Xuan; Wu, Dong-Sen; Xia, Yu-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Constitutive model of materials is one of the most requisite mathematical model in the finite element analysis, which describes the relationships of flow behaviors with strain, strain rate and temperature. In order to construct such constitutive relationships of ultra-high-strength BR1500HS steel at medium and low temperature regions, the true stress-strain data over a wide temperature range of 293-873 K and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1 were collected from a series of isothermal uniaxial tensile tests. The experimental results show that stress-strain relationships are highly non-linear and susceptible to three parameters involving temperature, strain and strain rate. By considering the impacts of strain rate and temperature on strain hardening, a modified constitutive model based on Johnson-Cook model was proposed to characterize flow behaviors in medium and low temperature ranges. The predictability of the improved model was also evaluated by the relative error (W(%)), correlation coefficient (R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). The R-value and AARE-value for modified constitutive model at medium and low temperature regions are 0.9915 & 1.56 % and 0.9570 & 5.39 %, respectively, which indicates that the modified constitutive model can precisely estimate the flow behaviors for BR1500HS steel in the medium and low temperature regions.

  6. Covalent Crosslinking of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Improved Tensile Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted much interest in recent years due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Currently, the tensile properties of bulk carbon nanotube-based materials (yarns, sheets, etc.) fall far short of those of the individual nanotube elements. The premature failure in these materials under tensile load has been attributed to inter-tube sliding, which requires far less force than that needed to fracture individual nanotubes.1,2 In order for nanotube materials to achieve their full potential, methods are needed to restrict this tube-tube shear and increase inter-tube forces.Our group is examining covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes as a means to increase the tensile properties of carbon nanotube materials. We are working with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet and yarn materials obtained from commercial sources. Several routes to functionalize the nanotubes have been examined including nitrene, aryl diazonium, and epoxide chemistries. The functional nanotubes were crosslinked through small molecule or polymeric bridges. Additionally, electron beam irradiation induced crosslinking of the non-functional and functional nanotube materials was conducted. For example, a nanotube sheet material containing approximately 3.5 mol amine functional groups exhibited a tensile strength of 75 MPa and a tensile modulus of 1.16 GPa, compared to 49 MPa and 0.57 GPa, respectively, for the as-received material. Electron beam irradiation (2.2x 1017 ecm2) of the same amine-functional sheet material further increased the tensile strength to 120 MPa and the modulus to 2.61 GPa. This represents approximately a 150 increase in tensile strength and a 360 increase in tensile modulus over the as-received material with only a 25 increase in material mass. Once we have optimized the nanotube crosslinking methods, the performance of these materials in polymer matrix composites will be evaluated.

  7. Modeling the Hot Tensile Flow Behaviors at Ultra-High-Strength Steel and Construction of Three-Dimensional Continuous Interaction Space for Forming Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Zhan, Zong-yang; Wang, Tong; Xia, Yu-feng

    2017-01-01

    The response of true stress to strain rate, temperature and strain is a complex three-dimensional (3D) issue, and the accurate description of such constitutive relationships significantly contributes to the optimum process design. To obtain the true stress-strain data of ultra-high-strength steel, BR1500HS, a series of isothermal hot tensile tests were conducted in a wide temperature range of 973-1,123 K and a strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1 on a Gleeble 3800 testing machine. Then the constitutive relationships were modeled by an optimally constructed and well-trained backpropagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN). The evaluation of BP-ANN model revealed that it has admirable performance in characterizing and predicting the flow behaviors of BR1500HS. A comparison on improved Arrhenius-type constitutive equation and BP-ANN model shows that the latter has higher accuracy. Consequently, the developed BP-ANN model was used to predict abundant stress-strain data beyond the limited experimental conditions. Then a 3D continuous interaction space for temperature, strain rate, strain and stress was constructed based on these predicted data. The developed 3D continuous interaction space for hot working parameters contributes to fully revealing the intrinsic relationships of BR1500HS steel.

  8. Tensile Strength of Polyester Composites Reinforced with Fique Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altoé, Giulio Rodrigues; Netto, Pedro Amoy; Teles, Maria Carolina Andrade; Daniel, Glenio; Margem, Frederico Muylaert; Monteiro, Sergio Neves

    The environmental concern is creating pressure for the substitution of high energy consumption materials for natural and sustainable ones. Compared to synthetic fibers, natural fibers have shown advantages in technical aspects such as flexibility and toughness. So there is a growing worldwide interest in the use of these fibers. Fique fiber extracted from fique plant, presents some significant characteristic, but until now only few studies on fique fiber were performed. This work aims to make the analysis of the tensile strength of polyester composites reinforced with fique fibers. The fibers were incorporated into the polyester matrix with volume fraction from 0 to 30%. After fracture the specimens were analyzed by a SEM (scanning electron microscope).

  9. Optimisation of hardness and tensile strength of friction stir welded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    The present work aims to optimize the operating parameters such as rotational speed, welding speed and tool diameter for maximum Hardness and Tensile strength of the friction stir welded joint on AA6061 alloy. Three factors with five level response surface design matrix were developed by using MINITAB14 software ...

  10. Evaluation of tensile strength and fracture behavior of friction welded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Friction welding; tensile strength; SEM; microhardness. 1. Introduction. Joining of the metals is one of the most essential needs of the industry (Handa & Chawla 2013a). The joining has increasingly been used in the materials technology because of the materials hav- ing different mechanical properties needs to be efficiently ...

  11. Evaluation of tensile strength and fracture behavior of friction welded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study an attempt was made to join austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304) with low alloy steel (AISI 1021) at five different rotational speeds ranging from 800 to 1600 rpm and at as many different axial pressures ranging from 75 MPa to 135 MPa and then determining the strength of the joint by means of tensile ...

  12. Analog Experiments on Tensile Strength of Dusty and Cometary Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiolik, Grzegorz; de Beule, Caroline; Wurm, Gerhard

    2017-11-01

    The tensile strength of small dusty bodies in the solar system is determined by the interaction between the composing grains. In the transition regime between small and sticky dust (μm) and non cohesive large grains (mm), particles still stick to each other but are easily separated. In laboratory experiments we find that thermal creep gas flow at low ambient pressure generates an overpressure sufficient to overcome the tensile strength. For the first time it allows a direct measurement of the tensile strength of individual, very small (sub)-mm aggregates which consist of only tens of grains in the (sub)-mm size range. We traced the disintegration of aggregates by optical imaging in ground based as well as microgravity experiments and present first results for basalt, palagonite and vitreous carbon samples with up to a few hundred Pa. These measurements show that low tensile strength can be the result of building loose aggregates with compact (sub)-mm units. This is in favour of a combined cometary formation scenario by aggregation to compact aggreates and gravitational instability of these units.

  13. Concrete under Impact Loading, Tensile Strength and Bond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Uniaxial impact tensile tests on plain concrete were carried out with the aid of Split Hopkinson Bar equipment with stress rates of up to 60000 N/mm2. s. Various concrete mixes were investigated under. dry and wet conditions. All the concretes showed an increase in strength with increasing stress

  14. Regional Variation in the Microscopy and Tensile Strength of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The linea alba (LA), a midline tendinous structure formed by the interlocking anterior abdominal wall aponeurotic fibers, acts as a passive tensile band that prevents sagging of the lower abdomen. The microstructure and the strength of these fibres would thus be expected to reflect on the forces that act on the linea alba.

  15. Optimisation of hardness and tensile strength of friction stir welded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimisation of hardness and tensile strength of friction stir welded AA6061 alloy using response surface methodology coupled with grey relational analysis and principle component ... Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was adopted to develop mathematical model between the response and process parameters.

  16. Evaluation of microtensile and tensile bond strength tests ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare two different bond strength test methods (tensile and microtensile) in investing the influence of erbium, chromium: yttrium‑scandium‑gallium‑garnet (Er, Cr: YSGG) laser pulse frequency on resin‑enamel bonding. Materials and Methods: One‑hundred and twenty‑five ...

  17. Axial dynamic tensile strength of concrete under static lateral compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheijm, J.

    2006-01-01

    The rate effect on concrete tensile strength can be modeled by the description of crack extension in a fictitious fracture plane [1,2].The plane represents the initial, internal damage and the geometry of the final fracture plane. In the paper, the same approach is applied to model the failure

  18. Tensile Strength of Finger Joints at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter C.; Olesen, Frits Bolonius

    A series of test s aimed a t establishing the effect of temperature upon the tensile strength parallel-to-grain of finger jointed laminae for glulam has been conducted in the Fire Research Laboratory at Aalborg University Centre. The objective of this report is to present the background...

  19. Split tensile strength of soilcrete blocks | Okere | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the ever increasing problems associated with dredging of rivers to obtain river sand, reduced dependence on river sand should be encouraged by using alternative materials in block production. This work deals with the production of soilcrete blocks using readily available and affordable laterite. Split tensile strength of ...

  20. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON TENSILE STRENGTH OF JACQUARD KNITTED FABRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRAD Raluca

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An objective approach to select the best fabric for technical and home textiles consists in mechanical properties evaluation. The goal of this study is to analyze the behavior of knitted fabrics undergoing stretch stress. In this respect, three types of 2 colors Rib structure (backstripes jacquard, twillback jacquard and double-layered 3x3 rib fabric have been presented and tested for tensile strength and elongation on three directions. First, the elasticity and the behavior of knitted Rib fabrics were described The fabrics were knitted using 100% PAN yarns with Nm 1/15x2 on a E5 CMS 330 Stoll V-bed knitting machine, and have been tested using INSTROM 5587 Tensile Testing Machine in respect of standards conditions. After a relaxation period, 15 specimens were prepared, being disposed at 0°, 45 and 90 angles to the wale direction on the flat knitted panel. The tensile strength and the elongation values were recorded and mean values were computed. After strength and tensile elongation testing for 3 types of rib based knitted fabrics, one can see that the double layer knit presents the best mechanical behavior, followed by birds-eyebacking 2 colors Jacquard and then back striped Jacquard. For tensile stress in bias direction, the twillbacking Jacquard has a good breakage resistance value due to the higher number of rib sinker loops in structure that are positioned on the same direction with the tensile force. The twillbacking Jacquard structure could be considered as an alternative for the base material for decorative and home textile products.

  1. Hydrogen Assisted Cracking of High Strength Alloys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gangloff, Richard P

    2003-01-01

    ... (Irwin and Wells, 1997; Paris, 1998). Second, materials scientists developed metals with outstanding balances of high tensile strength and high fracture toughness (Garrison, 1990; Wells, 1993; Boyer, 1993...

  2. Microstructure-based simulations of the tensile strength of snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenmuller, P.; Theile, T.; Schneebeli, M.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of snow is essential to understand the formation of snow avalanches. In particular, the failure properties of snow are determinant in snow slab avalanche release. Direct experiments on snow are difficult to conduct and to interpret. First, seasonal snow is often a very fragile material which can be easily damaged before a mechanical test is finished. Second, natural snow is generally not homogenous, but consists of many thin layers. Thus, a direct mechanical test is in this case very difficult to interpret. This motivated us to implement a numerical simulation that uses the full 3D-structure of snow. The microstructure of snow samples was captured with a micro-computer tomograph and the tensile strength of the same samples was measured. A subvolume (about 30 mm3) of the zone where the fracture occurred in the mechanical test was numerically simulated. To this purpose, the mechanical properties of monocrystalline ice were considered to model the constitutive material of snow. Because the orientation of ice grains cannot be determined in adsorption tomography, orientation-averaged properties were used as a first approximation. The results show that the average simulated tensile strength is in good agreement with the measurements for the tested snow, rounded grains at a density of about 350 kg m-3. In a second approach, a geometrical grain selection algorithm was used to associate to each ice grain a specific c-axis and the corresponding oriented anisotropic stiffness and strength. This artificial orientation of ice grains does not modify significantly the elastic stress distribution in the snow sample but decreases slightly the effective tensile strength of snow compared to the simulation using orientation-averaged properties of ice. As a conclusion, even if the size of the simulated volume remains relatively small (about 30 mm3), the direct numerical simulation of the tensile strength of snow is possible and enables the investigation of the

  3. Tensile rock mass strength estimated using InSAR

    KAUST Repository

    Jonsson, Sigurjon

    2012-11-01

    The large-scale strength of rock is known to be lower than the strength determined from small-scale samples in the laboratory. However, it is not well known how strength scales with sample size. I estimate kilometer-scale tensional rock mass strength by measuring offsets across new tensional fractures (joints), formed above a shallow magmatic dike intrusion in western Arabia in 2009. I use satellite radar observations to derive 3D ground displacements and by quantifying the extension accommodated by the joints and the maximum extension that did not result in a fracture, I put bounds on the joint initiation threshold of the surface rocks. The results indicate that the kilometer-scale tensile strength of the granitic rock mass is 1–3 MPa, almost an order of magnitude lower than typical laboratory values.

  4. Evidence for low tensile strength in comet nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotanekova, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Lacerda, P.; Lowry, S. C.; Fernández, Y. R.; Green, S. F.; Tubiana, C.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Hsieh, H. H.

    2017-09-01

    We provide an updated study of the collective properties of Jupiter Family comets (JFCs) by increasing the sample of comets with well-studied rotation periods and surface characteristics. To collect the sample, we review the properties of 35 JFCs with published rotation rates and add new lightcurves and phase functions for nine JFCs observed between 2004 and 2015. We use the extended sample of 37 comets to characterise the bulk density, tensile strength, collisional history and surface properties of JFCs. Using the model for stability of rotating solid biaxial ellipsoids by Davidsson (2001), we conclude that none of the observed JFCs require tensile strength larger than 10-25 Pa to remain stable against rotational breakup.

  5. Tensile Strength of Epoxy Composites Reinforced with Fique Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altoé, Giulio Rodrigues; Netto, Pedro Amoy; Teles, Maria Carolina Andrade; Borges, Luiz Gustavo Xavier; Margem, Frederico Muylaert; Monteiro, Sergio Neves

    Environmentally friendly composites, made from natural fibers, are among the most investigated and applied today. Natural fibers have showed advantages, such as, flexibility and toughness, if compared with synthetic fibers. This work investigates the tensile strength of epoxy composites reinforced with Fique fibers. The Fique fiber was extracted from Fique leaf presents some significant characteristic, but until now only few studies on Fique fiber were performed. Composites reinforced with up to 30% in volume of long, continuous and aligned Fique fibers were tested in an Instron machine at room temperature. The incorporation of Fique fibers increases the tensile strength of the composite. After fracture the specimens were analyzed by a SEM (scanning electron microscope).

  6. Tensile strength of bilayered ceramics and corresponding glass veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anunmana, Chuchai; Champirat, Tharee; Jirajariyavej, Bundhit

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the microtensile bond strength between two all-ceramic systems; lithium disilicate glass ceramic and zirconia core ceramics bonded with their corresponding glass veneers. Blocks of core ceramics (IPS e.max® Press and Lava™ Frame) were fabricated and veneered with their corresponding glass veneers. The bilayered blocks were cut into microbars; 8 mm in length and 1 mm(2) in cross-sectional area (n = 30/group). Additionally, monolithic microbars of these two veneers (IPS e.max® Ceram and Lava™ Ceram; n = 30/group) were also prepared. The obtained microbars were tested in tension until fracture, and the fracture surfaces of the microbars were examined with fluorescent black light and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to identify the mode of failure. One-way ANOVA and the Dunnett's T3 test were performed to determine significant differences of the mean microtensile bond strength at a significance level of 0.05. The mean microtensile bond strength of IPS e.max® Press/IPS e.max® Ceram (43.40 ± 5.51 MPa) was significantly greater than that of Lava™ Frame/Lava™ Ceram (31.71 ± 7.03 MPa)(Pveneer layer. Furthermore, the bond strength of Lava™ Frame/Lava™ Ceram was comparable to the tensile strength of monolithic glass veneer of Lava™ Ceram, while the bond strength of bilayered IPS e.max® Press/IPS e.max® Ceram was significantly greater than tensile strength of monolithic IPS e.max® Ceram. Because fracture site occurred mostly in the glass veneer and most failures were away from the interfacial zone, microtensile bond test may not be a suitable test for bonding integrity. Fracture mechanics approach such as fracture toughness of the interface may be more appropriate to represent the bonding quality between two materials.

  7. Testing Tensile and Shear Epoxy Strength at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, S. J.; Doehne, C. J.; Johnson, W. L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper covers cryogenic, tensile testing and research completed on a number of epoxies used in cryogenic applications. Epoxies are used in many different applications; however, this research focused on the use of epoxy used to bond MLI standoffs to cryogenic storage tanks and the loads imparted to the tank through the MLI. To conduct testing, samples were made from bare stainless steel, aluminum and primed aluminum. Testing involved slowly cooling test samples with liquid nitrogen then applying gradually increasing tensile loads to the epoxy. The testing evaluated the strength and durability of epoxies at cryogenic temperatures and serves as a base for future testing. The results of the tests showed that some epoxies withstood the harsh conditions while others failed. The two epoxies yielding the best results were Masterbond EP29LPSP and Scotch Weld 2216. For all metal surfaces tested, both epoxies had zero failures for up to 11.81 kg of mass.

  8. Comparison of the Tensile, Creep, and Rupture Strength Properties of Stoichiometric SiC Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Tensile strength, creep strength, and rupture strength properties were measured for the following types of polymer-derived stoichiometric SiC fibers: Hi-Nicalon Type S from Nippon Carbon, Tyranno SA from Ube, and Sylramic from Dow Corning. Also included in this study were an earlier version of the SA fiber plus two recent developmental versions of the Sylramic fiber. The tensile strength measurements were made at room temperature on as-received fibers and on fibers after high-temperature inert exposure. The creep-rupture property data were obtained at 1400 deg C in air as well as, argon. Some fiber types showed strong effects of environment on their strength properties. These results are compared and discussed in terms of underlying mechanisms and implications for ceramic composites.

  9. Effects of conventional welding and laser welding on the tensile strength, ultimate tensile strength and surface characteristics of two cobalt-chromium alloys: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhan Kumar, Seenivasan; Sethumadhava, Jayesh Raghavendra; Anand Kumar, Vaidyanathan; Manita, Grover

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laser welding and conventional welding on the tensile strength and ultimate tensile strength of the cobalt-chromium alloy. Samples were prepared with two commercially available cobalt-chromium alloys (Wironium plus and Diadur alloy). The samples were sectioned and the broken fragments were joined using Conventional and Laser welding techniques. The welded joints were subjected to tensile and ultimate tensile strength testing; and scanning electron microscope to evaluate the surface characteristics at the welded site. Both on laser welding as well as on conventional welding technique, Diadur alloy samples showed lesser values when tested for tensile and ultimate tensile strength when compared to Wironium alloy samples. Under the scanning electron microscope, the laser welded joints show uniform welding and continuous molt pool all over the surface with less porosity than the conventionally welded joints. Laser welding is an advantageous method of connecting or repairing cast metal prosthetic frameworks.

  10. Various conditioning methods for root canals influencing the tensile strength of titanium posts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmage, P.; Sohn, J.; Nergiz, I.; Ozcan, M.; Nergiz, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Conditioning the root canal is frequently advised to achieve high post-retention when resin composite luting cements are used. However, Manufacturers’ instructions for this purpose differ widely from one another. The aim of this study was to compare the tensile bond strengths of passive, tapered,

  11. Effect of the CO2 milliwatt laser on tensile strength of microsutures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menovsky, T.; Beek, J. F.; van Gemert, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Laser-assisted tissue repair is often accompanied by a high dehiscence rate, which may be due to alterations in suture material after laser exposure. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the tensile strength of microsurgical suture material. 10-0 nylon and

  12. Brazilian Tensile Strength of Anisotropic Rocks: Review and New Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianshou Ma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Strength anisotropy is one of the most distinct features of anisotropic rocks, and it also normally reveals strong anisotropy in Brazilian test Strength (“BtS”. Theoretical research on the “BtS” of anisotropic rocks is seldom performed, and in particular some significant factors, such as the anisotropic tensile strength of anisotropic rocks, the initial Brazilian disc fracture points, and the stress distribution on the Brazilian disc, are often ignored. The aim of the present paper is to review the state of the art in the experimental studies on the “BtS” of anisotropic rocks since the pioneering work was introduced in 1964, and to propose a novel theoretical method to underpin the failure mechanisms and predict the “BtS” of anisotropic rocks under Brazilian test conditions. The experimental data of Longmaxi Shale-I and Jixi Coal were utilized to verify the proposed method. The results show the predicted “BtS” results show strong agreement with experimental data, the maximum error is only ~6.55% for Longmaxi Shale-I and ~7.50% for Jixi Coal, and the simulated failure patterns of the Longmaxi Shale-I are also consistent with the test results. For the Longmaxi Shale-I, the Brazilian disc experiences tensile failure of the intact rock when 0° ≤ βw ≤ 24°, shear failure along the weakness planes when 24° ≤ βw ≤ 76°, and tensile failure along the weakness planes when 76° ≤ βw ≤ 90°. For the Jixi Coal, the Brazilian disc experiences tensile failure when 0° ≤ βw ≤ 23° or 76° ≤ βw ≤ 90°, shear failure along the butt cleats when 23° ≤ βw ≤ 32°, and shear failure along the face cleats when 32° ≤ βw ≤ 76°. The proposed method can not only be used to predict the “BtS” and underpin the failure mechanisms of anisotropic rocks containing a single group of weakness planes, but can also be generalized for fractured rocks containing multi-groups of weakness planes.

  13. Tensile strength of various nylon PA6 specimen modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Karel; Zahalka, Martin

    2017-05-01

    This article explores the influence of production technique on the strength of nylon parts. Identical specimens were manufactured by various techniques. The material of specimens was nylon PA6. 3D printing and injection molding were used, with various orientations of printed layers, and various orientations of specimens in the working space of the 3D printer. The variants are described in detail. A special mold was used for the injection molding process in order to make specimens with and without a weld line. The effect of this weld line was evaluated. All specimens were tested using the standard tensile test configuration. The strength was compared. It was found that the same plastic material has very different mechanical properties depending on the production process.

  14. Effect of Gap Distance on Tensile Strength of Preceramic Base Metal Solder Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Fattahi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. In order to fabricate prostheses with high accuracy and durability, soldering techniques have been introduced to clinical dentistry. However, these prostheses always fail at their solder joints. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of gap distance on the tensile strength of base metal solder joints. Materials and methods. Based on ADA/ISO 9693 specifications for tensile test, 40 specimens were fabricated from a Ni-Cr alloy and cut at the midpoint of 3-mm diameter bar and placed at desired positions by a specially designed device. The specimens were divided into four groups of 10 samples according to the desired solder gap distance: Group1: 0.1mm; Group2: 0.25mm; Group3: 0.5mm; and Group4: 0.75mm. After soldering, specimens were tested for tensile strength by a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5mm/min with a preload of 10N. Results. The mean tensile strength values of the groups were 162, 307.8, 206.1 and 336.7 MPa, respectively. The group with 0.75-mm gap had the highest and the group with 0.1-mm gap had the lowest tensile strength. Bonferroni test showed that Group1 and Group4 had statistically different values (P=0.023, but the differences between other groups were not significant at a significance level of 0.05. Conclusion. There was no direct relationship between increasing soldering gap distance and tensile strength of the solder joints.

  15. Improvement in Tensile Strength of Bamboo Knitted Fabric by Sol-Gel Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awais Khatri

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Textiles made of bamboo regenerated fibre are reported to have lower tensile strength than the other cellulosic fibres, due to high porosity of the fibre. This paper was aimed to modify the bamboo knitted fabric by the sol-gel coating to improve the tensile strength with minimum effect on its inherent morphology and ultimate relevant properties such as good absorbency and air permeability. The paddry- bake process was employed for the coating where tetraethyl-orthosilicate and nano-titanium-dioxide were used as the active ingredients. The treated fabrics were tested for the tensile behaviour in terms of breaking strength and elongation and the sol-gel process recipe and parameters were optimised. The absorbency, air-permeability and washing durability of the coating were also tested for the optimised process. Results showed the increase in tensile strength of the fabric by sol-gel coating, whereas absorbency and air-permeability were almost unaffected. The coating results were unaffected even after a washing treatment (equivalent to 5 industrial washings. Additionally, the wrinkle recovery angle of the coated fabric was also tested and found improved.

  16. Evaluation of ultimate tensile strength using Miniature Disk Bend Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kundan; Pooleery, Arun; Madhusoodanan, K.; Singh, R. N.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Shriwastaw, R. S.; Dutta, B. K.; Sinha, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    Correlations for evaluation of Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) using Miniature Disk Bend Test (MDBT) or Small Punch Test (SPT) has been an open issue since the development of the techniques. The larger plastic strains, in tri-axial state of stress during SPT, make the translation to the equivalent uniaxial parameter less certain. Correlations based on Pmax of load-displacement curve are also in disagreement as the point corresponding to Pmax does not represent a necking situation as in case of UTS, in a uniaxial tensile test. In present work, an attempt has been made for locating necking zone, which appears prior to Pmax, through experiments and FEM analyses. Experimental results on disk specimens from 20MnMoNi55, CrMoV ferritic steel and SS304LN materials along with FEM analyses found that load corresponding to 0.48 mm displacement is to be very close to the necking zone, and gives best fit for a UTS correlation.

  17. Effect of Fibre Hybridization on Compressive Strength, Split Tensile Strength and Water Permeability of SFRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M P Singh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of an investigation conducted to study the compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability of fibre concrete mixes containing steel fibres in mono, binary and ternary combinations. Steel fibres of different lengths i.e. 12.5 mm, 25 mm and 50 mm having constant diameter of 0.6 mm were used to obtain mono, binary and ternary combinations. A reference concrete mix with no fibres was also used for comparison purpose. The total fibre volume fraction was kept at 1.0% in all the mixes. Compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability tests were conducted of specimens of size 100 x 100 x 100 mm after 28 days of curing.  It has been observed that a fibre combination of 33% 12.5 mm + 33% 25 mm + 33% 50 mm long fibres can be adjudged as the most appropriate combination to be employed  in HySFRC for compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability.

  18. Tensile strength and the mining of black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adam R

    2013-11-22

    There are a number of important thought experiments that involve raising and lowering boxes full of radiation in the vicinity of black hole horizons. This Letter looks at the limitations placed on these thought experiments by the null energy condition, which imposes a fundamental bound on the tensile-strength-to-weight ratio of the materials involved, makes it impossible to build a box near the horizon that is wider than a single wavelength of the Hawking quanta, and puts a severe constraint on the operation of "space elevators" near black holes. In particular, it is shown that proposals for mining black holes by lowering boxes near the horizon, collecting some Hawking radiation, and dragging it out to infinity cannot proceed nearly as rapidly as has previously been claimed. As a consequence of this limitation, the boxes and all the moving parts are superfluous and black holes can be destroyed equally rapidly by threading the horizon with strings.

  19. Low tensile strength in older concrete structures with alkali-silica reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemes, A.J.M.; Visser, J.H.M.

    2000-01-01

    During an extensive investigation of some 25 concrete bridges and other structures suffer-ing from alkali-silica reaction it has been found that the uniaxial tensile strength of the concrete was extremely low in relation to both the compressive strength and the splitting tensile strength. It is

  20. Tensile strength of tablets containing two materials with a different compaction behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Veen, B.; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees; Bolhuis, G.K.; Zuurman, K.; Frijlink, H.W.

    2000-01-01

    The tensile strength of tablets compressed from binary mixtures is in general not linearly related to the strength of tablets prepared from single materials; in many cases it shows a decreased tensile strength relative to interpolation. The materials used in this study, sodium chloride and

  1. Flexural and tensile bond strength, related via a stochastic numerical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluijm, R. van der

    1998-01-01

    The flexural strength of masonry parallel to the bed joint depends on the geometry of the cross section, tensile bond strength, fracture energy, stiffness of units and of mortar joints. In experiments, tensile bond strength and fracture energy determined on relatively small specimens, show a large

  2. Prediction of Tensile Strength of Nano-short-fiber-reinforced Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Da Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tensile strength of nano-short-fiber-reinforced rubber composites (NFRC was studied. A new model for predicting the tensile strength of NFRC was put forward based on the mixture law. The influences of the volume content and mechanical performances of main components, short fiber critical aspect ratio, short fiber length and orientation distributions on the tensile strength of composites were investigated. The tensile strengths predicted by the model in this paper are in good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the mechanism of tensile fracture of SFRE was discussed. It is found that the tensile fracture of the composites depends largely on the bonding strength of fiber-matrix interface and the length of reinforcing short fibers.

  3. Tensile Strength Reliability Analysis of Cu48Zr48Al4 Amorphous Microwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichao Sun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Uniform Cu48Zr48Al4 amorphous microwires with a high surface quality are fabricated by a melt extraction technique. The mechanical property of microwires is evaluated via tensile tests. To estimate the strength scattering, statistical analysis of fracture strengths is conducted using logarithmic normal distribution, and two- and three-parameter Weibull analysis, severally. The results show that the tensile strengths of Cu48Zr48Al4 amorphous microwires range from 1724 to 1937 MPa with the arithmetical average value of 1836 MPa, and the arithmetical standard deviation of 56.4 MPa. The geometric mean of fracture strength is 1840 MPa using logarithmic normal distribution statistical analysis. Using two- and three-parameter Weibull analysis, the Weibull modulus and fracture threshold value are respectively calculated for 34.8 and 1483 MPa, which shows the excellent tensile mechanical properties with a high predictability of Cu48Zr48Al4 amorphous microwires and further indicates the great potential of application.

  4. Flexural and diametral tensile strength of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Della Bona

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the flexural strength (sf and the diametral tensile strength (st of light-cured composite resins, testing the hypothesis that there is a positive relation between these properties. Twenty specimens were fabricated for each material (Filtek Z250- 3M-Espe; AM- Amelogen, Ultradent; VE- Vit-l-escence, Ultradent; EX- Esthet-X, Dentsply/Caulk, following ISO 4049 and ANSI/ADA 27 specifications and the manufacturers’ instructions. For the st test, cylindrical shaped (4 mm x 6 mm specimens (n = 10 were placed with their long axes perpendicular to the applied compressive load at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The sf was measured using the 3-point bending test, in which bar shaped specimens (n = 10 were tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Both tests were performed in a universal testing machine (EMIC 2000 recording the fracture load (N. Strength values (MPa were calculated and statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey (a = 0.05. The mean and standard deviation values (MPa were Z250-45.06 ± 5.7; AM-35.61 ± 5.4; VE-34.45 ± 7.8; and EX-42.87 ± 6.6 for st; and Z250-126.52 ± 3.3; AM-87.75 ± 3.8; VE-104.66 ± 4.4; and EX-119.48 ± 2.1 for sf. EX and Z250 showed higher st and sf values than the other materials evaluated (p < 0.05, which followed a decreasing trend of mean values. The results confirmed the study hypothesis, showing a positive relation between the material properties examined.

  5. Dynamic rock tensile strengths of Laurentian granite: Experimental observation and micromechanical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiwen Xia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tensile strength is an important material property for rocks. In applications where rocks are subjected to dynamic loads, the dynamic tensile strength is the controlling parameter. Similar to the study of static tensile strength, there are various methods proposed to measure the dynamic tensile strength of rocks. Here we examine dynamic tensile strength values of Laurentian granite (LG measured from three methods: dynamic direct tension, dynamic Brazilian disc (BD test, and dynamic semi-circular bending (SCB. We found that the dynamic tensile strength from direct tension has the lowest value, and the dynamic SCB gives the highest strength at a given loading rate. Because the dynamic direct tension measures the intrinsic rock tensile strength, it is thus necessary to reconcile the differences in strength values between the direct tension and the other two methods. We attribute the difference between the dynamic BD results and the direct tension results to the overload and internal friction in BD tests. The difference between the dynamic SCB results and the direct tension results can be understood by invoking the non-local failure theory. It is shown that, after appropriate corrections, the dynamic tensile strengths from the two other tests can be reduced to those from direct tension.

  6. Change of Tensile Properties of High Cr Ferritic/Martensitic Stainless Steel after Irradiation at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Ryu, W. S.; Cho, Hae Dong; Han, Chang Hee; Ahn, S. B.; Choo, K. N

    2005-12-15

    In present study, we evaluated the irradiation properties of high Cr ferritic/martensitic steels. These steels were irradiated in HANARO for 14 days at 297{+-}5 .deg. C, and for 15 days at 307{+-}5 .deg. C, and then the fluence was 2.9x10{sup 20}n/cm{sup 2} (E>1.0Mev). High temperature tensile test after irradiation was performed at hot cell in IMEF. Tensile test temperature range was from room temperature to 700 .deg. C. The yield and ultimate tensile strength of specimens increased, and the elongation of specimens decreased by neutron irradiation. Especially elongation was greatly decreased. As the tensile test temperature increased, the increase of strength by irradiation was diminished. But elongation was not recovered at high temperature tensile test. As the irradiation fluence increased, the increase of yield and tensile strength became larger. But the elongation was not influenced by the increase of irradiation fluence.

  7. Tensile strength of biological fibrin sealants: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Laurence; Le Dem, Nicolas; Bubenheim, Michael; Tsilividis, Basile; Mezghani, Julien; Schwartz, Lilian; Francois, Arnaud; Ertaud, Jean Yves; Bagot d'Arc, Maurice; Scotté, Michel

    2012-08-01

    Fibrin sealants are commonly used in liver surgery, although their effectiveness in routine clinical practice remains controversial. Individual sealant characteristics are based on hemostatic effects and adhesion properties that can be experimentally measured using the 'rat skin test' or the 'pig skin test'. This study used a more relevant and realistic experimental canine model to compare the differences in the adhesive properties of four fibrin sealants in hepatectomy: Tisseel/Tissucol, Tachosil, Quixil, and Beriplast. A partial hepatectomy was performed in beagle dogs under general anesthesia to obtain liver cross-sections. Fibrin sealants were allocated to dog livers using a Youden square design. The tensile strength measurement was performed using a traction system to measure the rupture stress point of a small wooden cylinder bonded to the liver cross-section. Significantly greater adhesion properties were observed with Tisseel/Tissucol compared with Quixil or Beriplast (P = 0.002 and 0.001, respectively). Similarly, Tachosil demonstrated significantly greater adhesive properties compared with Beriplast (P = 0.009) or Quixil (P = 0.014). No significant differences were observed between Tisseel/Tissucol and Tachosil or between Beriplast and Quixil. The results of this comparative study demonstrate that different fibrin sealants exhibit different adhesive properties. Tisseel/Tissucol and Tachosil provided greatest adhesion to liver cross-section in our canine model of hepatectomy. These results may enable the optimal choice of fibrin sealants for this procedure in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of processing on defects and tensile strength of single flax fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslan, Mustafa; Mehmood, Shahid; Madsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    This study is to investigate the influence of consecutive processing steps on the defects and the tensile strength of single flax fibres. It was found that each processing step leads to an increasing number of defects and larger defect sizes, as well as decreasing tensile strength of the fibres....

  9. Guidelines to come to minimized tensile strength loss upon cellulase application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenting, H.B.M.; Lenting, H.B.M.; Warmoeskerken, Marinus

    2001-01-01

    Application of cellulase technology in the textile production process often results in a certain loss of tensile strength along with the desired performance. In this paper guidelines are given how to come to minimization or even prevention of tensile strength loss. Part of the considerations is

  10. Fluid stiction modeling for quickly separating plates considering the liquid tensile strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik C.

    2015-01-01

    the time dependent fluid stiction phenomenon, including a fluid tensile strength and cavitation effects, is proposed. The model is based on Reynolds theory, and the pressure distribution in the liquid zone is solved analytically for each time step, leading to a computationally efficient model without...... given that proper selections of liquid tensile strength and initial plate distance are made....

  11. environmental effects on tensile strength and other mechanical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    strength) as in aerospace parts subjected to thermal spiking (rapid excursions to high temperatures) with subsequent high strain rates [3 ]. Appropriate quality control procedures and production details are employed to minimize the effects of production related defects which cannot be completely eliminated, as shown by the ...

  12. Effect of laser welding on the titanium ceramic tensile bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Galo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Titanium reacts strongly with elements, mainly oxygen at high temperature. The high temperature of titanium laser welding modifies the surface, and may interfere on the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength. OBJECTIVE: The influence of laser welding on the titanium-ceramic bonding has not yet been established. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the influence of laser welding applied to commercially pure titanium (CpTi substructure on the bond strength of commercial ceramic. The influence of airborne particle abrasion (Al2O3 conditions was also studied. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty CpTi cylindrical rods (3 mm x 60 mm were cast and divided into 2 groups: with laser welding (L and without laser welding (WL. Each group was divided in 4 subgroups, according to the size of the particles used in airborne particle abrasion: A - Al2O3 (250 µm; B - Al2O3 (180 µm; C - Al2O3 (110 µm; D - Al2O3 (50 µm. Ceramic rings were fused around the CpTi rods. Specimens were invested and their tensile strength was measured at fracture with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min and 200 kgf load cell. Statistical analysis was carried out with analysis of variance and compared using the independent t test (p<0.05. RESULTS: Significant differences were found among all subgroups (p<0.05. The highest and the lowest bond strength means were recorded in subgroups WLC (52.62 MPa and LD (24.02 MPa, respectively. CONCLUSION: Airborne particle abrasion yielded significantly lower bond strength as the Al2O3 particle size decreased. Mechanical retention decreased in the laser-welded specimens, i.e. the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength was lower.

  13. Carboxyl functionalized carbon fibers with preserved tensile strength and electrochemical performance used as anodes of structural lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Mengjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Shubin, E-mail: shubinwang@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yu, Yalin; Feng, Qihang; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Boming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Carboxyl functionalized CF is acquired by simple chemical oxidation method. • These CF have preserved the tensile strength, better electrochemical properties. • The presence of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} prevented the turbostratic carbon from over-oxidization. • There CF can be used as anodes of multifunctional structural battery. • The preservation and improvement is result from the hindered over-oxidization. - Abstract: Carboxyl functionalized carbon fibers with preserved tensile strength and electrochemical properties were acquired through a simple chemical oxidation method, and the proposed underlying mechanism was verified. The surface of carboxyl functionalizing carbon fibers is necessary in acquiring functional groups on the surface of carbon fibers to further improve the thermal, electrical or mechanical properties of the fibers. Functionalization should preserve the tensile strength and electrochemical properties of carbon fibers, because the anodes of structural batteries need to have high strength and electrochemical properties. Functionalized with mixed H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/HNO{sub 3} considerably reduced the tensile strength of carbon fibers. By contrast, the appearance of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} preserved the tensile strength of functionalized carbon fibers, reduced the dispersion level of tensile strength values, and effectively increased the concentration of functional acid groups on the surface of carbon fibers. The presence of phosphoric acid hindered the over-oxidation of turbostratic carbon, and consequently preserved the tensile strength of carbon fibers. The increased proportion of turbostratic carbon on the surface of carbon fibers concurrently enhanced the electrochemical properties of carbon fibers.

  14. Coating of carbon nanotube fibers: variation of tensile properties, failure behavior and adhesion strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäder, Edith; Liu, Jian-Wen; Hiller, Janett; Lu, Weibang; Li, Qingwen; Zhandarov, Serge; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2015-07-01

    An experimental study of the tensile properties of CNT fibers and their interphasial behavior in epoxy matrices is reported. One of the most promising applications of CNT fibers is their use as reinforcement in multifunctional composites. For this purpose, an increase of the tensile strength of the CNT fibers in unidirectional composites as well as strong interfacial adhesion strength is desirable. However, the mechanical performance of the CNT fiber composites manufactured so far is comparable to that of commercial fiber composites. The interfacial properties of CNT fiber/polymer composites have rarely been investigated and provided CNT fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength of 14.4 MPa studied by the microbond test. In order to improve the mechanical performance of the CNT fibers, an epoxy compatible coating with nano-dispersed aqueous based polymeric film formers and low viscous epoxy resin, respectively, was applied. For impregnation of high homogeneity, low molecular weight epoxy film formers and polyurethane film formers were used. The aqueous based epoxy film formers were not crosslinked and able to interdiffuse with the matrix resin after impregnation. Due to good wetting of the individual CNT fibers by the film formers, the degree of activation of the fibers was improved leading to increased tensile strength and Young’s modulus. Cyclic tensile loading and simultaneous determination of electric resistance enabled to characterize the fiber’s durability in terms of elastic recovery and hysteresis. The pull-out tests and SEM study reveal different interfacial failure mechanisms in CNT fiber/epoxy systems for untreated and film former treated fibers, on the one hand, and epoxy resin treated ones, on the other hand. The epoxy resin penetrated between the CNT bundles in the reference or film former coated fiber, forming a relatively thick CNT/epoxy composite layer and thus shifting the fracture zone within the fiber. In contrast to this, shear sliding along

  15. Coating of carbon nanotube fibers: variation of tensile properties, failure behavior and adhesion strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith eMäder

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the tensile properties of CNT fibers and their interphasial behavior in epoxy matrices is reported. One of the most promising applications of CNT fibers is their use as reinforcement in multifunctional composites. For this purpose, an increase of the tensile strength of the CNT fibers in unidirectional composites as well as strong interfacial adhesion strength is desirable. However, the mechanical performance of the CNT fiber composites manufactured so far is comparable to that of commercial fiber composites. The interfacial properties of CNT fiber/polymer composites have rarely been investigated and provided CNT fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength of 14.4 MPa studied by the microbond test.In order to improve the mechanical performance of the CNT fibers, an epoxy compatible coating with nano-dispersed aqueous based polymeric film formers and low viscous epoxy resin, respectively, was applied. For impregnation of high homogeneity, low molecular weight epoxy film formers and polyurethane film formers were used. The aqueous based epoxy film formers were not crosslinked and able to interdiffuse with the matrix resin after impregnation. Due to good wetting of the individual CNT fibers by the film formers, the degree of activation of the fibers was improved leading to increased tensile strength and Young’s modulus. Cyclic tensile loading and simultaneous determination of electric resistance enabled to characterize the fiber’s durability in terms of elastic recovery and hysteresis.The pull-out tests and SEM study reveal different interfacial failure mechanisms in CNT fiber/epoxy systems for untreated and film former treated fibers, on the one hand, and epoxy resin treated ones, on the other hand. The epoxy resin penetrated between the CNT bundles in the reference or film former coated fiber, forming a relatively thick CNT/epoxy composite layer and thus shifting the fracture zone within the fiber. In contrast to this

  16. Enhancements in crystallinity, thermal stability, tensile modulus and strength of sisal fibres and their PP composites induced by the synergistic effects of alkali and high intensity ultrasound (HIU) treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaiah, Prakash; Ratnam, Chantara Thevy; Manickam, Sivakumar

    2017-01-01

    In this investigation, sisal fibres were treated with the combination of alkali and high intensity ultrasound (HIU) and their effects on the morphology, thermal properties of fibres and mechanical properties of their reinforced PP composites were studied. FTIR and FE-SEM results confirmed the removal of amorphous materials such as hemicellulose, lignin and other waxy materials after the combined treatments of alkali and ultrasound. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed an increase in the crystallinity of sisal fibres with an increase in the concentration of alkali. Thermogravimetric results revealed that the thermal stability of sisal fibres obtained with the combination of both alkali and ultrasound treatment was increased by 38.5°C as compared to the untreated fibres. Morphology of sisal fibre reinforced composites showed good interfacial interaction between fibres and matrix after the combined treatment. Tensile properties were increased for the combined treated sisal fibres reinforced PP composites as compared to the untreated and pure PP. Tensile modulus and strength increased by more than 50% and 10% respectively as compared to the untreated sisal fibre reinforced composite. It has been found that the combined treatment of alkali and ultrasound is effective and useful to remove the amorphous materials and hence to improve the mechanical and thermal properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Symbiosis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Robinia pseudoacacia L. Improves Root Tensile Strength and Soil Aggregate Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Liu, Zhenkun; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust) is a widely planted tree species on Loess Plateau for revegetation. Due to its symbiosis forming capability with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, we explored the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass, root morphology, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability in a pot experiment. We inoculated R. pseudoacacia with/without AM fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus versiforme), and measured root colonization, plant growth, root morphological characters, root tensile force and tensile strength, and parameters for soil aggregate stability at twelve weeks after inoculation. AM fungi colonized more than 70% plant root, significantly improved plant growth. Meanwhile, AM fungi elevated root morphological parameters, root tensile force, root tensile strength, Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) content in soil, and parameters for soil aggregate stability such as water stable aggregate (WSA), mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD). Root length was highly correlated with WSA, MWD and GMD, while hyphae length was highly correlated with GRSP content. The improved R. pseudoacacia growth, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability indicated that AM fungi could accelerate soil fixation and stabilization with R. pseudoacacia, and its function in revegetation on Loess Plateau deserves more attention.

  18. Evaluation of the tensile strength of the human ureter - Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Yaniv; Pichamuthu, Joseph E; Averch, Timothy D; Vorp, David A

    2014-09-15

    Introduction: Ureteral injuries such as avulsion are directly related to mechanical damage of the ureter. Understanding the tensile strength of this tissue may assist in prevention of iatrogenic injuries. Few published studies have looked at the mechanical properties of the animal ureter, and of those none have determined the tensile strength of the human ureter. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to determine the tensile strength of the human ureter. Materials and Methods: We harvested 11 human proximal ureters from patients who were undergoing nephrectomy for either kidney tumors or non-functioning kidney. The specimens were then cut into multiple circumferentially and longitudinally-oriented tissue strips for tensile testing. Strips were uniaxially stretched to failure in a tensile testing machine. The corresponding force and displacement were recorded. Finally, stress at failure was noted as the tensile strength of the sample. Circumferential tensile strength was also compared in the proximal and distal regions of the specimens. Results: The tensile strength of the ureter in circumferential and longitudinal orientations was found to be 457.52±33.74 Ncm-2 and 902.43±122.08 Ncm-2, respectively (pstrength in the proximal portion of the ureter was 409.89±35.13 Ncm-2 in comparison to 502.89±55.85 Ncm-2 in the distal portion (p=0.08). Conclusions: The circumferential tensile strength of the ureter was found to be significantly lower than the longitudinal strength. Circumferential tensile strength was also lower with more proximal parts of the ureter. This information may be important for the design of "intelligent" devices and simulators in order to prevent complications.

  19. Evaluation of the tensile strength of the human ureter--preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Yaniv; Pichamuthu, Joseph E; Averch, Timothy D; Vorp, David A

    2014-12-01

    Ureteral injuries such as avulsion are directly related to mechanical damage of the ureter. Understanding the tensile strength of this tissue may assist in prevention of iatrogenic injuries. Few published studies have looked at the mechanical properties of the animal ureter and, of those, none has determined the tensile strength of the human ureter. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to determine the tensile strength of the human ureter. We harvested 11 human proximal ureters from patients who were undergoing nephrectomy for either kidney tumors or nonfunctioning kidney. The specimens were then cut into multiple circumferentially and longitudinally oriented tissue strips for tensile testing. Strips were uniaxially stretched to failure in a tensile testing machine. The corresponding force and displacement were recorded. Finally, stress at failure was noted as the tensile strength of the sample. Circumferential tensile strength was also compared in the proximal and distal regions of the specimens. The tensile strength of the ureter in circumferential and longitudinal orientations was found to be 457.52±33.74 Ncm(-2) and 902.43±122.08 Ncm(-2), respectively (Pureter was 409.89±35.13 Ncm(-2) in comparison with 502.89±55.85 Ncm(-2) in the distal portion (P=0.08). The circumferential tensile strength of the ureter was found to be significantly lower than the longitudinal strength. Circumferential tensile strength was also lower with more proximal parts of the ureter. This information may be important for the design of "intelligent" devices and simulators to prevent complications.

  20. Effect of Flux Composition on the Percentage Elongation and Tensile Strength of Welds in Submerged Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Brijpal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This experimental study reveals the effects of CaF2, FeMn and NiO additions to the base fluxes on tensile strength and percentage elongation of the weld metal. The aim of this study is to develop suitable flux for mild steel for high tensile strength, impact strength and ductility. Bead on plate welds were made using submerged arc welding process. Mathematical model for percentage elongation and UTS of mild steel welds were made. The elements transfer to the welds have been correlated with the above mechanical performance characteristics. The effect of oxygen content on weld elongation and UTS also has been deduced. This study shows that CaF2 and NiO are the significant factors for tensile strength while FeMn is not significant for tensile strength. However, for elongation besides CaF2, the interaction of CaF2 and FeMn was also found significant. The effects of basicity index of the flux and carbon equivalent of the welds on tensile strength and percentage elongation of the welds have also been evaluated.

  1. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 103 to 104 s-1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  2. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations.

  3. On the Processing of Spalling Experiments. Part I: Identification of the Dynamic Tensile Strength of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forquin, P.; Lukić, B.

    2017-11-01

    The spalling technique based on the use of a single Hopkinson bar put in contact with the tested sample has been widely adopted as a reliable method for obtaining the tensile response of concrete and rock-like materials at strain rates up-to 200 s- 1. However, the traditional processing method, based on the use of Novikov acoustic approach and the rear face velocity measurement, remains quite questionable due to strong approximations of this data processing method. Recently a new technique for deriving cross-sectional stress fields of a spalling sample filmed with an ultra-high speed camera and based on using the full field measurements and the virtual fields method (VFM) was proposed. In the present work, this topic is perused by performing several spalling tests on ordinary concrete at high acquisition speed of 1Mfps to accurately measure the tensile strength, Young's modulus, strain-rate at failure and stress-strain response of concrete at high strain-rate. The stress-strain curves contain more measurement points for a more reliable identification. The observed tensile stiffness is up-to 50% lower than the initial compressive stiffness and the obtained peak stress was about 20% lower than the one obtained by applying the Novikov method. In order to support this claim, numerical simulations were performed to show that the change of stiffness between compression and tension highly affects the rear-face velocity profile. This further suggests that the processing based only on the velocity "pullback" is quite sensitive and can produce an overestimate of the tensile strength in concrete and rock-like materials.

  4. On the dynamic tensile strength of an FCC metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Neil; Jones, David; Fensin, Saryu; Trujillo, Carl; Martinez, Daniel; Gray, George T., III

    2017-06-01

    The tensile response of polycrystalline metals is often accompanied by the formation of pores within the structure of the material. This large deformation process is broadly identified as progressive with nucleation, growth, coalescence, and failure the physical path taken over very short periods of time. These are well known to be complex processes strongly influenced by microstructure, loading path, and the loading profile, which remains a significant challenge to represent and predict numerically. In a previous study, the influence of loading path on the damage evolution in high-purity tantalum has been presented; in this paper we present complimentary measurement on a pure FCC copper. Samples were shock loaded to three different peak shock stresses using both symmetric impact, and two different composite flyer plate configurations such that upon unloading the three samples displayed nearly identical ``pull-back'' signals as measured via rear-surface velocimetry. The damage evolution in the ``soft'' recovered copper samples was quantified using optical metallography, electron-back-scatter diffraction, and tomography. We shall compare metallurgical observations, velocimetry histories and one dimensional simulations to discuss dynamic failure mechanisms in this metal.

  5. Comparison of tensile strength of different carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Maria Faulstich de Paiva; Sérgio Mayer; Mirabel Cerqueira Rezende

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fabric/epoxy composites are materials used in aeronautical industry to manufacture several components as flaps, aileron, landing-gear doors and others. To evaluate these materials become important to know their mechanical properties, for example, the tensile strength. Tensile tests are usually performed in aeronautical industry to determinate tensile property data for material specifications, quality assurance and structural analysis. For this work, it was manufactured four different l...

  6. SIZE EFFECTS IN THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF UNIDIRECTIONAL FIBER COMPOSITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. SIVASAMBU; ET AL

    1999-08-01

    Monte Carlo simulation and theoretical modeling are used to study the statistical failure modes in unidirectional composites consisting of elastic fibers in an elastic matrix. Both linear and hexagonal fiber arrays are considered, forming 2D and 3D composites, respectively. Failure is idealized using the chain-of-bundles model in terms of {delta}-bundles of length {delta}, which is the length-scale of fiber load transfer. Within each {delta}-bundle, fiber load redistribution is determined by local load-sharing models that approximate the in-plane fiber load redistribution from planar break clusters as predicted from 2D and 3D shear-lag models. As a result these models are 1D and 2D, respectively. Fiber elements have random strengths following either the Weibull or the power-law distribution with shape and scale parameters {rho} and {sigma}{sub {delta}}, respectively. Simulations of {delta}-bundle failure, reveal two regimes. When fiber strength variability is low (roughly {rho} > 2) the dominant failure mode is by growing clusters of fiber breaks up to instability. When this variability is high (roughly 0 < {rho} < 1) cluster formation is suppressed by a dispersed fiber failure mode. For these two cases, closed-form approximations to the strength distribution of a {delta}-bundle are developed under the local load-sharing model and an equal load-sharing model of Daniels, respectively. The results compare favorably with simulations on {delta}-bundles with up to 1500 fibers. The location of the transition in terms of {rho} is affected by the upper tail properties of the fiber strength distributions as well as the number of fibers.

  7. ZrO2 nanoparticles' effects on split tensile strength of self compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, split tensile strength of self compacting concrete with different amount of ZrO2 nanoparticles has been investigated. ZrO2 nanoparticles with the average particle size of 15 nm were added partially to cement paste (Portland cement together with polycarboxylate superplasticizer and split tensile strength of the specimens has been measured. The results indicate that ZrO2 nanoparticles are able to improve split tensile strength of concrete and recover the negative effects of polycarboxylate superplasticizer. ZrO2 nanoparticle as a partial replacement of cement up to 4 wt. (% could accelerate C-S-H gel formation as a result of increased crystalline Ca(OH2 amount at the early age of hydration. The increased the ZrO2 nanoparticles' content more than 4 wt. (%, causes the reduced the split tensile strength because of unsuitable dispersion of nanoparticles in the concrete matrix.

  8. Assessing tablet bond types from structural features that affect tablet tensile strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, H; Nyström, C

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this article was to study the possibility of assessing the structural features affecting tablet tensile strength to obtain information on the dominating bond types, i.e. interparticulate attractions, in tablets. The features of the internal tablet structure considered to be important for tablet tensile strength were assessed using a simple tablet model for tablets made from seven materials: potassium chloride, sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, lactose, sucrose, microcrystalline cellulose, and ascorbic acid. Tablet porosity and particle size (measured as external specific surface area by permeametry) were the structural features that best correlated with tablet tensile strength. These features were described by a "structural factor," which was combined with tablet tensile strength, as an "interaction factor," to reflect the dominating bond types in tablets. The qualitative results gave dominating bond types in the tablets studied that matched the results of earlier studies, thus supporting the applicability of the method.

  9. Effects of the phase fractions on the carbide morphologies, Charpy and tensile properties in SA508 Gr.4N High Strength Low Alloy RPV Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Wee, Dang Moon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    To improve the strength and toughness of RPV (reactor pressure vessel) steels for nuclear power plants, an effective way is the change of material specification from tempered bainitic SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel into tempered martensitic/bainitic SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. It is known that the phase fractions of martensitic/bainitic steels are very sensitive to the austenitizing cooling rates. Kim reported that there are large differences of austenitizing cooling rates between the surface and the center locations in RPV due to its thickness of 250mm. Hence, the martensite/bainite fractions would be changed in different locations, and it would affect the microstructure and mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. These results may lead to inhomogeneous characteristics after austenitizing. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the changes of microstructure and mechanical properties with varying phase fractions in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. In this study, the effects of martensite/bainite fractions on microstructure and mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel were examined. The changes in phase fractions of Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel with different cooling rates were analyzed, and then the phase fractions were correlated with its microstructural observation and mechanical properties

  10. Effects of soldering methods on tensile strength of a gold-palladium metal ceramic alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadhanfari, Husain A; Khajah, Hasan M; Monaco, Edward A; Kim, Hyeongil

    2014-10-01

    The tensile strength obtained by conventional postceramic application soldering and laser postceramic welding may require more energy than microwave postceramic soldering, which could provide similar tensile strength values. The purpose of the study was to compare the tensile strength obtained by microwave postceramic soldering, conventional postceramic soldering, and laser postceramic welding. A gold-palladium metal ceramic alloy and gold-based solder were used in this study. Twenty-seven wax specimens were cast in gold-palladium noble metal and divided into 4 groups: laser welding with a specific postfiller noble metal, microwave soldering with a postceramic solder, conventional soldering with the same postceramic solder used in the microwave soldering group, and a nonsectioned control group. All the specimens were heat treated to simulate a normal porcelain sintering sequence. An Instron Universal Testing Machine was used to measure the tensile strength for the 4 groups. The means were analyzed statistically with 1-way ANOVA. The surface and fracture sites of the specimens were subjectively evaluated for fracture type and porosities by using a scanning electron microscope. The mean (standard deviation) ultimate tensile strength values were as follows: nonsectioned control 818 ±30 MPa, microwave 516 ±34 MPa, conventional 454 ±37 MPa, and laser weld 191 ±39 MPa. A 1-way ANOVA showed a significant difference in ultimate tensile strength among the groups (F3,23=334.5; Pgold and palladium noble metals than either conventional soldering or laser welding. Conventional soldering resulted in a higher tensile strength than laser welding. Under the experimental conditions described, either microwave or conventional postceramic soldering would appear to satisfy clinical requirements related to tensile strength. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tensile properties of machine strength graded timber for glued laminated timber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boström, Lars; Hoffmeyer, Preben; Solli, Kjell-Helge

    1999-01-01

    Special setting values based on tensile properties of Norway spruce are established for four different strength grading machines. The machines included are Computermatic, Cook-Bolinder, Ersson and Dynagrade.The study shows that the yield of timber to be used in tension, such as laminations...... for glulam, may be increased by basing the setting values on test results of the tensile properties rather than using the strength classes definen in EN338....

  12. General and mechanistic optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Sonia M; Gonzalez, Marcial; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2015-04-30

    We propose a general framework for determining optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression. This approach is based on the observation that tensile strength is directly proportional to the breaking force and inversely proportional to a non-linear function of geometric parameters and materials properties. This generalization reduces to the analytical expression commonly used for flat faced tablets, i.e., Hertz solution, and to the empirical relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry for convex-faced tablets, i.e., Pitt's equation. Under proper parametrization, optimal tensile strength relationship can be determined from experimental results by minimizing a figure of merit of choice. This optimization is performed under the first-order approximation that a flat faced tablet and a doubly curved tablet have the same tensile strength if they have the same relative density and are made of the same powder, under equivalent manufacturing conditions. Furthermore, we provide a set of recommendations and best practices for assessing the performance of optimal tensile strength relationships in general. Based on these guidelines, we identify two new models, namely the general and mechanistic models, which are effective and predictive alternatives to the tensile strength relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Peculiar structure and tensile strength of WB4: nonstoichiometric origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyang Gou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten tetraboride (WB4 is experimentally considered as potentially superhard material and is therefore expected to have highly structural stability and enhanced resistance against plastic deformation and failure. The examinations of bond-deformation mechanism suggest a significantly soft bond-deformation pattern induced by ionic W-B bonding for nominal WB4 in experiments, largely responsible for the limitation of its strength and structural integrity. Computations on the structures and mechanical properties for WB4 show a novel thermodynamically favored MoB4-type phase with excellent mechanical properties and remarkable incompressibility along c direction. The illustrations of nonstoichiometry and x-ray diffraction spectra rationalize the experimental observation of nominal composition WB4 as defective tungsten borides (W1-xB3 (x0.25. The results provide new insight into the real structural and mechanical properties of tungsten borides.

  14. Strength criterion for rocks under compressive-tensile stresses and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingqing You

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating in-situ stress with hydraulic borehole fracturing involves tensile strength of rock. Several strength criteria with three parameters result in tensile strengths with great differences, although they may describe the relation between strength of rock and confining pressure with low misfits. The exponential criterion provides acceptable magnitudes of tensile strengths for granites and over-estimates that for other rocks, but the criterion with tension cut-off is applicable to all rocks. The breakdown pressure will be lower than the shut-in pressure during hydraulic borehole fracturing, when the maximum horizontal principal stress is 2 times larger than the minor one; and it is not the peak value in the first cycle, but the point where the slope of pressure-time curve begins to decline.

  15. Tensile bond strength of ceramic crowns to dentin using resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, James F; de Rijk, Waldemar G; Hill, Jennifer; Hill, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    This study measured the bond strength of the self-adhesive resin cements and a bonded resin cement for crowns bonded to extracted teeth with preparations having a total taper greater than 30 degrees. A crown pull-off test was used with direction of pull along the path of insertion. The CAD/CAM system Cerec was used to create crowns with the pull-off loop as an integral part of the crown structure. One hundred extracted human molars were prepared for all-ceramic crowns with a 1.5-mm shoulder, greater than 30-degree axial wall convergence, a flat occlusal surface and 3 to 5 mm occlusal/ gingival height. All-ceramic crowns were cemented with five different self-adhesive cements (Rely X Unicem, Maxcem Elite, BisCem, SmartCem 2, and G-Cem) and one bonded resin cement (Multilink). Forfour cements (excluding GCem and Multilink) there were 2 groups, one with HF etching and one without ceramic surface treatment. The crowns were then subject to tensile stress until either the crown fractured or the crown was lifted off from the tooth. For several cements, the bond strength exceeded the tensile strength of the all-ceramic crown; thus, the crown fractured, leaving the cemented part of the crown on the tooth. The effect of ceramic surface etching was not statistically significant at p = 0.05; however, for each cement, the treated crowns showed a lower coefficient of variance (COV). For this study, the COV ranged from 24.9 % to 97.9 %. Loads ranged from 41.3 to 190.3 N. Some of the new self-etching resin cements can create bonds to non-retentive crown preparations that are stronger than the strength of a ceramic crown; however, these high bond strengths may not be able to be achieved consistently.

  16. Optimization of Tensile Strength of Phenolic-Glass Compound for Compression Molding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojjat Rajabzadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced phenolic resins have been widely used in thermal insulation products. Processability and mechanical properties are the two important characteristics of these compounds. In this research, the flow in spiral mold and tensile strength were considered as indicators for processability and mechanical properties, respectively. B-stage curing time, fiber length and silane treatment effects on flow properties and tensile strength were studied. Spiral flow test results showed that B-stage has a significance effect on flow rates optimized at 85°C for 3 h. Under this condition, resin viscosity increased to a suitable level and improved in transferring and dispersing the fibers. Tensile strength was increased by 3.5 h heat treatment and it was dropped beyond the B-stage. Heat treatment beyond this stage weakened the possible attachment of different components together. Silane treatment increased the tensile strength and based on electron microscopy studies there was improved fiber-resin compatibility with better dispersion of the fibers. Although there were improvements observed in fiber dispersion in silane treatment as well as the B-stage curing, but the effect was greater in the latter case, such that treatment by 3.5 h B-stage produced tensile strength by 130% while the silane treatment effect resulted in 30% greater tensile strength. This may imply that for some applications the silane treatment of the fibers is not sufficient and heat treatment could be considered as a substitute. Tensile strength increased with fiber length which was related to the nature of short-fibercomposites, while the load transfer improved with longer fibers.

  17. Effects of Thermal Treatment on Tensile Strength of Laurentian Granite Using Brazilian Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tubing; Li, Xibing; Cao, Wenzhuo; Xia, Kaiwen

    2015-11-01

    The effect of thermal treatment on several physical properties and the tensile strength of Laurentian granite (LG) are measured in this study. Brazilian disc LG specimens are treated at temperatures of up to 850 °C. The physical properties such as grain density, relative volume change per degree, and P-wave velocity are investigated under the effect of heat treatment. The results indicate that both the density and the P-wave velocity decrease with the increase in heating temperature. However, the relative volume change per degree is not sensitive below 450 °C, while a remarkable increase appears from 450 to 850 °C. All cases are explained by the increase in both number and width of the thermally induced microcracks with the heating temperature. Brazilian tests are carried out statically with an MTS hydraulic servo-control testing system and dynamically with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system to measure both static and dynamic tensile strength of LG. The relationship between the tensile strength and treatment temperatures shows that static tensile strength decreases with temperature while the dynamic tensile strength first increases and then decreases with a linear increase in the loading rate. However, the increase in dynamic tensile strength with treatment temperatures from 25 to 100 °C is due to slight dilation of the grain boundaries as the initial thermal action, which leads to compaction of rock. When the treatment temperature rises above 450 °C, the quartz phase transition results in increased size of microcracks due to the differential expansion between the quartz grains and other minerals, which is the main cause of the sharp reduction in tensile strength.

  18. Root tensile strength of 3 typical plant species and their contribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of root reinforcement depends on the morphological characteristics of the root system, the tensile strength of individual roots, the soil-root cohesive strength, and the distribution of the root system in the soil. This research looks into Sasumua Backslope in Kenya, where a great deal of erosion is responsible for ...

  19. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  20. Morphology, Tensile Strength and Oil Resistance of Gum Rubber Sheets Prepared from Lignin Modified Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asrul M.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the preparation of lignin filled natural rubber latex composite and its subsequent use to obtain lignin modified rubber. Two types of lignin i.e.: rubber wood and commercial alkali lignin were used as rubber filler. Gum rubber sheets were prepared from the lignin modified rubber and their properties were compared to Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR 20 and a type of rubber obtained from the coagulation of high ammonia latex. Rubber morphology was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscope on the cross-sectional area of cryo-fractured samples. Oil resistance of the rubber sheets was determined by measuring the mass change before and after ASTM IRM 903 oil immersion, while the tensile strengths were determined according to ASTM D412 standard. Low values of tensile strength obtained for the commercial alkali lignin modified rubber sheet relative to the rest of the rubber samples was attributed to poor lignin dispersion. This occurrence was substantiated by the SEM analysis of cryo-fractured samples where crazes and inhomogeneity was observed. Nonetheless, both lignin modified rubbers exhibited higher level of oil resistance compared to SMR 20. This is due to the nature of lignin as a hydrophilic component and its presence in the rubber matrix complicates the oil diffusion process into rubber.

  1. Development of High Specific Strength Envelope Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Keiji; Sano, Masa-Aki; Kakuta, Yoshiaki

    Progress in materials technology has produced a much more durable synthetic fabric envelope for the non-rigid airship. Flexible materials are required to form airship envelopes, ballonets, load curtains, gas bags and covering rigid structures. Polybenzoxazole fiber (Zylon) and polyalirate fiber (Vectran) show high specific tensile strength, so that we developed membrane using these high specific tensile strength fibers as a load carrier. The main material developed is a Zylon or Vectran load carrier sealed internally with a polyurethane bonded inner gas retention film (EVOH). The external surface provides weather protecting with, for instance, a titanium oxide integrated polyurethane or Tedlar film. The mechanical test results show that tensile strength 1,000 N/cm is attained with weight less than 230g/m2. In addition to the mechanical properties, temperature dependence of the joint strength and solar absorptivity and emissivity of the surface are measured. 

  2. 830-nm irradiation increases the wound tensile strength in a diabetic murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, I; Lanzafame, R J; Evans, R; Narayan, V; Dailey, B; Buehner, N; Naim, J O

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low-power laser irradiation on wound healing in genetic diabetes. Female C57BL/Ksj/db/db mice received 2 dorsal 1 cm full-thickness incisions and laser irradiation (830 nm, 79 mW/cm(2), 5.0 J/cm(2)/wound). Daily low-level laser therapy (LLLT) occurred over 0-4 days, 3-7 days, or nonirradiated. On sacrifice at 11 or 23 days, wounds were excised, and tensile strengths were measured and standardized. Nontreated diabetic wound tensile strength was 0.77 +/- 0.22 g/mm(2) and 1.51 +/- 0.13 g/mm(2) at 11 and 23 days. After LLLT, over 0-4 days tensile strength was 1.15 +/- 0.14 g/mm(2) and 2.45 +/- 0.29 g/mm(2) (P = 0.0019). Higher tensile strength at 23 days occurred in the 3- to 7-day group (2.72 +/- 0.56 g/mm(2) LLLT vs. 1.51 +/- 0.13 g/mm(2) nontreated; P laser irradiation at 830 nm significantly enhances cutaneous wound tensile strength in a murine diabetic model. Further investigation of the mechanism of LLLT in primary wound healing is warranted. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Tensile bond strength of metal bracket bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces with different surface conditionings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhoundi, Ms Ahmad; Kamel, M Rahmati; Hashemi, Sh Mahmood; Imani, M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of metal brackets bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces using three various surface treatments. Forty two glazed ceramic disks were assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups the specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HFA). Subsequently in first group, ceramic primer and adhesive were applied, but in second group a bonding agent alone was used. In third group, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid followed by ceramic primer and adhesive application. Brackets were bonded with light cure composites. The specimens were stored in distilled water in the room temperature for 24 hours and thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C. The universal testing machine was used to test the tensile bond strength and the adhesive remenant index scores between three groups was evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests respectively. The tensile bond strength was 3.69±0.52 MPa forfirst group, 2.69±0.91 MPa for second group and 3.60±0.41 MPa for third group. Group II specimens showed tensile strength values significantly different from other groups (Pbrackets to the glazed ceramic restorations with enough tensile bond strength.

  4. Optimal suture materials for contaminated gastrointestinal surgery: does infection influence the decrease of the tensile strength of sutures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoichi; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Ishikawa, Kenji; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Kamijo, Akemi; Tazume, Seiki; Yasuda, Masanori

    2012-12-01

    Suture materials are selected based on the following factors: absorbable/non-absorbable, monofilament/multifilament, duration with sufficiently high tensile strength, and the tissue to be sutured. Absorbable sutures are hydrolyzed in tissues. However, little is known about the influence of infection on the hydrolysis and decrease in the tensile strength. Four kinds of sutures, i.e., non-absorbable multifilament silk, non-absorbable monofilament polypropylene (Prolene(®)), absorbable multifilament polyglactin 910 (Vicryl(®)), and absorbable monofilament polydioxanone (PDS(®)) were implanted in the back of rats. A suspension of Escherichia coli + Bacteroides fragilis or saline was injected subcutaneously into the contaminated and clean condition groups, respectively. The sutures were removed 1, 2, 4 or 8 weeks after the implantation. There was significantly more severe inflammation macroscopically for the silk sutures under the contaminated conditions (p = 0.03), however, no significant differences were observed among the other three sutures. All 4 kinds of sutures showed a reduction of the tensile strength over time. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of reduction between both the clean and contaminated conditions for any of the sutures. The reduction of the tensile strength with time did not differ significantly between sutures exposed to contaminated and clean conditions, even for the absorbable sutures.

  5. Evaluation of Surface Roughness and Tensile Strength of Base Metal Alloys Used for Crown and Bridge on Recasting (Recycling).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit; Hashmi, Syed W; Rao, Yogesh; Garg, Akanksha

    2015-07-01

    Dental casting alloys play a prominent role in the restoration of the partial dentition. Casting alloys have to survive long term in the mouth and also have the combination of structure, molecules, wear resistance and biologic compatibility. According to ADA system casting alloys were divided into three groups (wt%); high noble, Noble and predominantly base metal alloys. To evaluate the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and surface roughness of the new and recast base metal (nickel-chromium) alloys. Recasting of the base metal alloys derived from sprue and button, to make it reusable has been done. A total of 200 test specimens were fabricated using specially fabricated jig of metal and divided into two groups- 100 specimens of new alloy and 100 specimens of recast alloys, which were tested for tensile strength on universal testing machine and surface roughness on surface roughness tester. Tensile strength of new alloy showed no statistically significant difference (p-value>0.05) from recast alloy whereas new alloy had statistically significant surface roughness (Maximum and Average surface roughness) difference (p-valuealloy. Within the limitations of the study it is concluded that the tensile strength will not be affected by recasting of nickel-chromium alloy whereas surface roughness increases markedly.

  6. Microstructure, Tensile Strength and Probabilistic Fatigue Life Evaluation of Gray Cast Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Yong Hyeon; Han, Seung-Wook; Choi, Nak-Sam [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    High-grade gray cast iron (HCI350) was prepared by adding Cr, Mo and Cu to the gray cast iron (GC300). Their microstructure, mechanical properties and fatigue strength were studied. Cast iron was made from round bar and plate-type castings, and was cut and polished to measure the percentage of each microstructure. The size of flake graphite decreased due to additives, while the structure of high density pearlite increased in volume percentage improving the tensile strength and fatigue strength. Based on the fatigue life data obtained from the fatigue test results, the probability - stress - life (P-S-N) curve was calculated using the 2-parameter Weibull distribution to which the maximum likelihood method was applied. The P-S-N curve showed that the fatigue strength of HCI350 was significantly improved and the dispersion of life data was lower than that of GC300. However, the fatigue life according to fatigue stress alleviation increased further. Data for reliability life design was presented by quantitatively showing the allowable stress value for the required life cycle number using the calculated P-S-N curve.

  7. Evaluation on Tensile Strength and Applicability of Tapered Rolled Thread Coupler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Jinhwan; Choi, Hyoungsuk; Jung, Chiyoung [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taejin [Korea Conformity Laboratories, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Sanghwan [Sammi Precision Co. Ltd., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Various diameters of reinforcing bars, ASTM A 615 Grade 60 11, 14, and 18, are used for construction of Nuclear Power Plant structures. But due to the large diameter of these rebar, placing rebar is difficult. This study suggests a new tapered rolled thread coupler which have improved workability and fastening force. To evaluate tensile strength and applicability, the tensile test are conducted and static load-carrying capacity of rolled thread coupler are evaluated. In the both tensile tests and column tests, the good agreement of load-carrying capacity are shown. Therefore the proposed tapered rolled thread coupler can be applied to the NPP to replace conventional coupler.

  8. Evaluation of microtensile and tensile bond strength tests ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-03

    Nov 3, 2015 ... improve the bonding effectiveness of adhesive resin systems to laser‑irradiated dental hard tissues, ... bond strength of self‑etch adhesive resin to enamel using two different bond tests: μTBS and TBS. ..... surface as possible as without resulting in any cavitation. It was observed that laser irradiation for 45 s ...

  9. Prediction of Splitting Tensile Strength of Concrete Containing Zeolite and Diatomite by ANN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gülbandılar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate with two different artificial neural network (ANN prediction model for the behavior of concrete containing zeolite and diatomite. For purpose of constructing this model, 7 different mixes with 63 specimens of the 28, 56 and 90 days splitting tensile strength experimental results of concrete containing zeolite, diatomite, both zeolite and diatomite used in training and testing for ANN systems was gathered from the tests. The data used in the ANN models are arranged in a format of seven input parameters that cover the age of samples, Portland cement, zeolite, diatomite, aggregate, water and hyper plasticizer and an output parameter which is splitting tensile strength of concrete. In the model, the training and testing results have shown that two different ANN systems have strong potential as a feasible tool for predicting 28, 56 and 90 days the splitting tensile strength of concrete containing zeolite and diatomite.

  10. The effect of pretreatment with fluoride on the tensile strength of orthodontic bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.N.; Sheen, D.H. (National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China))

    White spot decalcifications and caries occurring adjacent to bonded orthodontic brackets have long been a concern to orthodontists. One procedure suggested to overcome this problem is fluoride treatment prior to bonding. The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of orthodontic self-cured resin from Concise on teeth rinsed 4 minutes in 1.23% APF with untreated controls. Measurements were made on an Instron machine. Debonding interfaces were observed with a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Distributions were calculated. The tensile bond strengths of the fluoride-treated teeth and the untreated teeth were not significantly different. The debonding interfaces between resin and bracket base, within the resin itself, and between enamel and resin were similar in the two experimental groups. However, greater enamel detachment was seen within the fluoride pretreatment group. So while fluoride pretreatment does not significantly affect tensile bond strength, it may cause enamel detachment after debonding.

  11. Tensile Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits: Effect of the Temperature Gradient and Ash Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Nair, Akhilesh Balachandran; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2018-01-01

    Replacing coal with biomass in power plants is a viable option for reducing net CO2 emissions and combating climate change. However, biomass combustion in boilers may exacerbate problems related to ash deposition and corrosion, demanding effective deposit removal. The tensile adhesion strength...... the deposits. After sintering, the deposits were removed using an electrically controlled arm and the corresponding tensile adhesion strength was measured.The influence of the flue gas temperature (500–700 °C), steel surface temperature (500–650 °C), and deposit composition were investigated. The results...... revealed that increasing the flue gas temperature as well as the steel surface temperature led to a sharp increase in the tensile adhesion strength of the model deposits. The sharp increase was typically observed near the melting temperature (or deformation temperature) of the investigated model deposits...

  12. Effect of human urine on the tensile strength of sutures used for hypospadias surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstein, Ryan L; Sedaghati, Tina; Seifalian, Alexander M; Kang, Norbert

    2013-06-01

    Hypospadias is the most common congenital condition affecting between 1 in 250 and 300 live births. Even in experienced hands, surgery to repair this congenital defect can have a high complication rate. Wound dehiscence is reported to occur in 5% and fistula formation in 6%-40% depending on technique. The choice of suture material has been shown to affect the complication rate although there is (currently) no consensus about the best suture material to use. Ideally, the sutures used for urethroplasty should be absorbable while maintaining sufficient mechanical strength to support the wounds until they are self-supporting and able to resist urinary flow. Previous studies have compared the effects of human urine on different suture materials especially catgut. However, catgut is now banned in Europe. Our study examined the tensile and breaking strength as well as rate of degradation for four types of absorbable suture now commonly used for hypospadias repairs in the UK. We examined the effect of prolonged storage (up to 27 days) in human urine on 6/0 gauge Vicryl, Vicryl Rapide, Monocryl and polydioxanone (PDS) sutures. These four suture materials are commonly used by the senior plastic consultant surgeon (NK) for hypospadias repairs. 50 mm sections of these suture materials were stored in either urine or saline as control. At specified time points, each suture was placed in a uniaxial load testing machine to assess the stress-strain profile and the mechanical load required to break the suture was measured. Exposure to urine reduced the tensile and breaking strength of all the suture materials tested. PDS demonstrated the greatest resilience. Vicryl Rapide was the weakest suture and degraded completely by day 6. Vicryl and Monocryl had similar degradation profiles, but Vicryl retained more of its tensile strength for longer. There is a balance to be struck between the duration that a suture material must remain in any surgical wound and the risk that it causes

  13. Effect of Silver Nano-particles on Tensile Strength of Acrylic Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA is widely used for the fabrication of removable prostheses. Silver nano-particles (AgNps have been added to PMMA because of their antimicrobial properties, but their effect on the mechanical properties of PMMA is unknown. Theaim of this study was to investigate the effects of AgNps on the tensile strength of PMMA. Materials and methods. For this study, 12 specimens were prepared and divided into two groups. Group 1 included PMMA without AgNps and group 2 included PMMA mixed with 5 wt% of AgNps. Tensile strength of the specimens was measured by Zwick Z100 apparatus. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS using t-test. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results. This study showed that the mean tensile strengthof PMMA in group 2 was significantly lower than that in group 1. Therefore, the tensile strength decreased significantly after incorporation of silver nano-particles. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, tensile strength of acrylic resin specimens was influenced by silver nano-particles.

  14. TENSILE STRENGTH OF CIRCULAR FLAT AND CONVEX-FACED AVICEL PH102 TABLETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.HARIRIAN

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of flat and convex-faced circular tablets made from a size fraction of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH102, compacted under control conditions of pressures of 20 and 112 MPa have been assessed in term of tensile strength. The calculation of tensile strength (at, for flat-faced tablets was determined from the load (P in diametral compression test as described by Fell & Newton ot = 2P/ (7tDt. The material tensile strength of convex-faced tablets calculated from the observed fraction loads obtained in diametral compression testing, based on the equation derived by Pitt et al at= 10P/ [TTD2 (2.84I/D - 0.126t/W+ 3.15W/D + 0.01"1 ], where P is the fracture load, D is the tablet diameter, t is the overall tablet thickness and W is the central cylinder thickness. By comparing the tensile strength values of convex-faced tablets using porosity, tensile stress, and compaction pressure values, an optimum face-curvature in normal to unity range (D/R=0.67-1.0 and an optimum cylinder length of W/D=0.3, were found to be necessary for producing the overall strongest tablets. These optimum values varies with the formation pressure.

  15. Experimental Study On The Effect Of Micro-Cracks On Brazilian Tensile Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangyu

    2015-12-01

    For coal mine ground control issues, it is necessary to propose a failure criteria accounting for the transversely isotropic behaviors of rocks. Hence, it is very helpful to provide experimental data for the validation of the failure criteria. In this paper, the method for preparing transversely isotropic specimens and the scheme of the Brazilian tensile strength test are presented. Results obtained from Brazilian split tests under dry and water-saturated conditions reflect the effect of the development direction β of the structural plane, such as the bedding fissure, on the tensile strength, ultimate displacement, failure mode, and the whole splitting process. The results show that the tensile strength decreases linearly with increasing β. The softening coefficient of the tensile strength shows a sinusoidal function. The values of the slope and inflection point for the curve vary at the different stages of the Brazilian test. The failure mode of the rock specimen presented in this paper generally coincides with the standard Brazilian splitting failure mode. Based on the test results, the major influencing factors for the Brazilian splitting strength are analyzed and a mathematical model for solving the Brazilian splitting strength is proposed. The findings in this paper would greatly benefit the coal mine ground control studies when the surrounding rocks of interest show severe transversely isotropic behaviors.

  16. Tensile strength of bilayered ceramics and corresponding glass veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Anunmana, Chuchai; Champirat, Tharee; Jirajariyavej, Bundhit

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the microtensile bond strength between two all-ceramic systems; lithium disilicate glass ceramic and zirconia core ceramics bonded with their corresponding glass veneers. MATERIALS AND METHODS Blocks of core ceramics (IPS e.max® Press and Lava™ Frame) were fabricated and veneered with their corresponding glass veneers. The bilayered blocks were cut into microbars; 8 mm in length and 1 mm2 in cross-sectional area (n = 30/group). Additionally, monolithic microbars of thes...

  17. Study of root tensile strength of softwood and hardwood tree species: Implications for slope stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaiili, Marzieh; Abdi, Ehsan; Jafary, Mohammad; Majnounian, Baris

    2017-04-01

    Landslides are known as one of the major natural hazards and often incurring economics and human life losses. The role of tree roots in slope stability is very important, especially when human lives and infrastructure are at risk. The anchorage of roots and improvement of slope stability mainly depend on specific properties of root network systems, such as tensile strength. These properties of the roots which govern the degree of reinforcement are different among tree species. Although, many studies have been conducted about plant biotechnical properties of species, yet there is lack of knowledge on comparing root systems of softwood and hardwood tree species for similar site conditions. Therefore this study was conducted to assess the tensile strength of the root system of Picea abies (softwood species) and Fraxinus excelsior (hardwood species) planted on two forested hillslopes. To this aim, single root specimens were sampled for each species and their tensile strength were then measured in laboratory using a computer controlled Instron Universal Testing Machine. According to the results root tensile strength tends to decrease with diameter according to a power law for both species. Based on analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), a significant difference has been observed in the tensile strength between the two studied species. Also the results showed that the value of mean root tensile strength for Picea abies (19.31 ± 2.64 MPa) was much more than that of Fraxinus excelsior (16.98 ± 1.01 MPa) within all root diameter classes. The data presented in this study may expand the knowledge of biotechnical properties of Picea abies and Fraxinus excelsior, as biomaterial for soil bioengineering.

  18. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength of silicone-based denture liners after thermocycling and surface treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsimran Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To examine, evaluate, and compare the tensile bond strength of two silicone-based liners; one autopolymerizing and one heat cured, when treated with different chemical etchants to improve their adhesion with denture base resin. Materials and Methods: Hundred and sixty test specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA were fabricated; out of which 80 specimens were tested for tensile bond strength after bonding it to autopolymerizing resilient liner (Ufigel P and rest 80 to heat-cured resilient liner (Molloplast B. Each main group was further divided into four subgroups of 20 specimens each, one to act as a control and three were subjected to surface treatment with different chemical etchants namely dichloromethane, MMA monomer, and chloroform. The two silicone-based denture liners were processed between 2 PMMA specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 40 mm in the space provided by a spacer of 3 mm, thermocycled (5-55°C for 500 cycles, and then their tensile strength measurements were done in the universal testing machine. Results: One-way ANOVA technique showed a highly significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength values for all the groups. The Student′s t-test computed values of statistics for the compared groups were greater than the critical values both at 5% and at 1% levels. Conclusion: Surface treatment of denture base resin with chemical etchants prior to the application of silicone-based liner (Ufigel P and Molloplast-B increased the tensile bond strength. The increase was the highest with specimens subjected to 180 s of MMA surface treatment and the lowest with control group specimens.

  19. Shore hardness and tensile bond strength of long-term soft denture lining materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong-Jun; Yang, Hong-So; Chun, Min-Geoung; Park, Yeong-Joon

    2014-11-01

    Reduced softness and separation from the denture base are the most significant problems of long-term soft lining materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the durometer Shore A hardness and tensile bond strength of long-term soft denture lining materials and to investigate the correlation between these 2 properties. A group of 7 soft lining materials, 6 silicone based (Dentusil, GC Reline Soft, GC Reline Ultrasoft, Mucopren Soft, Mucosoft, Sofreliner Tough) and 1 acrylic resin based (Durabase), were evaluated for durometer Shore A hardness and tensile bond strength to heat-polymerized denture base resin (Lucitone 199). A specially designed split mold and loading assembly with a swivel connector were used for the durometer Shore A hardness test and tensile bond strength test to improve accuracy and facilitate measurement. Three specimens of each product were stored in a 37°C water bath, and durometer Shore A hardness tests were carried out after 24 hours and 28 days. A tensile bond strength test was carried out for 10 specimens of each product, which were stored in a 37°C water bath for 24 hours before the test. Repeated-measures ANOVA, the Kruskal-Wallis and Duncan multiple range tests, and the Spearman correlation were used for statistical analyses. The repeated-measures ANOVA found significant durometer Shore A hardness differences for the materials (Phardness (21.30 ±0.29 for 24 hours, 34.73 ±0.47 for 28 days), and GC Reline Soft showed the highest mean durometer Shore A hardness (50.13 ±0.48 for 24 hours, 57.20 ±0.28 for 28 days). The Kruskal-Wallis test found a significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength values (Phardness showed a statistically insignificant moderate positive correlation (r=0.571, P=.180 for Shore A hardness 24 hours versus tensile bond strength; r=0.607, P=.148 for Shore A hardness 28 days versus tensile bond strength). Within the limitations of this study, significant differences were found in durometer Shore A

  20. Effect of construction joints on the splitting tensile strength of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagib N. Gerges

    2015-12-01

    The results suggest that the reduction in the splitting tensile strength in the presence of a construction joint is not as much as most engineers tend to believe. Due to that belief, most engineers tend to overdesign for steel reinforcement at those joints to compensate for this reduction. The objective of the study is to better the understanding of the effects of a construction joint on the splitting tensile strength. Thus provide an empirical equation to assist engineers in their design calculations, therefore reducing the amount of steel reinforcement at the construction joints. Thus also leading to cost saving on projects.

  1. Improving the tensile strength of carbon nanotube yarn via one-step double [2+1] cycloadditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, HeeJin [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaegeun; Park, Byungrak; Sa, Jeong Hoon; Jung, Alum; Kim, Teawon; Park, Junbeom; Hwang, Woonbong; Lee, Kun Hong [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The tensile strength of a CNT yarn was improved through simple one-step double [2+1] cycloaddition reactions that crosslinked the constituent CNTs using a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-diazide crosslinker. The FT-IR spectrum confirmed that the azide groups in the PEG-diazide were converted into aziridine rings, indicating that the cycloaddition reaction was successful. The generation of crosslinked CNTs was also supported by the observation of N1s peak in the XPS spectrum and the increased thermal stability of the material, as observed by TGA. The tensile strength of the CNT yarn was increased from 0.2GPa to 1.4GPa after the crosslinking reaction when twisted at 4000 twists/ meter. The appropriate selection of the crosslinker may further optimize the CNT yarn crosslinking reaction. The simplicity of this one-step crosslinking reaction provides an economical approach to the mass production of high-strength CNT yarns.

  2. Transient Thermal Tensile Behaviour of Novel Pitch-Based Ultra-High Modulus CFRP Tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pietro Terrasi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel ultra-high modulus carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP prestressing tendon made from coal tar pitch-based carbon fibres was characterized in terms of high temperature tensile strength (up to 570 °C with a series of transient thermal and steady state temperature tensile tests. Digital image correlation was used to capture the high temperature strain development during thermal and mechanical loading. Complementary thermogravimetric (TGA and dynamic mechanical thermal (DMTA experiments were performed on the tendons to elucidate their high temperature thermal and mechanical behaviour. The novel CFRP tendons investigated in the present study showed an ambient temperature design tensile strength of 1400 MPa. Their failure temperature at a sustained prestress level of 50% of the design tensile strength was 409 °C, which is higher than the failure temperature of most fibre reinforced polymer rebars used in civil engineering applications at similar utilisation levels. This high-temperature tensile strength shows that there is potential to use the novel high modulus CFRP tendons in CFRP pretensioned concrete elements for building applications that fulfill the fire resistance criteria typically applied within the construction industry.

  3. Examining the influence of injection speed and mould temperature on the tensile strength of polypropylene and ABS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarøe, Esben Raahede; Blaimschein, Karl Stephan; Deker, Lasse

    This report is the final task of course “41738 Experimental Plastics Technology” in the three weeks period of June 2009 at DTU, IPL. The aim of this project has been to investigate the ultimate tensile strength behaviour of two different polymers, with different structural composition, by varying...... specimens. After production and tensile testing the specimens were examined with a microscope to underpin conclusions from the tensile test data. It was experienced that the injection speed in general increased the the tensile strength by orienting the polymeric-chains lengthwise in the specimens and thus...... increasing the strength in the tensile strength. This observation was however disturbed by the test results for small ABS specimens where an increased injection speed in general meant lower tensile strength, which though can be explained by the extremely rapid cooling that the small specimens in general were...

  4. Changes to Tensile Strength and Electromagnetic Shielding Effectiveness in Neutron Irradiated Carbon Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    compatibility ( EMC ) industry uses a wave theory approach to shielding theory, which uses abstract mathematical modeling techniques to yield a value of...2012. [Online]. Available: http://www.spira_emi.com/theory.htm. [Accessed 14 11 2012]. [22] “ Shielding Theory”, Learn EMC , 2012. [Online...CHANGES TO TENSILE STRENGTH AND ELECTROMAGNETIC SHIELDING EFFECTIVENESS IN NEUTRON IRRADIATED

  5. Estimation and comparison of tensile bond strengths at resin-dentin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To estimate and compare the Tensile Bond Strengths and to observe the resindentin interface of total-etch and self-etch bonding systems to dentin of primary and permanent molar teeth. Method: Thirty non-carious exfoliated primary human molars and thirty extracted permanent molars were randomly assigned to ...

  6. Tensile strength comparison between peroneus longus and hamstring tendons: A biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The tensile strength of the peroneus longus tendon, which is similar to that of hamstring, gives information that both have the same biomechanic properties. Peroneus longus should not be used as a first option in ACL reconstruction, but may be used as an alternative donor in cases involving multiple instability that require more tendon donors in the reconstruction.

  7. Roping in uncertainty – measuring the tensile strength of steel wire ropes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bergh, Riaan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available importance to enable early detection of degradation of the condition of the rope so that it may be replaced before the safety of people and equipment is endangered. To this end it is important the result of the tensile strength test is reported with known...

  8. Effect of surface treatment of titanium posts on the tensile bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmage, P; Sohn, J; Ozcan, M; Nergiz, [No Value

    Objectives. Retention of composite resins to metal can be improved when metal surfaces are conditioned. The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the effect of two conditioning treatments on the tensile bond strength of four resin-based luting cements and zinc phosphate cement to titanium

  9. Effect of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Tensile Strength of Dental Acrylic Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkavand, Saeed; Moslehifard, Elnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Adding further fillers to dental resins may enhance their physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of heat-curing acrylic resin reinforced by TiO2nanoparticles added into the resin matrix. Materials and methods. Commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained and characterized using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine their crystalline structure, particle size and morphology. TiO2-acrylic resin nanocomposite was prepared by mixing 0.5, 1 and 2 (wt%) of surface modified TiO2 nanoparticles in an amalgamator providing three groups of samples. Before curing, the obtained paste was packed into steel molds. After cur-ing, the specimens were removed from the molds. The tensile strength test samples were prepared according to ISO 1567. Results. Two crystalline phases were found in TiO2 nanoparticles including: (i) anatase as the major one, and (ii) rutile. The average particle size calculated according to the Scherrer equation was 20.4 nm, showing a normal size distribution. According to SEM images, the nanocomposite with 1wt% TiO2 nanoparticles had a better distribution compared to other groups. In addition, the group by 1wt% TiO2 exhibited higher tensile strength with a significant difference compared to other groups. ANOVA showed significant differences between the contents of TiO2 particles in acrylic resin (F = 22.19; P < 0.001). Conclusion. A considerable increase in tensile strength was observed with titania NPs reinforcement agents in 1wt% by weight. Further increase of TiO2 nanoparticles decreased the tensile strength.

  10. Tensile Bond Strength of Metal Bracket Bonding to Glazed Ceramic Surfaces With Different Surface Conditionings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Imani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of metal brackets bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces using three various surface treatments.Materials and Methods: Forty two glazed ceramic disks were assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups the specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HFA. Subsequently in first group, ceramic primer and adhesive were applied, but in second group a bonding agent alone was used. In third group, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid followed by ceramic primerand adhesive application. Brackets were bonded with light cure composites. The specimens were stored in distilled water in the room temperature for 24 hours and thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C. The universal testing machine was used to test the tensile bond strength and the adhesive remenant index scores between three groups was evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests respectively.Results: The tensile bond strength was 3.69±0.52 MPa forfirst group, 2.69±0.91 MPa for second group and 3.60±0.41 MPa for third group. Group II specimens showed tensile strength values significantly different from other groups (P<0.01.Conclusion: In spite of limitations in laboratory studies it may be concluded that in application of Scotch bond multipurpose plus adhesive, phosphoric acid can be used instead of HFA for bonding brackets to the glazed ceramic restorations with enough tensile bond strength.

  11. Effect of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Tensile Strength of Dental Acrylic Resins

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    Saeed Shirkavand

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Adding further fillers to dental resins may enhance their physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of heat-curing acrylic resin reinforced by TiO2nanoparticles added into the resin matrix. Materials and methods. Commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained and characterized using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM to determine their crystalline structure, particle size and morphology. TiO2-acrylic resin nanocomposite was prepared by mixing 0.5, 1 and 2 (wt% of surface modified TiO2 nanoparticles in an amalgamator providing three groups of samples. Before curing, the obtained paste was packed into steel molds. After cur-ing, the specimens were removed from the molds. The tensile strength test samples were prepared according to ISO 1567. Results. Two crystalline phases were found in TiO2 nanoparticles including: (i anatase as the major one, and (ii rutile. The average particle size calculated according to the Scherrer equation was 20.4 nm, showing a normal size distribution. Ac-cording to SEM images, the nanocomposite with 1wt% TiO2 nanoparticles had a better distribution compared to other groups. In addition, the group by 1wt% TiO2 exhibited higher tensile strength with a significant difference compared to other groups. ANOVA showed significant differences between the contents of TiO2 particles in acrylic resin (F = 22.19; P < 0.001. Conclusion. A considerable increase in tensile strength was observed with titania NPs reinforcement agents in 1wt% by weight. Further increase of TiO2 nanoparticles decreased the tensile strength.

  12. Comparison of tensile strength of different carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Maria Faulstich de Paiva

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fabric/epoxy composites are materials used in aeronautical industry to manufacture several components as flaps, aileron, landing-gear doors and others. To evaluate these materials become important to know their mechanical properties, for example, the tensile strength. Tensile tests are usually performed in aeronautical industry to determinate tensile property data for material specifications, quality assurance and structural analysis. For this work, it was manufactured four different laminate families (F155/PW, F155/HS, F584/PW and F584/HS using pre-impregnated materials (prepregs based on F155TM and F584TM epoxy resins reinforced with carbon fiber fabric styles Plain Weave (PW and Eight Harness Satin (8HS. The matrix F155TM code is an epoxy resin type DGEBA (diglycidil ether of bisphenol A that contains a curing agent and the F584TM code is a modified epoxy resin type. The laminates were obtained by handing lay-up process following an appropriate curing cycle in autoclave. The samples were evaluated by tensile tests according to the ASTM D3039. The F584/PW laminates presented the highest values of tensile strength. However, the highest modulus results were determined for the 8HS composite laminates. The correlation of these results emphasizes the importance of the adequate combination of the polymeric matrix and the reinforcement arrangement in the structural composite manufacture. The microscopic analyses of the tested specimens show valid failure modes for composites used in aeronautical industry.

  13. Effect of Normalizing Temperature on Fracture Characteristic of Tensile and Impact Tested Creep Strength-Enhanced Ferritic P92 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, N.; Pandey, C.; Mahapatra, M. M.

    2017-11-01

    The high-temperature Cr-Mo creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steels are mainly used in nuclear and thermal power plants. In the present investigation, a systematic study on fracture surface morphologies of tensile and impact tested specimens and mechanical properties of cast and forged (C&F) P92 steel was performed for various heat treatment conditions. The heat treatment was carried out in normalizing temperature range of 950-1150 °C and then tempered to a fixed tempering temperature of 760 °C. The effect of varying normalizing temperatures before and after tempering on microstructure evolution, tensile properties, Vicker's hardness and Charpy toughness was studied. The normalizing temperature before and after tempering was having a noticeable effect on mechanical properties of as-received P92 steel. The fracture surface of impact and tensile tested samples was also studied for various normalizing temperatures with or without tempering. Fracture surface morphology was affected by the presence of secondary phase carbide particles. The fraction area of cleavage facets on the tensile fracture surface was found to be increased with an increase in the normalizing temperature. The fractured tensile specimens were characterized by transgranular ductile dimples, tear ridges and transgranular cleavage facets for various heat treatments. The fracture mode of impact tested samples was more complex. It showed both quasi-cleavage facets and ductile dimple tearing for various normalizing temperatures.

  14. Effect of Normalizing Temperature on Fracture Characteristic of Tensile and Impact Tested Creep Strength-Enhanced Ferritic P92 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, N.; Pandey, C.; Mahapatra, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    The high-temperature Cr-Mo creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steels are mainly used in nuclear and thermal power plants. In the present investigation, a systematic study on fracture surface morphologies of tensile and impact tested specimens and mechanical properties of cast and forged (C&F) P92 steel was performed for various heat treatment conditions. The heat treatment was carried out in normalizing temperature range of 950-1150 °C and then tempered to a fixed tempering temperature of 760 °C. The effect of varying normalizing temperatures before and after tempering on microstructure evolution, tensile properties, Vicker's hardness and Charpy toughness was studied. The normalizing temperature before and after tempering was having a noticeable effect on mechanical properties of as-received P92 steel. The fracture surface of impact and tensile tested samples was also studied for various normalizing temperatures with or without tempering. Fracture surface morphology was affected by the presence of secondary phase carbide particles. The fraction area of cleavage facets on the tensile fracture surface was found to be increased with an increase in the normalizing temperature. The fractured tensile specimens were characterized by transgranular ductile dimples, tear ridges and transgranular cleavage facets for various heat treatments. The fracture mode of impact tested samples was more complex. It showed both quasi-cleavage facets and ductile dimple tearing for various normalizing temperatures.

  15. Influence of Strain Rate on Tensile Strength of Woven Geotextile in the Selected Range of Temperature

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    Stępień Sylwia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of geosynthetics behaviour has been carried out for many years. Before using geosynthetics in practice, the standard laboratory tests had been carried out to determine basic mechanical parameters. In order to examine the tensile strength of the sample which extends at a constant strain rate, one should measure the value of the tensile force and strain. Note that geosynthetics work under different conditions of stretching and temperatures, which significantly reduce the strength of these materials. The paper presents results of the tensile test of geotextile at different strain rates and temperatures from 20 °C to 100 °C. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of temperature and strain rate on tensile strength and strain of the woven geotextile. The article presents the method of investigation and the results. The data obtained allowed us to assess the parameters of material which should be considered in the design of the load-bearing structures that work at temperatures up to 100 °C.

  16. Water absorption and tensile strength degradation of Petung bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper) fiber—reinforced polymeric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judawisastra, H.; Sitohang, R. D. R.; Rosadi, M. S.

    2017-09-01

    Bamboo fibers have attracted great interest and are believed to have the potential as natural fiber for reinforcing polymer composites. This research aims to study water absorption behavior and its effect to tensile strength of the composites made from petung bamboo fiber, which is one of the most grown bamboo species in Indonesia. Unidirectional (UD) and random composites were manufactured using wet hand lay-up method. Examinations were carried out by means of boiling water immersion test, tensile test, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Water absorption of UD petung bamboo fiber/polyester composites is higher than that of random composites, i.e. 3.6% compared to 2.2%. This was due to higher fiber volume fraction of the UD composites. Water absorption caused irreversible tensile strength degradation on the composites. The initial properties of the composites were not recovered even after drying. The absorbed water decreased the tensile strength by 6% in UD composites and 38% in random composites. This was most likely to occur due to the permanent interfacial degradation.

  17. The effect of thermocycling on tensile bond strength of two soft liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geramipanah, Farideh; Ghandari, Masoumeh; Zeighami, Somayeh

    2013-09-01

    Failure of soft liners depends mostly on separation from the denture base resin; therefore measurement of the bond strength is very important. The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of two soft liners (Acropars, Molloplast-B) to denture base resin before and after thermocycling. Twenty specimens fromeach of the two different soft liners were processed according to the manufacturer's instructions between two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) sheets. Ten specimens in each group were maintained in 37°C water for 24 hours and 10 were thermocycled (5000 cycles) among baths of 5° and 55°C. The tensile bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Mode of failure was determined with SEM (magnification ×30). Two-way ANOVA was used to analyze the data. The mean and standard deviation of tensile bond strength of Acropars and Molloplast-B before thermocycling were 6.59±1.85 and1.51±0.22 MPa, respectively and 5.89±1.52 and1.37±0.18 MPa, respectively after thermocycling. There was no significant difference before and after thermocycling. Mode of failure in Acropars and Molloplast-B were adhesive and cohesive, respectivley. The bond strength of Acropars was significantly higher than Molloplast-B (P<0.05).

  18. The Effect of Thermocycling on Tensile Bond Strength of Two Soft Liners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Geramipanah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Failure of soft liners depends mostly on separation from the denture base resin; therefore measurement of the bond strength is very important. The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of two soft liners (Acropars, Molloplast-B to denture base resin before and after thermocycling.Materials and Methods: Twenty specimens from each of the two different soft liners were processed according to the manufacturer’s instructions between two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA sheets. Ten specimens in each group were maintained in 37°C water for 24 hours and 10 were thermocycled (5000 cycles among baths of 5° and 55°C. The tensile bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Mode of failure was determined with SEM (magnification ×30. Two-way ANOVA was used to analyze the data.Results: The mean and standard deviation of tensile bond strength of Acropars and Molloplast-B before thermocycling were 6.59±1.85 and 1.51±0.22 MPa, respectively and 5.89±1.52 and 1.37±0.18 MPa, respectively after thermocycling. There was no significant difference before and after thermocycling. Mode of failure in Acropars and Molloplast-B were adhesive and cohesive, respectivley.Conclusion: The bond strength of Acropars was significantly higher than Molloplast-B (P<0.05.

  19. Estimating the Uncertainty of Tensile Strength Measurement for A Photocured Material Produced by Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamczak Stanisław

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the measurement uncertainty for a material produced by additive manufacturing. The material investigated was FullCure 720 photocured resin, which was applied to fabricate tensile specimens with a Connex 350 3D printer based on PolyJet technology. The tensile strength of the specimens established through static tensile testing was used to determine the measurement uncertainty. There is a need for extensive research into the performance of model materials obtained via 3D printing as they have not been studied sufficiently like metal alloys or plastics, the most common structural materials. In this analysis, the measurement uncertainty was estimated using a larger number of samples than usual, i.e., thirty instead of typical ten. The results can be very useful to engineers who design models and finished products using this material. The investigations also show how wide the scatter of results is.

  20. Evaluation of flexural, diametral tensile, and shear bond strength of composite repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbery, T A; Gray, T; DeLatour, F; Boxx, C; Best, A M; Moon, P C

    2014-01-01

    Repairing composite restorations may be a more conservative treatment than replacing the entire restoration. The objective of this in vitro study was to determine the best repair method by measuring flexural, diametral tensile, and shear bond strength of repaired composites in which the surfaces were treated with chemical primers (Add & Bond or Silane Bond Enhancer), a bonding agent (Optibond Solo Plus [OBSP]), or mechanical retention with a bonding agent. Filtek Supreme Ultra shade B1B was placed in special molds to fabricate specimens that served to test the flexural, diametral tensile, or shear strength of the inherent resin substrate. The same molds were modified to make specimens for testing repair strength of the resin. Repairs were made immediately or after aging in deionized water at 37°C for seven days. All repair sites were finished with coarse Sof-Lex discs to simulate finishing new restorations or partially removing aged restorations. Repair surfaces were treated with one of the following: 1) phosphoric-acid etching and OBSP; 2) Add & Bond; 3) phosphoric-acid etching, Silane Bond Enhancer, and OBSP; or 4) quarter round bur, phosphoric-acid etching, and OBSP. Specimens were placed back in the original molds to fabricate specimens for diametral tensile or flexural testing or in an Ultradent jig to make specimens for shear bond testing. Composite resin in shade B5B was polymerized against the treated surfaces to make repairs. Two negative control groups for the three testing methods consisted of specimens in which repairs were made immediately or after aging without any surface treatments. Controls and experimental repairs were aged (water 37°C, 24 hours) before flexural, diametral tensile, or shear testing in an Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Experimental flexural repair strengths ranged from 26.4% to 88.6% of the inherent substrate strength. Diametral tensile repair strengths ranged from 40% to 80% of the inherent

  1. Tensile strength of surgical knots performed with the da Vinci surgical robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynisson, Pétur; Shokri, Ebi; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Persson, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the tensile strength of surgical knots made using the da Vinci robot. Four different types of flat square knots (strand-to-strand 4 throw, strand-to-strand 6 throw, loop-to-strand 4 throw, and loop-to-strand 6 throw) were made using the da Vinci-S system by 4 different surgeons, all experienced with the system. For the knots, we used braided polyglactin 910 (Vicryl 2-0). Hand-tied, flat, square, 4-throw strand-to-strand knots were used as reference. The tensile strength was measured for all knots using the Instron 5566 system calibrated to an accuracy of + or - .5% at 4 to 10 newtons (N) and + or - .4% at greater than 10 N. Compared with reference knots, only 1 of 4 surgeons could make knots as equally strong with the robot. For all surgeons, strand-to-strand knots had a significantly higher tensile strength than loop-to-strand knots when made with the robot. Adding 2 throws to the knot did not increase the knots strength in the robot. It is possible to make equally strong surgical knots with the da Vinci robot as by hand; however, despite previous experience with the robot, only 1 of 4 surgeons managed to do so. Adding 2 throws to R4SS and R4LS knots did not increase the tensile strength significantly for any of the 4 surgeons. It is important to train and tie knots using the da Vinci system with the same care as by hand and to be aware of possible differences in knot-tying technique with the robot and manually. With the robot, strand-to-strand knots were stronger than loop-to-strand knots, and should be preferred. Copyright 2010 AAGL. All rights reserved.

  2. The exercise-induced biochemical milieu enhances collagen content and tensile strength of engineered ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Daniel W D; Lee-Barthel, Ann; McIntyre, Todd; Shamim, Baubak; Lee, Cassandra A; Baar, Keith

    2015-10-15

    Exercise stimulates a dramatic change in the concentration of circulating hormones, such as growth hormone (GH), but the biological functions of this response are unclear. Pharmacological GH administration stimulates collagen synthesis; however, whether the post-exercise systemic milieu has a similar action is unknown. We aimed to determine whether the collagen content and tensile strength of tissue-engineered ligaments is enhanced by serum obtained post-exercise. Primary cells from a human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were used to engineer ligament constructs in vitro. Blood obtained from 12 healthy young men 15 min after resistance exercise contained GH concentrations that were ∼7-fold greater than resting serum (P Ligament constructs were treated for 7 days with medium supplemented with serum obtained at rest (RestTx) or 15 min post-exercise (ExTx), before tensile testing and collagen content analysis. Compared with RestTx, ExTx enhanced collagen content (+19%; 181 ± 33 vs. 215 ± 40 μg per construct P = 0.001) and ligament mechanical properties - maximal tensile load (+17%, P = 0.03 vs. RestTx) and ultimate tensile strength (+10%, P = 0.15 vs. RestTx). In a separate set of engineered ligaments, recombinant IGF-1, but not GH, enhanced collagen content and mechanics. Bioassays in 2D culture revealed that acute treatment with post-exercise serum activated mTORC1 and ERK1/2. In conclusion, the post-exercise biochemical milieu, but not recombinant GH, enhances collagen content and tensile strength of engineered ligaments, in association with mTORC1 and ERK1/2 activation. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  3. Bond strength and ultimate tensile strength of resin composite filled into dentine cavity; effect of bulk and incremental filling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayif, Ma'an M; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between micro-tensile bond strength (muTBS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of resin composite restorations in cavities filled by a bulk or incremental technique using the micro-tensile test. Class I cavities (4mm long, 3mm wide, 3mm deep) were prepared into dentine of sixteen human molars. All cavities were bonded with Clearfil SE Bond and restored with AP-X composite with either a bulk or incremental technique. After storage in water for 24h, the teeth were vertically sectioned to yield two slabs. Each slab was sectioned into three sticks. Sticks of one slab were trimmed into an hourglass of 0.7 mm2 area at resin-dentine interface for bond strength measurement while the other sticks were trimmed at the centre of the restoration for UTS measurement. Specimens were tested in tension at 1mm/min until failure. The results obtained were statistically analysed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc test (alpha=0.05). Pearson's correlation test was used to identify any correlation between muTBS and UTS for each filling method. Both muTBS and UTS of resin composite decreased towards the bottom of the cavity (pvariables. There was a relationship between muTBS and UTS of resin composite filled into dentin cavity in bulk technique.

  4. Tensile strength of warm and cool season forage grasses in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Zwi G; Fethiere, Richard; Adesogan, Adegbola; Sollenberger, Lynn

    2017-10-01

    The tensile strength (TS) of four warm-season and three cool-season forage grasses was measured with an Instron Universal machine, along with cell-wall analysis and determination of in vitro organic matter digestibility. The mean TS of the warm-season grasses was significantly higher than that of the cool season grasses (22 vs. 9 kg, respectively, p oats (12.6 vs. 6.8 and 7.5 kg, respectively, p digestibility (correlation coefficients were 0.64, 0.73. 0.41, and -0.64, respectively). Grass tensile strength may have implications on animal preference and on the energy that animals must spend during grazing, and consequently on animal performance (feed intake, daily weight gain and milk, and meat production). Information on grass TS would help to select and screen improved forage cultivars and enable to improve grassland management with better animal performance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of water storage on ultimate tensile strength and mass changes of universal adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrololumi, Nazanin; Beglou, Amirreza; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Sadr, Alireza; Sheikh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh-Mahsa; Ghasemi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of water storage on micro tensile strength (µTS) and mass changes (MC) of two universal adhesives. 10 disk-shaped specimens were prepared for each adhesive; Scotchbond Universal (SCU) All-Bond Universal (ABU) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2). At the baseline and after 1 day and 28 days of water storage, their mass were measured and compared to estimate water sorption and solubility. For µTS test, 20 dumbbell shaped specimens were also prepared for each adhesive in two subgroups of 1 day and 28 days water storage. MC was significantly lower for SCU and ABU than SB2 (P water; both universal adhesives showed less water sorption and higher values of µTS than the control group. Key words:Absorption, dental adhesives, dentin-bonding agents, solubility, tensile strength.

  6. Effects of substrate preheating during direct energy deposition on microstructure, hardness, tensile strength, and notch toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Gyeong Yun; Lee, Ki Yong; Park, Sang Hu; Shim, Do Sik

    2017-11-01

    This study examined the effects of substrate preheating for the hardfacing of cold-press dies using the high-speed tool steel AISI M4. The preheating of the substrate is a widely used technique for reducing the degree of thermal deformation and preventing crack formation. We investigated the changes in the metallurgical and mechanical properties of the high-speed tool steel M4 deposited on an AISI D2 substrate with changes in the substrate preheating temperature. Five preheating temperatures (100-500 °C; interval of 100 °C) were selected, and the changes in the temperature of the substrate during deposition were observed. As the preheating temperature of the substrate was increased, the temperature gradient between the melting layer and the substrate decreased; this prevented the formation of internal cracks, owing to thermal stress relief. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy showed that a dendritic structure was formed at the interface between the deposited layer and the substrate while a cellular microstructure was formed in the deposited layer. As the preheating temperature was increased, the sizes of the cells and precipitated carbides also increased. Furthermore, the hardness increased slightly while the strength and toughness decreased. Moreover, the tensile and impact properties deteriorated rapidly at excessively high preheating temperatures (greater than 500 °C). The results of this study can be used as preheating criteria for achieving the desired mechanical properties during the hardfacing of dies and molds.

  7. Effects of substrate preheating during direct energy deposition on microstructure, hardness, tensile strength, and notch toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Gyeong Yun; Lee, Ki Yong; Park, Sang Hu; Shim, Do Sik

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the effects of substrate preheating for the hardfacing of cold-press dies using the high-speed tool steel AISI M4. The preheating of the substrate is a widely used technique for reducing the degree of thermal deformation and preventing crack formation. We investigated the changes in the metallurgical and mechanical properties of the high-speed tool steel M4 deposited on an AISI D2 substrate with changes in the substrate preheating temperature. Five preheating temperatures (100-500 °C; interval of 100 °C) were selected, and the changes in the temperature of the substrate during deposition were observed. As the preheating temperature of the substrate was increased, the temperature gradient between the melting layer and the substrate decreased; this prevented the formation of internal cracks, owing to thermal stress relief. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy showed that a dendritic structure was formed at the interface between the deposited layer and the substrate while a cellular microstructure was formed in the deposited layer. As the preheating temperature was increased, the sizes of the cells and precipitated carbides also increased. Furthermore, the hardness increased slightly while the strength and toughness decreased. Moreover, the tensile and impact properties deteriorated rapidly at excessively high preheating temperatures (greater than 500 °C). The results of this study can be used as preheating criteria for achieving the desired mechanical properties during the hardfacing of dies and molds.

  8. Tensile strength and corrosion resistance of brazed and laser-welded cobalt-chromium alloy joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Rok; Legat, Andraz; Funduk, Nenad

    2006-10-01

    The longevity of prosthodontic restorations is often limited due to the mechanical or corrosive failure occurring at the sites where segments of a metal framework are joined together. The purpose of this study was to determine which joining method offers the best properties to cobalt-chromium alloy frameworks. Brazed and 2 types of laser-welded joints were compared for their mechanical and corrosion characteristics. Sixty-eight cylindrical cobalt-chromium dental alloy specimens, 35 mm long and 2 mm in diameter, were cast. Sixteen specimens were selected for electrochemical measurements in an artificial saliva solution and divided into 4 groups (n=4). In the intact group, the specimens were left as cast. The specimens of the remaining 3 groups were sectioned at the center, perpendicular to the long-axis, and were subsequently rejoined by brazing (brazing group) or laser welding using an X- or I-shaped joint design (X laser and I laser groups, respectively). Another 16 specimens were selected for electrochemical measurements in a more acidic artificial saliva solution. These specimens were also divided into 4 groups (n=4) as described above. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization were used to assess corrosion potentials, breakdown potentials, corrosion current densities, total impedances at lowest frequency, and polarization charge-transfer resistances. The remaining 36 specimens were used for tensile testing. They were divided into 3 groups in which specimen pairs (n=6) were joined by brazing or laser welding to form 70-mm-long cylindrical rods. The tensile strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine. Differences between groups were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance (alpha=.05). The fracture surfaces and corrosion defects were examined with a scanning electron microscope. The average tensile strength of brazed joints was 792 MPa and was significantly greater (Pcobalt-chromium alloy joints, but strength is

  9. Optimizing tensile strength of low-alloy steel joints in upset welding

    OpenAIRE

    Hamedi, M

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose In resistance upset welding, the heat is generated by resistance of the interface of abutting surfaces to the flow of electrical current in heating and post-weld heating stages. Upset welding typically results in solid-state welds with no melting at the joint. In this paper, the effect of process parameters including heating and post-weld heating power and their corresponding duration along with interference, on the tensile strength of the welded joint are experimentally inve...

  10. Optimization of tensile strength for new type acetone-urea-formaldehyde furan resin using uniform design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shengjun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the 24 h tensile strength of new type acetone-urea-formaldehyde furan resin (nitrogen content 3% was investigated by uniform design optimization. Four independent variables such as acetone : formaldehyde molar ratio (mol/mol, solution pH value, reaction temperature (℃ and reaction time (min were considered in the experiments. U*13(134 uniform design was employed and the equation of 24 h tensile strength model was obtained after 13 experimentations. The 24 h tensile strength was optimized by applying single factor experiments and stepwise non-linear regression analysis. Minitab (Minitab 15 trial version and MATLAB (R2010a trial version were used for data analysis. The t-value and p-value indicate that the major impact factors include the interaction effect of solution pH value and reaction temperature (X2X3, the linear terms of acetone : formaldehyde molar ratio (X1, reaction time (X4 followed by the square effects of acetone/formaldehyde molar ratio (X1X1. The optimized results were achieved with the acetone: formaldehyde molar ratio (mol/mol at 3:1, solution pH value at 6.0, reaction temperature at 70 ℃, and reaction time at 140 min, respectively. This method can not only significantly reduce the number and cost of the tests, but also provide a good experimental design strategy for the development of furan resin. The investigation shows that the predicted results of 24 h tensile strength are consistent well with the experimental ones.

  11. Effect of Strain Rates and Pre-Twist on Tensile Strength of Kevlar KM2 Single Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Tension. Polymer 2012, 53, 5568–5574. 9. Wilfong, R. E.; Zimmerman, J. Strength and Durability Characteristics of Kevlar Aramid Fiber . Journal of...Effect of Strain Rates and Pre-Twist on Tensile Strength of Kevlar KM2 Single Fiber by Brett D. Sanborn and Tusit T. Weerasooriya ARL-TR...6403 April 2013 Effect of Strain Rates and Pre-Twist on Tensile Strength of Kevlar KM2 Single Fiber Brett D. Sanborn Oak Ridge Institute

  12. Modification of Rule of Mixtures for Tensile Strength Estimation of Circular GFRP Rebars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jun You

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The rule of mixtures (ROM method is often used to estimate the tensile strength of fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs reinforcing bars (rebars. Generally, the ROM method predicts the FRP rebars’ modulus of elasticity adequately but overestimates their tensile strength. This may result from defects occurred during manufacture that prevent the used materials from exhibiting a sound performance and the shear-lag phenomenon by transmission of external forces through the surface of the rebar having a circular cross section. Due to the latter, there is a difference in fiber breaking points regarding the fibers located on the surface and fibers located at the center, and thus results in differences between the values calculated from the conventional ROM and the experimental result. In this study, for the purpose of resolving the problem, glass FRP (GFRP rebars were shaped to have a hollow section at the center of their cross sections and were further subject to tensile strength tests. The test results were further placed under regression analysis and a modified ROM within ±5% accuracy compared to the experimental value was proposed for GFRP rebars with 13, 16, and 19 mm diameters.

  13. Effect of elevated temperature on the tensile strength of Napier/glass-epoxy hybrid reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridzuan, M. J. M.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Afendi, M.; Firdaus, A. Z. Ahmad; Azduwin, K.

    2017-11-01

    The effects of elevated temperature on the tensile strength of Napier/glass-epoxy hybrid reinforced composites and its morphology of fractured surfaces are discussed. Napier/glass-epoxy hybrid reinforced composites were fabricated by using vacuum infusion method by arranging Napier fibres in between sheets of woven glass fibres. Napier and glass fibres were laminated with estimated volume ratios were 24 and 6 vol. %, respectively. The epoxy resin was used as matrix estimated to 70 vol. %. Specimens were tested to failure under tension at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min using Universal Testing Machine (Instron) with a load cell 100 kN at four different temperatures of RT, 40°C, 60°C and 80°C. The morphology of fractured surface of hybrid composites was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The result shows reduction in tensile strength at elevated temperatures. The increase in the temperature activates the process of diffusion, and generates critical stresses which cause the damage at first-ply or at the centre of the hybrid plate, as a result lower the tensile strength. The observation of FESEM images indicates that the fracture mode is of evolution of localized damage, from fibre/matrix debonding, matric cracking, delamination and fibre breakage.

  14. Tensile strength testing for resorbable mesh fixation systems in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynvoet, Emmelie; Berrevoet, Frederik; De Somer, Filip; Vercauteren, Griet; Vanoverbeke, Ingrid; Chiers, Koen; Troisi, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    In an attempt to improve patient outcome and quality of life after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair, resorbable fixation devices have been developed to allow adequate mesh fixation while minimizing accompanying side-effects as tack erosion and adhesion formation. In experimental set-up, 24 pigs were treated by laparoscopic mesh placement. Two different meshes (PP/ORC and PP/ePTFE) and four fixation devices were evaluated: a 6.4 mm poly(D,L: )-lactide pushpin (tack I), a 6.8 mm poly(D,L: )-lactide with blunt tip (tack II), a 4.1 mm poly(glycolide-co-L-lactide) (tack III) and one titanium tack (control tack). A first group of animals (n = 12) was euthanized after 2 weeks survival and a second group (n = 12) after 6 months. At euthanasia, a relaparoscopy was performed to assess adhesion formation followed by laparotomy with excision of the entire abdominal wall. Tensile strength of the individual fixation systems was tested with the use of a tensiometer by measuring the force to pull the tack out of the mesh. Additionally, the foreign body reaction to the fixation systems was evaluated histologically as was their potential degradation. At 2 weeks the tensile strength was significantly higher for the control tack (31.98 N/cm²) compared to the resorbable devices. Except for tack II, the tensile strength was higher when the devices were fixed in a PP/ePTFE mesh compared to the PP/ORC mesh. After 6 months only tack III was completely resorbed, while tack I (9.292 N/cm²) had the lowest tensile strength. At this time-point similar tensile strength was observed for both tack II (29.56 N/cm²) and the control tack (27.77 N/cm²). Adhesions seem to be more depending on the type of mesh, in favor of PP/ePTFE. At long term, the 4.1 mm poly(glycolide-co-L-lactide) tack was the only tack completely resorbed while the 6.8 mm poly(D,L: )-lactide tack with blunt tip reached equal strengths to the permanent tack.

  15. Evaluation and Study the Effect of Additives and Other Factors on Tensile Strength of Asphalt Paving Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa Khaleel A. Al-Baiti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of asphaltic concrete to cracking is dependent upon its tensile strength and flexibility characteristics. Also the low tensile strength has recognized as a major contributor to other performance problems. The fatigue life of mixtures decreases exponentially with decreasing of tensile strength. This trend is justified by the loss in stiffness and thereby initiating cracks and stripping. The main objective of this research is intended to study the effect of different variables related with the used materials and the external conditions on the tensile strength and predict a model of indirect tensile strength in asphalt concrete paving materials under the local prevailing conditions and investigate the effect of percent of additives of (Polyestrene resins and Hydrated Lime to enhance the resistance ability of asphalt concrete mixture against distresses. The main affected factors; soaking, asphalt content, compaction, aggregate maximum size and temperature, influence on the indirect tensile strength and presented through a statistics analysis model for tensile strength in asphalt mixture

  16. Tensile and erosive strength of soil macro-aggregates from soils under different management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbanek Emilia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reduced soil tillage practices are claimed to improve soil health, fertility and productivity through improved soil structure and higher soil organic matter contents. This study compares soil structure stability of soil aggregates under three different tillage practices: conventional, reduced and no tillage. The erosive strength of soil aggregates has been determined using the abrasion technique with the soil aggregate erosion chambers (SAE. During abrasion soil aggregates have been separated into the exterior, transitional and interior regions. The forces needed to remove the material from the aggregate were calculated as erosive strength and compared with the tensile strength of the aggregates derived from crushing tests. The relationship between aggregate strength and other soil properties such as organic carbon and hydrophobic groups’ content has also been identified.

  17. THE EFFECTS OF WOODEN BOARDS AND ADHESIVE TYPES TO DIAGONAL COMPRESSION AND TENSILE STRENGTHS ON THE BOX CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa ALTINOK

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The main factor for furniture manufacturing with box construction is diagonal compression or diagonal tensile strength on joint points. This strength differences according to type of wooden board joining style an glue type.In this study, the effects of lathly joining with different glue type on the different wooden board in box construction manufacturing was experimentally tested by diagonal compression and tensile test methods. Finally, it was determined that the diagonal compression and tensile strengths were lower in all lathly joining wooden board with used polyviniyl acetat glue and those were higer with used desmodur-vtka glue.

  18. Assessement of tensile strength of graphites by the Iosipescu coupon test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guilherme Borzani Manhani

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Polycrystalline graphites are widely used in the metallurgical, nuclear and aerospace industries. Graphites are particulated composites manufactured with a mixture of coke with pitch, and changes in relative proportions of these materials cause modifications in their mechanical properties. Uniaxial tension tests must be avoided for mechanical characterization in this kind of brittle material, due to difficulties in making the relatively long specimens and premature damages caused during testing set-up. On other types of tests, e.g. bending tests, the specimens are submitted to combined stress states (normal and transverse shear stresses. The Iosipescu shear test, is performed in a beam with two 90° opposite notches machined at the mid-length of the specimens, by applying two forces couples, so that a pure and uniform shear stress state is generated at the cross section between the two notches. When a material is isotropic and brittle, a failure at 45° in relation to the beam long axis can take place, i.e., the tensile normal stress acts parallel to the lateral surface of the notches, controls the failure and the result of the shear test is numerically equivalent to the tensile strength. This work has evaluated a graphite of the type used in rocket nozzles by the Iosipescu test and the resulted stress, ~11 MPa, was found to be equal to the tensile strength. Thus, the tensile strength can be evaluated just by a single and simple experiment, thus avoiding complicated machining of specimen and testing set-up.

  19. Effect of cement types on the tensile strength of metallic crowns submitted to thermocycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consani Simonides

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between metallic cast crowns and tensile strength according to cement types submitted to thermocycling was studied. Seventy-two metallic crowns were cast with Verabond II Ni-Cr alloy and cemented in standardized preparations with 10º tapering. Three types of finishing line (45-degree chamfered, 20-degree bevel shoulder and right shoulder were made with diamond burs on bovine teeth. Twenty-four metallic crowns in each group were randomly subdivided into three subgroups of 8 samples each according to the cement used: SS White zinc phosphate cement, Vitremer resin-modified glass ionomer cement, and Rely X resin cement and were submitted to thermocycling. Retention was evaluated according to tensile load required to displace the metallic cast crowns from tooth preparations with an Instron testing machine. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed a statistically significant difference among luting materials, with greater results for Rely X resin cement (24.9 kgf followed by SS White zinc phosphate cement (13.3 kgf and Vitremer resin-modified glass ionomer cement (10.1 kgf. The finishing line types did not influence the tensile resistance of the crowns fixed with the three cements. Increased tensile resistance of metallic crowns fixed on bovine teeth was obtained with resin cement, independent of the finishing line types.

  20. Root diversity in alpine plants: root length, tensile strength and plant age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, M.; Stroude, R.; Körner, C.; Buttler, A.; Rixen, C.

    2009-04-01

    A high diversity of plant species and functional groups is hypothesised to increase the diversity of root types and their subsequent effects for soil stability. However, even basic data on root characteristics of alpine plants are very scarce. Therefore, we determined important root characteristics of 13 plant species from different functional groups, i.e. grasses, herbs and shrubs. We excavated the whole root systems of 62 plants from a machine-graded ski slope at 2625 m a.s.l. and analysed the rooting depth, the horizontal root extension, root length and diameter. Single roots of plant species were tested for tensile strength. The age of herbs and shrubs was determined by growth-ring analysis. Root characteristics varied considerably between both plant species and functional groups. The rooting depth of different species ranged from 7.2 ± 0.97 cm to 20.5 ± 2.33 cm, but was significantly larger in the herb Geum reptans (70.8 ± 10.75 cm). The woody species Salix breviserrata reached the highest horizontal root extensions (96.8 ± 25.5 cm). Most plants had their longest roots in fine diameter classes (0.5

  1. Effects of different disinfection and sterilization methods on tensile strength of materials used for single-use devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stanley A; Merritt, Katharine; Woods, Terry O; McNamee, Scott G; Hitchins, Victoria M

    2002-01-01

    Driven by economic and time constraints, some medical centers and third parties are resterilizing single-use devices (SUDs) for reuse. The steam autoclave is quick, but most plastics used in SUDs cannot survive the temperature. Thus, a number of new methods of cleaning, disinfecting, and sterilizing these complex devices are being introduced on the market. The present study investigated the effects of a range of methods on the tensile strength of latex rubber, silicone elastomer, 2 different formulations of polyurethane, nylon, and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) specimens. The methods used were sodium hypochlorite bleach (Clorox), peracetic acid + hydrogen peroxide (Steris), formaldehyde gas (Chemiclave), low-temperature peracetic acid and gas plasma (Plazlyte), and low-temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (Sterrad). The results showed that silicone elastomer was minimally affected, whereas the strengths of nylon, polyethylene, and latex were reduced by some of the methods. Depending on the formulation, the strength of polyurethane either increased or decreased. The data demonstrated that disinfection and sterilization can affect the tensile strength of certain materials used in medical devices.

  2. Improved tensile strength of glycerol-plasticized gluten bioplastic containing hydrophobic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yihu; Zheng, Qiang

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the present work has been to study the influence of hydrophobic liquids on the morphology and the properties of thermo-molded plastics based on glycerol-plasticized wheat gluten (WG). While the total amount of castor oil and glycerol was remained constant at 30 wt%, castor oil with various proportions with respect to glycerol was incorporated with WG by mixing at room temperature and the resultant mixtures were thermo-molded at 120 degrees C to prepare sheet samples. Moisture absorption, morphology, dynamic mechanical properties, and tensile properties (Young's modulus, tensile strength and elongation at break) of the plastics were evaluated. Experimental results showed that the physical properties of WG plastic were closely related to glycerol to castor oil ratio. Increasing in castor oil content reduces the moisture absorption markedly, which is accompanied with a significant improvement in tensile strength and Young's modulus. These observations were further confirmed in 24 wt% glycerol-plasticized WG plastics containing 6 wt% silicone oil or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) liquid rubber.

  3. Effect of Fiber Waviness on Tensile Strength of a Flax-Sliver-Reinforced Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taweesak Piyatuchsananon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a composite material made from natural fibers and biodegradable resin, “green composite,” is attracting attention as an alternative composite material for the replacement of glass fiber-reinforced plastics. Plant-based natural fibers such as kenaf and flax have already been used as composite reinforcement materials because they are more environmentally friendly and costless fibers than artificial fibers. A problem of using natural fibers is the fiber waviness, which affects the tensile properties. Fiber waviness is fluctuation in the fiber orientation that is inherent in the sliver morphology of plant-based natural fibers. This study was conducted to clarify the relation between quantified parameters of fiber waviness and a composite’s tensile strength. First, the fiber orientation angles on a flax-sliver-reinforced composite were measured. Then the angle distribution was quantified through spatial autocorrelation analysis methods: Local Moran’s I and Local Geary’s c. Finally, the relation between the resultant tensile strength and quantified parameters was discussed.

  4. Alternate Method for Determination of Glue-line Tensile Strength of Spliced Veneers in Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Král

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality control is a crucial part of any manufacturing unit, as it assures compliance to established standards as well as maintenance of product quality for internal management purposes. Quality control of spliced veneer in Czech wood based industries is mainly based on ČSN 49 2315 and ČSN 49 2320 standards, which rely on measurement of crack length in finished product. This method has been satisfactorily used since 1985 but requirements of wood based industry has changed a lot in these years. We propose an alternate method for mesurement of tensile strength of spliced veneers. Samples of specified size spliced were taken as mentioned in details and they were subjected to tensile stength measurement. An addtional adhesive tape was used to avoid intra-material fibres disjointing, so that inter-material tensile strength can be measured for spliced veneers. This test can be used for on – site optimization of splicing machine units as well as regular quality control of spliced venners.

  5. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  6. The High Temperature Tensile and Creep Behaviors of High Entropy Superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Te-Kang; Yeh, An-Chou; Kuo, Chen-Ming; Kakehi, Koji; Murakami, Hideyuki; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Jian, Sheng-Rui

    2017-10-04

    This article presents the high temperature tensile and creep behaviors of a novel high entropy alloy (HEA). The microstructure of this HEA resembles that of advanced superalloys with a high entropy FCC matrix and L1 2 ordered precipitates, so it is also named as "high entropy superalloy (HESA)". The tensile yield strengths of HESA surpass those of the reported HEAs from room temperature to elevated temperatures; furthermore, its creep resistance at 982 °C can be compared to those of some Ni-based superalloys. Analysis on experimental results indicate that HESA could be strengthened by the low stacking-fault energy of the matrix, high anti-phase boundary energy of the strengthening precipitate, and thermally stable microstructure. Positive misfit between FCC matrix and precipitate has yielded parallel raft microstructure during creep at 982 °C, and the creep curves of HESA were dominated by tertiary creep behavior. To the best of authors' knowledge, this article is the first to present the elevated temperature tensile creep study on full scale specimens of a high entropy alloy, and the potential of HESA for high temperature structural application is discussed.

  7. The effect of salivary pH on diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement coated with coating agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismayanti, D.; Triaminingsih, S.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of artificial saliva with different acidities on the diametral tensile strength of Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) coated with varnish and nanofilled coating agent. The specimens coated with coating agents were immersed in artificial saliva with pH of 4.5, 5.5, and 7 for 24 hours in an incubatorat 37°C. The diametral tensile strength of the specimens was tested with Universal Testing Machine. There were no significant differences on the diametral tensile strength of all specimens that were put into groups based on the acidity of the saliva and the type of coating agent (p>0.05). Both varnish and nanofilled coating agent stayed on the RMGIC in the acidic condition that simulated the true condition of oral cavity in people with high caries risk for the 24 hours of maturation.

  8. Effect of salivary pH on diametral tensile strength of glass ionomer cement coated with coating agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahdillah; Triaminingsih, S.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of salivary pH to diametral tensile strength of glass ionomer cement (GIC) coated with a coating agent. GIC specimens coated with varnish and nano-filled coating agent were stored in artificial saliva at pH values of 4.5, 5.5, and 7 for 24 h at 37°C, then the diametral tensile strength was tested by universal testing machine. Results showed that there was no significant difference in the diametral tensile strength of the GIC coated with varnish and nano-filled coating agent with decreasing of salivary pH (p < 0.05). It can be concluded that salivary pH does not affect the diametral tensile strength of GIC coated by varnish or nano-filled coating agent

  9. Tensile strength and bonding in compacts: a comparison of diametral compression and three-point bending for plastically deforming materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mohd C I; Fell, John T

    2002-08-01

    The tensile strength of tablets is frequently used as a measure of the bonding achieved during compaction. Tablets from two plastically deforming materials and one brittle material have been subjected to tensile strength testing using diametral compression and three-point bending. The plastically deforming materials exhibited marked inhomogeneities, with the surfaces of the tablets considerably more compact than the inner material. The results from the two tests were different, with the three-point bending test giving higher results for tensile strength. The rate of change of tensile strength with overall tablet porosity was, however, the same for the two tests. Diametral compression would thus appear to give a reasonable estimate of bonding despite the non-homogenous nature of tablets prepared from plastically deforming materials.

  10. Studying of Compressive, Tensile and Flexural Strength of Concrete by Using Steel Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muslim Abdul-Ameer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the effect of adding steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete. Steel fiber has a very significant effect on concrete because it delays the propagation of micro cracks that generate due to loading on concrete members such as beams and slabs, therefore ,it increases the strength of concrete. The steel fiber was used in this study as a percentage of the volume of concrete. Mix proportion was 1: 2:4 (cement: sand: gravel by volume for all mixes and using 0% as (control mix,0.1 %,0.2%,0.5 % and 1.0% of steel fibers, these ratios leads to increase the compressive, tensile ,and flexural strength of concrete, where the improvement in flexural strength was significant

  11. Multi-scale investigation of tensile creep of ultra-high performance concrete for bridge applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garas Yanni, Victor Youssef

    Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) is relatively a new generation of concretes optimized at the nano and micro-scales to provide superior mechanical and durability properties compared to conventional and high performance concretes. Improvements in UHPC are achieved through: limiting the water-to-cementitious materials ratio (i.e., w/cm ≤ 0.20), optimizing particle packing, eliminating coarse aggregate, using specialized materials, and implementing high temperature and high pressure curing regimes. In addition, and randomly dispersed and short fibers are typically added to enhance the material's tensile and flexural strength, ductility, and toughness. There is a specific interest in using UHPC for precast prestressed bridge girders because it has the potential to reduce maintenance costs associated with steel and conventional concrete girders, replace functionally obsolete or structurally deficient steel girders without increasing the weight or the depth of the girder, and increase bridge durability to between 75 and 100 years. UHPC girder construction differs from that of conventional reinforced concrete in that UHPC may not need transverse reinforcement due to the high tensile and shear strengths of the material. Before bridge designers specify such girders without using shear reinforcement, the long-term tensile performance of the material must be characterized. This multi-scale study provided new data and understanding of the long-term tensile performance of UHPC by assessing the effect of thermal treatment, fiber content, and stress level on the tensile creep in a large-scale study, and by characterizing the fiber-cementitious matrix interface at different curing regimes through nanoindentation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in a nano/micro-scale study. Tensile creep of UHPC was more sensitive to investigated parameters than tensile strength. Thermal treatment decreased tensile creep by about 60% after 1 year. Results suggested the possibility of

  12. Tensile properties and fracturing behavior of weld joints in the CLAM at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Yucheng [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xiao, Chengwen, E-mail: emoryxiao@163.com [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Xu; Yue, Jiajia; Zhu, Qiang [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We use the stress triaxiality theory to explain the plastic deformation and facture behavior of the joints during the short term tensile tests at high temperature. • The tensile strength of CLAM welded joint at high temperature is lower compared with that at room temperature. • We explained the formation of crack and the reason of fracture. - Abstract: The tensile properties and fracturing behavior of weld joints in the Chinese low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) at high temperatures were studied. The result revealed that the cracks of weld joints in the base metal would appear in the heat-affected zone, after post-weld heat treatment for the high-temperature tensile test. The microstructure in the fractured frontier had different deformation and directions, and the fractured surface had different angles, a result associating with the normal faulting and shear fracturing. The tri-axial theory of stress can well explain the deformation and fracturing behavior of weld joints in the high-temperature tensile.

  13. Investigation of influential factors on the tensile strength of cold recycled mixture with bitumen emulsion due to moisture conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhamed Bayane Bouraima

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study attempts to investigate the effect of moisture conditioning on the indirect tensile strength (ITS of cold recycled mixture with bitumen emulsion. Firstly, samples were prepared using a Superpave gyratory compactor. They were hence conditioned using moisture induced sensitivity tester (MIST device. Factorial design was carried out considering four factors each at two different levels. These factors were specimen thickness, air voids content, pressure and number of cycles. In the MIST device, samples are cyclically subjected to water pressure through the sample pores. The MIST conditioned samples were tested for indirect tensile strength. The analysis of two-level full-factorial designed experiments revealed that all four factors have a negative effect on tensile strength of cold recycled mixture with bitumen emulsion. Specimen thickness was the most significant factor affecting the tensile strength followed by air voids content. In two-factor interaction, specimen thickness-number of cycles, air voids content-pressure, and pressure-number of cycles were significant. The most significant three-factor interaction was specimen thickness-pressure-number of cycles. The results from the study suggest that in measuring tensile strength, the appropriate specimen thickness and air voids content should be selected to quantify the representative tensile strength for in-situ conditions.

  14. Tensile strength of type IV dental stones dried in a microwave oven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersek, Nur; Canay, Senay; Akça, Kivanç; Ciftçi, Yalçin

    2002-05-01

    It is known that drying dental stones in a microwave oven can save time, but the strength of the material may be affected by different drying methods. This study evaluated the diametral tensile strength (DTS) of 5 type IV gypsum products at different time intervals using microwave and air-drying methods. . A total of 300 cylinder specimens were prepared from 5 type IV dental stones (Moldano, Amberok, Herastone, Shera-Sockel, and Fujirock; n = 60 per stone) in accordance with the manufacturers' recommendations. Half of the specimens of each stone (n = 30) were dried in open air within a temperature range of 20 +/- 2 degrees C; the other half (n = 30) underwent initial setting in a silicone rubber mold in open air for 10 minutes and then were dried in a microwave oven for 10 minutes. Within these groups, 10 specimens were tested under diametral compression at each of the following time periods: 30, 60, and 120 minutes after drying. Three-way analysis of variance and Scheffe's post hoc test were performed for statistical comparisons at a significance level of Pmicrowave oven (mean 2.99 MPa) were significantly higher (Pmicrowave oven drying had a positive effect on the diametral tensile strength of 5 type IV dental stones.

  15. Possibilities of Adhesives Filling With Micro-particle Fillers – Lap-shear Tensile Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Valášek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An adhesive bonding can be ranged among technologies of materials bonding which are used in all industrial branches. It plays its important role also in an area of the construction of agricultural machines, e.g. tractors, harvestors etc. Utility properties of adhesives can be extended by using various types of fillers. These fillers increase some mechanical characteristics of adhesives and not last they can decrease resultant price. The paper focuses on a possibility to fill the adhesives showing increased lap-shear tensile strength. These adhesives are used e.g. for adhesive bonding of coach bodies in an automotive industry so that is why it is possible to apply them also in the agricultural area. Laboratory experiments describe the lap-shear tensile strength of rigid adherents which were bonded with adhesives with a variable concentration of micro-particle filler – a glass powder. T-test used for a comparison of the shear strength of the bonds created with the adhesives with 5 vol.% of the glass powder did not evidence a statistically significant difference comparing with the unfilled adhesives. This priece of knowledge opens a possible way of a material usage of the glass powder in the area of the adhesive bonding.

  16. The difference of tensile bond strength between total and self etch adhesive systems in dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selly Yusalina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Total etch adhesive system has been widely used in teeth conservation area as an adhesive agent before implicating composite resin restoration agent. The aim of this research is to prove the difference of tensile bond strength between total etch (Single Bond and self etch adhesive system (Adper prompt L-Pop on dentin surface in vitro. The extracted and non carries maxillary premolar teeth were used in this research and were divided into 2 groups. The first group comprised 15 specimen teeth etched in phosphoric acid and was applicated with the Single Bond adhesive agent. The second group comprised 15 specimen teeth, applicated with the Adper Prompt-L-Pop. The composite resin (Z 350, 3M was applied incrementally and each of the layers was rayed for 20 seconds. The specimens were stored in physiologic solution before they were tested. Tensile bond strength was measured by LRX Plus Lloyd Instrument, with 1 N load and 1 mm/minute speed, and the measurement result was in Mpa unit. The result was evaluated statistically by the Student t-test with α = 0.05. Single Bond (the 5th generation showed a better bond strength compared to the Adper Prompt-L-Pop (the 6th generation.

  17. Standard test method for splitting tensile strength for brittle nuclear waste forms

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This test method is used to measure the static splitting tensile strength of cylindrical specimens of brittle nuclear waste forms. It provides splitting tensile-strength data that can be used to compare the strength of waste forms when tests are done on one size of specimen. 1.2 The test method is applicable to glass, ceramic, and concrete waste forms that are sufficiently homogeneous (Note 1) but not to coated-particle, metal-matrix, bituminous, or plastic waste forms, or concretes with large-scale heterogeneities. Cementitious waste forms with heterogeneities >1 to 2 mm and 5 mm can be tested using this procedure provided the specimen size is increased from the reference size of 12.7 mm diameter by 6 mm length, to 51 mm diameter by 100 mm length, as recommended in Test Method C 496 and Practice C 192. Note 1—Generally, the specimen structural or microstructural heterogeneities must be less than about one-tenth the diameter of the specimen. 1.3 This test method can be used as a quality control chec...

  18. Experimental study of tensile strength of pharmaceutical tablets: effect of the diluent nature and compression pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juban, Audrey; Briançon, Stéphanie; Puel, François; Hoc, Thierry; Nouguier-Lehon, Cécile

    2017-06-01

    In the pharmaceutical field, tablets are the most common dosage form for oral administration in the world. Among different manufacturing processes, direct compression is widely used because of its economics interest and it is a process which avoids the steps of wet granulation and drying processes. Tablets are composed of at least two ingredients: an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) which is mixed with a diluent. The nature of the powders and the processing conditions are crucial for the properties of the blend and, consequently, strongly influence the mechanical characteristics of tablets. Moreover, tablets have to present a suitable mechanical strength to avoid crumbling or breaking when handling, while ensuring an appropriate disintegration after administration. Accordingly, this mechanical property is an essential parameter to consider. Experimental results showed that proportion of the diluent, fragmentary (DCPA) or plastic (MCC), had a large influence on the tensile strength evolution with API content as well as the compression load applied during tableting process. From these results a model was developed in order to predict the tensile strength of binary tablets by knowing the compression pressure. The validity of this model was demonstrated for the two studied systems and a comparison was made with two existing models.

  19. Experimental study of tensile strength of pharmaceutical tablets: effect of the diluent nature and compression pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juban Audrey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the pharmaceutical field, tablets are the most common dosage form for oral administration in the world. Among different manufacturing processes, direct compression is widely used because of its economics interest and it is a process which avoids the steps of wet granulation and drying processes. Tablets are composed of at least two ingredients: an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API which is mixed with a diluent. The nature of the powders and the processing conditions are crucial for the properties of the blend and, consequently, strongly influence the mechanical characteristics of tablets. Moreover, tablets have to present a suitable mechanical strength to avoid crumbling or breaking when handling, while ensuring an appropriate disintegration after administration. Accordingly, this mechanical property is an essential parameter to consider. Experimental results showed that proportion of the diluent, fragmentary (DCPA or plastic (MCC, had a large influence on the tensile strength evolution with API content as well as the compression load applied during tableting process. From these results a model was developed in order to predict the tensile strength of binary tablets by knowing the compression pressure. The validity of this model was demonstrated for the two studied systems and a comparison was made with two existing models.

  20. Evaluation of tensile strength resistance of different biomaterials in calvarial rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sanada,Jefferson Tomio; Ribeiro, Ingrid Webb Josephson; Ribeiro, Cristiane Machado; Kapczinski,Myriam Pereira; do VALLE, Accácio Lins

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different grafting materials on bone tensile strength after 6-month wound healing. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Non-critical size defects (3-mm diameter) were created in calvarium of 30 three-month-old Wistar rats. Animals were divided into 3 groups (n=10) treated with different grafting materials: GenOx® (Group 1A); GenMix® (Group 1B); no treatment (blood clot, Group 3). Six months after the surgery, rats were sacrificed; bone specimens were...

  1. Effect of water storage on ultimate tensile strength and mass changes of universal adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Bahrololumi, Nazanin; Beglou, Amirreza; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Sadr, Alireza; Sheikh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh-Mahsa; Ghasemi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of water storage on micro tensile strength (?TS) and mass changes (MC) of two universal adhesives. Material and Methods 10 disk-shaped specimens were prepared for each adhesive; Scotchbond Universal (SCU) All-Bond Universal (ABU) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2). At the baseline and after 1 day and 28 days of water storage, their mass were measured and compared to estimate water sorption and solubility. For ?TS test, 20 dumbbe...

  2. High strength alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  3. High strength alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  4. The effect of silanated and impregnated fiber on the tensile strength of E-glass fiber reinforced composite retainer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niswati Fathmah Rosyida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fiber reinforced composite (FRC is can be used in dentistry as an orthodontic retainer. FRC  still has a limitations because of to  a weak bonding between fibers and matrix. Purpose: This research was aimed to evaluate the effect of silane as coupling agent and fiber impregnation on the tensile strength of E-glass FRC. Methods: The samples of this research were classified into two groups each of which consisted of three subgroups, namely the impregnated fiber group (original, 1x addition of silane, 2x addition of silane and the non-impregnated fiber group (original, 1x addition of silane, 2x addition of silane. The tensile strength was measured by a universal testing machine. The averages of the tensile strength in all groups then were compared by using Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney post hoc tests. Results: The averages of the tensile strength (MPa in the impregnated fiber group can be known as follow; original impregnated fiber (26.60±0.51, 1x addition of silane (43.38±4.42, and 2x addition of silane (36.22±7.23. The averages of tensile strength (MPa in the non-impregnated fiber group can also be known as follow; original non-impregnated fiber (29.38±1.08, 1x addition of silane (29.38±1.08, 2x addition of silane (12.48±2.37. Kruskal Wallis test showed that there was a significant difference between the impregnated fiber group and the non-impregnated fiber group (p<0.05. Based on the results of post hoc test, it is also known that the addition of silane in the impregnated fiber group had a significant effect on the increasing of the tensile strength of E-glass FRC (p<0.05, while the addition of silane in the non-impregnated fiber group had a significant effect on the decreasing of the tensile strength of E-glass FRC. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the addition of silane in the non-silanated fiber group can increase the tensile strength of E-glass FRC, but the addition of silane in the silanated fiber group can

  5. The effect of different light-curing units on tensile strength and microhardness of a composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Batista Franco

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different light-curing units on the tensile bond strength and microhardness of a composite resin (Filtek Z250 - 3M/ESPE. Conventional halogen (Curing Light 2500 - 3M/ESPE; CL and two blue light emitting diode curing units (Ultraled - Dabi/Atlante; UL; Ultrablue IS - DMC; UB3 and UB6 were selected for this study. Different light intensities (670, 130, 300, and 600 mW/cm², respectively and different curing times (20s, 40s and 60s were evaluated. Knoop microhardness test was performed in the area corresponding to the fractured region of the specimen. A total of 12 groups (n=10 were established and the specimens were prepared using a stainless steel mold composed by two similar parts that contained a cone-shaped hole with two diameters (8.0 mm and 5.0 mm and thickness of 1.0 mm. Next, the specimens were loaded in tensile strength until fracture in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and a 50 kg load cell. For the microhardness test, the same matrix was used to fabricate the specimens (12 groups; n=5. Microhardness was determined on the surfaces that were not exposed to the light source, using a Shimadzu HMV-2 Microhardness Tester at a static load of 50 g for 30 seconds. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05. Regarding the individual performance of the light-curing units, there was similarity in tensile strength with 20-s and 40-s exposure times and higher tensile strength when a 60-s light-activation time was used. Regarding microhardness, the halogen lamp had higher results when compared to the LED units. For all light-curing units, the variation of light-exposure time did not affect composite microhardness. However, lower irradiances needed longer light-activation times to produce similar effect as that obtained with high-irradiance light-curing sources.

  6. Tensile Strength and Hardness Correlations with Microscopy in Friction welded Aluminium to Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish, Rengarajan; Seshagiri Rao, Vaddi; Ananthapadmanaban, Dattaguru; Ravi, Balappa

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium and copper are good conductors of heat and electricity, copper being the better conductor, is a costly metal indeed. On the other hand, aluminium is cheap, easily available and also has a lower density than copper. Hence, worldwide efforts are being made to partially replace copper wire. Solid state welding should be used to join aluminium to copper. This is because the use of fusion welding results in brittle phases formed in the weld interface. One of the solid state welding techniques used for joining aluminium to copper is friction welding. In this paper, an attempt has been made to join aluminium to copper by friction welding by varying the friction welding parameters, namely friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length and speed of rotation of the workpiece. Nine different friction welding parameter combinations were used during welding in accordance with ASTM standards and results have been reported. Tensile strength and hardness tests were carried out for each parameter combination. Optimum friction welding parameter combination was identified with respect to tensile strength. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron dispersive spectroanalysis were obtained to identify modes of fracture and presence of intermetallic phases for each friction welding combination with the aim to narrow down friction welding parameters that give good properties on the whole.

  7. The tensile strength test of thermoplastic materials based on poly(butylene terephtalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzepecka Anna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic composites go toward making an increasingly greater percentage of all manufacturing polymer composites. They have a lot of beneficial properties and their manufacturing using injecting and extrusion methods is a very easy and cheap process. Their properties significantly overtake the properties of traditional materials and it is the reason for their use. Scientists are continuously carrying out research to find new applications of composites materials in new industries, not only in the automotive or aircraft industry. When thermoplastic composites are manufactured a very important factor is the appropriate accommodation of tensile strength to their predestination. Scientists need to know the behaviour of these materials during the impact of different forces, and the factors of working in normal conditions too. The main aim of this article was macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the structure of thermoplastic composites after static tensile strength test. Materials which were analysed were thermoplastic materials which have poly(butylene terephthalate – PBT matrix reinforced with different content glass fibres – from 10% for 30%. In addition, research showed the necessary force to receive fracture and set their distinguishing characteristic down.

  8. VARIANCE ANALYSIS OF WOOL WOVEN FABRICS TENSILE STRENGTH USING ANCOVA MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VÎLCU Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper has conducted a study on the variation of tensile strength for four woven fabrics made from wool type yarns depending on fiber composition, warp and weft yarns tensile strength and technological density using ANCOVA regression model. In instances where surveyed groups may have a known history of responding to questions differently, rather than using the traditional sharing method to address those differences, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA can be employed. ANCOVA shows the correlation between a dependent variable and the covariate independent variables and removes the variability from the dependent variable that can be accounted by the covariates. The independent and dependent variable structures for Multiple Regression, factorial ANOVA and ANCOVA tests are similar. ANCOVA is differentiated from the other two in that it is used when the researcher wants to neutralize the effect of a continuous independent variable in the experiment. The researcher may simply not be interested in the effect of a given independent variable when performing a study. Another situation where ANCOVA should be applied is when an independent variable has a strong correlation with the dependent variable, but does not interact with other independent variables in predicting the dependent variable’s value. ANCOVA is used to neutralize the effect of the more powerful, non-interacting variable. Without this intervention measure, the effects of interacting independent variables can be clouded

  9. Tensile strength of glass fiber posts submitted to different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Maria Isabel A; Gomes, Érica Alves; Messias, Danielle Cristine; Silva Filho, João Manoel; Souza Filho, Celso Bernardo; Paulino, Silvana Maria

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the tensile strength of glass fiber posts submitted to different surface treatments. Forty-eight maxillary canines had their crowns sectioned and root canals endodontically treated. The roots were embedded in acrylic resin and distributed into 3 groups according to the surface treatment: Group I: the posts were treated with silane agent for 30 s and adhesive; Group II: the posts were cleaned with alcohol before treatment with silane agent and adhesive; Group III: the posts were submitted to conditioning with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s before treatment with silane agent and adhesive. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups for adhesive polymerization or not before insertion into the canal: A - adhesive was not light cured and B - adhesive was light cured. All posts were cemented with Panavia F and the samples were subjected to tensile strength test in a universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. There was statistically significant difference (p0.05). It was concluded that the products used for cleaning the posts influenced the retention regardless of adhesive light curing.

  10. Application of ANFIS for analytical modeling of tensile strength of functionally graded steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the tensile strength of ferritic and austenitic functionally graded steels produced by electroslag remelting has been modeled. To produce functionally graded steels, two slices of plain carbon steel and austenitic stainless steels were spot welded and used as electroslag remelting electrode. Functionally graded steel containing graded layers of ferrite and austenite may be fabricated via diffusion of alloying elements during remelting stage. Vickers microhardness profile of the specimen has been obtained experimentally and modeled with adaptive network-based fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS. To build the model for graded ferritic and austenitic steels, training, testing and validation using respectively 174 and 120 experimental data were conducted. According to the input parameters, in the ANFIS model, the Vickers microhardness of each layer was predicted. A good fit equation which correlates the Vickers microhardness of each layer to its corresponding chemical composition was achieved by the optimized network for both ferritic and austenitic graded steels. Afterwards; the Vickers microhardness of each layer in functionally graded steels was related to the yield stress of the corresponding layer and by assuming Holloman relation for stress-strain curve of each layer, they were acquired. Finally, by applying the rule of mixtures, tensile strength of functionally graded steels configuration was found through a numerical method. The obtained results from the proposed model are in good agreement with those acquired from the experiments.

  11. Influence of disinfectant solutions on the tensile bond strength of a fourth generation dentin bonding agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOCANGEL Jorge Saldivar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different disinfectant solutions on the tensile bond strength of a fourth generation dentin bonding agent. Forty non carious human molars were selected. Teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and ground until the exposure of a flat superficial dentin surface. Teeth were randomly divided in 4 groups and treated as follows: Group 1 - 2.5% NaOCl for 40 seconds; Group 2 - 2% chlorhexidine for 40 seconds; Group 3 - 1.23% acidulated fluoride for 4 minutes; and Group 4 - control (without disinfectant solution. Following treatments, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus® (3M was used according to the manufacturer's instructions. After that, the test specimens were built with composite resin (Z100®-3M, using a standard Teflon matrix. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at a temperature of 37ºC. The tensile strength test was performed using a Mini Instrom testing machine. The mean values obtained for each group, in MPa, were: Group 1 - 7.37 (± 2.51; Group 2 - 11.25 (± 4.65; Group 3 - 9.80 (± 3.11; and Group 4 - 10.96 (± 3.37. The results were submitted to statistical analysis using the ANOVA test, and no statistical significant differences among the groups were found. It can be concluded that the different disinfectant substances used in this research do not adversely affect dentin adhesion.

  12. Effect of Preparation Methods on Crystallization Behavior and Tensile Strength of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Xiaolong; Wu, Chunrui

    2013-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes were prepared by non solvent induced phase separation (NIPS), melt spinning and the solution-cast method. The effect of preparation methods with different membrane formation mechanisms on crystallization behavior and tensile strength of PVDF membranes was investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to examine the crystal form of the surface layers and the overall membranes, respectively. Spherulite morphologies and thermal behavior of the membranes were studied by polarized light optical microscopy (PLO) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) separately. It was found that the crystallization behavior of PVDF membranes was closely related to the preparation methods. For membranes prepared by the NIPS method, the skin layers had a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase, and the total crystallinity was 60.0% with no spherulite. For melt spinning membranes, the surface layers also showed a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase. The total crystallinity was 48.7% with perfect spherulites. Whereas the crystallization behavior of solution-cast membranes was related to the evaporation temperature and the additive, when the evaporation temperature was 140 °C with a soluble additive in the dope solution, obvious spherulites appeared. The crystalline morphology of PVDF exerted a great influence on the tensile strength of the membranes, which was much higher with perfect spherulites. PMID:24957064

  13. High-strength iron aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKamey, C.G.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1996-06-01

    Past studies have shown that binary Fe{sub 3}Al possesses low creep-rupture strength compared to many other alloys, with creep-rupture lives of less than 5 h being reported for tests conducted at 593{degrees}C and 207 MPa. The combination of poor creep resistance and low room-temperature tensile ductility due to a susceptibility to environmentally-induced dynamic hydrogen embrittlement has limited use of these alloys for structural applications despite their excellent corrosion properties. With regard to the ductility problem, alloy development efforts have produced significant improvements, with ductilities of 10-20% and tensile yield strengths as high as 500 MPa being reported. Likewise, initial improvements in creep resistance have been realized through small additions of Mo, Nb, and Zr.

  14. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR. All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles. The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm2 sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL.

  15. Effect of Numbers of Load Cycling on the Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Total Etch Adhesives to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Daneshkazemi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today load cycling is used for similarity of invitro and invivo studies, though different results were reported in different studies. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of load cycling on micro tensile bond strength of two total etch adhesives to dentin. Methods: Enamel of 48 molar teeth were removed to expose the superficial dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into two equal groups, and were restored with Single bond (SB, ExciTE and Synergy composite. Then the teeth of each group were divided to 4 equal sub groups. Moreover, load cycling of 0, 50, 100, 200 k load cycle with 50 newton load was used. In each sub group, 12 hour glass slabs with 1mm2 thickness were made. Then the samples were loaded by Dartec testing machine (Model HC/10 with 1 mm/min cross head speed to make the fracture occur. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, t-test, Bonferroni tests. Results: The most micro tensile bond strength belonged to ExciTE without load cycling and lowest refered to SB with 200 k. There was a significant difference between the groups (p ExciTE= 0.0001, p SB = 0.001. Micro tensile bond strength in SB group was significantly lower than ExciTE (p= 0.001. Moreover, load cycling had negative effect on micro tensile bond strength. Conclusion: By increasing load cycling, micro tensile bond strength of both bondings decreased significantly

  16. Hygrothermal effects on the tensile strength of carbon/epoxy laminates with molded edges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Geraldo Maurício

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The interlaminar stresses are confined to a region near the free edge. Therefore, the laminate stacking sequence and the free edge finishing are some of the factors that affect the strength of the laminate and limit its life. The use of molded edges eliminates the need for trimming and machining the laminates edges thus improving productivity. However, this fabrication technique may have a detrimental effect on the laminate strength for certain stacking sequences. This effect in the presence of moisture has not been characterized. This work presents the results of a comparative study of the resistance to delamination of laminates with machined edges and molded edges. Additionally, two environmental conditions were considered: dry laminates and laminates saturated with moisture. The tensile strength of the laminates were measured and micrographs were used to analyze the microstructure of the laminates near the free edges. It is concluded that the mechanical properties of advanced composites depend on the environmental conditions and the fabrication techniques used to produce the laminates. Therefore, it is necessary to account for these factors when experimentally determining the design allowables.

  17. Size and strain rate effects in tensile strength of penta-twinned Ag nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Xiaoyan; Gao, Huajian

    2017-08-01

    Penta-twinned Ag nanowires (pt-AgNWs) have recently attracted much attention due to their interesting mechanical and physical properties. Here we perform large-scale atomistic simulations to investigate the influence of sample size and strain rate on the tensile strength of pt-AgNWs. The simulation results show an apparent size effect in that the nanowire strength (defined as the critical stress for dislocation nucleation) increases with decreasing wire diameter. To account for such size effect, a theoretical model involving the interaction between an emerging dislocation and the twin boundary has been developed for the surface nucleation of dislocations. It is shown that the model predictions are in quantitative agreement with the results from atomistic simulations and previous experimental studies in the literatures. The simulations also reveal that nanowire strength is strain-rate dependent, which predicts an activation volume for dislocation nucleation in the range of 1-10b3, where b is the magnitude of the Burgers vector for a full dislocation.

  18. A COMPARISON OF THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF PLASTIC PARTS PRODUCED BY A FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Beniak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid Prototyping systems are nowadays increasingly used in many areas of industry, not only for producing design models but also for producing parts for final use. We need to know the properties of these parts. When we talk about the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM technique and FDM devices, there are many possible settings for devices and models which could influence the properties of a final part. In addition, devices based on the same principle may use different operational software for calculating the tool path, and this may have a major impact. The aim of this paper is to show the tensile strength value for parts produced from different materials on the Fused Deposition Modeling device when the horizontal orientation of the specimens is changed.

  19. [Comparative animal experiments of different tissue adhesives. I. Tensile strength studies. II. Histologic and morphometric studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, E; Buntrock, P; Köhler, S

    1989-01-01

    This paper for the first time presents the results of extensive histological and histomorphometric studies investigating the tensile strength of tissue adhesives in model experiments on animals. The material used in comparative studies were TISSEEL, a human adhesive based on fibrinogen, HISTOACRYL-blue, a cyanoacrylate, and KL-3, a type of urethane adhesive. All the materials used in these studies were shown to be principally suitable as tissue adhesives. TISSEEL, the biological adhesive, was obviously superior to all the other adhesives whereas the two synthetic adhesives HISTOACRYL-blue and KL-3 were found to be roughly equal in their properties. The animal model described in the present paper is recommended for use as a standard technique for testing the suitability of new tissue adhesives.

  20. Tensile Bond Strength of So-called Universal Primers and Universal Multimode Adhesives to Zirconia and Lithium Disilicate Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Adham; Younes, Feras; Lehmann, Frank; Kern, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    To test the bond strength and durability after artificial aging of so-called universal primers and universal multimode adhesives to lithium disilicate or zirconia ceramics. A total of 240 ceramic plates, divided into two groups, were produced and conditioned: 120 acid-etched lithium disilicate plates (IPS e.max CAD) and 120 air-abraded zirconia plates (Zenostar T). Each group was divided into five subgroups (n = 24), and a universal restorative primer or multimode universal adhesive was used for each subgroup to bond plexiglas tubes filled with a composite resin to the ceramic plate. The specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 3 days without thermal cycling, or for 30 or 150 days with 7500 or 37,500 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, respectively. All specimens then underwent tensile bond strength testing. Initially, all bonding systems exhibited high TBS, but some showed a significant reduction after 30 and 150 days of storage. After 3, 30, and 150 days, Monobond Plus, which contains silane and phosphate monomer, showed significantly higher bond strengths than the other universal primer and adhesive systems. The bond strength to lithium disilicate and zirconia ceramic is significantly affected by the bonding system used. Using a separate primer containg silane and phosphate monomer provides more durable bonding than do silanes incorporated in universal multimode adhesives. Only one of five so-called universal primers and adhesives provided durable bonding to lithium disilicate and zirconia ceramic.

  1. Effect of robotic manipulation on unidirectional barbed suture integrity: evaluation of tensile strength and sliding force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Dharam; Clay, Kevin; Hossain, S G M; Park, Eugene; Nelson, Carl A; LaGrange, Chad A

    2012-06-01

    One of the more challenging portions of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) is the urethrovesical anastomosis. Because of this, a unidirectional absorbable barbed suture (V-Loc(™)) has been used to complete the anastomosis with better efficiency and less tension. The effect of robotic needle driver manipulation on barbed suture is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine whether robotic manipulation decreases the tensile strength and peak sliding force of V-Loc barbed suture. Fifty-six V-Loc sutures were compared with 56 Maxon sutures. All sutures were 3-0 caliber. Half of the sutures in each group were manipulated with a da Vinci(®) robot large needle driver five times over a 5 cm length of suture. The other half was not manipulated. Breaking force was determined by placing sutures in a Bose ElectroForce load testing device. For sliding force testing, 28 V-Loc sutures were manipulated in the same fashion and compared with 28 nonmanipulated V-Loc sutures. Peak force needed to make the suture slip backward in porcine small intestine was determined to be the sliding force. Scanning electron microscopy of the barbs before and after robotic manipulation was also performed. The mean difference in breaking forces for manipulated vs nonmanipulated Maxon sutures was 4.52 N (P=0.004). The mean difference in breaking forces for manipulated vs nonmanipulated V-Loc sutures was 1.30 N (P=0.046). The manipulated V-Loc group demonstrated a lower peak sliding force compared with the nonmanipulated group (0.76 vs 0.88 N, P=0.199). Electron microscopy revealed minor structural damage to the barbs and suture. Tensile strength and peak sliding force of V-Loc suture is decreased by robotic manipulation. This is likely because of structural damage to the suture and barbs. This structural damage, however, is likely not clinically significant.

  2. Tensile Fracture Strength of Brisbane Tuff by Static and Cyclic Loading Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erarslan, N.; Alehossein, H.; Williams, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    This research presents the results of laboratory experiments during the investigation of tensile strength-strain characteristics of Brisbane tuff disc specimens under static and diametral cyclic loading. Three different cyclic loading methods were used; namely, sinusoidal cyclic loading, type I and II increasing cyclic loading with various amplitude values. The first method applied the stress amplitude-cycle number (s-n) curve approach to the measurement of the indirect tensile strength (ITS) and fracture toughness ( K IC) values of rocks for the first time in the literature. The type I and II methods investigated the effect of increasing cyclic loading on the ITS and K IC of rocks. For Brisbane tuff, the reduction in ITS was found to be 30 % under sinusoidal loading, whereas type I and II increasing cyclic loading caused a maximum reduction in ITS of 36 %. The maximum reduction of the static K IC of 46 % was obtained for the highest amplitude type I cyclic loading tested. For sinusoidal cyclic loading, a maximum reduction of the static K IC of 30 % was obtained. A continuous irreversible accumulation of damage was observed in dynamic cyclic tests conducted at different amplitudes and mean stress levels. Scanning electron microscope images showed that fatigue damage in Brisbane tuff is strongly influenced by the failure of the matrix because of both inter-granular fracturing and trans-granular fracturing. The main characteristic was grain breakage under cyclic loading, which probably starts at points of contact between grains and is accompanied by the production of very small fragments, probably due to frictional sliding within the weak matrix.

  3. Tensile strength and impact resistance properties of materials used in prosthetic check sockets, copolymer sockets, and definitive laminated sockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerschutz, Maria J; Haynes, Michael L; Nixon, Derek M; Colvin, James M

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic sockets serve as the interface between people with amputations and their prostheses. Although most materials used to make prosthetic sockets have been used for many years, knowledge of these materials' properties is limited, especially after they are subjected to fabrication processes. This study evaluated tensile and impact properties of the current state-of-the-art materials used to fabricate prosthetic check sockets, copolymer sockets, and definitive laminated sockets. Thermolyn Rigid and Orfitrans Stiff check socket materials produced significantly lower tensile strength and impact resistance than polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG). Copolymer socket materials exhibited greater resistance to impact forces than the check socket materials but lower tensile strengths than PETG. The heated molding processes, for the check socket and copolymer materials, reduced both tensile strength and elongation at break. Definitive laminated sockets were sorted according to fabrication techniques. Nyglass material had significantly higher elongation, indicating a more ductile material than carbon-based laminations. Carbon sockets with pigmented resin had higher tensile strength and modulus at break than nonpigmented carbon sockets. Elongation at yield and elongation at break were similar for both types of carbon-based laminations. The material properties determined in this study provide a foundation for understanding and improving the quality of prosthetic sockets using current fabrication materials and a basis for evaluating future technologies.

  4. High-speed imaging on static tensile test for unidirectional CFRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Hideaki; Aoki, Yuichiro; Hirano, Yoshiyasu; Kondo, Yasushi; Nagao, Yosuke

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the fracture mechanism of unidirectional CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) under static tensile loading. The advantages of CFRP are higher specific stiffness and strength than the metal material. The use of CFRP is increasing in not only the aerospace and rapid transit railway industries but also the sports, leisure and automotive industries. The tensile fracture mechanism of unidirectional CFRP has not been experimentally made clear because the fracture speed of unidirectional CFRP is quite high. We selected the intermediate modulus and high strength unidirectional CFRP laminate which is a typical material used in the aerospace field. The fracture process under static tensile loading was captured by a conventional high-speed camera and a new type High-Speed Video Camera HPV-1. It was found that the duration of fracture is 200 microseconds or less, then images taken by a conventional camera doesn't have enough temporal-resolution. On the other hand, results obtained by HPV-1 have higher quality where the fracture process can be clearly observed.

  5. Expansion of Kolarik model for tensile strength of polymer particulate nanocomposites as a function of matrix, nanoparticles and interphase properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Yasser; Rhee, Kyong Yop

    2017-11-15

    Kolarik proposed a model for tensile strength of polymer particulate composites based on the cubic orthogonal skeleton or three perpendicular plates (3PP) system. In this paper, Kolarik model is expanded for tensile strength of polymer nanocomposites containing spherical nanoparticles assuming the interphase properties. This model expresses the strength as a function of interphase properties. This development is performed using some models such as Pukanszky and Nicolais-Narkis. The expanded model is applied to calculate the thickness and strength of interphase by the experimental results. Furthermore, the strength of polymer nanocomposites is evaluated at different levels of material and interphase properties. The experimental data show good agreement with the predictions of the developed model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of intravitreal bevacizumab and ranibizumab on cutaneous tensile strength during wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoforidis JB

    2013-01-01

    : saline controls, 18.31 ± 0.43; bevacizumab, 11.02 ± 0.45 (P < 0.0001; and ranibizumab, 13.55 ± 0.43 (P < 0.0001. The interobserver correlation coefficient was 0.928.Conclusion: At day 7, both anti–vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF agents had significantly suppressed MNV scores and exerted a significant reduction of cutaneous wound tensile strength compared with saline controls. At day 14, neither agent produced a significant effect on tensile wound strength. Since angiogenesis is an integral component of the proliferative phase of wound healing, we encourage clinicians to be aware of their patients' recent surgical history during intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy and to consider refraining from their use during the perioperative period.Keywords: wound healing, tensile strength, bevacizumab, ranibizumab

  7. A fast and simple method to estimate relative, hyphal tensile-strength of filamentous fungi used to assess the effect of autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintanilla, Daniela; Chelius, Cynthia; Iambamrung, Sirasa

    2018-01-01

    and process development. To overcome this issue, a method for fast and easy, statistically-verified quantification of relative hyphal tensile strength was developed. It involves off-line fragmentation in a high shear mixer followed by quantification of fragment size using laser diffraction. Particle size......-induced autophagy for Aspergillus nidulans (paternal strain) and a mutant strain (ΔAnatg8) lacking an essential autophagy gene. Both strains were grown in shake flasks, and relative hyphal tensile strength was compared. The mutant strain grown in control conditions appears to be weaker than the paternal strain......Fungal hyphal strength is an important phenotype which can have a profound impact on bioprocess behavior. Until now, there is not an efficient method which allows its characterization. Currently available methods are very time consuming; thus, compromising their applicability in strain selection...

  8. Tensile bond strength of different universal adhesive systems to lithium disilicate ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passia, Nicole; Lehmann, Frank; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; Kern, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Today, many adhesive systems with different coupling agents for tooth structures and restorative materials are available. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength (TBS) of different universal adhesive systems to etched lithium disilicate ceramic. The authors etched and bonded 96 disk-like lithium disilicate ceramic specimens (IPS e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) with 4 different adhesive bonding systems to Plexiglas tubes filled with a composite resin. The authors stored the specimens in water at 37°C for 3 days without thermal cycling or for 30 or 150 days with 7,500 or 37,500 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, respectively. Then, all specimens underwent TBS testing. The authors performed statistical analysis by using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests with a Bonferroni-Holm correction for multiple testing. Initially, all adhesive systems exhibited considerable TBS, but some showed a significant reduction after 30 days of storage. After 3, 30, and 150 days, the Monobond Plus and Multilink Automix (Ivoclar Vivadent) silane-containing adhesive system showed significantly higher bond strengths to lithium disilicate ceramic than did the other universal adhesive systems, some of which do not contain silanes. The bond strength to lithium disilicate ceramic is affected significantly by the adhesive bonding system used. Universal adhesive systems that do not contain a silane should be avoided for bonding lithium disilicate ceramic restorations because of their inferior bond strength. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tensile testing

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A complete guide to the uniaxial tensile test, the cornerstone test for determining the mechanical properties of materials: Learn ways to predict material behavior through tensile testing. Learn how to test metals, alloys, composites, ceramics, and plastics to determine strength, ductility and elastic/plastic deformation. A must for laboratory managers, technicians, materials and design engineers, and students involved with uniaxial tensile testing. Tensile Testing , Second Edition begins with an introduction and overview of the test, with clear explanations of how materials properties are determined from test results. Subsequent sections illustrate how knowledge gained through tensile tests, such as tension properties to predict the behavior (including strength, ductility, elastic or plastic deformation, tensile and yield strengths) have resulted in improvements in materals applications. The Second Edition is completely revised and updated. It includes expanded coverage throughout the volume on a variety of ...

  10. EFFECT OF ACCELERATED WEATHERING ON TENSILE PROPERTIES OF KENAF REINFORCED HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar A.H.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Umar A.H1, Zainudin E.S1,2 and Sapuan S.M.1,21Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing EngineeringFaculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra MalaysiaSelangor, Malaysia.2Biocomposite LaboratoryInstitute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Product (INTROPUniversiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia.Email: umarhanan@yahoo.com ABSTRACTIn this study, a high-density polyethylene composite reinforced with kenaf (Hibiscus Cannabinus L. bast fibres (K-HDPE was fabricated and tested for durability with regard to weather elements. The material consists of 40% (by weight fibres and 60% matrix. Other additives, such as ultraviolet (UV stabiliser and maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene (MaPE as a coupling agent were added to the composite material. The biocomposite was subjected to 1000 hours (h of accelerated weathering tests, which consisted of heat, moisture and UV light, intended to imitate the outdoor environment. The tensile properties of the K-HDPE composite were recorded after 0, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 h of exposure to the accelerated weathering. Compared with neat high-density polyethylene (HDPE, the K-HDPE composite has 22.7% lower tensile strength when produced but displays a less rapid rate of strength deterioration under weathering (After 1000 h of exposure the tensile strength of K-HDPE drops 29.4%, whereas, for neat HDPE, it falls rapidly by 36%. Due to better stiffness, the Young’s modulus of the K-HDPE composite is much higher than that of neat HDPE. The fibres on the surface of the K-HDPE composite gradually start to whiten after 200 h of exposure and become completely white after 600 h of exposure. For neat HDPE, micro-cracking on the surface can be observed after 200 h of exposure and the stress-strain curve obtained from the tensile test indicates its increase in brittleness proportional to the amount of weathering time.

  11. Optimization of tensile strength of friction welded AISI 1040 and AISI 304L steels according to statistics analysis (ANOVA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirik, Ihsan [Batman Univ. (Turkey); Ozdemir, Niyazi; Firat, Emrah Hanifi; Caligulu, Ugur [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

    2013-06-01

    Materials difficult to weld by fusion welding processes can be successfully welded by friction welding. The strength of the friction welded joints is extremely affected by process parameters (rotation speed, friction time, friction pressure, forging time, and forging pressure). In this study, statistical values of tensile strength were investigated in terms of rotation speed, friction time, and friction pressure on the strength behaviours of friction welded AISI 1040 and AISI 304L alloys. Then, the tensile test results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a confidence level of 95 % to find out whether a statistically significant difference occurs. As a result of this study, the maximum tensile strength is very close, which that of AISI 1040 parent metal of 637 MPa to could be obtained for the joints fabricated under the welding conditions of rotation speed of 1700 rpm, friction pressure of 50 MPa, forging pressure of 100 MPa, friction time of 4 s, and forging time of 2 s. Rotation speed, friction time, and friction pressure on the friction welding of AISI 1040 and AISI 304L alloys were statistically significant regarding tensile strength test values. (orig.)

  12. Statistical Analysis of the Tensile Strength of Coal Fly Ash Concrete with Fibers Using Central Composite Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela Barbuta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of coal fly ash and glass fiber waste on the tensile strength of cement concrete was studied using central composite design. Coal fly ash was used to replace 10% of the cement in the concrete mix. Glass fiber was added to improve the tensile properties of the concrete in different dosages and lengths. In total, 14 mixes were investigated, one only with 10% coal fly ash replacement of cement and the other thirteen were determined by the experimental design. Using analysis of variance, the order of importance of the variables was established for each property (flexural strength and split tensile strength. From the nonlinear response surfaces, it was found that higher values of flexural strength were obtained for fibers longer than 12 mm and at a dosage of 1-2%. For split tensile strength, higher values were obtained for fibers with a length of 19–28 mm and at a dosage of 1–1.5%.

  13. Effects of laser energy density on forming accuracy and tensile strength of selective laser sintering resin coated sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhifeng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Baozhu sand particles with size between 75 μm and 150 μm were coated by resin with the ratio of 1.5 wt.% of sands. Laser sintering experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of laser energy density (E = P/v, with different laser power (P and scanning velocity (v, on the dimensional accuracy and tensile strength of sintered parts. The experimental results indicate that with the constant scanning velocity, the tensile strength of sintered samples increases with an increase in laser energy density; while the dimensional accuracy apparently decreases when the laser energy density is larger than 0.032 J·mm-2. When the laser energy density is 0.024 J·mm-2, the tensile strength shows no obvious change; but when the laser energy density is larger than 0.024 J·mm-2, the sample strength is featured by the initial increase and subsequent decrease with simultaneous increase of both laser power and scanning velocity. In this study, the optimal energy density range for laser sintering is 0.024-0.032 J·mm-2. Moreover, samples with the best tensile strength and dimensional accuracy can be obtained when P = 30-40 W and v = 1.5-2.0 m·s-1. Using the optimized laser energy density, laser power and scanning speed, a complex coated sand mould with clear contour and excellent forming accuracy has been successfully fabricated.

  14. Determining the Compressive, Flexural and Splitting Tensile Strength of Silica Fume Reinforced Lightweight Foamed Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mydin M.A.O.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the performance of the properties of foamed concrete in replacing volumes of cement of 10%, 15% and 20% by weight. A control unit of foamed concrete mixture made with ordinary Portland cement (OPC and 10%, 15% and 20% silica fume was prepared. Three mechanical property parameters were studied such as compressive strength, flexural strength and splitting tensile of foamed concrete with different percentages of silica fume. Silica fume is commonly used to increase the mechanical properties of concrete materials and it is also chosen due to certain economic reasons. The foamed concrete used in this study was cured at a relative humidity of 70% and a temperature of ±28°C. The improvement of mechanical properties was due to a significant densification in the microstructure of the cement paste matrix in the presence of silica fume hybrid supplementary binder as observed from micrographs obtained in the study. The overall results showed that there is a potential to utilize silica fume in foamed concrete, as there was a noticeable enhancement of thermal and mechanical properties with the addition of silica fume.

  15. Tensile bond strength of hydroxyethyl methacrylate dentin bonding agent on dentin surface at various drying techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Ismiyatin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several dentin surface drying techniques to provide a perfect resin penetration on dentin. There are two techniques which will be compared in this study. The first technique was by rubbing dentin surface gently using cotton pellet twice, this technique is called blot dry technique. The second technique is by air blowing dentin surface for one second and continued by rubbing dentin surface gently using moist cotton. Purpose: This experiment was aimed to examine the best dentin surface drying techniques after 37% phosphoric acid etching to obtain the optimum tensile bond strength between hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA and dentin surface. Method: Bovine teeth was prepared flat to obtain the dentin surface and than was etched using 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. After etching the dentin was cleaned using 20 cc plain water and dried with blot dry techniques (group I, or dried with air blow for one second (group II, or dried with air blow for one second, and continued with rubbing gently using moist cotton pellet (group III, and without any drying as control group (group IV. After these drying, the dentin surfaces were applied with resin dentin bonding agent and put into plunger facing the composite mould. The antagonist plunger was filled with composite resin. After 24 hours, therefore bond strength was measured using Autograph. Result: Data obtained was analyzed using One-Way ANOVA with 95% confidence level and continued with LSD test on p≤0.05. The result showed that the highest tensile bond strength was on group I, while the lowest on group IV. Group II and IV, III and IV, II and III did not show signigicant difference (p>0.05. Conclusion: Dentin surface drying techniques through gentle rubbing using cotton pellet twice (blot dry technique gave the greatest tensile bond strength.Latar belakang masalah: Tehnik pengeringan permukaan dentin agar resin dapat penetrasi dengan sempurna adalah dengan cara pengusapan secara

  16. A combined study of expansive and tensile strength evolution of mortars under sulfate attack: implications on durability assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akpinar, P.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a combined study of the length-change and tensile strength evolution of highand low-C3A Portland cements. This approach has proven useful to provide an assessment on the performance under severe and moderate sulfate attack. While higher expansion rates are observed in high-C3A samples, tensile strength evolution of both cement types is essentially identical. The simultaneous increase of expansion rate and decrease in tensile strength is strongly suggestive that both processes are related. This is attributed to the formation and development of microcracks that favor the ingress of the sulfate solution in the specimens. These results provide further insights into the commonly accepted idea that standard (accelerated tests aiming to evaluate the expansion behavior do not provide reliable information on the expected performance (sulfate resistance and damage potential of Portland cements.

    En este trabajo se presenta un estudio combinado de la evolución de la expansión y resistencia a tracción de cementos Portland con contenidos variables de C3A. Esta aproximación ha demostrado ser útil en el diagnóstico de las prestaciones bajo condiciones severas y moderadas de ataque sulfático. Aunque las muestras con contenidos más altos de C3A muestran velocidades mayores de expansión, la evolución de la resistencia a tracción es idéntica para los cementos estudiados. La simultaneidad en el aumento de velocidad de expansión y disminución de la resistencia a tracción sugiere que ambos procesos están relacionados. Este comportamiento se atribuye a la formación y desarrollo de microfisuras que favorecen el ingreso de la solución de sulfatos en las probetas. Los resultados de este trabajo proporcionan evidencia adicional sobre la idea comúnmente aceptada de que los ensayos estándar (acelerados dirigidos a la evaluación del comportamiento expansivo no proporcionan

  17. Effect of Weight Fractions of Jute Fiber on Tensile Strength and Deflection Temperature of Jute Fiber/Polypropylene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabila, S.; Juwono, A. L.; Roseno, S.

    2017-05-01

    Jute is one of eco-friendly natural fiber with relatively low cost and high volume production. This study aimed to determine the effect of weight fractions of jute fiber as a reinforcement in polypropylene (PP) to obtain an optimum properties of PP/jute fiber composites. Jute fiber was pre-treated through alkalization. The PP was initially produced by extrusion process, followed by fabricated the composites by compiling the PP matrix and jute fibers into lamina using a hot-press method. The results of tensile test and heat deflection temperature test showed that the addition of 40wt% jute fiber to the PP increased the tensile strength about 19.7 % up to (38.2±4.9)MPa, the Young modulus about 79.8 % up to (3.20±0.26)GPa, and the heat deflection temperature about 143% up to (143.3±1.14)°C compared to pristine PP. Based on Scanning Electron Microscopy observation on the fracture surfaces, it was shown that the mode of failure on the composites failure surfaces was “fiber pull-out”, which due to the poor interface bond between the fiber and the matrix.

  18. Reduction versus cross-linking: how to improve the tensile strength of graphene oxide/polyvinyl alcohol composite film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Cheng-an; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Jian; Zou, Xiaorong; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Jianfang

    2017-08-01

    Both reduction and cross-linking can improve the mechanical performance of graphene/polymer composites. However, few reports exist on the comparison and combination of both methods. Taking graphene oxide/polyvinyl alcohol composite film as its model, this study focuses on the effect of reduction and cross-linking (as well as their order) on the composite film’s tensile strength. GO/PVA composite films were prepared by a simple solution mixing method, then reduced with hydroiodic acid and cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Both reduction and cross-linking can improve the tensile strength, but the effect of cross-linking is superior. The improvement of tensile strength is cumulative when reduction and cross-linking are used simultaneously or even successively. Moreover, the order in which these two methods are applied also plays a role; reduction first with cross-linking second shows superior results than the reverse. The tensile strength of the obtained composite film peaked at 112.8 MPa, which is over 7 times that of neat PVA.

  19. Effect of maleated natural rubber on tensile strength and compatibility of natural rubber/coconut coir composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujianto, O.; Noviyanti, R.; Wijaya, R.; Ramadhoni, B.

    2017-07-01

    Natural rubber (NR)/coconut coir (CF) composites were fabricated using co-rotating twin screw extruder with maleated NR (MNR) used as compatibilizer. The MNR was produced at three level of maleic anhydride (MA), and analyzed qualitative and quantitatively using FTIR and titration technique. Analysis on MNR using FTIR and titration methods showed that MA was grafted on NR chain at different percentage (0.76, 2.23, 4.79%) depended on MA concentration. Tensile strength data showed the best tensile strength was produced at 7 phr of MNR with 1 phr of MA level in MNR resulting 16.4 MPa. The improvement of compatibilized samples were more than 300% compare to uncompatibilized composite attributed to better interfacial bonding. The improvement on tensile strength was significantly influenced by MNR level and amount of MA added to produce MNR, as well as their interaction. The optimum conditions for producing NR-CF composite were predicted at 6.5 phr of MNR level with 1 phr of MA concentration added in MNR production, regardless screw rotation settings. Results from verification experiments confirm that developed model was capable of describing phenomena during composite preparation. Morphology analysis using scanning electron microscopy shows smooth covered fiber in compatibilized samples than that of without MNR. The morphology also showed less voids on compatibilized samples attributed to better interfacial bonding leading to tensile strength improvement.

  20. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of foamed asphalt mix tested in dry condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    Indirect tensile strength (ITS) test was conducted to analyse strength of the foamed asphalt mixes incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement. Samples were tested for ITS after cured in the oven at 40°C for 72 hours. This testing condition known as dry condition or unconditioned. Laboratory results show that reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) contents insignificantly affect the ITS results. ITS results significantly affected by foamed bitumen contents.

  1. Optimization of high filler loading on tensile properties of recycled HDPE/PET blends filled with rice husk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruey Shan; Ahmad, Sahrim; Ghani, Mohd Hafizuddin Ab; Salleh, Mohd Nazry

    2014-09-01

    Biocomposites of recycled high density polyethylene / recycled polyethylene terephthalate (rHDPE/rPET) blend incorporated with rice husk flour (RHF) were prepared using a corotating twin screw extruder. Maleic anhydride polyethylene (MAPE) was added as a coupling agent to improve the fibre-matrix interface adhesion. The effect of high filler loadings (50-90 wt%) on morphology and tensile properties of compatibilized rHDPE/rPET blend was investigated. The results of our study shown that composite with 70 wt% exhibited the highest tensile strength and Young's modulus, which are 22 MPa and 1752 MPa, respectively. The elongation at break decreased with increasing percentage of RHF. SEM micrograph confirmed fillers dispersion, morphological interaction and enhanced interfacial bonding between recycled polymer blends and rice husk. It can be concluded that the optimum RHF content is 70 wt% with maximum tensile strength.

  2. Glass Fiber Post/Composite Core Systems Bonded to Human Dentin: Analysis of Tensile Load vs Calculated Tensile Strength of Various Systems Using Pull-out Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keul, Christine; Köhler, Patrick; Hampe, Rüdiger; Roos, Malgorzata; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    Pull-out testing was used to determine the tensile load (TL) and tensile strength (TS) of five different fiber post systems bonded to human intracanal dentin. 120 caries-free premolars, canines, and maxillary central incisors were divided into 5 different groups for 5 fiber post systems (n = 24): 1. RelyX Fiber Post 3D (RX3D); 2. RelyX Fiber Post (RX); 3. Luxa- Post (LP); 4. FibreKleer 4X Tapered Post (FK); 5. ParaPost Taper Lux (PP). The teeth were prepared and posts inserted. Core buildups were performed with the corresponding product's resin composite. All specimens were stored in water for 24 h at 37°C. TL and TS were tested on half of the specimens (n = 12/group). The remaining samples were thermocycled (10,000 x 5°C/55°C) before testing. TL was directly measured and TS was calculated using the bonding surface. Failure modes were identified using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using twoway ANOVA with the post-hoc Scheffé test, as well as the chi-squared test (p post plus core buildup from the tooth; all other systems mainly demonstrated detachment of the core from the posts. PP, RX, and RX3D together with an adhesive core buildup yielded the highest bond strength to human dentin. Parameters TL and TS showed the same tendencies and statistical evidence.

  3. Tensile bond strength of veneering resins to PEEK: impact of different adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Keul, Christine; Beuer, Florian; Roos, Malgorzata; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2013-01-01

    This study tested tensile bond strength (TBS) between veneering resins and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) after pre-treatment with adhesive systems. Five-hundred-seventy-six PEEK disks were fabricated, air-abraded and divided into six pre-treatment groups (n=96/group): Z-Prime Plus, Ambarino P60, Monobond Plus, Visio.link, Signum PEEK Bond, and control group without pre-treatment. Each group was divided into three subgroups of different veneering resins (n=32): Sinfony, GC Gradia and VITA VM LC. After specimen preparation with a bond area of 6.6 mm(2), half of each subgroup (n=16) was tested initially, and the other half was thermo-cycled. TBS measurements were analysed by three-way and one-way ANOVA, t-test and Weibull statistics. Groups without pre-treatment and groups pre-treated by Z-Prime Plus and Ambarino P60 showed no TBS. Pre-treatment with Monobond Plus increased the TBS values. The highest TBS before and after thermo-cycling between PEEK and all tested veneering resins was observed for groups pre-treated with Visio.link and Signum PEEK Bond.

  4. Note on the Use of Diametrical Compression to Determine Tablet Tensile Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilden, Jon; Polizzi, Mark; Zettler, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    The diametrical compression (DC) test, as defined in United States Pharmacopeia and in American Society for Testing and Materials testing standard D 3967, has been used extensively to derive the tensile strength (TS) of pharmaceutical tablets from the measured breaking force. DC-derived TSs provide a good approach to measuring the consistency of tablet mechanical properties from one batch to the next. For these quality control type applications, method precision is required, but accuracy is not. In addition, DC has been used to calibrate parameters of the Druker Prager Cap model, a yield criterion expressing the failure of a powder compact under arbitrary 3D loading conditions. For this application, the DC method must not only provide suitable precision but also provide accuracy. In this work, we explore the accuracy of the DC method by comparing TS results to those of the 3-point bend test method (also defined in United States Pharmacopeia ). We conclude that the true TS of a powder compact is approximately double the DC-derived value. Although historical literature assumes that tablets fracture under tension along the centerline of the tablet, analysis of the stress state suggests that tablets are likely to fracture under shear. The impact of this ∼50% error should be considered when accuracy of the TS result is required. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Ringer's Solution on Tensile Strength of Non-Absorbable, Medium- and Long-Term Absorbable Sutures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Karpiński

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an experimental and correlational study of mechanical properties of selected surgical sutures. The research methods employed in the study consisted in conducting tensile strength tests on suture material and subjecting the obtained data to statistical analysis. The changes in tensile strength of absorbable sutures measured in tests were subsequently collated with results for suture material samples that were not exposed to Ringer’s solution. The results were, furthermore, compared with manufacturer’s specifications concerning suture absorption time in the body. The detailed analysis of differences between results presented in the study allowed us to formulate conclusions regarding the impact of exposure to Ringer’s solution on the strength of surgical sutures.

  6. HIGH TEMPERATURE TENSILE PROPERTIES OF NEW FE-CR-MN DEVELOPED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahmoudiniya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Ni-free austenitic stainless steels are being developed rapidly and high price of nickel is one of the most important motivations for this development. At present research a new FeCrMn steel was designed and produced based on Fe-Cr-Mn-C system. Comparative studies on microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of  new steel and AISI 316 steel were done. The results showed that new FeCrMn developed steel has single austenite phase microstructure, and its tensile strength and toughness were higher than those of 316 steel at 25, 200,350 and 500°C. In contrast with 316 steel, the new FeCrMn steel did not show strain induced transformation and dynamic strain aging phenomena during tensile tests that represented higher austenite stability of new developed steel. Lower density and higher strength of the new steel caused higher specific strength in comparison with the 316 one that can be considered as an important advantage in structural applications but in less corrosive environment

  7. Structural disorder effects on the tensile strength distribution of heterogeneous brittle materials with emphasis on fiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.; Uesaka, Tetsu

    2004-08-01

    Understanding the interplay of structural disorder and strength properties at various length scales can lead to improvements in the strength reliability of heterogeneous brittle materials. Various studies in ordered fiber- matrix composites have shown the existence of critical clusters of breaks and macroscopic weak-link scaling behavior. The fiber network in paper is structurally disordered. We verify experimentally that the tensile strength of newsprint samples follows weak-link scaling and obtain an estimate for the link and critical-cluster sizes. However, a slight nonlinear behavior is observed in the Weibull plots of the experimental strength distributions. We propose that this is due to mesoscopic structural disorder (e.g., at length scales between millimeters and centimeters), which we incorporate in the strength distribution of the links by averaging over the elastic stress variations. The prevailing industry perception is that mesoscopic disorder controls the strength reliability. In contrast, we find that it does not significantly affect the crucial lower tail of the strength distribution. Based on our analysis, we suggest a more reliable measurement approach for the tensile strength of newsprint paper. We also obtain explicit expressions for the effects of disorder on stress variations and the macroscopic Young’s modulus, including dependence on the shear modulus and anisotropic effects.

  8. Influence of Cutting Temperature on the Tensile Strength of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Delahaigue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP have seen a significant increase in use over the years thanks to their specific properties. Despite continuous improvements in the production methods of laminated parts, a trimming operation is still necessary to achieve the functional dimensions required by engineering specifications. Laminates made of carbon fibers are very abrasive and cause rapid tool wear, and require high cutting temperatures. This creates damage to the epoxy matrix, whose glass-transition temperature is often recognized to be about 180 °C. This study aims to highlight the influence of the cutting temperature generated by tool wear on the surface finish and mechanical properties obtained from tensile tests. Trimming operations were performed on a quasi-isotropic 24-ply carbon/epoxy laminate, of 3.6 mm thickness, with a 6 flutes diamond-coated (CVD cutter. The test specimens of 6 mm and 12 mm wide were obtained by trimming. The reduced width of the coupons allowed amplification of the effect of defects on the measured properties by increasing the proportion of coupon cross-section occupied by the defects. A new tool and a tool in an advanced state of wear were used to generate different cutting temperatures. Results showed a cutting temperature of 300 °C for the new tool and 475 °C for the worn tool. The analysis revealed that the specimens machined with the new tool have no thermal damage and the cut is clean. The plies oriented at −45° presented the worst surface finish according to the failure mode of the fiber. For the worn tool, the surface was degraded and the matrix was carbonized. After cutting, observations showed a degraded resin spread on the machined surface, which reduced the surface roughness and hid the cutting defects. In support of these observations, the tensile tests showed no variation of the mechanical properties for the 12 mm-wide specimens, but did show a 10% loss in mechanical properties for the 6 mm

  9. Effect of activation modes on the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and microhardness of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ah-Rang; Jeon, Yong-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Choi, Jae Won; Kwon, Yong Hoon; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and microhardnss of several selfadhesive resin cements (Rely-X U200, Clearfill SA Luting, G-CEM LinkAce, Maxcem Elite, PermaCem 2.0, and Zirconite) using different activation modes (self-cured, light-cured) and testing time (immediately, 24 h, thermocycling). Specimens were prepared for the compressive strength (Ø 4×6 mm) and diametral tensile strength and microhardness (Ø 6×3 mm) according to ISO standards. The strength after 24 h was higher than immediately after. In addition, G-CEM showed the highest values. In terms of the activation modes, Rely-X U200, PermaCem 2.0 had higher values in the light-curing than the self-curing. In conclusion, all cements demonstrated clinically available strength values and revealed differences in strength according to their composition, testing time and activation mode. Furthermore, correlation was found between the microhardness (degree of conversion) and mechanical strengths of the cements tested.

  10. Effect of Saliva on the Tensile Bond Strength of Different Generation Adhesive Systems: An In-Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Abhay Mani; Saha, Sonali; Dhinsa, Kavita; Garg, Aarti

    2015-01-01

    Background Newer development of bonding agents have gained a better understanding of factors affecting adhesion of interface between composite and dentin surface to improve longevity of restorations. Objective The present study evaluated the influence of salivary contamination on the tensile bond strength of different generation adhesive systems (two-step etch-and-rinse, two-step self-etch and one-step self-etch) during different bonding stages to dentin where isolation is not maintained. Materials and Methods Superficial dentin surfaces of 90 extracted human molars were randomly divided into three study Groups (Group A: Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system; Group B: Two-step self-etch adhesive system and Group C: One-step self-etch adhesive system) according to the different generation of adhesives used. According to treatment conditions in different bonding steps, each Group was further divided into three Subgroups containing ten teeth in each. After adhesive application, resin composite blocks were built on dentin and light cured subsequently. The teeth were then stored in water for 24 hours before sending for testing of tensile bond strength by Universal Testing Machine. The collected data were then statistically analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Results One-step self-etch adhesive system revealed maximum mean tensile bond strength followed in descending order by Two-step self-etch adhesive system and Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system both in uncontaminated and saliva contaminated conditions respectively. Conclusion Unlike One-step self-etch adhesive system, saliva contamination could reduce tensile bond strength of the two-step self-etch and two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Furthermore, the step of bonding procedures and the type of adhesive seems to be effective on the bond strength of adhesives contaminated with saliva. PMID:26393214

  11. Structural basis of the tensile strength of protein complexes mediating cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayas, Marco Vinicio

    This study explores the behaviour of adhesive complexes of cell adhesion molecules undergoing forced detachment. Molecular-forces measurements combined with Steered Molecular Dynamic (SMD) simulations were used to investigate the mechanical response of the CD2 C58 and hemophilic C-cadherin bonds. The CD2-CD58 adhesive complex, important for the adaptive immune response, contains several salt-bridges in the adhesive interface. SMD simulations showed that these inter-protein salt bridges contribute independently to the tensile strength of the complex. Consistent with this, force measurements with the Surface Force Apparatus (SFA) demonstrated that the elimination of single salt bridges weakens the bond. The corresponding loss in adhesion energy of the CD2-CD58 complex correlates with the importance of the salt bridges observed in the simulations. These findings correlate closely with the effect of the elimination of single salt bridges observed in cell aggregation assays and binding measurements. On the other hand, the hemophilic C-cadherin interaction determines specific cell-cell adhesion during development in Xenopus laevis . Single molecule force spectroscopy was used to characterize the multiple bound states between C-cadherin ectodomains. The experiments showed two short-lived bound states associated with the two outermost ectodomains and two long-lived states associated with the full ectodomain. It is likely that the two short-lived states are involved in the specificity of the interaction since previous studies showed that the corresponding states in E-cadherin have different lifetimes. In addition, SMD simulations of the forced dissociation of the strand dieter of C-cadherin suggested a mechanism for the specificity of cadherin interactions.

  12. The diametral tensile strength and hydrostability of polymer-ceramic nano-composite (pcnc) material prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepez, Johanna

    Statement of the problem: There is a weak connection between the filler and the resin matrix of dental composites caused primarily by hydrolysis of silane coupling agent, therefore, jeopardizing the mechanical properties of the dental restorations. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the diametral tensile strength (DTS) of a nano-mechanically bonded polymer ceramic nano composite (pcnc) versus the chemically bonding prototype polymer ceramic nano composite (pcnc) fabricated by using hydrolytically stable interphase. Materials and Methods: Composites were made with 60wt % filler, 38% triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEDGMA), 1% camphorquinone (CQ) and 1% 2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). Tests for DTS were performed using a universal testing machine. The disk-shaped specimens were loaded in compression between two supporting plates at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The samples, measuring 3 mm in height and 6 mm in diameter, were produced in a round stainless steel (SS) mold. A total of 144 samples were created. Groups of 48 samples were made for each of three different fillers. Specimens were soaked in artificial saliva at 37° for four time periods, dry(t=0), 1 day, 7 days, 28 days). At the end of each soaking time DTS tests were performed. Results: There where statistically significant differences in the DTS between the filler groups and the soaking times (p=matrix composition and bonding interphase of resin base composites promise improvements of mechanical properties, decreasing the incidence of clinical failure of posterior composite restorations, hence resulting in a more ideal restorative material for use in posterior segment. The results of this investigation showed that the deficiency of hydrostability in dental composites is a detrimental factor in the mechanical behavior. The silanation of the filler particles have a positive influence on the mechanical properties of dental composites but the hydrolysis of the

  13. Effect of thermal aging on the tensile bond strength at reduced areas of seven current adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baracco, Bruno; Fuentes, M Victoria; Garrido, Miguel A; González-López, Santiago; Ceballos, Laura

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the micro-tensile bond strength (MTBS) to dentin of seven adhesive systems (total and self-etch adhesives) after 24 h and 5,000 thermocycles. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were exposed and bonded with two total-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and XP Bond), two two-step self-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE and Filtek Silorane Adhesive System) and three one-step self-etch adhesives (G-Bond, Xeno V and Bond Force). All adhesive systems were applied following manufacturers' instructions. Composite buildups were constructed and the bonded teeth were then stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) or thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before being sectioned and submitted to MTBS test. Two-way ANOVA and subsequent comparison tests were applied at α = 0.05. Characteristic de-bonded specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 24 h water storage, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, Filtek Silorane Adhesive System and Adper Scotchbond SE and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. After thermocycling, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, followed by Filtek Silorane Adhesive System, Adper Scotchbond SE and Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. Thermal aging induced a significant decrease in MTBS values with all adhesives tested. The resistance of resin-dentin bonds to thermal-aging degradation was material dependent. One-step self-etch adhesives obtained the lowest MTBS results after both aging treatments, and their adhesive capacity was significantly reduced after thermocycling.

  14. The Disulfide Bonds within BST-2 Enhance Tensile Strength during Viral Tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Pont, Kelly E; McKenzie, Aidan M; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Sumner, Isaiah; Berndsen, Christopher E

    2016-02-16

    Human BST-2/tetherin is a host factor that inhibits the release of enveloped viruses, including HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV, from the cell surface by tethering viruses to the host cell membrane. BST-2 has an α-helical ectodomain that forms disulfide-linked dimers between two monomers forming a coiled coil. The ectodomain contains three cysteine residues that can participate in disulfide bond formation and are critical for viral tethering. The role of the disulfides in viral tethering is unknown but proposed to be for maintaining the dimer. We explored the role of the disulfides in the structure of BST-2 using experimental, biophysical methods. To understand the role of the disulfides in viral tethering, we used a new approach in viral tethering, steered molecular dynamics. We find that the disulfides coordinate the unfolding of the BST-2 monomers, which adds tensile strength to the coiled coil. Structural differences between oxidized and reduced BST-2 are apparent during unfolding, showing the monomers slide past each other in the absence of the disulfides. We found no evidence to support dissociation of the dimer upon reduction of the disulfide bonds. Moreover, the structure of BST-2 in the absence of the disulfides is similar to that of the oxidized form of BST-2, supporting previous X-ray crystallography and cellular work that showed the disulfides are not required for expression of BST-2. These data provide new insights into viral tethering by using novel techniques in the analysis of BST-2 to give amino acid level insight into functions of BST-2.

  15. PEEK surface treatment effects on tensile bond strength to veneering resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Jordan, Peter; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Roos, Malgorzata; Eichberger, Marlis; Gernet, Wolfgang; Keul, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) can be used as a framework material for fixed dental prostheses. However, information about the durable bond to veneering resins is still scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chemical treatments of PEEK on tensile bond strength (TBS) to veneering resins with special emphasis on surface free energy (SFE) and surface roughness (SR). Seven-hundred fifty PEEK specimens were fabricated and divided into the following 3 pretreatment groups (n=250/group): etching with sulfuric acid for 60 seconds, etching with piranha acid for 30 seconds, and an unetched control. After pretreatment, SFE was determined by using contact angle measurements and SR with a profilometer (n=10/group). The topography of pretreated PEEK surfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopy. Remaining specimens (n=240 per group) were conditioned with visio.link or Signum PEEK Bond, or were left untreated as the control group. Half of each group was veneered with Sinfony or VITA VM LC (n=40/group), and TBS was measured after storage in distilled water at 37°C for either 24 hours or 60 days. Data were analyzed by 4-way and 1-way ANOVA followed by the Scheffé post hoc test and chi-square test (α=.05). PEEK specimens etched with sulfuric acid resulted in higher SFE and SR than specimens without pretreatment or etching with piranha acid. Etching with sulfuric acid or piranha acid led to no general recommendations with respect to TBS. Conditioning with visio.link or Signum PEEK Bond significantly increased the TBS (Pveneered with Sinfony showed significantly higher TBS values than those veneered with VITA VM LC (Pveneering resin can only be achieved when additional adhesive materials were applied. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. (AJST) ANALYSIS OF THE WELD STRENGTH OF THE HIGH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-02

    Aug 2, 2013 ... ABSTRACT: An analysis was carried out to determine the strength of welded joints in. High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) dam liners. Samples were collected of welded joints and subjected to tensile tests and creep test. It was observed that the welded joints from field welded samples were much weaker ...

  17. An Ex-vivo Shear and tensile bond strengths of orthodontic molar tubes bonded using different techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwahadni, Ahed

    2017-01-01

    Background Molar bonding procedures need continuous improvement to be widely accepted clinically and eventually replace molar bands. Material and Methods The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of enamel micro-abrasion and silane coating of the base of molar tubes on shear and tensile bond strengths of orthodontic molar tubes. A total of 200 third molars were randomly allocated into five groups of 40 teeth as follows: group 1: molar tubes bonded to etched teeth (37% phosphoric acid gel; control group); group 2: molar tubes bonded to etched teeth (37% phosphoric acid) with the addition of silane to the base of molar tubes; group 3: molar tubes bonded to teeth pre-treated with 18% hydrochloric acid and pumice (micro-abrasion); group 4: molar tubes bonded to teeth pre-treated with microabrasion with the addition of silane to the base of molar tubes; group 5: molar tubes bonded to teeth pre-treated with microabrasion before conventional acid etching combined with the addition of silane to the base of molar tubes. The bond strength testing was performed using a computer control electromechanical universal testing machine. Results The highest mean shear and tensile bond strengths were recorded in group 5 (13.81±2.54MPa and 13.97±2.29 MPa, respectively). Micro-abrasion alone (group 3) and the combination of enamel micro-abrasion and the addition of silane (group 4) produced bond strength values comparable to the control. Conclusions Enamel surface pre-treatment (micro abrasion) before conventional acid etching combined with the addition of silane to the base of the molar tube produced the highest bond strengths among all tested groups. Key words:Molar, shear strength, tensile strength, orthodontic appliances. PMID:28298990

  18. An Ex-vivo Shear and tensile bond strengths of orthodontic molar tubes bonded using different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Alhaija, Elham; Jaradat, Mohammad; Alwahadni, Ahed

    2017-03-01

    Molar bonding procedures need continuous improvement to be widely accepted clinically and eventually replace molar bands. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of enamel micro-abrasion and silane coating of the base of molar tubes on shear and tensile bond strengths of orthodontic molar tubes. A total of 200 third molars were randomly allocated into five groups of 40 teeth as follows: group 1: molar tubes bonded to etched teeth (37% phosphoric acid gel; control group); group 2: molar tubes bonded to etched teeth (37% phosphoric acid) with the addition of silane to the base of molar tubes; group 3: molar tubes bonded to teeth pre-treated with 18% hydrochloric acid and pumice (micro-abrasion); group 4: molar tubes bonded to teeth pre-treated with microabrasion with the addition of silane to the base of molar tubes; group 5: molar tubes bonded to teeth pre-treated with microabrasion before conventional acid etching combined with the addition of silane to the base of molar tubes. The bond strength testing was performed using a computer control electromechanical universal testing machine. The highest mean shear and tensile bond strengths were recorded in group 5 (13.81±2.54MPa and 13.97±2.29 MPa, respectively). Micro-abrasion alone (group 3) and the combination of enamel micro-abrasion and the addition of silane (group 4) produced bond strength values comparable to the control. Enamel surface pre-treatment (micro abrasion) before conventional acid etching combined with the addition of silane to the base of the molar tube produced the highest bond strengths among all tested groups. Key words:Molar, shear strength, tensile strength, orthodontic appliances.

  19. Weibull Analysis of the Behavior on Tensile Strength of Hemp Fibers for Different Intervals of Fiber Diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohen, Lázaro A.; Margem, Frederico M.; Neves, Anna C. C.; Gomes, Maycon A.; Monteiro, Sérgio N.; Vieira, Carlos Maurício F.; de Castro, Rafael G.; Borges, Gustavo X.

    Economic and environmental benefits are motivating studies on natural fibers, especially lignocellulosic extracted from plants, have been studied to substitute synthetic fibers, such as glass fiber as reinforcement in polymer matrices. By contrast to synthetic fibers, natural fibers have the disadvantage of being heterogeneous in their dimensions specially the diameter. About the hemp fiber, little is known of their dimensional characteristics. The aim of the present work was to statistically characterize the distribution of the diameter of hemp fibers. Based on this characterization, diameter intervals were set and the dependence of the tensile strength of theses fibers with a corresponding diameter was analyzed by the Weibull method. The diameter was measured with precision using a profile projector. Tensile tests were conducted on each fiber obtain mechanical strength. The results interpreted by Weibull statistical showed a correlation between the resistances of the fiber to its diameter.

  20. Comparative evaluation of the effects of a new biological adhesive (Colagel on the tensile strength and healing of intestinal anastomoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Laus

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a new biological adhesive based on a mixture of gelatin-resorcin and formaldehyde (Colagel for use as an adjuvant in the reinforcement, impermeabilization and healing of intestinal anastomoses were evaluated and compared to those obtained with omentun fixation, the standard procedure used for this purpose. Two ileal anastomoses were performed in each of 12 experimental dogs using an extramucosal technique and single plane sutures. One of the anastomoses in each animal was covered with adhesive and the other with omentun, in random order. The anastomosed intestinal segments were tested for tensile strength and analysed histopathologically 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after surgery. The tensile strength of the anastomoses treated by the two different procedures was statistically identical. Histopathology revealed normal healing evolution for both procedures on days 1, 3 and 7, and greater exudation in the adhesive group on days 14, 21 and 28 after surgery.

  1. Effect of High Temperature on the Tensile Behavior of CFRP and Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, Houssam A.

    1999-01-01

    Concrete and other composite manufacturing processes are continuing to evolve and become more and more suited for use in non-Earth settings such as the Moon and Mars. The fact that structures built in lunar environments would experience a range of effects from temperature extremes to bombardment by micrometeorites and that all the materials for concrete production exist on the Moon means that concrete appears to be the most feasible building material. it can provide adequate shelter from the harshness of the lunar environment and at the same time be a cost effective building material. With a return to the Moon planned by NASA to occur after the turn of the century, it will be necessary to include concrete manufacturing as one of the experiments to be conducted in one of the coming missions. Concrete's many possible uses and possibilities for manufacturing make it ideal for lunar construction. The objectives of this research are summarized as follows: i) study the possibility of concrete production on the Moon or other planets, ii) study the effect of high temperature on the tensile behavior of concrete, and iii) study the effect of high temperature on the tensile behavior of carbon fiber reinforced with inorganic polymer composites. Literature review indicates that production of concrete on the Moon or other planets is feasible using the indigenous materials. Results of this study has shown that both the tensile strength and static elastic modulus of concrete decreased with a rise in temperature from 200 to 500 C. The addition of silica fume to concrete showed higher resistance to high temperatures. Carbon fiber reinforced inorganic polymer (CFRIP) composites seemed to perform well up to 300 C. However, a significant reduction in strength was observed of about 40% at 400 C and up to 80% when the specimens were exposed to 700 C.

  2. Influence of reprocessing on fibre length distribution, tensile strength and impact strength of injection moulded cellulose fibre-reinforced polylactide (PLA composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Graupner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the reprocessing behaviour of recycled injection moulded polylactide (PLA composites. The composites are reinforced with regenerated cellulose fibres (lyocell of variable fineness and a fibre mass content of 30%. They were reprocessed up to three times. The influence of reprocessing on the fibre length distribution and the resulting composite mechanical properties (tensile and impact strength was analysed. While the first reprocessing cycle does not affect the mechanical characteristics of the neat PLA matrix, the strength of the composites decreases significantly due to a decreasing fibre aspect ratio. It was shown that fibres having a larger cross-sectional area display a lower aspect ratio than finer fibres, after reprocessing. This phenomenon leads to a larger decrease in tensile strength of composites reinforced with coarser fibres when compared to composites reinforced with finer fibres. A comparison of virgin composites and threefold reprocessed composites with a similar fibre length distribution resulted in a significantly higher tensile strength compared to the virgin sample. This result leads to the conclusion that not only the fibre length is drastically reduced by reprocessing but also that the fibres and the matrix were damaged.

  3. Exploratory study on bitumen content determination for foamed bitumen mixes based on porosity and indirect tensile strength

    OpenAIRE

    Namutebi, May; Birgisson, Björn; Guarin, Alvaro; Jelagin, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Optimum bitumen content determination is one of the major aims for foamed bitumen mix design. However, mix design procedures for foamed bitumen mixes are still under development. In this paper a method to determine the optimum bitumen content for given foamed bitumen mix based on primary aggregate structure porosity and indirect tensile strength criterion is proposed. Using packing theory concepts, the aggregate gradation is divided into three aggregate structures which are oversize, primary ...

  4. Symbiosis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Robinia pseudoacacia L. Improves Root Tensile Strength and Soil Aggregate Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Liu, Zhenkun; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust) is a widely planted tree species on Loess Plateau for revegetation. Due to its symbiosis forming capability with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, we explored the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass, root morphology, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability in a pot experiment. We inoculated R. pseudoacacia with/without AM fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus versiforme), and measured root colonization, plant growth...

  5. Evaluation of tensile strength and surface topography of orthodontic wires after infection control procedures: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Brindha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate, the influence of four types of sterilization/disinfection procedures (autoclave, hot air oven, glutaraldehyde, and ultraviolet [UV] light on the tensile strength and surface topography of three orthodontic wires (stainless steel (SS, titanium - molybdenum alloy [TMA], and cobalt chromium (CoCr. Materials and Methods: Sample comprised of three types of 8 inches straight length segments of orthodontic wires. They were divided into three groups according to wire composition comprising of 50 samples each. Totally 50 samples of each group were then equally divided into five subgroups according to sterilization method. After sterilization and disinfection of the experimental group, surface topography was examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM and tensile strength was tested using universal testing machine. Result: The results of this study show that the mean ultimate tensile strength (UTS of SS wire after four sterilization procedures were similar to the control group (1845.815 ± 142.29 MPa.The mean UTS of TMA wire increases after four sterilization procedures when compared with the control group (874.107 ± 275.939 MPa. The mean UTS of CoCr wire remains same after UV light disinfection, but increases after other three sterilization procedures when compared with the control group (1449.759 ± 156.586 MPa. SEM photographs of the present study shows gross increase in pitting roughness of the surface topography of all the three types of wires after four types of sterilization. Conclusion: Orthodontists who want to offer maximum safety for their patients can sterilize orthodontic wires before placement, as it does not deteriorate the tensile strength and surface roughness of the alloys.

  6. Effects of material properties and speed of compression on microbial survival and tensile strength in diclofenac tablet formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayorinde, J O; Itiola, O A; Odeniyi, M A

    2013-03-01

    A work has been done to study the effects of material properties and compression speed on microbial survival and tensile strength in diclofenac tablet formulations. Tablets were produced from three formulations containing diclofenac and different excipients (DC, DL and DDCP). Two types of machines (Hydraulic hand press and single punch press), which compress the tablets at different speeds, were used. The compression properties of the tablets were analyzed using Heckel and Kawakita equations. A 3-dimensional plot was produced to determine the relationship between the tensile strength, compression speed and percentage survival of Bacillus subtilis in the diclofenac tablets. The mode of consolidation of diclofenac was found to depends on the excipient used in the formulation. DC deformed mainly by plastic flow with the lowest Py and Pk values. DL deformed plastically at the initial stage, followed by fragmentation at the later stage of compression, whereas DDCP deformed mainly by fragmentation with the highest Py and Pk values. The ranking of the percentage survival of B. subtilis in the formulations was DDCP > DL > DC, whereas the ranking of the tensile strength of the tablets was DDCP > DL > DC. Tablets produced on a hydraulic hand press with a lower compression speed had a lower percentage survival of microbial contaminants than those produced on a single punch press, which compressed the tablets at a much higher speed. The mode of consolidation of the materials and the speed at which tablet compression is carried out have effects on both the tensile strength of the tablets and the extent of destruction of microbial contaminants in diclofenac tablet formulations.

  7. Ultimate Strength Prediction of Carbon/Epoxy Tensile Specimens from Acoustic Emission Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    V. Arumugam R. Naren Shankar B. T.N. Sridhar A. Joseph Stanley

    2010-01-01

    .... 21 tensile specimens (ASTM D3039 standard) were cut from the cross ply laminates. 16 specimens were subjected to impact load from three different heights using a Fractovis Plus drop impact tester...

  8. Exploratory study on bitumen content determination for foamed bitumen mixes based on porosity and indirect tensile strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Namutebi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Optimum bitumen content determination is one of the major aims for foamed bitumen mix design. However, mix design procedures for foamed bitumen mixes are still under development. In this paper a method to determine the optimum bitumen content for given foamed bitumen mix based on primary aggregate structure porosity and indirect tensile strength criterion is proposed. Using packing theory concepts, the aggregate gradation is divided into three aggregate structures which are oversize, primary and secondary structures. Porosity for the primary aggregate structure is determined for given bitumen contents. A maximum value for porosity of 50% for the primary aggregate structure is used to choose initial bitumen content. Furthermore, a minimum indirect tensile strength criteria is suggested to refine this bitumen content. This method enables a bitumen content value to be chosen prior to the start of experimental work, as porosity is expressed in terms of physical parameters such as aggregate and binder specific gravity, and aggregate gradation which are known before the mix design process. The bitumen content is then later refined when the indirect tensile strength is determined in the laboratory. This method would reduce resources such as time and materials that may be required during the mix design procedure.

  9. Effect of conventional and experimental gingival retraction solutions on the tensile strength and inhibition of polymerization of four types of impression materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Sábio

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, two types of tests (tensile strength test and polymerization inhibition test were performed to evaluate the physical and chemical properties of four impression materials [a polysulfide (Permlastic, a polyether (Impregum, a condensation silicone (Xantopren and a polyvinylsiloxane (Aquasil ,3; when polymerized in contact with of one conventional (Hemostop and two experimental (Vislin and Afrin gingival retraction solutions. For the tensile strength test, the impression materials were mixed and packed into a steel plate with perforations that had residues of the gingival retraction solutions. After polymerization, the specimens were tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine. For the polymerization inhibition test, specimens were obtained after taking impressions from a matrix with perforations that contained 1 drop of the gingival retraction solutions. Two independent examiners decided on whether or not impression material remnants remained unpolymerized, indicating interference of the chemical solutions. Based on the analysis of the results of both tests, the following conclusions were reached: 1. The tensile strength of the polysulfide decreased after contact with Hemostop and Afrin. 2. None of the chemical solutions inhibited the polymerization of the polysulfide; 3. The polyether presented lower tensile strength after polymerization in contact with the three gingival retraction agents; 4. The polyether had its polymerization inhibited only by Hemostop; 5. None of the chemical solutions affected the tensile strength of the condensation silicone; 6. Only Hemostop inhibited the polymerization of the condensation silicone; 7. The polyvinylsiloxane specimens polymerized in contact with Hemostop had significantly lower tensile strength; 8. Neither of the chemical solutions (Afrin and Vislin affected the tensile strength of the polyvinylsiloxane and the condensation silicone; 9. Results of the tensile strength

  10. Evaluation of pH, ultimate tensile strength, and micro-shear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Artioli COSTA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the pH, ultimate tensile strength (UTS, and micro-shear bond strength (µSBS of two self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin. Sound bovine incisors (n = 10 and two self-adhesive resin cements (i.e., RelyX U-100 and seT PP were used. The pH of the resin cements was measured using a pH-indicator paper (n = 3. Specimens for UTS were obtained from an hourglass-shaped mold. For µSBS, cylinders with internal diameter of 0.75 mm and height of 0.5 mm were bonded to the flat enamel and dentin surfaces. Bonded cylinders were tested in the shear mode using a loop wire. The fracture mode was also evaluated. The cement seT PP showed a low pH; U-100 showed significantly higher UTS (49.9 ± 2.0 than seT PP (40.0 ± 2.1 (p < 0.05 and high µSBS to enamel (10.7 ± 3.7. The lowest µSBS was found for seT PP to dentin (0.7 ± 0.6; seT PP to enamel (4.8 ± 1.7, and for U-100 to dentin (7.2 ± 1.9, showing an intermediate µSBS value (p < 0.05. Adhesive failure was the most frequently observed failure mode. The resin cement that presented the lowest pH and UTS also presented the lowest micro-shear bond strength to enamel and dentin.

  11. An investigation into the effects of metal primer and surface topography on the tensile bond strength between cobalt chromium alloy and composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsum, David; Juszczyk, Andrzej; Clark, Robert K F; Radford, David R

    2011-03-01

    This study examined the influence of surface preparation and metal primer on the tensile bond strength between cobalt chromium alloy and composite resin. The bond strength between 168 cobalt chromium alloy dumb-bells with one of three test surfaces (beaded, machined or sandblasted) to composite resin were tested. Half of each group were treated with metal primer. The weakest bond strength was produced by the unprimed machined surface, many specimens failing before testing. The metal primer increased the bond strengths of all groups tested. The greatest bond strengths were achieved with the primed beaded and sandblasted surfaces. Within the limits of the study it has been shown that the surface preparation of the cobalt-chromium alloy did influence tensile bond strengths with composite resin and Metal Primer II increased the tensile bond strengths for all groups tested. The sandblasted surface treated with Metal Primer II is recommended for the bonding of composite resin to cobalt chromium alloy.

  12. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  13. A tensilmeter for the measurement of the tensile strength of grass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The design and construction of a simple and inexpensive tensilmeter for measuring the tensile properties of grass leaves is described. The instrument was found to give reliable results and was used to estimate the variation in the breaking force and breaking tension along the length of leaf blades of six grass species.

  14. Formability Characterization of a New Generation High Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sriram Sadagopan; Dennis Urban; Chris Wong; Mai Huang; Benda Yan

    2003-05-16

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are being progressively explored by the automotive industry all around the world for cost-effective solutions to accomplish vehicle lightweighting, improve fuel economy, and consequently reduce greenhouse emissions. Because of their inherent high strength, attractive crash energy management properties, and good formability, the effective use of AHSS such as Duel Phase and TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels, will significantly contribute to vehicle lightweighting and fuel economy. To further the application of these steels in automotive body and structural parts, a good knowledge and experience base must be developed regarding the press formability of these materials. This project provides data on relevant intrinsic mechanical behavior, splitting limits, and springback behavior of several lots of mild steel, conventional high strength steel (HSS), advanced high strength steel (AHSS) and ultra-high strength steel (UHSS), supplied by the member companies of the Automotive Applications Committee (AAC) of the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI). Two lots of TRIP600, which were supplied by ThyssenKrupp Stahl, were also included in the study. Since sheet metal forming encompasses a very diverse range of forming processes and deformation modes, a number of simulative tests were used to characterize the forming behavior of these steel grades. In general, it was found that formability, as determined by the different tests, decreased with increased tensile strength. Consistant with previous findings, the formability of TRIP600 was found to be exceptionally good for its tensile strength.

  15. A new high strength alloy for hydrogen fueled propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcpherson, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a high-strength alloy (1241 MPa ultimate and 1103 MPa yield, with little or no degradation in hydrogen) for application in advanced hydrogen-fueled rocket engines. Various compositions of the Fe-Ni-Co-Cr system with elemental additions of Cb, Ti and Al are discussed. After processing, notched tensile specimens were tested in 34.5-MPa hydrogen at room temperature, as the main screening test. The H2/air notch tensile ratio was used as the selection/rejection criterion. The most promising alloys are discussed.

  16. Influence of Immersion Conditions on The Tensile Strength of Recycled Kevlar®/Polyester/Low-Melting-Point Polyester Nonwoven Geotextiles through Applying Statistical Analyses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jing-Chzi Hsieh; Jia-Hsun Li; Ching-Wen Lou; Chien-Teng Hsieh; Wen-Hao Hsing; Yi-Jun Pan; Jia-Horng Lin

    2016-01-01

    ... are incorporated in this study. Therefore, influences of the content of recycled Kevlar® fibers, implementation of thermal treatment, and immersion periods on the tensile strength of recycled Kevlar...

  17. Transition in Deformation Mechanism of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy during High-Temperature Tensile Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Noda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys can be used for reducing the weight of various structural products, because of their high specific strength. They have attracted considerable attention as materials with a reduced environmental load, since they help to save both resources and energy. In order to use Mg alloys for manufacturing vehicles, it is important to investigate the deformation mechanism and transition point for optimizing the material and vehicle design. In this study, we investigated the transition of the deformation mechanism during the high-temperature uniaxial tensile deformation of the AZ31 Mg alloy. At a test temperature of 523 K and an initial strain rate of 3×10−3 s-1, the AZ31 Mg alloy (mean grain size: ~5 μm exhibited stable deformation behavior and the deformation mechanism changed to one dominated by grain boundary sliding.

  18. Influence of different brazing and welding methods on tensile strength and microhardness of orthodontic stainless steel wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Fraenzel, Wolfgang; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength and microhardness of joints made by conventional brazing and tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding. A standardized end-to-end joint configuration of the orthodontic wire material in spring hard quality was used. The joints were made using five different methods: brazing (soldering > 450 degrees C) with universal silver solder, two TIG, and two laser welders. Laser parameters and welding conditions were used according to the manufacturers' guidance. The tensile strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). The microhardness measurements were carried out with a hardness tester (Zwick 3202). Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's post hoc correction (P TIG or laser welding were found. The highest means were observed for TIG welding (699-754 MPa). Laser welding showed a significantly lower mean tensile strength (369-520 MPa) compared with TIG welding. Significant differences (P welded area. The mean microhardness differed significantly between brazing (1.99 GPa), TIG (2.22-2.39 GPa) and laser welding (2.21-2.68 GPa). For orthodontic purposes, laser and TIG welding are solder-free alternatives to joining metal. TIG welding with a lower investment cost is comparable with laser welding. However, while expensive, the laser technique is a sophisticated and simple method.

  19. The tensile strength of black bear (Ursus americanus) cortical bone is not compromised with aging despite annual periods of hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Kristin B; Drummer, Thomas D; Donahue, Seth W

    2005-11-01

    Black bears (Ursus americanus) may not develop disuse osteoporosis during long periods of disuse (i.e. hibernation) because they may be able to maintain bone formation. Previously, we found that cortical bone bending strength was not compromised with age in black bears' tibias, despite annual periods of disuse. Here we showed that cortical bone tensile strength (166-198MPa) also does not decrease with age (2-14 years) in black bear tibias. There were also no significant age-related changes in cortical bone porosity in black bear tibias. It is likely that the ability of black bears to maintain bone formation during hibernation keeps bone porosity low (2.3-8.6%) with aging, notwithstanding annual periods of disuse. This low porosity likely preserves ultimate stress with aging. Female bears give birth and nurse during hibernation; however, we found no significant differences between male and female tensile material properties, mineral content, or porosity. Our findings support the idea that black bears, which hibernate 5-7 months annually, have evolved biological mechanisms to mitigate the adverse effects of disuse on bone porosity and strength.

  20. Root tensile strength of grey alder and mountain maple grown on a coarse grained eco-engineered slope in the Swiss Alps related to wood anatomical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kink, Dimitri; Bast, Alexander; Meyer, Christine; Meier, Wolfgang; Egli, Markus; Gärtner, Holger

    2014-05-01

    Steep, vegetation free slopes are a common feature in alpine areas. The material covering these slopes is prone to all kind of erosional processes, resulting in a high risk potential for population and infrastructure. This risk potential is likely to increase with the predicted change in the spatiotemporal distribution of precipitation events. A potential increase in extreme precipitation events will also result in a higher magnitude and frequency of erosional processes. In the Swiss Alps as in many other mountainous areas, there is a need to stabilize these slopes to reduce their direct or indirect hazard potential. In this regard, eco-engineering is a very promising and sustainable approach for slope stabilization. Planting trees and shrubs is a central task in eco-engineering. A developing vegetation cover will on one hand reduce the mechanical effects of rainfall by an increased interception, on the other hand, the root systems cause modifications of soil properties. Roots not only provide anchorage for the plants, they also promote soil aggregation and are able to penetrate possible shear horizons. Overall, anchorage of plants is at the same extend also stabilizing the near subsurface. When rainfall occurs, the saturated soil exerts downhill pressure to a tree or shrub. As long as the root distribution supports anchorage, the respective slope area remains stable. At this point, the tensile strength of the roots is a critical measure, because it is more likely that the supporting roots break than the entire root system being pulled out of the soil completely. As a consequence, root tensile strength is an important parameter in characterizing the soil stabilization potential of trees and shrubs. It is known that tree roots show a high variability in their anatomical structure depending on their depth below soil surface as well as their distance to the main stem. Therefore, we assume that these structural changes affect the tensile strength of every single root

  1. In vitro Comparative Evaluation of Tensile Bond Strength of 6th, 7th and 8th Generation Dentin Bonding Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Kamble, Suresh S; Kandasamy, Baburajan; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Goyal, Nitin Kumar; Talukdar, Pratim; Seal, Mukut

    2015-01-01

    Background: Newer dentin bonding agents were developed to improve the quality of composite restoration and to reduce time consumption in its application. The aim of the present study was to evaluate tensile bond strength of 6th, 7th and 8th generation bonding agents by in vitro method. Materials and Methods: Selected 60 permanent teeth were assigned into 20 in each group (Group I: 6th generation bonding agent-Adper SE plus 3M ESPE, Group II: 7th generation bonding agent-G-Bond GC Corp Japan a...

  2. Studies on Effect of Fused Deposition Modelling Process Parameters on Ultimate Tensile Strength and Dimensional Accuracy of Nylon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraj, C. K.; Vishwas, M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the process parameters for fused deposition modelling (FDM). Layer thickness, Orientation angle and shell thickness are the process variables considered for studies. Ultimate tensile strength, dimensional accuracy and manufacturing time are the response parameters. For number of experimental runs the taguchi's L9 orthogonal array is used. Taguchis S/N ratio was used to identify a set of process parameters which give good results for respective response characteristics. Effectiveness of each parameter is investigated by using analysis of variance. The material used for the studies of process parameter is Nylon.

  3. Effect of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate pre-treatment on micro-tensile bond strength of resin composite to demineralized dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, J; Itota, T; Torii, Y; Nakabo, S; Yoshiyama, M

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) application on the micro-tensile bond strength of resin composite to demineralized dentin. Artificially demineralized lesions were formed on bovine dentin surfaces and treated with 10, 30, 50, 70 and 100 wt% HEMA aqueous solution. The surfaces were then applied and covered with SE Bond and AP-X according to the manufacturer's instruction. After immersion in 37 degrees C water for 24 h, bond strength were measured using a universal testing machine. Bond strengths to both demineralized dentin and normal dentin, without HEMA application, were also measured. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis at the resin-dentin interface were also performed. The bond strength data were statistically compared with anova and Scheffe's test (P < 0.05). Bond strength to demineralized dentin treated with over 30 wt% HEMA aqueous solution were significantly higher than that to demineralized dentin without HEMA application, but significantly lower than that to normal dentin. SEM observation revealed that the hybrid layer and resin-tags thickened and lengthened with HEMA application. In CLSM, the diffusion of adhesive primer into demineralized dentin increased with HEMA application. These results indicated that HEMA application might increase the bond strength to demineralized dentin by the enhancement of resin monomer penetration of HEMA.

  4. Tensile strength study of the abdominal wall following laparotomy synthesis using three types of surgical wires in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Lucas Félix; Ramos, Renata Ribeiro; Kestering, Darlan de Medeiros; Soldi, Marly da Silveira; Ely, Jorge Bins; d'Acampora, Armando José

    2008-01-01

    To study the tensile strength of the abdominal wall following laparotomy synthesis utilizing three types of surgical wires. Thirty Wistar rats were randomized into three groups of ten rats each. Each group underwent a 3cm-laparotomy which was closed with 3-0 polyglactin 910, polyglecrapone and catgut wires. After 63 days, euthanasia was performed and part of the abdominal wall was removed with which a strip was produced measuring 2.0 cm in length by 6.0 cm in width comprising the abdominal muscles with the implanted mesh. The sample was fixed in a mechanical test machine in which constant force was applied contrary to the tissue strips. Maximum force was considered, expressed in Newton, until full rupture of the tissue occurred. The non-parametrical Kruskal - Wallis test was used for the statistical analysis, admitting pstrength of the catgut group was slightly lower (33.50 N) than that of the polyglactin group (34.23 N), the difference not being statistically significant (p=0.733). The polyglecaprone group was the one which presented the lowest strength value of all three wires analyzed (29.86 N). No statistical difference was obtained when comparing the strength values of the polyglecaprone group and the catgut group (p=0.06 ). However, when the polyglecaprone group was compared to the polyglactin 910 group no statistical difference was obtained (p=0.029). The polyglactin wire presented the highest tensile strength among the three wires analyzed, such value being statistically significant when polyglactin was compared to the polyglecaprone wire.

  5. The Infuence of Coupling Agent and the Content of Fibers on Tensile Strength and Physical Properties of Cotton Fiber Stem/Recycled Polypropylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Kargarfard

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of coupling agent and the content of fiber on tensile strength and physical properties of wood/plastic composite produced from recycled polypropylene using mat forming procedure. Recycled polypropylene and three levels of Cotton Fiber Stem (50, 55 and 60% and three levels of MAPP (0, 3 and 5% were used. The results of tensile strength and physical properties were statistically analyzed using factorial experimental design. The results indicated that the tensile strength of composites with increasing MAPP content and decreasing of fiber content was improved However the modulus of tensile reduced significantly when the fibers content reduced. Also, the physical properties of composites were improved with increasing of MAPP consumption. Thickness swelling of composites after 24 hours and water absorption after 2 hours in boiling water showed these properties are lower when 50% fibers is used.

  6. Properties of aluminum alloys tensile, creep, and fatigue data at high and low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    This book compiles more than 300 tables listing typical average properties of a wide range of aluminum alloys. The individual test results were compiled, plotted in various ways, and analyzed. The average values from the tensile and creep tests were then normalized to the published typical room-temperature tensile properties of the respective alloys for easy comparison. This extensive project was done by Alcoa Laboratories over a period of several years. The types of data presented include: Typical Mechanical Properties of Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys at Various Temperatures, including tensile properties at subzero temperatures, at temperature after various holding times at the test temperature, and at room temperature after exposure at various temperatures for various holding times; creep rupture strengths for various times at various temperatures; stresses required to generate various amounts of creep in various lengths of time; rotating-beam fatigue strengths; modulus of elasticity as a function of t...

  7. The Value Compressive Strength and Split Tensile Strength on Concrete Mixture With Expanded Polystyrene Coated by Surfactant Span 80 as a Partial Substitution of Fine Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayat Irpan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The value of the density normal concrete which ranges between 2200–2400 kg/m3. Therefore the use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS as a subitute to fine aggregate can reduce the density of concrete. The purpose this research is to reduce the density of normal concrete but increase compressive strength of EPS concrete, with use surfactant as coating for the EPS. Variables of substitution percentage of EPS and EPS coated by surfactant are 5%,10%,15%,20%,25%. Method of concrete mix design based on SNI 03-2834-2000 “Tata Cara Pembuatan Rencana Campuran Beton Normal (Provisions for Proportioning Normal Concrete Mixture”. The result of testing, every increase percentage of EPS substitution will decrease the compressive strength around 1,74 MPa and decrease density 34,03 kg/m3. Using Surfactant as coating of EPS , compressive strength increase from the EPS’s compressive strength. Average of increasing compressive strength 0,19 MPa and increase the density 20,03 kg/m3,average decrease of the tensile split strength EPS coated surfaktan is 0,84 MPa.

  8. The Value Compressive Strength and Split Tensile Strength on Concrete Mixture With Expanded Polystyrene Coated by Surfactant Span 80 as a Partial Substitution of Fine Aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Irpan; Siauwantara, Alice

    2014-03-01

    The value of the density normal concrete which ranges between 2200-2400 kg/m3. Therefore the use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) as a subitute to fine aggregate can reduce the density of concrete. The purpose this research is to reduce the density of normal concrete but increase compressive strength of EPS concrete, with use surfactant as coating for the EPS. Variables of substitution percentage of EPS and EPS coated by surfactant are 5%,10%,15%,20%,25%. Method of concrete mix design based on SNI 03-2834-2000 "Tata Cara Pembuatan Rencana Campuran Beton Normal (Provisions for Proportioning Normal Concrete Mixture)". The result of testing, every increase percentage of EPS substitution will decrease the compressive strength around 1,74 MPa and decrease density 34,03 kg/m3. Using Surfactant as coating of EPS , compressive strength increase from the EPS's compressive strength. Average of increasing compressive strength 0,19 MPa and increase the density 20,03 kg/m3,average decrease of the tensile split strength EPS coated surfaktan is 0,84 MPa.

  9. Influence of core-finishing intervals on tensile strength of cast posts-and-cores luted with zinc phosphate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Andrea Lopes Iglesias

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The core finishing of cast posts-and-cores after luting is routine in dental practice. However, the effects of the vibrations produced by the rotary cutting instruments over the luting cements are not well-documented. This study evaluated the influence of the time intervals that elapsed between the cementation and the core-finishing procedures on the tensile strength of cast posts-and-cores luted with zinc phosphate cement. Forty-eight bovine incisor roots were selected, endodontically treated, and divided into four groups (n = 12: GA, control (without finishing; GB, GC, and GD, subjected to finishing at 20 minutes, 60 minutes, and 24 hours after cementation, respectively. Root canals were molded, and the resin patterns were cast in copper-aluminum alloy. Cast posts-and-cores were luted with zinc phosphate cement, and the core-finishing procedures were applied according to the groups. The tensile tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min for all groups, 24 hours after the core-finishing procedures. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. No significant differences were observed in the tensile strengths between the control and experimental groups, regardless of the time interval that elapsed between the luting and finishing steps. Within the limitations of the present study, it was demonstrated that the core-finishing procedures and time intervals that elapsed after luting did not appear to affect the retention of cast posts-and-cores when zinc phosphate cement was used.

  10. Influence of core-finishing intervals on tensile strength of cast posts-and-cores luted with zinc phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Michele Andrea Lopes; Mesquita, Gabriela Campos; Pereira, Analice Giovani; Dantas, Lucas Costa de Medeiros; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Soares, Carlos José; Mota, Adérito Soares da

    2012-01-01

    The core finishing of cast posts-and-cores after luting is routine in dental practice. However, the effects of the vibrations produced by the rotary cutting instruments over the luting cements are not well-documented. This study evaluated the influence of the time intervals that elapsed between the cementation and the core-finishing procedures on the tensile strength of cast posts-and-cores luted with zinc phosphate cement. Forty-eight bovine incisor roots were selected, endodontically treated, and divided into four groups (n = 12): GA, control (without finishing); GB, GC, and GD, subjected to finishing at 20 minutes, 60 minutes, and 24 hours after cementation, respectively. Root canals were molded, and the resin patterns were cast in copper-aluminum alloy. Cast posts-and-cores were luted with zinc phosphate cement, and the core-finishing procedures were applied according to the groups. The tensile tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min for all groups, 24 hours after the core-finishing procedures. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the tensile strengths between the control and experimental groups, regardless of the time interval that elapsed between the luting and finishing steps. Within the limitations of the present study, it was demonstrated that the core-finishing procedures and time intervals that elapsed after luting did not appear to affect the retention of cast posts-and-cores when zinc phosphate cement was used.

  11. Study on the strength characteristics of High strength concrete with Micro steel fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowdham, K.; Sumathi, A.; Saravana Raja Mohan, K.

    2017-07-01

    The study of High Strength Concrete (HSC) has become interesting as concrete structures grow taller and larger. The usage of HSC in structures has been increased worldwide and has begun to make an impact in India. Ordinary cementitious materials are weak under tensile loads and fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCCs) have been developed to improve this weak point. High Strength concrete containing Alccofine as mineral admixture and reinforced with micro steel fibers were cast and tested to study the mechanical properties. The concrete were designed to have compressive strength of 60 MPa. Mixtures containing 0% and 10% replacement of cement by Alccofine and with 1%, 2% and 3% of micro steel fibers by weight of concrete were prepared. Mixtures incorporating Alccofine with fibers developed marginal increase in strength properties at all curing days when compared to control concrete.

  12. Application of percolation model to the tensile strength and the reduced modulus of elasticity of three compacted pharmaceutical excipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busignies, Virginie; Leclerc, Bernard; Porion, Patrice; Evesque, Pierre; Couarraze, Guy; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Percolation theory has been applied to several mechanical properties of pharmaceutical tablets. This power law describes the change of tablet's properties with the relative density. It defines critical tablet densities from which the mechanical properties start to change. The exponent in the law is expected to be universal for a mechanical property and numerical values are proposed in the literature. In this work, the percolation model was applied to the tensile strength and the reduced modulus of elasticity (obtained from surface indentation test) of three compacted pharmaceutical excipients (a microcrystalline cellulose, a lactose and an anhydrous calcium phosphate). Two approaches were proposed. First, the exponent was kept constant and equal to the values used in the literature (2.7 for the tensile strength and 3.9 for the reduced modulus of elasticity). Secondly, the critical tablet density (i.e. the percolation threshold) and the exponent were determined from the model. In the first approach, the percolation thresholds were higher than the relative tapped density. Using the second approach, the experimentally determined exponents were not close to the values of the literature and the critical relative densities were higher than the relative tapped density or equal to zero. Then, this study showed that the exponent seems not universal and that the model must be used carefully.

  13. Waiting Time for Coronal Preparation and the Influence of Different Cements on Tensile Strength of Metal Posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilione Kruschewsky Costa Sousa Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the effect of post-cementation waiting time for core preparation of cemented cast posts and cores had on retention in the root canal, using two different luting materials. Sixty extracted human canines were sectioned 16 mm from the root apex. After cast nickel-chromium metal posts and cores were fabricated and luted with zinc phosphate (ZP cement or resin cement (RC, the specimens were divided into 3 groups (n = 10 according to the waiting time for core preparation: no preparation (control, 15 minutes, or 1 week after the core cementation. At the appropriate time, the specimens were subjected to a tensile load test (0.5 mm/min until failure. Two-way ANOVA (time versus cement and the Tukey tests (P < 0.05 showed significantly higher (P < 0.05 tensile strength values for the ZP cement groups than for the RC groups. Core preparation and post-cementation waiting time for core recontouring did not influence the retention strength. ZP was the best material for intraradicular metal post cementation.

  14. Effect of Re-Application of Microbrush on Micro Tensile Bond Strength of an Adhesive to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seied Majid Mosavi Nasab

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Re-application of microbrush may affect the micro tensile bond strength of adhesives to dentin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of re-application of microbrushes on the micro tensile bond strength of an adhesive to dentin.Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted molars teeth were collected and enamel of occlusal surface were removed to expose superficial dentin. Then superficial dentin was etched, washed and partially air dried.According to the times of application of microbrush, teeth were divided into two test groups. In group 1, newmicrobrushs were used, but in group 2, the ones that were already used for twice were included. Ambar dentin bonding agent (FGM/Brazil was applied to the etched dentin with microbrushes according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Then the crown of teeth was built up with LLiss (FGM/Brazil composite resin. The teeth were sectioned in buccolingual direction to obtain 1mm slabs. Then 50 hourglass- shape samples were made from 30 teeth (25 Specimens per group. The microtensile bond strength of the specimens was tested using MTD500 (SD Mechatronik, Germany. The data were statistically analyzed by T-test.Results: The mean values for the microtensile bond strength were 30.49±7.18 and 23.61±9.06 MPa±SD for the first and second groups, respectively. There was significant difference between the groups (P=0.005.Conclusion: Microbrushes should not be used for more than one cavity preparation.

  15. Analysis of the tensile strength on the healing of the abdominal wall of rats treated with infliximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, João Vieira; Freitas, Luís Alberto Mendonça de; Marques, Ravi Dias; Bocca, Anamélia Lorenzetti; Sousa, João Batista de; Oliveira, Paulo Gonçalves de

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of infliximab, a murine/human chimeric monoclonal antibody, on the tensile strength of abdominal wall surgical wounds. Sixty Wistar healthy male rats with initial body weight between 215 and 390 g and 60 and 90 days of age were randomly assigned into two groups, E (Experimental) and C (Control) with 30 animals each. Group E animals received a single subcutaneous dose of 5mg/Kg of infliximab, and Group C animals received equivalent subcutaneous volume of a solution of 0.9% NaCl. After 48h, animals from both groups were submitted to a 4 cm median incision in the abdominal wall, including all layers that had been reconstituted with continuous suture of the aponeurotic muscle and skin, with 5.0 nylon thread. Then, Group E animals were separated by simple allotment into three subgroups named E3, E7 and E14 with ten animals each, and those from group C into C3, C7, C14 and were submitted, respectively, the reoperation and euthanasia at the third, seventh and fourteenth postoperative day. The anterior abdominal wall, which was resected during reoperation, was cut with No 15 scalpel lamina perpendicularly to the surgical wound. Each specimen, in the form of a 6 cm x 2 cm strip, was fixed by the extremity so that the suture line was equidistant from the fixation points of the dynamometer, in order to undergo the tensile strength test. The dynamometer, which was gauged for each series of measures, was calibrated to apply velocity to the 25 mm/min rupture test; the rupture value was expressed in N (Newton). Prior to euthanasia, the abdominal vena cava was identified and punctured in order to collect blood for TNF-alpha dosage. The mean tensile strength found for animals from subgroups E3, E7, E14, C3, C7, C14 were, respectively, 16.03, 18.69, 27.01, 28.40, 27.22, 29.15 and 24.30 N. In the results of the multiple comparisons tests, significant differences (pabdominal wall wound decreasing the rupture strength in the inflammatory and proliferative phases.

  16. Experimental and finite element study of the effect of temperature and moisture on the tangential tensile strength and fracture behavior in timber logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur

    2014-01-01

    Timber is normally dried by kiln drying, in the course of which moisture-induced stresses and fractures can occur. Cracks occur primarily in the radial direction due to tangential tensile strength (TSt) that exceeds the strength of the material. The present article reports on experiments and nume...

  17. Effect of heat treatments on the microhardness and tensile strength of Al–0.25 wt.% Zr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Çadırlı, Emin [Niğde University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Niğde (Turkey); Tecer, Hicran [Coreal Aluminyum Kablo A.Ş., Free Zone of Kayseri, Kayseri (Turkey); Şahin, Mevlüt [Niğde University, Vocational School of Technical Sciences, Niğde (Turkey); Yılmaz, Elif [Erciyes University, Kayseri Vocational High School, Kayseri (Turkey); Kırındı, Talip [Kırıkkale University, Faculty of Education, Department of Elementary Education, Kırıkkale (Turkey); Gündüz, Mehmet, E-mail: gunduz@erciyes.edu.tr [Erciyes University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • The HV increases with increasing aging T up to 425 °C at a constant h (100 h). • The HV increases with increasing h up to 120 h at a constant T (400 °C). • Peak values of HV depend on the aging T and h are 370 MPa and 410 MPa respectively. • σ values reached a peak value (130 MPa) with increasing h up to 120 h at a constant T. • More fine dimples were found on the fracture surface of short time aged samples. - Abstract: In the present work, the effect of heat treatments on the microhardness and tensile properties of the Al–0.25 Zr (wt.%) alloy have been investigated. The Al–0.25 Zr (wt.%) alloy was melted in a vacuum furnace, and the molten alloy was poured into crucibles held in a hot filing furnace. Then, the samples were directionally solidified from bottom to top and aged isothermally and isochronally in a muffle furnace. Aging was performed in two ways: using a wide range of temperatures (350–600 °C) with a constant aging time (100 h) and a wide range of aging times (3–240 h) with a constant temperature (400 °C). The dependence of the microhardness (HV) and ultimate tensile strength (σ{sub UTS}) on the aging temperatures and aging times was determined. According to the experimental results, the HV and σ{sub UTS} values of the aged samples increase at a certain aging temperature and aging time values, reaching peak values at specific temperatures and aging times. The microhardness and ultimate tensile strength decreased with further increase of aging temperatures and aging times. The microscopic fracture surfaces of the aged samples under different aging conditions were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Fractographic analysis of the tensile fracture surfaces shows that the type of fracture changed significantly from ductile to brittle depending on the aging times. Transmission electron microscopy was also used to characterize the precipitation processes in an Al–0.25 Zr (wt.%) alloy aged at 400 °C for 120 h.

  18. Experimental Study on the Tensile Strength and Linear Expansion Coefficient of Air Tunnel Terrazzo Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boping Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, studies on the surface tension of air tunnel terrazzo under wind load and how regularly it is affected by temperature are relatively less, and the measured results of the thermal expansion coefficient of terrazzo have not yet been given. In this paper, based on the top terrazzo surface structure of the inner wall of the wind tunnel, the tensile performance tests of terrazzo surface layer are conducted, while the thermal expansion coefficient of the six terrazzo test blocks were tested. The tests and analysis show that the construction of terrazzo surface, based on the proposed construction process, can effectively guarantee the reliable cement performance for the binding layer between mortar and concrete base layer, terrazzo surface layer and the cement mortar layer. And the thermal expansion coefficient of terrazzo can be valued at 1.06e-5/ºC.

  19. Müller glia provide essential tensile strength to the developing retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Ryan B.; Randlett, Owen; Oswald, Julia; Yoshimatsu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the cellular basis of tissue integrity in a vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) tissue, we eliminated Müller glial cells (MG) from the zebrafish retina. For well over a century, glial cells have been ascribed a mechanical role in the support of neural tissues, yet this idea has not been specifically tested in vivo. We report here that retinas devoid of MG rip apart, a defect known as retinoschisis. Using atomic force microscopy, we show that retinas without MG have decreased resistance to tensile stress and are softer than controls. Laser ablation of MG processes showed that these cells are under tension in the tissue. Thus, we propose that MG act like springs that hold the neural retina together, finally confirming an active mechanical role of glial cells in the CNS. PMID:26416961

  20. Ti-Al Composite Wires with High Specific Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Schultz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available An alternative deformation technique was applied to a composite made of titanium and an aluminium alloy in order to achieve severe plastic deformation. This involves accumulative swaging and bundling. Furthermore, it allows uniform deformation of a composite material while producing a wire which can be further used easily. Detailed analysis concerning the control of the deformation process, mesostructural and microstructural features and tensile testing was carried out on the as produced wires. A strong grain refinement to a grain size of 250–500 nm accompanied by a decrease in 〈111〉 fibre texture component and a change from low angle to high angle grain boundary characteristics is observed in the Al alloy. A strong increase in the mechanical properties in terms of ultimate tensile strength ranging from 600 to 930 MPa being equivalent to a specific strength of up to 223 MPa/g/cm3 was achieved.

  1. Mechanical Strength and Failure Characteristics of Cast Mg-9 pctAl-1 pctZn Alloys Produced by a Heated-Mold Continuous Casting Process: Tensile Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Ohfuji, Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical properties and failure characteristics of a cast Mg alloy (AZ91: Mg-Al8.9-Zn0.6-Mn0.2) produced by a heated-mold continuous casting process (HMC) are investigated. In a modification of the original HMC process, the cooling of the liquid alloy by direct water spray is carried out in an atmosphere of high-purity argon gas. The HMC-AZ91 alloy exhibits excellent mechanical properties (high strength and high ductility) that are about twice as high as those for the same alloy produced by conventional gravity casting. The increased material strength and ductility of the HMC sample are attributed to nanoscale and microscale microstructural characteristics. The fine grains and tiny spherical eutectic structures ( e.g., Mg17Al12 and Al6Mn) distributed randomly in the matrix of the HMC alloy result in resistance to dislocation movement, leading to high tensile strength. Basal slip on (0001) planes in the relatively organized crystal orientation of the HMC alloy, as well as grain boundary sliding through tiny spherical eutectic structures, results in high ductility. Details of the failure mechanism under static loading in the HMC alloy are also discussed using failure models.

  2. High quality factor resonance at room temperature with nanostrings under high tensile stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbridge, Scott S.; Parpia, Jeevak M.; Reichenbach, Robert B.; Bellan, Leon M.; Craighead, H. G.

    2006-06-01

    Quality factors as high as 207 000 are demonstrated at room temperature for radio-frequency silicon nitride string resonators with cross sectional dimensions on the scale of 100 nm, made with a nonlithographic technique. A product of quality factor and surface to volume ratio greater than 6000 nm-1 is presented, the highest yet reported. Doubly clamped nanostring resonators are fabricated in high tensile-stress silicon nitride using a nonlithographic electrospinning process. We fabricate devices with an electron beam process, and demonstrate frequency and quality factor results identical to those obtained with the nonlithographic technique. We also compare high tensile-stress doubly clamped beams with doubly clamped and cantilever resonators made of a lower stress material, as well as cantilever beams made of the high stress material. In all cases, the doubly clamped high stress beams have the highest quality factors. We therefore attribute the high quality factors to high tensile stress. Potential dominant loss mechanisms are discussed, including surface and clamping losses, and thermoelastic dissipation. Some practical advantages offered by these nanostrings for mass sensing are discussed.

  3. Semi-analytical and Numerical Studies on the Flattened Brazilian Splitting Test Used for Measuring the Indirect Tensile Strength of Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y. G.; Wang, L. G.; Lu, Y. L.; Chen, J. R.; Zhang, J. H.

    2015-09-01

    Based on the two-dimensional elasticity theory, this study established a mechanical model under chordally opposing distributed compressive loads, in order to perfect the theoretical foundation of the flattened Brazilian splitting test used for measuring the indirect tensile strength of rocks. The stress superposition method was used to obtain the approximate analytic solutions of stress components inside the flattened Brazilian disk. These analytic solutions were then verified through a comparison with the numerical results of the finite element method (FEM). Based on the theoretical derivation, this research carried out a contrastive study on the effect of the flattened loading angles on the stress value and stress concentration degree inside the disk. The results showed that the stress concentration degree near the loading point and the ratio of compressive/tensile stress inside the disk dramatically decreased as the flattened loading angle increased, avoiding the crushing failure near-loading point of Brazilian disk specimens. However, only the tensile stress value and the tensile region were slightly reduced with the increase of the flattened loading angle. Furthermore, this study found that the optimal flattened loading angle was 20°-30°; flattened load angles that were too large or too small made it difficult to guarantee the central tensile splitting failure principle of the Brazilian splitting test. According to the Griffith strength failure criterion, the calculative formula of the indirect tensile strength of rocks was derived theoretically. This study obtained a theoretical indirect tensile strength that closely coincided with existing and experimental results. Finally, this paper simulated the fracture evolution process of rocks under different loading angles through the use of the finite element numerical software ANSYS. The modeling results showed that the Flattened Brazilian Splitting Test using the optimal loading angle could guarantee the tensile

  4. Prediction of Tensile Strength of Friction Stir Weld Joints with Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Mohammad W.; Huggett, Daniel J.; Liao, T. Warren; Wahab, Muhammad A.; Okeil, Ayman M.

    2015-01-01

    Friction-stir-welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process where joint properties are dependent on welding process parameters. In the current study three critical process parameters including spindle speed (??), plunge force (????), and welding speed (??) are considered key factors in the determination of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of welded aluminum alloy joints. A total of 73 weld schedules were welded and tensile properties were subsequently obtained experimentally. It is observed that all three process parameters have direct influence on UTS of the welded joints. Utilizing experimental data, an optimized adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) model has been developed to predict UTS of FSW joints. A total of 1200 models were developed by varying the number of membership functions (MFs), type of MFs, and combination of four input variables (??,??,????,??????) utilizing a MATLAB platform. Note EFI denotes an empirical force index derived from the three process parameters. For comparison, optimized artificial neural network (ANN) models were also developed to predict UTS from FSW process parameters. By comparing ANFIS and ANN predicted results, it was found that optimized ANFIS models provide better results than ANN. This newly developed best ANFIS model could be utilized for prediction of UTS of FSW joints.

  5. An ultrasonic technique for predicting tensile strength of southern pine lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Rajeshwar; D.A. Bender; D.E. Bray; K.A. McDonald

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technology to enhance mechanical stress rating of lumber. An ultrasonic NDE technique was developed that is sensitive to grain angle and edge knots in lumber - two primary determinants of lumber strength. The presence of edge knots increased the acoustic wave travel time and selectively...

  6. Evaluation of a sugar based edible adhesive utilizing a tensile strength tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new method to evaluate adhesives has been developed and utilized to formulate a recently patented adhesive based on sugar and citric acid. Factors affecting adhesive performance were uncovered, such as reduced strength due to improper heating time, and an optimal curing temperature of 60oC was ac...

  7. Stress-deformed state of cylindrical specimens during indirect tensile strength testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levan Japaridze

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the interaction between cylindrical specimen made of homogeneous, isotropic, and linearly elastic material and loading jaws of any curvature is considered in the Brazilian test. It is assumed that the specimen is diametrically compressed by elliptic normal contact stresses. The frictional contact stresses between the specimen and platens are neglected. The analytical solution starts from the contact problem of the loading jaws of any curvature and cylindrical specimen. The contact width, corresponding loading angle (2θ0, and elliptical stresses obtained through solution of the contact problems are used as boundary conditions for a cylindrical specimen. The problem of the theory of elasticity for a cylinder is solved using Muskhelishvili's method. In this method, the displacements and stresses are represented in terms of two analytical functions of a complex variable. In the main approaches, the nonlinear interaction between the loading bearing blocks and the specimen as well as the curvature of their surfaces and the elastic parameters of their materials are taken into account. Numerical examples are solved using MATLAB to demonstrate the influence of deformability, curvature of the specimen and platens on the distribution of the normal contact stresses as well as on the tensile and compressive stresses acting across the loaded diameter. Derived equations also allow calculating the modulus of elasticity, total deformation modulus and creep parameters of the specimen material based on the experimental data of radial contraction of the specimen.

  8. Effect of reactive adhesives on the tensile bond strength of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials to methyl methacrylate tray material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ona, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sato, Masayuki; Igarashi, Yoshimasa; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    The effect of new adhesives on the bond strength of elastomeric impression materials to acrylic trays was evaluated. Two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials (Fusion and Imprinsis) with reactive adhesives and one (Examix) with a conventional adhesive were tested. Flat, double-sided plates of auto-polymerizing methyl methacrylate (10 x 10 x 2.5 mm) were prepared with one of the adhesives. Five specimens were prepared by injecting each impression material into a 2-mm gap between the two plates. Tensile tests were conducted until separation failure occurred. The mean bond strengths of Fusion (1.0 MPa) and Imprinsis (0.8 MPa) were significantly greater than that of Examix (0.2 MPa). On the contrary, one of five Fusion showed adhesive failure mode while all the Imprinsis exhibited mixed failure. The conflicting results were presumably attributed to the mean tear strength of Fusion (0.8 N/mm) being higher than that of Imprinsis (0.5 N/mm).

  9. Effect of the fiber-matrix interphase on the transverse tensile strength of the unidirectional composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, H. C.; Arocho, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional fiber-matrix interphase model has been developed and analytical results obtained correlated well with available experimental data. It was found that by including the interphase between the fiber and matrix in the model, much better local stress results were obtained than with the model without the interphase. A more sophisticated two-dimensional micromechanical model, which included the interphase properties was also developed. Both one-dimensional and two-dimensional models were used to study the effect of the interphase properties on the local stresses at the fiber, interphase and matrix. From this study, it was found that interphase modulus and thickness have significant influence on the transverse tensile strength and mode of failure in fiber reinforced composites.

  10. Fine tuning of dwelling time in friction stir welding for preventing material overheating, weld tensile strength increase and weld nugget size decrease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After successful welding, destructive testing into test samples from Al 2024-T351 friction stir butt welds showed that tensile strength of the weld improve along the joint line, while dimensions of the weld nugget decrease. For those welds, both the base material and the welding tool constantly cool down during the welding phase. Obviously, the base material became overheated during the long dwelling phase what made conditions for creation of joints with the reduced mechanical properties. Preserving all process parameters but varying the dwelling time from 5-27 seconds a new set of welding is done to reach maximal achievable tensile strength. An analytical-numerical-experimental model is used for optimising the duration of the dwelling time while searching for the maximal tensile strength of the welds

  11. Influence of Immersion Conditions on The Tensile Strength of Recycled Kevlar®/Polyester/Low-Melting-Point Polyester Nonwoven Geotextiles through Applying Statistical Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Chzi Hsieh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The recycled Kevlar®/polyester/low-melting-point polyester (recycled Kevlar®/PET/LPET nonwoven geotextiles are immersed in neutral, strong acid, and strong alkali solutions, respectively, at different temperatures for four months. Their tensile strength is then tested according to various immersion periods at various temperatures, in order to determine their durability to chemicals. For the purpose of analyzing the possible factors that influence mechanical properties of geotextiles under diverse environmental conditions, the experimental results and statistical analyses are incorporated in this study. Therefore, influences of the content of recycled Kevlar® fibers, implementation of thermal treatment, and immersion periods on the tensile strength of recycled Kevlar®/PET/LPET nonwoven geotextiles are examined, after which their influential levels are statistically determined by performing multiple regression analyses. According to the results, the tensile strength of nonwoven geotextiles can be enhanced by adding recycled Kevlar® fibers and thermal treatment.

  12. Functional gradients in the pericarp of the green coconut inspire asymmetric fibre-composites with improved impact strength, and preserved flexural and tensile properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Nina; Labonte, David; Humburg, Heide; Buzkan, Tayfun; Dörgens, Anna; Kelterer, Wiebke; Müssig, Jörg

    2017-02-28

    Here we investigate the mechanical properties and structural design of the pericarp of the green coconut (Cocos nucifera L.). The pericarp showed excellent impact characteristics, and mechanical tests of its individual components revealed gradients in stiffness, strength and elongation at break from the outer to the inner layer of the pericarp. In order to understand more about the potential effect of such gradients on 'bulk' material properties, we designed simple, graded, cellulose fibre-reinforced polylactide (PLA) composites by stacking layers reinforced with fibres of different mechanical properties. Tensile properties of the graded composites were largely determined by the 'weakest' fibre, irrespective of the fibre distribution. However, a graded design led to pronounced asymmetric bending and impact properties. Bio-inspired, asymmetrically graded composites showed a flexural strength and modulus comparable to that of the strongest reference samples, but the elongation at maximum load was dependent on the specimen orientation. The impact strength of the graded composites showed a similar orientation-dependence, and peak values exceeded the impact strength of a non-graded reference composite containing identical fibre fractions by up to a factor of three. In combination, our results show that an asymmetric, systematic variation of fibre properties can successfully combine desirable properties of different fibre types, suggesting new routes for the development of high-performance composites, and improving our understanding of the structure-function relationship of the coconut pericarp.

  13. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  14. Effect of Load Rate on Ultimate Tensile Strength of Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2001-01-01

    The strengths of three continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/CAS-II, SiC/MAS-5 and SiC/SiC, were determined as a function of test rate in air at 1100 to 1200 C. All three composite materials exhibited a strong dependency of strength on test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress-rate) to another (constant stress loading) suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics. It was further found that constant stress-rate testing could be used as an alternative to life prediction test methodology even for composite materials, at least for short range of lifetimes and when ultimate strength is used as the failure criterion.

  15. Work-Hardening Induced Tensile Ductility of Bulk Metallic Glasses via High-Pressure Torsion

    OpenAIRE

    Soo-Hyun Joo; Dong-Hai Pi; Albertus Deny Heri Setyawan; Hidemi Kato; Milos Janecek; Yong Chan Kim; Sunghak Lee; Hyoung Seop Kim

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of engineering materials are key for ensuring safety and reliability. However, the plastic deformation of BMGs is confined to narrow regions in shear bands, which usually result in limited ductilities and catastrophic failures at low homologous temperatures. The quasi-brittle failure and lack of tensile ductility undercut the potential applications of BMGs. In this report, we present clear tensile ductility in a Zr-based BMG via a high-pressure torsion (HPT) process....

  16. Weibull statistical analysis of tensile strength of vascular bundle in inner layer of moso bamboo culm in molecular parasitology and vector biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Cui; Wanxi, Peng; Zhengjun, Sun; Lili, Shang; Guoning, Chen

    2014-07-01

    Bamboo is a radial gradient variation composite material against parasitology and vector biology, but the vascular bundles in inner layer are evenly distributed. The objective is to determine the regular size pattern and Weibull statistical analysis of the vascular bundle tensile strength in inner layer of Moso bamboo. The size and shape of vascular bundles in inner layer are similar, with an average area about 0.1550 mm2. A statistical evaluation of the tensile strength of vascular bundle was conducted by means of Weibull statistics, the results show that the Weibull modulus m is 6.1121 and the accurate reliability assessment of vascular bundle is determined.

  17. Micro-tensile bond strength of solely self-cured composite cement onto dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Thais Yumi Umeda; Santos, PH; de Munck, Jan; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate bonding effectiveness of a new experimental composite cement to dentin in terms of microtensile bond strength (μTBS) after 1week (‘immediate’) and 6month (‘aged’) artificial aging. Flat ground dentin of 32 human molars was prepared using 600-grit SiC paper. Selfmade composite blocks (Clearfil AP-X,Kuraray Noritake) were bonded to flat dentin surfaces using 4 composite cements: Exp. HPC100 (Kuraray Noritake), Multilink (Ivoclar Vivadent), RelyX Unicem 2 and RelyX Ultimate ...

  18. The Coupled Effect of Loading Rate and Grain Size on Tensile Strength of Sandstones under Dynamic Disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is of significance to comprehend the effects of rock microstructure on the tensile strength under different loading rates caused by mining disturbance. So, in this paper, three kinds of sandstones drilled from surrounding rocks in Xiao Jihan Coal to simulate the in situ stress state, whose average grain size is 30 μm (fine grain, FG, 105 μm (medium grain, MG, and 231 μm (Coarse grain, CG, are selected with the calculation of optical microscopic technique and moreover processed to Brazilian disc (BD to study the mechanical response of samples. The dynamic Brazilian tests of samples with three kinds of grain sizes are conducted with the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB driven by pendulum hammer, which can produce four different velocities (V=2.0 m/s, 2.5 m/s, 3.3 m/s, and 4.2 m/s when the incident bar is impacted by pendulum hammer. The incident wave produced by pendulum hammer is a slowly rising stress wave, which allows gradual stress accumulation in the specimen and maintains the load at both ends of the specimen in an equilibrium state. The results show that the dynamic strength of three kinds of BD samples represented loading rates dependence, and FG sandstones are more sensitive for loading rates than MG and CG samples. Moreover, the peak strength is observed to increase linearly with an increasing stress rates, and the relationship between the dynamic BD strength and stress rates can be built through a linear equation. Finally, the failure modes of different grain sizes are discussed and explained by microfailure mechanism.

  19. Effect of luting agents on the tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleisa, Khalil; Al-Dwairi, Ziad N; Alghabban, Rawda; Goodacre, Charles J

    2013-09-01

    Fiber posts can fail because of loss of retention; and it is unknown which luting agent provides the highest bond strength. The purpose of this study was to investigate the tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts luted to premolar teeth with 6 resin composite luting agents. Ninety-six single-rooted extracted human mandibular premolars were sectioned 2 mm coronal to the most incisal point of the cementoenamel junction. Root canals were instrumented and obturated with laterally condensed gutta percha and root canal sealer (AH26). Gutta percha was removed from the canals to a depth of 8 mm and diameter post spaces with a 1.5 mm were prepared. The specimens were divided into the following 6 groups according to the luting agent used (n=16): Group V, Variolink II; Group A, RelyX ARC; Group N, Multilink N; Group U, RelyX Unicem; Group P, ParaCore; Group F, MultiCore Flow. Each specimen was secured in a universal testing machine and a separating load was applied at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. The forces required to dislodge the posts were recorded. A 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to the mean retentive strengths of various cement materials (α=.05). Significant differences were recorded among the 6 cement types (PFiber posts luted with RelyX Unicem, Paracore, and MultiCore Flow demonstrated significantly higher bond strengths. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimal welding technology of high strength steel S690QL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Arsic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented the detailed procedure for defining the optimal technology for welding the structures made of the high strength steel S690QL. That steel belongs into a group of steels with exceptional mechanical properties. The most prominent properties are the high tensile strength and impact toughness, at room and at elevated temperatures, as well. However, this steel has a negative characteristic - proneness to appearance of cold cracks.  That impedes welding and makes as an imperative to study different aspects of this steel's properties as well as those of eventual filler metal. Selection and defining of the optimal welding technology of this high strength steel is done for the purpose of preserving the favorable mechanical properties once the welded joint is realized; properties of the welded metal and the melting zone, as well as in the heat affected zone, which is the most critical zone of the welded joint.

  1. Additively manufactured hierarchical stainless steels with high strength and ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Morris; Voisin, Thomas; McKeown, Joseph T.; Ye, Jianchao; Calta, Nicholas P.; Li, Zan; Zeng, Zhi; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Wen; Roehling, Tien Tran; Ott, Ryan T.; Santala, Melissa K.; Depond, Philip J.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Hamza, Alex V.; Zhu, Ting

    2018-01-01

    Many traditional approaches for strengthening steels typically come at the expense of useful ductility, a dilemma known as strength-ductility trade-off. New metallurgical processing might offer the possibility of overcoming this. Here we report that austenitic 316L stainless steels additively manufactured via a laser powder-bed-fusion technique exhibit a combination of yield strength and tensile ductility that surpasses that of conventional 316L steels. High strength is attributed to solidification-enabled cellular structures, low-angle grain boundaries, and dislocations formed during manufacturing, while high uniform elongation correlates to a steady and progressive work-hardening mechanism regulated by a hierarchically heterogeneous microstructure, with length scales spanning nearly six orders of magnitude. In addition, solute segregation along cellular walls and low-angle grain boundaries can enhance dislocation pinning and promote twinning. This work demonstrates the potential of additive manufacturing to create alloys with unique microstructures and high performance for structural applications.

  2. High Strength and High Modulus Electrospun Nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Yao; Cees W. M. Bastiaansen; Ton Peijs

    2014-01-01

    Electrospinning is a rapidly growing polymer processing technology as it provides a viable and simple method to create ultra-fine continuous fibers. This paper presents an in-depth review of the mechanical properties of electrospun fibers and particularly focuses on methodologies to generate high strength and high modulus nanofibers. As such, it aims to provide some guidance to future research activities in the area of high performance electrospun fibers.

  3. Variation of Lap Shear Tensile Strength of Polycarbonate Mild Steel Adhesive Joints with DC Glow Discharge Modified Polycarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Amrish K.; Barthwal, S. K.; Ray, S.

    2007-01-01

    It has been observed that the wettability/surface energy of polycarbonate (PC) changes with the variation in process parameters, such as discharge power and time of exposure of DC glow discharge. The wettability of the PC surface has been measured by the contact angle measurements of two test liquids, such as water and formamide, by the sessile drop method. The lap shear tensile strength (LSTS) of PC to the mild steel (MS) adhesive joint has been measured with both the as-received polymer and those exposed under DC glow discharge. An appreciable increase in the LSTS has been attained for samples treated under DC glow discharge at a lower power level and also at a short exposure time at higher power. This increase in LSTS is attributed to increased polar surface energy with increasing power and time of exposure. After a certain level of surface modification of the PC, the strength of the adhesive joint deteriorates, while the total surface energy and its polar component may increase continuously. The subsurface damage taking place particularly at long exposure times and at higher power may lead to deterioration of LSTS in spite of a strong interface between the polymer and the adhesive. In such a case, the joint is observed to fracture not across the interface but through the subsurface. The optimum exposure limits the subsurface damage while creating a strong interface.

  4. Tensile behaviour of geopolymer-based materials under medium and high strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menna Costantino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are a promising class of inorganic materials typically obtained from an alluminosilicate source and an alkaline solution, and characterized by an amorphous 3-D framework structure. These materials are particularly attractive for the construction industry due to mechanical and environmental advantages they exhibit compared to conventional systems. Indeed, geopolymer-based concretes represent a challenge for the large scale uses of such a binder material and many research studies currently focus on this topic. However, the behaviour of geopolymers under high dynamic loads is rarely investigated, even though it is of a fundamental concern for the integrity/vulnerability assessment under extreme dynamic events. The present study aims to investigate the effect of high dynamic loading conditions on the tensile behaviour of different geopolymer formulations. The dynamic tests were performed under different strain rates by using a Hydro-pneumatic machine and a modified Hopkinson bar at the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The results are processed in terms of stress-strain relationships and strength dynamic increase factor at different strain-rate levels. The dynamic increase factor was also compared with CEB recommendations. The experimental outcomes can be used to assess the constitutive laws of geopolymers under dynamic load conditions and implemented into analytical models.

  5. Tensile behaviour of geopolymer-based materials under medium and high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menna, Costantino; Asprone, Domenico; Forni, Daniele; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Bozza, Anna; Prota, Andrea; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Geopolymers are a promising class of inorganic materials typically obtained from an alluminosilicate source and an alkaline solution, and characterized by an amorphous 3-D framework structure. These materials are particularly attractive for the construction industry due to mechanical and environmental advantages they exhibit compared to conventional systems. Indeed, geopolymer-based concretes represent a challenge for the large scale uses of such a binder material and many research studies currently focus on this topic. However, the behaviour of geopolymers under high dynamic loads is rarely investigated, even though it is of a fundamental concern for the integrity/vulnerability assessment under extreme dynamic events. The present study aims to investigate the effect of high dynamic loading conditions on the tensile behaviour of different geopolymer formulations. The dynamic tests were performed under different strain rates by using a Hydro-pneumatic machine and a modified Hopkinson bar at the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The results are processed in terms of stress-strain relationships and strength dynamic increase factor at different strain-rate levels. The dynamic increase factor was also compared with CEB recommendations. The experimental outcomes can be used to assess the constitutive laws of geopolymers under dynamic load conditions and implemented into analytical models.

  6. High strain rate tensile testing of sheet materials using three Hopkinson pressure bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary G.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to circumvent the inherent problems associated with Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar (SHTB systems, a new experimental technique is proposed for the high strain rate tensile testing of sheet specimens in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB systems. Existing solutions employ a multiple gage section hat-shaped specimen to transform the incoming pulse from compression into tension at the specimen level. However, multiple gage section specimens are not suitable for studying the post-necking behavior of materials as the required symmetry of the mechanical system is no longer guaranteed in the post-necking range. Here, we present a new load-inversion device that is used in conjunction with three Hopkinson pressure bars for the tensile loading of single gage section sheet specimen. The device is designed to transform the compression load applied at its boundaries into a tensile loading of the specimen. Two output bars are used to measure the total force applied on the specimen boundaries, while Digital Image Correlation (DIC is used to determine the strain histories on the specimen surface based on photographs acquired at a frequency of about 100 kHz. In addition to uniaxial tensile experiments on TRIP780 steel sheet specimens at strain rates ranging from 200/s to 1000/s, results are presented on the dynamic fracture testing of notched tensile specimens.

  7. The Effect of Aluminum Content and Processing on the Tensile Behavior of High Pressure Die Cast Mg Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deda, Erin M.

    Due to their high specific strength and good castability, magnesium alloys are desirable for use in weight reduction strategies in automotive applications. However, the mechanical properties of high pressure die cast (HPDC) magnesium can be highly variable and dependent on location in the casting. To better understand the relationship between microstructure and tensile properties, the influence of alloying and section thickness on the microstructural features and tensile properties of Mg-Al and Mg-Al-Mn alloys is quantified. This investigation provides experimental input to modeling activities for the development of an Integrated Computational Materials Engineering capability, to assess and quantify the impact of microstructure on the tensile behavior of HPDC Mg AM series (magnesium-aluminum-manganese) alloys. As a result of this work, it is found that with increasing aluminum content, the yield strength increases and the ductility decreases. Increasing the plate thickness results in a decrease in both the yield strength and ductility. HPDC components have varying microstructural features through the plate thickness, developing a "skin" and "core". The grain size, beta-Mg 17Al12 phase, and solute content are all quantified through the thickness of the plates. By quantifying microstructural variations, a physics-based model has been developed which is able to predict the effects of alloying and plate thickness on yield strength. The primary factors affecting strengthening are accounted for using a linear superposition model of solid solution, grain size, and dispersion hardening. This model takes into account through-thickness microstructure gradients that exist in HPDC components by using a composite model to incorporate the skin and core changes. The yield strength in these alloys is dominated by grain boundary strengthening and solute hardening effects. In order to isolate the effects of eutectic phases, shrinkage porosity and oxide films on strength and

  8. The effect of short polyethylene fiber with different weight percentages on diametral tensile strength of conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Ghaboos, Seyed-Ali; Jowkar, Zahra

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of polyethylene fiber on diametral tensile strength of conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements. 60 specimens in 6 groups (n=10) were prepared. In group 1 conventional glass ionomer (Fuji GC) and in group 2 resin modified glass ionomer (Fuji LC) were as control groups. In group 3 and 4 conventional glass ionomers mixed with short polyethylene fibers in proportion of 1 wt% and 3 wt%, respectively. In fifth and sixth groups, resin modified glass ionomer and short polyethylene fibers were mixed in 1 and 3% wt, respectively. Samples were prepared in a round brass mold (6.5×2.5 mm). After thermo-cycling, the diametral tensile strength of the specimens were tested and data were analyzed with ANOVA and post-hoc tests (pglass ionomer cements increased after mixing with polyethylene fiber (pglass ionomer (pfiber was shown to have a significant positive influence on diametral tensile strength of two types of glass ionomers. Key words:Conventional glass ionomer, diametral tensile strength, polyethylene fiber, resin modified glass ionomer.

  9. Evaluation of micro-tensile bond strength of caries-affected human dentine after three different caries removal techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin Karaarslan, E; Yildiz, E; Cebe, M A; Yegin, Z; Ozturk, B

    2012-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect that different techniques for removing dental caries had on the strength of the microtensile bond to caries-affected human dentine created by three bonding agents. Forty-five human molar teeth containing carious lesions were randomly divided into three groups according to the technique that would be used to remove the caries: a conventional bur, an Er:YAG laser or a chemo-mechanical Carisolv(®) gel (n=15). Next, each of the three removal-technique groups was divided into three subgroups according to the bonding agents that would be used: Clearfil(®) SE Bond, G-Bond(®), or Adper(®) Single Bond 2 (n=5). Three 1mm(2) stick-shaped microtensile specimens from each tooth were prepared with a slow-speed diamond saw sectioning machine fitted with a diamond-rim blade (n=15 specimens). For each removal technique one dentine sample was analysed using scanning electron microscopy. There were statistically significant differences in the resulting tensile strength of the bond among the techniques used to remove the caries and there were also statistically significant differences in the strength of the bond among the adhesive systems used. The etch-and-rinse adhesive system was the most affected by the technique used to remove the caries; of the three techniques tested, the chemo-mechanical removal technique worked best with the two-step self etch adhesive system. The bond strength values of the etch-and-rinse adhesive system were affected by the caries removal techniques used in the present study. However, in the one- and two-step self etch adhesive systems, bond strength values were not affected by the caries removal techniques applied. While a chemo-mechanical caries removal technique, similar to Carisolv(®), may be suggested with self etch adhesive systems, in caries removal techniques with laser, etch-and-rinse systems might be preferred. Caries removal methods may lead to differences in the characteristics of dentine surface. Dentine

  10. Long-term tensile bond strength of differently cemented nanocomposite CAD/CAM crowns on dentin abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Stich, Nicola; Eichberger, Marlis; Edelhoff, Daniel; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Keul, Christine

    2014-03-01

    To test the tensile bond strength of luted composite computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) crowns after use of different adhesive systems combined with different resin composite cements on dentin abutments. Human molars (n=200) were embedded in acrylic resin, prepared in a standardized manner and divided into 20 groups (n=10). The crowns were treated as follows: (i) Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), (ii) Ambarino P60 (AM), (iii) Visio.link (VL), (iv) VP connect (VP), and (v) non-treated as control groups (CG) and luted with Variolink II (VAR) or Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Tensile bond strength (TBS) was measured initially (24h water, 37°C) and after aging (5000 thermal cycles, 5/55°C). The failure types were evaluated after debonding. TBS values were analyzed using three-way and one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Scheffé-test, and two-sample Student's t-tests. Among VAR and after aging, CG presented significantly higher TBS (p=0.007) than groups treated with MH, AM and VP. Other groups showed no impact of pre-treatment. A decrease of TBS values after thermal aging was observed within CSA: CG (p=0.002), MH (p<0.001), VL (p<0.001), AM (p=0.002), VP (p<0.001) and within VAR: MH (p=0.002) and AM (p=0.014). Groups cemented with VAR showed significantly higher TBS then groups cemented with CSA: non-aged groups: CG (p<0.001), and after thermal aging: CG (p=0.003), MH (p<0.001), VL (p=0.005), VP (p=0.010). According to the study results nano-composite CAD/CAM crowns should be cemented with VAR. Pre-treatment is not necessary if the tested resin composite cements are used. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlative analysis of cement-dentin interfaces using an interfacial fracture toughness and micro-tensile bond strength approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Evelise M; De Munck, Jan; Pongprueksa, Pong; Van Ende, Annelies; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2016-12-01

    To determine the interfacial fracture toughness (iFT) and micro-tensile strength (μTBS) of composite cements bonded to dentin. Fifty feldspar ceramic blocks (Vita Mark II, Vita Zahnfabrik) were luted onto dentin using two self-adhesive (G-CEM LinkAce, GC; SpeedCEM, Ivoclar Vivadent), two self-etch (Multilink Primer & Multilink Automix, Ivoclar Vivadent; Scotchbond Universal & RelyX Ultimate, 3 M ESPE), and one etch-and-rinse (Excite F DSC & Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent) composite cement (n=10). After 48h in 100% relative humidity at 37°C, one half of each tooth was sectioned in sticks with a chevron notch at the cement-dentin interface and tested in a 4-point bending test setup (iFT). The remaining half of the tooth was sectioned in micro-specimens and stressed in tension until failure (μTBS). The mode of failure was determined with a stereomicroscope at 50× magnification. Data were submitted to Weibull analysis and Pearson's correlation (α=0.05). At 10% probability of failure, no significant differences could be found using iFT, while the etch-and-rinse composite cement Variolink II presented a significantly higher μTBS at this level. At 63.2% probability of failure, the self-adhesive composite cement G-CEM LinkAce revealed a significantly lower μTBS and iFT, and the self-etch cement Multilink Automix also revealed a significantly lower μTBS than all other cements. The correlation found between iFT and μTBS was moderate and not significant (r(2)=0.618, p=0.11). Overall, the etch-and-rinse and 'universal' self-etch composite cements performed best. The micro-tensile bond strength and interfacial fracture toughness tests did not correlate well. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. STRENGTH OF NANOMODIFIED HIGH-STRENGTH LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOZEMTСEV Alexandr Sergeevich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research aimed at development of nanomodified high-strength lightweight concrete for construction. The developed concretes are of low average density and high ultimate compressive strength. It is shown that to produce this type of concrete one need to use hollow glass and aluminosilicate microspheres. To increase the durability of adhesion between cement stone and fine filler the authors offer to use complex nanodimensinal modifier based on iron hydroxide sol and silica sol as a surface nanomodifier for hollow microspheres. It is hypothesized that the proposed modifier has complex effect on the activity of the cement hydration and, at the same time increases bond strength between filler and cement-mineral matrix. The compositions for energy-efficient nanomodified high-strength lightweight concrete which density is 1300…1500 kg/m³ and compressive strength is 40…65 MPa have been developed. The approaches to the design of high-strength lightweight concrete with density of less than 2000 kg/m³ are formulated. It is noted that the proposed concretes possess dense homogeneous structure and moderate mobility. Thus, they allow processing by vibration during production. The economic and practical implications for realization of high-strength lightweight concrete in industrial production have been justified.

  13. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Studies of Microtexture and Its Effect on Tensile and High-Cycle Fatigue Properties of Laser-Powder-Deposited INCONEL 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huan; Azer, Magdi; Deal, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    The current work studies the microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of INCONEL 718 alloy (IN718) produced by laser direct metal deposition. The grain microstructure exhibits an alternative distribution of banded fine and coarse grain zones as a result of the rastering scanning pattern. The effects of the anisotropic crystallographic texture on the tensile and high-cycle fatigue (HCF) properties at room temperature are investigated. Tensile test results showed that the tensile strength of laser-deposited IN718 after direct aging or solution heat treatment is equivalent to the minimum-forged IN718 properties. The transverse direction (relative to the laser scanning direction) produces >10 pct stiffer modulus of elasticity but 3 to 6 pct less tensile strength compared to the longitudinal direction due to the preferential alignment of grains having and directions parallel to the tensile loading direction. Laser-deposited IN718 with good metallurgical integrity showed equivalent HCF properties compared to the direct-aged wrought IN718, which can be attributed to the banded grain size variation and cyclic change of inclining grain orientations resulted from alternating rastering deposition path.

  14. Influence of the final temperature of investment healting on the tensile strength and Vickers hardness of CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro César Garcia Oliveira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to evaluate the influence of the temperature of investment healting on the tensile strength and Vickers hardness of CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy casting. Were obtained for the tensile strength test dumbbell rods that were invested in the Rematitan Plus investment and casting in the Discovery machine cast. Thirty specimens were obtained, fiftten to the CP Titanium and fifteen to the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, five samples to each an of the three temperatures of investment: 430ºC (control group, 480ºC and 530ºC. The tensile test was measured by means of a universal testing machine, MTS model 810, at a strain of 1.0 mm/min. After the tensile strenght test the specimens were secctioned, embedded and polished to hardness measurements, using a Vickers tester, Micromet 2100. The means values to tensile tests to the temperatures 430ºC, 480 and 530: CP Ti (486.1 - 501.16 - 498.14 -mean 495.30 MPa and Ti-6Al-4V alloy (961.33 - 958.26 - 1005.80 - mean 975.13 MPa while for the Vickers hardness the values were (198.06, 197.85, 202.58 - mean 199.50 and (352.95, 339.36, 344.76 - mean 345.69, respectively. The values were submitted to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Tukey,s Test that indicate differences significant only between the materials, but not between the temperature, for both the materias. It was conclued that increase of the temperature of investment its not chance the tensile strength and the Vickers hardness of the CP Titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

  15. Influence of polypropylene fibres on the tensile strength and thermal properties of various densities of foamed concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhatial, Ashfaque Ahmed; Inn, Goh Wan; Mohamad, Noridah; Johnson Alengaram, U.; Mo, Kim Hung; Abdullah, Redzuan

    2017-11-01

    As almost half of the world’s population now lives in the urban areas, the raise in temperature in these areas has necessitated the development of thermal insulating material. Conventional concrete absorbs solar radiation during the daytime while releasing it at night causing raise in temperature in urban areas. The thermal conductivity of 2200 kg/m3 density conventional concrete is 1.6 W/mK. Higher the thermal conductivity value, greater the heat flow through the material. To reduce this heat transfer, the construction industry has turned to lightweight foamed concrete. Foamed concrete, due to its air voids, gives excellent thermal properties and sound absorption apart from fire-resistance and self-leveling properties. But due to limited studies on different densities of foamed concrete, the thermal properties are not understood properly thus limiting its use as thermal insulating material. In this study, thermal conductivity is determined for 1400, 1600 and 1800 kg/m3 densities of foamed concrete. 0.8% of Polypropylene fibres (PP) is used to reinforce the foamed concrete and improve the mechanical properties. Based upon the results, it was found that addition of PP fibres enhances the tensile strength and slightly reduced the thermal conductivity for lower densities, while the reverse affect was noticed in 1800 kg/m3 density.

  16. Experimental study comparing the tensile strength of different surgical meshes following aponeurotic-muscle deformity synthesis on Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Acampora, Armando José; Kestering, Darlan de Medeiros; Soldi, Marly da Silveira; Rossi, Lucas Félix

    2007-01-01

    To assess the tensile strength of polypropylene and polypropylene associated with polyglactin meshes (Vypro II--Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA) in a situation of partial separation of abdominal muscle aponeurosis on rats. Thirty rats were used of the Wistar strain, which were randomized into two groups of 15 specimens each. In both groups an aponeurotic-muscle deformity was created on the abdominal wall measuring 3.0 x 1.0 cm, which was closed with polypropylene mesh (polypropylene group) or Vypro mesh (vypro group). After 28 days the rats underwent euthanasia and an area was removed from the abdominal wall with which a strip was made measuring 2.0 cm in length and 6.0 cm in width comprising the abdominal muscles with the implanted mesh. This sample was placed in a mechanical test machine in which a constant force was applied contrary to the tissue strips. Maximum force expressed in Newton was considered until full rupture of the sample occurred. The non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis admitting pabdominal wall. All animals in both groups developed epiplon adherence to the mesh. The average force was 48.08 N for the polypropylene group and 45.32 for the vypro group. In these experimental conditions it could be observed that there is no statistically significant difference in the rupture force of the polypropylene and Vypro meshes (p=0.54).

  17. Influence of ceramic particulate type on microstructure and tensile strength of aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP was applied to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. Aluminum alloy AA6082 was used as the matrix material. Various ceramic particles, such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC, were used as reinforcement particle. AA6082 AMCs were produced using a set of optimized process parameters. The microstructure was studied using optical microscopy, filed emission scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diagram. The results indicated that the type of ceramic particle did not considerably vary the microstructure and ultimate tensile strength (UTS. Each type of ceramic particle provided a homogeneous dispersion in the stir zone irrespective of the location and good interfacial bonding. Nevertheless, AA6082/TiC AMC exhibited superior hardness and wear resistance compared to other AMCs produced in this work under the same set of experimental conditions. The strengthening mechanisms and the variation in the properties are correlated to the observed microstructure. The details of fracture mode are further presented.

  18. Microstructure, Tensile Adhesion Strength and Thermal Shock Resistance of TBCs with Different Flame-Sprayed Bond Coat Materials Onto BMI Polyimide Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, H. R.; Salehi, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) composed of different bond coats (Zn, Al, Cu-8Al and Cu-6Sn) with mullite top coats were flame-sprayed and air-plasma-sprayed, respectively, onto bismaleimide matrix composites. These polyimide matrix composites are of interest to replace PMR-15, due to concerns about the toxicity of the MDA monomer from which PMR-15 is made. The results showed that pores and cracks appeared at the bond coat/substrate interface for the Al-bonded TBC because of its high thermal conductivity and diffusivity resulting in transferring of high heat flux and temperature to the polymeric substrate during top coat deposition. The other TBC systems due to the lower conductivity and diffusivity of bonding layers could decrease the adverse thermal effect on the polymer substrate during top coat deposition and exhibited adhesive bond coat/substrate interfaces. The tensile adhesion test showed that the adhesion strength of the coatings to the substrate is inversely proportional to the level of residual stress in the coatings. However, the adhesion strength of Al bond-coated sample decreased strongly after mullite top coat deposition due to thermal damage at the bond coat/substrate interface. TBC system with the Cu-6Sn bond coat exhibited the best thermal shock resistance, while Al-bonded TBC showed the lowest. It was inferred that thermal mismatch stresses and oxidation of the bond coats were the main factors causing failure in the thermal shock test.

  19. Ductility and performance assessment of high strength self compacting concrete (HSSCC) deep beams: An experimental investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadhassani, Mohammad, E-mail: mmh356@yahoo.com [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jumaat, Mohd Zamin; Jameel, Mohammed [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Badiee, Hamid [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arumugam, Arul M.S. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ductility decreased with increase in tensile reinforcement ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The width of the load point and the support point influences premature failure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Load-deflection relationship is linear till 85% of the ultimate load. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The absorbed energy increases with the increase of tensile reinforcement ratios. - Abstract: The behavior of deep beams is significantly different from that of normal beams. Because of their proportions, deep beams are likely to have strength controlled by shear. This paper discusses the results of eight simply supported high strength self compacting concrete (HSSCC) deep beams having variation in ratio of web reinforcement and tensile reinforcement. The deflection at two points along the beam length, web strains, tensile bars strains and the strain at concrete surface are recorded. The results show that the strain distribution at the section height of mid span is nonlinear. Ductility decreased with increase in tensile reinforcement ratio. The effect of width of load point and the support point is more important than the effect of tensile reinforcement ratio in preventing premature failure. Load-deflection graphs confirm linear relationship up to 85% of the ultimate load for HSSCC over-reinforcement web sections. The absorbed energy index increases with the increase in tensile reinforcement ratios.

  20. Restoration of tensile strength in bark samples of Ficus benjamina due to coagulation of latex during fast self-healing of fissures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg; Speck, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The functions of plant latex have been discussed for a long time. Today, many studies support a defence mechanism as being its main function. A role as a self-healing mechanism was never attributed to the coagulation of latex. In this study we quantified the contribution of the coagulation of Ficus benjamina (weeping fig) latex to a restoration of the mechanical properties of the bark after external lesions. Tensile tests of F. benjamina bark were conducted either immediately after injury or at various latency times after injury. A significant increase in the tensile strength of bark samples until 30 min after injury was found, and this effect could be attributed to the coagulation of plant latex alone. The tensile strength remains nearly constant until several hours or days after injury. Then, very probably due to other mechanisms such as cell growth and cell proliferation, the tensile strength begins to increase slightly again. The coagulation of latex seals lesions and serves as a quick and effective pre-step of subsequent, more effective, long-lasting self-healing mechanisms such as cell growth and proliferation. Thus, a fast self-healing effect can be included in the list of functions of plant latex.

  1. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morakot Piemjai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred.

  2. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred.

  3. Comparison of tensile strength of slip knots with that of 3-1-1 knots using 10-0 nylon sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutchman, Carla R; Leung, Linus H; Moineddin, Rahim; Chew, Hall F

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the tensile strength of slip knots with that of 3-1-1 knots using 10-0 nylon sutures. In vitro, destructive materials testing was used. By adhering to the American Standard for Testing and Materials standards for testing of suture materials, slip knots were compared with 3-1-1 knots using 10-0 nylon suture material. Tensile testing was performed on each knot type using the Instron Microtester (Model 5848 Norwood, MA). Scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze all sutures tested to failure. The main outcome measure was the maximum load (newtons) or ultimate tensile strength before which each knot failed by breakage or by unraveling. The mean force resulting in failure by breakage of the 3-1-1 knot and slip knot was 0.71 and 0.64 N, respectively (P = 0.048). The mean force resulting in failure by the unraveling of the 3-1-1 knot and slip knot was 0.48 and 0.37 N, respectively (P = 0.022). In 10-0 nylon sutures, the 3-1-1 knot has a statistically significant greater tensile strength than the slip knot has in conditions wherein they fail by either breakage or unraveling.

  4. Restoration of tensile strength in bark samples of Ficus benjamina due to coagulation of latex during fast self-healing of fissures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg; Speck, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The functions of plant latex have been discussed for a long time. Today, many studies support a defence mechanism as being its main function. A role as a self-healing mechanism was never attributed to the coagulation of latex. In this study we quantified the contribution of the coagulation of Ficus benjamina (weeping fig) latex to a restoration of the mechanical properties of the bark after external lesions. Methods Tensile tests of F. benjamina bark were conducted either immediately after injury or at various latency times after injury. Key Results A significant increase in the tensile strength of bark samples until 30 min after injury was found, and this effect could be attributed to the coagulation of plant latex alone. The tensile strength remains nearly constant until several hours or days after injury. Then, very probably due to other mechanisms such as cell growth and cell proliferation, the tensile strength begins to increase slightly again. Conclusions The coagulation of latex seals lesions and serves as a quick and effective pre-step of subsequent, more effective, long-lasting self-healing mechanisms such as cell growth and proliferation. Thus, a fast self-healing effect can be included in the list of functions of plant latex. PMID:22207613

  5. Use of micro-tomography for validation of method to identify interfacial shear strength from tensile tests of short regenerated cellulose fibre composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajlane, A.; Miettinen, A.; Madsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The interfacial shear strength of short regenerated cellulose fibre/polylactide composites was characterized by means of an industry-friendly adhesion test method. The interfacial shear strength was back-calculated from the experimental tensile stress-strain curves of composites by using a micro...... contents (5wt%, 10wt%, and 15wt% for untreated fibres, and 15wt% for treated fibres). The properties of fibres were measured by an automated single fibre tensile test method. Based on these results, the efficiency of the fibre treatment to improve fibre/matrix adhesion is evaluated, and the applicability...... of the method to measure the interfacial shear strength is discussed. The results are compared with data from previous work, and with other results from the literature....

  6. Work-hardening induced tensile ductility of bulk metallic glasses via high-pressure torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Soo-Hyun; Pi, Dong-Hai; Setyawan, Albertus Deny Heri; Kato, Hidemi; Janecek, Milos; Kim, Yong Chan; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2015-04-23

    The mechanical properties of engineering materials are key for ensuring safety and reliability. However, the plastic deformation of BMGs is confined to narrow regions in shear bands, which usually result in limited ductilities and catastrophic failures at low homologous temperatures. The quasi-brittle failure and lack of tensile ductility undercut the potential applications of BMGs. In this report, we present clear tensile ductility in a Zr-based BMG via a high-pressure torsion (HPT) process. Enhanced tensile ductility and work-hardening behavior after the HPT process were investigated, focusing on the microstructure, particularly the changed free volume, which affects deformation mechanisms (i.e., initiation, propagation, and obstruction of shear bands). Our results provide insights into the basic functions of hydrostatic pressure and shear strain in the microstructure and mechanical properties of HPT-processed BMGs.

  7. High-temperature tensile ductility in WC-Co cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.C. [Kyungpook National Univ., Taegusi (Korea, Republic of); Sakuma, T. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science

    1997-09-01

    High-temperature tensile deformation in WC-Co was investigated at temperatures between 1,150 C and 1,250 C. The flow stress is sensitive to temperature, strain rate, volume fraction of binder, and the addition of other carbides. The stress-strain rate relationship is divided into three regions at each temperature as in superplastic metals. A large tensile elongation over 100 pct was first obtained in WC-6Co and WC-13Co (wt pct) at temperatures of 1,200 C. Contrary to superplastic metals, the largest tensile elongation is not obtained in region II but on the border of regions I and II. The failure mode changes from necking in region I to sharp cracking in region II.

  8. Effect of surface conditioning with airborne-particle abrasion on the tensile strength of polymeric CAD/CAM crowns luted with self-adhesive and conventional resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Basler, Tobias; Ender, Andreas; Roos, Malgorzata; Ozcan, Mutlu; Hämmerle, Christoph

    2012-02-01

    Adhesively bonded, industrially polymerized resins have been suggested as definitive restorative materials. It is claimed that such resins present similar mechanical properties to glass ceramic. The purpose of this study was to assess the tensile strength of polymeric crowns after conditioning with 2 different protocols: luted with self-adhesive or with conventional resin cements to dental abutments. Human teeth were prepared for crowns and divided into 13 groups (N=312, n=24 per group). Polymeric crowns were CAD/CAM fabricated and divided into 3 groups depending on different surface conditioning methods: A) No treatment, B) airborne-particle abrasion with 50 μm alumina, and C) airborne-particle abrasion with 110 μm alumina. Thereafter, the crowns were luted on dentin abutments with the following cements: 1) RXU (RelyX Unicem, self-adhesive), 2) GCM (G-Cem, self-adhesive), 3) ACG (artCem GI, conventional), and 4) VAR (Variolink II, conventional). Glass ceramic crowns milled and cemented with dual-polymerized resin cement (Variolink II) served as the control group. The tensile strength was measured initially (n=12) and after aging by mechanical thermocycling loading (1 200 000 cycles, 49 N, 5°C to 50°C) (n=12). The tensile strength (MPa) of all crowns was determined by the pull-off test (Zwick/Roell Z010; Ulm, Germany, 1mm/min). Subsequently, the failure types were classified. Data were analyzed with 2-way and 1-way ANOVA followed by a post hoc Scheffé test and t test (α=.05). No adhesion of the tested cements was observed on unconditioned polymeric CAD/CAM crowns and those luted with VAR. Among the tested cements, GCM showed significantly higher values after airborne-particle abrasion with 110 μm (initial: 2.8 MPa; after aging: 1 MPa) than 50 μm alumina (initial: 1.4 MPa; after aging: 0 MPa). No significant effect was found between 50 and 110 μm particle size alumina in combination with the other 2 cements. After aging, the tensile strength of the crowns

  9. Effect of thermal ageing on mechanical properties of a high-strength ODS alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Jang, Chang Heui [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Kyu [Nuclear Materials DivisionKorea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A new high-strength ODS alloy, ARROS, was recently developed for the application as the cladding material of a Sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). To assess the long-term integrity under thermal ageing, ARROS was thermally aged in air at 650°C for 1000 h. The degree of thermal ageing was assessed by mechanical tests such as uniaxial tensile, hardness, and small punch tests at from room temperature to 650°C. Tensile strength was slightly decreased but elongation, hardness, and small punch energy were hardly changed at all test temperatures for the specimen aged at 650°C for 1000 h. However, the variation in mechanical properties such as hardness and small punch energy increased after thermal ageing. Using the test results, the correlation between tensile strength and maximum small punch load was established.

  10. ABRASION RESISTANCE ESTIMATION OF HIGH STRENGTH CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şemsi YAZICI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study gives the results of a laboratory investigation undertaken to determine the relationship between mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strengths and abrasion resistance of 65-85 MPa high strength concretes incorporating silica fume, fly ash and silica fume-fly ash mixtures as supplementary cementing materials. A series of six different concrete mixtures including a control high strength concrete mixture (C1, and five high strength concrete mixtures (C2, C3, C4, C5, C6 incorporating supplementary cementing materials, were manufactured. The compressive strength, flexural strength, and abrasion resistance were determined for each mixture at 28-days. Mathematical expressions were suggested to estimate the abrasion resistance of concrete regarding their compressive strength and flexural strength.

  11. To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shori, Deepa; Pandey, Swapnil; Kubde, Rajesh; Rathod, Yogesh; Atara, Rahul; Rathi, Shravan

    2013-10-01

    Fiber posts are widely used for restoration of mutilated teeth that lack adequate coronal tooth structure to retain a core for definitive restoration, bond between the fiber post and composite material depends upon the chemical reaction between the post surface and the resin material used for building up the core. In attempt to maximize the resin bonding with fiber post, different post surface conditioning is advocated. Therefore the purpose of the study is to examine the interfacial strength between fiber post and composite, as core build-up material after different surface treatments of fiber posts. Twenty fiber posts were split into four groups off five each according to different surface treatments viz. Group I-(Negative Control), Group II-Silanization (Positive control), Group III-(37% Phosphoric Acid & Silanization) ,Group IV- (10% Hydrogen Peroxide and Silanization). With the preformed plastic mould, a core of dual cure composite resin around the fiber post having the uniform thickness was created. Tensile bond strength of each specimen was measured under Universal Testing Machine (UTM) at the cross head speed of 3mm/min. The results achieved with 10% Hydrogen peroxide had a marked effect on micro tensile bond strength values between the tested materials. Immense enhancement in the silanization efficiency of quartz fiber phase was observed with different surface chemical treatment of the resin phase of fiber posts with the marked increase in the micro-tensile bond strength between fiber post and composite core. Shori D, Pandey S, Kubde R, Rathod Y, Atara R, Rathi S. To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):27-32.

  12. Is There a Correlation Between Tensile Strength and Retrievability of Cemented Implant-Retained Crowns Using Artificial Aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Christian; Ali, Shurouk; El Bahra, Shadi; Harder, Sönke; Vollrath, Oliver; Kern, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this in-vitro study was to evaluate whether tensile strength and retrievability of cemented implant-retained crowns correlate when using artificial aging. A total of 128 crowns were fabricated from a cobalt-chromium alloy for 128 tapered titanium abutments (6 degrees taper, 4.3 mm diameter, 4 mm length, Camlog). The crowns were cemented with glass-ionomer (Ketac Cem, 3M) or resin cements (Multilink Implant, Telio CS Cem [Ivoclar Vivadent], Retrieve [Parkell]). Multilink Implant was used without priming. The experimental groups were subjected to either 37,500 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, 1,200,000 chewing cycles, or a combination of both. Control groups were stored for 10 days in deionized water. The crowns were removed with a universal testing machine or a clinically used removal device (Coronaflex, KaVo). Data were statistically analyzed using nonparametrical tests. Retention values were recorded between 31 N and 362 N. Telio CS Cem showed the lowest retention values, followed by Retrieve, Ketac Cem, and Multilink Implant (P≤.0001). The number of removal attempts with the Coronaflex were not significantly different between the cements (P>.05). Thermal cycling and chewing simulation significantly influenced the retrieval of Retrieve Telio CS Cem, and Ketac Cem specimens (P≤.05). Only for Multilink Implant and Telio CS Cem correlations between removal with the universal testing machine and the Coronaflex could be revealed (P≤.0001). Ketac Cem and Multilink Implant (without silane) can be used for a semipermanent cementation. Retrieve and Telio CS Cem are recommendable for a temporary cementation.

  13. Pre-heated dual-cured resin cements: analysis of the degree of conversion and ultimate tensile strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Álvares França

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the degree of conversion (DC and ultimate tensile strength (UTS of dual-cured resin cements heated to 50º C prior to and during polymerization. Disc- and hourglass-shaped specimens of Rely X ARC (RX and Variolink II (VII were obtained using addition silicon molds. The products were manipulated at 25º C or 50º C and were subjected to 3 curing conditions: light-activation through a glass slide or through a pre-cured 2-mm thick resin composite disc, or they were allowed to self-cure (SC. All specimens were dark-stored dry for 15 days. For DC analysis, the resin cements were placed into the mold located on the center of a horizontal diamond on the attenuated total reflectance element in the optical bench of a Fourier Transformed Infrared spectrometer. Infrared spectra (n = 6 were collected between 1680 and 1500 cm-1, and DC was calculated by standard methods using changes in ratios of aliphatic-to-aromatic C=C absorption peaks from uncured and cured states. For UTS test, specimens (n = 10 were tested in tension in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until failure. DC and UTS data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test (α= 5%. Both products showed higher DC at 50º C than at 25º C in all curing conditions. No significant difference in UTS was noted between most light-activated groups at 25º C and those at 50º C. VII SC groups showed higher UTS at 50º C than at 25º C (p < 0.05. Increased temperature led to higher DC, but its effects on resin cement UTS depended on the curing condition.

  14. Spinnability Investigation of High Strength Steel in Draw-spinning and Flow-spinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L.; Xiao, H.; Xu, D. K.

    2017-09-01

    High strength steels are difficult to process in spinning due to their high yield and tensile strength, poor ductility and large springback. In this paper, formability of dual phase steel has been investigated on the basis of spinnability evaluation in draw-spinning and flow-spinning processes. The influences of key process parameters such as feed ratio and wheel fillet radius on forming limit coefficient in draw-spinning and maximum thinning ratio in flow-spinning are studied in detail.

  15. Prediction of Torsional Strength for Very High Early Strength Geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woraphot PRACHASAREE

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Very early high strength geopolymers are gaining acceptance as alternative repair materials for highways and other infrastructure. In this study, a very rapid geopolymer binder based on Metakaolin (MK and Parawood ash (PWA, developed by the authors, was experimentally tested and a prediction model for its torsional strength is proposed. The geopolymer samples were subjected to uniaxial compression, flexural beam, and torsion tests. The modulus of rupture and torsional strength in terms of compression strength were found to be well approximated by 0.7(f’c1/2 and 1/7(x2y (f’c1/2, respectively. Also an interaction relation to describe combined bending and torsion was developed in this study. In addition, the effects of aspect ratio (y/x were studied on both torsional strength and combined bending and torsion. It was found that an aspect ratio of y/x = 3 significantly reduced the torsional resistance, to about 50 % of the torsional strength of a square section.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.4.17280

  16. Effects of light intensity and curing time of the newest LED Curing units on the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, D.; Herda, E.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of light intensity and curing time of the latest LED curing units on the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins. Sixty-three specimens from three brands (Polofil Supra, Filtek Z250, and Solare X) were divided into two test groups and one control group. The test groups were polymerized with a Flashmax P3 LED curing unit for one or three seconds. The control group was polymerized with a Ledmax 450 curing unit with the curing time based on the resin manufacturer’s instructions. A higher light intensity and shorter curing time did not influence the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins.

  17. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strengths of total-etch adhesives and self-etch adhesives with single and multiple consecutive applications: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Mandava, Deepthi; P, Ajitha; Narayanan, L Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluates the effect of single and multiple consecutive applications of adhesives on the tensile bond strength. The currently available adhesives follow either the total-etch or the self-etch concept. However, in both techniques the uniformity and thickness of the adhesive layer plays a significant role in the development of a good bond. Materials and Methods: Sixty composite-dentin bonded specimens were prepared using a total-etch adhesive (Gluma) and another 60 using a self-...

  18. The effect of different pretreatment methods of PMMA-based crowns on the long-term tensile bond strength to dentin abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keul, Christine; Kohen, Daliah; Eichberger, Marlis; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to test the effect of different pretreatments on tensile bond strength (TBS) of adhesively bonded CAD/CAM-generated polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) crowns to dentin. Two hundred human molars were prepared and divided into 20 groups (n = 10/group). PMMA crowns were pretreated thusly: Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), Visio.link (VL), Ambarino P60 (AM), VP connect (VP), and nontreated as control groups (CG). Two resin cements were used for cementation of crowns: Clearfil SA Cement (CSA) and Variolink II (VAR). TBS was measured initially (24 h water storage, 37 °C) and after aging (5,000 thermal cycles, 5/55 °C). TBS was analyzed using one-way ANOVA with Scheffé post hoc, unpaired Student t, Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis H, and chi-squared tests. Within CSA, pretreatment with MH and VL showed higher initial TBS compared with AM-treated groups. All other groups showed no statistical differences. For MH, VL, AM, and VP in combination with CSA, a negative impact of aging was observed (p < 0.001), whereas in all VAR groups, no impact was measured. Pretreatment with MH (p = 0.001) and VP (p = 0.008) presented higher initial TBS for CSA than for VAR. After aging, MH (p = 0.025) and VL (p = 0.034) cemented with VAR showed higher results than CSA. All tested groups showed very low TBS values. Pretreatments with MH, VL, and VP have minimally improved the tensile strength after aging. Although the tensile strength results were low, crowns adhesively cemented with pretreatments with MH, VL, and VP showed, after aging, a higher tensile strength than nontreated groups.

  19. Influence of Immersion Conditions on The Tensile Strength of Recycled Kevlar®/Polyester/Low-Melting-Point Polyester Nonwoven Geotextiles through Applying Statistical Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Jing-Chzi Hsieh; Jia-Hsun Li; Ching-Wen Lou; Chien-Teng Hsieh; Wen-Hao Hsing; Yi-Jun Pan; Jia-Horng Lin

    2016-01-01

    The recycled Kevlar®/polyester/low-melting-point polyester (recycled Kevlar®/PET/LPET) nonwoven geotextiles are immersed in neutral, strong acid, and strong alkali solutions, respectively, at different temperatures for four months. Their tensile strength is then tested according to various immersion periods at various temperatures, in order to determine their durability to chemicals. For the purpose of analyzing the possible factors that influence mechanical properties of geotextiles under di...

  20. Structural and High-Temperature Tensile Properties of Special Pitch-Coke Graphites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlensky, W. V.; Martens, H. E.

    1961-01-01

    The room-temperature structural properties and the tensile properties up to 5000 F (275O C) were determined for ten grades of specially prepared petroleum-coke coal-tar-pitch graphites which were graphitized at 5430 F (3000 C). One impregnation with coal-tar pitch increased the bulk density from 1.41 to 1.57 g/cm3 and the maximum strength at 4500 F (2500 C) from 4000 to 5700 psi. None of the processing parameters studied had a marked effect on the closed porosity or the X-ray structure or the per cent graphitization. The coarse-particle filler resulted in the lowest coefficient of thermal expansion and the fine-particle filler in the highest coefficient. A marked improvement in uniformity of tensile strength was observed. A standard-deviation analysis gave a one-sigma value of approximately 150 psi for one of these special grades and values of 340-420 psi for three commercial grades.

  1. Influence of chemical irrigants on the tensile bond strength of an adhesive system used to cement glass fiber posts to root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrine, Rina Andréa; De Martin, Alexandre Sigrist; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Pelegrine, André Antonio; da Silveira Bueno, Carlos Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of endodontic irrigants on the tensile bond strength of an adhesive system used to cement glass fiber posts to dentin. Fifty bovine roots were divided into 5 groups according to the solution used during instrumentation: G1, 0.9% NaCl (control); G2, 1.0% NaOCl; G3, 2.5% NaOCl; G4, 5.25% NaOCl; G5, 2% chlorhexidine gel + 0.9% NaCl. The root canals were obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer, and the glass fiber posts were cemented with Clearfil SE Bond/RelyX ARC. The specimens were submitted to tensile strength testing and the results were analyzed by analysis of variance. There were no statistically significant differences regarding the irrigant solution factor (P > .70). It was concluded that the different irrigant solutions did not affect the tensile bond strength of the fixation system used to cement the intraradicular glass fiber posts to dentin. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. In Vitro Comparison of Compressive and Tensile Strengths of Acrylic Resins Reinforced by Silver Nanoparticles at 2% and 0.2% Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA, is widely used in prosthodontics for fabrication of removable prostheses. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of adding silver nanoparticles (AgNPs to PMMA at 2% and 0.2% concentrations on compressive and tensile strengths of PMMA. Materials and methods. The silver nanoparticles were mixed with heat-cured acrylic resin in an amalgamator in two groups at 0.2 and 2 wt% of AgNPs. Eighteen 2×20×200-mm samples were prepared for tensile strength test, 12 samples containing silver nanoparticle and 6 samples for the control group. Another 18 cylindrical 25×38-mm samples were prepared for compressive strength test. Scanning electron microscopy was used to verify homogeneous distribution of particles. The powder was manually mixed with a resin monomer and then the mixture was properly blended. Before curing, the paste was packed into steel molds. After curing, the specimens were removed from the molds. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis, followed by multiple comparison test (Scheffé’s test. Results. This study showed that the mean compressive strength of PMMA reinforced with AgNPs was significantly higher than that of the unmodified PMMA (P<0.05. It was not statistically different between the two groups reinforced with AgNPs. The tensile strength was not significantly different between the 0.2% group and unmodified PMMA and it decreased significantly after incorporation of 2% AgNPs (P<0.05. Conclusion. Based on the results and the desirable effect of nanoparticles of silver on improvement of compressive strength of PMMA, use of this material with proper concentration in the palatal area of maxillary acrylic resin dentures is recommended.

  3. Analysis of the weld strength of the High Density Polyethylene (HDPE)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analysis was carried out to determine the strength of welded joints in High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) dam liners. Samples were collected of welded joints and subjected to tensile tests and creep test. It was observed that the welded joints from field welded samples were much weaker and had a very low straining ...

  4. High strength oil palm shell concrete beams reinforced with steel fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Poh-Yap, S.; Johnson-Alengaram, U.; Hung-Mo, K.; Zamin-Jumaat, M.

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of lightweight oil palm shell to produce high strength lightweight sustainable material has led many researchers towards its commercialization as structural concrete. However, the low tensile strength of Oil Palm Shell Concrete (OPSC) has hindered its development. This study aims to enhance the mechanical properties and flexural behaviours of OPSC by the addition of steel fibres of up to 3% by volume, to produce oil palm shell fibre-reinforced concrete (OPSFRC). The experiment...

  5. Effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser on tensile bond strength and caries resistance of human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, X; Zhang, L; Liu, R; Deng, M; Wang, Y; Liu, L; Nie, X

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin to human enamel and caries resistance of human enamel. A total of 201 human premolars were used in this in vitro study. A flat enamel surface greater than 4 × 4 mm in area was prepared on each specimen using a low-speed cutting machine under a water coolant. Twenty-one specimens were divided into seven groups for morphology observations with no treatment, 35% phosphoric acid etching (30 seconds), and laser irradiation (30 seconds) of pulsed Nd:YAG laser with five different laser-parameter combinations. Another 100 specimens were used for TBS testing. They were embedded in self-cured acrylic resin and randomly divided into 10 groups. After enamel surface pretreatments according to the group design, resin was applied. The TBS values were tested using a universal testing machine. The other 80 specimens were randomly divided into eight groups for acid resistance evaluation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) results showed that the enamel surfaces treated with 1.5 W/20 Hz and 2.0 W/20 Hz showed more etching-like appearance than those with other laser-parameter combinations. The laser-parameter combinations of 1.5 W/15 Hz and 1.5 W/20 Hz were found to be efficient for the TBS test. The mean TBS value of 14.45 ± 1.67 MPa in the laser irradiated group was significantly higher than that in the untreated group (3.48 ± 0.35 MPa) but lower than that in the 35% phosphoric acid group (21.50 ± 3.02 MPa). The highest mean TBS value of 26.64 ± 5.22 MPa was identified in the combination group (laser irradiation and then acid etching). Acid resistance evaluation showed that the pulsed Nd:YAG laser was efficient in preventing enamel demineralization. The SEM results of the fractured enamel surfaces, resin/enamel interfaces, and demineralization depths were consistent with those of the TBS test and the acid resistance evaluation. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser as an enamel surface

  6. INFLUENCE OF SILANE HEAT TREATMENT ON THE TENSILE BOND STRENGTH BETWEEN EX-3 SYNTHETIC VENEERING PORCELAIN AND COMPOSITE RESIN USING FIVE DIFFERENT ACTIVATION TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spartak Yanakiev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to assess the effect of five different silane activation temperatures and eight activation methods on the tensile bond strength between one veneering porcelain and one composite resin material. Material and methods: A total of 81 ceramic rods were made of EX-3 veneering ceramic (Kuraray Noritake Dental, Japan. Sintered ceramic bars were grinded with diamond disks to size 10x2x2mm ± 0,05mm. The front part of each bar was polished. After ultrasonic cleaning in distilled water, the specimens were divided into nine groups. Silane was activated with air at room temperature, 38º С, 50º С, 100º С, 120º С using a custom made blow drier. In a silicone mold, a composite resin Z250 (3М ESPE, St. Paul, USA was condensed toward the bond ceramic surface. A total of 81 specimens approximately 2,0 cm long were prepared for tensile bond testing. One way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni and Games-Howell tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The lowest tensile bond strength was observed in the control group (3,51MPa. Group 2 yielded the highest bond strength among all groups (19,54MPa. Silane heat treatment enhanced the bond strength for all treatment methods. Within the polished specimens, the highest bond strength was yielded with warm air at 120ºС (11,31MPa. Conclusion: The most effective method for bonding Z250 composite resin to EX-3 veneering ceramic includes HF etching, silane, and adhesive resin. The most effective heat treatment method for bonding is hot air at 120ºС.

  7. Resistência tênsil e friabilidade de um Latossolo sob diferentes sistemas de uso Tensile strength and friability of an Oxisol under different land use systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Antonio Tormena

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Diferentes propriedades físicas têm sido utilizadas para avaliar a qualidade física do solo. Nesse contexto, a resistência tênsil e a friabilidade são indicadores da qualidade estrutural e física de um solo. O objetivo deste estudo foi quantificar a resistência tênsil e a friabilidade de um Latossolo Vermelho distrófico em diferentes sistemas de uso: floresta nativa, pousio e cultivado. A amostragem de solo foi realizada em 2006, na Fazenda Experimental da Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Estado do Paraná, em três áreas contíguas sob mata nativa, pousio e cultivo de culturas anuais. A amostragem de solo consistiu da coleta de 10 blocos de solo (15 x 20 x 10 cm na profundidade de 0-15 cm. Em cada sistema de uso do solo, determinou-se a resistência tênsil de 400 agregados com diâmetro entre 12,5 e 19,0 mm. Também foram feitas determinações do teor de carbono orgânico do solo (CO e da densidade deste. A friabilidade foi estimada pelo coeficiente de variação da resistência tênsil. Para o solo estudado, tendo a mesma classe taxonômica e textural, mas sob diferentes sistemas de uso, a resistência tênsil de agregados aumentou proporcionalmente com a redução dos teores de CO. O solo foi classificado como friável independentemente do sistema de uso, e a friabilidade foi maior no solo sob mata, comparado com pousio e cultivado. A resistência tênsil de agregados, a friabilidade, o teor de CO e a densidade do solo caracterizaram a redução da qualidade do solo proporcionalmente à intensidade da sua utilização. A resistência tênsil dos agregados e a friabilidade do solo retrataram os efeitos dos sistemas de uso nas condições físicas e estruturais do solo.Different physical properties are used to evaluate the soil physical quality. In this context, soil tensile strength and friability are indicators of the soil physical and structural quality. The objective of this study was to quantify the tensile strength and

  8. Supercritical CO2 foaming of radiation crosslinked polypropylene/high-density polyethylene blend: Cell structure and tensile property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenguang; Xing, Zhe; Zhang, Mingxing; Zhao, Quan; Wang, Mouhua; Wu, Guozhong

    2017-12-01

    A blend of isotactic polypropylene (PP) with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in different PP/HDPE ratios was irradiated by γ-ray to induce cross-linking and then foamed using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a blowing agent. Radiation effect on the melting point and crystallinity were analyzed in detail. The average cell diameter and cell density were compared for PP/HDPE foams prepared under different conditions. The optimum absorbed dose for the scCO2 foaming of PP/HDPE in terms of foaming ability and cell structure was 20 kGy. Tensile measurements showed that the elongation at break and tensile strength at break of the crosslinked PP/HDPE foams were higher than the non-crosslinked ones. Of particular interest was the increase in the foaming temperature window from 4 ℃ for pristine PP to 8-12 ℃ for the radiation crosslinked PP/HDPE blends. This implies much easier handling of scCO2 foaming of crosslinked PP with the addition of HDPE.

  9. Dynamic tensile behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy at ultra-high strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Changjian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The samples having {0001} parallel to extruding direction (ED present a typical true stress–true strain curve with concave-down shape under tension at low strain rate. Ultra-rapid tensile tests were conducted at room temperature on a textured AZ31B magnesium alloy. The dynamic tensile behavior was investigated. The results show that at ultra-high strain rates of 1.93 × 102 s−1 and 1.70 × 103 s−1, the alloy behaves with a linear stress–strain response in most strain range and exhibits a brittle fracture. In this case, {10-12}  extension twinning is basic deformation mode. The brittleness is due to the macroscopic viscosity at ultra-high strain rate, for which the external critical shear stress rapidly gets high to result in a cleavage fracture before large amounts of dislocations are activated. Because {10-12} tension twinning, {10-11} compressive twinning, basal slip, prismatic slip and pyramidal slip have different critical shear stresses (CRSS, their contributions to the degree of deformation are very differential. In addition, Schmid factor plays an important role in the activity of various deformation modes and it is the key factor for the samples with different strain rates exhibit various mechanical behavior under dynamic tensile loading.

  10. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  11. Hardness and Tensile Strength of Multifilamentary Metal-matrix Composite Superconductors for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Leroy, D; Oberli, L; Rehmer, B

    2007-01-01

    Conventional indentation hardness measurements to obtain load independent Vickers hardness values for the different phases in multifilamentary superconducting (SC) wires are described. The concept of composite hardness is validated for a binary metal-matrix metal-filament Nb-Ti/Cu composite wire. The tensile materials properties of the individual wire components are estimated from their indentation hardness. The potential and limitations of this approach are critically discussed, based on a comparison with tensile test results obtained for wires and extracted Nb-Ti filaments.

  12. Tensile behaviour of polyethylene and poly(p-xylylene) fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werff, Harm

    1991-01-01

    This thesis deals with the tensile behaviour of fibres prepared from high molecular weight polymers.The tensile strength of a polymeric fibre is in general much lower than the corresponding theoretical value. In case of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), fibres can be prepared by

  13. Investigation on Tensile Strength Ratio (TSR Specimen to Predict Moisture Sensitivity of Asphalt Pavements Mixture and Using Polymer to Reduce Moisture Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Aziz Hameed Al-Shaybani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Moisture damage of asphalt concrete is defined as losing the strength and Permanence caused by the active presence of moisture.The most common technique to reduce moisture damage is using modifiers with the asphalt binder or the aggregate.The goal of this study was to explore the effect of various modifiers of polymer on the moisture susceptibility mixture of asphaltic concrete pavement. Modifiers included in this research selected two kinds of polymers Crumb Rubber No 50 (CR No 50 and Methyl Methacrylates (MMA(which are available in the local markets in Iraq and have been used in three percentages for each type. These percentages are (5, 10 and 15% for (CR No 50 and (2.5, 5 and 7.5(% for (MMA.Each type of these polymers is blended with asphalt by wet process at constant blending times for a suitable range of temperatures. The experimental works showed that all polymers modified mixtures have indirect tensile strength higher than control asphalt mixtures, its about (2-15 %, dependent on different type of polymer and polymer concentration under predicted suitable blending time.Test results of indirect tensile strength indicated betterment in modifying the proprieties of mixture, the increased resistance mixture of asphalt concrete pavement versus moisture damage, and reduced the effect of water on asphalt concrete properties. The final result is the addition of (10% CR No 50 and (5% MMA to asphalt mixtures showed an improved mixture of asphalt concrete properties and produced strong mixtures for road construction.One model is predicted for tensile strength ratio [TSR]to estimate the effects of polymer modification on moisture susceptibility mixture of asphalt concrete.

  14. High-strength, low-alloy steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, M S

    1980-05-23

    High-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steels have nearly the same composition as plain carbon steels. However, they are up to twice as strong and their greater load-bearing capacity allows engineering use in lighter sections. Their high strength is derived from a combination of grain refinement; precipitation strengthening due to minor additions of vanadium, niobium, or titanium; and modifications of manufacturing processes, such as controlled rolling and controlled cooling of otherwise essentially plain carbon steel. HSLA steels are less formable than lower strength steels, but dualphase steels, which evolved from HSLA steels, have ferrite-martensite microstructures and better formability than HSLA steels of similar strength. This improved formability has substantially increased the utilization potential of high-strength steels in the manufacture of complex components. This article reviews the development of HSLA and dual-phase steels and discusses the effects of variations in microstructure and chemistry on their mechanical properties.

  15. MECHANICAL STRENGTH OF HIGHLY POROUS CERAMICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBORN, IC; SANTEN, A; HOEKSTRA, HD; DEHOSSON, JTM; Born, I.C. van den

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical strength of highly porous ceramics in terms of the Weibull and Duxbury-Leath distributions. More than 1000 side-crushing strength tests on silica-catalyst carriers of various particle sizes have been performed in series. Within a series, preparation conditions

  16. Strength of VGCF/Al Composites for High Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Kohei; Sasaki, Katsuhiko; Imanishi, Terumitsu; Katagiri, Kazuaki; Kakitsuji, Atsushi; Shimizu, Akiyuki

    In this paper, the evaluation of the strength of the VGCF/Aluminum composites which have high thermal conductivity is reported. VGCF (Vapor Growth Carbon Fiber) is a kind of the Carbon nanotube (CNT) which has very high thermal conductivity as well as CNT. The composites are made by spark plasma sintering. The stress-strain curves of the composites are obtained by the tensile tests and show that the composites have brittle behavior. The brittleness of the composites increases with increase in the volume fraction of VGCF. A numerical simulation based on the micromechanics is conducted to estimate nonlinear behavior in the elastic deformation and plastic deformation of the stress-strain relations of the composites. The theories of Eshelby, Mori-Tanaka, Weibull, and Ramberg-Osgood are employed for the numerical simulation. The simulations give some information of the microstructural change in the composite related to the volume fraction of VGCF.

  17. Fabrication of High-Strength Gray Cast Iron Using Permanent Magnet Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Seung-Yeon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have developed the manufacturing technology for high strength gray cast irons by using the spent permanent magnet scraps. The cast specimen inoculated by using a spent magnet scraps showed the excellent tensile strength up to 306MPa. This tensile strength value is 50MPa higher than that of the specimen cast without inoculation, and is similar to that of the specimen inoculated by using the expensive misch-metal. These superior mechanical properties are attributed to complex sulfides created during solidification that promote the formation and growth of Type-A graphite. It is therefore concluded that spent magnets scrap can provide an efficient and cost-effective inoculation agent for the fabrication of high-performance gray cast iron.

  18. Effects of drawing strain and post-annealing conditions on microstructural evolution and tensile properties of medium- and high-carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Hyuk; Lee, Taekyung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Chong Soo

    2017-11-01

    Variation in the microstructure and tensile properties with the warm drawing strain and subsequent annealing of 0.45 wt% C (45C) medium-carbon steel and 0.82 wt% C (82C) high-carbon steel was investigated. The morphology and size of ferrite and pearlite changed considerably with applied strain during drawing and with annealing temperature and time, which made the tensile properties of the drawn steels vary considerably. With increasing drawing strain to 2.5, the yield strength increased significantly from 393 to 1332 MPa for the 45C steel and from 673 to 1876 MPa for the 82C steel; this was attributed mainly to the strain hardening caused by severely deformed ferrite and/or enhanced particle hardening caused by cementite segmentation. During annealing of heavily drawn steels, ferrite grain growth and coarsening of broken cementite particles occurred simultaneously, which caused effective recovery of the ductility of severely drawn steels. These results demonstrate that the tensile strength and elongation of medium- and high-carbon steel wires can be tuned considerably by controlling the extents of drawing and annealing, thereby widening their applicability and facilitating their manufacture to match their mechanical properties to each application.

  19. Effects of surface treatments and storage times on the tensile bond strength of adhesive cements to noble and base metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmann, Paulo Afonso; Santos, Jose Fortunato Ferreira; May, Liliana Gressler; Pereira, Joao Eduardo da Silva; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2008-01-01

    This work evaluated two resin cements and a glass-ionomer cement and their bond strength to gold-palladium (Au-Pd), silver-palladium (Ag-Pd), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloys, utilizing three surface treatments over a period of six months. Eight hundred ten pieces were cast (in a button shape flat surfaces) in one of three alloys. Each alloy group was assigned to three other groups, based on the surface treatment utilized. Specimens were fabricated by bonding similar buttons in using one of three adhesive cements. The 405 pairs were thermocycled and stored in saline solution (0.9% NaCl) at 37 degrees C. The tensile bond strengths were measured in a universal testing machine after storage times of 2, 90, or 180 days. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained with the base metal alloy (10.9 +/- 8.6 MPa). In terms of surface treatment, oxidation resulted in the highest mean bond strength (13.7 +/- 7.3 MPa), followed by sandblasting (10.3 +/- 5.5 MPa) and polishing (3.0 +/- 6.4 MPa). Panavia Ex (13.2 +/- 9.3 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strengths than the other two cements, although the storage time reduced all bond strengths significantly.

  20. Numerical modeling of the tensile strength of a biological granular aggregate: Effect of the particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Karsta; Frank, Xavier; Lullien-Pellerin, Valérie; George, Matthieu; Radjai, Farhang; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2017-06-01

    Wheat grains can be considered as a natural cemented granular material. They are milled under high forces to produce food products such as flour. The major part of the grain is the so-called starchy endosperm. It contains stiff starch granules, which show a multi-modal size distribution, and a softer protein matrix that surrounds the granules. Experimental milling studies and numerical simulations are going hand in hand to better understand the fragmentation behavior of this biological material and to improve milling performance. We present a numerical study of the effect of granule size distribution on the strength of such a cemented granular material. Samples of bi-modal starch granule size distribution were created and submitted to uniaxial tension, using a peridynamics method. We show that, when compared to the effects of starch-protein interface adhesion and voids, the granule size distribution has a limited effect on the samples' yield stress.

  1. Limits on rock strength under high confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Carl E.; Schulson, Erland M.

    2007-06-01

    Understanding of deep earthquake source mechanisms requires knowledge of failure processes active under high confinement. Under low confinement the compressive strength of rock is well known to be limited by frictional sliding along stress-concentrating flaws. Under higher confinement strength is usually assumed limited by power-law creep associated with the movement of dislocations. In a review of existing experimental data, we find that when the confinement is high enough to suppress frictional sliding, rock strength increases as a power-law function only up to a critical normalized strain rate. Within the regime where frictional sliding is suppressed and the normalized strain rate is below the critical rate, both globally distributed ductile flow and localized brittle-like failure are observed. When frictional sliding is suppressed and the normalized strain rate is above the critical rate, failure is always localized in a brittle-like manner at a stress that is independent of the degree of confinement. Within the high-confinement, high-strain rate regime, the similarity in normalized failure strengths across a variety of rock types and minerals precludes both transformational faulting and dehydration embrittlement as strength-limiting mechanisms. The magnitude of the normalized failure strength corresponding to the transition to the high-confinement, high-strain rate regime and the observed weak dependence of failure strength on strain rate within this regime are consistent with a localized Peierls-type strength-limiting mechanism. At the highest strain rates the normalized strengths approach the theoretical limit for crystalline materials. Near-theoretical strengths have previously been observed only in nano- and micro-scale regions of materials that are effectively defect-free. Results are summarized in a new deformation mechanism map revealing that when confinement and strain rate are sufficient, strengths approaching the theoretical limit can be achieved in

  2. Application of high strength MnMoNi steel to pressure vessels for nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Kurihara, I.; Sasaki, T.; Koyama, Y.; Tanaka, Y. [The Japan Steel Works, Ltd. (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Recent increase in output of nuclear power plant has been attained by enlargement of major components such as pressure vessels. Such large components have almost reached limit of size from the points of manufacturing capacity and cost in both forgemasters and fabricaters. In order to solve this problem, it must be beneficial to apply design by use of material of higher strength which brings reduction of pressure vessel thickness and weight. The Japan Steel Works, Ltd. (JSW) has many manufacturing experiences of large integrated forgings made from high strength MnMoNi steel with tensile strength level of 620MPa for steam generator (SG) pressure vessel, and has made confirmation tests of its material properties. This paper describes the confirmation test results such as tensile and impact properties, nil-ductility transition temperature (NDT-T), static and dynamic fracture toughness weldability including under clad cracking (UCC) sensitivity and metallurgical factors which influence on such material properties. (orig.)

  3. Application of high strength MnMoNi steel to pressure vessels for nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K. E-mail: koumei_suzuki@jsw.co.jp; Kurihara, I.; Sasaki, T.; Koyoma, Y.; Tanaka, Y

    2001-06-01

    Recent increase in output of nuclear power plant has been attained by enlargement of major components such as pressure vessels. Such large components have almost reached a size limit from the points of manufacturing capacity and cost in both forgemasters and fabricaters. In order to solve this problem, it must be beneficial to apply design by use of material of higher strength, which brings reduction of pressure vessel thickness and weight. The Japan Steel Works Ltd. (JSW) has many manufacturing experiences of large integrated forgings made from high strength MnMoNi steel with tensile strength level of 620 MPa for steam generator (SG) pressure vessel, and has performed confirmation tests of its material properties. This paper describes the confirmation test results such as tensile and impact properties, nil-ductility transition temperature (NDT-T), static and dynamic fracture toughness, weldability including under-clad cracking (UCC) sensitivity, as well as metallurgical factors which influence on such material properties.

  4. High Strength of Mg-9%Al-1%Zn Alloys Achieved by Severe Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Muranaga, Takuya

    2017-10-01

    To obtain the excellent mechanical properties of AZ91 magnesium alloy (Mg-8.9%Al-0.6%Zn-0.2%Mn), the microstructural characteristics of AZ91 alloys are modified by various forging and heating processes. High tensile properties (ultimate tensile strength σ UTS = 420 MPa and fracture strain ɛ f = 3%) are obtained for the alloy made by the following process: solution treatment (ST) at 410 °C for 24 h plus water quenching, multidirectional forging (MDF) with 5% strain applied in 15 forgings at room temperature, and warm unidirectional forging (WUF) at a forging rate of 75% at 225 °C. The high tensile strength is a reflection of improved microstructural characteristics, namely a fine α-Mg phase and a high dislocation density. Moreover, brittle β-phase is significantly attributed to the mechanical properties of AZ91 alloy. Because of the severe deformation undergone by the alloy during the MDF process, the solution treatment is important to achieve high ductility with low internal strain, i.e., normalization. In fact, the ɛ f value for the ST sample is as high as 10%, leading to severe work hardening during the tensile test, with deformation twins and slips. The WUF process is conducted immediately after the sample has been heated to 225 °C, for less than 5 min, to avoid material softening. A relatively high tensile strength ( σ UTS = 305 MPa) is also achieved using the WUF process (with a forging rate of 75% at 200 °C) after the ST and aging process (200 °C for 12 h) although low ductility is found ( ɛ f = 0.7%), with hard and brittle β-phases being precipitated around the grain boundaries.

  5. Tensile bond strength of a light-cured glass ionomer cement when used for bracket bonding under different conditions: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirovski, I; Madzarova, S

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the tensile bond strength of a new light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement (Fuji Ortho LC), following the bonding of stainless steel brackets to 40 extracted human premolar teeth under four different enamel surface conditions: (1) non-etched, moistened with water; (2) etched, moistened with water; (3) etched, moistened with human saliva; and (4) etched, moistened with human plasma. The etched surface produced a higher bond strength than the non-etched surface when contaminated with distilled water. Contamination with human saliva resulted in a further increase in bond strength whilst plasma contamination produced an even higher strength. However, one-way analysis of variance showed no statistically significant difference between the various groups. After debonding, enamel and bracket base surfaces were examined for residual adhesive. The location of the adhesive also indicated improved bonding to etched enamel. This investigation shows that regardless of enamel surface pretreatment or environment, Fuji Ortho LC provides an adequate strength for bonding of orthodontic brackets.

  6. New tungsten alloy has high strength at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Tungsten-hafnium-carbon alloy has tensile strengths of 88,200 psi at 3000 deg F and 62,500 psi at 3500 deg F. Possible industrial applications for this alloy would include electrical components such as switches and spark plugs, die materials for die casting steels, and heating elements.

  7. High Temperature Strength of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clauer, A.H.; Hansen, Niels

    1984-01-01

    The tensile flow stress of coarse-grained dispersion strengthened Al-Al2O3 materials were measured as a function of temperature (77–873 K) and volume fraction (0.19-0.92 vol.%) of aluminium oxide. For the same material, the creep strength was determined as a function of temperature in the range 573...

  8. Theoretical Model of the Effect of Crack Tip Blunting on the Ultimate Tensile Strength of Welds in 2219-T87 Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical model representing blunting of a crack tip radius through diffusion of vacancies is presented. The model serves as the basis for a computer program which calculates changes, due to successive weld heat passes, in the ultimate tensile strength of 2219-T81 aluminum. In order for the model to yield changes of the same order in the ultimate tensile strength as that observed experimentally, a crack tip radius of the order of .001 microns is required. Such sharp cracks could arise in the fusion zone of a weld from shrinkage cavities or decohered phase boundaries between dendrites and the eutectic phase, or, possibly, from plastic deformation due to thermal stresses encountered during the welding process. Microstructural observations up to X2000 (resolution of about .1 micron) did not, in the fusion zone, show structural details which changed significantly under the influence of a heat pass, with the exception of possible small changes in the configuration of the interdendritic eutectic and in porosity build-up in the remelt zone.

  9. Assessment of Tensile Bond Strength of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin to Enamel Using Two Types of Resin Cements and Three Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-bonded bridgework with a metal framework is one of the most conservative ways to replace a tooth with intact abutments. Visibility of metal substructure and debonding are the complications of these bridgeworks. Today, with the introduction of fiber-reinforced composite resins, it is possible to overcome these complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin materials (FRC to enamel. Methods: Seventy-two labial cross-sections were prepared from intact extracted teeth. Seventy-two rectangular samples of cured Vectris were prepared and their thickness was increased by adding Targis. The samples were divided into 3 groups for three different surface treatments: sandblasting, etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid, and roughening with a round tapered diamond bur. Each group was then divided into two subgroups for bonding to etched enamel by Enforce and Variolink II resin cements. Instron universal testing machine was used to apply a tensile force. The fracture force was recorded and the mode of failure was identified under a reflective microscope. Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the three surface treatment groups (P=0.53. The mean bond strength of Variolink II cement was greater than that of Enforce (P=0.04. There was no relationship between the failure modes (cohesive and adhesive and the two cement types. There was some association between surface treatment and failure mode. There were adhesive failures in sandblasted and diamond-roughened groups and the cohesive failure was dominant in the etched group. Conclusion: It is recommended that restorations made of fiber-reinforced composite resin be cemented with VariolinkII and surface-treated by hydrofluoric acid.   Keywords: Tensile bond strength; surface treatment methods; fiber-reinforced composite resin

  10. Development and application of super heavy gauge high-strength structural steel for high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Linhao Gu; Lu, Shiping; Liu, Chunming; Liu, Jingang; Zhang, Suyuan; Chu, Rensheng; Ma, Changwen

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents development of 130mm S460G1-Z35 by using low carbon Nb-Ni-Mo-V-Ti micro-alloying design and two-stage rolling, quenching and tempering process. For the super heavy gauge high-strength structural steel, the yield strength is higher than 450MPa, the tensile strength is higher than 550MPa, the elongation is greater than 20%, the low temperature(-40) impact energy value is not less than 250J, the z-direction section shrinkage is more than 65%, and the welding performance is good. The plate are successfully applied to the engineering construction of the city of dreams in Macau.

  11. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Bonding Agent on the Tensile Bond Strength of Two Pit and Fissure Sealants Using Invasive and Non-invasive Techniques: An in–vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shamsher; Adlakha, Vivek; Babaji, Prashant; Chandna, Preetika; Thomas, Abi M.; Chopra, Saroj

    2013-01-01

    Background: Newer technologies and the development of pit and fissure sealants have shifted the treatment philosophy from ‘drill and fill’ to that of ‘seal and heal’. Aims: The purpose of this in–vitro study was to evaluate the effects of bonding agents on the tensile bond strengths of two pit and fissure sealants by using invasive and non-invasive techniques. Study Design and Methods: One hundred and twenty bicuspids were collected and teeth were divided into two groups: Group-I (Clinpro) and Group-II (Conseal f) with 60 teeth in each group. For evaluating tensile bond strengths, occlusal surfaces of all the teeth were flattened by reducing buccal and lingual cusps without disturbing fissures. Standardised polyvinyl tube was bonded to occlusal surfaces with respective materials. Sealants were applied, with or without bonding agents, in increments and they were light cured. Tensile bond strengths were determined by using Universal Testing Machine. Statistical Analysis: Data were then statistically analysed by using Student t–test for comparison. Results: A statistically significant difference was found in tensile bond strength in invasive with bonding agent group than in non-invasive with bonding agent group. Conclusion: This study revealed that invasive techniques increase the tensile bond strengths of sealants as compared to non- invasive techniques and that the use of a bonding agent as an intermediate layer between the tooth and fissure sealant is beneficial for increasing the bond strength. PMID:24298525

  12. High temperature strength and inelastic behavior of plate-fin structures for HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, F. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Fukahori-machi 5-717-1, 851-0392 Nagasaki (Japan)]. E-mail: fumiko_kawashima@mhi.co.jp; Igari, T. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Fukahori-machi 5-717-1, 851-0392 Nagasaki (Japan); Miyoshi, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Fukahori-machi 5-717-1, 851-0392 Nagasaki (Japan); Kamito, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Fukahori-machi 5-717-1, 851-0392 Nagasaki (Japan); Tanihira, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Fukahori-machi 5-717-1, 851-0392 Nagasaki (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    In this paper, both high temperature strength and inelastic behavior of plate-fin structures were discussed for applying these structures to the compact heat exchangers such as recuperative and intermediate heat exchangers for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). Firstly tensile, creep and fatigue tests of the brazed plate-fin model of small size were carried out to obtain the rupture strength and inelastic behavior. The influence of the braze filler metal thickness on the tensile strength was experimentally studied and a possibility of predicting both the tensile and creep strength was discussed using the data of base material of plates and fins. Secondly, we demonstrated the fabrication of large-size core with a dimension of 1000 mm, and also demonstrated that the bonding ratio in this core was improved up to almost 100% by adopting the pressurized tank system in the brazing process. Finally, we proposed the stress analysis method of plate-fin structures on the basis of the equivalent-homogeneous-solid concept, and carried out the elastic-plastic analysis of recuperative heat exchanger for HTGR. Characteristics of stress-strain behavior were discussed together with a possibility of predicting the fatigue life of the structure.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Transgenic Silkworm Silk Under High Strain Rate Tensile Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.-M.; Claus, B.; Chen, W.

    2017-12-01

    Studies have shown that transgenic silkworm silk may be capable of having similar properties of spider silk while being mass-producible. In this research, the tensile stress-strain response of transgenic silkworm silk fiber is systematically characterized using a quasi-static load frame and a tension Kolsky bar over a range of strain-rates between 10^{-3} and 700/s. The results show that transgenic silkworm silk tends to have higher overall ultimate stress and failure strain at high strain rate (700/s) compared to quasi-static strain rates, indicating rate sensitivity of the material. The failure strain at the high strain rate is higher than that of spider silk. However, the stress levels are significantly below that of spider silk, and far below that of high-performance fiber. Failure surfaces are examined via scanning electron microscopy and reveal that the failure modes are similar to those of spider silk.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Transgenic Silkworm Silk Under High Strain Rate Tensile Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.-M.; Claus, B.; Chen, W.

    2017-09-01

    Studies have shown that transgenic silkworm silk may be capable of having similar properties of spider silk while being mass-producible. In this research, the tensile stress-strain response of transgenic silkworm silk fiber is systematically characterized using a quasi-static load frame and a tension Kolsky bar over a range of strain-rates between 10^{-3} and 700/s. The results show that transgenic silkworm silk tends to have higher overall ultimate stress and failure strain at high strain rate (700/s) compared to quasi-static strain rates, indicating rate sensitivity of the material. The failure strain at the high strain rate is higher than that of spider silk. However, the stress levels are significantly below that of spider silk, and far below that of high-performance fiber. Failure surfaces are examined via scanning electron microscopy and reveal that the failure modes are similar to those of spider silk.

  15. High temperature tensile properties and deep drawing of fully green composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, research and development of materials using biomass sources are much expected to construct a sustainable society. The so-called green composite consisting of natural fibers and biodegradable resin, is one of the most promising materials in developing biomass products. In this study, especially, we focus on the tensile deformation behavior of the green composites reinforced with ramie woven fabrics at high temperature. The results show that the fracture strain at high temperatures increases larger than that of room temperature, and initial deformation resistance of the composites seen at room temperature does not appear at high temperatures. Thus, several conditions to cause more deformability of the green composites were found. Finally, in order to utilize such deformability, Lankford-values of the green composites were clarified, and deep drawing was carried out for sheet materials made of the green composites.

  16. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Aiying [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Lu, Jian, E-mail: jianlu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Y. Morris, E-mail: ymwang@llnl.gov [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility, leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.

  17. Commercialization of NASA's High Strength Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the commercialization of a new high strength cast aluminum alloy, invented by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, for high temperature applications will be presented. Originally developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low- exhaust emission, the novel NASA aluminum alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (450 F-750 F), which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance for automotive engine applications. It is an ideal low cost material for cast components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. NASA alloy also offers greater wear resistance, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys, and the new alloy can be produced economically from sand, permanent mold and investment casting. Since 2001, this technology was licensed to several companies for automotive and marine internal combustion engines applications.

  18. Sustainable normal and high strength recycled aggregate concretes using crushed tested cylinders as coarse aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal S. Hamad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on a research program that was designed at the American University of Beirut (AUB to investigate the fresh and hardened mechanical properties of a high performance concrete mix produced with partial or full substitution of crushed natural lime-stone aggregates with recycled aggregates from crushed tested cylinders in batching plants. Choosing crushed cylinders as source of recycling would result in reusing portion of the waste products of the concrete production industry. An extensive concrete batching and testing program was conducted to achieve two optimum normal and high strength concrete mixes. The variables were the nominal concrete strength (28 or 60 MPa and the percentage replacement of natural coarse aggregates with recycled aggregates from crushed tested cylinders (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, or 100%. Normal strength tested cylinders were used as source of the recycled aggregates for the normal strength concrete (NSC mix and high strength tested cylinders were used for the high strength concrete (HSC mix. Tests on the trial batches included plastic state slump and hardened state mechanical properties including cylinder compressive strength, cylinder splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and standard beams flexural strength. The results indicated no significant effect on the slump and around 10% average reduction in the hardened mechanical properties for both investigated levels of concrete compressive strength.

  19. High strength, low carbon, dual phase steel rods and wires and process for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gareth; Nakagawa, Alvin H.

    1986-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility, low carbon, dual phase steel wire, bar or rod and process for making the same is provided. The steel wire, bar or rod is produced by cold drawing to the desired diameter in a single multipass operation a low carbon steel composition characterized by a duplex microstructure consisting essentially of a strong second phase dispersed in a soft ferrite matrix with a microstructure and morphology having sufficient cold formability to allow reductions in cross-sectional area of up to about 99.9%. Tensile strengths of at least 120 ksi to over 400 ksi may be obtained.

  20. The effect of tensile and compressive loading on the hierarchical strength of idealized tropocollagen-hydroxyapatite biomaterials as a function of the chemical environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubey, Devendra K; Tomar, Vikas [Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)], E-mail: vikas.tomar@nd.edu

    2009-05-20

    Hard biomaterials such as bone, dentin and nacre have primarily a polypeptide phase (e.g. tropocollagen (TC)) and a mineral phase (e.g. hydroxyapatite (HAP) or aragonite) arranged in a staggered manner. It has been observed that the mechanical behaviour of such materials changes with the chemical environment and the direction of applied loading. In the presented investigation, explicit three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based analyses are performed on idealized TC-HAP composite biomaterial systems to understand the effects of tensile and compressive loadings in three different chemical environments: (1) unsolvated, (2) solvated with water and (3) calcinated and solvated with water. The MD analyses are performed on two interfacial supercells corresponding to the lowest structural level (level n) of TC-HAP interactions and on two other supercells with HAP supercells arranged in a staggered manner (level n+1) in a TC matrix. The supercells at level n+1 are formed by arranging level n interfacial supercells in a staggered manner. Analyses show that at level n, the presence of water molecules results in greater stability of TC molecules and TC-HAP interfaces during mechanical deformation. In addition, water also acts as a lubricant between adjacent TC molecules. Under the application of shear stress dominated loading, water molecules act to strengthen the TC-HAP interfacial strength in a manner similar to the action of glue. An overall effect of the observed mechanisms is that, in a staggered arrangement, tensile strength increases in the presence of water and calcinated water environments. On the other hand, corresponding compressive strength decreases under similar circumstances. Fundamentally, supercells with primarily normal load transfer at the TC-HAP interfaces are stronger in tensile shear loading. On the other hand, supercells with primarily tangential or shear load transfer at the TC-HAP interfaces are stronger in compressive shear loading. A

  1. Durability improvement assessment in different high strength ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper provides an insight into a new biotechnological method based on calcite precipitation for achieving high strength bio-concrete durability. It is very clear that mineral precipitation has the potential to enhance construction material resistance towards degradation procedures. The appropriate microbial cell ...

  2. Development of a test method for determining the cracking susceptibility of resistance spot welded high strength steel sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    In this study a test method for determining the cracking susceptibility of resistance spot welded high strength steel sheets was investigated. The development of a suitable test procedure is based on the External-Loaded Hot Crack Test (PVC-Test). The test modification for resistance spot welding contains a constant tensile force load. The test method for determining the cracking susceptibility was experimentally verified for a high strength steel, a transformation induced plasticity steel (TR...

  3. Effect of Hybrid Fibers on the Mechanical Properties of High Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid H. Hussein, Saeed K. Rejeb Hayder T. Abd

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, high strength concrete of 75 MPa compressive strength was investigated. The experimental program was designed to study the effect of fibers and hybrid fibers (steel and polypropylene fibers on the fresh (workability and wet density and hardened properties (compressive strength, splitting strength, flexural strength and dry density of high strength concrete. Results show that decreases in slump flow of all concrete mixtures containing steel, polypropylene and hybrid fibers compared with control mix (0% fiber. Hybrid high strength concrete with steel and polypropylene fibers showed superior compressive, splitting, flexural strengths over the others concrete without or with single fibers content. The test results indicate that the maximum increase in compressive and flexural strengths are obtains with the hybridization ratio (70%steel + 30% polypropylene and were equal to 14.54% and 23.34% respectively, compared with the control mix. While, the maximum increase in splitting tensile strength with (100% steel fiber + 0 polypropylene is 21.19%. 

  4. Academy of Dental Materials guidance on in vitro testing of dental composite bonding effectiveness to dentin/enamel using micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Steve; Breschi, Lorenzo; Özcan, Mutlu; Pfefferkorn, Frank; Ferrari, Marco; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2017-02-01

    An ideal dental adhesive should provide retentive strength, marginal seal, be relatively simple to achieve and demonstrate clinical durability. Future improvements in adhesive bonding to tooth structure require in vitro test methods that provide reliable data for materials development and/or evaluation of experimental variables. The objective of this project was to identify a test method that is relatively easy to perform, repeatable and ultimately useful for predicting clinical outcomes. The Academy of Dental Materials initiated a project to develop and distribute guidance documents on laboratory test methods that are useful for the evaluation of dental adhesives and cements, composite resins and ceramics. The dental adhesive sub-group has identified the micro-tensile bond strength test, especially after subjecting the specimens to a durability challenge, as currently the best practical surrogate measure of dental composite restoration retention. The following μTBS guidance is meant to aid the researcher in conducting the μTBS test. The authors, while recognizing the limitations of a static, strength-based test method, welcome comments and suggestions for improvements of this guidance document in future revisions. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation on dissimilar laser welding of advanced high strength steel sheets for the automotive industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossini, M., E-mail: matteo.rossini@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Spena, P. Russo, E-mail: pasquale.russospena@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Cortese, L., E-mail: luca.cortese@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Matteis, P., E-mail: paolo.matteis@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Firrao, D., E-mail: donato.firrao@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2015-03-25

    To support the use of advanced high strength steels in car body design and fabrication, an investigation was carried out on dissimilar butt laser welding between TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels, Dual Phase (DP) steels, hot stamping boron (22MnB5) steels, and TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels. The base materials and the weldments were fully characterized by means of metallography, microhardness, and tensile tests. Digital image analysis was also used to provide additional information on the local strain field in the joint during the tensile tests. Fractographic examination was finally performed on the fracture surfaces of the tensile samples. The dissimilar joints between the DP, 22MnB5, and TRIP steels exhibit good resistance properties. On the contrary, the dissimilar joints encompassing the TWIP steel exhibit poor mechanical strength and fail along the weld seam by intergranular fracture, probably due to presence of Mn segregations. Therefore, the laser welding of TWIP steel with other advanced high strength steels is not recommended without the use of proper metal fillers. Dissimilar laser welding of DP, TRIP and 22MnB5 combinations, on the contrary, can be a solution to assemble car body parts made of these steel grades.

  6. High-strength mineralized collagen artificial bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Tao, Chun-Sheng; Cui, Helen; Wang, Chang-Ming; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2014-03-01

    Mineralized collagen (MC) is a biomimetic material that mimics natural bone matrix in terms of both chemical composition and microstructure. The biomimetic MC possesses good biocompatibility and osteogenic activity, and is capable of guiding bone regeneration as being used for bone defect repair. However, mechanical strength of existing MC artificial bone is too low to provide effective support at human load-bearing sites, so it can only be used for the repair at non-load-bearing sites, such as bone defect filling, bone graft augmentation, and so on. In the present study, a high strength MC artificial bone material was developed by using collagen as the template for the biomimetic mineralization of the calcium phosphate, and then followed by a cold compression molding process with a certain pressure. The appearance and density of the dense MC were similar to those of natural cortical bone, and the phase composition was in conformity with that of animal's cortical bone demonstrated by XRD. Mechanical properties were tested and results showed that the compressive strength was comparable to human cortical bone, while the compressive modulus was as low as human cancellous bone. Such high strength was able to provide effective mechanical support for bone defect repair at human load-bearing sites, and the low compressive modulus can help avoid stress shielding in the application of bone regeneration. Both in vitro cell experiments and in vivo implantation assay demonstrated good biocompatibility of the material, and in vivo stability evaluation indicated that this high-strength MC artificial bone could provide long-term effective mechanical support at human load-bearing sites.

  7. Periodontal wound healing with and without platelet-rich plasma: histologic observations and assessment of flap tensile strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Charles A; Bannister, Sharon R; Mackey, Scott A; Maller, Steven C; McDonnell, Howard T; Deas, David E

    2009-06-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been promoted as a surgical adjunct to enhance hard and soft tissue wound healing. Although anecdotally reported to be of value, the results of controlled studies examining the added effects of PRP on surgical procedures have been mixed. The purpose of this study was to test the effect of PRP on flap strength at various post-surgical time points in a minipig animal model. Twelve Yucatan minipigs provided four sites per animal. PRP was prepared from each animal at the time of surgery. Following reflection of a mucoperiosteal flap in each quadrant, subgingival plaque and calculus were removed. Each surgical site was irrigated with sterile saline; prior to suturing, one randomly selected test quadrant in each arch was treated with PRP. Four animals were euthanized at day 14, and two animals were euthanized at 2, 7, 10, and 28 days. The flap strength in each quadrant was tested by attaching to a loop of 3-0 silk suture through the tissue; the force required to separate the flap from the tooth/bone interface was recorded for each site. A separate portion of each flap site was prepared for descriptive histologic examination, including inflammation, hemorrhage, and new bone growth. Flap strength was significantly less on day 2 compared to later time points, and there were no significant differences between the test and control groups. No histologic differences in healing between test and control sites were seen at any time point. PRP did not seem to contribute to greater flap strength at any post-surgical time point, nor was it associated with any histologic differences in wound healing in this Yucatan minipig model. The time points chosen for observation post-surgery, as well as the variability in the PRP platelet count, may have contributed to the lack of positive findings in this study.

  8. Aspects of flexural behavior of high strength concrete elements with or without steel fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe-Alexandru Bărbos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Steel fiber reinforced high strength concrete (SFRHSC is concrete made of hydraulic cements containing fine or fine and coarse aggregate and discontinuous discrete steel fibers. In tension, SFRHSC fails only after the steel fiber breaks or is pulled out of the cement matrix. A more general and current approach to the mechanics of fiber reinforcing assumes a crack arrest mechanism based on fracture mechanics. In this model, the energy to extend a crack and debond the fibers in the matrix relates to the properties of the composite. The designers may best view SFRHSC as a concrete with increased strain capacity, impact resistance, energy absorption, fatigue endurance and tensile strength.

  9. Development of High Strength and High Toughness Steels for Reactor Vessel and Surgeline Pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. S.; Kim, M. C.; Yoon, J. H.; Kim, K. B.; Choi, K. J.; Cho, H. D.

    2010-07-15

    In addition to evaluating the effects of alloying elements, heat treatment conditions, weldability and neutron irradiation behavior were evaluated with 15 types of SA508 Gr.4N model alloys for reactor pressure vessel. The maximum yield strength of 630MPa were obtained by controlling chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions. Model alloys also showed excellent impact toughness and fracture toughness. The microstructure and mechanical properties of weld heat affected zone were evaluated by using simulated specimens and the effects of post weld heat treatment conditions were also investigated. Neutron irradiation behavior at high fluence level were characterized and then compared with commercial reactor pressure vessel steel. The value of transition temperature shift(TTS) was 22 .deg. C at 6.4x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} which is similar to commercial RPV steel. However, its toughness after irradiation is much better than that of unirradiated commercial RPV steel due to the superior initial toughness. Leak-before-break(LBB) properties of type 316 stainless steel model alloys and their welds for surge line were evaluated as well as microstructure and mechanical properties. Tensile tests and J-R fracture resistance tests were carried out at RT and 316 .deg. C. The model alloys showed good tensile strength over standard value, except type 316L which has lower C/N. In the LBB safety analysis result, all of type 316 model alloys have higher allowable load than that of OPR1000 surge line

  10. Effects of Alloying Elements on Room and High Temperature Tensile Properties of Al-Si Cu-Mg Base Alloys =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyaldin, Loay

    In recent years, aluminum and aluminum alloys have been widely used in automotive and aerospace industries. Among the most commonly used cast aluminum alloys are those belonging to the Al-Si system. Due to their mechanical properties, light weight, excellent castability and corrosion resistance, these alloys are primarily used in engineering and in automotive applications. The more aluminum is used in the production of a vehicle, the less the weight of the vehicle, and the less fuel it consumes, thereby reducing the amount of harmful emissions into the atmosphere. The principal alloying elements in Al-Si alloys, in addition to silicon, are magnesium and copper which, through the formation of Al2Cu and Mg2Si precipitates, improve the alloy strength via precipitation hardening following heat treatment. However, most Al-Si alloys are not suitable for high temperature applications because their tensile and fatigue strengths are not as high as desired in the temperature range 230-350°C, which are the temperatures that are often attained in automotive engine components under actual service conditions. The main challenge lies in the fact that the strength of heat-treatable cast aluminum alloys decreases at temperatures above 200°C. The strength of alloys under high temperature conditions is improved by obtaining a microstructure containing thermally stable and coarsening-resistant intermetallics, which may be achieved with the addition of Ni. Zr and Sc. Nickel leads to the formation of nickel aluminide Al3Ni and Al 9FeNi in the presence of iron, while zirconium forms Al3Zr. These intermetallics improve the high temperature strength of Al-Si alloys. Some interesting improvements have been achieved by modifying the composition of the base alloy with additions of Mn, resulting in an increase in strength and ductility at both room and high temperatures. Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloys such as the 354 (Al-9wt%Si-1.8wt%Cu-0.5wt%Mg) alloys show a greater response to heat treatment as a

  11. Tensile ductility of an AlCoCrFeNi multi-phase high-entropy alloy through hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and homogenization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhi, E-mail: Zhi.Tang@alcoa.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Senkov, Oleg N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Parish, Chad M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Fan [CompuTherm LLC, 437 S. Yellowstone Dr., Suite 217, Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Santodonato, Louis J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wang, Gongyao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Zhao, Guangfeng; Yang, Fuqian [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Liaw, Peter K., E-mail: pliaw@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The microstructure and phase composition of an AlCoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) were studied in as-cast (AlCoCrFeNi-AC, AC represents as-cast) and homogenized (AlCoCrFeNi-HP, HP signifies hot isostatic pressed and homogenized) conditions. The AlCoCrFeNi-AC ally has a dendritric structure in the consisting primarily of a nano-lamellar mixture of A2 (disordered body-centered-cubic (BCC)) and B2 (ordered BCC) phases, formed by an eutectic reaction. The homogenization heat treatment, consisting of hot isostatic pressed for 1 h at 1100 °C, 207 MPa and annealing at 1150 °C for 50 h, resulted in an increase in the volume fraction of the A1 phase and formation of a Sigma (σ) phase. Tensile properties in as-cast and homogenized conditions are reported at 700 °C. The ultimate tensile strength was virtually unaffected by heat treatment, and was 396±4 MPa at 700 °C. However, homogenization produced a noticeable increase in ductility. The AlCoCrFeNi-AC alloy showed a tensile elongation of only 1.0%, while after the heat-treatment, the elongation of AlCoCrFeNi-HP was 11.7%. Thermodynamic modeling of non-equilibrium and equilibrium phase diagrams for the AlCoCrFeNi HEA gave good agreement with the experimental observations of the phase contents in the AlCoCrFeNi-AC and AlCoCrFeNi-HP. The reasons for the improvement of ductility after the heat treatment and the crack initiation subjected to tensile loading were discussed.

  12. Work-hardening induced tensile ductility of bulk metallic glasses via high-pressure torsion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joo, Soo-Hyun; Pi, Dong-Hai; Setyawan, Albertus Deny Heri; Kato, Hidemi; Janecek, Milos; Kim, Yong Chan; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2015-01-01

    .... Enhanced tensile ductility and work-hardening behavior after the HPT process were investigated, focusing on the microstructure, particularly the changed free volume, which affects deformation mechanisms (i.e...

  13. A low-cost hierarchical nanostructured beta-titanium alloy with high strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Arun; Joshi, Vineet V.; Srivastava, Ankit; Manandhar, Sandeep; Moxson, Vladimir; Duz, Volodymyr A.; Lavender, Curt

    2016-04-01

    Lightweighting of automobiles by use of novel low-cost, high strength-to-weight ratio structural materials can reduce the consumption of fossil fuels and in turn CO2 emission. Working towards this goal we achieved high strength in a low cost β-titanium alloy, Ti-1Al-8V-5Fe (Ti185), by hierarchical nanostructure consisting of homogenous distribution of micron-scale and nanoscale α-phase precipitates within the β-phase matrix. The sequence of phase transformation leading to this hierarchical nanostructure is explored using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Our results suggest that the high number density of nanoscale α-phase precipitates in the β-phase matrix is due to ω assisted nucleation of α resulting in high tensile strength, greater than any current commercial titanium alloy. Thus hierarchical nanostructured Ti185 serves as an excellent candidate for replacing costlier titanium alloys and other structural alloys for cost-effective lightweighting applications.

  14. Determining the tensile response of materials at high temperature using DIC and the Virtual Fields Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeri, Guillermo; Koohbor, Behrad; Kidane, Addis; Sutton, Michael A.

    2017-04-01

    An experimental approach based on Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is successfully applied to predict the uniaxial stress-strain response of 304 stainless steel specimens subjected to nominally uniform temperatures ranging from room temperature to 900 °C. A portable induction heating device equipped with custom made water-cooled copper coils is used to heat the specimen. The induction heater is used in conjunction with a conventional tensile frame to enable high temperature tension experiments. A stereovision camera system equipped with appropriate band pass filters is employed to facilitate the study of full-field deformation response of the material at elevated temperatures. Using the temperature and load histories along with the full-field strain data, a Virtual Fields Method (VFM) based approach is implemented to identify constitutive parameters governing the plastic deformation of the material at high temperature conditions. Results from these experiments confirm that the proposed method can be used to measure the full field deformation of materials subjected to thermo-mechanical loading.

  15. Hydrogen Assisted Cracking of High Strength Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Speidel reported simple Arrhenius behavior for lower strength Nimonic 105 (ays = 825 MPa) for 0C < T < 1000C (Speidel, 1974). The very high temperature... 115 of 194 L (a) R 250 nm 250 nm L (b) R Figure 43: Matching field emission SEM images of an IG facet in cz~hardened j3-Ti (Beta-C) cracked in aqueous...Thompson, ASM International, Materials Park, OH, 1974, pp. 115 -147. W.W. Gerberich, Y.T. Chen and C. St. John, A short-time diffusion correlation for

  16. High Strength and Wear Resistant Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Chen, Po Shou

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent thermal growth stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  17. Interfacial (Fiber-matrix) Properties of High-strength Mortar (150 MPa) from Fiber Pullout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shannag, M.J.; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Will

    1996-01-01

     The steel fiber-matrix properties of high-strength mortar (150 MPa), such as DSP (densified small particle), are obtained and compared to an ordinary strength mortar (40 MPa) using a specially designed fiber pullout apparatus. A new method for estimating the debonding energy of the interfacial z...... DSP mortar has significantly improved interfacial properties compared to ordinary strength mortar. These results are important in the understanding of the role of steel fibers in improving the tensile properties of high-strength, brittle, cement-matrix composites....... The steel fiber-matrix properties of high-strength mortar (150 MPa), such as DSP (densified small particle), are obtained and compared to an ordinary strength mortar (40 MPa) using a specially designed fiber pullout apparatus. A new method for estimating the debonding energy of the interfacial...... zone from the experimental pullout curve is presented. The method is used to separate the areas under the pullout curve corresponding to debonding and friction. The predictions are compared to other methods in the literature. The proposed method seems to provide less variations in the results. The high-strength...

  18. Advanced high strength steels for automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galán, J.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The car industry is facing pressure because of the growing demand for more fuel-efficient passenger cars. In order to limit energy consumption and air pollution the weight of the carbody has to be reduced. At the same time, high levels of safety have to be guaranteed. In this situation, the choice of material becomes a key decision in car design. As a response to the requirements of the automotive sector, high strength steels and advanced high strength steels have been developed by the steel industry. These modern steel grades offer an excellent balance of low cost, light weight and mechanical properties.

    La industria del automóvil se enfrenta a una creciente demanda de vehículos de pasajeros más eficientes. Con el fin de disminuir el consumo de energía y la contaminación ambiental, el peso del vehículo tiene que ser reducido, al mismo tiempo que se garantizan altos niveles de seguridad. Ante esta situación, la elección de material se convierte en una decisión crucial en el diseño del vehículo. Como respuesta a las necesidades del sector automovilístico, nuevos aceros avanzados y de alta resistencia, han sido desarrollados por la industria siderúrgica. Dichos tipos de acero ofrecen un excelente equilibrio de precio, peso y propiedades mecánicas.

  19. Laser and plasma dental soldering techniques applied to Ti-6Al-4V alloy: ultimate tensile strength and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Morgana G; Araújo, Cleudmar A; Menegaz, Gabriela L; Silva, João Paulo L; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio A; Simamoto Júnior, Paulo Cézar

    2015-05-01

    The literature provides limited information regarding the performance of Ti-6Al-4V laser and plasma joints welded in prefabricated bars in dental applications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical strength of different diameters of Ti-6Al-4V alloy welded with laser and plasma techniques. Forty-five dumbbell-shaped rods were created from Ti-6Al-4V and divided into 9 groups (n=5): a control group with 3-mm and intact bars; groups PL2.5, PL3, PL4, and PL5 (specimens with 2.5-, 3-, 4-, and 5-mm diameters welded with plasma); and groups L2.5, L3, L4, and L5 (specimens with 2.5-, 3-, 4-, and 5-mm diameters welded with laser). The specimens were tested for ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and elongation percentages (EP) were obtained. Fractured specimens were analyzed by stereomicroscopy, and welded area percentages (WAP) were calculated. Images were made with scanning electron microscopy. In the initial analysis, the data were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA (2×4) and the Tukey Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test. In the second analysis, the UTS and EP data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, and the Dunnett test was used to compare the 4 experimental groups with the control group (α=.05). The Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficient tests were applied to correlate the study factors. Finite element models were developed in a workbench environment with boundary conditions simulating those of a tensile test. The 2-way ANOVA showed that the factors welding type and diameter were significant for the UTS and WAP values. However, the interaction between them was not significant. The 1-way ANOVA showed statistically significant differences among the groups for UTS, WAP, and EP values. The Dunnett test showed that all the tested groups had lower UTS and EP values than the control group. The 2.5- and 3-mm diameter groups showed higher values for UTS and WAP than the other test groups. A positive correlation was found between welded area percentage and UTS

  20. Time-Dependent Behavior of High-Strength Kevlar and Vectran Webbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.

    2014-01-01

    High-strength Kevlar and Vectran webbings are currently being used by both NASA and industry as the primary load-bearing structure in inflatable space habitation modules. The time-dependent behavior of high-strength webbing architectures is a vital area of research that is providing critical material data to guide a more robust design process for this class of structures. This paper details the results of a series of time-dependent tests on 1-inch wide webbing including an initial set of comparative tests between specimens that underwent realtime and accelerated creep at 65 and 70% of their ultimate tensile strength. Variability in the ultimate tensile strength of the webbings is investigated and compared with variability in the creep life response. Additional testing studied the effects of load and displacement rate, specimen length and the time-dependent effects of preconditioning the webbings. The creep test facilities, instrumentation and test procedures are also detailed. The accelerated creep tests display consistently longer times to failure than their real-time counterparts; however, several factors were identified that may contribute to the observed disparity. Test setup and instrumentation, grip type, loading scheme, thermal environment and accelerated test postprocessing along with material variability are among these factors. Their effects are discussed and future work is detailed for the exploration and elimination of some of these factors in order to achieve a higher fidelity comparison.

  1. Effects of fibre loading and moisture absorption on the tensile properties of hybrid Napier/glass/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikri, M. Z.; Ridzuan, M. J. M.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Afendi, M.; Basaruddin, K. S.

    2017-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of moisture absorption on the mechanical degradation of hybrid Napier/glass-epoxy composites. The hybrid Napier/glass-epoxy composites plates were produced by the vacuum infusion method using epoxy resin as a matrix. The hybrid composite specimens were tested after following 50 h of water immersion. The moisture content decreased as the glass fibre content increased. The wet and dry hybrid composite samples were subjected to tensile tests. The incorporation of the glass fibre into the Napier grass fibre-epoxy composites enhanced their tensile strength and tensile modulus. The tensile strength and tensile modulus of the hybrid Napier/glass-epoxy composites (24/6–70 vol%) were 43 MPa and 3.2 GPa, respectively. However, the tensile strength and tensile modulus properties highly degraded under wet conditions.

  2. Damage characterization of high-strength multiphase steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heibel, S.; Nester, W.; Clausmeyer, T.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    High-strength steels show an entirely different material behavior than conventional deep-drawing steels. This fact is caused among others by the multiphase nature of their structure. The Forming Limit Diagram as the classic failure criterion in forming simulation is only partially suitable for this class of steels. An improvement of the failure prediction can be obtained by using damage mechanics. Therefore, an exact knowledge of the material-specific damage is essential for the application of various damage models. In this paper the results of microstructure analysis of a dual-phase steel and a complex-phase steel with a tensile strength of 1000 MPa are shown comparatively at various stress conditions. The objective is to characterize the basic damage mechanisms and based on this to assess the crack sensitivity of both steels. First a structural analysis with regard to non-metallic inclusions, the microstructural morphology, phase identification and the difference in microhardness between the structural phases is carried out. Subsequently, the development of the microstructure at different stress states between uniaxial and biaxial tension is examined. The damage behavior is characterized and quantified by the increase in void density, void size and the quantity of voids. The dominant damage mechanism of the dual-phase steel is the void initiation at phase boundaries, within harder structural phases and at inclusions. In contrast the complex-phase steel shows a significant growth of a smaller amount of voids which initiate only at inclusions. To quantify the damage tolerance and the susceptibility of cracking the criterion of the fracture forming limit line (FFL) is used. The respective statements are supported by results of investigations regarding the edge-crack sensitivity.

  3. INFLUENCE OF HIGH-STRENGTH REINFORCEMENT WITHOUT ADHESION TO CONCRETE ON STRENGTH OF CAST-IN-SITU BEAMLESS FLOORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osipenko Yuri Grigoryevich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence and location of prestressed high-strength reinforcement without adhesion to concrete on the strength of a beamless floor panel is considered. The work is aimed at clarifying the methodology for calculating the strength of cast-in-situ beamless floor with mixed reinforcement, where reinforcement is used in a plastic shell of monostrend type without adhesion to concrete for the most complete use of the strength characteristics of the panel material. The aim of the study is to determine the level of influence and location of prestressed reinforcement without adhesion to concrete on the strength of a panel of cast-in-situ beamless floor, as well as comparison of the results obtained for the stresses of ropes in panels with contour and diagonal arrangement of prestressed reinforcement. The shape of the rope position is represented by a part of the parabola passing through the points of the rope support. On the support, the vertical and horizontal components of the reaction are determined by the longitudinal force in the rope and the exit angle of the guy rope. 9х9m cast-in-situ beamless floor panels in two variants were investigated: with diagonal and contour stressing steel. The values of increment in stresses in the ropes and the resulting values at various prestress and deflection levels, presented in the form of tables and graphs, have been calculated. According to the results of the study, the use of high-strength prestressed ropes without adhesion to concrete, as an additional working reinforcement, reduces deflections of the panels and lowers consumption of common reinforcement. The results indicate a relative decrease in efficiency of using rope strength along with an increase in the initial prestress level. From the point of ensuring load-bearing capacity, the contour positioning of ropes is preferable, due to more complete use of strength of high-tensile reinforcement. To meet the requirements of ultimate limit states, the

  4. Influence of high pulsed magnetic field on tensile properties of TC4 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gui-Rong; Wang, Fang-Fang; Wang, Hong-Ming; Zheng, Rui; Xue, Fei; Cheng, Jiang-Feng

    2017-04-01

    The tensile tests of TC4 alloy are carried on electronic universal testing machine in the synchronous presence of high pulsed magnetic field (HPMF) parallel to the axial direction. The effects of magnetic induction intensity (B=0, 1 T, 3 T, and 5 T) on elongation (δ) of TC4 alloy are investigated. At 3 T, the elongation arrives at a maximum value of 12.41%, which is enhanced by 23.98% in comparison with that of initial sample. The elongation curve shows that 3 T is a critical point. With B increasing, the volume fraction of α phase is enhanced from 49.7% to 55.9%, which demonstrates that the HPMF can induce the phase transformation from β phase to α phase. Furthermore, the magnetic field not only promotes the orientation preference of crystal plane along the slipping direction, but also has the effect on increasing the dislocation density. The dislocation density increases with the enhancement of magnetic induction intensity and the 3-T parameter is ascertained as a turning point from increase to decrease tendency. When B is larger than 3 T, the dislocation density decreases with the enhancement of B. The influence of magnetic field is analyzed on the basis of magneto-plasticity effect. The high magnetic field will enhance the dislocation strain energy and promote the state conversion of radical pair generated between the dislocation and obstacles from singlet into triplet state, in which is analyzed the phenomenon that the dislocation density is at an utmost with B=3 T. Finally, the inevitability of optimized 3-T parameter is further discussed on a quantum scale. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51371091, 51174099, and 51001054) and the Industrial Center of Jiangsu University, China (Grant No. ZXJG201585).

  5. On the performance of circular concrete-filled high strength steel columns under axial loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahmoud El-Heweity

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a numerical study to investigate the performance of circular high-strength steel tubes filled with concrete (CFT under monotonic axial loading. A model is developed to implement the material constitutive relationships and non-linearity. Calibration against previous experimental data shows good agreement. A parametric study is then conducted using the model and compared with codes provisions. Strength and ductility of confined concrete are of primary concern. Variables considered are yield stress of steel tube and column diameter. The assessment of column performance is based on axial load carrying capacities and enhancements of both strength and ductility due to confinement. Two parameters namely strength enhancement factor (Kf and ductility index (μ are clearly defined and introduced for assessment. Results indicate that both concrete strength and ductility of CFT columns are enhanced but to different extents. The ductile behaviors are significantly evident. The increase in yield stress of steel tube has a minimal effect on concrete strength but pronounced effect on concrete ductility. However, reduction in ductility is associated with using high-tensile steel of Grade 70. The overall findings indicate that the use of high-strength tube in CFT columns is not promising. This finding may seriously be considered in seismic design.

  6. Exploring the effects of SiC reinforcement incorporation on mechanical properties of friction stir welded 7075 aluminum alloy: Fatigue life, impact energy, tensile strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Mohsen, E-mail: Mohsen.bahrami@aut.ac.ir [Faculty of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Helmi, Nader [Faculty of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehghani, Kamran [Faculty of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Centre of Excellence in Smart Structures and Dynamical Systems (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Givi, Mohammad Kazem Besharati [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-10

    In the current research, the role of SiC nano-particles in improving the mechanical properties of friction stir welded (FSWed) 7075 aluminum alloy is investigated. To this end, friction stir welding (FSW) was conducted at 1250 rpm and 40 mm/min. The experiment carried out with and without incorporating SiC nano-particles along the joint line. Cross-sectional microstructures of the joints were characterized employing optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results achieved through X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the presence of SiC powders. Moreover, it was discovered that the volume fraction of the reinforcement particles was 20%. Along with an excellent bonding between SiC nano-particles and aluminum matrix, SEM photograph demonstrated a good dispersion of SiC reinforcements. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results were also in tight agreement with the recent SEM microstructure. Thanks to the presence of SiC nano-particles, tensile strength, percent elongation, fatigue life, and toughness of the joint improved tremendously. The fracture morphologies were in good agreement with corresponding ductility results.

  7. Tensile bond strength and SEM analysis of enamel etched with Er:YAG laser and phosphoric acid: a comparative study in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Luis H.; Tanaka, Celso Shin-Ite [Bandeirante University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Prosthodontics; Lobo, Paulo D.C.; Villaverde, Antonio B.; Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Brugnera Junior, Aldo [University of Vale do Paraba, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. of Research and Development]. E-mail: abrugnera@uol.com.br; Moriyama, Yumi [Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada). Div. of Biophysics and Bioimaging; Watanabe, Ii-Sei [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. of Biomedical Sciences

    2008-01-15

    Er:YAG laser has been studied as a potential tool for restorative dentistry due to its ability to selectively remove oral hard tissue with minimal or no thermal damage to the surrounding tissues. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the tensile bond strength (TBS) of an adhesive/composite resin system to human enamel surfaces treated with 37% phosphoric acid, Er:YAG laser ({lambda}=2.94 {mu}m) with a total energy of 16 J (80 mJ/pulse, 2Hz, 200 pulses, 250 ms pulse width), and Er:YAG laser followed by phosphoric acid etching. Analysis of the treated surfaces was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to assess morphological differences among the groups. TBS means (in MPa) were as follows: Er:YAG laser + acid (11.7 MPa) > acid (8.2 MPa) > Er:YAG laser (6.1 MPa), with the group treated with laser+acid being significantly from the other groups (p=0.0006 and p= 0.00019, respectively). The groups treated with acid alone and laser alone were significantly different from each other (p=0.0003). The SEM analysis revealed morphological changes that corroborate the TBS results, suggesting that the differences in TBS means among the groups are related to the different etching patterns produced by each type of surface treatment. The findings of this study indicate that the association between Er:YAG laser and phosphoric acid can be used as a valuable resource to increase bond strength to laser-prepared enamel. (author)

  8. High strength oil palm shell concrete beams reinforced with steel fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poh-Yap

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of lightweight oil palm shell to produce high strength lightweight sustainable material has led many researchers towards its commercialization as structural concrete. However, the low tensile strength of Oil Palm Shell Concrete (OPSC has hindered its development. This study aims to enhance the mechanical properties and flexural behaviours of OPSC by the addition of steel fibres of up to 3% by volume, to produce oil palm shell fibre-reinforced concrete (OPSFRC. The experimental results showed that the steel fibres significantly enhanced the mechanical properties of OPSFRC. The highest compressive strength, splitting tensile and flexural strengths of 55, 11.0 and 18.5 MPa, respectively, were achieved in the OPSFRC mix reinforced with 3% steel fibres. In addition, the flexural beam testing on OPSFRC beams with 3% steel fibres showed that the steel fibre reinforcement up to 3% produced notable increments in the moment capacity and crack resistance of OPSFRC beams, but accompanied by reduction in the ductility.

  9. Exposure Assessment of a High-energy Tensile Test With Large Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Michel, Silvain; Terrasi, Giovanni; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the particle and fiber release from two carbon fiber reinforced polymer cables that underwent high-energy tensile tests until rupture. The failing event was the source of a large amount of dust whereof a part was suspected to be containing possibly respirable fibers that could cause adverse health effects. The released fibers were suspected to migrate through small openings to the experiment control room and also to an adjacent machine hall where workers were active. To investigate the fiber release and exposure risk of the affected workers, the generated particles were measured with aerosol devices to obtain the particle size and particle concentrations. Furthermore, particles were collected on filter samples to investigate the particle shape and the fiber concentration. Three situations were monitored for the control room and the machine hall: the background concentrations, the impact of the cable failure, and the venting of the exposed rooms afterward. The results showed four important findings: The cable failure caused the release of respirable fibers with diameters below 3 μm and an average length of 13.9 μm; the released particles did migrate to the control room and to the machine hall; the measured peak fiber concentration of 0.76 fibers/cm(3) and the overall fiber concentration of 0.07 fibers/cm(3) in the control room were below the Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) for fibers without indication of carcinogenicity; and the venting of the rooms was fast and effective. Even though respirable fibers were released, the low fiber concentration and effective venting indicated that the suspected health risks from the experiment on the affected workers was low. However, the effect of long-term exposure is not known therefore additional control measures are recommended.

  10. Press hardening of alternative high strength aluminium and ultra-high strength steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiguren, Joseba; Ortubay, Rafael; Agirretxe, Xabier; Galdos, Lander; de Argandoña, Eneko Sáenz

    2016-10-01

    The boron steel press hardening process takes more and more importance on the body in white structure in the last decade. In this work, the advantages of using alternative alloys on the press hardening process is analysed. In particular, the press hardening of AA7075 high strength aluminium and CP800 complex phase ultra-high strength steel is analysed. The objective is to analyse the potential decrease on springback while taking into account the strength change associated with the microstructural modification carried out during the press hardening process. The results show a clear improvement of the final springback in both cases. Regarding the final mechanical properties, an important decrease has been measured in the AA7075 due to the process while an important increase has been found in the CP800 material.

  11. Investigating the influence of nanoadhesion on strength properties of high-strength organic fibres and organoplastics based on them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. I. Burya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The tensile, thermophysical and tribotechnical characteristics of organoplastics based on thermosetting matrix chaotically reinforced with discrete highly tensile organic fiber have been investigated, and the efficiency of nano-additions introduced both into the polymer matrix and as fibre finish is shown in this paper.

  12. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Microstructure, Tensile Properties, and Fracture Behavior of Cold-Rolled High-Mn Light-Weight Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cho, Kyung Mox [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Joonoh; Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    The effects of the annealing temperature on the microstructure and tensile properties of cold-rolled light-weight steels are investigated using two Fe-30Mn-xAl-0.9C alloys that contain different Al content. The initial alloy microstructure is composed of a single austenite or a mixture of austenite and ferrite depending on the nominal aluminum content. For the alloy with 9 wt%Al content, the recrystallization and grain growth of austenite occurrs depending on the annealing temperature. However, for the alloy with 11 wt%Al content, the β-Mn phase is observed after annealing for 10 min at 550~800 ℃. The β-Mn transformation kinetics is the fastest at 700 ℃. The formation of the β-Mn phase has a detrimental effect on the ductility, and this leads to significant decreases in the total elongation. The same alloy also forms κ-carbide and DO3 ordering at 550~900 ℃. The investigated alloys exhibit a fully recrystallized microstructure after annealing at 900 ℃ for 10 min, which results in a high total elongation of 25~55%with a high tensile strength of 900~1170 MPa.

  13. Down-regulation of POLYGALACTURONASE1 alters firmness, tensile strength and water loss in apple (Malus x domestica) fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Ross G; Sutherland, Paul W; Johnston, Sarah L; Gunaseelan, Kularajathevan; Hallett, Ian C; Mitra, Deepali; Brummell, David A; Schröder, Roswitha; Johnston, Jason W; Schaffer, Robert J

    2012-08-02

    While there is now a significant body of research correlating apple (Malus x domestica) fruit softening with the cell wall hydrolase ENDO-POLYGALACTURONASE1 (PG1), there is currently little knowledge of its physiological effects in planta. This study examined the effect of down regulation of PG1 expression in 'Royal Gala' apples, a cultivar that typically has high levels of PG1, and softens during fruit ripening. PG1-suppressed 'Royal Gala' apples harvested from multiple seasons were firmer than controls after ripening, and intercellular adhesion was higher. Cell wall analyses indicated changes in yield and composition of pectin, and a higher molecular weight distribution of CDTA-soluble pectin. Structural analyses revealed more ruptured cells and free juice in pulled apart sections, suggesting improved integrity of intercellular connections and consequent cell rupture due to failure of the primary cell walls under stress. PG1-suppressed lines also had reduced expansion of cells in the hypodermis of ripe apples, resulting in more densely packed cells in this layer. This change in morphology appears to be linked with reduced transpirational water loss in the fruit. These findings confirm PG1's role in apple fruit softening and suggests that this is achieved in part by reducing cellular adhesion. This is consistent with previous studies carried out in strawberry but not with those performed in tomato. In apple PG1 also appears to influence other fruit texture characters such as juiciness and water loss.

  14. Down-regulation of POLYGALACTURONASE1 alters firmness, tensile strength and water loss in apple (Malus x domestica) fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background While there is now a significant body of research correlating apple (Malus x domestica) fruit softening with the cell wall hydrolase ENDO-POLYGALACTURONASE1 (PG1), there is currently little knowledge of its physiological effects in planta. This study examined the effect of down regulation of PG1 expression in ‘Royal Gala’ apples, a cultivar that typically has high levels of PG1, and softens during fruit ripening. Results PG1-suppressed ‘Royal Gala’ apples harvested from multiple seasons were firmer than controls after ripening, and intercellular adhesion was higher. Cell wall analyses indicated changes in yield and composition of pectin, and a higher molecular weight distribution of CDTA-soluble pectin. Structural analyses revealed more ruptured cells and free juice in pulled apart sections, suggesting improved integrity of intercellular connections and consequent cell rupture due to failure of the primary cell walls under stress. PG1-suppressed lines also had reduced expansion of cells in the hypodermis of ripe apples, resulting in more densely packed cells in this layer. This change in morphology appears to be linked with reduced transpirational water loss in the fruit. Conclusions These findings confirm PG1’s role in apple fruit softening and suggests that this is achieved in part by reducing cellular adhesion. This is consistent with previous studies carried out in strawberry but not with those performed in tomato. In apple PG1 also appears to influence other fruit texture characters such as juiciness and water loss. PMID:22856470

  15. Down-regulation of POLYGALACTURONASE1 alters firmness, tensile strength and water loss in apple (Malus x domestica fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Ross G

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is now a significant body of research correlating apple (Malus x domestica fruit softening with the cell wall hydrolase ENDO-POLYGALACTURONASE1 (PG1, there is currently little knowledge of its physiological effects in planta. This study examined the effect of down regulation of PG1 expression in ‘Royal Gala’ apples, a cultivar that typically has high levels of PG1, and softens during fruit ripening. Results PG1-suppressed ‘Royal Gala’ apples harvested from multiple seasons were firmer than controls after ripening, and intercellular adhesion was higher. Cell wall analyses indicated changes in yield and composition of pectin, and a higher molecular weight distribution of CDTA-soluble pectin. Structural analyses revealed more ruptured cells and free juice in pulled apart sections, suggesting improved integrity of intercellular connections and consequent cell rupture due to failure of the primary cell walls under stress. PG1-suppressed lines also had reduced expansion of cells in the hypodermis of ripe apples, resulting in more densely packed cells in this layer. This change in morphology appears to be linked with reduced transpirational water loss in the fruit. Conclusions These findings confirm PG1’s role in apple fruit softening and suggests that this is achieved in part by reducing cellular adhesion. This is consistent with previous studies carried out in strawberry but not with those performed in tomato. In apple PG1 also appears to influence other fruit texture characters such as juiciness and water loss.

  16. High strength air-dried aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2012-11-06

    A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

  17. Comparative study on the tensile bond strength and marginal fit of complete veneer cast metal crowns using various luting agents: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Devi Parameswari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several commercially available luting agents are used to cement the dental restorations such as intra-coronal, extra-coronal, and fixed partial dentures. Tensile bond strength (TBS and accurate marginal fit are the essential factors to determine the good clinical results in fixed prosthesis. The retentivity of the luting cements is assessed by their adhesive capacity over the tooth surface and metal surface. Generally, the adhesive ability has been evaluated with in vitro testing, with tensile bond tests. The failure of fixed prosthesis may be happened as a result of incomplete seating during cementation. Most research on cementation of crowns relates seating failure to the thickness of the cement film. Materials and Methods: The study is divided into four groups with 10 samples for each of the luting cement taken up for testing TBS and four groups with 5 samples for each luting agent chosen for assessing marginal fit. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: In this in vitro study, the TBS of luting cements, and marginal fit in relation to luting cements were tested by using appropriate testing devices. The TBS of cement is measured using universal testing machine, and the results are tabulated. The marginal gap that exists between the margin of the cast metal crown, and the finish line is measured using travelling microscope before and after cementation. The difference between these two values gives the discrepancy that is due to the film thickness of cement used for luting the restoration. Summary and Conclusion: The TBS value of zinc phosphate cement and glass ionomer cement were found to be almost same. The chemical adhesiveness of the glass ionomer with calcium ions of enamel and dentin may be the attributed reason (ionic bonding. In this study, the polycarboxylate is the one that showed low TBS, and it may be attributed to the weakness of the cement due to reduced film thickness, though this cement has

  18. Effect of microstructure on the fracture response of advanced high strength steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark David

    The effect of constituent hardness on formability performance for higher-strength dual phase (DP) steels was evaluated. A commercially-produced DP steel with 1080 MPa ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was processed to create eight additional constituent hardness conditions by tempering and cold-rolling, processes that primarily affected constituent hardness properties. Using nanoindentation, ferrite and martensite hardness values for the nine conditions of the DP steel (as-received, four as-tempered, four temper cold-rolled) provided a range of hardness values to evaluate formability performance. Formability performance for the nine steel conditions was evaluated using tensile and hole expansion testing. A decrease in martensite/ferrite hardness ratio corresponded to an increase in hole expansion ratio (HER), and an increase in yield strength (YS). A lower hardness ratio (increased similarity of ferrite and martensite hardness) was interpreted to increase strain-sharing between ferrite and martensite, which suppressed plastic strain localization to higher stresses for the case of YS, and to higher formability limits for the case of HER. A lower hardness ratio corresponded to a decrease in work-hardening, and was interpreted to be caused by the suppression of strain localization in ferrite. Multiple studies from literature correlated HER to tensile properties, and the nine steel conditions produced consistent trends with the data reported in each study, confirming the experimental HER and tensile properties obtained in the current study are consistent with literature. The microstructural response to plastic deformation was evaluated using two DP steels with equivalent UTS and different hardness ratios. Nanoindentation analyses on tensile specimens deformed to the UTS revealed a greater increase in ferrite hardness for the higher hardness ratio steel, interpreted to be caused by the greater amount of work hardening. EBSD crystallographic orientation maps for the two DP

  19. Comparison and Analysis of Steel Frame Based on High Strength Column and Normal Strength Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taiyu; An, Yuwei

    2018-01-01

    The anti-seismic performance of high strength steel has restricted its industrialization in civil buildings. In order to study the influence of high strength steel column on frame structure, three models are designed through MIDAS/GEN finite element software. By comparing the seismic performance and economic performance of the three models, the three different structures are comprehensively evaluated to provide some references for the development of high strength steel in steel structure.

  20. High-Temperature Tensile Flow Behavior of Caliber-Rolled Mg-3Al-1Zn Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiphode, R. L.; Narayana Murty, S. V. S.; Prabhu, N.; Kashyap, B. P.

    2015-07-01

    Mg-3Al-1Zn (AZ31) alloy was caliber rolled isothermally in the temperature range of 523 K to 723 K (250 °C to 450 °C) to develop fine grains of 3 to 13 µm. Tensile tests by constant initial strain rate as well as differential strain rate test techniques were conducted over the temperature range of 493 K to 723 K (220 °C to 450 °C) and strain rate range of 10-5 to 10-1 s-1. Maximum tensile elongation of 182 pct was obtained at test temperature of 723 K (450 °C) and strain rate of 10-3 s-1 in the sample obtained from caliber rolling at 723 K (450 °C), in spite of its large grain size of 13 µm. The strain rate sensitivity index ` m' was found to vary from 0.08 to 0.33 and activation energy for deformation ` Q' varied from 30 to 185 kJ mol-1 depending on test condition and caliber-rolling condition. These variations in m and Q values are explained by the difference in prior grain size, texture, and twins developed as a function of caliber-rolling temperature, and further by the concomitant microstructural change occurring during tensile test itself. The presence of twins and orientation of grains influences the parameters of the constitutive relation to varying extent.

  1. Experimental evaluation of the fretting fatigue behavior of high-strength steel monostrands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Jan; Fischer, Gregor; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the fretting fatigue behavior of pretensioned high-strength steel monostrands is investigated. A method based on the digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to quantify the relative movement between individual wires along the length of the monostrand. The experimental data...... indicate that the interwire movement due to transverse deformations is highest at the neutral axis of the monostrand. The results showthat the midspan and the anchorage of the monostrand are the two locationswhere the combination of tensile strains and the interwire friction is the most unfavorable...

  2. Fabrication of cellulose self-assemblies and high-strength ordered cellulose films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zaiwu; Zhang, Jingjing; Jiang, Anning; Lv, Wenting; Wang, Yuewen; Geng, Hongjuan; Wang, Jin; Qin, Menghua

    2015-03-06

    Based on the formation of cellulose hydrogels in NaOH/urea aqueous solvent media, cellulose self-assembly precursor is acquired. It is proved that the water uptake capability of the cellulose hydrogels depends highly on the cross-link degree (CLD) of cellulose. With varying CLD and concentration of cellulose, a variety of morphologies of cellulose self-assemblies, including sheets with perfect morphology, high-aspect-ratio fibers, and disorganized segments and network, are formed through evaporation. Furthermore, cellulose films are fabricated by diecasting and evaporating the cellulose hydrogels, resulting in a 3D-ordered structure of closely stacking of cellulose sheets. The mechanical test indicates both tensile strength and flexibility of the cellulose films are greatly improved, which is attributed to the formation of the orderly stacking of cellulose sheets. The study is expected to lay an important foundation on the preparation of ordered and high-strength cellulose materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High strain rate and quasi-static tensile behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V after cyclic damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verleysen P.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is common that energy absorbing structural elements are subjected to a number of loading cycles before a crash event. Several studies have shown that previous fatigue can significantly influence the tensile properties of some materials, and hence the behaviour of structural elements made of them. However, when the capacity of absorbing energy of engineering materials is determined, fresh material without any fatigue damage is most often used. This study investigates the effect of fatigue damage on the dynamic tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V in thin-sheet form. Results are completed with tests at quasi-static strain rates and observations of the fracture surfaces, and compared with results obtained from other alloys and steel grades. The experiments show that the dynamic properties of Ti-6Al-4V are not affected by a number of fatigue loading cycles high enough to significantly reduce the energy absorbing capabilities of EDM machined samples.

  4. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-02

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400-450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0-1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3-5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  5. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400-450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0-1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3-5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  6. Light-curing efficiency of dental adhesives by gallium nitride violet-laser diode determined in terms of ultimate micro-tensile strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Kato, Junji; De Munck, Jan; Hatayama, Hitoshi; Haruyama, Akiko; Yoshinari, Masao; Takase, Yasuaki; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Tsunoda, Masatake

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether violet-laser diode (VLD) can be used as light-curing source. The ultimate (micro-)tensile strength (μTS) of three adhesives was determined when cured by VLD in comparison with curing by two different types of commercial LED light-curing units. One VLD (VLM 500) and two LED units (Curenos and G-Light Prima) were used to cure the adhesive resin of the two-step self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE Bond, Tokuso Mac Bond II, and FL-Bond II. A 0.6-mm thick acrylic mould was filled with adhesive resin and cured for 60 s. After 24-h water storage, specimens were trimmed into an hourglass shape with a width of 1.2 mm at the narrowest part, after which the μTS was determined (n=10). In addition, the light transmittance of each adhesive was characterized using a UV-vis-NIR spectrometer. No significant difference in curing efficiency between VLD and LED were observed for both Tokuso Mac Bond II and FL-Bond II (p>0.05). For Clearfil SE Bond, the μTS of VLD-cured specimens was higher than that of the specimens cured by the LED Curenos unit (p<0.05). Spectrometry revealed that this marked difference must be attributed to a different light transmittance of Clearfil SE Bond for visible blue light versus for the lower area of UV and visible violet light. In conclusion, A GaN-based violet laser diode can be used as light-curing source to initiate polymerization of dental resins.

  7. Design of High Compressive Strength Concrete Mix without Additives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    N, M, Akasha; Mohamed, Mansour Ahmed; Abdelrazig, Nasreen Maruiod

    2017-01-01

    .... The selected materials, with high specification using special production techniques, the properties ,the mix design procedure and mix proportion of the high strength concrete (HSC) were discussed...

  8. Hydroformability of 980MPa and 1180MPa ultra-high strength ERW steel tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuji; Katsumura, Tatsuro; Aratani, Masatoshi; Sonobe, Osamu; Kato, Yasushi

    2013-12-01

    High strength steel tubes have attracted attention as materials for reducing auto body weight. However, there have been few reports on hydroforming using materials with nominal tensile strengths exceeding 980MPa. Therefore, free bulge forming tests and rectangular section bulge forming tests were carried out with electric resistance welded (ERW) tubes having nominal tensile strengths of 980MPa and 1180MPa. These steels are dual-phase steels consisting of martensite and ferrite. In the free bulge forming tests, the limiting bulging ratio (LBR) under axial feeding was 17% for the 980MPa material and 5% for the 1180MPa material. In the rectangular section bulge tests with a bulging ratio of 4%, it was possible to avoid rupture of the 1180MPa material at the heat-affected zone (HAZ) by applying axial feed loading or selecting the proper welded seam position. Under the same rectangular section bulging test conditions, forming of the 980MPa material without defects was possible regardless of the axial feeding condition and selection of the welded seam position.

  9. Effect of tension lap splice on the behavior of high strength concrete (HSC beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El-Azab

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, many research efforts have been carried out on the bond strength between normal strength concrete (NSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. Many codes gave a minimum splice length for tension and compression reinforcement as a factor of the bar diameter depending on many parameters such as concrete strength, steel yield stress, shape of bar end, shape of bar surface and also bar location. Also, codes gave another restriction about the percentage of total reinforcement to be spliced at the same time. Comparatively limited attention has been directed toward the bond between high strength concrete (HSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. HSC has high modulus of elasticity, high density and long-term durability. This research presents an experimental study on the bond between high strength concrete (HSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. It reports the influence of several parameters on bond in splices. The parameters covered are casting position, splice length as a factor of bar diameter, bar diameter and reinforcement ratio. The research involved tests on sixteen simply-supported beams of 1800 mm span, 200 mm width and 400 mm thickness made of HSC. In each beam, the total tensile steel bars were spliced in the constant moment zone. Crack pattern, crack propagation, cracking load, failure load and mi span deflection were recorded and analyzed to study the mentioned parameters effect.

  10. The strain-rate sensitivity of high-strength high-toughness steels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilmore, M.F. (AFRL/MNMW, Eglin AFB, FL); Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the strain-rate sensitivity of four high strength, high-toughness alloys at strain rates ranging from 0.0002 s-1 to 200 s-1: Aermet 100, a modified 4340, modified HP9-4-20, and a recently developed Eglin AFB steel alloy, ES-1c. A refined dynamic servohydraulic method was used to perform tensile tests over this entire range. Each of these alloys exhibit only modest strain-rate sensitivity. Specifically, the strain-rate sensitivity exponent m, is found to be in the range of 0.004-0.007 depending on the alloy. This corresponds to a {approx}10% increase in the yield strength over the 7-orders of magnitude change in strain-rate. Interestingly, while three of the alloys showed a concominant {approx}3-10% drop in their ductility with increasing strain-rate, the ES1-c alloy actually exhibited a 25% increase in ductility with increasing strain-rate. Fractography suggests the possibility that at higher strain-rates ES-1c evolves towards a more ductile dimple fracture mode associated with microvoid coalescence.

  11. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength of a polyvinyl acetate-based resilient liner following various denture base surface pre-treatment methods and immersion in artificial salivary medium: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob M Philip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: This study was formulated to evaluate and estimate the influence of various denture base resin surface pre-treatments (chemical and mechanical and combinations upon tensile bond strength between a poly vinyl acetate-based denture liner and a denture base resin. Materials and Methods: A universal testing machine was used for determining the bond strength of the liner to surface pre-treated acrylic resin blocks. The data was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the t-test (α =.05. Results: This study infers that denture base surface pre-treatment can improve the adhesive tensile bond strength between the liner and denture base specimens. The results of this study infer that chemical, mechanical, and mechano-chemical pre-treatments will have different effects on the bond strength of the acrylic soft resilient liner to the denture base. Conclusion: Among the various methods of pre-treatment of denture base resins, it was inferred that the mechano-chemical pre-treatment method with air-borne particle abrasion followed by monomer application exhibited superior bond strength than other methods with the resilient liner. Hence, this method could be effectively used to improve bond strength between liner and denture base and thus could minimize delamination of liner from the denture base during function.

  12. Alkyl chitosan film-high strength, functional biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Xing, Cao; Xin, Shen; Shitao, Yu; Feng, Su; Shiwei, Liu; Fusheng, Liu; Congxia, Xie

    2017-11-01

    Biofilm with strong tensile strength is a topic item in the area of tissue engineering, medicine engineering, and so forth. Here we introduced an alkyl chitosan film with strong tensile strength and its possibility for an absorbable anticoagulation material in vivo was tested in the series of blood test, such as dynamic coagulation time, plasma recalcification time and hemolysis. Alkyl chitosan film was a better biomaterial than traditional chitosan film in the anticoagulation, tissue compatibility and cell compatibility. The unique trait of alkyl chitosan film may be for its greater contact angle and hydrophobicity ability to reduce the adsorption capacity for the blood component and the activity of fibrinolytic enzymes, enhance the antibacterial capacity than chitosan film. Moreover, none of chitosan film or butyl chitosan film exhibited quick inflammation or other disadvantage and degraded quickly by implanted test. Therefore, Alkyl chitosan film is of prospective properties as an implantable, absorbable agent for tissue heals, and this material need further research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 3034-3041, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strengths of total-etch adhesives and self-etch adhesives with single and multiple consecutive applications: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Mandava Deepthi; Ajitha P; Narayanan L

    2009-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluates the effect of single and multiple consecutive applications of adhesives on the tensile bond strength. The currently available adhesives follow either the total-etch or the self-etch concept. However, in both techniques the uniformity and thickness of the adhesive layer plays a significant role in the development of a good bond. Materials and Methods: Sixty composite-dentin bonded specimens were prepared using a total-etch adhesive (Gluma) and another 60 using a sel...

  14. Investigation of Material Performance Degradation for High-Strength Aluminum Alloy Using Acoustic Emission Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibo Ai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural materials damages are always in the form of micro-defects or cracks. Traditional or conventional methods such as micro and macro examination, tensile, bend, impact and hardness tests can be used to detect the micro damage or defects. However, these tests are destructive in nature and not in real-time, thus a non-destructive and real-time monitoring and characterization of the material damage is needed. This study is focused on the application of a non-destructive and real-time acoustic emission (AE method to study material performance degradation of a high-strength aluminum alloy of high-speed train gearbox shell. By applying data relative analysis and interpretation of AE signals, the characteristic parameters of materials performance were achieved and the failure criteria of the characteristic parameters for the material tensile damage process were established. The results show that the AE method and signal analysis can be used to accomplish the non-destructive and real-time detection of the material performance degradation process of the high-strength aluminum alloy. This technique can be extended to other engineering materials.

  15. Influência de diferentes condições higrotérmicas na resistência à tração de compósitos de fibra de carbono/epóxi modificada Influence of different hygrothermal conditions on the tensile strength of carbon/epoxy 8552 composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antônio P. Cunha

    2006-01-01

    composites ([0/0]s were investigated. The longitudinal tensile strength results at room temperature was not significantly affected by exposing the samples to either the humidity-controlled chamber or the salt spray chamber. However, the specimens submitted to the humidity-controlled chamber and tested at elevated temperature (80 °C and 90% RH presented a decrease in the longitudinal tensile strength. A small decrease in the transversal tensile strength results was observed during room temperature tests in the samples submitted to salt spray chamber. A higher decrease in the transversal tensile strength was verified in the samples submitted to the humidity-chamber. Samples submitted to the salt spray chamber tested at elevated temperature showed a small decrease in the transversal tensile strength (11%. A drastic reduction in the strength (51% was observed in the samples submitted to the humidity-chamber and tested at high temperature. A fractograph study by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM was performed in every single sample involved in the tests. These results highlight that the elevated temperatures affect the polymeric matrix.

  16. A Feasibility Study of High-Strength Bi-2223 Conductor for High-Field Solenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godeke, A; Abraimov, D V; Arroyo, E; Barret, N; Bird, M D; Francis, A; Jaroszynski, J; Kurteva, D V; Markiewicz, W D; Marks, E L; Marshall, W S; McRae, D M; Noyes, P D; Pereira, R C P; Viouchkov, Y L; Walsh, R P; White, J M

    2017-03-01

    We performed a feasibility study on a high-strength Bi2-x Pb x Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x (Bi-2223) tape conductor for high-field solenoid applications. The investigated conductor, DI-BSCCO Type HT-XX, is a pre-production version of Type HT-NX, which has recently become available from Sumitomo Electric Industries (SEI). It is based on their DI-BSCCO Type H tape, but laminated with a high-strength Ni-alloy. We used stress-strain characterizations, single- and double-bend tests, easy- and hard-way bent coil-turns at various radii, straight and helical samples in up to 31.2 T background field, and small 20-turn coils in up to 17 T background field to systematically determine the electro-mechanical limits in magnet-relevant conditions. In longitudinal tensile tests at 77 K, we found critical stress- and strain-levels of 516 MPa and 0.57%, respectively. In three decidedly different experiments we detected an amplification of the allowable strain with a combination of pure bending and Lorentz loading to ≥ 0.92% (calculated elastically at the outer tape edge). This significant strain level, and the fact that it is multi-filamentary conductor and available in the reacted and insulated state, makes DI-BSCCO HT-NX highly suitable for very high-field solenoids, for which high current densities and therefore high loads are required to retain manageable magnet dimensions.

  17. Influence of Different Drying Conditions on High Strength Concrete Compressive Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Safan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different drying conditions on the compressive strength and strength development rates of high strength concrete up to an age of 28 days was evaluated. Two HSC mixes with and without silica fume addition were used to cast cubes of 10 cm size. The cubes were stored in different drying conditions until the age of testing at 3, 7, 28 days.

  18. Dissimilar ultrasonic spot welding of Mg-Al and Mg-high strength low alloy steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound dissimilar lap joints were achieved via ultrasonic spot welding (USW, which is a solid-state joining technique. The addition of Sn interlayer during USW effectively blocked the formation of brittle al12Mg17 intermetallic compound in the Mg-Al dissimilar joints without interlayer, and led to the presence of a distinctive composite-like Sn and Mg2Sn eutectic structure in both Mg-Al and Mg-high strength low alloy (HSLA steel joints. The lap shear strength of both types of dissimilar joints with a Sn interlayer was significantly higher than that of the corresponding dissimilar joints without interlayer. Failure during the tensile lap shear tests occurred mainly in the mode of cohesive failure in the Mg-Al dissimilar joints and in the mode of partial cohesive failure and partial nugget pull-out in the Mg-HSLA steel dissimilar joints.

  19. The effect of air abrasion of metal implant abutments on the tensile bond strength of three luting agents used to cement implant superstructures: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugdev, Jasvinder; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Lynch, Edward

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effect of airborne particle abrasion of metal implant abutments on tensile bond strength (TBS) of TempBond, Retrieve, and Premier implant cements. Specimens were designed to replicate a single metal implant crown cemented to both smooth and airborne particle-abraded Osteo-Ti implant abutments with zero degrees of taper. Twenty castings were fabricated and cemented to either a smooth surface abutment (SSA) or to an airborne particle-abraded abutment (AAA). TBS was measured with a 50-kg load and a crosshead speed of 0.5 cm/min in a universal testing machine. Each cement was tested 10 times on both abutment types. The mean TBS values (standard deviations, 95% confidence intervals) of SSAs for TempBond, Retrieve, and Premier cements were 115.89 N (26.44, 96.98-134.81), 134.43 N (36.95, 108.25-160.60), and 132.51 N (55.10, 93.09-171.93), respectively. The corresponding values for AAAs were 129.69 N (30.39, 107.95-151.43), 298.67 N (80.36, 241.19-356.16), and 361.17 N (133.23, 265.86-456.48), respectively. There was no significant difference in TBS among the dental cements when used with an SSA. Air abrasion of abutments did not increase the TBS of TempBond but significantly increased crown retention with Retrieve and Premier. For SSAs, all failures were adhesive on the abutment surface; for AAAs, mostly cohesive cement failures occurred. The retention of copings cemented with Retrieve or Premier to zero-degree-taper abutments was significantly increased after airborne particle abrasion of the abutments. However, this was not significant when TempBond was used. Airborne particle abrasion of abutments and the use of Retrieve or Premier can be recommended for nonretrievable prostheses. Although TempBond functioned similarly to the two other cements in SSAs, it is advisable to limit its use to provisional prostheses; its long-term performance needs to be assessed clinically.

  20. Strength of precast concrete shear joints reinforced with high-strength wire ropes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Henrik B.; Hoang, Linh Cao; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    This paper concerns the in-plane shear strength of connections between precast concrete wall elements reinforced with looped high-strength wire ropes. The looped wire ropes are pre-installed in so-called ‘wire boxes’ which function as shear keys. Although only a small amount of research...... on the shear strength of such connections can be found in the literature, this type of connection is increasingly being used because wire ropes are much more construction-friendly than traditional U-bars. A rigid plastic upper bound model for the shear strength of wall connections reinforced with looped wire...

  1. Numerical Analysis on the High-Strength Concrete Beams Ultimate Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarzewski, Piotr; Stolarski, Adam

    2017-10-01

    Development of technologies of high-strength concrete (HSC) beams production, with the aim of creating a secure and durable material, is closely linked with the numerical models of real objects. The three-dimensional nonlinear finite element models of reinforced high-strength concrete beams with a complex geometry has been investigated in this study. The numerical analysis is performed using the ANSYS finite element package. The arc-length (A-L) parameters and the adaptive descent (AD) parameters are used with Newton-Raphson method to trace the complete load-deflection curves. Experimental and finite element modelling results are compared graphically and numerically. Comparison of these results indicates the correctness of failure criteria assumed for the high-strength concrete and the steel reinforcement. The results of numerical simulation are sensitive to the modulus of elasticity and the shear transfer coefficient for an open crack assigned to high-strength concrete. The full nonlinear load-deflection curves at mid-span of the beams, the development of strain in compressive concrete and the development of strain in tensile bar are in good agreement with the experimental results. Numerical results for smeared crack patterns are qualitatively agreeable as to the location, direction, and distribution with the test data. The model was capable of predicting the introduction and propagation of flexural and diagonal cracks. It was concluded that the finite element model captured successfully the inelastic flexural behaviour of the beams to failure.

  2. Development of K-Basin High-Strength Homogeneous Sludge Simulants and Correlations Between Unconfined Compressive Strength and Shear Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Yasuo; Baer, Ellen BK; Chun, Jaehun; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sande, Susan; Buchmiller, William C.

    2011-02-20

    K-Basin sludge will be stored in the Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSCs) at an interim storage location on Central Plateau before being treated and packaged for disposal. During the storage period, sludge in the STSCs may consolidate/agglomerate, potentially resulting in high-shear-strength material. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) plans to use water jets to retrieve K-Basin sludge after the interim storage. STP has identified shear strength to be a key parameter that should be bounded to verify the operability and performance of sludge retrieval systems. Determining the range of sludge shear strength is important to gain high confidence that a water-jet retrieval system can mobilize stored K-Basin sludge from the STSCs. The shear strength measurements will provide a basis for bounding sludge properties for mobilization and erosion. Thus, it is also important to develop potential simulants to investigate these phenomena. Long-term sludge storage tests conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) show that high-uranium-content K-Basin sludge can self-cement and form a strong sludge with a bulk shear strength of up to 65 kPa. Some of this sludge has 'paste' and 'chunks' with shear strengths of approximately 3-5 kPa and 380-770 kPa, respectively. High-uranium-content sludge samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (e.g., 185 C, 10 hours) have been observed to form agglomerates with a shear strength up to 170 kPa. These high values were estimated by measured unconfined compressive strength (UCS) obtained with a pocket penetrometer. Due to its ease of use, it is anticipated that a pocket penetrometer will be used to acquire additional shear strength data from archived K-Basin sludge samples stored at the PNNL Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) hot cells. It is uncertain whether the pocket penetrometer provides accurate shear strength measurements of the material. To assess the bounding material strength and

  3. Behaviour of high-strength concrete incorporating ground ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of tests were carried out on concrete incorporating Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBFS) of “Mittal steel Annaba” (Algeria) ... Keywords: High strength concrete- fillers- high-temperature- polypropylene fibres- Ground granulated. Furnace Slag ..... hybrid fibre reinforced high strength concrete after heat exposition ...

  4. Fatigue strength of repaired cracks in welded connections made of very high strength steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyel, A.

    2017-01-01

    For cyclically loaded structures, fatigue design becomes one of the important design criteria. The state of art shows that with modification of the conventional structural design methodology, the use of very high strength steels may have a positive effect on fatigue strength of welded connections.

  5. Strength of precast concrete shear joints reinforced with high-strength wire ropes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Henrik B.; Hoang, Linh Cao; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    This paper concerns the in-plane shear strength of connections between precast concrete wall elements reinforced with looped high-strength wire ropes. The looped wire ropes are pre-installed in so-called ‘wire boxes’ which function as shear keys. Although only a small amount of research on the sh...

  6. Differentiation of molecular chain entanglement structure through laser Raman spectrum measurement of High strength PET fibers under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, D.; Takarada, W.; Kikutani, T.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism for the improvement of mechanical properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibers based on the concept of controlling the state of molecular entanglement. For this purpose, five different PET fibers were prepared through either the conventional melt spinning and drawing/annealing process or the high-speed melt spinning process. In both cases, the melt spinning process was designed so as to realize different Deborah number conditions. The prepared fibers were subjected to the laser Raman spectroscopy measurement and the characteristics of the scattering peak at around 1616 cm‑1, which corresponds to the C-C/C=C stretching mode of the aromatic ring in the main chain, were investigated in detail. It was revealed that the fibers drawn and annealed after the melt spinning process of lower Deborah number showed higher tensile strength as well as lower value of full width at half maximum (FWHM) in the laser Raman spectrum. Narrow FWHM was considered to represent the homogeneous state of entanglement structure, which may lead to the higher strength and toughness of fibers because individual molecular chains tend to bare similar level of tensile stress when the fiber is stretched. In case of high-speed spun fibers prepared with a high Deborah number condition, the FWHM was narrow presumably because much lower tensile stress in comparison with the drawing/annealing process was applied when the fiber structure was developed, however the value increased significantly upon applying tensile load to the fibers during the laser Raman spectrum measurement. From these results, it was concluded that the Laser Raman spectroscopy could differentiate molecular chain entanglement structure of various fiber samples, in that low FWHM, which corresponds to either homogeneous state of molecular entanglement or lower level of mean residual stress, and small increase of FWTH upon applying tensile stress are considered to be the

  7. HIGH IONIC STRENGTH OR PRESENCE OF INOSITOL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    has all the characteristics associated with the reaction of CysF9(93)β, a sulphydryl group that is invariant in all mammalian haemoglobins. The slow kinetic phase is assigned to CysH3(125)β. Quantitative analysis of the pH dependence of kapp for this phase at 50 mM ionic strength gave an unusually low pKa of 6.0 for this ...

  8. HIGH IONIC STRENGTH OR PRESENCE OF INOSITOL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    dependence of kapp for this phase at 50 mM ionic strength gave an unusually low pKa of 6.0 for this sulphydryl group. Published data on guinea pig haemoglobin show that it has a much-enhanced acid Bohr effect compared to human haemoglobin. This indicates that CysH3(125)β functions as an acid Bohr group in guinea ...

  9. Alloy and composition dependence of hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility in high-strength steel fasteners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahimi, S. V.; Yue, S.; Sriraman, K. R.

    2017-06-01

    High-strength steel fasteners characterized by tensile strengths above 1100 MPa are often used in critical applications where a failure can have catastrophic consequences. Preventing hydrogen embrittlement (HE) failure is a fundamental concern implicating the entire fastener supply chain. Research is typically conducted under idealized conditions that cannot be translated into know-how prescribed in fastener industry standards and practices. Additionally, inconsistencies and even contradictions in fastener industry standards have led to much confusion and many preventable or misdiagnosed fastener failures. HE susceptibility is a function of the material condition, which is comprehensively described by the metallurgical and mechanical properties. Material strength has a first-order effect on HE susceptibility, which increases significantly above 1200 MPa and is characterized by a ductile-brittle transition. For a given concentration of hydrogen and at equal strength, the critical strength above which the ductile-brittle transition begins can vary due to second-order effects of chemistry, tempering temperature and sub-microstructure. Additionally, non-homogeneity of the metallurgical structure resulting from poorly controlled heat treatment, impurities and non-metallic inclusions can increase HE susceptibility of steel in ways that are measurable but unpredictable. Below 1200 MPa, non-conforming quality is often the root cause of real-life failures. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  10. Prospective high strength steel utilizing TRIP effect; Hentai yuki sosei koka wo riyoshita jisedai kokyodo usukoban

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Y.; Kimura, N.; Itami, a.; Hiwatashi, S.; Kawano, O.; Sakata, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-11-29

    The transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) means the large extension of chemically unstable austenitic {gamma} phase when it is transformed into martensite by the addition of dynamic energy. The application of TRIP effect is promising to the auto-body use steel plate because thin stainless steel plates excelling in bulging properties are producible. The present paper explained the enlarging mechanism of elongation, principle of production, examples of production on the actual line, formability, weldability and fatigue durability. Than that of the different conventional steel plates, a better combination of both strength and elongation was recorded through the actual line trial production of cold and hot rolled steel plates which were 590 to 980N/mm{sup 2} in tensile strength. Their apparent superiority in bulging properties was confirmed in the vicinity of plain strain, while their deep drawability was also known to be good through a TZP test. The presently developed steel excelled the conventional high-strength steel in strength at spot welding, while its fatigue strength was higher even than that of the dual-phase steel so far regarded as the best in it. 13 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Mechanical strength and thermophysical properties of PM212: A high temperature self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Phillip M.; Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Martineau, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A powder metallurgy composite, PM212, composed of metal bonded chromium carbide and solid lubricants is shown to be self-lubricating to a maximum application temperature of 900 C. The high temperature compressive strength, tensile strength, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity data needed to design PM212 sliding contact bearings and seals are reported for sintered and isostatically pressed (HIPed) versions of PM212. Other properties presented are room temperature density, hardness, and elastic modulus. In general, both versions appear to have adequate strength to be considered as sliding contact bearing materials, but the HIPed version, which is fully dense, is much stronger than the sintered version which contains about 20 percent pore volume. The sintered material is less costly to make, but the HIPed version is better where high compressive strength is important.

  12. Bacterial cellulose gels with high mechanical strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Yukari; Sakata, Tadanori; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Tajima, Kenji

    2015-02-01

    A composite structure was formed between polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) and bacterial cellulose (BC) gels swollen in polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a solvent (BC/PEG gel) to improve the mechanical strength of the gels. The mechanical strength under compression and the rheostatic properties of the gels were evaluated. The compression test results indicated that the mechanical strength of the gels depended on the weight percent of cross-linked PEGDA in the gel, the chain length between the cross-linking points, and the cross-linking density of PEGDA polymers. The PEGDA polymers around the cellulose fibers were resistant to pressure; thus, the BC/PEG-PEGDA gel was stronger than the BC/PEG gel under compression. The results of transmittance measurements and thermomechanical analysis showed that the rheostatic properties of the gels were retained even after composite structure formation. BC/PEG-PEGDA gels, which are expected to be biocompatible, may be useful for clinical applications as a soft material. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High-strength carbon nanotube/carbon composite fibers via chemical vapor infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaegeun; Kim, Teawon; Jung, Yeonsu; Jung, Kihoon; Park, Junbeom; Lee, Dong-Myeong; Jeong, Hyeon Su; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Park, Chong Rae; Lee, Kun-Hong; Kim, Seung Min

    2016-12-07

    In this study, we have developed an efficient and scalable method for improving the mechanical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers. The mechanical properties of as-synthesized CNT fibers are primarily limited by their porous structures and the weak bonding between adjacent CNTs. These result in inefficient load transfer, leading to low tensile strength and modulus. In order to overcome these limitations, we have adopted chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to efficiently fill the internal voids of the CNT fibers with carbon species which are thermally decomposed from gas phase hydrocarbon. Through the optimization of the processing time, temperature, and gas flow velocity, we have confirmed that carbon species formed by the thermal decomposition of acetylene (C2H2) gas successfully infiltrated into porous CNT fibers and densified them at relatively low temperatures (650-750 °C). As a result, after CVI processing of the as-synthesized CNT fibers under optimum conditions, the tensile strength and modulus increased from 0.6 GPa to 1.7 GPa and from 25 GPa to 127 GPa, respectively. The CVI technique, combined with the direct spinning of CNT fibers, can open up a route to the fast and scalable fabrication of high performance CNT/C composite fibers. In addition, the CVI technique is a platform technology that can be easily adapted into other nano-carbon based yarn-like fibers such as graphene fibers.

  14. Supramolecular gels with high strength by tuning of calix[4]arene-derived networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Ha; Park, Jaehyeon; Park, Jin-Woo; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Jaworski, Justyn; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2015-03-01

    Supramolecular gels comprised of low-molecular-weight gelators are generally regarded as mechanically weak and unable to support formation of free-standing structures, hence, their practical use with applied loads has been limited. Here, we reveal a technique for in situ generation of high tensile strength supramolecular hydrogels derived from low-molecular-weight gelators. By controlling the concentration of hydrochloric acid during hydrazone formation between calix-[4]arene-based gelator precursors, we tune the mechanical and ductile properties of the resulting gel. Organogels formed without hydrochloric acid exhibit impressive tensile strengths, higher than 40 MPa, which is the strongest among self-assembled gels. Hydrogels, prepared by solvent exchange of organogels in water, show 7,000- to 10,000-fold enhanced mechanical properties because of further hydrazone formation. This method of molding also allows the gels to retain shape after processing, and furthermore, we find organogels when prepared as gel electrolytes for lithium battery applications to have good ionic conductivity.

  15. Deformation behavior of a high strength multiphase steel at macro- and micro-scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diego-Calderón, I. de, E-mail: irenedediego.calderon@imdea.org [IMDEA Materials Institute, Calle Eric Kandel 2, Getafe 28906, Madrid (Spain); Santofimia, M.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Molina-Aldareguia, J.M.; Monclús, M.A.; Sabirov, I. [IMDEA Materials Institute, Calle Eric Kandel 2, Getafe 28906, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-12

    Advanced high strength steels via quenching and partitioning (Q and P) process are a mainstream trend in modern steel research. This work contributes to a better understanding of their local mechanical properties and local deformation behavior at the micro-scale in relation to their local microstructure. A low alloyed steel was subjected to Q and P heat treatments leading to the formation of complex multiphase microstructures. Nanoindentation tests were performed to measure nanohardness of individual phases and to generate 2D maps showing nanohardness distribution on the surface of the material. To study local in-plane plastic strain distribution during deformation, in situ tensile tests were carried out using the digital image correlation technique. Significant partitioning of plastic strain between phase microconstituents during tensile deformation is shown. The effect of the microstructure on the mechanical behavior of the Q and P processed steel is analyzed. The local plastic deformation behavior of individual phases is discussed with respect to their strength and their spatial orientation.

  16. Development of Low Carbon Niobium Bearing High Strength F-B Dual Phase Steel with High Hole Expansion Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Xia, Ming-sheng; Xiong, Zi-liu; Du, Yan-bing; Qiao, Zhi-ming; Zhang, Hong-bo

    In the study a low carbon niobium bearing high strength F-B dual phase automobile steel with high hole expansion property has been investigated. Steels of different chemical composition have been investigated by simulation experiments of controlled rolling and cooling process to study the influences of chemical elements, especially for C,Nb and Ti, and cooling pattern on the mechanical properties, flangeability and microstructure of strips. So-called 3-stages cooling pattern was adopted in simulation experiments, combining ultra fast cooling in first stage, air cooling in middle stage and fast cooling in the last stage, and at the end of run-out table the temperature of rolled pieces drop to below Bs point. Optical microstructure and SEM morphology have been observed. Results indicate that it is possible to obtain dual phase microstructure of polygonal ferrite plus bainite in adopting 3-stages cooling pattern. The low temperature coiling method using 3-step controlled cooling pattern after hot rolling is effective to produce low carbon Nb bearing steel with high balance of strength-ductility-flangeability, in addition, higher carbon content of steel tend to be detrimental to flangeability of steel, due to much carbide precipitation at ferrite boundary. Based on the results of simulation experiments mill trial has been carried out and hot rolled high strength steel with tensile strength higher as 600Mpa and hole expansion ratio higher as 100% has been developed successfully.

  17. A Study on Wet and Dry Tensile Properties of Wood pulp/Lyocell Wetlace Nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinjiang; Deng, Chao; Qu, Benchen; Zhan, Qu; Jin, Xiangyu

    2017-10-01

    A new biodegradable wood pulp/Lyocell moist wipe had been developed, which made from wetlaid/spunlace(wetlace) technology. The dry and wet tensile curve characteristics were described and the relationship between dry and wet strength in both machine direction (MD) and cross-machine direction (CD) were investigated. The results indicate that the fabricated wetlace materials are composed of the entanglements and cohesions of wood pulp/Lyocell fibres. The modulus and tensile strength of the materials were obviously decreased in wet state, and the tensile curves in the dry and wet state both can be divided into two parts. It is noted that there exists a high linear correlation between the dry and wet strength in MD or CD. Meanwhile, the diminished amplitude of wet strength in CD is larger than that of wet strength in MD and the relationship fluctuation between the wet and dry strength in CD is significantly higher than that in MD.

  18. Effect of microstructure on the high temperature strength of nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of these parameters on room temperature and high temperature strength of the composite up to 1300°C in ambient condition were studied. The high temperature flexural strength of the composite of all compositions increased at 1200 and 1300°C because of oxidation of Si3N4 phase and blunting crack front.

  19. High-Strength Aluminum Casting Alloy for High-Temperature Applications (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Project No. 97-10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    A new aluminum-silicon alloy has been successfully developed at Marshall Space Flight Center that has a significant improvement in tensile strength at elevated temperatures (550 to 700 F). For instance, the new alloy shows in average tensile strength of at least 90 percent higher than the current 390 aluminum piston alloy tested at 500 F. Compared to conventional aluminum alloys, automotive engines using the new piston alloy will have improved gas mileage, and may produce less air pollution in order to meet the future U.S. automotive legislative requirements for low hydrocarbon emissions. The projected cost for this alloy is less than $0.95/lb, and it readily allows the automotive components to be cast at a high production volume with a low, fully accounted cost. It is economically produced by pouring molten metal directly into conventional permanent steel molds or die casting.

  20. High Strength and Compatible Aluminum Alloy for Hydrogen-Peroxide Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a new high strength and Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) propellant compatible aluminum alloy for NASA Hyper-X vehicle's fuel tanks and structures. The tensile strength of the new alloy is more than 3 times stronger than the conventional 5254 alloy while it still maintains HP compatibility similar to 5254 (Class 1 category). The alloy development strategy consists of selecting certain rare earth and transition metals, with unique electrochemical properties, that will not act as catalysts to decompose liquid HP at the atomic level. Such elements will added to the aluminum alloy and the mixture will be cast and rolled into thin sheet metals. Test coupons are machined from sheet metals for HP long-term exposure testing and mechanical properties testing. In addition, the ability to weld the new alloy using Friction Stir Welding has also been explored. Currently, aluminum alloy 5254 is the state-of-the-art material for HP storage, but its yield strength is very low (420 ksi) and may not be suitable for the development of light-weight fuel tanks for Hyper-X vehicles. The new high strength and HP compatible alloy could represent an enabling material technology for NASA's Hyper-X vehicles, where flight weight reduction is a critical requirement. These X-planes are currently under studied as air-breathing hypersonic research vehicles featuring a lifting body configuration with a Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engine system.

  1. The assessment of bond strength between heat damaged concrete and high strength fibre reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M. Z. A. Mohd; Muhamad, K.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the bond strength between heat damaged concrete and high strength fibre reinforced concrete (HPFRC). Firstly, this paper presents the various steps taken to prepare the HPFRC with self-compacting property. The minimum targeted slump flow is 600 mm and minimum targeted compressive strength is 80 MPa. The key mix variables considered are such as type of superplasticizer, water cement ratio and silica fume content. Then, the bond strength between the heat damaged concrete with HPFRC was examined. The experimental parameters are heating temperature, surface treatment technique and curing method and the results show that, all experimental parameters are significantly affected the bond strength between heat damaged concrete and HPFRC.

  2. A High-Strength, Absorbable, Antibacterial Knotless Tissue Control Device for Fascial Closure

    OpenAIRE

    Nawrocki, Jesse G.; Nonnenmann, Heather; Mooney, Mark; Sutton, Nadia; Schmitz, Niels-Derrek

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review provides an overview of the STRATAFIX? SYMMETRIC PDS? Plus Knotless Tissue Control Device design and performance characteristics and highlights the device?s relevance for use in gynecological procedures. Various device testing was conducted on tensile strength, fixation tab mass comparison to conventional suture knot tower, initiation stitch strength, and wound holding strength to highlight the STRATAFIX? SYMMETRIC PDS? Plus Device?s key product attributes that m...

  3. Degradation of mechanical properties of cast Cr-Mo-V and Cr-W-V steam turbine casings after long-term service at elevated temperatures: Pt. 1:; Tensile properties, brittle fracture strength and Charpy impact properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzmann, M.; Man, J.; Vlach, B. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno (Czech Republic). Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie); Krumpos, J. (Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Plzen (Czech Republic). Inst. of Technology and Reliability of Machine Structures)

    1994-01-01

    The effect of elevated service temperature on tensile properties, brittle fracture strength and on the Charpy V-notch transition curve of Cr-Mo-V and Cr-W-V cast steels is presented. A lowering of the yield stress and ultimate tensile stress (softening) was observed with both types of cast steels after long-term exposure at elevated temperatures. The brittle fracture strength of Cr-Mo-V steel established by testing both the smooth bars [sigma][sub BF] and notch specimens [sigma][sub BF][sup *] at low temperatures was not influenced during exposure at elevated temperatures. The fracture appearance transition temperature (FATT) of this steel determined by impact Charpy test was also not affected by long-term exposure. Thus, it could be concluded that this type of cast steel was not embrittled during operation. On the contrary, a decrease in brittle fracture strength [sigma][sub BF][sup *] (250 MPa) and an increase in FATT (50[sup o]C) were observed in the Cr-W-V steel after 2 x 10[sup 5] h of service. (Author)

  4. Survey of Processing Methods for High Strength High Conductivity Wires for High Field Magnet Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-10-01

    This paper will deal with the basic concepts of attaining combination of high strength and high conductivity in pure materials, in-situ composites and macrocomposites. It will survey current attainments, and outline where some future developments may lie in developing wire products that are close to the theoretical strength of future magnet applications.

  5. Improvement in Predicting the Post-Cracking Tensile Behavior of Ultra-High Performance Cementitious Composites Based on Fiber Orientation Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Sung Choi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the post-cracking tensile behavior of Ultra-High Performance Cementitious Composites (UHPCC was studied and an improved analytical model to predict the behavior depending on the fiber orientation distribution was proposed. Two different casting methods were adopted to estimate the influence of the casting method on the tensile behavior. The direct tensile test results showed that the post-cracking tensile behavior was considerably dependent on the casting method. The influence of the casting method was quantified by image analysis of the fiber distribution. The fiber orientation distribution obtained by image analysis may sometimes include considerable error according to the image resolution, which may cause inaccuracy when predicting the post-cracking tensile behavior based on the fiber orientation distribution. To overcome this dependency, the tensile bridging behavior by the fibers in UHPCC was simulated considering the obtained fiber orientation distribution as well as the number of fibers detected. The post-cracking behavior was then simulated by combining the bridging behavior and tension softening behavior of the matrix. The approach adopted in this study to simulate the post-cracking behavior of UHPCC showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Synthesis of Bulk Nanostructured DO22 Superlattice of Ni3(Mo, Nb with High Strength, High Ductility, and High Thermal Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Tawancy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that a bulk nanostructured material combining high strength, high ductility, and high thermal stability can be synthesized in a Ni-Mo-Nb alloy with composition approaching Ni3(Mo, Nb. By means of a simple aging treatment at 700°C, the grains of the parent face-centered cubic phase are made to transform into nanosized ordered crystals with DO22 superlattice maintaining a size of 10–20 nm after up to 100 hours of aging and corresponding room-temperature yield strength of 820 MPa and tensile ductility of 35%. Deformation of the superlattice is found to predominantly occur by twinning on {111} planes of the parent phase. It is concluded that, although the respective slip systems are suppressed, most of the twinning systems are preserved in the DO22 superlattice enhancing the ductility.

  7. Increasing Lean Mass and Strength: A Comparison of High Frequency Strength Training to Lower Frequency Strength Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    THOMAS, MICHAEL H.; BURNS, STEVE P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect strength training frequency has on improvements in lean mass and strength. Participants were 7 women and 12 men, age (χ̄= 34.64 years ± 6.91 years), with strength training experience, training age (χ̄= 51.16 months ± 39.02 months). Participants were assigned to one of two groups to equal baseline group demographics. High frequency training group (HFT) trained each muscle group as the agonist, 3 times per week, exercising with 3 sets per muscle group per session (3 total body workouts). Low frequency training group (LFT) trained each muscle group as the agonist one time per week, completing all 9 sets during that one workout. LFT consisted of a routine split over three days: 1) pectoralis, deltoids, and triceps; 2) upper back and biceps; 3) quadriceps, hamstrings, calves, and abdominals. Following eight weeks of training, HFT increased lean mass by 1.06 kg ± 1.78 kg, (1.9%), and LFT increased lean mass by .99 kg ± 1.31 kg, (2.0%). HFT strength improvements on the chest press was 9.07 kg ± 6.33 kg, (11%), and hack squat 20.16 kg ± 11.59 kg, (21%). LFT strength improvements on chest press was 5.80kg ± 4.26 kg, (7.0%), and hack squat 21.83 kg ± 11.17 kg, (24 %). No mean differences between groups were significant. These results suggest that HFT and LFT of equal set totals result in similar improvements in lean mass and strength, following 8 weeks of strength training. PMID:27182422

  8. Fatigue Properties of the Ultra-High Strength Steel TM210A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guang-Qiang; Kang, Xia; Zhao, Gui-Ping

    2017-09-09

    This paper presents the results of an experiment to investigate the high cycle fatigue properties of the ultra-high strength steel TM210A. A constant amplitude rotating bending fatigue experiment was performed at room temperature at stress ratio R = -1. In order to evaluate the notch effect, the fatigue experiment was carried out upon two sets of specimens, smooth and notched, respectively. In the experiment, the rotating bending fatigue life was tested using the group method, and the rotating bending fatigue limit was tested using the staircase method at 1 × 10⁷ cycles. A double weighted least square method was then used to fit the stress-life (S-N) curve. The S-N curves of the two sets of specimens were obtained and the morphologies of the fractures of the two sets of specimens were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the fatigue limit of the smooth specimen for rotating bending fatigue was 615 MPa; the ratio of the fatigue limit to tensile strength was 0.29, and the cracks initiated at the surface of the smooth specimen; while the fatigue limit of the notched specimen for rotating bending fatigue was 363 MPa, and the cracks initiated at the edge of the notch. The fatigue notch sensitivity index of the ultra-high strength maraging steel TM210A was 0.69.

  9. Thermal, tensile and rheological properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) processed and irradiated by gamma-ray in different atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreto, H. F. R.; Oliveira, A. C. F.; Gaia, R.; Parra, D. F.; Lugão, A. B.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate structural changes of high density polyethylene (HDPE) modified by ionizing radiation (gamma rays) in different atmospheres. The gamma radiation process for modification of commercial polymers is a widely applied technique to promote new physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Gamma irradiation originates free radicals which can induce chain scission or recombination, providing its annihilation, branching or crosslinking. This polymer was irradiated with gamma source of 60Co at doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy at a dose rate of 5 kGy/h. The changes in molecular structure of HDPE, after gamma irradiations were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile machine and oscillatory rheology. The results showed the variations of the properties depending on the dose at each atmosphere.

  10. Thermal, tensile and rheological properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) processed and irradiated by gamma-ray in different atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreto, H. F. R., E-mail: hferreto@ipen.br, E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Oliveira, A. C. F., E-mail: hferreto@ipen.br, E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Parra, D. F., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.br, E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br; Lugão, A. B., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.br, E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br [Center of Chemistry and Environment, Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research - IPEN (Brazil); Gaia, R., E-mail: renan-gaia7@hotmail.com [Faculdades Oswaldo Cruz (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate structural changes of high density polyethylene (HDPE) modified by ionizing radiation (gamma rays) in different atmospheres. The gamma radiation process for modification of commercial polymers is a widely applied technique to promote new physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Gamma irradiation originates free radicals which can induce chain scission or recombination, providing its annihilation, branching or crosslinking. This polymer was irradiated with gamma source of {sup 60}Co at doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy at a dose rate of 5 kGy/h. The changes in molecular structure of HDPE, after gamma irradiations were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile machine and oscillatory rheology. The results showed the variations of the properties depending on the dose at each atmosphere.

  11. High strength forgeable tantalum base alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Increasing tungsten content of tantalum base alloy to 12-15% level will improve high temperature creep properties of existing tantalum base alloys while retaining their excellent fabrication and welding characteristics.

  12. Fatigue strength of truss girders made of very high strength steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, R.J.M.; Kolstein, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    An effective application of Very High Strength Steel (VHSS) in civil engineering structures is expected in stiff, truss like structures, typically made of Circular Hollow Sections (CHS). Use of castings in combination with CHS could be promising for the design of highly fatigue resistant joints.

  13. Investigation of high-strength bolt-tightening verification techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The current means and methods of verifying that high-strength bolts have been properly tightened are very laborious and time : consuming. In some cases, the techniques require special equipment and, in other cases, the verification itself may be some...

  14. Preparation and evaluation of a high-strength biocompatible glass-ionomer cement for improved dental restoratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, D; Zhao, J; Park, J; Chu, T M [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Yang, Y; Zhang, J T [Department of Phamacology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)], E-mail: dxie@iupui.edu

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a high-strength light-cured glass-ionomer cement (LCGIC). The polymer in the cement was composed of the 6-arm star-shape poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), which was synthesized using atom-transfer radical polymerization. The polymer was used to formulate with water and Fuji II LC filler to form LCGIC. Compressive strength (CS) was used as a screening tool for evaluation. Commercial glass-ionomer cement Fuji II LC was used as control. The results show that the 6-arm PAA polymer exhibited a lower viscosity in water as compared to its linear counterpart that was synthesized via conventional free-radical polymerization. This new LCGIC system was 48% in CS, 77% in diametral tensile strength, 95% in flexural strength and 59% in fracture toughness higher but 93.6% in shrinkage lower than Fuji II LC. An increasing polymer content significantly increased CS, whereas an increasing glass filler content increased neither yield strength nor ultimate CS except for modulus. During aging, the experimental cement showed a significant and continuous increase in yield strength, modulus and ultimate CS, but Fuji II LC only showed a significant increase in strength within 24 h. The experimental cement was very biocompatible in vivo to bone and showed little in vitro cytotoxicity. It appears that this novel LCGIC cement will be a better dental restorative because it demonstrated significantly improved mechanical strengths and better in vitro and in vivo biocompatibilities as compared to the current commercial LCGIC system.

  15. Numerical study of high-strength concrete column confined with high-strength stirrups under axial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinwei; Wang, Nan; Niu, Xin; Cai, Zhe; Wang, Gang

    2018-01-01

    In order to study the deformation and stress distribution of confined concrete, the axial compression behavior of high-strength concrete column confined with high-strength stirrups is simulated through through nonlinear finite element program. The finite element model reflect the confining effect of high-strength stirrups in specimen. The calculated results shown that the deformation of stirrups is not equivalent in the cross section and the longitudinal section and the confined stress and axial stress of concrete is not uniform in the cross section.

  16. AN INVESTIGATION OF METALLURGICAL FACTORS WHICH AFFECT THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF ULTRA HIGH STRENGTH STEELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, William E.; Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.

    1973-05-01

    The relationship between microstructure, heat treatment and room temperature fracture toughness has been determined for the low alloy ultra-high strength steels 4130, 4330, 4340, 4140 and 300-M. Optical metallography, microprobe analysis, and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology, while both Charpy V-notch impact tests and plane strain fracture toughness tests were used to determine the fracture properties. The normal commercial heat treatment resulted in the formation of some bainite in all the alloys. MnS inclusions on prior austenite grain boundaries were found to initiate cracks during loading. By increasing the austenitizing temperature to l200 C, the fracture toughness could be increased by at least 60%. For some alloys increasing the severity of the quench in conjunction with the higher austenitizing temperatures resulted in further increases in the fracture toughness, and the elimination of any observable upper bainite. There was no correlation between the Charpy impact test results and the fracture toughness results. The alloys 4130, 4140, 4340 all showed a severe intergranular embrittlement when austenitized at high temperatures and tempered above 200 C, while the alloys 4330 and 300-M exhibited no drop in toughness for the same heat treatment conditions. The as-quenched tensile specimens had a very low 'micro' yield strength which rapidly increased to the level of the 'macro' yield strength when tempered.

  17. Tensile bond strength of resin composite repair in vitro using different surface preparation conditionings to an aged CAD/CAM resin nanoceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Krawczuk, Andreas; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted in order to assess the pretreatment method (air abrasion, both wet and dry, and Al2O3 grinder), the conditioning method (comprised of different adhesive systems), the repair resin composite (low and high modulus of elasticity), the contamination of CoJet air-abraded surfaces with water, and the effect phosphoric acid on the macrotensile bond strength (TBS) to aged CAD/CAM resin nanoceramic (RNC). Aged RNC substrates (LAVA Ultimate, 3M ESPE; N = 900; 10,000 cycles, 5 °C/55 °C) were air-abraded (CoJet 3M ESPE) with and without water contamination or treated with an Al2O3 grinder (Cimara, Voco). Immediately after pretreatment, half of the specimens were additionally cleaned with phosphoric acid, while the rest were only rinsed with water. Four intermediate agents (Futurabond U/VOCO, Scotchbond Universal/3M ESPE, One Coat Bond/Coltène Whaledent, visio.link/bredent) were selected for conditioning the surface, while no conditioned specimens acted as control groups. Specimens were thereafter repaired using two direct resin composites (Arabesk Top and GrandioSo, VOCO), stored for 24 h at 37 °C in H2O, and thermally aged f