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Sample records for high tensile steels

  1. Welding wires for high-tensile steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laz'ko, V.E.; Starova, L.L.; Koval'chuk, V.G.; Maksimovich, T.L.; Labzina, I.E.; Yadrov, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    Strength of welded joints in arc welding of high-tensile steels of mean and high thickness by welding wires is equal to approximately 1300 MPa in thermohardened state and approximately 600 MPa without heat treatment. Sv-15Kh2NMTsRA-VI (EhK44-VI) -Sv-30Kh2NMTsRA-VI (EkK47-VI) welding wires are suggested for welding of medium-carbon alloyed steels. These wires provide monotonous growth of ultimate strength of weld metal in 1250-1900 MPa range with increase of C content in heat-treated state

  2. Tensile and high cycle fatigue behaviors of high-Mn steels at 298 and 110 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Wongyu; Jeong, Daeho; Sung, Hyokyung; Kim, Sangshik, E-mail: sang@gnu.ac.kr

    2017-02-15

    Tensile and high cycle fatigue behaviors of high-Mn austenitic steels, including 25Mn, 25Mn0.2Al, 25Mn0.5Cu, 24Mn4Cr, 22Mn3Cr and 16Mn2Al specimens, were investigated at 298 and 110 K. Depending on the alloying elements, tensile ductility of high-Mn steels either increased or decreased with decreasing temperature from 298 to 110 K. Reasonable correlation between the tendency for martensitic tranformation, the critical twinning stress and the percent change in tensile elongation suggested that tensile deformation of high-Mn steels was strongly influenced by SFE determining TRIP and TWIP effects. Tensile strength was the most important parameter in determining the resistance to high cycle fatigue of high-Mn steels with an exceptional work hardening capability at room and cryogenic temperatures. The fatigue crack nucleation mechanism in high-Mn steels did not vary with decreasing tempertature, except Cr-added specimens with grain boundary cracking at 298 K and slip band cracking at 110 K. The EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) analyses suggested that the deformation mechanism under fatigue loading was significantly different from tensile deformation which could be affected by TRIP and TWIP effects. - Highlights: •The resistances to HCF of various high-Mn steels were measured. •The variables affecting tensile and HCF behaviors of high-Mn steels were assessed. •The relationship between tensile and the HCF behaviors of high-Mn steels was established.

  3. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Y., E-mail: yano.yasuhide@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Ukai, S.; Oono, N. [Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8628 (Japan); Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hayashi, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Torimaru, T. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900–1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  4. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Y.; Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Kimura, A.; Hayashi, S.; Torimaru, T.

    2017-04-01

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900-1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  5. HIGH TEMPERATURE TENSILE PROPERTIES OF NEW FE-CR-MN DEVELOPED STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mahmoudiniya; Sh. Kheirandish; M. Asadi Asadabad

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, Ni-free austenitic stainless steels are being developed rapidly and high price of nickel is one of the most important motivations for this development. At present research a new FeCrMn steel was designed and produced based on Fe-Cr-Mn-C system. Comparative studies on microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of  new steel and AISI 316 steel were done. The results showed that new FeCrMn developed steel has single austenite phase microstructure, and its tensile st...

  6. A comparison of the iraddiated tensile properties of a high-manganese austenitic steel and type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The USSR steel EP-838 is a high-manganese, low-nickel steel that also has lower chromium and molybdenum than type 316 stainless steel. Tensile specimens of 20%-cold-worked EP-838 and type 316 stainless steel were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the coolant temperature (approx.=50 0 C). A displacement damage level of 5.2 dpa was reached for the EP-838 and up to 9.5 dpa for the type 316 stainless steel. Tensile tests at room temperature and 300 0 C on the two steels indicated that the irradiation led to increased strength and decreased ductility compared to the unirradiated steels. Although the 0.2% yield stress of the type 316 stainless steel in the unirradiated condition was greater than that for the EP-838, after irradiation there was essentially no difference between the strength or ductility of the two steels. The results indicate that the replacement of the majority of the nickel by manganese and a reduction of chromium and molybdenum in an austenitic stainless steel of composition near that for type 316 stainless steel has little effect on the irradiated and unirradiated tensile properties at low temperatures. (orig.)

  7. Strain rate dependent tensile behavior of advanced high strength steels: Experiment and constitutive modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Daeyong; Han, Heung Nam; Barlat, F.; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    High strain rate tensile tests were conducted for three advanced high strength steels: DP780, DP980 and TRIP780. A high strain rate tensile test machine was used for applying the strain rate ranging from 0.1/s to 500/s. Details of the measured stress–strain responses were comparatively analyzed for the DP780 and TRIP780 steels which show similar microstructural feature and ultimate tensile strength, but different strengthening mechanisms. The experimental observations included: usual strain rate dependent plastic flow stress behavior in terms of the yield stress (YS), the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the uniform elongation (UE) and the total elongation (TE) which were observed for the three materials. But, higher strain hardening rate at early plastic strain under quasi-static condition than that of some increased strain rates was featured for TRIP780 steel, which might result from more active transformation during deformation with lower velocity. The uniform elongation that explains the onset of instability and the total elongation were larger in case of TRIP steel than the DP steel for the whole strain rate range, but interestingly the fracture strain measured by the reduction of area (RA) method showed that the TRIP steel has lower values than DP steel. The fractographs using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at the fractured surfaces were analyzed to relate measured fracture strain and the microstructural difference of the two materials during the process of fracture under various strain rates. Finally, constitutive modeling for the plastic flow stresses under various strain rates was provided in this study. The proposed constitutive law could represent both Hollomon-like and Voce-like hardening laws and the ratio between the two hardening types was efficiently controlled as a function of strain rate. The new strength model was validated successfully under various strain rates for several grades of steels such as mild steels, DP780, TRIP780, DP980 steels.

  8. HIGH TEMPERATURE TENSILE PROPERTIES OF NEW FE-CR-MN DEVELOPED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahmoudiniya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Ni-free austenitic stainless steels are being developed rapidly and high price of nickel is one of the most important motivations for this development. At present research a new FeCrMn steel was designed and produced based on Fe-Cr-Mn-C system. Comparative studies on microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of  new steel and AISI 316 steel were done. The results showed that new FeCrMn developed steel has single austenite phase microstructure, and its tensile strength and toughness were higher than those of 316 steel at 25, 200,350 and 500°C. In contrast with 316 steel, the new FeCrMn steel did not show strain induced transformation and dynamic strain aging phenomena during tensile tests that represented higher austenite stability of new developed steel. Lower density and higher strength of the new steel caused higher specific strength in comparison with the 316 one that can be considered as an important advantage in structural applications but in less corrosive environment

  9. High temperature tensile properties of 316 stainless steel implanted with helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Yamamoto, Norikazu; Shiraishi, Haruki

    1993-01-01

    Helium embrittlement is one of the problems in structural materials for fusion reactors. Recently, martensitic steels have been developed which have a good resistance to high-temperature helium embrittlement, but the mechanism has not yet been clarified. In this paper, tensile behaviors of helium implanted austenitic stainless steels, which are sensitive to the helium embrittlement, were studied and compared with those of martensitic steels under the same experimental conditions, and the effect of microstructure on helium embrittlement was discussed. Helium was implanted by 300 appm at 573-623 K to miniature tensile speciments of 316 austenitic steels using a cyclotron accelerator. Solution annealed (316SA) and 20% cold worked (316CW) specimens were used. Post-implantation tensile tests were carried out at 573, 873 and 973 K. Yield stress at 573 K increased with the helium implantation in 316SA and 316CW, but the yield stress changes of 316SA at 873 and 973 K were different from that of 316CW. Black-dots were observed in the as-implanted specimen and bubbles were observed in the speciments tensile-tested at 873 and 973 K. Intergranular fracture was observed at only 973 K in both of the 316SA and 316CW specimens. Therefore, cold work did not suppress the high-temperature helium embrittlement under this experimental condition. The difference in the influence of helium on type 316 steel and 9Cr martensitic steels were discussed. Test temperature change of reduction in are showed clearly that helium embrittlement did not occur in 9Cr martensitic steels but occurred in 316 austenitic steels. Fine microstructures of 9Cr martensitic steels should suppress helium embrittlement at high temperatures. (author)

  10. High strain rate tensile properties of annealed 2 1/4 Cr--1 Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Oakes, R.E. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The high strain rate tensile properties of annealed 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel were determined and the tensile behavior from 25 to 566 0 C and strain rates of 2.67 x 10 -6 to 144/s were described. Above 0.1/s at 25 0 C, both the yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength increased rapidly with increasing strain rate. As the temperature was increased, a dynamic strain aging peak appeared in the ultimate tensile strength-temperature curves. The peak height was a maximum at about 350 0 C and 2.67 x 10 -6 /s. With increasing strain rate, a peak of decreased height occurred at progressively higher temperatures. The major effect of strain rate on ductility occurred at elevated temperatures, where a decrease in strain rate caused an increase in total elongation and reduction in area

  11. High temperature tensile properties and fracture characteristics of bimodal 12Cr-ODS steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Ankur; Litvinov, Dimitri; Aktaa, Jarir

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the tensile properties and fracture characteristics of a 12Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with unique elongated bimodal grain size distribution. The tensile tests were carried out at four different temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 700 °C, at a nominal strain rate of 10"−"3 s"−"1. At room temperature the material exhibits a high tensile strength of 1294 MPa and high yield strength of 1200 MPa. At 700 °C, the material still exhibits relatively high tensile strength of 300 MPa. The total elongation-to-failure exceeds 18% over the whole temperature range and has a maximum value of 29% at 600 °C. This superior ductility is attributed to the material's bimodal grain size distribution. In comparison to other commercial, as well as experimental, ODS steels, the material shows an excellent compromise between strength and ductility. The fracture surface studies reveal a change in fracture behavior from a mixed mode fracture at room temperature to fully ductile fracture at 600 °C. At 700 °C, the fracture path changes from intragranular to intergranular fracture, which is associated with a reduced ductility. - Highlights: • The steel has a unique elongated bimodal grain size distribution. • The steel shows an excellent compromise between strength and ductility. • Superior ductility in comparison to other commercial and experimental ODS steels. • Fracture behavior changes from mixed mode fracture at room temperature to fully ductile fracture at 600 °C. • Fracture path changes from intragranular to intergranular fracture at 700 °C.

  12. High-rate tensile behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Jin; Park, Gi-Joon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Joo, E-mail: djkim75@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jae Heum; Lee, Jang Hwa [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, 2311 Daewha-Dong, Ilsan-Gu, Goyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 411-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • The final goal is to develop a fiber reinforced concrete for containment buildings. • High rate tensile behavior of FRC was investigated. • Strain energy frame impact machine was used for tensile impact tests. • Different rate sensitivity of FRC was found according to the type fiber. • Adding more fibers by increasing S/a is positive for higher impact resistance of FRC. -- Abstract: The direct tensile behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) at high strain rates were investigated for their potential to enhance the resistance of the containment building of nuclear power plants (NPPs) against aircraft impact. Two types of deformed steel, hooked (H) and twisted (T) fibers were employed. To improve the tensile resistance of FRCs even at higher rates by adding more fibers, the mixture of concrete was modified by either increasing the sand-to-coarse aggregate ratio or decreasing the maximum size of coarse aggregate. All FRC specimens produced two to six times greater tensile strength and one to five times higher toughness at high strain rates (4–53 s{sup −1}) than those at a static rate (0.000167 s{sup −1}). T-fiber generally produced higher tensile strength and toughness than H-fiber at both static and high rates. Although both fibers showed favorable rate sensitivity, T-fiber produced much greater enhancement, at higher strain rates, in tensile strength and slightly lower enhancement in toughness than H-fiber. As the maximum size of coarse aggregate decreased from 19 to 5 mm, the tensile strength and toughness of FRCs with T-fibers noticeably increased at both static and high strain rates.

  13. Effects of boron addition on tensile and Charpy impact properties in high-phosphorous steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seokmin; Lee, Junghoon [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyong Su [Next Generation Products Research Group, Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, Pohang 790-785 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sunghak, E-mail: shlee@postech.ac.kr [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide a new possibility for improving the steel-making productivity by fabricating plain carbon steels containing high phosphorous (P), effects of microstructures on tensile and Charpy impact properties were investigated in this study. Nine plain carbon steels were fabricated by controlling the addition of P and boron (B), and isothermal or quench heat-treatments were conducted on these steels to make ferrite–bainite-based or martensite-based microstructures. The addition of B positively influenced the grain refinement and the formation of bainites, thereby leading to the increase in strength. The upper shelf energy (USE) decreased with increasing P content, while the energy transition temperature (ETT) increased, in all the steels. The B addition beneficially affected both the USE and ETT as the dimpled ductile fracture mode prevailed in the B-added steels. This was because B preferentially covered grain boundaries, which reduced the grain boundary segregation of P. Thus, it effectively suppressed the intergranular fracture due to the segregation of P. According to the fractographic results, the increased tendency of intergranular fracture mode was observable in the 20-ppm-B-added steels rather than in the 10-ppm-B-added steels. When an excess amount of B, e.g., 20 ppm of B, was added, the severe segregation of B on grain boundaries occurred, and led to the precipitation of boro-carbides, which could act as intergranular crack initiation sites.

  14. Microstructure and tensile properties of high strength duplex ferrite-martensite (DFM) steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborti, P.C.; Mitra, M.K.

    2007-01-01

    Duplex ferrite-martensite (DFM) steels containing 38-80% martensite of varying morphologies were developed by batch intercritical annealing of a commercial variety vanadium bearing 0.2% C-Mn steel at different temperatures. Microstructures before intercritical annealing were found to control the morphological distribution of the phase constituents of the developed DFM steels. Tensile test results revealed best strength-ductility combination for finely distributed lamellar ferrite-martensite phase aggregate containing ∼60% martensite developed from a prior martensitic structure. Taking consideration of the modified law of mechanical mixture the experimental tensile strength data of the developed DFM steels has been formulated with some success and very good estimation for tensile strengths of pure ferrite and low carbon martensite has been made from tensile strength data of DFM steels

  15. In-situ tensile test of high strength nanocrystalline bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Mike, E-mail: mike.haddad@uni-ulm.de [Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Ivanisenko, Yulia; Courtois-Manara, Eglantine [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Fecht, Hans-Jörg [Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany)

    2015-01-03

    Because of its great importance in modern engineering and technology applications, steel continues to be highly relevant in the modern research field of nanocrystalline materials. Innovative processing methods and procedures are required for the production of such materials, which possess superior properties compared to their conventional counter parts. In this research, the original microstructure of a commercial C45 steel (Fe, 0.42–0.5 wt% C, 0.5–0.8 wt% Mn) was modified from ferritic–pearlitic to bainitic. Warm high pressure torsion for 5 rotations at 6 GPa and 350 °C was used to process the bainitic sample leading to an ultrafine/nano-scale grain size. A unique nano-crystalline microstructure consisting of equiaxed and elongated ferrite grains with a mean size smaller than 150 nm appeared in images taken by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Results of in-situ tensile testing in a scanning electron microscope showed very high tensile strength, on the order of 2100 MPa with a total elongation of 4.5% in comparison with 800 MPa and around 16% in the original state. Fracture occurred abruptly, without any sign of necking, and was typically caused by the stress concentration at a surface flaw. Also, stress concentrations near all surface defects were observed on the sample, visualized by the formation of shear bands. The fracture surface was covered with dimples, indicating ductile fracture. These properties are fully comparable with high strength, high alloyed steels.

  16. Effect of tensile overloads on fatigue crack growth of high strength steel wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, J.; Reguly, A.; Strohaecker, T.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A proof load process may be an option to increase the fatigue life of flexible pipelines. • There is possibility to produce plastic deformation at crack tip of tensile armor wires. • Controlled overloads provide effective crack growth retardation. • Crack growth retardation is also evident at higher stress ratios. - Abstract: Fatigue of the tensile armor wires is the main failure mode of flexible risers. Techniques to increase the life of these components are required to improve the processes safety on oil exploration. This work evaluates the crack growth retardation of high strength steel wires used in flexible pipelines. Fracture toughness tests were performed to establish the level of stress intensity factor wherein the wires present significant plastic deformation at the crack tip. The effect of tensile overload on fatigue behavior was assessed by fatigue crack growth testing under constant ΔK control and different overload ratios with two different load ratios. The outcomes show that the application of controlled overloads provides crack retardation and increases the fatigue life of the wires more than 31%. This behavior is also evident at stress ratio of 0.5, in spite of the crack closure effect being minimized by increasing the applied mean stress

  17. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components

  18. Tensile stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to very high dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20--100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. The data bases and mechanistic understanding of, the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high dose, i.e., is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-commotion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-11 reactor after irradiation to {approximately}50 dpa at {approximately}370 C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microcopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at low ECP, and this susceptibility led to poor work-hardening capability and low ductility.

  19. High Temperature Tensile Properties of Unirradiated and Neutron Irradiated 20 Cr-35 Ni Austenitic Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, R B; Solly, B

    1966-12-15

    The tensile properties of an unirradiated and neutron irradiated (at 40 deg C) 20 % Cr, 35 % Ni austenitic steel have been studied at 650 deg C, 750 deg C and 820 deg C. The tensile elongation and mode of fracture (transgranular) of unirradiated specimens tested at room temperature and 650 deg C are almost identical. At 750 deg C and 820 deg C the elongation decreases considerably and a large part of the total elongation is non-uniform. Furthermore, the mode of fracture at these temperatures is intergranular and microscopic evidence suggests that fracture is caused by formation and linkup of grain boundary cavities. YS and UTS decrease monotonically with temperature. Irradiated specimens show a further decrease in ductility and an increase in the tendency to grain boundary cracking. Irradiation has no significant effect on the YS, but the UTS are reduced. The embrittlement of the irradiated specimens is attributed to the presence of He and Li atoms produced during irradiation and the possible mechanisms are discussed. Prolonged annealing of irradiated and unirradiated specimens at 650 deg C appears to have no significant effect on tensile properties.

  20. High strain rate tensile curves of hyperquenched Z03 CN18-10 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrillon, B.

    1978-01-01

    Tensile tests are presented at constant decreasing speeds, made at room temperature. This type of test can give a better evaluation of the structure behaviour in shock or burst loadings, because in that case the elongation speeds varies from high values to zero [fr

  1. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been found to play an important role for this HSSS due to load transfer and strain partitioning between two phases, and a higher strain rate could cause even higher strain partitioning in the softer austenite grains, delaying the deformation instability. Deformation twins are observed in the austenite grains at all strain rates to facilitate the uniform tensile deformation. The B2 phase (FeAl intermetallic compound is less deformable at higher strain rates, resulting in easier brittle fracture in B2 particles, smaller dimple size and a higher density of phase interfaces in final fracture surfaces. Thus, more energy need be consumed during the final fracture for the experiments conducted at higher strain rates, resulting in better tensile toughness.

  2. Examination and modeling of void growth kinetics in modern high strength dual phase steels during uniaxial tensile deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidi, N., E-mail: navidsae@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafizadeh, F.; Niroumand, B. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Forouzan, M.R.; Mohseni mofidi, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Barlat, F. [Materials Mechanics Laboratory (MML), Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology (GIFT), Pohang University of Science and Technology - POSTECH, San 31 Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    Ductile fracture mechanisms during uniaxial tensile testing of two different modern high strength dual phase steels, i.e. DP780 and DP980, were studied. Detailed microstructural characterization of the strained and sectioned samples was performed by scanning electron microscopy as well as EBSD examination. The results revealed that interface decohesion, especially at martensite particles located at ferrite grain boundaries, was the most probable mechanism for void nucleation. It was also revealed that the creation of cellular substructure can reduce stored strain energy and thereby, higher true fracture strain was obtained in DP980 than DP780 steel. Prediction of void growth behavior based on some previously proposed models showed unreliable results. Therefore, a modified model based on Rice-Tracey family models was proposed which showed a very lower prediction error compared with other models. - Highlights: • Damage mechanism in two modern high strength dual phase steels was studied. • Creation of cellular substructures can reduce the stored strain energy within the ferrite grains. • The experimental values were examined by Agrawal as well as RT family models. • A modified model was proposed for prediction of void growth behavior of DP steels.

  3. Tensile strength/yield strength (TS/YS) ratios of high-strength steel (HSS) reinforcing bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavio, Anggraini, Retno; Raka, I. Gede Putu; Agustiar

    2018-05-01

    The building codes such as American Concrete Institute (ACI) 318M-14 and Standard National Indonesia (SNI) 2847:2013 require that the ratio of tensile strength (TS) and yield strength (YS) should not less than 1.25. The requirement is based on the assumption that a capability of a structural member to develop inelastic rotation capacity is a function of the length of the yield region. This paper reports an investigation on various steel grades, namely Grades 420, 550, 650, and 700 MPa, to examine the impact of different TS/YS ratios if it is less or greater than the required value. Grades 550, 650, and 700 MPa were purposely selected with the intention to examine if these higher grades are still promising to be implemented in special structural systems since they are prohibited by the building codes for longitudinal reinforcement, whereas Grade 420 MPa bars are the maximum limit of yield strength of reinforcing bars that is allowable for longitudinal reinforcement of special structural systems. Tensile tests of these steel samples were conducted under displacement controlled mode to capture the complete stress-strain curves and particularly the post-yield response of the steel bars. From the study, it can be concluded that Grade 420 performed higher TS/YS ratios and they were able to reach up to more than 1.25. However, the High Strength Still (HSS) bars (Grades 550, 600, and 700 MPa) resulted in lower TS/YS ratios (less than 1.25) compared with those of Grade 420 MPa.

  4. High tensile strength fly ash based geopolymer composite using copper coated micro steel fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mehdi; Mehrali, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    -matrix interaction. In this present study, effects of micro steel fibers (MSF) incorporation on mechanical properties of fly ash based geopolymer was investigated at different volume ratio of matrix. Various properties of the composite were compared in terms of fresh state by flow measurement and hardened state......As a ceramic-like material, geopolymers show a high quasi-brittle behavior and relatively low fracture energy. To overcome this, the addition of fibers to a brittle matrix is a well-known method to improve the flexural strength. Moreover, the success of the reinforcements is dependent on the fiber...... by variation of shrinkage over time to assess performance of the composites subjected to flexural and compressive load. The fiber-matrix interface, fiber surface and toughening mechanisms were assessed using field emission scan electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) through a period...

  5. Effect of different stages of tensile deformation on micromagnetic parameters in high-strength, low-alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Moorthy, V.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, B. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group

    1999-08-01

    The influence of tensile deformation on the magnetic Barkhausen emissions (MBE) and hysteresis loop has been studied in a high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA) and its weldment. The magnetic measurements were made both in loaded and unloaded conditions for different stress levels. The root-mean-square (RMS) voltage of the MBE has been used for analysis. This study shows that the preyield and postyield deformation can be identified from the change in the MBE profile. The initial elastic deformation showed a linear increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition, and the MBE level remained constant in the unloaded condition. The microplastic yielding, well below the macroyield stress, significantly reduces the MBE, indicating the operation of grain-boundary dislocation sources below the macroyield stress. This is indicated by the slow increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition and the decrease in the MBE level in the unloaded condition. The macroyielding resulted in a significant increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition and, more clearly, in the unloaded condition. The increase in the MBE level during macroyielding has been attributed to the grain rotation phenomenon, in order to maintain the boundary integrity between adjacent grains, which would preferentially align the magnetic domains along the stress direction. This study shows that MBE during tensile deformation can be classified into four stages: (1) perfectly elastic, (2) microplastic yielding, (3) macroyielding, and (4) progressive plastic deformation. A multimagnetic parameter approach, combining the hysteresis loop and MBE, has been suggested to evaluate the residual stresses.

  6. Alloying system for cold-resisting high-tensile welds of maraging steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yushchenko, K.A.; Pustovit, A.I.; Taver, E.I.; Piskarev, M.N.

    1978-01-01

    Studied was the effect of molybdenum (2.2-5%) and chromium (11.3-13.5%) on the structure and properties of welds in steel of the Cr-Ni-Mo-Co-Ti system at heat strengthened condition (hardening, cold treatment, ageing). The welds were made by argon-arc welding process involving a nonconsumable electrode without additives. The welds were tested at temperatures of 20 and -196 deg C. It is pointed out that the welds with a pure martensite structure at -196 deg C have a low ductility and impact strength. To obtain welds having a satisfactory value of impact strength more than 120 kGf/mm 2 at 20 deg C, it is necessary that the metal contains 20...60 % of residual austenite

  7. Effects of cyclic tensile loading on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility for sensitized Type 304 stainless steel in 290 C high purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaku, H.; Tokiwai, M.; Hirano, H.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of load waveform on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility have been examined for sensitized Type 304 stainless steels in a 290 C high purity water loop. Concerning the strain rate in the trapezoidal stress waveform, it was found that IGSCC susceptibility was higher for smaller values of the strain rate. It was also shown that IGSCC susceptibility became higher when the holding time at the upper stress was prolonged, and when the upper stress was high. The occurrence of IGSCC for sensitized Type 304 stainless steel became easy due to the application of cyclic tensile stress in 290 C high purity water

  8. Tensile behavior of borated stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.J. Jr.; Sorenson, K.B.

    1991-01-01

    Borated stainless steel tensile testing is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The goal of the test program is to provide data to support a code case inquiry to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III. The adoption by ASME facilitates a material's qualification for structural use in transport cask applications. For transport cask basket applications, the potential advantage to using borated stainless steel arises from the fact that the structural and criticality control functions can be combined into one material. This can result in a decrease in net section thickness of the basket web (increased payload capacity) and eliminates the fabrication process and cost of attaching a discrete boron poison material to the basket web. In addition, adding borate stainless steel to the inventory of acceptable structural material provides the Department of Energy (DOE) and its cask contractors an alternative to current proposed materials which have not been qualified for structural service. The test program at SNL involves procuring material, machining test specimens, and conducting the tensile tests. From test measurements obtained so far, general trends indicate that tensile properties (yield strength and ultimate strength) increase with boron content and are in all cases superior to the minimum required properties established in A-240, Type 304, a typical grade of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, in a designed basket, web thicknesses using borated stainless steel would be comparable to or thinner tan an equivalent basket manufactured from a typical stainless steel without boron additions. General trends from test results indicate that ductilities decrease with increasing boron content

  9. Tensile and stress corrosion cracking properties of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to a very high dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Strain, R.V.; Shack, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20-100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. Our databases and mechanistic understanding of the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high doses, i.e. is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-corrosion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-II reactor after irradiation to ∼50 dpa at ∼370 deg. C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 degree sign C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at a low ECP, and this susceptibility led to a poor work-hardening capability and low ductility

  10. An Electron Microscope Study of the Thermal Neutron Induced Loss in High Temperature Tensile Ductility of Nb Stabilized Austenitic Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, R B

    1965-04-15

    Irradiated {approx}3 x 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (thermal), <3 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) at 40 deg C and the corresponding unirradiated control tensile specimens of a 20 % Cr, 25 % Ni, Nb stabilized steel tested at 650 deg C, 750 deg C and 800 deg C have been examined by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the irradiation induced embrittlement of the tensile specimens at elevated temperatures is preceded by the formation of fine precipitates within the grains. These precipitates may restrict the deformation within the grains such that the stresses are concentrated at the grain boundaries thereby leading to premature failure. It is suggested that the main effect of the irradiation is to promote conditions necessary for the formation of these precipitates, namely, super saturation and fresh nucleation sites within the matrix through the energetic emission of He and Li atoms from boron as an impurity.

  11. An Electron Microscope Study of the Thermal Neutron Induced Loss in High Temperature Tensile Ductility of Nb Stabilized Austenitic Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, R.B.

    1965-04-01

    Irradiated ∼3 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (thermal), 18 n/cm 2 (> 1 MeV) at 40 deg C and the corresponding unirradiated control tensile specimens of a 20 % Cr, 25 % Ni, Nb stabilized steel tested at 650 deg C, 750 deg C and 800 deg C have been examined by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the irradiation induced embrittlement of the tensile specimens at elevated temperatures is preceded by the formation of fine precipitates within the grains. These precipitates may restrict the deformation within the grains such that the stresses are concentrated at the grain boundaries thereby leading to premature failure. It is suggested that the main effect of the irradiation is to promote conditions necessary for the formation of these precipitates, namely, super saturation and fresh nucleation sites within the matrix through the energetic emission of He and Li atoms from boron as an impurity

  12. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  13. Unstable propagation behavior of a ductile crack in SUS-304 stainless steel under high compliance tensile loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoda, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    In relation to the safe maintenance of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to prevent reactor coolant pipings from burst type failure caused by the unstable propagation of defects and cracks, such as stress corrosion cracking and fatigue cracks. In ductile materials, crack propagation is stable in tensile loading under fixed grip condition, when a specimen is controlled to deform in proportion to the increase of tensile load. However, it has been known that the instability of ductile cracks occurs after tensile load reached the maximum, especially under constant loading condition arising in the loading devices with high compliance or low tensile rigidity. In order to confirm the reliability of SUS 304 stainless pipes subjected to SCC, the crack propagation behavior was examined with the specimens having center cracks, using both testing machines with high compliance and low compliance. The instability of ductile cracks and the propagation velocity of unstable cracks were analyzed, and the calculated results were compated with the experimental results. Not only the compliance of testing machines but also the conditions of specimens affected the propagation of cracks. (Kako, I.)

  14. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium

  15. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabruri, Efendi, E-mail: effe004@lipi.go.id; Anwar, Moch Syaiful, E-mail: moch.syaiful.anwar@lipi.go.id; Prifiharni, Siska, E-mail: siska.prifiharni@lipi.go.id; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang [Research Center for Metallurgy and Materials, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) Kawasan Puspiptek Gd. 470 Serpong, Tangerang Selatan 15314 (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  16. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  17. Tensile Properties of Under-Matched Weld Joints for 950 MPa Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kouji; Arakawa, Toshiaki; Akazawa, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Kousei; Matsuo, Hiroki; Nakagara, Kiyoyuki; Suita, Yoshikazu

    In welding of 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel, preheating is crucial in order to avoid cold cracks, which, however, eventually increases welding deformations. One way to decrease welding deformations is lowering preheating temperature by using under-matched weld metal. Toyota and others clarify that although breaking elongation can decrease due to plastic constraint effect under certain conditions, static tensile of under-matched weld joints is comparable to that of base metal. However, there has still been no report about joint static tensile of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel. In this study, we aim to research tensile strength and fatigue strength of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile steel.

  18. Elevated temperature tensile properties of borated 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.J.; Sorenson, K.B.; McConnell, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the tensile properties of Powder Metallurgy (PM) 'Grade A' material with that of the conventional IM 'Grade B' material for two selected Types (i.e., boron contents) as defined by the ASTM A887 specification: Types 304B5 and 304B7. Tensile properties have been generated for these materials at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 400degC (752degF). The data at higher temperatures are required for ASME Code Case purposes, since the use temperature of a basket under 'worst case' cask conditions may be as high as 343degC (650degF), due to self-heating by the activated fuel elements. We will also discuss the current status of efforts aimed at obtaining an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Case for selected grades of borated stainless steel covered by the ASTM A887 specification. (J.P.N.)

  19. Tensile and creep data on type 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V. K.; Booker, B. L.P.; Booker, M. K.; McEnerney, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes tensile and creep data on 13 heats of type 316 stainless steel. It includes ten different product forms (three plates, four pipes, and three bars) of the reference heat tested at ORNL. Tensile data are presented in tabular form and analyzed as a function of temperature by the heat centering method. This method yielded a measure of variations within a single heat as well as among different heats. The upper and lower scatter bands developed by this method were wider at the lower temperatures than at the high temperatures (for strength properties), a trend reflected by the experimental data. The creep data on both unaged and aged specimens are presented in tabular form along with creep curves for each test. The rupture time data are compared with the ASME Code Case minimum curve at each test temperature in the range from 538 to 704{sup 0}C. The experimental rupture time data are also compared with the values predicted by using the rupture model based on elevated-temperature ultimate tensile strength. A creep ductility trend curve was developed on the basis of the reference heat data and those published in the literature on nitrogen effects. To characterize the data fully, information was also supplied on vendor, product form, fabrication method, material condition (mill-annealed vs laboratory annealed and aged), grain size, and chemical composition for various heats. Test procedures used for tensile and creep results are also discussed.

  20. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Microstructure, Tensile Properties, and Fracture Behavior of Cold-Rolled High-Mn Light-Weight Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cho, Kyung Mox [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Joonoh; Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    The effects of the annealing temperature on the microstructure and tensile properties of cold-rolled light-weight steels are investigated using two Fe-30Mn-xAl-0.9C alloys that contain different Al content. The initial alloy microstructure is composed of a single austenite or a mixture of austenite and ferrite depending on the nominal aluminum content. For the alloy with 9 wt%Al content, the recrystallization and grain growth of austenite occurrs depending on the annealing temperature. However, for the alloy with 11 wt%Al content, the β-Mn phase is observed after annealing for 10 min at 550~800 ℃. The β-Mn transformation kinetics is the fastest at 700 ℃. The formation of the β-Mn phase has a detrimental effect on the ductility, and this leads to significant decreases in the total elongation. The same alloy also forms κ-carbide and DO3 ordering at 550~900 ℃. The investigated alloys exhibit a fully recrystallized microstructure after annealing at 900 ℃ for 10 min, which results in a high total elongation of 25~55%with a high tensile strength of 900~1170 MPa.

  1. The study on the threshold strain of microvoid formation in TRIP steels during tensile deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wurong; Guo Bimeng; Ji Yurong; He Changwei; Wei Xicheng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The tensile mechanical behaviors of TRIP steels were studied under high rate deformation conditions. ► The threshold strain of microvoid formation was examined quantitatively. ► The effects of retained austenite of TRIP on suppressing microvoid formed during tensile process have been discussed. - Abstract: Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels exhibit a better combination of strength and ductility properties than conventional high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels, and therefore receive considerable attention in the automotive industry. In this work, the tensile mechanical behaviors of TRIP-aided steels were studied under the condition of the quasi-static and high deformed rates. The deformed specimens were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) along the tensile axis. The threshold strain of microvoid formation was examined quantitatively according to the evolution of deformation. The results showed that: the yield and tensile strengths of TRIP steels increase with the strain rate, whereas their elongations decrease. However, the threshold strain for TRIP steels at high strain rate is larger than that at low strain rate. Comparing with the deformed microstructure and microvoids formed in the necking zone of dual phase (DP) steel, the progressive deformation-induced transformation of retained austenite in TRIP steels remarkably increases the threshold strain of microvoid formation and furthermore postpones its growth and coalescence.

  2. A Modified Constitutive Model for Tensile Flow Behaviors of BR1500HS Ultra-High-Strength Steel at Medium and Low Temperature Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Quan, Guo-Zheng; Pan, Jia; Wang, Xuan; Wu, Dong-Sen; Xia, Yu-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Constitutive model of materials is one of the most requisite mathematical model in the finite element analysis, which describes the relationships of flow behaviors with strain, strain rate and temperature. In order to construct such constitutive relationships of ultra-high-strength BR1500HS steel at medium and low temperature regions, the true stress-strain data over a wide temperature range of 293-873 K and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1 were collected from a series of isothermal uniaxial tensile tests. The experimental results show that stress-strain relationships are highly non-linear and susceptible to three parameters involving temperature, strain and strain rate. By considering the impacts of strain rate and temperature on strain hardening, a modified constitutive model based on Johnson-Cook model was proposed to characterize flow behaviors in medium and low temperature ranges. The predictability of the improved model was also evaluated by the relative error (W(%)), correlation coefficient (R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). The R-value and AARE-value for modified constitutive model at medium and low temperature regions are 0.9915 & 1.56 % and 0.9570 & 5.39 %, respectively, which indicates that the modified constitutive model can precisely estimate the flow behaviors for BR1500HS steel in the medium and low temperature regions.

  3. Void nucleation in spheroidized steels during tensile deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, J.R. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of various mechanical and material parameters on void formation at cementite particles in axisymmetric tensile specimens of spheroidized plain carbon steels. Desired microstructures for each of three steel types were obtained. Observations of void morphology with respect to various microstructural features were made using optical and scanning electron microscopy

  4. Size Effect Studies on Tensile Tests for Hot Stamping Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodu; Li, Yuanyuan; Han, Xianhong; Zhang, Junbo

    2018-02-01

    Tensile tests have been widely used to determine basic mechanical properties of materials. However, the properties measured may be related to geometrical factors of the tested samples especially for high-strength steels; this makes the properties' definitions and comparisons difficult. In this study, a series of tensile tests of ultra-high-strength hot-stamped steel were performed; the geometric shapes and sizes as well as the cutting direction were modified. The results demonstrate that the hot-stamped parts were isotropic and the cutting direction had no effect; the measured strengths were practically unrelated to the specimen geometries, including both size and shape. The elongations were slightly related to sample sizes within the studied range but highly depended on the sample shape, represented by the coefficient K. Such phenomena were analyzed and discussed based on microstructural observations and fracture morphologies. Moreover, two widely used elongation conversion equations, the Oliver formula and Barba's law, were introduced to verify their applicability, and a new interpolating function was developed and compared.

  5. Dynamic strain aging of twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel in tensile testing and deep drawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.G.; Hong, S.; Anjabin, N.; Park, B.H.; Kim, S.K.; Chin, K.-G.; Lee, S.; Kim, H.S.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic strain aging (DSA) of metallic materials due to solute atom diffusion to mobile dislocations induce deformation instability with load fluctuations and deformation localizations, hence reducing their sheet formability. In this paper, DSA behaviors of twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steel with and without Al during tensile testing and deep drawing are investigated in terms of strain localization and the Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) band. A theoretical DSA model with internal variables of dislocation density and twin volume fraction is presented for an estimation of strain localization and strain hardening behavior of TWIP steels. The simulation results of the load history and PLC bands during tensile testing and deep drawing are in good agreement with the experimental values. A serration behavior is observed in high-Mn TWIP steels and its tensile residual stress is higher than that in the Al-added TWIP steels, which results in a deformation crack or delayed fracture of deep drawn specimens

  6. Effect of cryogenic treatment on tensile behavior of case carburized steel-815M17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensely, A.; Senthilkumar, D.; Mohan Lal, D.; Nagarajan, G.; Rajadurai, A.

    2007-01-01

    The crown wheel and pinion represent the most highly stressed parts of a heavy vehicle; these are typically made of 815M17 steel. The reasons for the frequent failure of these components are due to tooth bending impact, wear and fatigue. The modern processes employed to produce these as high, durable components include cryogenic treatment as well as conventional heat treatment. It helps to convert retained austenite into martensite as well as promote carbide precipitation. This paper deals with the influence of cryogenic treatment on the tensile behavior of case carburized steel 815M17. The impetus for studying the tensile properties of gear steels is to ensure that steels used in gears have sufficient tensile strength to prevent failure when gears are subjected to tensile or fatigue loads, and to provide basic design information on the strength of 815M17 steel. A comparative study on the effects of deep cryogenic treatment (DCT), shallow cryogenic treatment (SCT) and conventional heat treatment (CHT) was made by means of tension testing. This test was conducted as per ASTM standard designation E 8M. The present results confirm that the tensile behavior is marginally reduced after cryogenic treatment (i.e. both shallow and deep cryogenic treatment) for 815M17 when compared with conventional heat treatment. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis of the fracture surface indicates the presence of dimples and flat fracture regions are more common in SCT specimens than for CHT and DCT-processed material

  7. Elevated temperature tensile properties of P9 steel towards ferritic steel wrapper development for sodium cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, B.K., E-mail: bkc@igcar.gov.in; Mathew, M.D.; Isaac Samuel, E.; Christopher, J.; Jayakumar, T.

    2013-11-15

    Tensile deformation and fracture behaviour of the three developmental heats of P9 steel for wrapper applications containing varying silicon in the range 0.24–0.60% have been examined in the temperature range 300–873 K. Yield and ultimate tensile strengths in all the three heats exhibited gradual decrease with increase in temperature from room to intermediate temperatures followed by rapid decrease at high temperatures. A gradual decrease in ductility to a minimum at intermediate temperatures followed by an increase at high temperatures has been observed. The fracture mode remained transgranular ductile. The steel displayed signatures of dynamic strain ageing at intermediate temperatures and dominance of recovery at high temperatures. No significant difference in the strength and ductility values was observed for varying silicon in the range 0.24–0.60% in P9 steel. P9 steel for wrapper application displayed strength and ductility values comparable to those reported in the literature.

  8. Elevated temperature tensile properties of P9 steel towards ferritic steel wrapper development for sodium cooled fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, B. K.; Mathew, M. D.; Isaac Samuel, E.; Christopher, J.; Jayakumar, T.

    2013-11-01

    Tensile deformation and fracture behaviour of the three developmental heats of P9 steel for wrapper applications containing varying silicon in the range 0.24-0.60% have been examined in the temperature range 300-873 K. Yield and ultimate tensile strengths in all the three heats exhibited gradual decrease with increase in temperature from room to intermediate temperatures followed by rapid decrease at high temperatures. A gradual decrease in ductility to a minimum at intermediate temperatures followed by an increase at high temperatures has been observed. The fracture mode remained transgranular ductile. The steel displayed signatures of dynamic strain ageing at intermediate temperatures and dominance of recovery at high temperatures. No significant difference in the strength and ductility values was observed for varying silicon in the range 0.24-0.60% in P9 steel. P9 steel for wrapper application displayed strength and ductility values comparable to those reported in the literature.

  9. Elevated temperature tensile properties of P9 steel towards ferritic steel wrapper development for sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, B.K.; Mathew, M.D.; Isaac Samuel, E.; Christopher, J.; Jayakumar, T.

    2013-01-01

    Tensile deformation and fracture behaviour of the three developmental heats of P9 steel for wrapper applications containing varying silicon in the range 0.24–0.60% have been examined in the temperature range 300–873 K. Yield and ultimate tensile strengths in all the three heats exhibited gradual decrease with increase in temperature from room to intermediate temperatures followed by rapid decrease at high temperatures. A gradual decrease in ductility to a minimum at intermediate temperatures followed by an increase at high temperatures has been observed. The fracture mode remained transgranular ductile. The steel displayed signatures of dynamic strain ageing at intermediate temperatures and dominance of recovery at high temperatures. No significant difference in the strength and ductility values was observed for varying silicon in the range 0.24–0.60% in P9 steel. P9 steel for wrapper application displayed strength and ductility values comparable to those reported in the literature

  10. Cavitation erosion tests of high tensile stainless steels for the Techno-Superliner (TSL-F) hulls; Techno superliner (TSL-F) sentai kozoyo kokyodo stainless ko no cavitation erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, M.; Ito, H.; Shibasaki, K. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Mizuta, A.; Sugimoto, H. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Tomono, Y. [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Investigations were given by using the magnetostrictive vibration method and the high-speed fluid testing method on cavitation erosion resistance of high-tensile stainless steels thought to have high applicability to submerged hull structures of Techno-Supeliner (TSL-L). The investigations revealed that these steels have nearly equivalent resistance to even SUS 304 or 15-5PH steel which is thought to have the highest cavitation erosion resistance among the conventional materials used customarily. An experiment using both materials provided a result different quantitatively but similar qualitatively in relative merits between the materials. Correlation between both materials was presented. A cavitation erosion experiment using a 1/6 scale model of the actual TSL-F was carried out to measure the amount of cavitation erosion generated on wing surfaces. Results from the experiment were used to attempt estimation of cavitation erosion amount at the level of the actual TSL-F. 21 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Cavitation erosion tests of high tensile stainless steels for the Techno-Superliner (TSL-F) hulls; Techno superliner (TSL-F) sentai kozoyo kokyodo stainless ko no cavitation erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, M; Ito, H; Shibasaki, K [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Mizuta, A; Sugimoto, H [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Tomono, Y [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Investigations were given by using the magnetostrictive vibration method and the high-speed fluid testing method on cavitation erosion resistance of high-tensile stainless steels thought to have high applicability to submerged hull structures of Techno-Supeliner (TSL-L). The investigations revealed that these steels have nearly equivalent resistance to even SUS 304 or 15-5PH steel which is thought to have the highest cavitation erosion resistance among the conventional materials used customarily. An experiment using both materials provided a result different quantitatively but similar qualitatively in relative merits between the materials. Correlation between both materials was presented. A cavitation erosion experiment using a 1/6 scale model of the actual TSL-F was carried out to measure the amount of cavitation erosion generated on wing surfaces. Results from the experiment were used to attempt estimation of cavitation erosion amount at the level of the actual TSL-F. 21 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Handbook for tensile properties of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Ryu, W. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, W. G.; Chung, M. K.; Han, C. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    Database system of nuclear materials has not been developed and the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in nuclear power plant are not summarized systematically in Korea. Although Korea designs nuclear power plant, many materials used in nuclear power plant are imported because we do not have database system of nuclear material yet and it was hard to select a proper material for the structural materials of nuclear power plant. To develop database system of nuclear materials, data of mechanical, corrosion, irradiation properties are needed. Of theses properties, tensile properties are tested and summarized in this report. Tensile properties of stainless steel used in nuclear reactor internal were investigated. Data between Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and foreign laboratory were compared to determine the precision of the result. To develope database system, materials, chemical composition, heat treatment, manufacturing process, and grain size were classified. Tensile properties were tested and summarized to use input data of database system. 9 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  13. Porosity Defect Remodeling and Tensile Analysis of Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linfeng Sun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties on ASTM A216 WCB cast steel with centerline porosity defect were studied with radiographic mapping and finite element remodeling technique. Non-linear elastic and plastic behaviors dependent on porosity were mathematically described by relevant equation sets. According to the ASTM E8 tensile test standard, matrix and defect specimens were machined into two categories by two types of height. After applying radiographic inspection, defect morphologies were mapped to the mid-sections of the finite element models and the porosity fraction fields had been generated with interpolation method. ABAQUS input parameters were confirmed by trial simulations to the matrix specimen and comparison with experimental outcomes. Fine agreements of the result curves between simulations and experiments could be observed, and predicted positions of the tensile fracture were found to be in accordance with the tests. Chord modulus was used to obtain the equivalent elastic stiffness because of the non-linear features. The results showed that elongation was the most influenced term to the defect cast steel, compared with elastic stiffness and yield stress. Additional visual explanations on the tensile fracture caused by void propagation were also given by the result contours at different mechanical stages, including distributions of Mises stress and plastic strain.

  14. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-01-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ X-ray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 °C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 °C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 °C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 °C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments. - Highlights: • The tensile deformation of 9Cr ODS steel was studied by synchrotron irradiation. • The evolution of internal mean stress was calculated. • The evolution of dislocation character was determined by best-fit method. • Edge type dominates plasticity at RT and 300 °C, while screw type dominates at 600 °C.

  15. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guangming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Zhou, Zhangjian, E-mail: zhouzhj@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Mo, Kun [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Almer, Jonathan [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Stubbins, James F. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ X-ray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 °C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 °C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 °C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 °C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments. - Highlights: • The tensile deformation of 9Cr ODS steel was studied by synchrotron irradiation. • The evolution of internal mean stress was calculated. • The evolution of dislocation character was determined by best-fit method. • Edge type dominates plasticity at RT and 300 °C, while screw type dominates at 600 °C.

  16. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  17. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  18. Tempering response to different morphologies of martensite in tensile deformation of dual-phase steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, E.; Manzoor, T.; Sarwar, M.; Arif, M.; Hussain, N.

    2011-01-01

    A low alloy steel containing 0.2% C was heat treated with three cycles of heat treatments with the aim to acquire different morphologies of martensite in dual phase microstructure. Microscopic examination revealed that the morphologies consisting of grain boundary growth, scattered laths and bulk form of martensite were obtained. These morphologies have their distinct patterns of distribution in the matrix (ferrite). In tensile properties observations the dual phase steel with bulk morphology of martensite showed minimum of ductility but high tensile strength as compared to other two morphologies. This may be due to poor alignments of bulk martensite particles along tensile axes during deformation. Tempering was employed with various holding times at 550 deg. C to induce ductility in the heat treated material. The tempering progressively increased the ductility by increasing holding time. However, tempering response to strengths and ductilities was different to all three morphologies of martensite. (author)

  19. Tensile Deformation Temperature Impact on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AISI 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi; He, Tiantian; Lu, Yan; Ren, Fengzhang; Volinsky, Alex A.; Cao, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted on AISI 316LN austenitic stainless steel from - 40 to 300 °C at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the deformed steel were investigated by optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, x-ray diffraction, and microhardness testing. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and microhardness increase with the decrease in the test temperature. The tensile fracture morphology has the dimple rupture feature after low-temperature deformations and turns to a mixture of transgranular fracture and dimple fracture after high-temperature ones. The dominating deformation microstructure evolves from dislocation tangle/slip bands to large deformation twins/slip bands with temperature decrease. The deformation-induced martensite transformation can only be realized at low temperature, and its quantity increases with the decrease in the temperature.

  20. Influence of HIP pressure on tensile properties of a 14Cr ODS ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksiuta, Z., E-mail: z.oksiuta@pb.edu.pl [Bialystok Technical University, Mechanical Department, Wiejska 45c, 15-351 Bialystok (Poland); Ozieblo, A.; Perkowski, K.; Osuchowski, M. [Institute of Ceramics and Building Materials, Postępu 9, 02-676 Warsaw (Poland); Lewandowska, M. [Warsaw University of Technology, Woloska 141, 02-504 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • The HIPping parameters of the 14Cr–2W–0.3Ti–0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS steel powder were investigated. • The density and microstructure of the tested specimens after HIPping were studied. • The mechanical properties, high temperature tensile tests, were performed. • Residual porosity was observed in all tested specimens. • HIPping pressure has negligible influence on the strength of the ODS steel however improves material ductility. - Abstract: An oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with a nominal composition of Fe–14Cr–2W–0.3Ti–0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (in wt.%) was consolidated by hot isostatic pressing at 1150 °C under various pressures in the range of 185–300 MPa for 3 h. The microstructure, microhardness and high temperature tensile properties of the steel were investigated. With increasing compaction pressure the density of specimens also increased, however OM and SEM observations revealed residual porosity in all tested specimens and similar ferritic microstructure with bimodal-like grains and numerous of large oxide particles, located at the grain boundaries. Mechanical testing revealed that compaction pressure has negligible influence on the hardness and tensile strength of the ODS steel, however improves the material ductility.

  1. Influence of HIP pressure on tensile properties of a 14Cr ODS ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Ozieblo, A.; Perkowski, K.; Osuchowski, M.; Lewandowska, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The HIPping parameters of the 14Cr–2W–0.3Ti–0.3Y 2 O 3 ODS steel powder were investigated. • The density and microstructure of the tested specimens after HIPping were studied. • The mechanical properties, high temperature tensile tests, were performed. • Residual porosity was observed in all tested specimens. • HIPping pressure has negligible influence on the strength of the ODS steel however improves material ductility. - Abstract: An oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with a nominal composition of Fe–14Cr–2W–0.3Ti–0.3Y 2 O 3 (in wt.%) was consolidated by hot isostatic pressing at 1150 °C under various pressures in the range of 185–300 MPa for 3 h. The microstructure, microhardness and high temperature tensile properties of the steel were investigated. With increasing compaction pressure the density of specimens also increased, however OM and SEM observations revealed residual porosity in all tested specimens and similar ferritic microstructure with bimodal-like grains and numerous of large oxide particles, located at the grain boundaries. Mechanical testing revealed that compaction pressure has negligible influence on the hardness and tensile strength of the ODS steel, however improves the material ductility

  2. Tensile Fracture Behavior of Progressively-Drawn Pearlitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Toribio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a study is presented of the tensile fracture behavior of progressively-drawn pearlitic steels obtained from five different cold-drawing chains, including each drawing step from the initial hot-rolled bar (not cold-drawn at all to the final commercial product (pre-stressing steel wire. To this end, samples of the different wires were tested up to fracture by means of standard tension tests, and later, all of the fracture surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Micro-fracture maps (MFMs were assembled to characterize the different fractographic modes and to study their evolution with the level of cumulative plastic strain during cold drawing.

  3. Applicability of Voce equation for tensile flow and work hardening behaviour of P92 ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainath, G.; Choudhary, B.K.; Christopher, J.; Isaac Samuel, E.; Mathew, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed analysis of true stress (σ)-true plastic strain (ε) data indicated that tensile flow behaviour of P92 ferritic steel can be adequately described by Voce equation at strain rates ranging from 3.16 × 10 −5 to 1.26 × 10 −3  s −1 over a temperature range 300–923 K. The steel exhibited two-stage work hardening in the variations of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) with stress. At all the strain rates, the variations in σ-ε, θ-σ and work hardening parameters associated with Voce equation with temperature exhibited three distinct temperature regimes. At intermediate temperatures, the variations in σ-ε, θ-σ and work hardening parameters with temperature and strain rate exhibited anomalous behaviour due to the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing in the steel. The shift in θ-σ towards low stresses, and rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate suggested dominance of dynamic recovery at high temperatures. - Highlights: • Tensile flow and work hardening behaviour of P92 steel has been examined. • Applicability of Voce equation to P92 steel is demonstrated. • Three temperature regimes in flow and work hardening has been observed. • Good match between predicted and the experimental tensile properties has been shown

  4. Effect of N+Cr alloying on the microstructures and tensile properties of Hadfield steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhang, F.C., E-mail: zfc@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Equipment and Technology of Cold Strip Rolling, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wang, F. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Liu, H.; Yu, B.D. [China Railway Shanhaiguan Bridge Group Co. LTD, Qinhuangdao 066205 (China)

    2017-01-02

    The microstructures and tensile behaviors of traditional Hadfield steel, named Mn12 steel, and Hadfield steel alloyed with N+Cr, named Mn12CrN steel were studied through optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, among others. Three different tensile strain rates of 5×10{sup −4}, 5×10{sup −3}, and 5×10{sup −2} s{sup −1} were selected in the tensile test. The deformation microstructures and fracture morphologies of the two steels after fracture in the tensile test were observed to analyze the tensile deformation response to different tensile strain rates. Results showed that the grain size of Mn12CrN steel was evidently refined after alloying with N+Cr. The grain would not become abnormally coarse even with increasing austenitizing temperature. During tensile deformation, the strength and plasticity of Mn12CrN steel were superior to those of Mn12 steel at the same strain rate. With increasing the strain rate, the changes in strength and plasticity of Mn12CrN steel were less sensitive to tensile strain rate compared with Mn12 steel. The effects of grain refinement and N+Cr alloying on dynamic strain aging and deformation twining behaviors were responsible for this lack of sensitivity to strain rate.

  5. Effect of N+Cr alloying on the microstructures and tensile properties of Hadfield steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.; Zhang, F.C.; Wang, F.; Liu, H.; Yu, B.D.

    2017-01-01

    The microstructures and tensile behaviors of traditional Hadfield steel, named Mn12 steel, and Hadfield steel alloyed with N+Cr, named Mn12CrN steel were studied through optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, among others. Three different tensile strain rates of 5×10 −4 , 5×10 −3 , and 5×10 −2 s −1 were selected in the tensile test. The deformation microstructures and fracture morphologies of the two steels after fracture in the tensile test were observed to analyze the tensile deformation response to different tensile strain rates. Results showed that the grain size of Mn12CrN steel was evidently refined after alloying with N+Cr. The grain would not become abnormally coarse even with increasing austenitizing temperature. During tensile deformation, the strength and plasticity of Mn12CrN steel were superior to those of Mn12 steel at the same strain rate. With increasing the strain rate, the changes in strength and plasticity of Mn12CrN steel were less sensitive to tensile strain rate compared with Mn12 steel. The effects of grain refinement and N+Cr alloying on dynamic strain aging and deformation twining behaviors were responsible for this lack of sensitivity to strain rate.

  6. Effect of cold work on tensile behavior of irradiated type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Tensile specimens were irradiated in ORR at 250, 290, 450, and 500 0 C to produce a displacement damage of approx.5 dpa and 40 at. ppM He. Irradiation at 250 and 290 0 C caused an increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength and a decrease in ductility relative to unaged and thermally aged controls. The changes were greatest for the 20%-cold-worked steel and lowest for the 50%-cold-worked steel. Irradiation at 450 0 C caused a slight relative decrease in strength for all cold-worked conditions. A large decrease was observed at 500 0 C, with the largest decrease occurring for the 50%-cold-worked specimen. No bubble, void, or precipitate formation was observed for specimens examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The irradiation hardening was correlated with Frank-loop and ''black-dot'' loop damage. A strength decrease at 500 0 C was correlated with dislocation network recovery. Comparison of tensile and TEM results from ORR-irradiated steel with those from steels irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Experimental Breeder Reactor indicated consistent strength and microstructure changes

  7. Development of TS590MPa grade high tensile strength steel for automotive anti-collision parts; Shogeki kyushuyo 590MPa kyu kochoryoku koban no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, K; Takagi, S; Furukimi, O; Hira, T; Obara, T [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Tanimura, S [University of Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The effects of strain rate on the deformation behavior of steels were investigated to find the most appropriate micro-structure of steel for anti-crash parts of automobiles, such as front-side-members. The dual phase steel absorbed a higher amount of energy during dynamic deformation than other steels with the same static yield strength. The increase of volume fraction of the austenite phase in the dual phase steel deteriorates the dynamic deformation behavior. The FEM analysis for crash test of HAT-sectional sheet box also showed the superior performance of the dual phase steel. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Investigation of the tensile properties of continuous steel wire-reinforced gray cast iron composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdemir, Ahmet; Kus, Recai; Simsir, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Metal matrix composite (MMC) is an important structural material. → Gray cast irons as a matrix material in MMC have more advantages than other cast irons. → Interface greatly determines the mechanical properties of MMC. → Interface formed by diffusion of carbon atoms. → While decarburizing takes place in gray cast iron, carburiszing takes place in steel near the interface. - Abstract: The aim of the present study was to improve the tensile properties of gray cast iron by reinforcing the material with a steel wire. The composite was produced by sand mold casting, and the specimens were normalized by applying heat treatments at 800 deg. C, 850 deg. C, and 900 deg. C. Tension tests were conducted on gray cast iron and composite specimens, and the microstructure of the specimens was examined with an optical microscope. The fracture surface of the tension test specimens was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and graphite-free transition regions with high degrees of hardness were observed due to the diffusion of carbon from the cast iron to the steel wire. The microstructure of the transition region (fine pearlitic phase with partially dissolved graphite flakes) and the bond quality in the transition region increased the tensile properties of cast iron composites. Also, it is concluded that the tensile properties of gray cast iron increased with an increase in the normalization temperature.

  9. Investigation of the tensile properties of continuous steel wire-reinforced gray cast iron composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akdemir, Ahmet [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey); Kus, Recai [Department of Mechanical Education, Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey); Simsir, Mehmet, E-mail: msimsir@cumhuriyet.edu.tr [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Cumhuriyet University, Kayseri Yolu 7. Km, 58140 Sivas (Turkey)

    2011-04-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Metal matrix composite (MMC) is an important structural material. {yields} Gray cast irons as a matrix material in MMC have more advantages than other cast irons. {yields} Interface greatly determines the mechanical properties of MMC. {yields} Interface formed by diffusion of carbon atoms. {yields} While decarburizing takes place in gray cast iron, carburiszing takes place in steel near the interface. - Abstract: The aim of the present study was to improve the tensile properties of gray cast iron by reinforcing the material with a steel wire. The composite was produced by sand mold casting, and the specimens were normalized by applying heat treatments at 800 deg. C, 850 deg. C, and 900 deg. C. Tension tests were conducted on gray cast iron and composite specimens, and the microstructure of the specimens was examined with an optical microscope. The fracture surface of the tension test specimens was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and graphite-free transition regions with high degrees of hardness were observed due to the diffusion of carbon from the cast iron to the steel wire. The microstructure of the transition region (fine pearlitic phase with partially dissolved graphite flakes) and the bond quality in the transition region increased the tensile properties of cast iron composites. Also, it is concluded that the tensile properties of gray cast iron increased with an increase in the normalization temperature.

  10. Effects of the phase fractions on the carbide morphologies, Charpy and tensile properties in SA508 Gr.4N High Strength Low Alloy RPV Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Wee, Dang Moon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    To improve the strength and toughness of RPV (reactor pressure vessel) steels for nuclear power plants, an effective way is the change of material specification from tempered bainitic SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel into tempered martensitic/bainitic SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. It is known that the phase fractions of martensitic/bainitic steels are very sensitive to the austenitizing cooling rates. Kim reported that there are large differences of austenitizing cooling rates between the surface and the center locations in RPV due to its thickness of 250mm. Hence, the martensite/bainite fractions would be changed in different locations, and it would affect the microstructure and mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. These results may lead to inhomogeneous characteristics after austenitizing. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the changes of microstructure and mechanical properties with varying phase fractions in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. In this study, the effects of martensite/bainite fractions on microstructure and mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel were examined. The changes in phase fractions of Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel with different cooling rates were analyzed, and then the phase fractions were correlated with its microstructural observation and mechanical properties

  11. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  12. Tensile properties and flow behavior analysis of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Kanwarjeet, E-mail: kanwar722@yahoo.com; Latha, S.; Nandagopal, M.; Mathew, M.D.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-11-15

    The tensile properties and flow behavior of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube have been investigated in the framework of various constitutive equations for a wide range of temperatures (300–923 K) and strain rates (3 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}, 3 × 10{sup −4} s{sup −1} and 3 × 10{sup −5} s{sup −1}). The tensile flow behavior of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube was most accurately described by Voce equation. The variation of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and σθ with stress (σ) indicated two stage behavior characterized by rapid decrease at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in high stresses (Stage III). The variation of work hardening parameters and work hardening rate in terms of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ with temperature exhibited three distinct regimes. Rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters and rapid shift of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ towards low stresses with increase in temperature indicated dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Tensile properties of the material have been best predicted from Voce equation.

  13. Tensile properties and flow behavior analysis of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanwarjeet; Latha, S.; Nandagopal, M.; Mathew, M. D.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-11-01

    The tensile properties and flow behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube have been investigated in the framework of various constitutive equations for a wide range of temperatures (300-923 K) and strain rates (3 × 10-3 s-1, 3 × 10-4 s-1 and 3 × 10-5 s-1). The tensile flow behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube was most accurately described by Voce equation. The variation of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and σθ with stress (σ) indicated two stage behavior characterized by rapid decrease at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in high stresses (Stage III). The variation of work hardening parameters and work hardening rate in terms of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ with temperature exhibited three distinct regimes. Rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters and rapid shift of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ towards low stresses with increase in temperature indicated dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Tensile properties of the material have been best predicted from Voce equation.

  14. Tensile properties and flow behavior analysis of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Kanwarjeet; Latha, S.; Nandagopal, M.; Mathew, M.D.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-01-01

    The tensile properties and flow behavior of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube have been investigated in the framework of various constitutive equations for a wide range of temperatures (300–923 K) and strain rates (3 × 10 −3 s −1 , 3 × 10 −4 s −1 and 3 × 10 −5 s −1 ). The tensile flow behavior of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube was most accurately described by Voce equation. The variation of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and σθ with stress (σ) indicated two stage behavior characterized by rapid decrease at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in high stresses (Stage III). The variation of work hardening parameters and work hardening rate in terms of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ with temperature exhibited three distinct regimes. Rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters and rapid shift of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ towards low stresses with increase in temperature indicated dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Tensile properties of the material have been best predicted from Voce equation

  15. Effect of tempering upon the tensile properties of a nanostructured bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, H.S. [University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Peet, M.J., E-mail: mjp54@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Avettand-Fènoël, M-N. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET) UMR CNRS 8207, Université, Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve D' ASCQ (France); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    The tensile properties of a nanostructured carbide-free bainitic steel formed at 200–250 °C are compared against those after tempering sufficiently to remove the retained austenite. Although significant ductility is observed following tempering, a comparison of tempered and untempered samples shows that it is in fact reduced when a comparison is made at identical strength. The shape of the stress–strain curves shows clear evidence that the capacity for work hardening is reduced with the loss of austenite. The nanostructure of the steel transformed at 250 °C is examined by transmission electron microscopy, to compare the as-transformed to the tempered structure. In this case after tempering at 500 °C the energy absorbed during the tensile test is lower, due to the lower strength. Reduction of strength is caused by the slight coarsening of the bainite plates, and lower dislocation density after tempering. Considering the formation of carbide particles in high strength steel, impressive ductility is exhibited even in the tempered condition.

  16. Effect of elastic and plastic tensile mechanical loading on the magnetic properties of NGO electrical steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuning, N., E-mail: nora.leuning@iem.rwth-aachen.de [Institute of Electrical Machines, RWTH Aachen University, D-52062 Aachen (Germany); Steentjes, S. [Institute of Electrical Machines, RWTH Aachen University, D-52062 Aachen (Germany); Schulte, M.; Bleck, W. [Steel Institute, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Hameyer, K. [Institute of Electrical Machines, RWTH Aachen University, D-52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    The magnetic properties of non-grain-oriented (NGO) electrical steels are highly susceptible to mechanical stresses, i.e., residual, external or thermal ones. For rotating electrical machines, mechanical stresses are inevitable and originate from different sources, e.g., material processing, machine manufacturing and operating conditions. The efficiency and specific losses are largely altered by different mechanical stress states. In this paper the effect of tensile stresses and plastic deformations on the magnetic properties of a 2.9 wt% Si electrical steel are studied. Particular attention is paid to the effect of magnetic anisotropy, i.e., the influence of the direction of applied mechanical stress with respect to the rolling direction. Due to mechanical stress, the induced anisotropy has to be evaluated as it is related to the stress-dependent magnetostriction constant and the grain alignment. - Highlights: • A detailed look at magnetic anisotropy of FeSi NGO electrical steel. • Study of magnetic behavior under elastic as well as plastic tensile stresses. • Correlation of magnetic behavior with microscopic deformation mechanisms. • Discussion of detrimental and beneficial effects of external stresses. • Loss separation at different polarizations and frequencies under increasing stress.

  17. Effect of tempering upon the tensile properties of a nanostructured bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, H.S.; Peet, M.J.; Avettand-Fènoël, M-N.; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.

    2014-01-01

    The tensile properties of a nanostructured carbide-free bainitic steel formed at 200–250 °C are compared against those after tempering sufficiently to remove the retained austenite. Although significant ductility is observed following tempering, a comparison of tempered and untempered samples shows that it is in fact reduced when a comparison is made at identical strength. The shape of the stress–strain curves shows clear evidence that the capacity for work hardening is reduced with the loss of austenite. The nanostructure of the steel transformed at 250 °C is examined by transmission electron microscopy, to compare the as-transformed to the tempered structure. In this case after tempering at 500 °C the energy absorbed during the tensile test is lower, due to the lower strength. Reduction of strength is caused by the slight coarsening of the bainite plates, and lower dislocation density after tempering. Considering the formation of carbide particles in high strength steel, impressive ductility is exhibited even in the tempered condition

  18. Effect of elastic and plastic tensile mechanical loading on the magnetic properties of NGO electrical steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuning, N.; Steentjes, S.; Schulte, M.; Bleck, W.; Hameyer, K.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties of non-grain-oriented (NGO) electrical steels are highly susceptible to mechanical stresses, i.e., residual, external or thermal ones. For rotating electrical machines, mechanical stresses are inevitable and originate from different sources, e.g., material processing, machine manufacturing and operating conditions. The efficiency and specific losses are largely altered by different mechanical stress states. In this paper the effect of tensile stresses and plastic deformations on the magnetic properties of a 2.9 wt% Si electrical steel are studied. Particular attention is paid to the effect of magnetic anisotropy, i.e., the influence of the direction of applied mechanical stress with respect to the rolling direction. Due to mechanical stress, the induced anisotropy has to be evaluated as it is related to the stress-dependent magnetostriction constant and the grain alignment. - Highlights: • A detailed look at magnetic anisotropy of FeSi NGO electrical steel. • Study of magnetic behavior under elastic as well as plastic tensile stresses. • Correlation of magnetic behavior with microscopic deformation mechanisms. • Discussion of detrimental and beneficial effects of external stresses. • Loss separation at different polarizations and frequencies under increasing stress.

  19. Acoustic emission during tensile deformation of M250 grade maraging steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Chandan Kumar; Rajkumar, Kesavan Vadivelu; Chandra Rao, Bhaghi Purna; Jayakumar, Tamanna

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) generated during room temperature tensile deformation of varyingly heat treated (solution annealed and thermally aged) M250 grade maraging steel specimens have been studied. Deformation of microstructure corresponding to different heat treated conditions in this steel could be distinctly characterized using the AE parameters such as RMS voltage, counts and peak amplitude of AE hits (events).

  20. High-Tensile Strength Tape Versus High-Tensile Strength Suture: A Biomechanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnandt, Ryan J; Smith, Jennifer L; Nguyen-Ta, Kim; McDonald, Lucas; LeClere, Lance E

    2016-02-01

    To determine which suture design, high-tensile strength tape or high-tensile strength suture, performed better at securing human tissue across 4 selected suture techniques commonly used in tendinous repair, by comparing the total load at failure measured during a fixed-rate longitudinal single load to failure using a biomechanical testing machine. Matched sets of tendon specimens with bony attachments were dissected from 15 human cadaveric lower extremities in a manner allowing for direct comparison testing. With the use of selected techniques (simple Mason-Allen in the patellar tendon specimens, whip stitch in the quadriceps tendon specimens, and Krackow stitch in the Achilles tendon specimens), 1 sample of each set was sutured with a 2-mm braided, nonabsorbable, high-tensile strength tape and the other with a No. 2 braided, nonabsorbable, high-tensile strength suture. A total of 120 specimens were tested. Each model was loaded to failure at a fixed longitudinal traction rate of 100 mm/min. The maximum load and failure method were recorded. In the whip stitch and the Krackow-stitch models, the high-tensile strength tape had a significantly greater mean load at failure with a difference of 181 N (P = .001) and 94 N (P = .015) respectively. No significant difference was found in the Mason-Allen and simple stitch models. Pull-through remained the most common method of failure at an overall rate of 56.7% (suture = 55%; tape = 58.3%). In biomechanical testing during a single load to failure, high-tensile strength tape performs more favorably than high-tensile strength suture, with a greater mean load to failure, in both the whip- and Krackow-stitch models. Although suture pull-through remains the most common method of failure, high-tensile strength tape requires a significantly greater load to pull-through in a whip-stitch and Krakow-stitch model. The biomechanical data obtained in the current study indicates that high-tensile strength tape may provide better repair

  1. Effect of fluoride mouthwash on tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, D. I.; Anggani, H. S.; Ismah, N.

    2017-08-01

    Patients with orthodontic treatment are commonly recommended to use a fluoride mouthwash for maintaining their oral hygiene and preventing dental caries. However, fluoride may affect the characteristics of stainless steel orthodontic archwires used during treatment. The effect of fluoride mouthwash on the tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires is still unknown. The purpose of this study is to know the effect of fluoride mouthwash on the tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires. Examine the tensile strength of 0.016 inch stainless steel orthodontic archwires after immersion in 0.05%, 100 ml fluoride mouthwash for 30, 60, and 90 min. There is no statistically significant difference in the tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires after immersed in fluoride mouthwash. The p-values on immersion fluoride mouthwash for 30, 60, and 90 min consecutively are 0.790; 0.742; and 0.085 (p > 0.05). The use of fluoride mouthwash did not have an effect on the tensile strength of stainless Steel orthodontic archwires.

  2. Hot tensile behaviour in silicon-killed boron microalloyed steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Lesley H.; Cornish, Lesley A.

    2017-10-01

    Low carbon steel for drawing and cold heading applications should have low strength, high ductility and low strain ageing rates. To achieve this, nitrogen must be removed from solid solution, which can be done by low additions of boron. A wire producer had been experiencing occasional problems with severe cracking on silicon-killed, boron steel billets during continuous casting, but the solution was not obvious. Samples from four billets, each from different casts, were removed for analysis and testing. The tested steel compositions were within the specification limits, with boron to nitrogen ratios of 0.40-1.19. Hot ductility testing was performed on a Gleeble 1500 using parameters approximating the capabilities of this particular billet caster. The steel specimens were subjected to in situ melting, then cooled at a rate of 2 C.s-1 to temperatures in the range 750-1250°C, where they were then pulled to failure at a strain rate of 8x10-4 s-1. In this work, it was found that both the boron to nitrogen ratio and the manganese to sulphur ratio influenced the hot ductility and hence the crack susceptibility. Excellent hot ductility was found for B:N ratios above 1.0, which confirmed that the B:N ratio should be above a stoichiometric value of 0.8 to remove all nitrogen from solid solution. TEM analysis showed that coarse BN precipitates nucleated on other precipitates, such as (Fe,Mn)S, which have relatively low melting points, and are detrimental to hot ductility. Low Mn:S ratios of 10 - 12 were shown to promote precipitation of FeS, so a Mn:S > 14 was recommended. A narrower billet surface temperature range for straightening was recommended to prevent transverse surface cracking. Additionally, analysis of industrial casting data showed that the scrap percentage due to transverse cracking increased significantly for Mn:S < 14. An exponential decay relationship between the manganese to sulphur ratio and the average scrap percentage due to transverse cracking was

  3. The tensile and fatigue properties of type 1.4914 ferritic steel for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmy, P.; Victoria, M.; Ruan, Y.

    1989-08-01

    Martensitic steels have received considerable attention as structural materials in fusion reactor applications. In present designs, fusion reactors are expected to operate in a cyclic mode, thus producing cyclic thermal stresses in the first wall. Due to its thermal expansion coefficient and very low swelling rate, 1.4914 martensitic steel is a suitable candidate for the first wall with high neutron loadings. This paper presents the preirradiation results obtained with subsize-specimens designed to be irradiated with a proton beam in the PIREX facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) of Wuerenlingen. Both tensile and low cycle fatigue tests were performed in vacuum in the region from 300 K to 870 K (720 K in the case of fatigue tests). Tensile tests on the subsize specimens (0.33 mm thick) compared well to those on bulk specimens, showing a minimum in ductility at around 620 K. The fatigue tests, performed on tubular specimens (3.4 mm external diameter, 0.35 mm wall thickness) showed substantial softening setting in at a low number of cycles. The initial microstructure observed in transmission microscopy consists of fine martensite laths. As cyclic deformation proceeds, dislocation cells form, that gradually replace the martensitic laths. (author) 19 figs., 5 tabs., 16 refs

  4. Dynamic tensile tests with superimposed ultrasonic oscillations for stainless steel type 321 at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinke, B.; Malmberg, T.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years various containment codes for Fast Breeder Reactor accidents have been assessed by comparison with explosion tests in water-filled vessels (COVA experiments). Common to the various codes, a systematic underestimation of the circumferential vessel strains was found. In the COVA tests high frequency pressure oscillations in the ultrasonic range were observed and thus it has been conjectured that the phenomenon of ''acoustic softening'' might be relevant in explaining the discrepancies in the strains. To validate this conjecture a hydro-pneumatic tensile test apparatus was developed which allows dynamic tensile testing at room temperature with and without superimposed ultrasonic oscillations. The dynamic tensile tests on the COVA sheet material (stainless steel AISI 321) without ultrasonic insonation show a linear dependence of the flow stress on the logarithm of the strain rate. The results at low strain rates (10 -3 s -1 ) agree favourably with previous measurements but at high rates (50 s -1 ) at 20% lower flow stress is observed. The dynamic tensile tests with continuous and intermittent insonation show the phenomenon of ''acoustic softening'': The average flow stress is reduced by an amount of about half the oscillating amplitude. At high strain rates the reduction is less. A severe ''acoustic softening'' observed by several authors for various metals at low strain rates was not observed. The experimental results were compared with the theory of the superpositon mechanism assuming a rate-independent elastic-plastic and an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive model. Although the rate-independent model is capable to predict qualitatively some of the observed effects, a better description is obtained with the viscoplastic model. The conclusion is that the ''acoustic softening'' of the COVA material is far too small to explain the discrepancies between measured and computed strains found in the containment code validation studies. (orig.)

  5. Tensile properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and the weld joints after neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, K.; Ioka, I.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hamada, A.; Hishinuma, A. [and others

    1996-10-01

    Tensile specimens of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and its weldments fabricated with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques were irradiated to a peak dose of 19 dpa and a peak helium level of 250 appm in the temperature range between 200 and 400{degrees}C in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The He/dpa ratio of about 13 appm/dpa is similar to the typical helium/dpa ratio of a fusion reactor environment. The tensile tests were carried out at the irradiation temperature in vacuum. The irradiation caused an increase in yield stress to levels between 670 and 800 MPa depending on the irradiation temperature. Total elongation was reduced to less than 10%, however the specimens failed in a ductile manner. The results were compared with those of the specimens irradiated using irradiation capsules producing larger amount of He. Although the He/dpa ratio affected the microstructural change, the impact on the post irradiation tensile behavior was rather small for not only base metal specimens but also for the weld joint and the weld metal specimens.

  6. Tensile and charpy impact properties of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on eight reduced-activation Cr-W steels after irradiation to 15-17 and 26-29 dpa, and Charpy impact tests were conducted on the steels irradiated to 26-29 dpa. Irradiation was in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 365{degrees}C on steels containing 2.25-12% Cr, varying amounts of W, V, and Ta, and 0.1%C. Previously, tensile specimens were irradiated to 6-8 dpa and Charpy specimens to 6-8, 15-17, and 20-24 dpa. Tensile and Charpy specimens were also thermally aged to 20000 h at 365{degrees}C. Thermal aging had little effect on the tensile behavior or the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), but several steels showed a slight increase in the upper-shelf energy (USE). After {approx}7 dpa, the strength of the steels increased and then remained relatively unchanged through 26-29 dpa (i.e., the strength saturated with fluence). Post-irradiation Charpy impact tests after 26-29 dpa showed that the loss of impact toughness, as measured by an increase in DBTT and a decrease in the USE, remained relatively unchanged from the values after 20-24 dpa, which had been relatively unchanged from the earlier irradiations. As before, the two 9Cr steels were the most irradiation resistant.

  7. Tensile anisotropy and creep properties of a Fe-14CrWTi ODS ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckmeyer, A., E-mail: antonin.steckmeyer@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Rodrigo, Vargas Hideroa [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gentzbittel, J.M. [CEA Grenoble, DRT/LITEN/DTBH/LCTA, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rabeau, V.; Fournier, B. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-07-15

    A Fe-14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel is studied as a potential material for cladding tube application for the next generation of fast-breeder nuclear reactors. Tensile specimens machined out from a hot extruded round bar in three different orientations are used to evaluate the mechanical anisotropy of this steel for temperatures in the range 20-750 Degree-Sign C. Its anisotropy is discussed both in terms of mechanical strength and fracture mode. At high temperatures (HTs), above 500 Degree-Sign C, the longitudinal direction appears to be the most ductile and most resistant direction. Longitudinal creep tests between 650 Degree-Sign C and 900 Degree-Sign C were also carried out. They show this ODS steel has a high HT creep lifetime and a low creep failure strain. Intergranular cracks aligned along the loading axis were observed on fractured creep specimens. They reveal a particular weakness of prior particle boundaries and suggest to modify the elaboration process through mechanical alloying and hot extrusion.

  8. High temperature tensile testing of modified 9Cr-1Mo after irradiation with high energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Hamilton, M.L.; Maloy, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the effect of tensile test temperatures ranging from 50 to 600 deg. C on the tensile properties of a modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel after high energy proton irradiation at about 35-67 deg. C to doses from 1 to 3 dpa and 9 dpa. For the specimens irradiated to doses between 1 and 3 dpa, it was observed that the yield strength and ultimate strength decreased monotonically as a function of tensile test temperature, whereas the uniform elongation (UE) remained at approximately 1% for tensile test temperatures up to 250 deg. C and then increased for tensile test temperatures up to and including 500 deg. C. At 600 deg. C, the UE was observed to be less than the values at 400 and 500 deg. C. UE of the irradiated material tensile tested at 400-600 deg. C was observed to be greater than the values for the unirradiated material at the same temperatures. Tensile tests on the 9 dpa specimens followed similar trends

  9. Vacancy clustering behavior in hydrogen-charged martensitic steel AISI 410 under tensile deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, K; Mutou, Y; Shirai, Y

    2016-01-01

    The formation and accumulation of defects under tensile deformation of hydrogen- charged AISI 410 martensitic steels were investigated by using positron lifetime spectroscopy. During the deformation process, dislocations and vacancy-clusters were introduced and increased with increasing strains. Between hydrogen-charged and uncharged samples with the same tensile strains there was no significant difference in the dislocation density and monovacancy equivalent vacancy density. (paper)

  10. Study of tensile test behavior of austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes in cold worked condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terui, Clarice, E-mail: clarice.terui@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CINA/CTMSP), Iperó, SP (Brazil). Centro Industrial Nuclear da Marinha; Lima, Nelson B. de, E-mail: nblima@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    These austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes are potential candidates to be used in fuel elements of nuclear power plants (as PWR - Pressurized Water Reactor). So, their metallurgical condition and mechanical properties, as the tensile strength and yield strength, normally are very restrict in demanding project and design requirements. Several full size tensile tests at room temperature and high temperature (315 deg C) were performed in these seamless tubes in cold-worked condition. The results of specified tensile and yield strengths were achieved but the elongation of the tube, in the geometry of the component, could not be measured at high temperature due to unconventional mode of rupture (helical mode without separation of parts). The average value of elongation was obtained from stress-strain curves of hot tensile tests and was around 5%. The results obtained in this research show that this behavior of the full size tensile test samples of thin-walled tube (wall thickness less than 0.5 mm) in high temperature (315°C) is due to the combination of the manufacturing process, the material (crystallographic structure and chemical composition) and the final geometry of the component. In other words, the strong crystallographic texture of material induced by tube drawing process in addition with the geometry of the component are responsible for the behavior in hot uniaxial tensile tests. (author)

  11. Effect of tungsten on tensile properties and flow behaviour of RAFM steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanaja, J., E-mail: jvanaja@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Laha, K.; Nandagopal, M. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sam, Shiju [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2013-02-15

    Effect of tungsten in the range of 1–2 wt.% on tensile properties and flow behaviour of 9Cr–W–Ta–V Reduced Activation Ferritic–Martensitic (RAFM) steel has been investigated. The tungsten in the investigated range was found to have only minor effect on the tensile properties of the steel over the temperature range of 300–873 K and at a strain rate of 3 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}. The tensile flow behaviour of the RAFM steels was adequately described by the Voce’s constitutive equation. The tensile strength of the steels were predicted well from the parameters of the Voce’s constitutive equation. The Voce’s strain hardening parameter ‘n{sub v}’ was found to be quite sensitive to the tungsten content and predicted the onset of dislocation climbing process at relatively higher testing temperature with the increase in tungsten content. The equivalence between tensile and creep deformations and the influence of tungsten have been discussed.

  12. Effect of tungsten on tensile properties and flow behaviour of RAFM steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Nandagopal, M.; Sam, Shiju; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2013-01-01

    Effect of tungsten in the range of 1–2 wt.% on tensile properties and flow behaviour of 9Cr–W–Ta–V Reduced Activation Ferritic–Martensitic (RAFM) steel has been investigated. The tungsten in the investigated range was found to have only minor effect on the tensile properties of the steel over the temperature range of 300–873 K and at a strain rate of 3 × 10 −3 s −1 . The tensile flow behaviour of the RAFM steels was adequately described by the Voce’s constitutive equation. The tensile strength of the steels were predicted well from the parameters of the Voce’s constitutive equation. The Voce’s strain hardening parameter ‘n v ’ was found to be quite sensitive to the tungsten content and predicted the onset of dislocation climbing process at relatively higher testing temperature with the increase in tungsten content. The equivalence between tensile and creep deformations and the influence of tungsten have been discussed

  13. Assessment of tensile and creep data for types 304 and 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, V.K.; Booker, M.K.

    1976-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels of types 304 and 316 are prime construction materials for nuclear fast breeder reactors and will be used in the temperature range where elevated-temperature, tensile, creep, and fatigue properties are required to calculate the design stress limits. This report examines the possible variations in such properties, using data from several sources including data from Japan and the United Kingdom. United States data were shown to contain the largest variations in both tensile and creep properties, with Japanese data the least. For a given country no distinction could be made in variations in tensile properties of types 304 and 316 stainless steels, but variations in standard error of estimate for all creep properties analyzed were significantly lower for type 316 stainless steel than corresponding variations in creep properties of type 304 stainless steel. The data from each of these countries showed the same creep rupture strength (at 10 4 h) for type 316 stainless steel; this was not true for the type 304 stainless steel. Results of the analysis performed in this paper showed that the U.S. and foreign data on types 304 and 316 stainless steels could possibly be combined for the determination of design stress intensity limits

  14. The influence of temperature on the tensile properties of a super duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girones, A.; Mateo, A.; Llanes, L.; Anglada, M

    2001-01-01

    Tensile tests, at temperatures ranging between 275 and 475 degree centigree were performed in a superduplex stainless steel EN 1.4410. The dependence of yield stress and ultimate tensile strength on temperature indicates the existence of dynamic strain aging (DSA). In order to evaluate the influence of strain rate on this phenomenon, tests were conducted at two different strain rates, both at 325 degree centigree, temperature at which DSA is maximum for this materials. The results shows that the flow stress has an inverse strain rate sensitivity which confirms the existence of DSA in the steel under study. (Author) 10 refs

  15. Microstructure and Tensile-Shear Properties of Resistance Spot-Welded Medium Mn Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The medium Mn steels are gaining increasing attention due to their excellent combination of mechanical properties and material cost. A cold-rolled 0.1C5Mn medium Mn steel with a ferrite matrix plus metastable austenite duplex microstructure was resistance spot-welded with various welding currents and times. The nugget size rose with the increase of heat input, but when the welding current exceeded the critical value, the tensile-shear load increased slowly and became unstable due to metal expulsion. The fusion zone exhibited a lath martensite microstructure, and the heat-affected zone was composed of a ferrite/martensite matrix with retained austenite. The volume fraction of retained austenite decreased gradually from the base metal to the fusion zone, while the microhardness presented a reverse varying trend. Interfacial failure occurred along the interface of the steel sheets with lower loading capacity. Sufficient heat input along with serious expulsion brought about high stress concentration around the weld nugget, and the joint failed in partial interfacial mode. Pull-out failure was absent in this study.

  16. Application of ANFIS for analytical modeling of tensile strength of functionally graded steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the tensile strength of ferritic and austenitic functionally graded steels produced by electroslag remelting has been modeled. To produce functionally graded steels, two slices of plain carbon steel and austenitic stainless steels were spot welded and used as electroslag remelting electrode. Functionally graded steel containing graded layers of ferrite and austenite may be fabricated via diffusion of alloying elements during remelting stage. Vickers microhardness profile of the specimen has been obtained experimentally and modeled with adaptive network-based fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS. To build the model for graded ferritic and austenitic steels, training, testing and validation using respectively 174 and 120 experimental data were conducted. According to the input parameters, in the ANFIS model, the Vickers microhardness of each layer was predicted. A good fit equation which correlates the Vickers microhardness of each layer to its corresponding chemical composition was achieved by the optimized network for both ferritic and austenitic graded steels. Afterwards; the Vickers microhardness of each layer in functionally graded steels was related to the yield stress of the corresponding layer and by assuming Holloman relation for stress-strain curve of each layer, they were acquired. Finally, by applying the rule of mixtures, tensile strength of functionally graded steels configuration was found through a numerical method. The obtained results from the proposed model are in good agreement with those acquired from the experiments.

  17. Strain rate dependent deformation and failure behavior of laser welded DP780 steel joint under dynamic tensile loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Dong, Danyang; Wang, Lei; Chu, Xi; Wang, Pengfei; Jin, Mengmeng

    2015-01-01

    Laser welded DP steel joints are used widely in the automotive industry for weight reduction. Understanding the deformation and fracture behavior of the base metal (BM) and its welded joint (WJ), especially at high strain rates, is critical for the design of vehicle structures. This paper is concerned with the effects of strain rate on the tensile properties, deformation and fracture behavior of the laser welded DP780 steel joint. Quasi-static and dynamic tensile tests were performed on the WJ and BM of the DP780 steel using an electromechanical universal testing machine and a high-speed tensile testing machine over a wide range of strain rate (0.0001–1142 s −1 ). The microstructure change and microhardness distribution of the DP780 steel after laser welding were examined. Digital image correlation (DIC) and high-speed photography were employed for the strain measurement of the DP780 WJ during dynamic tensile tests. The DP780 WJ is a heterogeneous structure with hardening in fusion zone (FZ) and inner heat-affected zone (HAZ), and softening in outer HAZ. The DP780 BM and WJ exhibit positive strain rate dependence on the YS and UTS, which is smaller at lower strain rates and becomes larger with increasing strain rate, while ductility in terms of total elongation (TE) tends to increase under dynamic loading. Laser welding leads to an overall reduction in the ductility of the DP780 steel. However, the WJ exhibits a similar changing trend of the ductility to that of the BM with respect to the strain rate over the whole strain rate range. As for the DP780 WJ, the distance of tensile failure location from the weld centerline decreases with increasing strain rate. The typical ductile failure characteristics of the DP780 BM and WJ do not change with increasing strain rate. DIC measurements reveal that the strain localization starts even before the maximum load is attained in the DP780 WJ and gradual transition from uniform strains to severely localized strains occurs

  18. Strain rate dependent deformation and failure behavior of laser welded DP780 steel joint under dynamic tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang, E-mail: liuyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Dong, Danyang, E-mail: dongdanyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Lei, E-mail: wanglei@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Chu, Xi, E-mail: chuxi.ok@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Pengfei, E-mail: wpf1963871400@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Jin, Mengmeng, E-mail: 24401878@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-03-11

    Laser welded DP steel joints are used widely in the automotive industry for weight reduction. Understanding the deformation and fracture behavior of the base metal (BM) and its welded joint (WJ), especially at high strain rates, is critical for the design of vehicle structures. This paper is concerned with the effects of strain rate on the tensile properties, deformation and fracture behavior of the laser welded DP780 steel joint. Quasi-static and dynamic tensile tests were performed on the WJ and BM of the DP780 steel using an electromechanical universal testing machine and a high-speed tensile testing machine over a wide range of strain rate (0.0001–1142 s{sup −1}). The microstructure change and microhardness distribution of the DP780 steel after laser welding were examined. Digital image correlation (DIC) and high-speed photography were employed for the strain measurement of the DP780 WJ during dynamic tensile tests. The DP780 WJ is a heterogeneous structure with hardening in fusion zone (FZ) and inner heat-affected zone (HAZ), and softening in outer HAZ. The DP780 BM and WJ exhibit positive strain rate dependence on the YS and UTS, which is smaller at lower strain rates and becomes larger with increasing strain rate, while ductility in terms of total elongation (TE) tends to increase under dynamic loading. Laser welding leads to an overall reduction in the ductility of the DP780 steel. However, the WJ exhibits a similar changing trend of the ductility to that of the BM with respect to the strain rate over the whole strain rate range. As for the DP780 WJ, the distance of tensile failure location from the weld centerline decreases with increasing strain rate. The typical ductile failure characteristics of the DP780 BM and WJ do not change with increasing strain rate. DIC measurements reveal that the strain localization starts even before the maximum load is attained in the DP780 WJ and gradual transition from uniform strains to severely localized strains

  19. Utilization of ISO 6892:2009 testing standard for determining tensile properties of TM380 mild steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shoke, L

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available mild steel. To achieve this objective, we reviewed the ISO 6892:2009 tensile testing standard along with reported good practice guidelines. Tensile tests were conducted on a dog-bone shaped TM380 mild steel specimen with strain gauges attached on either...

  20. The tensile properties of austenitic steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Elevated temperature tensile data on Mo containing and Mo free austenitic weld metals have been collected from French, German and UK sources and the results analysed. In the as welded condition the proof strength is significantly higher than that of wrought material and Mo containing weld metal is stronger than Mo free weld metal. The differences in UTS values are not so marked, and on average at temperatures above 400 0 the weld metal UTS is slightly lower than that of wrought material. The ductility of weld metal is significantly lower than that for wrought material. 7 refs, 2 tables, 20 figs

  1. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  2. Tensile property improvement of TWIP-cored three-layer steel sheets fabricated by hot-roll-bonding with low-carbon steel or interstitial-free steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeyeong; Kim, Jung-Su; Kang, Minju; Sohn, Seok Su; Cho, Won Tae; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2017-01-01

    TWIP-cored three-layer steel sheets were newly fabricated by hot rolling of TWIP steel sheet surrounded by low-carbon (LC) or interstitial-free (IF) steel sheets. TWIP/LC or TWIP/IF interfaces were well bonded without pores or voids, while a few pearlites were thinly formed along the interfaces. The strengths and elongation of the TWIP-cored sheets increased as the volume fraction of TWIP-cored region increased, and were also well matched with the ones calculated by a rule of mixtures based on volume fraction or force fraction. According to digital image correlation and electron back-scatter diffraction analyses, very high strain hardening effect in the initial deformation stage and active twin formation in the interfacial region beneficially affected the overall homogeneous deformation in the TWIP-cored sheets without any yield point phenomenon occurring in the LC sheet and serrations occurring in the TWIP sheet, respectively. These TWIP-cored sheets can cover a wide range of yield strength, tensile strength, and ductility levels, e.g., 320~498 MPa, 545~878 MPa, and 48~54%, respectively, by controlling the volume fraction of TWIP-cored region, and thus present new applications to multi-functional automotive steel sheets requiring excellent properties.

  3. Low temperature tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking resistance in the super duplex stainless steels weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeung Woo; Sung, Jang Hyun; Lee, Sung Keun

    1998-01-01

    Low temperature tensile properties and SCC resistances of super duplex stainless steels and their weldments are investigated. Tensile strengths increase remarkably with decreasing test temperature, while elongations decrease steeply at -196 .deg. C after showing peak or constant value down to -100 .deg. C. Owing to the low tensile deformation of weld region, elongations of welded specimen decrease in comparison to those of unwelded specimen. The welded tensile specimen is fractured through weld region at -196 .deg. C due to the fact that the finely dispersed ferrite phase in the austenite matrix increases an opportunity to supply the crack propagation path through the brittle ferrite phase at low temperature. The stress corrosion cracking initiates preferentially at the surface ferrite phase of base metal region and propagates through ferrite phase. When the corrosion crack meets with the fibrously aligned austenite phase to the tensile direction, the ferrite phase around austenite continues to corrode. Eventually, fracture of the austenite phase begins without enduring the tensile load. The addition of Cu+W to the super duplex stainless steel deteriorates the SCC resistance in boiling MgCl 2 solution, possibly due to the increment of pits in the ferrite phase and reduction of N content in the austenite phase

  4. Void coalescence and fracture behavior of notched and un-notched tensile tested specimens in fine grain dual phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidi, N., E-mail: navidsae@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafizadeh, F.; Niroumand, B. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Forouzan, M.R.; Mohseni mofidi, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Barlat, F. [Materials Mechanics Laboratory (MML), Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology (GIFT), Pohang University of Science and Technology POSTECH, San 31 Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-17

    Due to growing global concern about the environmental issues, steel developers have been forced by automobile makers to produce more efficient steel grades with high strength to weight ratios along with high crashworthiness performance. In order to find deficiencies of the existing steels and develop superior steel products, detailed understanding of deformation and damage behavior in the existing steels is needed. In the present research, deformation and damage evolution during room temperature uniaxial tensile test of a modern high strength Dual Phase Steel, i.e. DP780, were studied. Detailed scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the microstructures of notched and un-notched tensile fractured specimens revealed that in notched specimen, plastic deformation was concentrated more within the notched region. Therefore, much higher reduction in thickness with a high reduction gradient occurred in this region, In the un-notched specimen, however, plastic deformation was more uniformly distributed in larger parts of the gauge length, and therefore, thickness reduction happened with a lower gradient. Although geometric notch on the specimen did not change the void nucleation and growth mechanisms, the kinetics of these phenomena was influenced. On the other hand, voids linkage mechanism tended to change from void coalescence in the un-notched specimen to void sheeting in the notched specimen. Moreover, three different models developed by Brown & Embury (BM), Thomason and Pardoen were employed to predict the final fracture strain. It was revealed that, BM model showed much more accurate predictions for the studied DP steel in comparison with those of Thomason and Pardoens’ models.

  5. Void coalescence and fracture behavior of notched and un-notched tensile tested specimens in fine grain dual phase steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeidi, N.; Ashrafizadeh, F.; Niroumand, B.; Forouzan, M.R.; Mohseni mofidi, S.; Barlat, F.

    2015-01-01

    Due to growing global concern about the environmental issues, steel developers have been forced by automobile makers to produce more efficient steel grades with high strength to weight ratios along with high crashworthiness performance. In order to find deficiencies of the existing steels and develop superior steel products, detailed understanding of deformation and damage behavior in the existing steels is needed. In the present research, deformation and damage evolution during room temperature uniaxial tensile test of a modern high strength Dual Phase Steel, i.e. DP780, were studied. Detailed scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the microstructures of notched and un-notched tensile fractured specimens revealed that in notched specimen, plastic deformation was concentrated more within the notched region. Therefore, much higher reduction in thickness with a high reduction gradient occurred in this region, In the un-notched specimen, however, plastic deformation was more uniformly distributed in larger parts of the gauge length, and therefore, thickness reduction happened with a lower gradient. Although geometric notch on the specimen did not change the void nucleation and growth mechanisms, the kinetics of these phenomena was influenced. On the other hand, voids linkage mechanism tended to change from void coalescence in the un-notched specimen to void sheeting in the notched specimen. Moreover, three different models developed by Brown & Embury (BM), Thomason and Pardoen were employed to predict the final fracture strain. It was revealed that, BM model showed much more accurate predictions for the studied DP steel in comparison with those of Thomason and Pardoens’ models

  6. Influence of grain size on the tensile and creep properties of a type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannan, S.L.; Samuel, K.G.; Rodriguez, P.

    The influence of grain size, on the tensile deformation behaviour in the temperature range 300-1223 K and on the creep rate at 873 and 973 K over a wide range of applied stresses, in a type 316 stainless steel has been investigated. For the tensile results, the Hall-Petch relation was found to be valid up to 1023 K. The variations of flow stress and work hardening rate with temperature and grain size have been found to be influenced by dynamic strain aging which occurs in the temperature range 523-923 K. The creep experiments revealed that grain boundaries contribute to strengthening at high stresses (180-260 MPa) at 873 K but this strengthening does not correlate with the available models which attempt to incorporate the Hall-Petch strengthening effect into creep rate equations. At 973 K the creep rate was generally constant but increased at small grain sizes and at lower stresses due to increased contribution from grain boundary sliding. The difference in the grain size effects on creep at the two temperatures is attributed to the difference in the substructures developed during creep. (author)

  7. Effect of normalization heat treatment on creep and tensile properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneer Selvi, S.; Sakthivel, T.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.

    2016-01-01

    Creep and tensile properties have been investigated on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel subjected to single and double normalization heat treatments. Optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopic investigation revealed the presence of refined prior austenite grain size and fine M 23 C 6 precipitates in the double normalized steel compared to the steel subjected to single normalization heat treatment. Increased creep strain and significant reduction in creep rupture life were observed with the double normalized steel in comparison with single normalized steel. Increased tensile ductility coupled with marginal decrease in tensile strength at higher test temperature was observed with double normalized steel compared to single normalized steel. It has been attributed to the presence of refined prior austenite grain size and coarsening of Nb rich MX precipitates in double normalized steel. (author)

  8. Effect of Strengthening Mechanism on Strain-Rate Related Tensile Properties of Low-Carbon Sheet Steels for Automotive Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anindya; Biswas, Pinaki; Tarafder, S.; Chakrabarti, D.; Sivaprasad, S.

    2018-05-01

    In order to ensure crash resistance of the steels used in automotive components, the ensile deformation behavior needs to be studied and predicted not only under quasi-static condition, but also under dynamic loading rates. In the present study, tensile tests have been performed on four different automobile grade sheet steels, namely interstitial free steel, dual-phase 600 and 800, and a carbon manganese steel over the strain rate regime of 0.001-800/s. Apart from the variation in strength (which always increased with strain rate), the effect of strengthening mechanism on strain rate sensitivity and strain hardening behavior has been evaluated. Strain rate sensitivity was found to increase at high-strain rate regime for all the steels. Contribution of solid solution hardening on strain rate sensitivity at lower plastic strains was found to be higher compared to dislocation strengthening and second-phase hardening. However, precipitation hardening coupled with solid solution hardening produced the highest strain rate sensitivity, in C-Mn-440 steel at high strain rates. Different strain-rate-sensitive models which take into account the change in yield stress and strain hardening behavior with strain rate for ductile materials were used to predict the flow behavior of these sheet steels at strain rates up to 800/s.

  9. Influence of sodium evnironment on the uniaxial tensile behavior of titanium modified type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Chopra, O.K.; Kassner, T.F.

    1978-01-01

    True stress-true strain tensile data have been obtained for titanium modified type 316 stainless steel in the solution annealed condition and after exposure to a flowing sodium environment at temperature of 700, 650, 600 and 550 0 C. The specimens were exposed to sodium for times between 120 and 5012 h to produce carbon penetration depths in the range 0.05-0.30 mm. The Voce equation was used to describe tensile flow curves for plastic strains above 0.005. The results showed that, when compared with solution annealed specimens, the tensile flow behavior of the sodium exposed specimens is characterized by a higher strain hardening rate, which decreases rapidly as the flow stress increases. The loss in tensile ductility of the material due to carburization in sodium environment was found to be minimal. (Auth.)

  10. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of high strength steel sheets for crashworthiness; Shototsu anzen`yo kokyodo usu koban no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, K; Yamamoto, M; Mizui, N; Hirose, Y; Kojima, K [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd. Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    For frontal or rear members of automotive body, the most suitable high strength steel was investigated. Dynamic tensile test at strain-rate of 2000/s and crash test of hat-shape column at 4m/s were conducted for steel sheets with tensile strength ranging from 290 to 980 MPa. Dynamic tensile strength increases with increasing static one but the ratio of dynamic tensile strength to static one decreases. Tensile strength remarkably affects crash energy absorption of column and TRIP steel is superior to other steels with same tensile strength. 7 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  13. Finite element analysis of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC): validation of experimental tensile capacity of dog-bone specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Mashfiqul; Chowdhury, Md. Arman; Sayeed, Md. Abu; Hossain, Elsha Al; Ahmed, Sheikh Saleh; Siddique, Ashfia

    2014-09-01

    Finite element analyses are conducted to model the tensile capacity of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC). For this purpose dog-bone specimens are casted and tested under direct and uniaxial tension. Two types of aggregates (brick and stone) are used to cast the SFRC and plain concrete. The fiber volume ratio is maintained 1.5 %. Total 8 numbers of dog-bone specimens are made and tested in a 1000-kN capacity digital universal testing machine (UTM). The strain data are gathered employing digital image correlation technique from high-definition images and high-speed video clips. Then, the strain data are synthesized with the load data obtained from the load cell of the UTM. The tensile capacity enhancement is found 182-253 % compared to control specimen to brick SFRC and in case of stone SFRC the enhancement is 157-268 %. Fibers are found to enhance the tensile capacity as well as ductile properties of concrete that ensures to prevent sudden brittle failure. The dog-bone specimens are modeled in the ANSYS 10.0 finite element platform and analyzed to model the tensile capacity of brick and stone SFRC. The SOLID65 element is used to model the SFRC as well as plain concretes by optimizing the Poisson's ratio, modulus of elasticity, tensile strength and stress-strain relationships and also failure pattern as well as failure locations. This research provides information of the tensile capacity enhancement of SFRC made of both brick and stone which will be helpful for the construction industry of Bangladesh to introduce this engineering material in earthquake design. Last of all, the finite element outputs are found to hold good agreement with the experimental tensile capacity which validates the FE modeling.

  14. Correlation of hot-microhardness with elevated-temperature tensile properties of low activation ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu Chenyih

    1986-01-01

    Hot microhardness and elevated temperature tensile tests have been performed on 9Cr-2.5W-0.3V-0.15C(GA3X) low activation ferritic steel at temperatures from 20 0 C to 650 0 C. The uniform elongation of the tensile test correlated well with the ductility parameter of the microhardness test. The hot-microhardness test showed a sensitive response to the softening and changes in ductility of the GA3X steel. The ultimate tensile strength and 0.2% yield strength of this steel correlated well with hot microhardness data at test temperatures up to 400 0 C using Cahoon's expressions σ uts = (H/2.9)(n/0.217) n and σ ys = (H/3)(0.1) n , respectively, where H is the diamond pyramid hardness and n is the strain hardening exponent. A 20-30% underestimate of tensile strengths were obtained using Cahoon's expressions at temperatures above 400 0 C, which is probably attributed to creep deformation and may be improved by selecting a proper loading condition during the hardness test. (orig.)

  15. Notch Effect on Tensile Deformation Behavior of 304L and 316L Steels in Liquid Helium and Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, K.; Fujii, H.

    2004-01-01

    Tensile tests of type 304L and 316L steels were carried out using round bar specimens with a notch in liquid helium, hydrogen, liquid nitrogen and at ambient temperature. The obtained tensile strengths were compared with the tensile strengths of smooth specimens. For smooth specimens, tensile strength increased with a decrease in temperature and the strengths in liquid helium and hydrogen show similar values in both steels. For notched specimen of 304L steel, tensile strength (including fracture strength) increased noticeably from ambient to liquid nitrogen temperature but showed a large decrease in liquid helium and hydrogen. In liquid hydrogen and helium, the tensile strength is a little lower in liquid hydrogen than in liquid helium and both strengths are lower than tensile strengths of smooth specimens. For notched specimen of 316L steel, an increase in tensile strength from ambient to liquid nitrogen temperature was not so large and a decrease from liquid nitrogen to liquid hydrogen was small. The tensile strengths in liquid helium and hydrogen were nearly same and higher than those of smooth specimens. Different behavior of serration was observed between liquid helium and hydrogen, and between 304L and 316L steels. The reasons for these differences were discussed using computer simulation

  16. Tensile Fracture Behavior of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Manufactured by Hot Isostatic Pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A. J.; Brayshaw, W. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2018-02-01

    Herein we investigate how the oxygen content in hot isostatically pressed (HIP'd) 316L stainless steel affects the mechanical properties and tensile fracture behavior. This work follows on from previous studies, which aimed to understand the effect of oxygen content on the Charpy impact toughness of HIP'd steel. We expand on the work by performing room-temperature tensile testing on different heats of 316L stainless steel, which contain different levels of interstitial elements (carbon and nitrogen) as well as oxygen in the bulk material. Throughout the work we repeat the experiments on conventionally forged 316L steel as a reference material. The analysis of the work indicates that oxygen does not contribute to a measureable solution strengthening mechanism, as is the case with carbon and nitrogen in austenitic stainless steels (Werner in Mater Sci Eng A 101:93-98, 1988). Neither does oxygen, in the form of oxide inclusions, contribute to precipitation hardening due to the size and spacing of particles. However, the oxide particles do influence fracture behavior; fractography of the failed tension test specimens indicates that the average ductile dimple size is related to the oxygen content in the bulk material, the results of which support an on-going hypothesis relating oxygen content in HIP'd steels to their fracture mechanisms by providing additional sites for the initiation of ductile damage in the form of voids.

  17. The crack propagating behavior of composite coatings prepared by PEO on aluminized steel during in situ tensile processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhitong; Li Guang; Wu Zhenqiang; Xia Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Composite coatings on the aluminized steel were prepared by the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique, which comprised of Fe-Al layer, Al layer and Al 2 O 3 layer. → The evaluation method of the crack critical opening displacement δ c was introduced to describe quantitatively the resistance of Al layer to the propagation behavior of cracks and evaluate the fracture behavior of composite coatings. → The crack propagating model was established. - Abstract: This paper investigates the in situ tensile cracks propagating behavior of composite coatings on the aluminized steel generated using the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique. Cross-sectional micrographs and elemental compositions were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The composite coatings were shown to consist of Fe-Al, Al and Al 2 O 3 layers. The cracks propagating behavior was observed in real-time in situ SEM tensile test. In tensile process, the cracks were temporarily stopped when cracks propagated from Fe-Al layer to Al layer. The critical crack opening displacement δ c was introduced to quantitatively describe the resistance of the Al layer. There was a functional relation among the thickness ratio t Al /t Al 2 O 3 , the δ c of composite coatings and tensile cracks' spacing. The δ c increased with the increasing of the thickness ratio (t Al /t Al 2 O 3 ). The high δ c value means high fracture resistance. Therefore, a control of the thickness ratio t Al /t Al 2 O 3 was concerned as a key to improve the toughness and strength of the aluminized steel.

  18. Influence of thermo-mechanical treatment on the tensile properties of a modified 14Cr–15Ni stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayanand, V.D., E-mail: vdvijayanand@igcar.gov.in; Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M.D.

    2014-10-15

    The titanium modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic stainless steel is used as clad and wrapper material for fast breeder nuclear reactor. Thermo-mechanical treatments consisting of solution annealing at two different temperatures of 1273 and 1373 K followed by cold-work and thermal ageing have been imparted to the steel to tailor its microstructure for enhancing strength. Tensile tests have been carried out on the thermo-mechanically treated steel at nominal strain rate of 1.6 × 10{sup −4} s{sup −1} over a temperature range of 298–1073 K. The yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength of the steel increased with increase in solution treatment temperature and this has been attributed to the fine and higher density of Ti(C,N) precipitate. Tensile flow behaviour of the steel has been analysed using Ludwigson and Voce constitutive equations. The steel heat treated at higher solution temperature exhibited earlier onset of cross slip during tensile deformation. The rate of recovery at higher test temperatures was also influenced by variations in solution heat treatment temperature. In addition, dynamic recrystallization during tensile deformation at higher temperatures was profound for steel solution heat-treated at lower temperature. The differences in flow behaviour and softening mechanisms during tensile testing of the steel after different heat treated conditions have been attributed to the nature of Ti(C,N) precipitation.

  19. Influence of thermo-mechanical treatment on the tensile properties of a modified 14Cr–15Ni stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayanand, V.D.; Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    The titanium modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic stainless steel is used as clad and wrapper material for fast breeder nuclear reactor. Thermo-mechanical treatments consisting of solution annealing at two different temperatures of 1273 and 1373 K followed by cold-work and thermal ageing have been imparted to the steel to tailor its microstructure for enhancing strength. Tensile tests have been carried out on the thermo-mechanically treated steel at nominal strain rate of 1.6 × 10 −4 s −1 over a temperature range of 298–1073 K. The yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength of the steel increased with increase in solution treatment temperature and this has been attributed to the fine and higher density of Ti(C,N) precipitate. Tensile flow behaviour of the steel has been analysed using Ludwigson and Voce constitutive equations. The steel heat treated at higher solution temperature exhibited earlier onset of cross slip during tensile deformation. The rate of recovery at higher test temperatures was also influenced by variations in solution heat treatment temperature. In addition, dynamic recrystallization during tensile deformation at higher temperatures was profound for steel solution heat-treated at lower temperature. The differences in flow behaviour and softening mechanisms during tensile testing of the steel after different heat treated conditions have been attributed to the nature of Ti(C,N) precipitation

  20. Studying of Compressive, Tensile and Flexural Strength of Concrete by Using Steel Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muslim Abdul-Ameer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the effect of adding steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete. Steel fiber has a very significant effect on concrete because it delays the propagation of micro cracks that generate due to loading on concrete members such as beams and slabs, therefore ,it increases the strength of concrete. The steel fiber was used in this study as a percentage of the volume of concrete. Mix proportion was 1: 2:4 (cement: sand: gravel by volume for all mixes and using 0% as (control mix,0.1 %,0.2%,0.5 % and 1.0% of steel fibers, these ratios leads to increase the compressive, tensile ,and flexural strength of concrete, where the improvement in flexural strength was significant

  1. Thermoelastoviscoplastic modeling of RAFM steel JLF-1 using tensile and low cycle fatigue experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Msolli, S., E-mail: sabeur.msolli@univ-lorraine.fr

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a modeling of the elastoviscoplastic behavior of a Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel JLF-1 is presented. The modeling of this material was based on various Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) and tensile tests performed in air and vacuum using different imposed strain rates and temperature ranges going from ambient temperature to 873 K. The coupled viscoplastic model is coded in FORTRAN program, implemented into the finite elements code ABAQUS and used to predict the thermomechanical behavior of a fatigue specimen made of RAFM steel JLF-1. Good agreements were found between numerical results and experimental data.

  2. Hydrogen Induced Crack and Phase Transformation in Hydrogen Pressured Tensile Test of 316L Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Un Bong; Nam, Sung Hoon [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Byung Hak; Shim, Jong Hun [Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Uk [Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Keyyong [Korea Research Institute of Ship and Ocean Engineering, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    The aim of this investigation is to prove the mechanism of hydrogen induced crack (HIC) of 316L stainless steels in hydrogen pressured tensile test. Microstructures like twin, planar slip, and abnormal phase transformation around the HIC were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Deformation twin accompanied by planar slip could be related to the main cause of HIC in the hydrogen pressured tensile condition, because intragranular HICs were mainly observed along the boundaries of twins and planar slip lines. An abnormal forbidden diffraction was also accompanied by HIC in the hydrogen attacked area. Examination of the HIC mechanism in austenitic stainless steel can be applied to the fitness of use for alloys with the possibility of various susceptible cracks in a hydrogen and stress atmosphere.

  3. Fatigue assessment by energy approach during tensile tests on AISI 304 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Risitano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of the fatigue limit for steel ductile materials using non-destructive methods is a topic of great interest to researchers today. In recent years, the method adopted has implemented infrared sensors to detect the surface temperature and correlate it with the fatigue limit. In previous paper, a new energy approach was proposed to investigate the fatigue limit during tensile test. The numerical procedure proposed by Chrysochoos is adopted to clean infrared images and applied to analyse the surface heat sources during tensile test. AISI 304 specimens with rectangular cross-sections are tested. Moreover fatigue tests at increasing loads were carried out on steel by a stepwise succession, applied to the same specimen, for applying the thermographic method. The predictions of the fatigue limit, obtained by the analysis of the energy evolution during the static tests, were compared with the predictions obtained applying the thermographic method during fatigue tests.

  4. Effect of implanted helium on tensile properties and hardness of 9% Cr martensitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, P.; Henry, J.; Chen, J.; Brachet, J.-C.

    2003-05-01

    Hundred micrometer thick specimens of 9% Cr martensitic steels EM10 and T91 were homogeneously implanted with He 4 to concentrations up to 0.5 at.% at temperatures from 150 to 550 °C. The specimens were tensile tested at room temperature and at the respective implantation temperatures. Subsequently the fracture surfaces were analysed by scanning electron microscopy and some of the specimens were examined in an instrumented hardness tester. The implanted helium caused hardening and embrittlement which both increased with increasing helium content and with decreasing implantation temperature. Fracture surfaces showed intergranular brittle appearance with virtually no necking at the highest implantation doses, when implanted below 250 °C. The present tensile results can be scaled to tensile data after irradiation in spallation sources on the basis of helium content but not on displacement damage. An interpretation of this finding by microstructural examination is given in a companion paper [J. Nucl. Mater., these Proceedings].

  5. Austenite stability in reversion-treated structures of a 301LN steel under tensile loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Järvenpää, A.; Jaskari, M.; Man, Jiří; Karjalainen, L. P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 127, MAY (2017), s. 12-26 ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-32665S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : austenitic stainless steel * austenite stability * grain size * reversion annealing * tensile straining * deformation induced martensite Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.714, year: 2016

  6. Magnetic memory signals variation induced by applied magnetic field and static tensile stress in ferromagnetic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Haihong; Yang, Cheng; Qian, Zhengchun; Han, Gang; Liu, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Stress can induce a spontaneous magnetic field in ferromagnetic steel under the excitation of geomagnetic field. In order to investigate the impact of applied magnetic field and tensile stress on variation of the residual magnetic signals on the surface of ferromagnetic materials, static tensile tests of Q235 structural steel were carried out, with the normal component of the residual magnetic signals, H p (y), induced by applied magnetic fields with different intensities measured through the tensile tests. The H p (y), its slope coefficient K S and maximum gradient K max changing with the applied magnetic field H and tensile stress were observed. Results show that the magnitude of H p (y) and its slope coefficient K S increase linearly with the increase of stress in the elastic deformation stage. Under yield stress, H p (y) and K S reach its maximum, and then decrease slightly with further increase of stress. Applied magnetic field affects the magnitude of H p (y) instead of changing the signal curve′s profile; and the magnitude of H p (y), K S , K max and the change rate of K S increase with the increase of applied magnetic field. The phenomenon is also discussed from the viewpoint of magnetic charge in ferromagnetic materials. - Highlights: • We investigated how applied magnetic field and tensile stress impact H p (y) signals. • Magnitude of H p (y), K S and K max increase with the increase of applied magnetic field. • Both applied magnetic field and tensile stress impact material magnetic permeability. • Applied magnetic field can help to evaluate the stress distribution of components.

  7. Magnetic memory signals variation induced by applied magnetic field and static tensile stress in ferromagnetic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Haihong, E-mail: huanghaihong@hfut.edu.cn; Yang, Cheng; Qian, Zhengchun; Han, Gang; Liu, Zhifeng

    2016-10-15

    Stress can induce a spontaneous magnetic field in ferromagnetic steel under the excitation of geomagnetic field. In order to investigate the impact of applied magnetic field and tensile stress on variation of the residual magnetic signals on the surface of ferromagnetic materials, static tensile tests of Q235 structural steel were carried out, with the normal component of the residual magnetic signals, H{sub p}(y), induced by applied magnetic fields with different intensities measured through the tensile tests. The H{sub p}(y), its slope coefficient K{sub S} and maximum gradient K{sub max} changing with the applied magnetic field H and tensile stress were observed. Results show that the magnitude of H{sub p}(y) and its slope coefficient K{sub S} increase linearly with the increase of stress in the elastic deformation stage. Under yield stress, H{sub p}(y) and K{sub S} reach its maximum, and then decrease slightly with further increase of stress. Applied magnetic field affects the magnitude of H{sub p}(y) instead of changing the signal curve′s profile; and the magnitude of H{sub p}(y), K{sub S}, K{sub max} and the change rate of K{sub S} increase with the increase of applied magnetic field. The phenomenon is also discussed from the viewpoint of magnetic charge in ferromagnetic materials. - Highlights: • We investigated how applied magnetic field and tensile stress impact H{sub p}(y) signals. • Magnitude of H{sub p}(y), K{sub S} and K{sub max} increase with the increase of applied magnetic field. • Both applied magnetic field and tensile stress impact material magnetic permeability. • Applied magnetic field can help to evaluate the stress distribution of components.

  8. Tensile strength and durability characteristics of high-performance fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadoss, P.; Nagamani, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents investigations towards developing a better understanding of the contribution of steel fibers to the tensile strength of high-performance fiber reinforced concrete (HPFRC). For 32 series of mixes, flexural and splitting tensile strengths were determined at 28 days. The variables investigated were fiber volume fraction (0%, 0.5%, 1% and 1.5% with an aspect of 80), silica fume replacement level (SF/CM=0.05 and 0.10) and matrix composition (w/cm ratios ranging from 0.25 t 0.40). The influence of fiber content in terms of fiber reinforcing index on the flexural and splitting tensile strengths of HPFRC is presented. Comparative studies were performed on the tensile behavior of SFRC measured by two different loading tests: flexural test and splitting test. Based on the test results, using the least square method, empirical expressions were developed to predict 28-day tensile strength of HPFRC in terms of fiber reinforcing index. Durability tests were carried out to examine the performance of the SFRC. Relationship between flexural and splitting tensile strengths has been developed using regression analysis. The experimental values of previous researchers were compared with the values predicted by the empirical equations and the absolute variation obtained was within 6% and 5% for flexural and splitting tensile strengths respectively. (author)

  9. Dynamic Strain Aging Phenomena and Tensile Response of Medium-Mn TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Daniel M.; Van Aken, David C.

    2018-04-01

    Dynamic strain aging (DSA) and rapid work hardening are typical behaviors observed in medium-Mn transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel. Three alloys with manganese ranging from 10.2 to 13.8 wt pct with calculated room temperature stacking fault energies varying from - 2.1 to 0.7 mJ/m2 were investigated. Significant serrations were observed in the stress-strain behavior for two of the steels and the addition of 4.6 wt pct chromium was effective in significantly reducing the occurrence of DSA. Addition of chromium to the alloy reduced DSA by precipitation of M23(C,N)6 during batch annealing at 873 K (600 °C) for 20 hours. Three distinct DSA mechanisms were identified: one related to manganese ordering in stacking faults associated with ɛ-martensite and austenite interface, with activation energies for the onset and termination of DSA being 145 and 277 kJ/mol. A second mechanism was associated with carbon diffusion in γ-austenite where Mn-C bonding added to the total binding energy, and activation energies of 88 and 155 kJ/mol were measured for the onset and termination of DSA. A third mechanism was attributed to dislocation pinning and unpinning by nitrogen in α-ferrite with activation energies of 64 and 123 kJ/mol being identified. Tensile behaviors of the three medium manganese steels were studied in both the hot band and batch annealed after cold working conditions. Ultimate tensile strengths ranged from 1310 to 1404 MPa with total elongation of 24.1 to 34.1 pct. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to determine the transformation response of the steels using interrupted tensile tests at room temperature. All three of the processed steels showed evidence of two-stage TRIP where γ-austenite first transformed to ɛ-martensite, and subsequently transformed to α-martensite.

  10. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Md. Arman; Islam, Md. Mashfiqul; Ibna Zahid, Zubayer

    2016-01-01

    Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE) platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A tot...

  11. The characteristics of ultra-high performance concrete and cracking behavior of reinforced concrete tensile specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Rahdar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The tensile behavior of concrete depends on some factors such as member dimensions, reinforcement ratio, diameter of rebar, strength and elasticity modulus of material. In this research the experimental method is used to examine the characteristics and the behavior of ultra-high performance concrete on the tensile behavior of concrete members reinforced by steel rebar. The results show that increasing the rebar cover on diameter rebar ratio (C/d increases the initial stiffening before the cracking stage in concrete. Also, by increasing of reinforcement ratio the cracking space decreased.

  12. Coolant compatibility studies. The effect of irradiation on tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking sensitivity of martensitic steels. MANET 4 - complementary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystrand, A.C.

    1994-02-01

    Tensile and stress corrosion cracking tests have been carried out on MANET-type (1.4914 and FV448) and reduced activation (LA12TaLC) high-chromium martensitic steels. The materials had previously been exposed up to 5000 h at ∼275 degrees C in the core, above the core and remote from the core of a high pressure water loop in the Studsvik R2 reactor. After the mechanical testing the materials were examined visually and metallographically. The steel samples exposed in the core section showed large increases in tensile yield strengths when tested at 250 degrees C. However, the magnitude of the radiation hardening was considerably smaller in the reduced activation steel compared to the commercial steels; this observation is consistent with published data on other high-chromium martensitic steels and is associated with the lower chromium content of the LA12TaLC steel (8.9%) compared with those of the commercial steels (10.6 and 11.3%). Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) was not detected in any of the stressed steel samples after autoclave testing for times up to 1500 h at 250 degrees C in air-saturated high purity water. This apparent resistance to IASCC may be due to the high chromium martensitic steels not being sensitized by the irradiation in a comparable manner to that shown by the austenitic steels. However, additional studies are required to clarify some of the existing uncertainties with respect to IASCC of these martensitic steels

  13. Tensile properties of four types of austenitic stainless steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balladon, P.

    1990-01-01

    In the field of an LMFBR research programme on austenitic stainless steel welds in a Shared Cost Action Safety, Research Area 8, coordinated by JRC-Ispra, four cooperating laboratories (ECN, IKE/MPA, the Welding Institute and UNIREC) have been involved in the fabrication and extensive characterization of welded joints made from one plate of ICL 167 stainless steel. The materials included parent metal, four vacuum electron beam welds, one non vacuum electron beam weld, one submerged arc weld, one gas metal arc weld and one manual metal arc weld. This report summarizes the 106 tensile tests performed at room temperature and 550 0 C, including the influence of strain rate, specimen orientation and welding procedure. Main results are that electron beam welds have tensile properties close to those of parent metal with higher values of yield strength in longitudinal orientation and lower values of total elongation in transverse orientation but with a similar reduction of area, that filler metal welds own the highest values of yield strength and lowest values of ductility. Most of the welds properties are higher than the minimum specified for parent metal, except for some values of total elongation, mainly in transverse orientation. In view of using electron beam welding for production of components used in LMFBR, results obtained show that tensile properties of electron beam welds compare well to those of classical welds. (author)

  14. Characterization of the failure behavior of zinc coating on dual phase steel under tensile deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Guiming; Sloof, Willem G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The microcracks and voids at the zinc grain boundaries are the initial sites for the coating cracking. → The crack spacing of the fragmentally fractured zinc coating is mainly determined by the zinc grain size. → Small zinc grain size and the c-axis direction of zinc grain parallel to the zinc surface are beneficial to the mitigation of the zinc coating delamination. - Abstract: The failure behavior of hot-dip galvanized zinc coatings on dual phase steels under tensile deformation is characterized with in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Under tension, the pre-existed microcracks and voids at the zinc grain boundaries propagate along the zinc grain boundaries to form crack nets within the coating, leading to a segmented fracture of the zinc coating with the crack spacing approximately equal to the zinc grain size. With further loading, the coating segments partially delaminated along the interface between the top zinc layer and the inhibition layer instead of the interface between the inhibition layer and steel substrate. As the c-axis of zinc grains trends to be normal to the tensile loading direction, the twinning deformation became more noticeable, and meanwhile the coating delamination was diminished. The transverse and incline tunneling cracks occurred in the inhibition layer with tensile deformation. The existence of the brittle FeZn 13 particles on top of the inhibition layer was unfavorable to the coating adhesion.

  15. Tensile behavior of EUROFER ODS steel after neutron irradiation up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materna-Morris, Edeltraud; Lindau, Rainer; Schneider, Hans-Christian; Möslang, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The first 9%CrWVTa steel (0.5% Y_2O_3), EUROFER ODS HIP, have been neutron irradiated up to 16.3 dpa, between 250 and 450 °C, in the High Flux Reactor (HFR). • After post-irradiation tensile tests, there was not any increase of the upper yield strength or strain localization after irradiation which is typical of RAFM steels. • Initially higher yield strength, R_p_0_._2, and distinctive tensile strength, R_m, of EUROFER ODS HIP compared to EUROFER97 steel. • These values increased due to the neutron irradiation at lower irradiation temperatures. - Abstract: During the development of structural material for future fusion reactors, a 50 kg heat of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic 9%CrWVTa steel with nanoscaled Y_2O_3-particles, EUROFER97 ODS HIP, was produced using powder metallurgy fabrication technology. This first batch of EUROFER97 ODS HIP and, for comparison, the steel EUROFER97 were prepared for a post-irradiation tensile test program. During neutron irradiation in the HFR (High Flux Reactor, The Netherlands), an accumulated dose of up to 16.3 dpa was reached for 771 days at full power, with the irradiation temperature ranging between 250 and 450 °C. During the post-examinations, all specimens showed the highest tensile strength at lower irradiation temperatures between 250 and 350 °C. However, ODS-alloy and steel were found to clearly differ in the mechanical behavior, which could be documented by fully instrumented tensile tests. In the un-irradiated state, tensile strength of the ODS-alloy already was increased considerably by about 60% compared to the steel. Strengthening was further increased by another 20% after neutron irradiation, but with a much better ductility than observed in the steel. The typical irradiation-induced strain localization of EUROFER97 or RAFM steels could not be observed in the EUROFER97 ODS HIP alloy.

  16. Effect of cryogenic treatment on the tensile behaviour of En 52 and 21-4N valve steels at room and elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaswin, M. Arockia; Lal, D. Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Tensile behaviour of cryo-treated valve steels are investigated at elevated temperature. → En 52 and 21-4N valve steel materials are treated at - 196 o C . → Tensile strength of cryo-treated En 52 and 21-4N valve steel has improved by 8 % and 12 % respectively. → Precipitation of fine carbides through cryogenic treatment is the reason for the improved strength. -- Abstract: This experimental study investigates the effects of cryogenic treatment on the tensile behaviour of En 52 and 21-4N valve steels at room and elevated temperatures. The materials are subjected to shallow cryogenic treatment (SCT) at 193 K and deep cryogenic treatment (DCT) at 85 K and the tensile behaviour is compared with that of the conventional heat treatment (CHT). The high temperature tensile test is conducted at 673 K (400 o C) and 923 K (650 o C) for the En 52 and 21-4N valve steels respectively. The ultimate tensile strength of the En 52 and 21-4N DCT samples show an enhancement of 7.87% and 6.76% respectively, over the CHT samples tested at the elevated temperature. The average yield strength of the En 52 DCT samples has an improvement 11% than that of the CHT samples when tested at room and elevated temperatures. The deep cryogenic treatment conducted at the optimized condition shows 7.84% improvement in the tensile strength for the En 52 valve steel and 11.87% improvement for the 21-4N valve steel when compared to the strength of the samples without the cryogenic treatment. A scanning electron microscopic analysis of the fracture surface indicates the presence of dimples and microvoid coalescence on the grain facets and interfaces of the cryo-treated specimens. The fracture surface of the deep cryo-treated 21-4N valve steel specimen shows a complete intergranular fracture with deep secondary cracks between the grains. On comparing the results of the percentage elongation, the cryo-treated samples show a smaller reduction in the elongation than that of the

  17. Stress Wave Attenuation in Aluminum Alloy and Mild Steel Specimens Under SHPB Tensile Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothnis, J. R.; Ravikumar, G.; Arya, H.; Yerramalli, Chandra S.; Naik, N. K.

    2018-02-01

    Investigations on the effect of intensity of incident pressure wave applied through the striker bar on the specimen force histories and stress wave attenuation during split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tensile testing are presented. Details of the tensile SHPB along with Lagrangian x- t diagram of the setup are included. Studies were carried out on aluminum alloy 7075 T651 and IS 2062 mild steel. While testing specimens using the tensile SHPB setup, it was observed that the force calculated from the transmitter bar strain gauge was smaller than the force obtained from the incident bar strain gauge. This mismatch between the forces in the incident bar and the transmitter bar is explained on the basis of stress wave attenuation in the specimens. A methodology to obtain force histories using the strain gauges on the specimen during SHPB tensile testing is also presented. Further, scanning electron microscope images and photomicrographs are given. Correlation between the microstructure and mechanical properties is explained. Further, uncertainty analysis was conducted to ascertain the accuracy of the results.

  18. Experimental Investigation for Tensile Performance of GFRP-Steel Hybridized Rebar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Woo Seo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tensile performance of the recently developed “FRP Hybrid Bar” at Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT is experimentally evaluated by the authors. FRP Hybrid Bar is introduced to overcome the low elastic modulus of the existing GFRP bars to be used as a structural member in reinforced concrete structures. The concept of material hybridization is applied to increase elastic modulus of GFRP bars by using steel. This hybridized GFRP bar can be used in concrete structures as a flexural reinforcement with a sufficient level of elastic modulus. In order to verify the effect of material hybridization on tensile properties, tensile tests are conducted. The test results for both FRP Hybrid Bar and the existing GFRP bars are compared. The results indicate that the elastic modulus of FRP Hybrid Bar can be enhanced by up to approximately 250 percent by the material hybridization with a sufficient tensile strength. To ensure the long-term durability of FRP Hybrid Bar to corrosion resistance, the individual and combined effects of environmental conditions on FRP Hybrid Bar itself as well as on the interface between rebar and concrete are currently under investigation.

  19. Twinning and martensitic transformations in nickel-enriched 304 austenitic steel during tensile and indentation deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, M.N., E-mail: gussevmn@ornl.gov; Busby, J.T.; Byun, T.S.; Parish, C.M.

    2013-12-20

    Twinning and martensitic transformation have been investigated in nickel-enriched AISI 304 stainless steel subjected to tensile and indentation deformation. Using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), the morphology of α- and ε-martensite and the effect of grain orientation to load axis on phase and structure transformations were analyzed in detail. It was found that the twinning occurred less frequently under indentation than under tension; also, twinning was not observed in [001] and [101] grains. In tensile tests, the martensite particles preferably formed at the deformation twins, intersections between twins, or at the twin-grain boundary intersections. Conversely, martensite formation in the indentation tests was not closely associated with twinning; instead, the majority of martensite was concentrated in the dense colonies near grain boundaries. Martensitic transformation seemed to be obstructed in the [001] grains in both tensile and indentation test cases. Under a tensile stress of 800 MPa, both α- and ε-martensites were found in the microstructure, but at 1100 MPa only α-martensite presented in the specimen. Under indentation, α- and ε-martensite were observed in the material regardless of the stress level.

  20. Static tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel studied by in situ neutron diffraction and synchrotron radiation white x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Noriyuki; Kawahata, Taiji; Ishimaru, Eiichiro; Takahashi, Akihiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shobu, Takahisa

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel (S32101) from the viewpoints of plastic deformability among phases or grains, we performed static tensile tests, in situ neutron diffraction, and white x-ray diffraction experiments at room temperature. In the static tensile tests, the S32101 steel displayed a larger uniform elongation and a better tensile strength-uniform elongation balance than a commercial SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel. A larger uniform elongation of S32101 is associated with the macroscopic work hardening behavior that a work hardening rate higher than the flow stress can maintain up until high true strains. From the experimental results of synchrotron radiation white x-ray diffraction experiments, the hard phase of S32101 was changed from the ferrite (α) phase to austenite (γ) one during tensile deformation. This led to a larger stress partitioning between the phases at the latter stage of deformation. From the experimental results of in situ neutron diffraction, it was found that the stress partitioning of the γ phase in the S32101 was the largest among the present results. Therefore, the larger work hardening rate of S32101 can be explained by the large stress partitioning of the γ phase, that between γ and α phases and γ volume fraction. (author)

  1. Effects of temperature and strain rate on the tensile behaviors of SIMP steel in static lead bismuth eutectic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian, E-mail: jliu12b@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Yan, Wei [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Sha, Wei [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Wang, Wei; Shan, Yiyin [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Yang, Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, 110016 (China)

    2016-05-15

    In order to assess the susceptibility of candidate structural materials to liquid metal embrittlement, this work investigated the tensile behaviors of ferritic-martensitic steel in static lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). The tensile tests were carried out in static lead bismuth eutectic under different temperatures and strain rates. Pronounced liquid metal embrittlement phenomenon is observed between 200 °C and 450 °C. Total elongation is reduced greatly due to the liquid metal embrittlement in LBE environment. The range of ductility trough is larger under slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. - Highlights: • The tensile behaviors of SIMP steel in LBE are investigated for the first time. • The SIMP is susceptible to LME at different strain rates and temperatures. • The total elongation is reduced greatly. • The ductility trough is wider under SSRT. • The tensile specimens rupture in brittle manner without obvious necking.

  2. Effects of temperature and strain rate on the tensile behaviors of SIMP steel in static lead bismuth eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian; Yan, Wei; Sha, Wei; Wang, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess the susceptibility of candidate structural materials to liquid metal embrittlement, this work investigated the tensile behaviors of ferritic-martensitic steel in static lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). The tensile tests were carried out in static lead bismuth eutectic under different temperatures and strain rates. Pronounced liquid metal embrittlement phenomenon is observed between 200 °C and 450 °C. Total elongation is reduced greatly due to the liquid metal embrittlement in LBE environment. The range of ductility trough is larger under slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. - Highlights: • The tensile behaviors of SIMP steel in LBE are investigated for the first time. • The SIMP is susceptible to LME at different strain rates and temperatures. • The total elongation is reduced greatly. • The ductility trough is wider under SSRT. • The tensile specimens rupture in brittle manner without obvious necking.

  3. Engineering Performance of High Strength Concrete Containing Steel Fibre Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The development and utilization of the high strength concrete in the construction industry have been increasing rapidly. Fiber reinforced concrete is introduced to overcome the weakness of the conventional concrete because concrete normally can crack under a low tensile force and it is known to be brittle. Steel fibre is proved to be the popular and best combination in the high strength concrete to result the best in the mechanical and durability properties of high strength concrete with consideration of curing time, steel fibre geometry, concrete grade and else more. The incorporation of steel fibre in the mortar mixture is known as steel fibre reinforced concrete have the potential to produce improvement in the workability, strength, ductility and the deformation of high strength concrete. Besides that, steel fibre also increases the tensile strength of concrete and improves the mechanical properties of the steel fibre reinforced concrete. The range for any high strength concrete is between 60MPa-100MPa. Steel fibre reinforced concrete which contains straight fibres has poorer physical properties than that containing hooked end stainless steel fibre due to the length and the hooked steel fibre provide a better effective aspects ratio. Normally, steel fibre tensile strength is in the range of 1100MPa-1700MPa. Addition of less steel fibre volumes in the range of 0.5% to 1.0% can produce better increase in the flexural fatigue strength. The strength can be increased with addition of steel fibre up to certain percentage. This paper will review and present some basic properties of steel fibre reinforced concrete such as mechanical, workability and durability properties.

  4. Microscopic observation and statics consideration of tensile fracture of TiC coating on stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Akira; Hasiguti, Ryukiti

    1986-01-01

    We have measured the tensile fracture properties of the TiC coated SUS316L stainless steel, applying a stress perpendicular to the plane of interface between the coating and the substrate. The fracture of the as grown or non-annealed specimens occurred partially within the TiC layer. A tensile fracture of the TiC coated specimens after vacuum annealing at about 1373 K (1100 deg C) presented arc-shape curved fracture surfaces which can be understood by statics consideration taking into account the maximum stress plane theory and the residual thermal stress. The strengths of non-annealed and annealed specimens are 34.4 MPa (350 kgf/cm 2 ) and 30.2 MPa (308 kgf/cm 2 ), respectively, expressed in terms of Weibull's 50 % fracture stresses. (author)

  5. Effects of hydrogen on the tensile strength characteristics of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, R.; Pelissier, J.; Pluchery, M.; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay

    1961-01-01

    This paper deals with the effects of hydrogen on stainless steel, that might possibly be used as a canning material in hydrogen-cooled reactors. Apparent ultimate-tensile strength is only 80 per cent of initial value for hydrogen content about 50 cc NTP/ 100 g, and reduction in area decreases from 80 to 55 per cent. A special two-stage replica technique has been developed which allows fracture surface of small tensile specimens (about 0.1 mm diam.) to be examined in an electron microscope. All the specimens showed evidence of ductile character throughout the range of hydrogen contents investigated, but the aspect of the fracture surfaces gradually changes with increasing amounts. (author) [fr

  6. Microstructure and dynamic tensile behavior of DP600 dual phase steel joint by laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Danyang, E-mail: dongdanyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [College of Science, Northeastern University, No. 11, Lane 3, WenHua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: liuyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Yang, Yuling, E-mail: yulingyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [College of Science, Northeastern University, No. 11, Lane 3, WenHua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China); Li, Jinfeng, E-mail: lijinfengboda@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, No. 11, Lane 3, WenHua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China); Ma, Min, E-mail: sharon6789@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, No. 11, Lane 3, WenHua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China); Jiang, Tao, E-mail: tao.jiang906@yahoo.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, No. 11, Lane 3, WenHua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2014-01-31

    Dual phase (DP) steels have been widely used in the automotive industry to reduce vehicle weight and improve car safety. In such applications welding and joining have to be involved, which would lead to a localized change of the microstructure and property, and create potential safety and reliable issues under dynamic loading. The aim of the present study is to examine the rate-dependent mechanical properties, deformation and fracture behavior of DP600 steel and its welded joint (WJ) produced by Nd:YAG laser welding over a wide range of strain rates (0.001–1133 s{sup −1}). Laser welding results in not only significant microhardness increase in the fusion zone (FZ) and inner heat-affected zone (HAZ), but also the formation of a softened zone in the outer HAZ. The yield strength (YS) of the DP600 steel increases and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) remains almost unchanged, but the ductility decreases after welding. The DP600 base metal (BM) and WJ are of positive strain rate sensitivity and show similar stress–strain response at all studied strain rates. The enhanced ductility at strain rates ranging from 1 to 100 s{sup −1} is attributed to the retardation of the propagation of plastic strain localization due to the positive strain rate sensitivity and the thermal softening caused by deformation induced adiabatic temperature rise during dynamic tensile deformation. The tensile failure occurs in the inner HAZ of the joint and the distance of failure location from the weld centerline decreases with increasing strain rate. The mechanism for the changing failure location can be related to the different strain rate dependence of the plastic deformation behavior of the microstructures in various regions across the joint. The DP600 WJ absorbs more energy over the whole measured strain rates than that of the BM due to the higher strength at the same strain when the deformation only up to 10% is considered.

  7. Irradiation induced tensile property change of SA 508 Cl.3 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Hong, Jun-Hwa; Kuk, Il-Hiun

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation induced tensile property change of four kinds of reactor pressure vessel steels manufactured by different steel refining process was compared based on the differences in the unirradiated and irradiated microstructure. Microvickers hardness, indentation, and miniature tensile specimen tests were conducted for mechanical property measurement and optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used for microstructural characterization. Specimens were 2 irradiated to a neutron fluence of 2.7x10 19 n/cm 2 (E ≥ 1 MeV) at 288 deg. C. Investigation on the unirradiated microstructures showed largely a same microstructure in that tempered acicular bainite and ferrite with bainitic phase prevailing in the unirradiated condition. Band-shaped segregations were also clearly observed except a kind of materials. A large difference in the unirradiated microstructure appeared in the grain size and carbide microstructure. Of carbide microstructures, noticeable differences were observed in the size and distribution of cementite, and bainitic lath microstructures. No noticeable changes were observed in the optical and thin film TEM microstructures after irradiation. Complicated microstructural. state of heat treated bainitic low alloy microstructure prevents easy quantification of microstructural changes due to irradiation. Apparent differences, however, were observed in the results of mechanical testing. Results of tensile testing and hardness measurement show that a steel refined by vacuum carbon deoxidation(VCD) method exhibits the highest radiation hardening behavior. Some of mechanical testing results on irradiated materials were possible to understand based on the initial microstructure, but further investigations using a wide array of sophisticated tools (for example, SANS, APFIM) are required to understand and characterize irradiation induced defects that are responsible for irradiation hardening behavior but are not revealed by

  8. Irradiation induced tensile property change of SA 508 Cl. 3 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Kuk, Il Hiun

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation induced tensile property change of four kinds of reactor pressure vessel steels manufactured by different steel refining process was compared based on the differences in the miniature tensile specimen tests were conducted for mechanical property measurement and optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used for microstructural characterization. Specimens were irradiated to a neutron fluence of 2.7 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (E ≥ 1 MeV) at 288 deg C. Investigation on the unirradiated microstructures showed largely a same microstructure in that tempered acicular bainite and ferrite with bainitic phase prevailing in the unirradiated condition. Ban-shaped segregations were also clearly observed except a kind of materials. A large difference in the unirradiated microstructure appeared in the grain size and carbide microstructure. Of carbide microstructures, noticeable differences were observed in the size and distribution of cementite, and bainitic lath microstructures. No noticeable changes were observed in the optical and thin film TEM microstructures after irradiation. Complicated microstructural state of heat treated bainitic low alloy microstructure prevents easy quantification of microstructural changes due to irradiation. Apparent differences, however, were observed in the results of mechanical testing. Results of tensile testing and hardness measurement show that a steel refined by vacuum carbon deoxidation (VCD) method exhibits the highest radiation hardening behavior. Some of mechanical testing results on irradiated materials were possible to understand based on the initial microstructure, but further investigations using a wide array of sophisticated tools (for example, SANS, APFIM) are required to understand and characterize irradiation induced defects that are responsible for irradiation hardening behavior but are not revealed by conventional TEM. (author)

  9. Tensile properties and deformation mechanisms of a 14Cr ODS ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckmeyer, A., E-mail: antonin.steckmeyer@cea.f [Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Praud, M.; Fournier, B.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Bechade, J.L.; Tournie, I.; Tancray, A.; Bougault, A. [Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bonnaillie, P. [Service de Recherche en Metallurgie Physique, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-10-15

    The search for a new cladding material is part of the research studies carried out at CEA to develop a sodium-cooled fast reactor meeting the expectations of the Generation IV International Forum. In this study, the tensile properties of a ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel produced by hot extrusion at CEA have been evaluated. They prove the studied alloy to be as resistant as and more ductile than the other nano-reinforced alloys of literature. The effects of the strain rate and temperature on the total plastic strain of the material remind of diffusion phenomena. Intergranular damage and intergranular decohesion are clearly highlighted.

  10. Influence of temperature and grain size on the tensile ductility of AISI 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannan, S.L.; Samuel, K.G.; Rodriguez, P.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of tmeperature and grain size on the tensile ductility of AISI 316 stainless steel has been examined in the temperature range 300-1223 K for specimens with grain sizes varying from 0.025 to 0.650 mm at a nominal strain rate of 3 X 10 -4 s -1 . The percentage total elongation and reduction in area at fracture show minimum ductility at an intermediate temperature, and the temperature corresponding to this ductility minimum has been found to increase with increase in grain size. The total elongation is found to decrease with increase in grain size at high temperatures where failures are essentially intergranular in nature. At 300 K, both uniform and total elongation increase with increase in grain size and then show a small decrease for a very coarse grain size. The high ductility observed at low temperatures (300 K) is consistent with the observation of characteristic dimples associated with transgranular ductile fracture. The ductility minimum with respect to temperature is associated with the occurrence of intergranular fracture, as evidenced by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The present results support the suggestion that the ductility minimum coincides with the maximum amount of grain boundary sliding; at temperatures beyond the ductility minimum, grain boundary separation by cavitation is retarded by the occurrence of grain boundary migration, as evidenced by the grain boundary cusps. In tests conducted at various strain rates in the range 10 -3 -10 -6 s -1 at 873 K the ductility was found to decrease with decreasing strain rate, emphasizing the increased importance of grain boundary sliding at lower strain rates. (Auth.)

  11. Microstructure and tensile properties of yttrium nitride dispersion-strengthened 14Cr–3W ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Liqing [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4067, QLD (Australia); Liu, Zuming, E-mail: lzm@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chen, Shiqi; Guo, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Innovative nano yttrium nitride dispersion strengthened steels were fabricated. • Higher content of additives accelerate the steel-ceramic powder milling process more. • Steel with high content (3%) of YN dispersoids can obtain good performance at 500 °C. - Abstract: 14Cr–3W ferritic steel powders were mechanically milled with microscale yttrium nitride (YN) particles to fabricate particle dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels. After hot consolidation and annealing, the steel matrix was homogeneously dispersed with nano-scale YN particles. The steel containing 0.3 wt.% YN particles exhibited a yield strength of 1445 MPa at room temperature. Its total elongation was 10.3%, and the fracture surface exhibited mixed ductile and quasi-cleavage fracture morphologies. The steel with a much higher content of YN particles (3 wt.%) in its matrix was much stronger (1652 MPa) at room temperature at the cost of ductility. In particular, it exhibited a high yield strength (1350 MPa) with applicable ductility (total elongation > 10%) at 500 °C. This study has developed a new kind of reinforcement particle to fabricate high-performance ferritic steels.

  12. Effect of tempering on microstructure and tensile properties of niobium modified martensitic 9Cr heat resistant steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, A., E-mail: anupmetal@gmail.com; Bandyopadhay, T.K.

    2015-01-03

    The effect of tempering on the microstructure of niobium modified 8.8 wt% chromium steel has been evaluated. Steel has been prepared using the conventional melting and casting route. Homogenization and forging is done at 1100 °C. Dilatometric study shows that the Ac{sub 1}, Ac{sub 3} and M{sub s} temperatures are 800, 855, and 131 °C, respectively. Initial cast and forged microstructures consist of martensite/ferrite. The samples are subsequently tempered at 500–800 °C for various intervals of time (1–5 h). The microstructure of the tempered sample is analyzed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) is used to identify the precipitate. Nanometer-sized precipitates (50–200 nm) are observed after tempering at 700 °C for 1 h. Niobium rich MC type carbide precipitates and chromium rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type precipitates are observed after tempering at 700 °C. Tensile strength decreases with increasing tempering temperature. Maximum tensile strength of 920 MPa is observed after tempering at 700 °C and maximum elongation of ∼11% is observed after tempering at 750 °C.

  13. Effects of the strain rate on the tensile properties of a TRIP-aided duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jeom Yong [Stainless Steel Product Group, Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, Pohang 790-785 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaeeun; Lee, Keunho; Koh, Ji-Yeon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, RIAM, Seoul National University, Seoul 151–744 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae-Hyung [Light Metal Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Heung Nam, E-mail: hnhan@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, RIAM, Seoul National University, Seoul 151–744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung-Tae, E-mail: ktpark@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-01

    Factors influencing the strain-rate dependence of the tensile properties of TRIP-aided lean duplex stainless steel were investigated by employing several characterization techniques of EBSD, TEM, and nanoindentation. The steel exhibited excellent tensile strength over 800 MPa and elongation, which exceeded 70% at a strain rate of 10{sup −3} s{sup −1} due to strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT), but both values decreased considerably with an increase in the strain rate. The hardness and the maximum shear stress for dislocation nucleation of the austenite were found to be higher than those of the ferrite by sub-grain scale nanoindentation tests. As a result, strain partitioning to the ferrite rather than the austenite was more significant from an early stage of deformation, suppressing the SIMT in the austenite. An EBSD strain analysis on the intra- and inter-grain scale revealed that this strain partitioning became more pronounced as the strain rate increased. Adiabatic heating, which induces austenite stabilization, also became more significant as the strain rate increased. Therefore, the present results indicate that the diminishing TRIP effects at high strain rates can be attributed to preferential strain partitioning to the soft ferrite phase from an early stage of deformation, as well as adiabatic heating.

  14. Mechanical stability of individual austenite grains in TRIP steel studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction during tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondé, R. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Jimenez-Melero, E. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Zhao, L. [Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Wright, J.P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Brück, E. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Zwaag, S. van der [Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands); Dijk, N.H. van, E-mail: N.H.vanDijk@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-11-17

    The stability of individual metastable austenite grains in low-alloyed TRIP steels has been studied during tensile loading using high-energy X-ray diffraction. The carbon concentration, grain volume and grain orientation with respect to the loading direction was monitored for a large number of individual grains in the bulk microstructure. Most austenite grains transform into martensite in a single transformation step once a critical load is reached. The orientation-dependent stability of austenite grains was found to depend on their Schmid factor with respect to the loading direction. Under the applied tensile stress the average Schmid factor decreased from an initial value of 0.44 to 0.41 at 243 MPa. The present study reveals the complex interplay of microstructural parameters on the mechanical stability of individual austenite grains, where the largest grains with the lowest carbon content tend to transform first. Under the applied tensile stress the average carbon concentration of the austenite grains increased from an initial value of 0.90 to 1.00 wt% C at 243 MPa, while the average grain volume of the austenite grains decreased from an initial value of 19 to 15 µm{sup 3} at 243 MPa.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Steel-FRP Composite Bars under Tensile and Compressive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The factory-produced steel-fiber reinforced polymer composite bar (SFCB is a new kind of reinforcement for concrete structures. The manufacturing technology of SFCB is presented based on a large number of handmade specimens. The calculated stress-strain curves of ordinary steel bar and SFCB under repeated tensile loading agree well with the corresponding experimental results. The energy-dissipation capacity and residual strain of both steel bar and SFCB were analyzed. Based on the good simulation results of ordinary steel bar and FRP bar under compressive loading, the compressive behavior of SFCB under monotonic loading was studied using the principle of equivalent flexural rigidity. There are three failure modes of SFCB under compressive loading: elastic buckling, postyield buckling, and no buckling (ultimate compressive strength is reached. The increase in the postyield stiffness of SFCB rsf can delay the postyield buckling of SFCB with a large length-to-diameter ratio, and an empirical equation for the relationship between the postbuckling stress and rsf is suggested, which can be used for the design of concrete structures reinforced by SFCB to consider the effect of reinforcement buckling.

  16. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Flow Behavior and Anisotropy of a Medium-Manganese TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturk, Rakan; Hector, Louis G.; Matthew Enloe, C.; Abu-Farha, Fadi; Brown, Tyson W.

    2018-06-01

    The dependence of the plastic anisotropy on the nominal strain rate for a medium-manganese (10 wt.% Mn) transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with initial austenite volume fraction of 66% (balance ferrite) has been investigated. The material exhibited yield point elongation, propagative instabilities during hardening, and austenite transformation to α'-martensite either directly or through ɛ-martensite. Uniaxial strain rates within the range of 0.005-500 s-1 along the 0°, 45°, and 90° orientations were selected based upon their relevance to automotive applications. The plastic anisotropy ( r) and normal anisotropy ( r n) indices corresponding to each direction and strain rate were determined using strain fields obtained from stereo digital image correlation systems that enabled both quasistatic and dynamic measurements. The results provide evidence of significant, orientation-dependent strain rate effects on both the flow stress and the evolution of r and r n with strain. This has implications not only for material performance during forming but also for the development of future strain-rate-dependent anisotropic yield criteria. Since tensile data alone for the subject medium-manganese TRIP steel do not satisfactorily determine the microstructural mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic-scale behavior observed on tensile testing, additional tests that must supplement the mechanical test results presented herein are discussed.

  17. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Flow Behavior and Anisotropy of a Medium-Manganese TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturk, Rakan; Hector, Louis G.; Matthew Enloe, C.; Abu-Farha, Fadi; Brown, Tyson W.

    2018-04-01

    The dependence of the plastic anisotropy on the nominal strain rate for a medium-manganese (10 wt.% Mn) transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with initial austenite volume fraction of 66% (balance ferrite) has been investigated. The material exhibited yield point elongation, propagative instabilities during hardening, and austenite transformation to α'-martensite either directly or through ɛ-martensite. Uniaxial strain rates within the range of 0.005-500 s-1 along the 0°, 45°, and 90° orientations were selected based upon their relevance to automotive applications. The plastic anisotropy (r) and normal anisotropy (r n) indices corresponding to each direction and strain rate were determined using strain fields obtained from stereo digital image correlation systems that enabled both quasistatic and dynamic measurements. The results provide evidence of significant, orientation-dependent strain rate effects on both the flow stress and the evolution of r and r n with strain. This has implications not only for material performance during forming but also for the development of future strain-rate-dependent anisotropic yield criteria. Since tensile data alone for the subject medium-manganese TRIP steel do not satisfactorily determine the microstructural mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic-scale behavior observed on tensile testing, additional tests that must supplement the mechanical test results presented herein are discussed.

  18. Tensile properties and fracture of (α+γ) two phase stainless steel with fine grained microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogiyama, Hiroyuki; Tsukuda, Hitoshi; Soyama, Yoshiro

    1989-01-01

    The tensile properties and fracture of the (α+γ) two phase stainless steel with very fine γ grains were investigated. Two different microstructures with very fine γ grains can be obtianed by the thermomechanical treatments; One has both very fine γ and α grains, and the other has very fine γ and large α grains. The specimens were prepared in quenched and aged (475degC) conditions. The results obtained are as follows. The 0.2 % proof stress and tensile strength increase with the aging at 475degC for all specimens. The refinement of the γ grains plays an important role for the increase of strength in both quenched and aged conditions, and also for the ductility in the quenched condition. The refinement of α grains, however, contributes to the increase of the ductility in the aged condition. Accordingly, it is found that very good combinations of tensile strength and ductility can be achieved by the aging and the refinement of the γ and α grains (micro duplex structure). (author)

  19. Formability Characterization of a New Generation High Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sriram Sadagopan; Dennis Urban; Chris Wong; Mai Huang; Benda Yan

    2003-05-16

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are being progressively explored by the automotive industry all around the world for cost-effective solutions to accomplish vehicle lightweighting, improve fuel economy, and consequently reduce greenhouse emissions. Because of their inherent high strength, attractive crash energy management properties, and good formability, the effective use of AHSS such as Duel Phase and TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels, will significantly contribute to vehicle lightweighting and fuel economy. To further the application of these steels in automotive body and structural parts, a good knowledge and experience base must be developed regarding the press formability of these materials. This project provides data on relevant intrinsic mechanical behavior, splitting limits, and springback behavior of several lots of mild steel, conventional high strength steel (HSS), advanced high strength steel (AHSS) and ultra-high strength steel (UHSS), supplied by the member companies of the Automotive Applications Committee (AAC) of the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI). Two lots of TRIP600, which were supplied by ThyssenKrupp Stahl, were also included in the study. Since sheet metal forming encompasses a very diverse range of forming processes and deformation modes, a number of simulative tests were used to characterize the forming behavior of these steel grades. In general, it was found that formability, as determined by the different tests, decreased with increased tensile strength. Consistant with previous findings, the formability of TRIP600 was found to be exceptionally good for its tensile strength.

  20. Estimation of the Ultimate Tensile Strength of Steel from Its HB and HV Hardness Numbers and Coercive Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandomirskii, S. G.

    2017-11-01

    A formula is derived to accurately describe the tabulated relation between the Brinell ( HB) and Vickers ( HV) hardnesses of steel over the entire range of their possible variation. This formula and the formulas describing the relation between the HB hardness of chromium-molybdenum and chromium-nickel steels and their ultimate tensile strength σu are used to analyze the change in σu of 38KhNM steel upon quenching and tempering. The data that reveal a relation between σu of 38KhNM steel and its coercive force are obtained.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Tensile Test on Connection of Cold-formed Cut-curved Steel Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Mohd Syahrul Hisyam Mohd; Muftah, Fadhluhartini; Rahman, Nurul Farraheeda Abdul; Fakri Muda, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Cold-formed steel (CFS) is widely used as structural and non-structural components such as roof trusses and purlin. A CFS channel section with double intermediate web stiffener and lipped is chosen based on the broader usage in roof truss construction. CFS section is cut to form cold-formed pre-cut-curved steel section and lastly strengthened by several types of method or likely known as connection to establish the cold-formed cut-curved steel (CFCCS) section. CFCCS is proposed to be used as a top chord section in the roof truss system. The CFCCS is to resist the buckling phenomena of the roof truss structure and reduced the compression effect on the top chord. The tensile test connection of CFCCS section, especially at the flange element with eight types of connection by welding, plate with self-drilling screw and combination is investigated. The flange element is the weakest part that must be solved first other than the web element because they are being cut totally, 100% of their length for curving process. The testing is done using a universal testing machine for a tensile load. From the experiment, specimen with full welding has shown as a good result with an ultimate load of 13.37 kN and reported having 35.41% when compared with normal specimen without any of connection methods. Furthermore, the experimental result is distinguished by using Eurocode 3. The failure of a full welding specimen is due to breaking at the welding location. Additionally, all specimens with either full weld or spot weld or combination failed due to breaking on weld connection, but specimen with flange plate and self-drilling screw failed due to tilting and bearing. Finally, the full welding specimen is chosen as a good connection to perform the strengthening method of CFCCS section.

  2. Elevated temperature tensile properties of borated 304 stainless steel: Effect of boride dispersion on strength and ductility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.J.; Sorenson, K.B.; McConnell, P.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional cast and wrought (open-quotes Ingot Metallurgyclose quotes) borated 304 stainless steel has been used for a number of years in spent fuel storage applications where a combination of structural integrity and neutron criticality control are required. Similar requirements apply for materials used in transport cask baskets. However, in the high boron contents (>1.0 wt. %) which are most useful for criticality control, the conventional cast and wrought material suffers from low ductility as well as low impact toughness. The microstructural reason for these poor properties is the relatively coarse size of the boride particles in these alloys, which act as sites for crack initiation. Recently, a open-quotes premiumclose quotes grade of borated 304 stainless steel has been introduced (Strober and Smith, 1988) which is made by a Powder Metallurgy (PM) process. This material has greatly improved ductility and impact properties relative to the conventional cast and wrought product. In addition, an ASTM specification (ATSM A887) has been developed for borated stainless steel, containing 8 different material Types with respect to boron content - with the highest level (Type B7) having permissible range from 1.75 to 2.25 wt. % boron - and each Type contains two different Grades of material based on tensile and impact properties. While the ASTM specification is properties-based and does not require a specific production process for a particular grade of material, the PM material qualifies as open-quotes Grade Aclose quotes material while the conventional Ingot Metallurgy (IM) material generally qualifies as open-quotes Grade Bclose quotes material. This paper presents a comparison of the tensile properties of PM open-quotes Grade Aclose quotes material with that of the conventional IM open-quotes Grade Bclose quotes material for two selected Types (i.e., boron contents) as defined by the ASTM A887 specification: Types 304B5 and 304B7

  3. Properties of Reinforced Concrete Steel Rebars Exposed to High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlker Bekir Topçu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the mechanical properties of yield strength and modulus of elasticity is considered as the primary element affecting the performance of steel structures under fire. In this study, hot-rolled S220 and S420 reinforcement steel rebars were subjected to high temperatures to investigate the fire performance of these materials. It is aimed to determine the remaining mechanical properties of steel rebars after elevated temperatures. Steels were subjected to 20, 100, 200, 300, 500, 800, and 950∘C temperatures for 3 hours and tensile tests were carried out. Effect of temperature on mechanical behavior of S220 and S420 were determined. All mechanical properties were reduced due to the temperature increase of the steel rebars. It is seen that mechanical properties of S420 steel was influenced more than S220 steel at elevated temperatures.

  4. Prediction of hole expansion ratio for various steel sheets based on uniaxial tensile properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyung; Kwon, Young Jin; Lee, Taekyung; Lee, Kee-Ahn; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Chong Soo

    2018-01-01

    Stretch-flangeability is one of important formability parameters of thin steel sheets used in the automotive industry. There have been many attempts to predict hole expansion ratio (HER), a typical term to evaluate stretch-flangeability, using uniaxial tensile properties for convenience. This paper suggests a new approach that uses total elongation and average normal anisotropy to predict HER of thin steel sheets. The method provides a good linear relationship between HER of the machined hole and the predictive variables in a variety of materials with different microstructures obtained using different processing methods. The HER of the punched hole was also well predicted using the similar approach, which reflected only the portion of post uniform elongation. The physical meaning drawn by our approach successfully explained the poor HER of austenitic steels despite their considerable elongation. The proposed method to predict HER is simple and cost-effective, so it will be useful in industry. In addition, the model provides a physical explanation of HER, so it will be useful in academia.

  5. Tensile properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by shear punch testing and correlation with microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthik, V., E-mail: karthik@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India); Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Kasiviswanathan, K.V.; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, Baldev [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India)

    2011-10-15

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel (P91) is subjected to a series of heat treatments consisting of soaking for 5 min at the selected temperatures in the range 973 K-1623 K (below Ac{sub 1} to above Ac{sub 4}) followed by oil quenching and tempering at 1033 K for 1 h to obtain different microstructural conditions. The tensile properties of the different microstructural conditions are evaluated from small volumes of material by shear punch test technique. A new methodology for evaluating yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and strain hardening exponent from shear punch test by using correlation equations without employing empirical constants is presented and validated. The changes in the tensile properties are related to the microstructural changes of the steel investigated by electron microscopic studies. The steel exhibits minimum strength and hardness when soaked between Ac{sub 1} and Ac{sub 3} (intercritical range) temperatures due to the replacement of original lath martensitic structure with subgrains. The finer martensitic microstructure produced in the steel after soaking at temperatures above Ac{sub 3} leads to a monotonic increase in hardness and strength with decreasing strain hardening exponent. For soaking temperatures above Ac{sub 4}, the hardness and strength of the steel increases marginally due to the formation of soft {delta} ferrite. - Highlights: > A methodology presented for computing tensile properties from shear punch test. > UTS and strain hardening estimated using extended analysis of blanking models. > The analysis methodology validated for different heat treated 9Cr-1Mo steel. > Changes in tensile properties of steel correlated with microstructures.

  6. Hot Tensile and Fracture Behavior of 35CrMo Steel at Elevated Temperature and Strain Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengbing Xiao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the tensile deformation and fracture behavior of 35CrMo steel during hot processing, uniaxial tensile tests at elevated temperatures and strain rates were performed. Effects of deformation condition on the flow behavior, strain rate sensitivity, microstructure transformation, and fracture characteristic were characterized and discussed. The results indicated that the flow stress was sensitive to the deformation condition, and fracture occurs immediately after the peak stress level is reached, especially when the temperature is low or the strain rate is high. The strain rate sensitivity increases with the deformation temperature, which indicates that formability could improve at high temperatures. Photographs showing both the fracture surfaces and the matrix near the fracture section indicated the ductile nature of the material. However, the fracture mechanisms varied according to the deformation condition, which influences the dynamic recrystallization (DRX condition, and the DRX was accompanied by the formation of voids. For samples deformed at high temperatures or low strain rates, coalescence of numerous voids formed in the recrystallized grains is responsible for fracture, while at high strain rates or low temperatures, the grains rupture mainly by splitting because of cracks formed around the inclusions.

  7. Influence of strain rate and temperature on tensile properties and flow behaviour of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanaja, J., E-mail: jvanaja4@gmail.com [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Laha, K. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sam, Shiju [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2012-05-15

    Tensile strength and flow behaviour of a Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) steel (9Cr-1W-0.06Ta-0.22V-0.08C) have been investigated over a temperature range of 300-873 K at different strain rates. Tensile strength of the steel decreased with temperature and increased with strain rate except at intermediate temperatures. Negative strain rate sensitivity of flow stress of the steel at intermediate temperatures revealed the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing in the steel, even though no serrated flow was observed. The tensile flow behaviour of the material was well represented by the Voce strain hardening equation for all the test conditions. Temperature and strain rate dependence of the various parameters of Voce equation were interpreted with the possible deformation mechanisms. The equivalence between the saturation stress at a given strain rate in tensile test and steady state deformation rate at a given stress in creep test was found to be satisfied by the RAFM steel.

  8. Influence of strain rate and temperature on tensile properties and flow behaviour of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Sam, Shiju; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2012-05-01

    Tensile strength and flow behaviour of a Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) steel (9Cr-1W-0.06Ta-0.22V-0.08C) have been investigated over a temperature range of 300-873 K at different strain rates. Tensile strength of the steel decreased with temperature and increased with strain rate except at intermediate temperatures. Negative strain rate sensitivity of flow stress of the steel at intermediate temperatures revealed the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing in the steel, even though no serrated flow was observed. The tensile flow behaviour of the material was well represented by the Voce strain hardening equation for all the test conditions. Temperature and strain rate dependence of the various parameters of Voce equation were interpreted with the possible deformation mechanisms. The equivalence between the saturation stress at a given strain rate in tensile test and steady state deformation rate at a given stress in creep test was found to be satisfied by the RAFM steel.

  9. Influence of strain rate and temperature on tensile properties and flow behaviour of a reduced activation ferritic–martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Sam, Shiju; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2012-01-01

    Tensile strength and flow behaviour of a Reduced Activation Ferritic–Martensitic (RAFM) steel (9Cr–1W–0.06Ta–0.22V–0.08C) have been investigated over a temperature range of 300–873 K at different strain rates. Tensile strength of the steel decreased with temperature and increased with strain rate except at intermediate temperatures. Negative strain rate sensitivity of flow stress of the steel at intermediate temperatures revealed the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing in the steel, even though no serrated flow was observed. The tensile flow behaviour of the material was well represented by the Voce strain hardening equation for all the test conditions. Temperature and strain rate dependence of the various parameters of Voce equation were interpreted with the possible deformation mechanisms. The equivalence between the saturation stress at a given strain rate in tensile test and steady state deformation rate at a given stress in creep test was found to be satisfied by the RAFM steel.

  10. Prediction Of Tensile And Shear Strength Of Friction Surfaced Tool Steel Deposit By Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Hussain, M.; Pitchi Raju, V.; Kandasamy, J.; Govardhan, D.

    2018-04-01

    Friction surface treatment is well-established solid technology and is used for deposition, abrasion and corrosion protection coatings on rigid materials. This novel process has wide range of industrial applications, particularly in the field of reclamation and repair of damaged and worn engineering components. In this paper, we present the prediction of tensile and shear strength of friction surface treated tool steel using ANN for simulated results of friction surface treatment. This experiment was carried out to obtain tool steel coatings of low carbon steel parts by changing contribution process parameters essentially friction pressure, rotational speed and welding speed. The simulation is performed by a 33-factor design that takes into account the maximum and least limits of the experimental work performed with the 23-factor design. Neural network structures, such as the Feed Forward Neural Network (FFNN), were used to predict tensile and shear strength of tool steel sediments caused by friction.

  11. Optimal welding technology of high strength steel S690QL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Arsic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented the detailed procedure for defining the optimal technology for welding the structures made of the high strength steel S690QL. That steel belongs into a group of steels with exceptional mechanical properties. The most prominent properties are the high tensile strength and impact toughness, at room and at elevated temperatures, as well. However, this steel has a negative characteristic - proneness to appearance of cold cracks.  That impedes welding and makes as an imperative to study different aspects of this steel's properties as well as those of eventual filler metal. Selection and defining of the optimal welding technology of this high strength steel is done for the purpose of preserving the favorable mechanical properties once the welded joint is realized; properties of the welded metal and the melting zone, as well as in the heat affected zone, which is the most critical zone of the welded joint.

  12. Low temperature tensile deformation and acoustic emission signal characteristics of AISI 304LN stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barat, K.; Bar, H.N. [Material Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Mandal, D. [Material Processing and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Roy, H., E-mail: himadri9504@gmail.com [NDT and Metallurgy Group, CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Durgapur 713209 (India); Sivaprasad, S.; Tarafder, S. [Material Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2014-03-01

    This investigation examines low temperature tensile deformation behavior of AISI 304LN stainless steel along with synergistic analysis of acoustic emission signals. The tensile tests are done at a range of temperatures starting from 283 K till 223 K. The fracture surfaces of the broken specimens are investigated using scanning electron microscope. The amount of deformation induced martensite is measured using a feritscope. The obtained results reveal that with decrease in test temperature, both strength and ductility increase. The increase in strength and ductility with decreasing temperature is explained in terms of void morphologies and formation of deformation induced martensite. The rapid increment in strength and ductility at 223 K is associated with the burst of martensitic transformation at that temperature; which has been clarified from acoustic emission signals. An additional initiative has been taken to model the evolution of martensite formation from the observed cumulative emission counts using a non linear logarithmic functional form. The fitted curves from the recorded acoustic emission cumulative count data are found to be better correlated compared to earlier obtained results. However, at 223 K normal non-linear logarithmic fit is not found suitable due to presence of burst type signals at intervals, therefore; piecewise logarithmic function to model acoustic emission bursts is proposed.

  13. A Simplified Micromechanical Modeling Approach to Predict the Tensile Flow Curve Behavior of Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Tarun; Kumar, B. Ravi; Singh, Vishal

    2017-11-01

    Micromechanical modeling is used to predict material's tensile flow curve behavior based on microstructural characteristics. This research develops a simplified micromechanical modeling approach for predicting flow curve behavior of dual-phase steels. The existing literature reports on two broad approaches for determining tensile flow curve of these steels. The modeling approach developed in this work attempts to overcome specific limitations of the existing two approaches. This approach combines dislocation-based strain-hardening method with rule of mixtures. In the first step of modeling, `dislocation-based strain-hardening method' was employed to predict tensile behavior of individual phases of ferrite and martensite. In the second step, the individual flow curves were combined using `rule of mixtures,' to obtain the composite dual-phase flow behavior. To check accuracy of proposed model, four distinct dual-phase microstructures comprising of different ferrite grain size, martensite fraction, and carbon content in martensite were processed by annealing experiments. The true stress-strain curves for various microstructures were predicted with the newly developed micromechanical model. The results of micromechanical model matched closely with those of actual tensile tests. Thus, this micromechanical modeling approach can be used to predict and optimize the tensile flow behavior of dual-phase steels.

  14. Evaluation of interface adhesion of hot-dipped zinc coating on TRIP steel with tensile testing and finite element calculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, G.M.; De Hosson, J.T.M.; Sloof, W.G.; Pei, Y.T.

    In this work, a methodology for the determination of the interface adhesion strength of zinc coating on TRIP steel is present. This method consists of a conventional tensile test in combination with finite element calculation. The relation between the average interface crack length and the applied

  15. Tensile mechanical properties of a stainless steel irradiated up to 19 dpa in the Swiss spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Shigeru, E-mail: saito.shigeru@jaea.go.jp [JAEA, J-PARC Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kikuchi, Kenji [Ibaraki Univ., iFRC, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1106 (Japan); Hamaguchi, Dai [JAEA, J-PARC Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Usami, Kouji; Endo, Shinya; Ono, Katsuto; Matsui, Hiroki [JAEA, Dept. of Hot Laboratories, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kawai, Masayoshi [KEK, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305-0801 (Japan); Dai, Yong [PSI, Spallation Source Division, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the lifetime of the beam window of an accelerator-driven transmutation system (ADS), post irradiation examination (PIE) of the STIP (SINQ target irradiation program, SINQ; Swiss spallation neutron source) specimens was carried out. The specimens tested in this study were made from the austenitic steel Japan primary candidate alloy (JPCA). The specimens were irradiated at SINQ Target 4 (STIP-II) with high-energy protons and spallation neutrons. The irradiation conditions were as follows: the proton energy was 580 MeV, irradiation temperatures ranged from 100 to 430 Degree-Sign C, and displacement damage levels ranged from 7.1 to 19.5 dpa. Tensile tests were performed in air at room temperature (RT), 250 Degree-Sign C and 350 Degree-Sign C. Fracture surface observation after the tests was done by Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results of the tensile tests performed at R.T. showed the extra hardening of JPCA at higher dose compared to the fission neutron irradiated data. At the higher temperatures, 250 Degree-Sign C and 350 Degree-Sign C, the extra hardening was not observed. Degradation of ductility bottomed around 10 dpa, and specimens kept their ductility until 19.5 dpa. All specimens fractured in ductile manner.

  16. Anisotropy in tensile and ductile-brittle transition behavior of ODS ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasada, R., E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Lee, S.G.; Isselin, J.; Lee, J.H.; Omura, T.; Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Okuda, T. [KOBELCO Research Institute, 1-5-5, Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271 (Japan); Inoue, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Ukai, S.; Ohnuki, S. [Materials Science and Engineering, Hokkaido University, N14 W8, Kita ku, Sapporo 060-8626 (Japan); Fujisawa, T. [Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Abe, F. [National Institute of Materials Science, Tsukuba, (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    Anisotropic fracture behavior of SOC-1 oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel has been investigated for a hot-extruded bar by tensile tests and Charpy impact tests. These mechanical properties are better in the longitudinal direction than in the transverse directions against extrusion direction (ED). Fracture surface observations by scanning electron microscopy and auger electron spectroscopy indicated bundle-like morphology with existence of segregation/precipitation/inclusions along ED. Pole figures of the hot-extruded bar characterized using electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) technique and X-ray diffraction exhibited <1 1 0> fiber texture formation along ED. The EBSD orientation map showed a complex bundle-like grain morphology which consists of elongated grains having a specific orientation <1 1 0>// ED and relatively isotropic and small grains having other orientation. The results conclude that the combined effects of observed elongated grain morphology and these small grains with segregation/precipitation/inclusions along ED can explain the anisotropic fracture behavior of the hot-extruded ODS ferritic steel.

  17. Theoretical design and advanced microstructure in super high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, F.G.; Santofimia, M.J.; Garcia-Mateo, C.; Chao, J.; Garcia de Andres, C.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical design procedure based on phase transformation theory alone has been successfully applied to design steels with a microstructure consisting of a mixture of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite. Using thermodynamics and kinetics models, a set of four carbide free bainitic steels with a 0.3 wt.% carbon content were designed and manufactured following a thermomechanical treatment consisting of hot rolling and two-step cooling. The designed steels present significant combinations of strength and ductility, with tensile strengths ranging from 1500 to 1800 MPa and total elongations over 15%. However, a carbon content of 0.3 wt.% is still high for in-use properties such as weldability. In this sense, a reduction in the average carbon content of advanced bainitic steels was proposed. Improved bainitic steels with a carbon content of 0.2 wt.% reached combinations of strength and ductility comparable to those in TRIP assisted steels.

  18. An Evaluation of Global and Local Tensile Properties of Friction-Stir Welded DP980 Dual-Phase Steel Joints Using a Digital Image Correlation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoungwook; Kim, Cheolhee; Song, Jung Han

    2015-12-04

    The effect of the microstructure heterogeneity on the tensile plastic deformation characteristic of friction-stir-welded (FSW) dual-phase (DP) steel was investigated for the potential applications on the lightweight design of vehicles. Friction-stir-welded specimens with a butt joint configuration were prepared, and quasi-static tensile tests were conducted, to evaluate the tensile properties of DP980 dual-phase steels. The friction-stir welding led to the formation of martensite and a significant hardness rise in the stir zone (SZ), but the presence of a soft zone in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was caused by tempering of the pre-existing martensite. Owing to the appearance of severe soft zone, DP980 FSW joint showed almost 93% joint efficiency with the view-point of ultimate tensile strength and relatively low ductility than the base metal (BM). The local tensile deformation characteristic of the FSW joints was also examined using the digital image correlation (DIC) methodology by mapping the global and local strain distribution, and was subsequently analyzed by mechanics calculation. It is found that the tensile deformation of the FSW joints is highly heterogeneous, leading to a significant decrease in global ductility. The HAZ of the joints is the weakest region where the strain localizes early, and this localization extends until fracture with a strain near 30%, while the strain in the SZ and BM is only 1% and 4%, respectively. Local constitutive properties in different heterogeneous regions through the friction-stir-welded joint was also briefly evaluated by assuming iso-stress conditions. The local stress-strain curves of individual weld zones provide a clear indication of the heterogeneity of the local mechanical properties.

  19. Effects of Ti and Ta addition on microstructure stability and tensile properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for nuclear fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Kyu; Lee, Ji Won; Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang Hoon; Hong, Hyun Uk

    2018-03-01

    The effects of Ti and Ta addition on microstructure stability and tensile properties of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel have been investigated. Ti addition of 0.06 wt% to conventional RAFM reference base steel (Fe-9.3Cr-0.93W-0.22V-0.094Ta-0.1C) was intended to promote the precipitation of nano-sized (Ti,W) carbides with a high resistance to coarsening. In addition, the Ti addition was substituted for 0.094 wt% Ta. The Ti-added RAFM steel (Ti-RAFM) exhibited a higher yield strength (ΔYS = 32 MPa) at 600 °C than the reference base steel due to additional precipitation hardening by (Ti,W)-rich MX with an average size of 6.1 nm and the area fraction of 2.39%. However, after thermal exposure at 600 °C for 1000 h, this Ti-RAFM was more susceptible to degradation than the reference base steel; the block width increased by 77.6% in Ti-RAFM after thermal exposure while the reference base steel showed only 9.1% increase. In order to suppress diffusion rate during thermal exposure, the large-sized Ta element with low activation was added to Ti-RAFM. The Ta-added Ti-RAFM steel exhibited good properties with outstanding microstructure stability. Quantitative comparison in microstructures was discussed with a consideration of Ti and Ta addition.

  20. Tensile Stress-Strain Results for 304L and 316L Stainless-Steel Plate at Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; S. D. Snow; T. E. Rahl

    2007-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting moderate strain rate (10 to 200 per second) research on stainless steel materials in support of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). For this research, strain rate effects are characterized by comparison to quasi-static tensile test results. Considerable tensile testing has been conducted resulting in the generation of a large amount of basic material data expressed as engineering and true stress-strain curves. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of quasi-static tensile testing of 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steels in order to add to the existing data pool for these materials and make the data more readily available to other researchers, engineers, and interested parties. Standard tensile testing of round specimens in accordance with ASTM procedure A 370-03a were conducted on 304L and 316L stainless-steel plate materials at temperatures ranging from -20 F to 600 F. Two plate thicknesses, eight material heats, and both base and weld metal were tested. Material yield strength, Young's modulus, ultimate strength, ultimate strain, failure strength and failure strain were determined, engineering and true stress-strain curves to failure were developed, and comparisons to ASME Code minimums were made. The procedures used during testing and the typical results obtained are described in this paper

  1. Tensile properties of strip casting 6.5 wt% Si steel at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hao-Ze, E-mail: lhzqq83@163.com; Liu, Zhen-Yu, E-mail: zyliu@mail.neu.edu.cn

    2015-07-15

    Tensile behaviors of strip casting 6.5 wt% Si steel are tested at elevated temperatures ranging from 300 °C to 800 °C. A detailed study of the morphology of the fracture surface and the ordered phase at each deforming temperature is carried out by a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The results show that the deforming temperature rather than the ordered degree determines the tensile properties. As the deforming temperature increases, the stress level in the whole deforming stage continually decreases, whereas the elongation gradually increases. The ductile–brittle transition occurs around 350 °C. The elongation of 2% at 300 °C rapidly increases up to 16.4% at 350 °C and the corresponding fracture mode transforms from the complete cleavage fracture to the mixture of the very limited cleavage fracture, intergranular dimple fracture and the dimple fracture. Serrated flow is observed at 350 °C and 400 °C probably due to the occurrence of dynamic strain aging. Due to the gradually weakened grain boundary cohesion with the deforming temperature increasing, intergranular dimple pattern dominates the fracture surface at 600 °C and the elongation slowly increases from 16.4% at 350 °C to 22.8% at 600 °C. At 700 °C and 800 °C, the much more enhanced dynamic recovery, the substantially decreased stress levels which contribute to the inhibition of the intergranular dimple fracture, the much lower content of the B2 ordered phase at 700 °C, and the completely disordered state at 800 °C give rise to the dramatically improved elongations of 88.8% and 130.8%, respectively.

  2. Measurement of the yield and tensile strengths of neutron-irradiated and post-irradiation recovered vessel steels with notched specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiente, A.

    1996-01-01

    Tensile circumferentially notched bars are examined as test specimens for measuring the yield and tensile strengths of nuclear pressure vessel steels under several conditions of irradiation and temperature that a vessel can experience during its service life, including recovery post-irradiation treatment. For all the vessel steels, notch geometries and conditions explored, it has been found that notched specimens fail by plastic collapse, and simple formulae have been derived that allow the yield and tensile strengths to be determined from the yielding and plastic collapse load of a notched specimen. Values measured in this way show good agreement with those measured by the standard tensile test method. (orig.)

  3. Tensile Property of ANSI 304 Stainless Steel Weldments Subjected to Cavitation Erosion Based on Treatment of Laser Shock Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Yue-Hua; Luo, Kai-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Zhao, Yong; Huang, Jian-Yun; Wu, Xu-Dong; Zhou, Chuang

    2018-05-16

    Tensile property was one important index of mechanical properties of ANSI 304 stainless steel laser weldments subjected to cavitation erosion (CE). Laser shock processing (LSP) was utilized to strengthen the CE resistance, and the tensile property and fracture morphology were analyzed through three replicated experiment times. Results showed tensile process of treated weldments was composed of elastic deformation, plastic deformation, and fracture. The elastic limit, elastic modulus, elongation, area reduction, and ultimate tensile strength of tensile sample after CE were higher in view of LSP. In the fracture surface, the fiber zone, radiation zone and shear lip zone were generated, and those were more obvious through LSP. The number and size of pores in the fracture surface were smaller, and the fracture surface was smoother and more uniform. The dimples were elongated along the unified direction due to effects of LSP, and the elongated direction was in agreement with the crack propagation direction. Their distribution and shape were uniform with deeper depth. It could be reflected that the tensile property was improved by LSP and the CE resistance was also enhanced.

  4. Reversed Microstructures and Tensile Properties after Various Cold Rolling Reductions in AISI 301LN Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Järvenpää

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Heavy cold rolling is generally required for efficient grain size refinement in the martensitic reversion process, which is, however, not desirable in practical processing. In the present work, the influence of cold rolling reductions of 32%, 45% and 63% on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of a metastable austenitic AISI 301LN type steel were investigated in detail adopting scanning electron microscopy with the electron backscatter diffraction method and mechanical testing. A completely austenitic microstructure and a partially reversed counterpart were created. It was found that the fraction of grains with a size of 3 µm or larger, called medium-sized grains, increased with decreasing the prior cold rolling reduction. These grains are formed mainly from the shear-reversed austenite, transformed from slightly-deformed martensite, by gradual evolution of subgrains to grains. However, in spite of significant amounts of medium-sized grains, the tensile properties after the 32% or 45% cold rolling reductions were practically equal to those after the 63% reduction. The austenite stability against the formation of deformation-induced martensite in subsequent straining was reduced by lowering the cold rolling reduction, due to the larger grain size of medium-sized grains and the shift of their orientation towards {211} .

  5. Effect of niobium on tensile, impact and hardness mechanical properties in martensitic steels that could be strengthened

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casteletti, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    Martensitic steels that could be strengthened by precipitation, based on traditional maraging steels were developed, aiming to total or partial substitution of the expensive elements. Niobium was used as the precipitation forming element and it was very effective in the strengthening of martensitic matrix. The Ni element was completely and partially substituted by Mn. Tensile and impact tests at room temperature and aging curves were obtained in the temperature range from 400 to 600 sup(0)C, for 20 alloys systems. Metallographic and fractographic analysis were done, and the results are presents. (M.C.K.)

  6. Low cycle fatigue of 2.25Cr1Mo steel with tensile and compressed hold loading at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Yu, Dunji; Zhao, Zizhen; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Gang; Chen, Xu, E-mail: xchen@tju.edu.cn

    2016-06-14

    A series of uniaxial strain-controlled fatigue and creep-fatigue tests of the bainitic 2.25Cr1Mo steel forging were performed at 455 °C in air. Three different hold periods (30 s, 120 s, 300 s) were employed at maximum tensile strain and compressive strain under fully reversed strain cycling. Both tensile and compressive holds significantly reduce the fatigue life. Fatigue life with tensile hold is shorter than that with compressive hold. A close relationship is found between the reduction of fatigue life and the amount of stress relaxation. Microstructural examination by scanning electron microscope reveals that strain hold introduces more crack sources, which can be probably ascribed to the intensified oxidation and the peeling-off of oxide layers. A modified plastic strain energy approach considering stress relaxation effect is proposed to predict the creep-fatigue life, and the predicted lives are in superior agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Tantalum-Addition Effect on Tensile and Creep Properties in 9Cr-0.5Mo-2W-V-Nb Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Kim, Sung Ho; Back, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Tae Kyu; Lee, Chan Bock

    2011-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels (FMS) are being considered prospectively as cladding materials of a SFR fuel in Gen-IV nuclear systems. There are sound technical justifications for these material selections, and the adoption of the FM steels for a wide range of nuclear and non-nuclear applications has generated much industrial technology and experience. However, there are strong incentives to develop advanced materials, especially cladding, for a Gen-IV SFR. To develop an improved FM steel for the Gen-IV SFR fuel cladding in Korea, a R and D program has been progressed since 2007. Categories of materials considered in the program included 8∼12% Cr FM steels. A strong recommendation was made for the development of a high strength steel equivalent to or superior to ASTM Gr.92 steel (hereafter Gr. 92) to offset the difficulties encountered with commercial available high Cr (8∼12%) steels. Since the fuel cladding in a Gen-IV SFR would operate under higher temperatures than 600 .deg. C, contacting with liquid sodium, and be irradiated by neutrons to as high as 200dpa, the developed cladding should thus sustain both superior irradiation and temperature stabilities during its operational life. The newly developed advanced steel should also overcome severe drawbacks: mechanical properties, especially creep, are deteriorated at a higher temperature over 600 .deg. C. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Ta addition on the tensile and creep properties of the three alloys which are designed, manufactured and tested. Their properties are obtained and compared for developing new FM fuel cladding materials

  8. Partial transformation of austenite in Al-Mn-Si TRIP steel upon tensile straining: an in situ EBSD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Nybo; Adachi, Y.; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of austenite to martensite in an Al–Mn–Si transformation-induced plasticity steel was investigated with in situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements under tensile straining. The visualisation of the microstructure upon straining allows for an investigation...... to be more stable than large grains, while austenite grains located beside bainitic ferrite are the most stable. Moreover, it is demonstrated that austenite grains transform gradually...

  9. In situ room temperature tensile deformation of a 1% CrMoV bainitic steel using synchrotron and neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisser, M.A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Materials (IMX), CH-1012 Lausanne (Switzerland); Evans, A.D.; Van Petegem, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Holdsworth, S.R. [EMPA Materials Science and Technology, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Van Swygenhoven, H., E-mail: helena.vs@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Materials (IMX), CH-1012 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    Neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction spectra have been acquired during room temperature tensile deformation of a creep-resistant bainitic 1% CrMoV steel, in order to study the evolution of internal microstresses and load-sharing mechanisms between the ferrite matrix and the various carbides. Cementite takes load from the plastifying matrix at the onset of macroscopic plasticity resulting in residual interphase stresses. Single peak fitting indicates an elastic anisotropic behaviour of cementite.

  10. Acoustic emission during tensile deformation and fracture of nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel specimens with notches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission generated during tensile deformation and fracture of nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel specimens with notches has been studied. The extent of acoustic activity generated depends on notch tip severity, notch tip blunting and tearing of the notches. The equation N=AK m applied to the acoustic emission data of the notched specimens has shown good correlation. Acoustic emission technique can be used to estimate the size of an unknown notch. (author)

  11. Material properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels for core materials of FBR. Tensile properties of sodium exposed and nickel diffused materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shoichi; Yoshida, Eiichi

    2002-12-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel is candidate for a long-life core materials of future FBR, because of good swelling resistance and high creep strength. In this study, tensile tests were carried out the long-term extrapolation of sodium environmental effects on the mechanical properties of ODS steels. The tested heats of materials are M93, M11 and F95. The specimens were pre-exposed to sodium for 1,000 and 3,000 hours under non-stress conditions. The pre-exposure to sodium was conducted using a sodium test loop constituted by austenitic steels. For the conditions of sodium exposure test, the sodium temperature was 650 and 700degC, the oxygen concentration in sodium was about 1 ppm and sodium flow rate on the surface of specimen was less than 1x10 -4 m/seconds (nearly static). Further the specimen with the nickel diffused was prepared, which is simulate to nickel diffusing through sodium from the surface of structural stainless steels. The main results obtained were as follows; (1) The tensile strength and the fracture elongation after sodium exposure (maximum 3,000 hours) were same as that of as-received materials. If was considered that the sodium environmental effect is negligible under the condition of this study. (2) Tensile properties of nickel diffused specimens were slightly lower than that of the as-received specimens, but it remains equal to that of thermal aging specimens. (3) The change in microstructure such as a degraded layer was observed on the surface of nickel diffused specimen. In the region of the degraded layer, phase transformations from the α-phase to the γ-phase were recognized. But, the microscopic oxide particles were observed same as that of α-phase base metal. (author)

  12. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Arman Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A total of 8 numbers of cylinder specimens are cast and tested in 1000 kN capacity digital universal testing machine (UTM and also modeled in ANSYS. The enhancement of compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of SFRC specimen is achieved up to 17% and 146%, respectively, compared to respective plain concrete specimen. Results gathered from finite element analyses are validated with the experimental test results by identifying as well as optimizing the controlling parameters to make FE models. Modulus of elasticity, Poisson’s ratio, stress-strain behavior, tensile strength, density, and shear transfer coefficients for open and closed cracks are found to be the main governing parameters for successful model of plain concrete and SFRC in FE platform. After proper evaluation and logical optimization of these parameters by extensive analyses, finite element (FE models showed a good correlation with the experimental results.

  13. Effect of tensile pre-strain at different orientation on martensitic transformation and mechanical properties of 316L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, F.; Zulfi, F. R.; Korda, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Deformation induced martensite was studied in 316L stainless steel through tensile pre-strain deformation in the rolling direction (RD) and perpendicular to the rolling direction (LT) at various %pre-strain. The experiment was carried out at various given %pre-strain, which were 0%, 4.6%, 12%, 17.4%, and 25.2% for the RD, whereas for LT were 0%, 4.6%, 12%, 18%, and 26% for LT. Changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties were observed using optical microscope, tensile testing, hardness testing, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The experimental results showed that the volume fraction of martensite was increased as the %pre-strain increased. In the same level of deformation by tensile pre-strain, the volume of martensite for RD was higher than that with LT direction. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and hardness of the steel were increased proportionally with the increases in %pre-strain, while the value of elongation and toughness were decreased with the increases in %pre-strain.

  14. Irradiation effects on tensile ductility and dynamic toughness of ferritic-martensitic 7-12 Cr steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preininger, D.

    2006-01-01

    The superimposed effect of irradiation-induced hardening by small defects (clusters, dislocation loops) and chromium-rich - precipitate formations on tensile ductility and Charpy-impact behaviour of various ferritic-martensitic (7-13)CrWVTa(Ti)-RAFM steels have been examined by micro-mechanical deformation and ductile/dynamic fracture models. Analytical relations have been deduced describing irradiation-induced changes of uniform ductility and fracture strain as well as ductile-to-brittle transition temperature DBTT and ductile upper shelf energy USE observed from impact tests. The models apply work-hardening with competitive action of relevant dislocation multiplication and annihilation reactions. The impact model takes into account stress intensity with local plasticity and fracture within the damage zone of main crack. Especially, the influences of radiation-induced changes in ductile and dynamic fracture stresses have been considered together with effects from strain rate sensitivity of strength, precipitate morphology as mean size dp and volume fraction fv as well as deformation temperature and strain rate. For these, particularly the correlation between tensile ductility and impact properties have been examined. Strengthening by clusters and loops generally reduces uniform ductility, and more stronger fracture strain as well as ductile upper shelf energy USE and additionally increases DBTT for constant fracture stresses. A superimposed precipitation hardening by formation of 3-6 nm, f v 6 nm, which clear above the sharable limit of coherent precipitates increases with increasing fraction fv and but strongly reduces with increasing matrix strength due to full martensitic structure, higher C, N alloying contents and pronounced hardening by irradiation-induced cluster and loop formations. A combined increase of fracture stresses due to irradiation-induced changes of the grain boundary structure diminishes the strength-induced increase in DBTT and more stronger

  15. High cycle fatigue of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, J.P.; Lehmann, D.; Picker

    1990-01-01

    This study concerns the evaluation of material data to be used in LMFBR design codes. High cycle fatigue properties of three austenitic stainless steels are evaluated: type AISI 316 (UKAEA tests), type AISI 316L (CEA tests) and type AISI 304 (Interatom tests). The data on these steels comprised some 550 data points from 14 casts. This data set covered a wide range of testing parameters: temperature from 20-625 0 C, frequency from 1-20 000 Hz, constant amplitude and random fatigue loading, with and without mean stress, etc. However, the testing conditions chosen by the three partners differed considerably because they had been fixed independently and not harmonized prior to the tests. This created considerable difficulties for the evaluations. Experimental procedures and statistical treatments used for the three subsets of data are described and discussed. Results are presented in tables and graphs. Although it is often difficult to single out the influence of each parameter due to the different testing conditions, several interesting conclusions can be drawn: The HCF properties of the three steels are consistent with the 0.2% proof stress, the fatigue limit being larger than the latter at temperatures above 550 0 C. The type 304 steel has lower tensile properties than the two other steels and hence also lower HCF properties. Parameters which clearly have a significant effect of HCF behaviour are mean stress or R-ratio (less in the non-endurance region than in the endurance region), temperature, cast or product. Other parameters have probably a weak or no effect but it is difficult to conclude due to insufficient data: environment, specimen orientation, frequency, specimen geometry

  16. Microstructure and Strain Rate-Dependent Tensile Deformation Behavior of Fiber Laser-Welded Butt Joints of Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Dong, Danyang; Han, Zhiqiang; Yang, Zhibin; Wang, Lu; Dong, Qingwei

    2018-05-01

    The microstructure and tensile deformation behavior of the fiber laser-welded similar and dissimilar dual-phase (DP) steel joints over a wide range of strain rates from 10-3 to 103 s-1 were investigated for the further applications on the lightweight design of vehicles. The high strain rate dynamic tensile deformation process and full-field strain distribution of the base metals and welded joints were examined using the digital image correlation method and high-speed photography. The strain rate effects on the stress-strain responses, tensile properties, deformation, and fracture behavior of the investigated materials were analyzed. The yield stress (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the dissimilar DP780/DP980 welded joints were lying in-between those of the DP780 and DP980 base metals, and all materials exhibited positive strain rate dependence on the YS and UTS. Owing to the microstructure heterogeneity, the welded joints showed relatively lower ductility in terms of total elongation (TE) than those of the corresponding base metals. The strain localization started before the maximum load was reached, and the strain localization occurred earlier during the whole deformation process with increasing strain rate. As for the dissimilar welded joint, the strain localization tended to occur in the vicinity of the lowest hardness value across the welded joint, which was in the subcritical HAZ at the DP780 side. As the strain rate increased, the typical ductile failure characteristic of the investigated materials did not change.

  17. Microstructure and Strain Rate-Dependent Tensile Deformation Behavior of Fiber Laser-Welded Butt Joints of Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Dong, Danyang; Han, Zhiqiang; Yang, Zhibin; Wang, Lu; Dong, Qingwei

    2018-04-01

    The microstructure and tensile deformation behavior of the fiber laser-welded similar and dissimilar dual-phase (DP) steel joints over a wide range of strain rates from 10-3 to 103 s-1 were investigated for the further applications on the lightweight design of vehicles. The high strain rate dynamic tensile deformation process and full-field strain distribution of the base metals and welded joints were examined using the digital image correlation method and high-speed photography. The strain rate effects on the stress-strain responses, tensile properties, deformation, and fracture behavior of the investigated materials were analyzed. The yield stress (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the dissimilar DP780/DP980 welded joints were lying in-between those of the DP780 and DP980 base metals, and all materials exhibited positive strain rate dependence on the YS and UTS. Owing to the microstructure heterogeneity, the welded joints showed relatively lower ductility in terms of total elongation (TE) than those of the corresponding base metals. The strain localization started before the maximum load was reached, and the strain localization occurred earlier during the whole deformation process with increasing strain rate. As for the dissimilar welded joint, the strain localization tended to occur in the vicinity of the lowest hardness value across the welded joint, which was in the subcritical HAZ at the DP780 side. As the strain rate increased, the typical ductile failure characteristic of the investigated materials did not change.

  18. Tensile stress-strain and work hardening behaviour of P9 steel for wrapper application in sodium cooled fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, J.; Choudhary, B. K.; Isaac Samuel, E.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Tensile flow behaviour of P9 steel with different silicon content has been examined in the framework of Hollomon, Ludwik, Swift, Ludwigson and Voce relationships for a wide temperature range (300-873 K) at a strain rate of 1.3 × 10 -3 s -1. Ludwigson equation described true stress ( σ)-true plastic strain ( ɛ) data most accurately in the range 300-723 K. At high temperatures (773-873 K), Ludwigson equation reduces to Hollomon equation. The variations of instantaneous work hardening rate ( θ = dσ/ dɛ) and θσ with stress indicated two-stage work hardening behaviour. True stress-true plastic strain, flow parameters, θ vs. σ and θσ vs. σ with respect to temperature exhibited three distinct temperature regimes and displayed anomalous behaviour due to dynamic strain ageing at intermediate temperatures. Rapid decrease in flow stress and flow parameters, and rapid shift in θ- σ and θσ- σ towards lower stresses with increase in temperature indicated dominance of dynamic recovery at high temperatures.

  19. High yttria ferritic ODS steels through powder forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Prakash, Ujjwal; Dabhade, Vikram V.; Laha, K.; Sakthivel, T.

    2017-05-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are being developed for future nuclear reactors. ODS Fe-18%Cr-2%W-0.2%Ti steels with 0, 0.35, 0.5, 1 and 1.5% Y2O3 (all compositions in weight%) dispersion were fabricated by mechanical alloying of elemental powders. The powders were placed in a mild steel can and forged in a stream of hydrogen gas at 1473 K. The steels were forged again to final density. The strength of ODS steel increased with yttria content. Though this was accompanied by a decrease in tensile elongation, all the steels showed significant ductility. The ductility in high yttria alloys may be attributed to improved inter-particle bonding between milled powders due to reduction of surface oxides by hydrogen. This may permit development of ODS steels with yttria contents higher than the conventional limit of 0.5%. It is suggested that powder forging is a promising route to fabricate ODS steels with high yttria contents and improved ductility.

  20. Investigation on dissimilar laser welding of advanced high strength steel sheets for the automotive industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossini, M., E-mail: matteo.rossini@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Spena, P. Russo, E-mail: pasquale.russospena@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Cortese, L., E-mail: luca.cortese@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Matteis, P., E-mail: paolo.matteis@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Firrao, D., E-mail: donato.firrao@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2015-03-25

    To support the use of advanced high strength steels in car body design and fabrication, an investigation was carried out on dissimilar butt laser welding between TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels, Dual Phase (DP) steels, hot stamping boron (22MnB5) steels, and TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels. The base materials and the weldments were fully characterized by means of metallography, microhardness, and tensile tests. Digital image analysis was also used to provide additional information on the local strain field in the joint during the tensile tests. Fractographic examination was finally performed on the fracture surfaces of the tensile samples. The dissimilar joints between the DP, 22MnB5, and TRIP steels exhibit good resistance properties. On the contrary, the dissimilar joints encompassing the TWIP steel exhibit poor mechanical strength and fail along the weld seam by intergranular fracture, probably due to presence of Mn segregations. Therefore, the laser welding of TWIP steel with other advanced high strength steels is not recommended without the use of proper metal fillers. Dissimilar laser welding of DP, TRIP and 22MnB5 combinations, on the contrary, can be a solution to assemble car body parts made of these steel grades.

  1. Effect of Controlled Cooling on Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Low C Nb-Ti-Containing HSLA Steel for Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-mechanical control processing (TMCP of low carbon (C Nb-Ti-containing HSLA steel with different cooling rates from 5 to 20 °C/s was simulated using a Gleeble 3500 system. The samples’ microstructure was characterized and the tensile properties measured. The results show that a microstructure mainly consisting of quasi-polygonal ferrite (QPF, granular bainitic ferrite (GBF, and martensite/austenite (M/A constituent formed in each sample. Furthermore, the accelerated cooling led to a significant grain refinement of the QPF and GBF, and an increase in the density of dislocations, as well as suppressed the precipitation of nanoscale particles; however, the overall yield strength (YS still increased obviously. The accelerated cooling also brought about a decrease in amount of M/A constituent acting as a mixed hard phase, which weakened the overall strain-hardening capacity of the QPF + GBF + M/A multiphase steel and simultaneously elevated yield-to-tensile strength ratio (YR. In addition, the mechanisms in dominating the influence of controlled cooling on the final microstructure and tensile properties were discussed.

  2. Pressure vessels for reactors made from structural steel with limited tensile strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machatti, H.

    1973-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel is prestressed in several directions with prestressing elements fabricated of steel with a high yielding point. This design allows a substantial reduction of wall thickness or an increase of the inner diameter at equal wall thickness. The prestress of the prestressing elements is designed to achieve a maximum stress release of the vessel walls at normal operating conditions and to fully utilize the maximum load of the vessel walls. For safety reasons the cross section of the prestressing elements is constructed in a way that strain is always 20 % lower the yield point. (P.K.)

  3. Development of India-specific RAFM steel through optimization of tungsten and tantalum contents for better combination of impact, tensile, low cycle fatigue and creep properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, K., E-mail: laha@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Saroja, S.; Moitra, A.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2013-08-15

    Effects of tungsten and tantalum contents on impact, tensile, low cycle fatigue and creep properties of Reduced Activation Ferritic–Martensitic (RAFM) steel were studied to develop India-specific RAFM steel. Four heats of the steel have been melted with tungsten and tantalum contents in the ranges 1–2 wt.% and 0.06–0.14 wt.% respectively. Increase in tungsten content increased the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), low cycle fatigue and creep strength of the steel, whereas the tensile strength was not changed significantly. Increase in tantalum content increased the DBTT and low cycle fatigue strength of the steel whereas the tensile and creep strength decreased. Detailed TEM investigations revealed enhanced microstructural stability of the steel against creep exposure on tungsten addition. The RAFM steel having 1.4 wt.% tungsten with 0.06 wt.% tantalum was found to possess optimum combination of impact, tensile, low cycle fatigue and creep properties and is considered for Indian-specific RAFM steel.

  4. Construction of cryogenic testing system and tensile deformation behavior of AISI 300 series stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.M.; Nahm, S.H.; Huh, Y.H.; Lee, J.J.; Bahng, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    For practical application of cryogenic engineering, development and characterization of structural materials for use at low temperatures are essential. For these purposes, a system for mechanical testing at liquid helium temperatures was developed and it was shown that the precision and accuracy of the system met the requirements of standards for materials testing machines. Using this system, tensile deformation behavior of AISI 304,316 and 310S austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures was investigated. Tests were conducted on round, tensile specimens having a 6.25mm diameter at 4,77, and 295 K and loading rate was 0.5mm/min. Serrations were observed in all alloys at 4 K. The stress-displacement curves at 77 and 4 K showed different tendency from those at 298 K. As the testing temperature decreased, ultimate strengths of 304 and 316 were largely increased compared to the increase of yield strengths, but the increase of ultimate strength of 310S was almost the same to that of yield strength. Type 310S had the highest yield strength and the lowest tensile strength at all temperatutes. These tensile characteristics were considered to be strongly affected by austenite stability.(Author)

  5. Experimental assessments of notch ductility and tensile strength of stainless steel weldments after 1200C neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Menke, B.H.; Awadalla, N.G.; O'Kula, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C/sub V/) properties of American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 300 series stainless steel plate, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) materials from commercial production weldments in 406-mm-diameter pipe (12.7-mm wall) were investigated in unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Weld and HAZ tensile properties were also assessed in the two conditions. The plates and weld filler wires represent different steel melts; the welds were produced using the multipass metal inert gas (MIG) process. Weldment properties in two test orientations were evaluated. Specimens were irradiated in a light water cooled and moderated reactor to 1 x 10/sup 20/ n/cm/sup 2/, E > 0.1 MeV, using a controlled temperature assembly. Specimen tests were performed at 25 and 125 0 C. The radiation-induced reductions in C/sub V/ energy absorption at 25 0 C were about 42% for the weld and the HAZ materials evaluated. A trend of energy increase with temperature was observed. The concomitant elevation in yield strength was about 53%. The increase in tensile strength in contrast was only 16%. The postirradiation yield strength of the axial test orientation in the pipe was less than that of the circumferential test orientation. Results for the HAZ indicate that this component may be the weakest link in the weldment from a fracture resistance viewpoint

  6. Application of high strength steel to nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susukida, H.; Sato, M.; Takano, G.; Uebayashi, T.; Yoshida, K.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear reactor containment vessels are becoming larger in size with the increase in the power generating capacity of nuclear power plants. For example, a containment vessel for a PWR power plant with an output of 1,000 MWe becomes an extremely large one if it is made of the conventional JIS SGV 49 (ASTM A 516 Gr. 70) steel plates less than 38 mm in thickness. In order to design the steel containment vessel within the conventional dimensional range, therefore, it is necessary to use a high strength steel having a higher tensile strength than SGV 49 steel, good weldability and a higher fracture toughness and moreover, possessing satisfactory properties without undergoing post-weld heat treatment. The authors conducted a series of verification tests on high strength steel developed by modifying the ASTM A 543 Grade B Class 1 steel with a view to adopting it as a material for the nuclear reactor containment vessels. As the result of evaluation of the test results from various angles, we confirmed that the high strength steel is quite suitable for the manufacture of nuclear reactor containment vessels. (auth.)

  7. Comparison of the mechanical strength properties of several high-chromium ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, M.K.; Sikka, V.K.; Booker, B.L.P.

    1981-01-01

    A modified 9 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel has been selected as an alternative material for breeder reactors. Different 9 Cr-1 Mo steels are already being used commercially in UK and USA and a 9 Cr-2 Mo steel (EM12) is being used commercially in France. The 12% Cr steel alloy HT9 is also often recommended for high-temperature service. Creep-rupture data for all six seels were analyzed to yield rupture life as a function of stress, temperature, and lot-to-lot variations. Yield and tensile strength data for the three 9 Cr-1 Mo materials were also examined. All results were compared with Type 304 stainless steel, and the tensile and creep properties of the modified and British 9 Cr-1 Mo materials were used to calculate allowable stress values S 0 per Section VIII, Division 1 and S/sub m/ per code Case N-47 to section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. these values were compared with code listings for American commercial 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, and Type 304 stainless steel. The conclusion is made that the modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel displays tensile and creep strengths superior to those of the other ferritic materials examined and is at least comparable to Type 304 stainless steel from room temperature to about 625 0 C. 31 figures

  8. Effect of strain rate and notch geometry on tensile properties and fracture mechanism of creep strength enhanced ferritic P91 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Chandan; Mahapatra, M. M.; Kumar, Pradeep; Saini, N.

    2018-01-01

    Creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF) P91 steel were subjected to room temperature tensile test for quasi-static (less than 10-1/s) strain rate by using the Instron Vertical Tensile Testing Machine. Effect of different type of notch geometry, notch depth and angle on mechanical properties were also considered for different strain rate. In quasi-static rates, the P91 steel showed a positive strain rate sensitivity. On the basis of tensile data, fracture toughness of P91 steel was also calculated numerically. For 1 mm notch depth (constant strain rate), notch strength and fracture toughness were found to be increased with increase in notch angle from 45° to 60° while the maximum value attained in U-type notch. Notch angle and notch depth has found a minute effect on P91 steel strength and fracture toughness. The fracture surface morphology was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM).

  9. Tensile stress–strain and work hardening behaviour of P9 steel for wrapper application in sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christopher, J.; Choudhary, B.K.; Isaac Samuel, E.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► σ–ε behaviour has been adequately described by Ludwigson and Hollomon equations. ► Instantaneous work hardening rate (θ) exhibited two-stage behaviour. ► σ–ε, flow parameters, θ and θσ vs.σ exhibited three distinct temperature regimes. ► Influence of dynamic strain ageing at intermediate temperatures has been identified. ► Dominance of dynamic recovery at high temperatures was demonstrated. - Abstract: Tensile flow behaviour of P9 steel with different silicon content has been examined in the framework of Hollomon, Ludwik, Swift, Ludwigson and Voce relationships for a wide temperature range (300–873 K) at a strain rate of 1.3 × 10 −3 s −1 . Ludwigson equation described true stress (σ)–true plastic strain (ε) data most accurately in the range 300–723 K. At high temperatures (773–873 K), Ludwigson equation reduces to Hollomon equation. The variations of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and θσ with stress indicated two-stage work hardening behaviour. True stress–true plastic strain, flow parameters, θ vs. σ and θσ vs. σ with respect to temperature exhibited three distinct temperature regimes and displayed anomalous behaviour due to dynamic strain ageing at intermediate temperatures. Rapid decrease in flow stress and flow parameters, and rapid shift in θ–σ and θσ–σ towards lower stresses with increase in temperature indicated dominance of dynamic recovery at high temperatures.

  10. Assessment of models predicting irradiation effects on tensile properties of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineau, L.; Landron, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an analysis of tensile data acquired as part of the French Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program (RVSP) is produced. This program contains amongst other mechanical tests, tensile tests at 20 and 300 C degrees on non irradiated base metals and at 300 C degrees only on irradiated materials. It shows that irradiation leads to an increase in the yield strength and a decrease in the strain hardening. The exploitation of tensile results has permitted to express a relationship between yield strength increase measured and fluence value, as well as between strain hardening decrease and yield strength evolution. The use of these relations in the aim at predicting evolution of tensile properties with irradiation has then permitted to propose a methodology to model entire stress-strain curves of irradiated base metal only based on the non irradiated stress-strain curve. These predictions were successfully compared with an experimental standard case. (authors)

  11. Additively manufactured hierarchical stainless steels with high strength and ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Morris; Voisin, Thomas; McKeown, Joseph T.; Ye, Jianchao; Calta, Nicholas P.; Li, Zan; Zeng, Zhi; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Wen; Roehling, Tien Tran; Ott, Ryan T.; Santala, Melissa K.; Depond, Philip J.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Hamza, Alex V.; Zhu, Ting

    2018-01-01

    Many traditional approaches for strengthening steels typically come at the expense of useful ductility, a dilemma known as strength-ductility trade-off. New metallurgical processing might offer the possibility of overcoming this. Here we report that austenitic 316L stainless steels additively manufactured via a laser powder-bed-fusion technique exhibit a combination of yield strength and tensile ductility that surpasses that of conventional 316L steels. High strength is attributed to solidification-enabled cellular structures, low-angle grain boundaries, and dislocations formed during manufacturing, while high uniform elongation correlates to a steady and progressive work-hardening mechanism regulated by a hierarchically heterogeneous microstructure, with length scales spanning nearly six orders of magnitude. In addition, solute segregation along cellular walls and low-angle grain boundaries can enhance dislocation pinning and promote twinning. This work demonstrates the potential of additive manufacturing to create alloys with unique microstructures and high performance for structural applications.

  12. Tensile properties of candidate structural materials for high power spallation sources at high helium contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, P.; Henry, J.; Chen, J.

    2005-08-01

    Low activation 9%Cr martensitic steels EUROFER97, pure tantalum, and low carbon austenitic stainless steel 316L were homogeneously implanted with helium to concentrations up to 5000 appm at temperatures from 70 °C to 400 °C. The specimens were tensile tested at room temperature and at the respective implantation temperatures. In all materials the helium caused an increased in strength and reduction in ductility, with both changes being generally larger at lower implantation and testing temperatures. After implantation some work hardening was retained in 316L and in tantalum, while it almost completely disappeared in EUROFER97. After tensile testing, fracture surfaces were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Implantation caused reduction of necking, but up to concentrations of 2500 appm He fracture surface still showed transgranular ductile appearance. Completely brittle intergranular fracture was observed in tantalum at 9000 appm He and is also expected for EUROFER97 at this concentration, according to previous results on similar 9%Cr steels.

  13. Tensile properties of neutron irradiated 316Ti and 15-15Ti steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.; Levy, V.; Seran, J.L.; Maillard, A.; Royer, J.; Rabouille, O.

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the tensile behavior of CW316Ti and CW15-15Ti Phenix fuel pin cladding. The tensile tests were conducted on defueled tubes irradiated up to 115 dpa 3 in the 400-640 deg C temperature range. Test temperature corresponds essentially to irradiation temperature. The results emphasize that although irradiation induces a reduction of ductility, failure always occurs with significant plastic deformation even for the most irradiated clads. (author). 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  14. Creep theories compared by means of high sensitivity tensile creep data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salim, A.

    1987-01-01

    Commonly used creep theories include time-hardening, strain-hardening and Rabotnov's modified strain-hardening. In the paper they are examined by using high sensitivity tensile creep data produced on 1% CrMoV steel at a temperatue of 565 0 C. A special creep machine designed and developed by the author is briefly described and is compared with other existing machines. Tensile creep data reported cover a stress range of 100-260 MN m -2 ; four variable-creep tests each in duplicate are also reported. Test durations are limited to 3000 h, or failure, whichever occurs earlier. The strain-hardening theory and Rabotnov's modified strain-hardening theory are found to give good prediction of creep strain under variable stress conditions. The time-hardening theory shows a relatively poor agreement and considerably underestimates the accumulated inelastic strain under increasing stress condition. This discrepancy increases with the increased stress rate. The theories failed to predict the variable stress results towards the later part of the test where tertiary effects were significant. The use of creep equations which could account for creep strain at higher stress levels seems to improve the situation considerably. Under conditions of variable stress, it is suggested that a theory based on continuous damage mechanics concepts might give a better prediction. (author)

  15. High yttria ferritic ODS steels through powder forging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Deepak [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, I.I.T-Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Prakash, Ujjwal, E-mail: ujwalfmt@iitr.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, I.I.T-Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Dabhade, Vikram V. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, I.I.T-Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Laha, K.; Sakthivel, T. [Mechanical Metallurgy Group, IGCAR, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

    2017-05-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are being developed for future nuclear reactors. ODS Fe-18%Cr-2%W-0.2%Ti steels with 0, 0.35, 0.5, 1 and 1.5% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (all compositions in weight%) dispersion were fabricated by mechanical alloying of elemental powders. The powders were placed in a mild steel can and forged in a stream of hydrogen gas at 1473 K. The steels were forged again to final density. The strength of ODS steel increased with yttria content. Though this was accompanied by a decrease in tensile elongation, all the steels showed significant ductility. The ductility in high yttria alloys may be attributed to improved inter-particle bonding between milled powders due to reduction of surface oxides by hydrogen. This may permit development of ODS steels with yttria contents higher than the conventional limit of 0.5%. It is suggested that powder forging is a promising route to fabricate ODS steels with high yttria contents and improved ductility. - Highlights: •ODS steels with yttria contents beyond the conventional limit of 0.5 wt% were fabricated by powder forging in a hydrogen atmosphere. •All the alloys exhibited significant ductility. •This may be attributed to improved inter-particle bonding due to reduction of surface oxides by hydrogen. •Strength in excess of 300 MPa was obtained at 973 K for 0.5%, 1% and 1.5% yttria ODS alloys. •Powder forging is a promising route to fabricate ODS steels and permits development of compositions with up to 1.5% yttria.

  16. Long-term high temperature strength of 316FR steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    As low-carbon medium-nitrogen type 316 stainless steel (316FR) was selected as a primary candidate for main structural material of a next fast reactor plant in Japan, its long-term high-temperature strength gains much interest from many organizations involved in design activities of the plant. Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), as a research organization for electric power industry in Japan, has been conducting a multi-year project under the sponsorship of Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) for studying the long-term high temperature strength of this steel. Data obtained by various strength tests, including short-time tensile, fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue tests for this steel are given in this paper. The results of study on creep-fatigue life prediction methods are also presented. It was found that modified ductility exhaustion method previously proposed by the author has satisfactory accuracy in creep-fatigue life estimation

  17. Post-cracking tensile behaviour of steel-fibre-reinforced roller-compacted-concrete for FE modelling and design purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarifar, N.; Pilakoutas, K.; Angelakopoulos, H.; Bennett, T.

    2017-01-01

    Fracture of steel-fibre-reinforced-concrete occurs mostly in the form of a smeared crack band undergoing progressive microcracking. For FE modelling and design purposes, this crack band could be characterised by a stress-strain (σ-ε) relationship. For industrially-produced steel fibres, existing methodologies such as RILEM TC 162-TDF (2003) propose empirical equations to predict a trilinear σ-ε relationship directly from bending test results. This paper evaluates the accuracy of these methodologies and their applicability for roller-compacted-concrete and concrete incorporating steel fibres recycled from post-consumer tyres. It is shown that the energy absorption capacity is generally overestimated by these methodologies, sometimes up to 60%, for both conventional and roller-compacted concrete. Tensile behaviour of fibre-reinforced-concrete is estimated in this paper by inverse analysis of bending test results, examining a variety of concrete mixes and steel fibres. A multilinear relationship is proposed which largely eliminates the overestimation problem and can lead to safer designs. [es

  18. High temperature oxidation behavior of ODS steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaito, T.; Narita, T.; Ukai, S.; Matsuda, Y.

    2004-08-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are being developing for application as advanced fast reactor cladding and fusion blanket materials, in order to allow increased operation temperature. Oxidation testing of ODS steel was conducted under a controlled dry air atmosphere to evaluate the high temperature oxidation behavior. This showed that 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steels have superior high temperature oxidation resistance compared to 11 mass% Cr PNC-FMS and 17 mass% Cr ferritic stainless steel. This high temperature resistance is attributed to earlier formation of the protective α-Cr 2O 3 on the outer surface of ODS steels.

  19. The effect of tungsten on the tensile and creep rupture strength of 12 CrMoV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oakes, G.; Orr, J.

    1978-01-01

    A collaborative project involving the Brown-Firth Research Laboratories, the Sheffield Laboratories of the British Steel Corporation and Tube Investments Limited has been carried out to assess the effect of a controlled tungsten addition (0.5%) on the tensile and rupture properties of 12 CrMoV steel. The results obtained indicate that 0.5% tungsten increases the tensile properties at room temperature by approximately 3% but this diminishes with increasing test temperature. The creep rupture properties of the tungsten-bearing material showed a marked short time (500-1000 hours) strength advantage over the tungsten-free material at temperatures up to 650 0 C. At longer times and higher temperatures this stress advantage was reduced considerably so that at times in the region of 10,000 to 15,000 hours it was approximately 5%. In view of the limited data generated, it was found impossible to extrapolate with confidence to longer times but there was, however, no indication that a significant strength advantage is to be anticipated at 100,000 hours for the tungsten-bearing material. (author)

  20. Experimental assessments of notch ductility and tensile strength of stainless steel weldments after 1200C neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Menke, B.H.; Awadalla, N.G.; O'Kula, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C/sub v/) properties of AISI 300 series stainless steel plate, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) materials from commercial production weldments in 406-mm-diameter pipe (12.7-mm wall) were investigated in unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Weld and HAZ tensile properties were also assessed in the two conditions. The plates and weld filler wires represent different steel melts; the welds were produced using the multipass MIG process. Weldment properties in two test orientations were evaluated. Specimens were irradiated in the UBR reactor to 1 x 10 20 n/cm 2 , E >0.1 MeV in a controlled temperature assembly. Specimen tests were performed at 25 0 C and 125 0 C. The radiation-induced reductions in C/sub v/ energy absorption at 25 0 C were about 42 percent for the weld and HAZ materials evaluated. A trend of energy increase with temperature was observed. The concomitant elevation in yield strength was about 53%. In contrast, the increase in tensile strength was only 16%. The postirradiation yield strength of the axial test orientation in the pipe was less than that of the circumferential test orientation. Results for the HAZ indicate that this component may be the weakest link in the weldment from a fracture resistant viewpoint

  1. Development of fully dense and high performance powder metallurgy HSLA steel using HIP method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wensheng; Pang, Xinkuan; Ma, Yunzhu; Cai, Qingshan; Zhu, Wentan; Liang, Chaoping

    2018-05-01

    In order to solve the problem that the mechanical properties of powder metallurgy (P/M) steels are much lower than those of traditional cast steels with the same composition due to their porosity, a high–strength–low–alloy (HSLA) steel with fully dense and excellent mechanical properties was fabricated through hot isostatic pressing (HIP) using gas–atomized powders. The granular structure in the P/M HIPed steel composed of bainitic ferrite and martensite–austenite (M–A) islands is obtained without the need of any rapid cooling. The P/M HIPed steel exhibit a combination of tensile strength and ductility that surpasses that of conventional cast steel and P/M sintered steel, confirming the feasibility of fabricating high performance P/M steel through appropriate microstructural control and manufacture process.

  2. Correlation of fracture toughness with tensile properties for irradiated 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-08-01

    A correlation has been developed which allows an estimate to be made of the toughness of austenitic alloys using more easily obtained tensile data. Tensile properties measured on 20% cold-worked AISI 316 specimens made from ducts and cladding irradiated in EBR-II were used to predict values for the plane strain fracture toughness according to a model originally developed by Krafft. Some microstructural examination is required to determine a parameter designated as the process zone size. In contrast to the frequently employed Hahn-Rosenfeld model, this model gives results which agree with recent experimental determinations of toughness performed in the transgranular failure regime

  3. Effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of 304L austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinlabi OYETUNJI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of AISI 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS was studied. The tensile strength property of ASS welded samples was evaluated. Prepared samples of the ASS were welded under these three various variables. Tensile test was then carried out on the welded samples. It was found that the reduction in ultimate tensile strength (UTS of the butt joint samples increases with increase in core diameter of the electrode. Also, the best electrode for welding 304L ASS is 308L stainless steel-core electrode of 3.2 mm core diameter. It is recommended that the findings of this work can be applied in the chemical, food and oil industries where 304L ASS are predominantly used.

  4. Processing of a new high strength high toughness steel with duplex microstructure (Ferrite + Austenite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martis, Codrick J.; Putatunda, Susil K.; Boileau, James

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► This new steel has exceptional combination of high strength and fracture toughness. ► Austempering treatment resulted in a very fine scale bainitic ferrite microstructure. ► As the austempering temperature increases yield strength and toughness decreases. ► Maximum fracture toughness of 105 MPa √m is obtained after austempering at 371 °C. ► A relationship between fracture toughness and the parameter σ y (X γ C γ ) 1/2 was observed. - Abstract: In this investigation a new third generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS) has been developed. This steel was synthesized by austempering of a low carbon and low alloy steel with high silicon content. The influence of austempering temperature on the microstructure and the mechanical properties including the fracture toughness of this steel was also examined. Compact tension and cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from a low carbon low alloy steel and were initially austenitized at 927 °C for 2 h and then austempered in the temperature range between 371 °C and 399 °C to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography. Test results show that the austempering heat treatment has resulted in a microstructure consisting of very fine scale bainitic ferrite and austenite. A combination of very high tensile strength of 1388 MPa and fracture toughness of 105 MPa √m was obtained after austempering at 371 °C

  5. High temperature creep strength of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Austenitic stainless steel may be one of the candidates because of good strength and corrosion resistance at the high temperatures, however irradiation swelling well occurred to 120dpa at high temperatures and this leads the decrease of the mechanical properties and dimensional stability. Compared to this, ferritic/martensitic steel is a good solution because of excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. ODS steel is the most promising structural material because of excellent creep and irradiation resistance by uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density which is extremely stable at the high temperature in ferritic/martensitic matrix. In this study, high temperature strength of advanced radiation resistance ODS steel was investigated for the core structural material of next generation nuclear systems. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying, hot isostactic pressing and hot rolling processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels, and creep rupture test as well as tensile test were examined to investigate the behavior at high temperatures. ODS steels were fabricated by a mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes. Mechanical properties at high temperatures were investigated. The creep resistance of advanced radiation resistant ODS steels was more superior than those of ferritic/ martensitic steel, austenitic stainless steel and even a conventional ODS steel.

  6. High - speed steel for precise cased tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karwiarz, J.; Mazur, A.

    2001-01-01

    The test results of high-vanadium high - speed steel (SWV9) for precise casted tools are presented. The face -milling cutters of NFCa80A type have been tested in industrial operating conditions. An average life - time of SWV9 steel tools was 3-10 times longer compare to the conventional high - speed milling cutters. Metallography of SWB9 precise casted steel revealed beneficial for tool properties distribution of primary vanadium carbides in the steel matrix. Presented results should be a good argument for wide application of high - vanadium high - speed steel for precise casted tools. (author)

  7. Effect of tensile deformation on micromagnetic parameters in 0.2% carbon steel and 2.25Cr-1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorthy, V.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, B. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group; Kashyap, B.P. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Bombay (India). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science

    1999-04-23

    The influence of prior tensile deformation on the magnetic Barkhausen emission (MBE) and the hysteresis (B-H) curve has been studied in 0.2% carbon steel and 2.25Cr-1Mo steel under different tempered conditions. This study shows that the micromagnetic parameters can be used to identify the four stages of deformation, namely (1) perfectly elastic, (2) microplastic yielding, (3) macroyielding and (4) progressive plastic deformation. However, it is observed that the MBE profile shows more distinct changes at different stages of tensile deformation than the hysteresis curve. It has been established that the beginning of microplastic yielding and macroyielding can be identified from the MBE profile which is not possible from the stress-strain plot. The onset of microplastic yielding can be identified from the decrease in the MBE peak height. The macroyielding can be identified from the merging of the initially present two-peak MBE profile into a single central peak with relatively higher peak height and narrow profile width. The difference between the variation of MBE and hysteresis curve parameters with strain beyond macroyielding indicates the difference in the deformation state of the surface and bulk of the sample.

  8. Weld Metallurgy and Mechanical Properties of High Manganese Ultra-high Strength Steel Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin; Lindner, Stefan; Monfort, Damien; Petring, Dirk

    The increasing demand for ultra-high strength steels in vehicle manufacturing leads to the application of new alloys. This poses a challenge on joining especially by fusion welding. A stainless high manganese steel sheet with excellent strength and deformation properties stands in the centre of the development. Similar and dissimilar welds with a metastable austenitic steel and a hot formed martensitic stainless steel were performed. An investigation of the mixing effects on the local microstructure and the hardness delivers the metallurgical features of the welds. Despite of carbon contents above 0.4 wt.% none of the welds have shown cracks. Mechanical properties drawn from tensile tests deliver high breaking forces enabling a high stiffness of the joints. The results show the potential for the application of laser beam welding for joining in assembly of structural parts.

  9. High strain rate and quasi-static tensile behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V after cyclic damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verleysen P.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is common that energy absorbing structural elements are subjected to a number of loading cycles before a crash event. Several studies have shown that previous fatigue can significantly influence the tensile properties of some materials, and hence the behaviour of structural elements made of them. However, when the capacity of absorbing energy of engineering materials is determined, fresh material without any fatigue damage is most often used. This study investigates the effect of fatigue damage on the dynamic tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V in thin-sheet form. Results are completed with tests at quasi-static strain rates and observations of the fracture surfaces, and compared with results obtained from other alloys and steel grades. The experiments show that the dynamic properties of Ti-6Al-4V are not affected by a number of fatigue loading cycles high enough to significantly reduce the energy absorbing capabilities of EDM machined samples.

  10. Effect of effective grain size on Charpy impact properties of high-strength bainitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sang Yong; Han, Seung Youb; Lee, Sung Hak; Hwang, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Gil

    2008-01-01

    This study is concerned with the effect of Cu and B addition on microstructure and mechanical properties of high-strength bainitic steels. Six kinds of steels were fabricated by varying alloying elements and hot-rolling conditions, and their microstructures and tensile and Charpy impact properties were investigated. Their effective grain sizes were also characterized by the electron back-scatter diffraction analysis. The tensile test results indicated that the B- or Cu-containing steels had the higher yield and tensile strengths than the B- or Cu-free steels because their volume fractions of bainitic ferrite and martensite were quite high. The B- or Cu-free steels had the higher upper shelf energy than the B- or Cu-containing steels because of their higher volume fraction of granular bainite. In the steel containing 10 ppm B without Cu, the best combination of high strengths, high upper shelf energy, and low energy transition temperature could be obtained by the decrease in the overall effective grain size due to the presence of bainitic ferrite having smaller effective grain size

  11. Mechanical properties and fatigue strength of high manganese non-magnetic steel/carbon steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaji, Eiji; Ikeda, Soichi; Kim, You-Chul; Nakatsuji, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Kosuke.

    1997-01-01

    The dissimilar materials welded joints of high manganese non-magnetic steel/carbon steel (hereafter referred to as DMW joints), in which weld defects such as hot crack or blowhole are not found, were the good quality. Tensile strength of DMW joints was 10% higher than that of the base metal of carbon steel. In the bend tests, the DMW joints showed the good ductility without crack. Charpy absorbed energy at 0(degC) of the DMW joints was over 120(J) in the bond where it seems to be the lowest. Large hardening or softening was not detected in the heat affected zone. Fatigue strength of the DMW joints is almost the same with that of the welded joints of carbon steel/carbon steel. As the fatigue strength of the DMW joints exceeds the fatigue design standard curve of JSSC for carbon steel welded joints, the DMW joints can be treated the same as the welded joints of carbon steel/carbon steel of which strength is lower than that of high manganese non-magnetic steel, from the viewpoint of the fatigue design. (author)

  12. Ductility of high chromium stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretyat'ko, V.N.; Kazantsev, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Aimed to optimize the hot working conditions for high chromium stainless steels the experiments were carried in the temperature range of 800-1300 deg C using hot torsion tests and cylindrical specimens of ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels 08Kh13, 12Kh13, 20Kh13, 30Kh13 and 40Kh13. Testing results showed that steel plasticity varies in a wide range depending on carbon content. Steels of lesser carbon concentration (08Kh13 and 12Kh13) exhibit a sharp increase in plasticity with a temperature rise, especially in the interval of 1200-1250 deg C. Steels 20Kh13 and 30Kh13 display insignificant plasticity increasing, whereas plastic properties of steel 40Kh13 increase noticeably in the range of 1000-1300 deg C. It is shown that optimal hot working conditions for specific steel must be selected with account of steel phase composition at high temperatures

  13. High carbon microalloyed martensitic steel with ultrahigh strength-ductility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Ying [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai 200245 (China); Chen, Nailu, E-mail: nlchen@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-04-29

    Based on the idea of rising the mechanical stability of retained austenite by the addition of Si in Fe-Mn based steels, an Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb was designed, then its hot rolled plate was successively tread by normalization process as pretreatment of novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process. Product of tensile and elongation (PSE) of 53.94 GPa% were obtained for this high carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel, and the PSE (40.18 GPa%) obtained by the conversion of tensile sample size using Oliver formula still is more excellent PSE than those of other microalloyed advanced high strength steels reported. The microstructural characterization reveals origin of ultrahigh PSE resulting from both the increase of considerable and dispersed carbon enriched retained austenite with relative high mechanical stability in volume fraction and the decrease of brittle twin-type martensite with the sensitivity of notch.

  14. Empirical relations for tensile properties of austenitic stainless steels irradiated in mixed-spectrum reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    An assessment has been made of available tensile property data relevant to the design of fusion reactors, especially near term devices expected to operate at lower temperatures than power reactors. Empirical relations have been developed for the tensile properties as a functions of irradiation temperature for neutron exposures of 10-15, 20, 30, and 50 dpa. It was found that yield strength depends little on the particular austenitic alloy and little on the helium concentration. Strength depends upon initial condition of the alloy only for exposures of less than 30 dpa. Uniform elongation was found to be more sensitive to alloy and condition. It was also more sensitive than strength to helium level. However, below 500deg C, helium only appeared to have an efect at 10-15 dpa. At higher temperatures, helium embrittlement was apparent, and its threshold temperature decreased with increasing neutron exposure level. (orig.)

  15. Ductile damage identification and tensile notch effect for Eurofer97 steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stratil, Luděk; Hadraba, Hynek; Dlouhý, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2013), s. 185-190 ISSN 1338-1660. [FRACTOGRAPHY 2012. Stará Lesná, 21.10.2012-24.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/0466; GA ČR GD106/09/H035 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Eurofer97 * notched tensile bars * voids * nucleation and growth Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy

  16. Effect of surface decarburization on the mechanical properties of high strength low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saqib, S.

    1993-01-01

    An attempt has been made to study the relationship of mechanical properties with the microstructure of a high strength low alloy steel. A thorough investigation was conducted on the steel sheet and variation in mechanical properties was observed across its thickness with a change in the microstructure. Change in hardness and tensile strength at the surface compare to the core of the material is attributed to decarburization. The current research indicates that the correlation between hardness and tensile strength is not valid for steels if the hardness is determined on the surface only. Great care should be taken at the time of determination of tensile strength by using conversion charts/tables on the basis of hardness values obtained by practical means. (author)

  17. Effect of heat treatment, with and without mechanical work, on the tensile and creep behaviour at 6000C of austenitic stainless steel stabilised with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of various heat treatments, with and without mechanical work, on the microstructure and the tensile and creep behaviour at 600 0 C of the titanium stabilised austenitic stainless steel DIN 1.4970, as well as the effects of aging temperature, pre-strain and small boron additions on the creep behaviour of these steels are discussed. The most probable mechanism is suggested. (Author) [pt

  18. Effect of flowing sodium on corrosion and tensile properties of AISI type 316LN stainless steel at 823 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivai Bharasi, N.; Thyagarajan, K.; Shaikh, H.; Balamurugan, A. K.; Bera, Santanu; Kalavathy, S.; Gurumurthy, K.; Tyagi, A. K.; Dayal, R. K.; Rajan, K. K.; Khatak, H. S.

    2008-07-01

    AISI type 316LN stainless steel was exposed to flowing sodium in mass transfer loop (MTL) at 823 K for 16 000 h and then examined for changes in the tensile properties due to the mass transfer and corrosion effects. Comparisons in microstructural and mechanical properties were made between annealed, thermally aged and sodium exposed materials. Microstructural examination of thermally aged and sodium exposed materials revealed precipitation of carbides at the grain boundaries. The sodium exposed samples contained a degraded layer at the surface up to a depth of around 10 μm and a surface carburized layer of about 30 μm. There was about 15% increase in yield strength and a decrease of about 20% in ductility for the sodium exposed material vis-a-vis thermally aged material and this was attributed to carburization effects and microstructural changes.

  19. Effect of flowing sodium on corrosion and tensile properties of AISI type 316LN stainless steel at 823 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivai Bharasi, N.; Thyagarajan, K.; Shaikh, H.; Balamurugan, A.K.; Bera, Santanu; Kalavathy, S.; Gurumurthy, K.; Tyagi, A.K.; Dayal, R.K.; Rajan, K.K.; Khatak, H.S.

    2008-01-01

    AISI type 316LN stainless steel was exposed to flowing sodium in mass transfer loop (MTL) at 823 K for 16 000 h and then examined for changes in the tensile properties due to the mass transfer and corrosion effects. Comparisons in microstructural and mechanical properties were made between annealed, thermally aged and sodium exposed materials. Microstructural examination of thermally aged and sodium exposed materials revealed precipitation of carbides at the grain boundaries. The sodium exposed samples contained a degraded layer at the surface up to a depth of around 10 μm and a surface carburized layer of about 30 μm. There was about 15% increase in yield strength and a decrease of about 20% in ductility for the sodium exposed material vis-a-vis thermally aged material and this was attributed to carburization effects and microstructural changes

  20. Influence of laboratory annealing on tensile properties and design stress intensity limits for Type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, V.K.; Booker, M.K.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of reannealing (laboratory annealing) on yield and ultimate tensile strength values of 19 heats of type 304 stainless steel was determined. Most heats were reannealed at 1065 0 C for 0.5 hr. The reannealed properties were used to determine the influence of reannealing on time-independent design stress intensity limits (S/sub m/). The major findings are as follows: 1. Reannealing lowered the 0.2 percent yield strength versus temperature curve by approximately 42 MPa over the range from room temperature to 649 0 C. 2. The estimated S/sub m/ values for reannealed material were 24 to 28 MPa lower than the current code values. 3. Reannealing appears to influence the S/sub m/ value sufficiently to warrant the consideration of separate values of S/sub m/ in Sect. III of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and Code Case 1592 for ''as-received'' and reannealed material

  1. Laser, tungsten inert gas, and metal active gas welding of DP780 steel: Comparison of hardness, tensile properties and fatigue resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Park, Sung Hyuk; Kwon, Hyuk Sun; Kim, Gyo Sung; Lee, Chong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We report the mechanical properties of DP780 steel welded by three methods. • The size of the welded zone increases with heat input (MAG > TIG > laser). • The hardness of the welded zone increases with cooling rate (laser > TIG > MAG). • Tensile and fatigue properties are strongly dependent on welding method. • Crack initiation sites depend on the microstructural features of the welded zone. - Abstract: The microstructural characteristics, tensile properties and low-cycle fatigue properties of a dual-phase steel (DP780) were investigated following its joining by three methods: laser welding, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and metal active gas (MAG) welding. Through this, it was found that the size of the welded zone increases with greater heat input (MAG > TIG > laser), whereas the hardness of the weld metal (WM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) increases with cooling rate (laser > TIG > MAG). Consequently, laser- and TIG-welded steels exhibit higher yield strength than the base metal due to a substantially harder WM. In contrast, the strength of MAG-welded steel is reduced by a broad and soft WM and HAZ. The fatigue life of laser-and TIG-welded steel was similar, with both being greater than that of MAG-welded steel; however, the fatigue resistance of all welds was inferior to that of the non-welded base metal. Finally, crack initiation sites were found to differ depending on the microstructural characteristics of the welded zone, as well as the tensile and cyclic loading

  2. Bond behavior of reinforcing steel in ultra-high performance concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) is a relatively new class of advanced cementitious composite : materials, which exhibits high compressive [above 21.7 ksi (150 MPa)] and tensile [above 0.72 ksi (5 MPa)] : strengths. The discrete steel fiber rei...

  3. Tensile properties of irradiated and fatigue exposed stainless steel DIN X 6 CrNi 1811 (similar to AISI type 304) plate and welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, M.I. de; Schaaf, B. van der; Elen, J.D.

    1979-10-01

    Test specimens of plate metal and welded joints of stainless steel DIN 1.4948, which is similar to AISI type 304, have been irradiated at 723 K and 823 K up to fluences of 1.10 23 n.m -2 and 5.10 24 n.m -2 (E > 0.1 MeV). These are representative conditions for the SNR-300 reactor vessel and inner components after 16 years of operation. High-rate (depsilon/dt = 1 s -1 ) tensile tests were performed after fatigue exposure up to various fractions of fatigue life (D) ranging from 5% to 95% at the same temperatures as the nominal temperatures of the irradiation series

  4. Self-consistent modelling of lattice strains during the in-situ tensile loading of twinning induced plasticity steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Pereloma, Elena V.; Clausen, Bjørn; Brown, Donald W.; Tomé, Carlos N.; Gazder, Azdiar A.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of lattice strains in a fully recrystallised Fe–24Mn–3Al–2Si–1Ni–0.06C TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steel subjected to uniaxial tensile loading up to a true strain of ∼35% was investigated via in-situ neutron diffraction. Typical of fcc elastic and plastic anisotropy, the {111} and {200} grain families record the lowest and highest lattice strains, respectively. Using modelling cases with and without latent hardening, the recently extended Elasto-Plastic Self-Consistent model successfully predicted the macroscopic stress–strain response, the evolution of lattice strains and the development of crystallographic texture. Compared to the isotropic hardening case, latent hardening did not have a significant effect on lattice strains and returned a relatively faster development of a stronger 〈111〉 and a weaker 〈100〉 double fibre parallel to the tensile axis. Close correspondence between the experimental lattice strains and those predicted using particular orientations embedded within a random aggregate was obtained. The result suggests that the exact orientations of the surrounding aggregate have a weak influence on the lattice strain evolution

  5. Tensile and impact behaviour of BATMAN II steels, Ti-bearing reduced activation martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchioni, G.; Casagrande, E.; De Angelis, U.; De Santis, G.; Ferrara, D.; Pilloni, L.

    Two series of Reduced Activation Ferrous alloys (RAF) have been produced and studied by Casaccia's Laboratories. These martensitic alloys are named BATMAN steels. They are among the few presently developed RAF materials to exploit Ti as a carbide forming and grain size stabilizing element instead of Ta. In this work their mechanical properties are illustrated.

  6. Experimental investigation on FRP to steel adhesively-bonded joint under tensile loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, X.; Kolstein, M.H.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Due to various advantages of Fibre-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) decks, the FRP to steel composite girder system is being increasingly used in the construction of new bridges as well as the rehabilitation projects of old bridges. This paper focus on the mechanical behaviors and failure modes of the

  7. Elastic interaction between twins during tensile deformation of austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nicolai Ytterdal; Winther, Grethe; Dale, Darren

    2016-01-01

    . However, the components of the Type II stress normal to the twin boundary plane exhibit the same large variations as for the grain boundaries. Elastic grain interactions are therefore complex and must involve the entire set of neighbouring grains. The elastic-regime stress along the tensile direction......In austenite, the twin boundary normal is a common elastically stiff direction shared by the two twins, which may induce special interactions. By means of three-dimensional X-ray diffraction this elastic interaction has been analysed and compared to grains separated by conventional grain boundaries...

  8. Mechanical Performance of Ferritic Martensitic Steels for High Dose Applications in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered for core applications and pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors as well as first walls and blankets for fusion reactors. There are significant scientific data on testing and industrial experience in making this class of alloys worldwide. This experience makes F/M steels an attractive candidate. In this article, tensile behavior, fracture toughness and impact property, and creep behavior of the F/M steels under neutron irradiations to high doses with a focus on high Cr content (8 to 12) are reviewed. Tensile properties are very sensitive to irradiation temperature. Increase in yield and tensile strength (hardening) is accompanied with a loss of ductility and starts at very low doses under irradiation. The degradation of mechanical properties is most pronounced at martensitic steels exhibit a high fracture toughness after irradiation at all temperatures even below 673 K (400 °C), except when tested at room temperature after irradiations below 673 K (400 °C), which shows a significant reduction in fracture toughness. Creep studies showed that for the range of expected stresses in a reactor environment, the stress exponent is expected to be approximately one and the steady state creep rate in the absence of swelling is usually better than austenitic stainless steels both in terms of the creep rate and the temperature sensitivity of creep. In short, F/M steels show excellent promise for high dose applications in nuclear reactors.

  9. The influences of impurity content, tensile strength, and grain size on in-service temper embrittlement of CrMoV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheruvu, N.S.; Seth, B.B.

    1989-01-01

    The influences of impurity levels, grain size, and tensile strength on in-service temper embrittlement of CrMoV steels have been investigated. The samples for this study were taken from steam turbine CrMoV rotors which had operated for 15 to 26 years. The effects of grain size and tensile strength on embrittlement susceptibility were separated by evaluating the embrittlement behavior of two rotor forgings made from the same ingot after an extended step-cooling treatment. Among the residual elements in the steels, only P produces a significant embrittlement. The variation of P and tensile strength has no effect on in-service temper embrittlement susceptibility, as measured by the shift in fracture appearance transition temperature (FATT). However, the prior austenite grain size plays a major role in service embrittlement. The fine grain steels with a grain size of ASTM No. 9 or higher are virtually immune to in-service embrittlement. In steels having duplex grain sizes, embrittlement susceptibility is controlled by the size of coarser grains. For a given steel chemistry, the coarse grain steel is more susceptible to in-service embrittlement, and a decrease in ASTM grain size number from 4 to 0/1 increases the shift in FATT by 61 degrees C (10/10 degrees F). It is demonstrated that long-term service embrittlement can be simulated, except in very coarse grain steels, by using the extended step-cooling treatment. The results of step-cooling studies show that the coarse grain rotor steels take longer time during service to reach a fully embrittled state than the fine grain rotor steels

  10. Investigation of the Microstructure Evolution in a Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C Steel via In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction during a Tensile Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Song, Wenwen; Bleck, Wolfgang

    2017-09-25

    The quantitative characterization of the microstructure evolution in high-Mn steel during deformation is of great importance to understanding its strain-hardening behavior. In the current study, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was employed to characterize the microstructure evolution in a Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C steel during a tensile test. The microstructure at different engineering strain levels-in terms of ε-martensite and α'-martensite volume fractions, the stacking fault probability, and the twin fault probability-was analyzed by the Rietveld refinement method. The Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C steel exhibits a high ultimate tensile strength with a superior uniform elongation and a high strain-hardening rate. The remaining high strain-hardening rate at the strain level about 0.025 to 0.35 results from ε-martensite dominant transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) effect. The increase in the strain-hardening rate at the strain level around 0.35 to 0.43 is attributed to the synergetic α'-martensite dominant TRIP and twinning-induced-plasticity (TWIP) effects. An evaluation of the stacking fault energy (SFE) of the Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C steel by the synchrotron measurements shows good agreement with the thermodynamic calculation of the SFE.

  11. Interpretation of quasi-static and dynamic tensile behavior by digital image correlation technique in TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) and low-carbon steel sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Minju; Park, Jaeyeong; Sohn, Seok Su; Kim, Hyoung Seop [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nack J. [Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sunghak, E-mail: shlee@postech.ac.kr [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-02

    In this study, dynamic tensile tests were conducted on TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) and low-carbon (LC) steel sheets at a strain rate of 1500–2000/s by using a split Hopkinson tensile bar, and deformation mechanisms related with improvement of dynamic tensile properties were investigated by a digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The dynamic tensile strength was higher than the quasi-static tensile strength in both TWIP and LC sheets, while the dynamic elongation was same to the quasi-static elongation in the TWIP sheet and was much lower than the quasi-static elongation in the LC sheet. According to the DIC results of the dynamically tensioned TWIP sheet, the homogeneous deformation occurred before the necking at the strain of 47.4%. This indicated that the dynamic deformation processes were almost similar to the quasi-static ones as the TWIP sheet was homogeneously deformed in the initial and intermediate deformation stages. This could be explained by deformation mechanisms including twinning, in consideration of favorable effect of increased twinning on tensile properties under the dynamic loading. On the other hand, the dynamically tensioned LC sheet was rapidly deformed and fractured as the necking was intensified in a narrow strain-concentrated region. The present DIC technique is an outstanding method for detailed dynamic deformation analyses, and provides an important idea for practical safety analyses of automotive steel sheets.

  12. On high temperature strength of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Manabu; Kanero, Takahiro; Ihara, Yoshihito

    1977-01-01

    In the steels for high temperature use, the oxidation resistance is regarded as important, but carbon steels show enough oxidation resistance to be used continuously at the temperature up to 500 deg. C if the strength is left out of consideration, and up to 450 deg. C even when the strength is taken into account. Moreover, the production is easy, the workability and weldability are good, and the price is cheap in carbon steels as compared with alloy steels. In the boilers for large thermal power stations, 0.15-0.30% C steels are used for reheater tubes, main feed water tubes, steam headers, wall water tubes, economizer tubes, bypass pipings and others, and they account for 70% of all steel materials used for the boilers of 350 MW class and 30% in 1000 MW class. The JIS standard for the carbon steels for high temperature use and the related standards in foreign countries are shown. The high temperature strength of carbon steels changes according to the trace elements, melting and heat treatment as well as the main compositions of C, Si and Mn. Al and N affect the high temperature strength largely. The characteristics of carbon steels after the heating for hours, the factors controlling the microstructure and high temperature strength, and the measures to improve the high temperature strength of carbon steels are explained. (Kako, I.)

  13. The effect of equal channel angular pressing on the tensile properties and microstructure of two medical implant materials: ASTM F-138 austenitic steel and Grade 2 titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes Filho, A. de A.; Sordi, V. L.; Kliauga, A. M.; Ferrante, M.

    2010-07-01

    Titanium and F-138 stainless steel are employed in bone replacement and repair. The former material was ECAP-deformed at room temperature and at 300°C, followed in some cases by cold rolling. The steel was ECAP-deformed at room temperature only. Work-hardening behavior was studied by making use of the Kocks-mecking plots and microstructural evolution was followed by TEM. Conclusions show that for Ti, ECAP combined with cold rolling gives the best strength-ductility combination, whilst room temperature ECAP increases the tensile strength of the steel but caused substantial ductility loss.

  14. The effect of equal channel angular pressing on the tensile properties and microstructure of two medical implant materials: ASTM F-138 austenitic steel and Grade 2 titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filho, A de A Mendes; Sordi, V L; Kliauga, A M; Ferrante, M, E-mail: ferrante@ufscar.b [Federal University of Sao Carlos, Materials Engineering Department, Sao Carlos, 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Titanium and F-138 stainless steel are employed in bone replacement and repair. The former material was ECAP-deformed at room temperature and at 300{sup 0}C, followed in some cases by cold rolling. The steel was ECAP-deformed at room temperature only. Work-hardening behavior was studied by making use of the Kocks-mecking plots and microstructural evolution was followed by TEM. Conclusions show that for Ti, ECAP combined with cold rolling gives the best strength-ductility combination, whilst room temperature ECAP increases the tensile strength of the steel but caused substantial ductility loss.

  15. High temperature damage of a re-sulfurized stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinet, Hougo

    2002-01-01

    After having evoked the industrial problem raised by high-temperature damage in the 303 stainless steel, and outlined that the experimental study of high-temperature damage implies the study of the sane (or non damaged) material, the study of micro-voids germination, growth and coalescence, and the study of the material failure process, the author of this research thesis reports a bibliographical study on the behaviour of sane re-sulfurized stainless steel and different damage models. He presents experimental techniques (thermal-mechanical compression and tensile tests, image analysis in optical microscopy) which have been used in this work, and describes and comments results obtained on axisymmetric samples for micro-void germination, growth and coalescence in case of a damage under low and medium stress triaxiality. The last part addresses the study of the damage of strongly notched samples (stress triaxialities close to those existing at the crack bottom) [fr

  16. The Statistical Analysis of Relation between Compressive and Tensile/Flexural Strength of High Performance Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kępniak M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the tensile and flexural strength of HPC (high performance concrete. The aim of the paper is to analyse the efficiency of models proposed in different codes. In particular, three design procedures from: the ACI 318 [1], Eurocode 2 [2] and the Model Code 2010 [3] are considered. The associations between design tensile strength of concrete obtained from these three codes and compressive strength are compared with experimental results of tensile strength and flexural strength by statistical tools. Experimental results of tensile strength were obtained in the splitting test. Based on this comparison, conclusions are drawn according to the fit between the design methods and the test data. The comparison shows that tensile strength and flexural strength of HPC depend on more influential factors and not only compressive strength.

  17. Micro-scale measurements of plastic strain field, and local contributions of slip and twinning in TWIP steels during in situ tensile tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, H.K. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Laboratoire de Mécanique des Solides, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR7649, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Doquet, V., E-mail: doquet@lms.polytechnique.fr [Laboratoire de Mécanique des Solides, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR7649, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Zhang, Z.F. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2016-08-30

    In-situ tensile tests were carried out on Fe22Mn0.6C and Fe22Mn0.6C3Al (wt%) twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steels specimens covered with gold micro-grids. High resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were periodically captured. The latter were used for measurements of the plastic strain field, using digital image correlation (DIC). Although no meso-scale localization bands appeared, some areas were deformed three times more than average. Plastic deformation inside the grains was more heterogeneous in Fe22Mn0.6C, but at meso-scale, the degree of strain heterogeneity was not higher, at least up to 12% strain. Plastic deformation started from grain boundaries or annealing twin boundaries in both materials, due to a high elastic anisotropy of the grains. An original method based on DIC was developed to estimate the twin fraction in grains that exhibit a single set of slip/twin bands. Deformation twinning accommodated 60–80% of the plastic strain in some favorably oriented grains, from the onset of plastic flow in Fe22Mn0.6C, but was not observed in the Al-bearing steel until 12% strain. The back stress was important in both materials, but significantly higher in Fe22Mn0.6C.

  18. Micro-scale measurements of plastic strain field, and local contributions of slip and twinning in TWIP steels during in situ tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.K.; Doquet, V.; Zhang, Z.F.

    2016-01-01

    In-situ tensile tests were carried out on Fe22Mn0.6C and Fe22Mn0.6C3Al (wt%) twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steels specimens covered with gold micro-grids. High resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were periodically captured. The latter were used for measurements of the plastic strain field, using digital image correlation (DIC). Although no meso-scale localization bands appeared, some areas were deformed three times more than average. Plastic deformation inside the grains was more heterogeneous in Fe22Mn0.6C, but at meso-scale, the degree of strain heterogeneity was not higher, at least up to 12% strain. Plastic deformation started from grain boundaries or annealing twin boundaries in both materials, due to a high elastic anisotropy of the grains. An original method based on DIC was developed to estimate the twin fraction in grains that exhibit a single set of slip/twin bands. Deformation twinning accommodated 60–80% of the plastic strain in some favorably oriented grains, from the onset of plastic flow in Fe22Mn0.6C, but was not observed in the Al-bearing steel until 12% strain. The back stress was important in both materials, but significantly higher in Fe22Mn0.6C.

  19. Phase stability of high manganese austenitic steels for cryogenic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, K

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the austenitic stability against a' martensitic transformation of three non-magnetic austenitic steels : a new stainless steel X2CrMnNiMoN 19-12-11-1 grade, a traditional X8CrMnNiN 19-11-6 grade and a high manganese X8MnCrNi 28-7-1 grade. Measurements of relative magnetic susceptibility at room temperature are performed on strained tensile specimens at 4.2 K. A special extensometer for high precision strain measurements at low temperature has been developed at CERN to test specimens up to various levels of plastic strain. Moreover, the high precision strain recording of the extensometer enables a detailed study of the serrated yield phenomena associated with 4.2 K tensile testing and their influence on the evolution of magnetic susceptibility. The results show that high Mn contents increase the stability of the austenitic structure against a' martensitic transformation, while keeping high strength at cryogenic temperature. Moreover, proper elaboration through primary and possi...

  20. The High Temperature Tensile and Creep Behaviors of High Entropy Superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Te-Kang; Yeh, An-Chou; Kuo, Chen-Ming; Kakehi, Koji; Murakami, Hideyuki; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Jian, Sheng-Rui

    2017-10-04

    This article presents the high temperature tensile and creep behaviors of a novel high entropy alloy (HEA). The microstructure of this HEA resembles that of advanced superalloys with a high entropy FCC matrix and L1 2 ordered precipitates, so it is also named as "high entropy superalloy (HESA)". The tensile yield strengths of HESA surpass those of the reported HEAs from room temperature to elevated temperatures; furthermore, its creep resistance at 982 °C can be compared to those of some Ni-based superalloys. Analysis on experimental results indicate that HESA could be strengthened by the low stacking-fault energy of the matrix, high anti-phase boundary energy of the strengthening precipitate, and thermally stable microstructure. Positive misfit between FCC matrix and precipitate has yielded parallel raft microstructure during creep at 982 °C, and the creep curves of HESA were dominated by tertiary creep behavior. To the best of authors' knowledge, this article is the first to present the elevated temperature tensile creep study on full scale specimens of a high entropy alloy, and the potential of HESA for high temperature structural application is discussed.

  1. Development of a new ultrafine grained dual phase steel and examination of the effect of grain size on tensile deformation behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidi, N., E-mail: navidsae@gmail.com; Ashrafizadeh, F.; Niroumand, B.

    2014-04-01

    Ultrafine grained dual phase (DP) steels are among the newest grades of DP steels that incorporate the uniform distribution of fine martensite particles (in the order of 1–2 μm) within a ferrite matrix. These new grades of steels have been developed in response to the world's demand for decreasing the fuel consumption in automobiles by increasing the strength to weight ratio. In the present research, a new kind of ultrafine grained DP (UFG-DP) steel with an average grain size of about 2 μm as well as a coarse grained DP (CG-DP) steel with an average grain size of about 5.4 μm was produced by consecutive intercritical annealing and cold rolling of low carbon AISI 8620 steel. The martensite volume fraction for both microstructures was the same and about 50 percent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microstructural examination and room temperature tensile deformation analyses were performed on both UFG-DP and CG-DP steels and their deformation behavior in terms of strength, elongation and strain hardening was studied and compared. Room-temperature uniaxial tensile tests revealed that for a given martensite volume fraction, yield and tensile strengths were not very sensitive to martensite morphology. However, uniform and total elongation values were noticeably affected by refining martensite particles. The higher plasticity of fine martensite particles as well as the more uniform strain distribution within the UFG-DP microstructure resulted in higher strain hardenability and, finally, the higher ductility of the UFG-DP steel.

  2. Advanced high strength steels for automotive industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, J.; Samek, L.; Verleysen, P.; Verbeken, K.; Houbert, Y.

    2012-11-01

    The car industry is facing pressure because of the growing demand for more fuel-efficient passenger cars. In order to limit energy consumption and air pollution the weight of the car body has to be reduced. At the same time, high levels of safety have to be guaranteed. In this situation, the choice of material becomes a key decision in car design. As a response to the requirements of the automotive sector, high strength steels and advanced high strength steels have been developed by the steel industry. These modern steel grades offer an excellent balance of low cost, light weight and mechanical properties. (Author) 48 refs.

  3. High Cr ODS steels R and D for high burnup fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, A.; Kasada, R.; Kishimoto, H.; Iwata, N.; Cho, H.-S.; Toda, N.; Yutani, K.; Ukai, S.; Fujiwara, M.

    2007-01-01

    High-performance cladding materials is essential to realize highly efficient and high-burnup operation over 150 GWd/t of so called Generation IV nuclear energy systems, such as supercritical-water-cooled reactor (SCWR) and lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR). Oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) ferritic/ martensitic steels, which contain 9-12%Cr, show rather high resistance to neutron irradiation embrittlement and high strength at elevated temperatures. However, their corrosion resistance is not good enough in SCW and in lead at high temperatures. High-Cr ODS steels have been developed to improve corrosion resistance. An increase in Cr content an addition resulted in a drastic improvement of corrosion resistance in SCW and in lead. On the contrary, high-Cr steels often show an enhancement of aging embrittlement as well as irradiation embrittlement. Anisotropy in tensile properties is another issue. In order to overwhelm these issues, surveillance tests of the material performance have been performed for high Cr-ODS steels produced by new processing technologies. It is demonstrated that the dispersion of nono-sized oxide particles in high density is effective to attain high-performance and high-Cr ODS steels have a high potential as fuel cladding materials for SCWR and LFR with high efficiency and high burnup. (authors)

  4. Phase transformation and mechanical behavior of thermomechanically controlled processed high strength ordnance steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.S.; Ghosh, S.K.; Kundu, S.; Chatterjee, S.

    2013-01-01

    A new low carbon titanium and niobium microalloyed steel has been thermomechanically processed in a pilot plant unit. Phase transformation phenomenon of the above steel during continuous cooling has been assessed. Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties has also been studied at different finish rolling temperatures. A mixture of intragranular ferrite with granular bainite and bainitic ferrite along with inter-lath and intra-lath precipitation of (Ti, Nb)CN particles are the characteristic microstructural feature of air cooled steel. However, mixture of lower bainite and lath martensitic structure along with similar type (Ti, Nb)CN precipitate is observed in water quenched steel. High yield strength (896–948 MPa) with high tensile strength (974–1013 MPa) has been achieved with moderate ductility (16–17%) for the selected range of finish rolling temperature for air cooled steel. However, the water quenched steel yields higher yield strength (1240–1260 MPa) as well as higher tensile strength (1270–1285 MPa) but with lower ductility (13–14%) for the selected range of finish rolling temperature. Fairly good impact toughness values in the range of 50–89 J are obtained for the air cooled steel which are marginally higher than those of water quenched steel (42–81 J). - Highlights: ► New high strength steel has been processed in a pilot plant scale. ► Primarily granular bainite and bainitic ferrite are obtained in air cooled steel. ► Mixture of lower bainite and lath martensite is obtained in water quenched steel. ► (Ti, Nb)CN precipitate is obtained for both air cooled and water quenched steels. ► Highest strength with reasonable ductility has been achieved after water quenching

  5. Phase transformation and mechanical behavior of thermomechanically controlled processed high strength ordnance steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.S. [Ordnance Development Centre, Metal and Steel Factory, Ishapore 743 144 (India); Ghosh, S.K., E-mail: skghosh@metal.becs.ac.in [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711 103 (India); Kundu, S.; Chatterjee, S. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711 103 (India)

    2013-02-15

    A new low carbon titanium and niobium microalloyed steel has been thermomechanically processed in a pilot plant unit. Phase transformation phenomenon of the above steel during continuous cooling has been assessed. Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties has also been studied at different finish rolling temperatures. A mixture of intragranular ferrite with granular bainite and bainitic ferrite along with inter-lath and intra-lath precipitation of (Ti, Nb)CN particles are the characteristic microstructural feature of air cooled steel. However, mixture of lower bainite and lath martensitic structure along with similar type (Ti, Nb)CN precipitate is observed in water quenched steel. High yield strength (896–948 MPa) with high tensile strength (974–1013 MPa) has been achieved with moderate ductility (16–17%) for the selected range of finish rolling temperature for air cooled steel. However, the water quenched steel yields higher yield strength (1240–1260 MPa) as well as higher tensile strength (1270–1285 MPa) but with lower ductility (13–14%) for the selected range of finish rolling temperature. Fairly good impact toughness values in the range of 50–89 J are obtained for the air cooled steel which are marginally higher than those of water quenched steel (42–81 J). - Highlights: ► New high strength steel has been processed in a pilot plant scale. ► Primarily granular bainite and bainitic ferrite are obtained in air cooled steel. ► Mixture of lower bainite and lath martensite is obtained in water quenched steel. ► (Ti, Nb)CN precipitate is obtained for both air cooled and water quenched steels. ► Highest strength with reasonable ductility has been achieved after water quenching.

  6. Tensile strength and creep behaviour of austenitic stainless steel type 18Cr - 12Ni with niobium additions at 700{sup 0}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sordi, V L; Bueno, L O, E-mail: sordi@ufscar.b [Federal University of Sao Carlos, Materials Engineering Department, Sao Carlos (SP), 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The effect of niobium additions up to 2.36 wt% on the creep behavior of a series of seven extra low carbon 18Cr-12Ni austenitic stainless steels at 700{sup 0}C has been investigated. Grain size and hardness measurements, hot tensile tests and constant stress creep tests from 90 to 180 MPa were carried out for each alloy, in the solution treated condition at 1050, 1200 and 1300{sup 0}C followed by quench in water. The mechanical behavior at high temperature was related to the amount of NbC precipitation occurring during the tests. Solid solution and intermetallic compound effects were also considered. Creep data analysis was done to determine the parameters of the creep power-law equation {epsilon}-dot = A.{sigma}{sup n} and the Monkman-Grant relation {epsilon}-dot .t{sup m}{sub R} = K. Niobium-carbide precipitation in these steels reduces the secondary stage dependence of strain rate with applied stress, resulting in n-values which indicate the possibility of operation of various creep mechanisms. The creep strength during the secondary stage is primarily controlled by the amount of NbC available for precipitation. However, the rupture times increase progressively with niobium content, as the amount of undissolved carbide particles in grain boundaries and the Laves phase precipitation increase.

  7. Tensile strength and creep behaviour of austenitic stainless steel type 18Cr - 12Ni with niobium additions at 700°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordi, V. L.; Bueno, L. O.

    2010-07-01

    The effect of niobium additions up to 2.36 wt% on the creep behavior of a series of seven extra low carbon 18Cr-12Ni austenitic stainless steels at 700°C has been investigated. Grain size and hardness measurements, hot tensile tests and constant stress creep tests from 90 to 180 MPa were carried out for each alloy, in the solution treated condition at 1050, 1200 and 1300°C followed by quench in water. The mechanical behavior at high temperature was related to the amount of NbC precipitation occurring during the tests. Solid solution and intermetallic compound effects were also considered. Creep data analysis was done to determine the parameters of the creep power-law equation dot epsilon = A.σn and the Monkman-Grant relation dot epsilon.tmR = K. Niobium-carbide precipitation in these steels reduces the secondary stage dependence of strain rate with applied stress, resulting in n-values which indicate the possibility of operation of various creep mechanisms. The creep strength during the secondary stage is primarily controlled by the amount of NbC available for precipitation. However, the rupture times increase progressively with niobium content, as the amount of undissolved carbide particles in grain boundaries and the Laves phase precipitation increase.

  8. Experimental Investigation into Corrosion Effect on Mechanical Properties of High Strength Steel Bars under Dynamic Loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The tensile behaviors of corroded steel bars are important in the capacity evaluation of corroded reinforced concrete structures. The present paper studies the mechanical behavior of the corroded high strength reinforcing steel bars under static and dynamic loading. High strength reinforcing steel bars were corroded by using accelerated corrosion methods and the tensile tests were carried out under different strain rates. The results showed that the mechanical properties of corroded high strength steel bars were strain rate dependent, and the strain rate effect decreased with the increase of corrosion degree. The decreased nominal yield and ultimate strengths were mainly caused by the reduction of cross-sectional areas, and the decreased ultimate deformation and the shortened yield plateau resulted from the intensified stress concentration at the nonuniform reduction. Based on the test results, reduction factors were proposed to relate the tensile behaviors with the corrosion degree and strain rate for corroded bars. A modified Johnson-Cook strength model of corroded high strength steel bars under dynamic loading was proposed by taking into account the influence of corrosion degree. Comparison between the model and test results showed that proposed model properly describes the dynamic response of the corroded high strength rebars.

  9. Influence of dynamic strain ageing on tensile strain energy of type 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaac Samuel, B.; Choudhary, B.K.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2010-01-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on type 316 L(N) stainless steel over a wide temperature range of 300-1123 K employing strain rates ranging from 3.16 X 10 -5 to 3.16 X 10 -3/s . The variation of strain energy in terms of modulus of resilience and modulus of toughness over the wide range of temperatures and strain rates were examined. The variation in modulus of resilience with temperature and strain rate did not show the signatures of dynamic strain ageing (DSA). However, the modulus of toughness exhibited a plateau at the intermediate temperatures of 523-1023 K. Further, the distribution of energy absorbed till necking and energy absorbed from necking till fracture were found to characterise the deformation and damage processes, respectively, and exhibited anomalous variations in the temperature range 523-823 K and 823-1023 K, respectively. In addition to the observed manifestations of DSA such as serrated load-elongation curve, peaks/plateaus in flow stress, ultimate tensile strength and work hardening rate, negative strain rate sensitivity and ductility minima, the observed anomalous variations in modulus of toughness at intermediate temperatures (523-1023 K) can be regarded as yet another key manifestation of DSA. At temperatures above 1023 K, a sharp decrease in the modulus of toughness and also in the strain energies up to necking and from necking to fracture observed, with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate, reveal the onset of dynamic recovery leading to early cross slip and climb processes. (author)

  10. Tensile properties and impact toughness of S30408 stainless steel and its welded joints at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Huiming; Wu, Yingzhe; Lu, Qunjie; Xu, Ping; Zheng, Jinyang; Wei, Lijun

    2018-06-01

    Designing a cryogenic pressure vessel based on the mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steel (ASS) at its cryogenic operating temperature fully utilizes the potential of the material at low temperatures, resulting in lightweight and compact products. A series of tensile tests and impact tests were carried out in a wide range of 77-293 K, to investigate the mechanical properties of S30408 base metal (BM) and welded joints (WJ) at cryogenic temperatures. As the temperature decreases, yield stress (Rp0.2) and ultimate tensile stress (Rm) increase significantly thanks to the low-temperature strengthening effects. To estimate strengths at cryogenic temperatures, quadratic polynomial model was used to accurately predict the variations of Rp0.2 and Rm from 77 K to 293 K. As an important phase in the WJ, ferrite presents a radial pattern and an inhomogeneity in the WJ's cross-section. Due to the formation of ferrite in the WJ, the WJ has higher Rp0.2 and lower Rm , Charpy absorbed energy and lateral expansion compared with the BM. Strain-induced martensite transformation is an important role influencing the deformation of ASS at low temperatures. In this study, less martensite amount was measured in the weldment zone with higher Nickel equivalents which stabilize the austenite phase at cryogenic temperatures. Additionally, due to higher ferrite content and more precipitates forming, the SAW joints has lower Rm and impact toughness than PAW + GTAW joints. To ensure the structural integrity and safety, the PAW + GTAW method should be chosen and ferrite content be controlled.

  11. Investigations on the tensile strength of high performance concrete incorporating silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanu Bhanja; Bratish Sengupta

    2005-01-01

    Though the literature is rich in reporting on silica fume concrete the technical data on tensile strength is quite limited. The present paper is directed towards developing a better understanding on the isolated contribution of silica fume on the tensile strengths of High Performance Concrete. Extensive experimentation was carried out over water-binder ratios ranging from 0.26 to 0.42 and silica fume binder ratios from 0.0 to 0.3. For all the mixes compressive, flexural and split tensile strengths were determined at 28 days. The results of the present investigation indicate that silica fume incorporation results in significant improvements in the tensile strengths of concrete. It is also observed that the optimum replacement percentage, which led to maximization of strength, is not a constant one but depends on the water- cementitious material ratio of the mix. Compared to split tensile strengths, flexural strengths have exhibited greater percentage gains in strength. Increase in split tensile strength beyond 15% silica fume replacement is almost insignificant whereas sizeable gains in flexural tensile strength have occurred even up to 25% replacements. For the present investigation transgranular failure of concrete was observed which indicate that silica fume incorporation results in significant improvements in the strength of both paste and transition zone. (authors)

  12. Evaluation of impacts of stress triaxiality on plastic deformability of RAFM steel using various types of tensile specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Taichiro, E-mail: kato.taichiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166, Obuchi-omotedate, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ohata, Mitsuru [Osaka University, 2-1, Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nogami, Shuhei [Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2, Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166, Obuchi-omotedate, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The fracture ductility is lower as the stress triaxiality is higher. • Voids of the interrupted RB1 specimen were observed along grain boundaries and expanded parallel to the tensile axis. • Voids of interrupted R0.2 specimen were rounded shape than those of RB1. • The fracture surface of specimens were observed the elongated and the equiaxed dimples. • The decrease of plastic deformability of the notched specimen was caused by the process of voids formation and crack growth due to the effect of plastic constraint of the notch. - Abstract: A case study on a fusion blanket design such as DEMO indicated that there could be some sections with high stress triaxiality, a parameter to evaluate the magnitude of plastic constraint, in the case of plasma disruption or coolant loss accident. Therefore, it is necessary to accurately understand the ductility loss limit of structural material in order to conduct the structural design assessment of the irradiated and embrittled fusion reactor blanket. Tensile tests were conducted by using three kinds of tensile specimen shapes to investigate of the plastic deformability of F82H. From the results, the fracture ductility is lower as the stress triaxiality is higher. Voids of the interrupted RB1 specimen were observed along grain boundaries and expanded parallel to the tensile axis. That of interrupted R0.2 specimen was rounded shape compared with those of RB1. The fracture surface of RB1 and R0.2 specimens were observed the elongated dimples and the equiaxed dimples without so much elongation, respectively. It is considered that the decrease of plastic deformability for the notched specimen was caused by the process of voids formation and crack growth due to the effect of plastic constraint of the notch.

  13. Effects of mean tensile stresses on high-cycle fatigue life and strain accumulation in some reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.; Chow, J.G.Y.

    1977-05-01

    An assessment has been made of the effects of mean tensile stresses on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of solution-treated Type 304 stainless steel, normalized and tempered 2 1 / 4 Cr-1Mo steel, Incoloy-800H, and low-carbon Incoloy-800. Mean stresses are usually detrimental to fatigue strength, especially at high temperatures and stress levels, where significant creep can occur during fatigue cycling. Depending on the magnitudes of the alternating and mean stresses, failure may be creep or fatigue controlled. Strain accumulation is also affected by these stress levels and possibly, also, by the cyclic work-hardening characteristics of the material. It is shown that the Goodman Law for estimating mean stress effects is inadequate, since it does not account for time-dependent deformation. An alternative expression not having such a limitation was, therefore, derived and this relates the alternating and mean stresses to the time to failure. Based on limited metallographic observations of fatigue striations in the 2 1 / 4 Cr-1Mo steel an estimate was made of the crack propagation rate. It was found that a crack of critical size could, under certain conditions, propagate through most of the specimen diameter in a matter of seconds. This presents a more significant safety problem than the case for a crack extending under low-cycle conditions since preventative measures probably could not be implemented before the crack had grown to a large size

  14. The effect of a single tensile overload on stress corrosion cracking growth of stainless steel in a light water reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue He; Li Zhijun; Lu Zhanpeng; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The affect of a single tensile overload on SCC growth rate is investigated. → A single tensile overload would produce a residual plastic strain in the SCC tip. → The residual plastic strain would decrease the plastic strain rate in the SCC tip. → A single tensile overload would cause crack growth rate retardation in the SCC tip. → SCC growth rate in the quasi-stationary crack tip is relatively lower. - Abstract: It has been found that a single tensile overload applied during constant load amplitude might cause crack growth rate retardation in various crack propagating experiments which include fatigue test and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) test. To understand the affecting mechanism of a single tensile overload on SCC growth rate of stainless steel or nickel base alloy in light water reactor environment, based on elastic-plastic finite element method (EPFEM), the residual plastic strain in both tips of stationary and growing crack of contoured double cantilever beam (CDCB) specimen was simulated and analyzed in this study. The results of this investigation demonstrate that a residual plastic strain in the region immediately ahead of the crack tips will be produced when a single tensile overload is applied, and the residual plastic strain will decrease the plastic strain rate level in the growing crack tip, which will causes crack growth rate retardation in the tip of SCC.

  15. Tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of a Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaprasad, P.V.; Venugopal, S.; Venkadesan, S.

    1997-01-01

    The flow-stress data of a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel in the temperature range 300 to 1,023 K was analyzed in terms of Ludwigson and Voce equations. The parameters of these equations were critically examined with respect to the effect of Ti/C ratio and test temperature. It was found that the Ludwigson equation described the flow behavior adequately up to the test temperature of 923 K, whereas the Voce equation could be employed in the full temperature range. The peaks/plateaus observed in the variation of these parameters as a function of temperature in the intermediate temperature range have been identified as one of the manifestations of dynamic strain aging (DSA). Also, the variation of these parameters with temperature clearly could bring out the different domains of DSA observed in this alloy. The work-hardening analysis of the flow-stress data revealed that in the DSA regime, the onset of stage III hardening is athermal

  16. High-strength maraging steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grachev, S.V.; Shejn, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of data on technological and operation properties of maraging steels on Fe-Cr-Ni, Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr-Co-Mo bases is given. Their advantages and drawbacks are pointed out. The scheme of strengthening heat treatment is considered. The fields of the most effective application of maraging steels for instance, for products operating under conditions of low-cycle and shock cyclic loading are mentioned

  17. Effects of microstructures on hydrogen induced cracking of electrochemically hydrogenated double notched tensile sample of 4340 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sk, Mobbassar Hassan, E-mail: Skmobba@qu.edu.qa [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Overfelt, Ruel A. [Materials Research and Education Center, Materials Engineer, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Abdullah, Aboubakr M. [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar)

    2016-04-06

    Quantitative fractographic characteristics of 4340 steel is demonstrated for a grain size range of 10−100 µm and hardness range of 41–52 HRC. Double-notched tensile samples were electrochemically charged in-situ with hydrogen in 0.5 m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+5 mg/l As{sub 2}O{sub 3} solution for 0–40 min charging time. Hydrogen induced fracture initiations were analyzed by novel metallographic investigation of the “unbroken” notch while the overall fractographic behaviors were examined by the scanning electron microscopic imaging of the fracture surfaces of the actually broken notch. Effect of hydrogen was predominantly manifested as intergranular fracture for the harder samples and quasi-cleavage fracture for the softer counterparts. 10–40 µm samples showed the maximum intensity of the hydrogen induced fracture features (intergranular and/or quasi-cleavage) close to the notch which gradually reduced with increasing distance from the notch. The largest grained samples (100 µm) however showed brittle behavior even in absence of hydrogen with similar intensity of percent fracture features at all distance from the notch, while presence of hydrogen intensified the overall percent brittle fractures with their intensities being highest close to the notch. Finally, the brittle fracture characteristics of the hydrogen embrittled samples were shown to be distinguishably different from that of the liquid nitrogen treated samples of same grain sizes and hardnesses.

  18. Theoretical and experimental study on unstable fracture for type 304 stainless steel plates with a soft tensile testing machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, G.; Takahashi, Y.; Ando, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The object of this paper is to show experimental results on stable as well as unstable fractures for Type 304 stainless steel plates with a central crack using a soft tensile testing machine. The test machine was installed specially for the safety study of nuclear piping systems and its maximum loading capacity and maximum displacement are 600 ton and 500 mm, respectively. The compliance of the machine is 1.0 x 10 -4 (mm/N). The transition points from the stable to the unstable crack growth observed in the test were theoretically determined by using three methods. In the first method, the 'applied' value of T was calculated with the simple expression based on the dimensional analysis. In the second method, the fully-plastic solutions were used to calculate the nonlinear value of J, which was added to the linear value of J, thus the 'applied' values of T was determined by differentiating the total value of J, which was obtained for the material with the Ramberg-Osgood type stress-strain relation. In the final method, the finite element method was fully utilized to determine the 'applied' value of T. The value of J in the finite element method was obtained with the use of the path-integral. (orig./GL)

  19. Separation of nucleation and growth of voids during tensile deformation of a dual phase steel using synchrotron microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Requena, Guillermo, E-mail: guillermo.requena@tuwien.ac.at [INSA-Lyon, MATEIS CNRS UMR5510, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Maire, Eric; Leguen, Claire [INSA-Lyon, MATEIS CNRS UMR5510, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Thuillier, Sandrine [LIMATB, Université de Bretagne-Sud, rue de Saint Maudé, BP 92116, 56321 Lorient Cedex (France)

    2014-01-01

    The damage evolution in a DP980 dual phase steel is followed in situ by synchrotron microtomography during tensile deformation focusing on the effect that the triaxiality, induced by different sample geometries, exerts on damage formation and damage evolution. The growth of existing voids is separated from the voids nucleated between consecutive deformation steps using three-dimensional image analysis. The experimental results are correlated with those obtained by finite element analysis using a Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman framework with a Chu and Needleman formulation to introduce the effect of nucleation of cavities. A relatively simple way to determine the nucleation parameters is proposed based on the volume of nucleated voids obtained from the tomographies. The evolution of the total volume fraction of cavities obtained from the calculations shows a good agreement with the experiments for the notched samples and reflects the effect of triaxiality on damage. Contrarily to experiments, the calculated accumulated volume fraction of nucleated voids does not reflect the effect of triaxiality suggesting the necessity to implement this parameter in the nucleation model.

  20. Fatigue crack retardation of high strength steel in saltwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokaji, K.; Ando, Z.; Imai, T.; Kojima, T.

    1983-01-01

    A high strength steel was studied in 3 percent saltwater to investigate the effects of a corrosive environment and sheer thickness on fatigue crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload. Experiments were carried out under sinusoidally varying loads at a load ratio of 0 and frequency of 10 H /SUB z/ . A single tensile overload was found to cause delayed retardation, and the crack propagation rate at first increased, followed by fairly rapid decrease to a minimum value and then increased gradually to its steady-state value, just as it did in air. The overload affected zone size and the retardation cycles increased with decreasing sheet thickness, just as they did in air. However, the zone size and the cycles were larger in 3 percent saltwater than in air. Since the crack propagation rates through the overload affected zone were not affected by the test environment, the longer retardation cycles in 3 percent saltwater were attributed to an enlargement of the overload affected zone size. The crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload in 3 percent saltwater was well explained by the crack closure concept

  1. Investigation of the hot ductility of a high-strength boron steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Güler, Hande; Ertan, Rukiye; Özcan, Reşat

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the high-temperature ductility behaviour of an Al–Si-coated 22MnB5 sheet was investigated. The mechanical properties of Al–Si-coated 22MnB5 boron steel were examined via hot tensile tests performed at temperatures ranging from 400 to 900 °C at a strain rate of 0.083 s −1 . The deformation and fracture mechanisms under hot tensile testing were considered in relation to the testing data and to the fracture-surface observations performed via SEM. The hot ductility of the tested boron steel was observed as a function of increasing temperature and the Al–Si-coated 22MnB5 boron steel exhibited a ductility loss at 700 °C

  2. Post-uniform elongation and tensile fracture mechanisms of Fe-18Mn-0.6C-xAl twinning-induced plasticity steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Ha-Young; Lee, Sang-Min; Nam, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Joon; Fabrègue, Damien; Park, Myeong-heom; Tsuji, Nobuhiro; Lee, Young-Kook

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the complicated interrelationship between necking, post-uniform elongation (e_p_u), strain rate sensitivity (SRS), fracture mechanism and Al concentration in Fe-18Mn-0.6C-xAl twinning-induced plasticity steels. Many tensile tests were conducted for in- and ex-situ observations of necking, fracture surfaces, crack propagation and the density and size of micro-voids with the assistance of a high-speed camera and X-ray tomographic equipment. The addition of Al increased e_p_u, SRS and reduction ratios in dimension of the neck part of tensile specimens, and also changed fracture mode from quasi-cleavage to ductile fracture at the edge part. The quasi-cleavage surface of Al-free specimen was induced by edge and side cracks occurring along grain boundary junctions and twin boundaries within the edges and side surfaces where local deformation bands meet. The ductile-fracture surface of 1.5 %Al-added specimen was formed by the coalescence of micro-voids. While the side-to-middle crack propagation occurred in Al-free and 1 %Al-added specimens due to side cracks, the middle-to-side crack propagation was observed in 1.5 %Al-added specimen. The Al-free specimen had the larger size of the 20 largest voids compared to the 1.5 %Al-added specimen despite its lower void density and local strain due to the accelerated growth of voids near the tips of side cracks. Evaluating the negligible e_p_u of Al-free specimen by SRS is not deemed to be reasonable due to its inappreciable necking and side cracks. The improvement of e_p_u in 1.5 %Al-added specimen is primarily due to disappearance of edge and side cracks.

  3. A comparison of tensile, fracture and fatigue mechanical behaviour of structural reinforcing bars made with different steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez, C.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of austenitic stainless steels as rebar is an option increasingly used in reinforced concrete structures exposed to aggressive environments and especially those that have to work in marine environments. The same is true for duplex stainless steel rebars, although nowadays they have a lower use, mainly due to the fact that their inclusion in the reinforced concrete standards was delayed 10 years compared to austenitic stainless steel ones, and consequently their in-service behavior is not as well known. A study of the mechanical properties, including fracture toughness, fatigue behaviour and corrosion resistance in saline alkaline environments of austenitic (AISI 304LN and 316LN and duplex (D2205 stainless steel reinforcing bars was performed in this work. Bars made on a high ductility carbon steel (B500SD that are normally used to reinforce concrete were also characterized and used as a comparison. Stainless steel reinforcing bars show mechanical properties at least similar but usually higher than one of the best carbon steel re-bars (B500SD, along with a significantly higher ductility and, of course, much better corrosion behaviour in saline alkaline environments.El uso de aceros inoxidables austeníticos como armaduras de refuerzo es una opción cada vez más utilizada en estructuras de hormigón armado expuestas a ambientes agresivos y especialmente en las que han de trabajar en ambientes marinos. Lo mismo cabe decir de las armaduras de acero inoxidable dúplex, si bien su uso es menor, debido sobre todo a que su inclusión en la normativa aplicable al armado de hormigón se retrasó 10 años con respecto a los inoxidables austeníticos y, consecuentemente, su comportamiento en servicio es menos conocido. En este trabajo se analiza el comportamiento mecánico, incluyendo fractura y fatiga, así como la resistencia a la corrosión en medios que simulan un hormigón contaminado de cloruros, de armaduras fabricadas tanto con

  4. Effects of Cu and B addition on microstructure and mechanical properties of high-strength bainitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sang Yong; Han, Seung Youb; Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Chang Gil; Lee, Sunghak

    2009-01-01

    Effects of Cu and B addition on microstructure and mechanical properties of high-strength bainitic steels were investigated in this study. Six kinds of steels were fabricated by controlling the amount of Cu and B addition, and their microstructures and tensile and Charpy impact properties were investigated. Their effective grain sizes were also characterized by the electron back-scatter diffraction analysis. The tensile test results indicated that the B- or Cu-containing steels had the higher yield and tensile strengths than the B- or Cu-free steels because their volume fractions of acicular ferrite and martensite were quite high. The B- or Cu-free steels had the higher upper shelf energy than the B- or Cu-containing steels because of their lower volume fraction of martensite. In the steel containing 10 ppm B without Cu, the best combination of high strengths, high upper shelf energy, and low energy transition temperature could be obtained by the decrease in effective grain size due to the presence of acicular ferrite having fine effective grain size.

  5. Preplastic strain effect on chromium carbides precipitation of type 316 stainless steel during high-temperature ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, X.; Zhao, W.

    1992-01-01

    Long exposure of Type 316 stainless steel to elevated temperature (400-900 o C) is known to cause high-temperature embrittlement due to chromium carbides and σ-phase precipitating in grain boundaries. Numerous investigations have been published on the mechanical properties and microstructure changes occurring during such exposure. However, no investigations exist on the preplastic deformation effect on chromium carbide precipitation in the grain matrix and grain boundary during high-temperature ageing of Type 316 stainless steel and then its effects on the room-temperature tensile properties. Since the stainless steel sometimes is deformed before use at high temperatures, it is necessary to study the preplastic strain effect of the stainless steel on the microstructure change and mechanical property change during high-temperature exposure. The purpose of the present investigation was to carry out such a study. The conclusions reached are as follows. First, chromium carbides are precipitated in deformation lines (slip lines) and then the amount of chromium carbides precipitation in the grain boundary is relatively reduced in predeformed stainless steel after ageing. Secondly, plastic strain pretreatments of and subsequent ageing treatments of Type 316 stainless steel can improve its tensile ductility. Finally, secondary cracking of aged stainless steel occurs in a normal tensile test. The secondary cracking can be reduced by adding preplastic strain into the material. (Author)

  6. Evolution of microstructure and tensile properties of Fe–18Ni–12Cr based AFA steel during aging at 700 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Man [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 10083 (China); Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Hongying [School of Mechanical Engineering, Anyang Institute of Technology, Anyang 455002 (China); Phaniraj, Madakashira P.; Han, Heung Nam [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jinsung [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Zhangjian, E-mail: zhouzhj@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 10083 (China)

    2016-08-30

    The effects of aging at 700 °C on the microstructure and tensile properties of an alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel were investigated. With increasing aging time, B2-NiAl and Laves phase precipitated first on grain boundaries (GB) and then in the grain interior. The GB precipitate coverage reached 74% after aging for 1000 h. The GB precipitates not only suppressed grain coarsening during aging, but also influenced the tensile fracture mode at 700 °C by partitioning stress concentration on triple junctions. Moreover plate-like and spherical NbC particles precipitated during aging. Spherical NbC with size of around 5 nm were stable, while plate-like NbC grew to 89 nm after aging for 1000 h. These precipitates played an important role on the tensile strength. Age hardening contributed to the increasing tensile strength at RT with aging time, while the softening mechanism of dynamic recovery dominated the tensile tests at 700 °C.

  7. Tensile deformation behavior and deformation twinning of an equimolar CoCrFeMnNi high-entropy alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, S.-H.; Kato, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Jang, M.J.; Moon, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Tsai, C.W.; Yeh, J.W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Kim, H.S., E-mail: hskim@postech.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Center for High Entropy Alloys, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-24

    The tensile deformation and strain hardening behaviors of an equimolar CoCrFeMnNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) were investigated and compared with low and medium entropy equiatomic alloys (LEA and MEA). The HEA had a lower yield strength than the MEA because the addition of Mn weakens solid solution hardening in the HEA. However, deformation twinning induced the multiple stage strain hardening behavior of the HEA and enhanced strength and elongation. Using tensile-interrupted electron backscatter diffraction analysis, geometrically necessary dislocations were observed as plume-shaped features in grain interior, and a considerable texture was characterized, which is typical of face centered cubic metals. Moreover, the relationship between favorably oriented grains and twinning in the HEA bore a clear resemblance to the same tendency in TWIP steels. The thickness of the twin bundles was less than 100 nm. A high density of stacking defects was found in the nanotwins. Nano twinning and stacking faults were found to contribute to the remarkable mechanical properties. Deformation induced twinning not only demonstrated the dynamic Hall-Petch effect but also changed dislocation cell substructures into microband structures.

  8. Dynamic tensile behaviour and deformational mechanism of C5191 phosphor bronze under high strain rates deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Dao-chun [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Taizhou Vocational & Technical College, Taizhou 318000 (China); Chen, Ming-he, E-mail: meemhchen@nuaa.edu.cn [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Lei; Cheng, Hu [College of Mechanical Engineering, Taizhou University, Taizhou 318000 (China)

    2016-01-01

    High speed stamping process is used to high strength and high electrical conductivity phosphor bronze with extremely high strain rates more than 10{sup 3} s{sup −1}. This study on the dynamic tensile behaviour and deformational mechanism is to optimise the high speed stamping processes and improve geometrical precision in finished products. Thus, the tensile properties and deformation behaviour of C5191 phosphor bronze under quasi-static tensile condition at a strain rate of 0.001 s{sup −1} by electronic universal testing machine, and dynamic tensile condition at strain rate of 500, 1000 and 1500 s{sup −1} by split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) apparatus were studied. The effects of strain rate and the deformation mechanism were investigated by means of SEM and TEM. The results showed that the yield strength and tensile strength of C5191 phosphor bronze under high strain rates deformation increased by 32.77% and 11.07% respectively compared with quasi-static condition, the strain hardening index increases from 0.075 to 0.251, and the strength of the material strain rates sensitivity index change from 0.005 to 0.022, which presented a clear sensitive to strain rates. Therefore, it is claimed that the dominant deformation mechanism was changed by the dislocation motion under different strain rates, and the ability of plastic deformation of C5191 phosphor bronze increased due to the number of movable dislocations increased significantly, started multi-line slip, and the soft effect of adiabatic temperature rise at the strain rate ranging from 500 to 1500 s{sup −1}.

  9. Microstructural evolution and the variation of tensile behavior after aging heat treatment of precipitation hardened martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jong-Ho, E-mail: jongho.shin@doosan.com [Casting and Forging Technology Development Team, Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, 22 Doosanvolvo-ro, Changwon 642-792 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, JaeSuk [Materials and Manufacturing Development Team, Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, 22 Doosanvolvo-ro, Changwon 642-792 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Wook [Casting and Forging Technology Development Team, Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, 22 Doosanvolvo-ro, Changwon 642-792 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The effects of aging temperature on the microstructural evolution and the tensile behavior of precipitation hardened martensitic steel were investigated. Microscopic analysis using transmission electron microscope (TEM) was combined with the microstructural analysis using the synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) to characterize the microstructural evolution with aging temperature. Peak hardness was obtained by precipitation of the Ni{sub 3}Al ordered phase. After aging at temperature range from 420 to 590 °C, spherical Ni{sub 3}Al precipitates and ellipsoidal M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides were observed within laths and at lath boundaries, respectively. Strain hardening behavior was analyzed with Ludwik equation. It is observed that the plastic strain regimes can be divided into two different stages by a rapid increase in strain hardening followed by a comparatively lower increase. At the first strain hardening stage, the aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen, and the exponent in the aged specimen was not changed considerably with increasing aging temperature. It is revealed that the strain hardening exponents at the first and the second stages were associated with the Ni{sub 3}Al precipitates and the domain size representing the coherent scattering area, respectively. - Highlights: • All of aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen at the first stage. • The value of strain hardening exponent in the aged specimen was nearly constant with aging temperature. • Ni{sub 3}Al precipitation dominantly influenced to the increase of strain hardening exponent at the first strain hardening stage. • Domain size was associated with strain hardening exponent at the second strain hardening stage.

  10. Microstructural evolution and the variation of tensile behavior after aging heat treatment of precipitation hardened martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jong-Ho; Jeong, JaeSuk; Lee, Jong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The effects of aging temperature on the microstructural evolution and the tensile behavior of precipitation hardened martensitic steel were investigated. Microscopic analysis using transmission electron microscope (TEM) was combined with the microstructural analysis using the synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) to characterize the microstructural evolution with aging temperature. Peak hardness was obtained by precipitation of the Ni 3 Al ordered phase. After aging at temperature range from 420 to 590 °C, spherical Ni 3 Al precipitates and ellipsoidal M 23 C 6 carbides were observed within laths and at lath boundaries, respectively. Strain hardening behavior was analyzed with Ludwik equation. It is observed that the plastic strain regimes can be divided into two different stages by a rapid increase in strain hardening followed by a comparatively lower increase. At the first strain hardening stage, the aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen, and the exponent in the aged specimen was not changed considerably with increasing aging temperature. It is revealed that the strain hardening exponents at the first and the second stages were associated with the Ni 3 Al precipitates and the domain size representing the coherent scattering area, respectively. - Highlights: • All of aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen at the first stage. • The value of strain hardening exponent in the aged specimen was nearly constant with aging temperature. • Ni 3 Al precipitation dominantly influenced to the increase of strain hardening exponent at the first strain hardening stage. • Domain size was associated with strain hardening exponent at the second strain hardening stage

  11. Effect of Sintering Atmosphere and Solution Treatment on Density, Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Duplex Stainless Steels Developed from Pre-alloyed Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Arun Prasad; Mahendran, Sudhahar; Ramajayam, Mariappan; Ganesan, Dharmalingam; Chinnaraj, Raj Kumar

    2017-10-01

    In this research, Powder Metallurgy (P/M) of Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) of different compositions were prepared through pre-alloyed powders and elemental powders with and without addition of copper. The powder mix was developed by pot mill for 12 h to obtain the homogeneous mixture of pre-alloyed powder with elemental compositions. Cylindrical green compacts with the dimensions of 30 mm diameter and 12 mm height were compacted through universal testing machine at a pressure level of 560 ± 10 MPa. These green compacts were sintered at 1350 °C for 2 h in hydrogen and argon atmospheres. Some of the sintered stainless steel preforms were solution treated at 1050 °C followed by water quenching. The sintered as well as solution treated samples were analysed by metallography examination, Scanning Electron Microscopy and evaluation of mechanical properties. Ferrite content of sintered and solution treated DSS were measured by Fischer Ferritoscope. It is inferred that the hydrogen sintered DSS depicted better density (94% theoretical density) and tensile strength (695 MPa) than the argon sintered steels. Similarly the microstructure of solution treated DSS revealed existence of more volume of ferrite grains than its sintered condition. Solution treated hydrogen sintered DSS A (50 wt% 316L + 50 wt% 430L) exhibited higher tensile strength of 716 MPa and elongation of 17%, which are 10-13% increment than the sintered stainless steels.

  12. Effect of steel fibres on mechanical properties of high-strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holschemacher, K.; Mueller, T.; Ribakov, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) became in the recent decades a very popular and attractive material in structural engineering because of its good mechanical performance. The most important advantages are hindrance of macrocracks' development, delay in microcracks' propagation to macroscopic level and the improved ductility after microcracks' formation. SFRC is also tough and demonstrates high residual strengths after appearing of the first crack. This paper deals with a role of steel fibres having different configuration in combination with steel bar reinforcement. It reports on results of an experimental research program that was focused on the influence of steel fibre types and amounts on flexural tensile strength, fracture behaviour and workability of steel bar reinforced high-strength concrete beams. In the frame of the research different bar reinforcements (2o6 mm and 2o12 mm) and three types of fibres' configurations (two straight with end hooks with different ultimate tensile strength and one corrugated) were used. Three different fibre contents were applied. Experiments show that for all selected fibre contents a more ductile behaviour and higher load levels in the post-cracking range were obtained. The study forms a basis for selection of suitable fibre types and contents for their most efficient combination with regular steel bar reinforcement.

  13. Tensile and Charpy impact properties of an ODS ferritic/martensitic steel 9Cr–1.8W–0.5Ti–0.35Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian, E-mail: zhouzhj@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Wang, Man; Li, Shaofu; Zou, Lei; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • The tensile property and Charpy impact were tested. • Both strength and plasticity in LT direction are better than that of TL direction. • The LSE was more than 65% of the USE from absorbed energy curve. • The initiation and propagation energy at different temperatures were calculated. • High LSE and dimples on the fracture surface indicated good toughness at −60 °C. - Abstract: A 9Cr-ODS ferritic/martensitic steel with a composition of 9Cr–1.8W–0.5Ti–0.35Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} was fabricated by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing, followed by hot rolling. Tensile properties were measured at room temperature (23 °C) and 700 °C in the rolling direction (LT) and the transverse direction (TL). The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the as-rolled samples in both directions reached 990 MPa at 23 °C, and still maintained at 260 MPa at 700 °C. The tensile strength and elongation of the rolling direction was greater than that of the transverse direction. The Charpy impact was tested from −100 to 100 °C in the LT direction. The lower shelf energy (LSE) was more than 65% of the upper shelf energy (USE). The total absorbed energy was separated into the energies for crack initiation and propagation. The propagation energy was always higher than the initiation energy in the range of temperatures tested. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the rolled 9Cr ODS evaluated by an absorbed energy curve was about 0 °C. However, the high LSE and the fracture surface that still contained dimples at lower shelf indicated good toughness of the as-rolled 9Cr ODS steels at temperature of −60 °C.

  14. Attenuation capability of low activation-modified high manganese austenitic stainless steel for fusion reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eissa, M.M. [Steel Technology Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan (Egypt); El-kameesy, S.U.; El-Fiki, S.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Ghali, S.N. [Steel Technology Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan (Egypt); El Shazly, R.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt); Saeed, Aly, E-mail: aly_8h@yahoo.com [Nuclear Power station Department, Faculty of Engineering, Egyptian-Russian University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Improvement stainless steel alloys to be used in fusion reactors. • Structural, mechanical, attenuation properties of investigated alloys were studied. • Good agreement between experimental and calculated results has been achieved. • The developed alloys could be considered as candidate materials for fusion reactors. - Abstract: Low nickel-high manganese austenitic stainless steel alloys, SSMn9Ni and SSMn10Ni, were developed to use as a shielding material in fusion reactor system. A standard austenitic stainless steel SS316L was prepared and studied as a reference sample. The microstructure properties of the present stainless steel alloys were investigated using Schaeffler diagram, optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction pattern. Mainly, an austenite phase was observed for the prepared stainless steel alloys. Additionally, a small ferrite phase was observed in SS316L and SSMn10Ni samples. The mechanical properties of the prepared alloys were studied using Vickers hardness and tensile tests at room temperature. The studied manganese stainless steel alloys showed higher hardness, yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength than SS316L. On the other hand, the manganese stainless steel elongation had relatively lower values than the standard SS316L. The removal cross section for both slow and total slow (primary and those slowed down in sample) neutrons were carried out using {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. Gamma ray attenuation parameters were carried out for different gamma ray energy lines which emitted from {sup 60}Co and {sup 232}Th radioactive sources. The developed manganese stainless steel alloys had a higher total slow removal cross section than SS316L. While the slow neutron and gamma rays were nearly the same for all studied stainless steel alloys. From the obtained results, the developed manganese stainless steel alloys could be considered as candidate materials for fusion reactor system with low activation based on the short life

  15. High-strength shape memory steels alloyed with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullakko, K.; Jakovenko, P.T.; Gavriljuk, V.G.

    1996-01-01

    Since shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si systems was observed, increasing attention has been paid to iron based shape memory alloys due to their great technological potential. Properties of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys have been improved by alloying with Cr, Ni, Co and C. A significant improvement on shape memory, mechanical and corrosion properties is attained by introducing nitrogen in Fe-Mn-Si based systems. By increasing the nitrogen content, strength of the matrix increases and the stacking fault energy decreases, which promote the formation of stress induced martensite and decrease permanent slip. The present authors have shown that nitrogen alloyed shape memory steels exhibit recoverable strains of 2.5--4.2% and recovery stresses of 330 MPa. In some cases, stresses over 700 MPa were attained at room temperature after cooling a constrained sample. Yield strengths of these steels can be as high as 1,100 MPa and tensile strengths over 1,500 MPa with elongations of 30%. In the present study, effect of nitrogen alloying on shape memory and mechanical properties of Fe-Mn-Si, Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni and Fe-Mn-Cr-Ni-V alloys is studied. Nitrogen alloying is shown to exhibit a beneficial effect on shape memory properties and strength of these steels

  16. Cubic martensite in high carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Xiao, Wenlong; Jiao, Kun; Ping, Dehai; Xu, Huibin; Zhao, Xinqing; Wang, Yunzhi

    2018-05-01

    A distinguished structural characteristic of martensite in Fe-C steels is its tetragonality originating from carbon atoms occupying only one set of the three available octahedral interstitial sites in the body-centered-cubic (bcc) Fe lattice. Such a body-centered-tetragonal (bct) structure is believed to be thermodynamically stable because of elastic interactions between the interstitial carbon atoms. For such phase stability, however, there has been a lack of direct experimental evidence despite extensive studies of phase transformations in steels over one century. In this Rapid Communication, we report that the martensite formed in a high carbon Fe-8Ni-1.26C (wt%) steel at room temperature induced by applied stress/strain has actually a bcc rather than a bct crystal structure. This finding not only challenges the existing theories on the stability of bcc vs bct martensite in high carbon steels, but also provides insights into the mechanism for martensitic transformation in ferrous alloys.

  17. Comparative study on the high-temperature tensile and creep properties of Alloy 617 base and weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Hong, Sung Deok; Kim, Yong Wan; Kim, Seon Jin; Park, Jae Young; Ekaputra, I. M. W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative investigation on the high-temperature tensile and creep properties of Alloy 617 base metal (BM) and weld metal (WM) fabricated by a gas tungsten arc weld process. The WM had higher yield strength and lower ultimate tensile strength than the BM does; however, its elongation was significantly lower than that of the BM. The creep curve of the BM and WM was somewhat different from that of typical heat-resistance steel, and did not show a textbook creep. The WM exhibited a longer creep rupture life, lower creep rate, and lower rupture ductility than the BM. However, as the creep rupture time reached approximately 36,800 h, the creep life of the WM was expected to be almost similar to that of the BM; and after 36,800 h, its creep life was expected to be worse than the BM. Loner creep tests is needed to investigate the long-term creep life of the WM. The creep failure mode of the BM and WM was obviously an intergranular cracking of the cavity formation and growth mechanisms, although it was more evident in the WM. The BM had a more ductile fracture surface than the WM

  18. Hot ductility behavior of a low carbon advanced high strength steel (AHSS) microalloyed with boron

    OpenAIRE

    Mejía, Ignacio; Bedolla Jacuinde, Arnoldo; Maldonado, Cuauhtémoc; Cabrera Marrero, José M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study analyses the influence of boron addition on the hot ductility of a low carbon advanced high strength NiCrVCu steel. For this purpose hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (650, 750, 800, 900 and 1000 ◦C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s−1. Experimental results showed a substantial improvement in hot ductility for the low carbon advanced high strength steel when microalloyed with boron compared with that without boron addition. Nevertheless,...

  19. High-power Laser Welding of Thick Steel-aluminum Dissimilar Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Pfeifer, Ronny; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a worldwide reduction of CO2-emissions is indispensable to avoid global warming. Besides the automotive sector, lightweight construction is also of high interest for the maritime industry in order to minimize CO2-emissions. Using aluminum, the weight of ships can be reduced, ensuring lower fuel consumption. Therefore, hybrid joints of steel and aluminum are of great interest to the maritime industry. In order to provide an efficient lap joining process, high-power laser welding of thick steel plates (S355, t = 5 mm) and aluminum plates (EN AW-6082, t = 8 mm) is investigated. As the weld seam quality greatly depends on the amount of intermetallic phases within the joint, optimized process parameters and control are crucial. Using high-power laser welding, a tensile strength of 10 kN was achieved. Based on metallographic analysis, hardness tests, and tensile tests the potential of this joining method is presented.

  20. Precipitation Effect on Mechanical Properties and Phase Stability of High Manganese Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Cheoljun; Kim, Rosa; Lee, Un-Hae; Kim, Jongryoul

    2017-09-01

    High manganese (Mn) steels are attractive for automotive applications due to their excellent tensile strength and superior elongation. However, the relatively low yield strength of Mn steels compared to other advanced high-strength steels is a critical problem limiting their use in structural parts. In order to increase the yield strength, the precipitation hardening effect of Mn steels was investigated by the addition of carbide-forming elements. Changes in the austenite phase stability were also evaluated in terms of stacking fault energy (SFE). As a result, fine V(C,N) precipitates were found to increase the yield strength effectively but to lower the SFE by the consumption of matrix carbons. For achieving precipitation hardening without sacrificing austenite stability, the soluble carbon content was discussed.

  1. Microstructure-property relationship in microalloyed high-strength steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    High-strength steels are favoured materials in the industry for production of safe and sustainable structures. The main technology used for joining the components of such steel is fusion welding. Steel alloy design concepts combined with advanced processing technologies have been extensively investigated during the development of High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) steels. However, very few studies have addressed the issue of how various alloy designs, even with limited microalloy addition, can influence the properties of high-strength steel welds. In high-strength steel welding practices, the challenges regarding microstructure evolution and the resulting mechanical properties variation, are of great interest. The main focus is the debate regarding the role of microalloy elements on phase transformation and weld performance. Limited Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) softening and limited austenite grain coarsening are significant design essentials, but the primary goal is to ensure excellent toughness and tensile properties in the steel weld. To achieve this purpose, microalloy elements such as Ti, Nb, or V were intentionally added to modern high-strength steels. The focus of this work was to understand the mechanical properties of HSLA steels resulting from differences in alloy design after joining by modern welding processes. To begin, three microalloyed S690QL steels (Nb, Ti, and Ti+V addition) were investigated. Optical microscopy confirmed that similar mixtures of tempered bainite and martensite predominated the parent microstructure in the three steels, different types of coarse microalloy precipitates were also visible. These precipitates were analysed by using a thermodynamic-based software and then identified by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results of mechanical testing revealed that all three steels performed above the standard toughness and tensile strength values, but with varied yielding phenomena. During the welding operation, each of the three steels

  2. Microstructure-property relationship in microalloyed high-strength steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei

    2017-04-01

    High-strength steels are favoured materials in the industry for production of safe and sustainable structures. The main technology used for joining the components of such steel is fusion welding. Steel alloy design concepts combined with advanced processing technologies have been extensively investigated during the development of High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) steels. However, very few studies have addressed the issue of how various alloy designs, even with limited microalloy addition, can influence the properties of high-strength steel welds. In high-strength steel welding practices, the challenges regarding microstructure evolution and the resulting mechanical properties variation, are of great interest. The main focus is the debate regarding the role of microalloy elements on phase transformation and weld performance. Limited Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) softening and limited austenite grain coarsening are significant design essentials, but the primary goal is to ensure excellent toughness and tensile properties in the steel weld. To achieve this purpose, microalloy elements such as Ti, Nb, or V were intentionally added to modern high-strength steels. The focus of this work was to understand the mechanical properties of HSLA steels resulting from differences in alloy design after joining by modern welding processes. To begin, three microalloyed S690QL steels (Nb, Ti, and Ti+V addition) were investigated. Optical microscopy confirmed that similar mixtures of tempered bainite and martensite predominated the parent microstructure in the three steels, different types of coarse microalloy precipitates were also visible. These precipitates were analysed by using a thermodynamic-based software and then identified by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results of mechanical testing revealed that all three steels performed above the standard toughness and tensile strength values, but with varied yielding phenomena. During the welding operation, each of the three steels

  3. Modern high strength QT, TM and duplex-stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, P.; Luxenburger, G.; Porter, D.; Ericsson, C.

    2003-01-01

    Pressure vessels are commonly manufactured with normalised steel grades with a yield strength up to 355 MPa or with austenitic stainless steels when corrosion as to be considered. From three decades, modern steels with higher mechanical properties - up to yield strength of 960 Mpa - are available and largely used for other applications where weight saving is of major importance as per off-shore, bridges, cranes, shipbuilding, line pipes.. The paper presents these modern steel's families - TMCP (Thermo Mechanically Controlled Process), QT (Quenched and Tempered) and Duplex (austeno-ferritic) stainless - in comparison with the normalised and austenitic steel grades. The following aspects are presented: the main mechanical properties (tensile and Charpy) as per the requirements of the standards for pressure equipment; some examples of use of these modern steels in the industry are given; the limitations of the forming conditions are considered; the weldability aspects and welds properties are developed; the interest of the PWHT (Post Weld Heat Treatment) is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Fracture modelling of a high performance armour steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, P.; Nilsson, M.; Tjernberg, A.

    2006-08-01

    The fracture characteristics of the high performance armour steel Armox 500T is investigated. Tensile mechanical experiments using samples with different notch geometries are used to investigate the effect of multi-axial stress states on the strain to fracture. The experiments are numerically simulated and from the simulation the stress at the point of fracture initiation is determined as a function of strain and these data are then used to extract parameters for fracture models. A fracture model based on quasi-static experiments is suggested and the model is tested against independent experiments done at both static and dynamic loading. The result show that the fracture model give reasonable good agreement between simulations and experiments at both static and dynamic loading condition. This indicates that multi-axial loading is more important to the strain to fracture than the deformation rate in the investigated loading range. However on-going work will further characterise the fracture behaviour of Armox 500T.

  5. Effects of Temperature and Strain Rate on Tensile Deformation Behavior of 9Cr-0.5Mo-1.8W-VNb Ferritic Heat-Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Weng, Xiaoxiang; Jiang, Yong; Gong, Jianming

    2017-09-01

    A series of uniaxial tensile tests were carried out at different strain rate and different temperatures to investigate the effects of temperature and strain rate on tensile deformation behavior of P92 steel. In the temperature range of 30-700 °C, the variations of flow stress, average work-hardening rate, tensile strength and ductility with temperature all show three temperature regimes. At intermediate temperature, the material exhibited the serrated flow behavior, the peak in flow stress, the maximum in average work-hardening rate, and the abnormal variations in tensile strength and ductility indicates the occurrence of DSA, whereas the sharp decrease in flow stress, average work-hardening rate as well as strength values, and the remarkable increase in ductility values with increasing temperature from 450 to 700 °C imply that dynamic recovery plays a dominant role in this regime. Additionally, for the temperature ranging from 550 to 650 °C, a significant decrease in flow stress values is observed with decreasing in strain rate. This phenomenon suggests the strain rate has a strong influence on flow stress. Based on the experimental results above, an Arrhenius-type constitutive equation is proposed to predict the flow stress.

  6. Creep deformation of high Cr-Mo ferritic/martensitic steels by material softening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Song, B. J.; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2005-01-01

    High Cr (9-12%Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels represent a valuable alternative to austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications up to 600 .deg. C both in power and petrochemical plant, as well as good resistance to oxidation and corrosion. Material softening is the main physical phenomenon observed in the crept material. Thermally-induced change (such as particle coarsening or matrix solute depletion) and strain-induced change (such as dynamic subgrain growth) of microstructure degraded the alloy strength. These microstructural changes during a creep test cause the material softening, so the strength of the materials decreased. Many researches have been performed for the microstructural changes during a creep test, but the strength of crept materials has not been measured. In the present work, we measured the yield and tensile strength of crept materials using Indentationtyped Tensile Test System (AIS 2000). Material softening was quantitatively evaluated with a creep test condition, such as temperature and applied stress

  7. Orientation-dependent evolution of the dislocation density in grain populations with different crystallographic orientations relative to the tensile axis in a polycrystalline aggregate of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungár, Tamás; Stoica, Alexandru D.; Tichy, Géza; Wang, Xun-Li

    2014-01-01

    Line profile analysis was carried out on neutron diffraction patterns collected by the energy-dispersive method for an in situ tensile-deformed AISI-316 stainless steel specimen. The experiments were carried out at the VULCAN engineering beam line of the spallation neutron source of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both the dislocation densities and the local stresses in grains oriented with different h k l crystal directions along the tensile axis were determined. The work-hardening equation of Taylor was tested for the h k l-dependent phenomenological constant α. The grain-orientation-dependent α values were directly related to the heterogeneity of dislocation distribution in correlation with previous transmission electron microscopy data

  8. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the elevated temperature tensile flow behavior of service-exposed 2.25Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girish Shastry, C.; Parameswaran, P.; Mathew, M.D.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Mannan, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    The elevated temperature tensile flow behavior of service-exposed 2.25Cr-1Mo steel has been critically examined with respect to strain rate sensitivity (m) and apparent activation energy (Q) for tensile deformation. The predominant role of forest dislocations in determining the relative flow response at true plastic strains greater than 0.01 is inferred from the profile of 'm' against flow stress. The variation of 'm' with temperature and strain is discussed based on the kinetics of dislocation generation and recovery. The decrease in Q with the increase in strain rate or temperature is attributed to the increase in recovery processes like dislocation annihilation and subcell/subgrain formation. This suggestion has been supported by transmission electron microscopy

  9. Effect of chemistry variations on the short-term rupture life and tensile properties of 20% cold-worked type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.; Paxton, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of compositional variations on the rupture life of 20% cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel were investigated at 19-ksi (131-MPa) uniaxial tensile stress and at 1400 0 F (1033 K). Forty-nine different alloys were studied, with compositional variations from nominal in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, boron, manganese, copper, silicon, molybdenum, cobalt, chromium and nickel. This alloy and cold-work level represents the duct and fuel cladding material choice for the first four core loadings of the Fast Flux Test Facility, a key element in the Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. Tensile properties of four of the alloys were studied at temperatures from room temperature to 1600 0 F (1144 K). Boron, nitrogen, and molybdenum plus silicon additions significantly increased rupture life, while chromium and carbon additions decreased rupture life. Molybdenum plus silicon additions increased yield and ultimate strength and ductility at 1200 0 F (922 K) and below

  10. Microstructure, tensile properties and fracture behavior of high temperature Al–Si–Mg–Cu cast alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, A.M.A., E-mail: madel@uqac.ca [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Samuel, F.H. [Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Chicoutimi, QC, Canada G7H 2B1 (Canada); Al Kahtani, Saleh [Industrial Engineering Program, Mechanical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, Al Kharj (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-08-10

    The high temperature tensile behavior of 354 aluminum cast alloy was investigated in the presence of Zr and Ni. The cast alloys were given a solutionizing treatment followed by artificial aging at 190 °C for 2 h. High temperature tensile tests were conducted at various temperatures from 25 °C to 300 °C. Optical microscopy and electron probe micro-analyzer were used to study the microstructure of different intermetallic phases formed. The fractographic observations of fracture surface were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy to understand the fracture mechanism. The results revealed that the intermetallics phases of (Al, Si){sub 3}(Zr, Ti), Al{sub 3}CuNi and Al{sub 9}NiFe are the main feature in the microstructures of alloys with Zr and Ni additions. The results also indicated that the tensile strength of alloy decreases with an increase in temperature. The combined addition of 0.2 wt% Zr and 0.2 wt% Ni leads to a 30% increase in the tensile properties at 300 °C compared to the base alloy. Zr and Ni bearing phases played a vital role in the fracture mechanism of the alloys studied.

  11. Microstructure, tensile properties and fracture behavior of high temperature Al–Si–Mg–Cu cast alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A.M.A.; Samuel, F.H.; Al Kahtani, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    The high temperature tensile behavior of 354 aluminum cast alloy was investigated in the presence of Zr and Ni. The cast alloys were given a solutionizing treatment followed by artificial aging at 190 °C for 2 h. High temperature tensile tests were conducted at various temperatures from 25 °C to 300 °C. Optical microscopy and electron probe micro-analyzer were used to study the microstructure of different intermetallic phases formed. The fractographic observations of fracture surface were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy to understand the fracture mechanism. The results revealed that the intermetallics phases of (Al, Si) 3 (Zr, Ti), Al 3 CuNi and Al 9 NiFe are the main feature in the microstructures of alloys with Zr and Ni additions. The results also indicated that the tensile strength of alloy decreases with an increase in temperature. The combined addition of 0.2 wt% Zr and 0.2 wt% Ni leads to a 30% increase in the tensile properties at 300 °C compared to the base alloy. Zr and Ni bearing phases played a vital role in the fracture mechanism of the alloys studied

  12. Formability of high-alloy dual-phase Cr-Ni steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfmark, J.

    2004-01-01

    The formability of dual-phase high-alloy Cr-Ni steel within the temperature range from 900 to 1250 C was studied using laboratory tensile and torsion tests. The dual-phase steels on 24% Cr basis are characterized by poor hot formability due to very low stable deformation values and slow recrystallization. Mathematical description of deformation stability exhaustion was derived, as well as a model of formability control based on analysis of the gradual diffuse deformation stability from the stability limit to the moment when the deformation starts to concentrate in a small volume of the test piece. Rolling simulation of dual-phase steel strip was used as an example demonstrating the draught scheme optimization technique which avoids the danger of crack occurrence during the rolling of dual-phase steel strip. (orig.)

  13. Applicability of newly developed 610MPa class heavy thickness high strength steel to boiler pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Norihiko; Kaihara, Shoichiro; Ishii, Jun [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Kajigaya, Ichiro [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Totsuka, Takehiro; Miyazaki, Takashi [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Corp., Aioi (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    Construction of a 350 MW Class PFBC (Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion) boiler plant is under planning in Japan. Design temperature and pressure of the vessel are maximum 350 C and 1.69 MPa, respectively. As the plate thickness of the vessel exceeds over 100 mm, high strength steel plate of good weldability and less susceptible to reheat cracking was required and developed. The steel was aimed to satisfy the tensile strength over 610 MPa at 350 C after postweld heat treatment (PWHT), with good notch toughness. The authors investigated the welding performances of the newly developed steel by using 150 mm-thick plate welded by pulsed-MAG and SAW methods. It was confirmed that the newly developed steel and its welds possess sufficient strength and toughness after PWHT, and applicable to the actual pressure vessel.

  14. HIGH FREQUENCY INDUCTION WELDING OF HIGH SILICON STEEL TUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Miranda Alé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High-Si steel is a low cost alternative for the fabrication of tubular structures resistant to atmospheric corrosion. However, the literature has often pointed out that steels presenting a higher Si content and/or a lower Mn/Si ratio have higher susceptibility to defects at the weld bond line during HFIW (High Frequency Induction Welding process, which has been widely used for manufacturing small diameter tubes. In this study the effect of the HFIW conditions on the quality of steel tubes with high-Si content and low Mn/Si ratio is investigated. The quality of welded tubes was determined by flare test and the defects in the bond line were identified by SEM. It has been found that higher welding speeds, V-convergence angles and power input should be applied in welding of high-Si steel, when compared to similar strength C-Mn steel.

  15. Development of new high-performance stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Soo

    2002-01-01

    This paper focused on high-performance stainless steels and their development status. Effect of nitrogen addition on super-stainless steel was discussed. Research activities at Yonsei University, on austenitic and martensitic high-performance stainless, steels, and the next-generation duplex stainless steels were introduced

  16. Ductile failure analysis of high strength steel in hot forming based on micromechanical damage model

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Liang; Liu Wenquan; Wang Dantong; Hu Ping

    2016-01-01

    The damage evolution of high strength steel at elevated temperature is investigated by using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model. A hybrid method integrated thermal tensile test and numerical technique is employed to identify the damage parameters. The analysis results show that the damage parameters are different at different temperature as the variation of tested material microstructure. Furthermore, the calibrated damage parameters are implemented to simulate a bugling forming at el...

  17. Modelling and Simulation of Tensile Fracture in High Velocity Compacted Metal Powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsen, P.; Haeggblad, H.-A.

    2007-01-01

    In cold uniaxial powder compaction, powder is formed into a desired shape with rigid tools and a die. After pressing, but before sintering, the compacted powder is called green body. A critical property in the metal powder pressing process is the mechanical properties of the green body. Beyond a green body free from defects, desired properties are high strength and uniform density. High velocity compaction (HVC) using a hydraulic operated hammer is a production method to form powder utilizing a shock wave. Pre-alloyed water atomised iron powder has been HVC-formed into circular discs with high densities. The diametral compression test also called the Brazilian disc test is an established method to measure tensile strength in low strength material like e.g. rock, concrete, polymers and ceramics. During the test a thin disc is compressed across the diameter to failure. The compression induces a tensile stress perpendicular to the compressed diameter. In this study the test have been used to study crack initiation and the tensile fracture process of HVC-formed metal powder discs with a relative density of 99%. A fictitious crack model controlled by a stress versus crack-width relationship is utilized to model green body cracking. Tensile strength is used as a failure condition and limits the stress in the fracture interface. The softening rate of the model is obtained from the corresponding rate of the dissipated energy. The deformation of the powder material is modelled with an elastic-plastic Cap model. The characteristics of the tensile fracture development of the central crack in a diametrically loaded specimen is numerically studied with a three dimensional finite element simulation. Results from the finite element simulation of the diametral compression test shows that it is possible to simulate fracturing of HVC-formed powder. Results from the simulation agree reasonably with experiments

  18. High efficient and continuous surface modification of carbon fibers with improved tensile strength and interfacial adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingfeng; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Yue; Jin, Zhen; Liu, Xu; Huang, Yudong

    2017-08-01

    Most of the surface modification technologies for carbon fibers, no matter in laboratory scale or for commercial manufacture, are accompanied by a simultaneous decrease in tensile strength. In this paper, a feasible and high efficient strategy for carbon fiber treatment which could obviously improve both tensile strength and interfacial adhesion was proposed. Continuously moving carbon fibers were treated with atmospheric helium plasma for 1 min, followed by a 5 min pyrolytic carbon deposition using ethanol as precursor at 800 °C. The effects of the new approach were characterized by SEM, AFM, nanoindentation, XPS, Raman, wettability analysis, single fiber tensile strength testing and single fiber pull-out testing. After modification, pyrolytic carbon coating was deposited on the fiber surface uniformly, and the roughness and surface energy increased significantly. The single fiber tensile testing results indicate that the resulting fiber strength increased 15.7%, rising from 3.13 to 3.62 GPa. Meanwhile, the interfacial shear strength of its epoxy composites increased from 65.3 to 83.5 MPa. The comparative studies of carbon fibers modified with commercial anodic oxidation and sizing were also carried out. The results demonstrate that the new method can be utilized in the carbon fiber manufacture process and is more efficient than the traditional approaches.

  19. Damage Mechanisms and Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Multiphase Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Heibel

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The usage of high-strength steels for structural components and reinforcement parts is inevitable for modern car-body manufacture in reaching lightweight design as well as increasing passive safety. Depending on their microstructure these steels show differing damage mechanisms and various mechanical properties which cannot be classified comprehensively via classical uniaxial tensile testing. In this research, damage initiation, evolution and final material failure are characterized for commercially produced complex-phase (CP and dual-phase (DP steels in a strength range between 600 and 1000 MPa. Based on these investigations CP steels with their homogeneous microstructure are characterized as damage tolerant and hence less edge-crack sensitive than DP steels. As final fracture occurs after a combination of ductile damage evolution and local shear band localization in ferrite grains at a characteristic thickness strain, this strain measure is introduced as a new parameter for local formability. In terms of global formability DP steels display advantages because of their microstructural composition of soft ferrite matrix including hard martensite particles. Combining true uniform elongation as a measure for global formability with the true thickness strain at fracture for local formability the mechanical material response can be assessed on basis of uniaxial tensile testing incorporating all microstructural characteristics on a macroscopic scale. Based on these findings a new classification scheme for the recently developed high-strength multiphase steels with significantly better formability resulting of complex underlying microstructures is introduced. The scheme overcomes the steel designations using microstructural concepts, which provide no information about design and production properties.

  20. Elevated-temperature tensile properties of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel irradiated in the EBR-II, AD-2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Vitek, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of irradiated on the tensile properties of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel was determined for specimens irradiation in EBR-II at 390 to 550 0 C. Unirradiated control specimens and specimens aged for 5000 h at the irradiation temperatures were also tested. Irradiation to approximately 9 dpa at 390 0 C increased the strength and decreased the ductility compared with the unirradiated and aged specimens. Softening occurred in samples irradiated and tested at 450, 500, and 550 0 C

  1. Study of interaction of fatigue damage and ratcheting. Effect of a tensile primary load on torsion fatigue resistance of stainless steel 304 L at ambient temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakem, N.S.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of ratcheting on fatigue resistance of a stainless steel 304 L, used for reactor vessels, is studied experimentally. Lifetime of samples is reduced if a static constant tensile load (primary loading) is superimposed to cyclic torsion deformations (secondary loading). An equivalent deformation concept is developed to express a criterion of fatigue rupture under primary loading. No effect is noted on the curve of cyclic strain hardening. This fatigue analysis gives no information on cumulated axial deformation. Progressive elongation, observed during testing, is dependent of primary and secondary loading. Rupture is produced by fatigue because cumulated axial deformation is limited ( 4 cycles at rupture cumulated deformation is [fr

  2. Measurements of Bauschinger effect and transient behavior of a quenched and partitioned advanced high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Shun-lai; Sun, Li; Niu, Chao

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, the needs for new advanced high strength steels (AHSS) with high ductility and strength have rapidly increased to achieve the targets of more fuel-efficient and safer vehicles in automotive industry. However, several undesirable phenomena are experimentally observed during the forming of such materials, particularly with complex loading and large plastic deformation. Springback is one of the most important problems that should be compensated in sheet metal forming process. In this paper, we investigated the hardening behavior of a Q and P (quench and partitioning) steel designated by QP980CR, which is a new third generation advance high strength steel, from the Baosteel Group Corp. in Shanghai, China. The uni-axial tensile and cyclic simple shear tests were conducted. The uni-axial tensile tests were performed on the specimens at 0°, 45° and 90° to rolling direction (RD). The flow stress and transverse strain evolution were obtained in view of the digital image correlation (DIC) measurement. The plastic anisotropy was optimized from the uni-axial tensile tests and thereafter incorporated into the simulations of cyclic simple shear tests. The cyclic simple shear tests were conducted with three prestrains to measure the Bauschinger effect, transient behavior and permanent softening, and to determine the material parameters of the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening model

  3. Measurements of Bauschinger effect and transient behavior of a quenched and partitioned advanced high strength steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Shun-lai, E-mail: shawn@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Sun, Li [Manufacturing Process Research, General Motors China Science Lab, No. 56, Jinwan Road, Shanghai (China); Niu, Chao [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades, the needs for new advanced high strength steels (AHSS) with high ductility and strength have rapidly increased to achieve the targets of more fuel-efficient and safer vehicles in automotive industry. However, several undesirable phenomena are experimentally observed during the forming of such materials, particularly with complex loading and large plastic deformation. Springback is one of the most important problems that should be compensated in sheet metal forming process. In this paper, we investigated the hardening behavior of a Q and P (quench and partitioning) steel designated by QP980CR, which is a new third generation advance high strength steel, from the Baosteel Group Corp. in Shanghai, China. The uni-axial tensile and cyclic simple shear tests were conducted. The uni-axial tensile tests were performed on the specimens at 0°, 45° and 90° to rolling direction (RD). The flow stress and transverse strain evolution were obtained in view of the digital image correlation (DIC) measurement. The plastic anisotropy was optimized from the uni-axial tensile tests and thereafter incorporated into the simulations of cyclic simple shear tests. The cyclic simple shear tests were conducted with three prestrains to measure the Bauschinger effect, transient behavior and permanent softening, and to determine the material parameters of the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening model.

  4. Mechanical properties of low alloy high phosphorus weathering steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jena B.K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical behaviour of two low alloy steels (G11 and G12 was studied with respect to different phosphorus contents. Tensile strength and yield strength increased while percentage elongation at fracture decreased on increasing phosphorus content. The SEM and light optical photomicrograph of low phosphorus steel (G11 revealed ferrite and pearlite microstructure. On increasing phosphorus content from 0.25 wt.% to 0.42 wt.%, the morphology of grain changed from equiaxed shape to pan-cake shape and grain size also increased. The Charpy V notch (CVN impact energy of G11 and G12 steel at room temperature was 32 J and 4 J respectively and their fractographs revealed brittle rupture with cleavage facets for both the steels. However, the fractograph of G11 steel after tensile test exhibited ductile mode of fracture with conical equiaxed dimple while that of G12 steel containing 0.42 wt. % P exhibited transgranular cleavage fracture. Based on this study, G11 steel containing 0.25 wt. % P could be explored as a candidate material for weathering application purpose where the 20°C toughness requirement is 27 J as per CSN EN10025-2:2004 specification.

  5. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Zuogui; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Zhang Boping

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  6. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Songjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China); Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Zuogui [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Akiyama, Eiji [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: AKIYAMA.Eiji@nims.go.jp; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Boping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  7. Weldability and Impact Energy Properties of High-Hardness Armor Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, Aleksandar; Geric, Katarina; Jovanovic, Milos; Vukic, Lazic

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the weldability of high-hardness armor steel by the gas metal arc welding method has been investigated. The study was aimed at determining the weakness points of manual welding compared to automated welding through microhardness testing, the cooling rate, tensile characteristics and nondestructive analysis. Detailed studies were performed for automated welding on the impact energy and microhardness in the fusion line, as the most sensitive zone of the armor steel weld joint. It was demonstrated that the selection of the preheating and interpass temperature is important in terms of the cooling rate and quantity of diffusible and retained hydrogen in the weld joint. The tensile strength was higher than 800 MPa. The width of the heat-affected zone did not exceed 15.9 mm, measured from the weld centerline, while the impact energy results were 74 and 39 J at 20 and - 40 °C, respectively.

  8. Grain-orientation-dependent of γ–ε–α′ transformation and twinning in a super-high-strength, high ductility austenitic Mn-steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandari, M., E-mail: m.eskandari@scu.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarei-Hanzaki, A. [Hot Deformation & Thermo-mechanical Processing of High Performance Engineering Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohtadi-Bonab, M.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bonab, Velayat Highway (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Onuki, Y. [Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, Ibaraki University (Japan); Basu, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, ITM University, Gurgaon (India); Asghari, A. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Texas at San Antonio, Texas (United States); Szpunar, J.A. [Advanced Materials for Clean Energy, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2016-09-30

    A newly developed, austenitic lightweight steel, containing a low-density element, Al, exhibits tensile elongation up to 50% as well as high ultimate-tensile stress (tensile fracture at 1800 MPa) without necking behavior. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis is carried out to investigate the orientation dependence of the martensitic transformation in tensile testing to 30% strain at 323 K (25 °C). A pronounced γ→ε→α′ transformation is observed in <111> and <110>∥TD (TD: tensile direction) γ-grains. The α′-transformation textures is analyzed. Large misorientation spreads is seen in the <100>∥TD γ-grains. Interestingly, twin-assisted martensitic transformation is detected in the <111>∥TD followed by the twin boundary directly moving to a γ/α′ phase boundary. These phenomena are related to a change of Schmid factor for different orientations of grains.

  9. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1].

  10. Influence of Austempering Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Medium Carbon High Silicon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaksha, P. A.; Ravishankar, K. S.

    2017-08-01

    In the present investigation, the influence of austempering heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of medium carbon high silicon steel was evaluated. The test specimens were machined from the as-received steel and were first austenitised at 900 °C for 45 minutes, followed by austempering heat treatment in salt bath at various temperatures 300 °C, 350 °C and 400 °C for a fixed duration of two hours, after that those specimens were air-cooled to room temperature. The characterization studies were carried out using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffractometer (XRD) and then correlated to the hardness and tensile properties. Results indicate that, the specimens austempered at lower temperature i.e. at 300 °C, which offered high hardness, tensile strength and lower ductility (1857 MPa and 13.3 %) due to the presence of acicular bainite i.e. lower bainite and also some martensite in the microstructure. At 350 °C, reduction in the tensile strength and hardness was observed, but comparatively higher ductility, which was favored by the presence of bainite laths i.e. upper bainitic structure along with higher retained austenite content. Finally at 400 °C, reduction in both ductility and tensile strength was observed, which is due to the precipitation of carbides between the banite laths, however good strain hardening response was observed at austempering temperatures of 350 °C and 400 °C.

  11. High strength oil palm shell concrete beams reinforced with steel fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poh-Yap

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of lightweight oil palm shell to produce high strength lightweight sustainable material has led many researchers towards its commercialization as structural concrete. However, the low tensile strength of Oil Palm Shell Concrete (OPSC has hindered its development. This study aims to enhance the mechanical properties and flexural behaviours of OPSC by the addition of steel fibres of up to 3% by volume, to produce oil palm shell fibre-reinforced concrete (OPSFRC. The experimental results showed that the steel fibres significantly enhanced the mechanical properties of OPSFRC. The highest compressive strength, splitting tensile and flexural strengths of 55, 11.0 and 18.5 MPa, respectively, were achieved in the OPSFRC mix reinforced with 3% steel fibres. In addition, the flexural beam testing on OPSFRC beams with 3% steel fibres showed that the steel fibre reinforcement up to 3% produced notable increments in the moment capacity and crack resistance of OPSFRC beams, but accompanied by reduction in the ductility.

  12. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of the effect of microstructure on tensile behavior and retained austenite stability of thermo-mechanically processed transformation induced plasticity steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Kun [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Liss, Klaus-Dieter [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Timokhina, Ilana B. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3217 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V., E-mail: elenap@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-04-26

    Transmission electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the martensitic transformation and lattice strains under uniaxial tensile loading of Fe-Mn-Si-C-Nb-Mo-Al Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel subjected to different thermo-mechanical processing schedules. In contrast with most of the diffraction analysis of TRIP steels reported previously, the diffraction peaks from the martensite phase were separated from the peaks of the ferrite-bainite α-matrix. The volume fraction of retained γ-austenite, as well as the lattice strain, were determined from the diffraction patterns recorded during tensile deformation. Although significant austenite to martensite transformation starts around the macroscopic yield stress, some austenite grains had already experienced martensitic transformation. Hooke’s Law was used to calculate the phase stress of each phase from their lattice strain. The ferrite-bainite α-matrix was observed to yield earlier than austenite and martensite. The discrepancy between integrated phase stresses and experimental macroscopic stress is about 300 MPa. A small increase in carbon concentration in retained austenite at the early stage of deformation was detected, but with further straining a continuous slight decrease in carbon content occurred, indicating that mechanical stability factors, such as grain size, morphology and orientation of the retained austenite, played an important role during the retained austenite to martensite transformation.

  13. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzar, B.; Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 10 4 to 4 × 10 4  s −1 . The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading

  14. Some elevated temperature tensile and strain-controlled fatigue properties for a 9%Cr1Mo steel heat treated to simulate thick section material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, S.J.; Jacques, S.

    Current interest has been expressed in the usage of thick section 9%Cr1%Mo steel, particularly for UK Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) steam generator tubeplates. This paper presents the results of some preliminary mechanical property test work on a single cast of the steel, heat treated to simulate heavy ruling sections encompassing thicknesses likely to be met in the CDFR context. The microstructures of the simulated thick section material were found to remain predominantly as tempered martensite even at the slowest transformation cooling rates used (50 deg. C/h). The effect of microstructure is reflected in the elevated temperature proof stress, tensile strength and strain-controlled fatigue endurance which were found to be comparable with the properties established for thin section normalised and tempered 9%Cr1%Mo steel. These results are extremely encouraging and, taken in conjunction with the results from other simulation work on this material, further demonstrate the potential of thick section 9%Cr1%Mo steel. (author)

  15. High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel Strengthened by Multiply Nanoscale Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y. F.; Zuo, L.

    Recently, we have being focused on improving the strength without sacrificing ductility of High-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels by designing nanostructures. Several developments have been obtained, summarized as the following three parts: (a) Depressively nanoscale precipitates: A ferritic steel with finely dispersed precipitates reveals a yield strength of 760 MPa, approximately three times higher than that of conventional Ti-bearing high strength hot-rolled sheet steels, and its ultimate tensile strength reaches 850 MPa with an elongation-to-failure value of 18%. The finely dispersed TiC precipitates in the matrix provide matrix strengthening. The estimated magnitude of precipitation strengthening is around 458 MPa. The effects of the particle size, particle distribution and intrinsic particle strength have been investigated through dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations. The DD results show that strengthening is not only a function of the density of the nano-scale precipitates but also of their size. (b) Ultrafinely ferritic plate: An interstitial-free (IF) steel sheet with a cold-rolling reduction of 75% shows a high tensile strength (710MPa) while preserving a considerable plastic strain (13%). The ductility recovery with increasing the rolling reduction up to 75% is related with the decreasing both in lamellar spacings and cell blocks sizes. (c) Parallel nano-laminated austenite: A composite microstructure consisting of ferrite, bainitic ferrite (BF) laths and retained austenite (RA) platelets has been found for the steel with a chemical composition of 0.19C-0.30Si-1.76Mn-1.52Al (in mass fraction), processed with annealing and bainitic holding. The sample annealed at 820oC (for 120s) and partitioned at 400oC (for 300s) has the best combination of ultimate tensile strength (UTS, 682 MPa) and elongation to failure ( 70%) with about 26% of BF plates 16% RA in its microstructure.

  16. Prediction of failure strain and burst pressure in high yield-to-tensile strength ratio linepipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, M.; Bowie, G.

    2007-01-01

    Failure pressures and strains were predicted for a number of burst tests as part of a project to explore failure strain in high yield-to-tensile strength ratio linepipe. Twenty-three methods for predicting the burst pressure and six methods of predicting the failure strain are compared with test results. Several methods were identified which gave accurate and reliable estimates of burst pressure. No method of accurately predicting the failure strain was found, though the best was noted

  17. Prediction of failure strain and burst pressure in high yield-to-tensile strength ratio linepipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, M. [Institute of Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: mlx@ansto.gov.au; Bowie, G. [BlueScope Steel Ltd., Level 11, 120 Collins St, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia)

    2007-08-15

    Failure pressures and strains were predicted for a number of burst tests as part of a project to explore failure strain in high yield-to-tensile strength ratio linepipe. Twenty-three methods for predicting the burst pressure and six methods of predicting the failure strain are compared with test results. Several methods were identified which gave accurate and reliable estimates of burst pressure. No method of accurately predicting the failure strain was found, though the best was noted.

  18. Advanced high strength steels for automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galán, J.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The car industry is facing pressure because of the growing demand for more fuel-efficient passenger cars. In order to limit energy consumption and air pollution the weight of the carbody has to be reduced. At the same time, high levels of safety have to be guaranteed. In this situation, the choice of material becomes a key decision in car design. As a response to the requirements of the automotive sector, high strength steels and advanced high strength steels have been developed by the steel industry. These modern steel grades offer an excellent balance of low cost, light weight and mechanical properties.

    La industria del automóvil se enfrenta a una creciente demanda de vehículos de pasajeros más eficientes. Con el fin de disminuir el consumo de energía y la contaminación ambiental, el peso del vehículo tiene que ser reducido, al mismo tiempo que se garantizan altos niveles de seguridad. Ante esta situación, la elección de material se convierte en una decisión crucial en el diseño del vehículo. Como respuesta a las necesidades del sector automovilístico, nuevos aceros avanzados y de alta resistencia, han sido desarrollados por la industria siderúrgica. Dichos tipos de acero ofrecen un excelente equilibrio de precio, peso y propiedades mecánicas.

  19. Observation austenite memory and significant enhancement of tensile properties during cyclic reverse martensite transformation in a Fe-Ni-C TRIP steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alaei, Aida; Jafarian, Hamidreza, E-mail: jafarian@iust.ac.ir; Eivani, Ali Reza

    2016-10-31

    In this study, the influence of reverse martensite transformation (reverse transformation) on microstructure development and mechanical properties of Fe-24Ni-0.3C metastable austenitic TRIP steel was investigated. Microstructural characterization by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system proved that large amount of low angle boundaries appeared after 1-cycle of reverse transformation (γ→α→γ). It is also found that the 1-cycle reversely transformed austenite and original austenite exhibited similar shape, size and orientations indicating that austenite memory appeared during reverse transformation. By increasing the number of reverse transformation cycle, fraction of low angle boundaries significantly increased. Uniaxial tensile test exhibited that yield and ultimate tensile strengths significantly improved even by 1-cycle reverse transformation comparing to the starting material. In addition, further continuation of reverse transformation up to 5- or 7-cycle causes gradual increase in yield and ultimate tensile strengths as well. The significant improvement in yield strength should be originated from increasing the dislocation density that are introduced during reverse transformation.

  20. Yttrium addition for high temperatures stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtado, Nelson Cesar Chaves Pinto

    1997-07-01

    The current work studied the effect of Yttrium on the microstructure of 2% Nb, modified - HP steel, with respect to its mechanical properties. Alloys were prepared with nominal Yttrium additions of 0,1% and 0,25%. Microstructural analyses and mechanical tests were undertaken in the as-cast condition and after ageing for 100 h at 700 deg C, 900 deg C and 1100 deg C. Structural characterization was performed by optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM/EDS), X-ray diffractometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tensile testing was performed at room temperature and 871 deg C and creep testing at 925 deg C at a loading of 55 MPa. The material produced exhibited superior mechanical properties and surface oxidation resistance than traditional alloys of this class, even through gravity cast in a magnetic furnace. Agglomerates of Yttrium-rich phases were identifies in both as-cast and aged specimens, always associated with chromium carbides of characteristic morphologies. These morphologies, combined with the microstructural constituents, may have established the factors which resulted in the improved metallurgical stability of these alloys under the experimental testing conditions and temperatures which simulated real industrial service conditions and temperatures. (author)

  1. Tensile properties and fracture mechanism of IN-100 superalloy in high temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan T. Jovanović

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties and fracture mechanism of a polycrystalline IN-100 superalloy have been investigated in the range from room temperature to 900°C. Optical microscopy (OM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM applying replica technique were used for microstructural investigation, whereas scanning electron microscopy (SEM was utilized for fracture study. High temperature tensile tests were carried out in vacuumed chamber. Results show that strength increases up to 700°C, and then sharply decreases with further increase in temperature. Elongation increases very slowly (6-7.5% till 500°C, then decreases to 4.5% at 900°C. Change in elongation may be ascribed to a change of fracture mechanism. Appearance of a great number of microvoids prevails up to 500°C resulting in a slow increase of elongation, whereas above this temperature elongation decrease is correlated with intergranular crystallographic fracture and fracture of carbides.

  2. High strain rate tensile behavior of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh; Paman, Ashish; Madhu, V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to perform quasi static and high strain rate tensile tests on Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy under different strain rates ranging from 0.01–3500/s and also at temperatures of 25,100, 200 and 300 °C. The combined effect of strain rate, temperature and stress triaxiality on the material behavior is studied by testing both smooth and notched specimens. Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive and fracture models are established based on high strain rate tensile data obtained from Split hopkinson tension bar (SHTB) and quasi-static tests. By modifying the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms in the Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive model, a new J–C constitutive model of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy was obtained. The improved Johnson–Cook constitutive model matched the experiment results very well. With the Johnson–Cook constitutive and fracture models, numerical simulations of tensile tests at different conditions for Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy were conducted. Numerical simulations are performed using a non-linear explicit finite element code autodyn. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical simulation results and the experiment results. The fracture surfaces of specimens tested under various strain rates and temperatures were studied under scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  3. Multi-resolution Delta-plus-SPH with tensile instability control: Towards high Reynolds number flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, P. N.; Colagrossi, A.; Marrone, S.; Antuono, M.; Zhang, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    It is well known that the use of SPH models in simulating flow at high Reynolds numbers is limited because of the tensile instability inception in the fluid region characterized by high vorticity and negative pressure. In order to overcome this issue, the δ+-SPH scheme is modified by implementing a Tensile Instability Control (TIC). The latter consists of switching the momentum equation to a non-conservative formulation in the unstable flow regions. The loss of conservation properties is shown to induce small errors, provided that the particle distribution is regular. The latter condition can be ensured thanks to the implementation of a Particle Shifting Technique (PST). The novel variant of the δ+-SPH is proved to be effective in preventing the onset of tensile instability. Several challenging benchmark tests involving flows past bodies at large Reynolds numbers have been used. Within this a simulation characterized by a deforming foil that resembles a fish-like swimming body is used as a practical application of the δ+-SPH model in biological fluid mechanics.

  4. Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.; Savukov, V.P.; Runov, A.E.; Belov, V.A.; Sobolev, J.V.; Sobolev, V.V.; Pavlov, N.M.; Paton, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    Steels also containing Al, N and arsenic, are suitable for the construction of large components for high-power nuclear reactors due to their good mechanical properties such as good through-hardening, sufficiently low brittleness conversion temperature and slight displacement of the latter with neutron irradiation. Defined steels and their properties are described. (IHOE) [de

  5. EFFECT OF ACCELERATED WEATHERING ON TENSILE PROPERTIES OF KENAF REINFORCED HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar A.H.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Umar A.H1, Zainudin E.S1,2 and Sapuan S.M.1,21Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing EngineeringFaculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra MalaysiaSelangor, Malaysia.2Biocomposite LaboratoryInstitute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Product (INTROPUniversiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia.Email: umarhanan@yahoo.com ABSTRACTIn this study, a high-density polyethylene composite reinforced with kenaf (Hibiscus Cannabinus L. bast fibres (K-HDPE was fabricated and tested for durability with regard to weather elements. The material consists of 40% (by weight fibres and 60% matrix. Other additives, such as ultraviolet (UV stabiliser and maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene (MaPE as a coupling agent were added to the composite material. The biocomposite was subjected to 1000 hours (h of accelerated weathering tests, which consisted of heat, moisture and UV light, intended to imitate the outdoor environment. The tensile properties of the K-HDPE composite were recorded after 0, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 h of exposure to the accelerated weathering. Compared with neat high-density polyethylene (HDPE, the K-HDPE composite has 22.7% lower tensile strength when produced but displays a less rapid rate of strength deterioration under weathering (After 1000 h of exposure the tensile strength of K-HDPE drops 29.4%, whereas, for neat HDPE, it falls rapidly by 36%. Due to better stiffness, the Young’s modulus of the K-HDPE composite is much higher than that of neat HDPE. The fibres on the surface of the K-HDPE composite gradually start to whiten after 200 h of exposure and become completely white after 600 h of exposure. For neat HDPE, micro-cracking on the surface can be observed after 200 h of exposure and the stress-strain curve obtained from the tensile test indicates its increase in brittleness proportional to the amount of weathering time.

  6. Stress-strain relationship of high-strength steel (HSS) reinforcing bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggraini, Retno; Tavio, Raka, I. Gede Putu; Agustiar

    2018-05-01

    The introduction of High-Strength Steel (HSS) reinforcing bars in reinforced concrete members has gained much attention in recent years and led to many advantages such as construction timesaving. It is also more economical since it can reduce the amount of reinforcing steel bars used in concrete members which in turn alleviates the congestion of reinforcement. Up to present, the building codes, e.g. American Concrete Institute (ACI) 318M-14 and Standard National Indonesia (SNI) 2847:2013, still restrict the use of higher-strength steel reinforcing bars for concrete design up to Grade 420 MPa due to the possible suspected brittle behavior of concrete members. This paper evaluates the characteristics of stress-strain relationships of HSS bars if they are comparable to the characteristics of those of Grade 420 MPa. To achieve the objective of the study, a series of steel bars from various grades (420, 550, 650, and 700 MPa) was selected. Tensile tests of these steel samples were conducted under displacement-controlled mode to capture the complete stress-strain curves and particularly the post-yield response of the steel bars. The results indicate that all the steel bars tested had the actual yield strengths greater than the corresponding specified values. The stress-strain curves of HSS reinforcing bars (Grade 550, 650, and 700 MPa) performed slightly different characteristics with those of Grade 420 MPa.

  7. The negative effect of Zr addition on the high temperature strength in alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Jang, Min-Ho; Kang, Jun-Yun; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The effect of a Zr addition on the precipitation behavior and mechanical properties in Nb-containing alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels was investigated using tensile tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis. The TEM observation showed that a Zr addition led to the formation of a (Nb,Zr)(C,N) complex particle, which coarsened the Nb-rich carbonitride. Tensile tests were performed at an elevated temperature (700 °C), and both the tensile and yield strengths decreased with a Zr addition. This unexpected result of a Zr addition was due to the reduction of the precipitation strengthening by particle coarsening. - Highlights: • The effect of Zr on high temperature strength in AFA steel containing Nb was studied. • Both the tensile and yield strengths of an AFA steel decreased with Zr-addition. • This is due to the reduction of precipitation strengthening by particle coarsening. • Nb(C,N) and (Nb,Zr)(C,N) particles were precipitated in an AFA and Zr-added AFA steel. • The size of (Nb,Zr)(C,N) particle is much bigger than that of Nb(C,N) particle

  8. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  9. Reduced activation ODS ferritic steel - recent development in high speed hot extrusion processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksiuta, Zbigniew [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Bialystok Technical University (Poland); Lewandowska, Malgorzata; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology (Poland); Baluc, Nadine [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    The paper presents the microstructure and mechanical properties of an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS), reduced activation, ferritic steel, namely the Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy, which was fabricated by hot isostatic pressing followed by high speed hydrostatic extrusion (HSHE) and heat treatment HT at 1050 C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations revealed significant differences in the grain size and dislocation density between the as-HIPped and as-HSHE materials. It was also found that the microstructure of the steel is stable after HT. The HSHE process improves significantly the tensile and Charpy impact properties of the as-HIPped steel. The ultimate tensile strength at room temperature increases from 950 up to 1350 MPa, while the upper shelf energy increases from 3.0 up to 6.0 J. However, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) remains relatively high (about 75 C).These results indicate that HSHE is a promising method for achieving grain refinement and thus improving the mechanical properties of ODS ferritic steels. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Ductile fracture evaluation of ductile cast iron and forged steel by nonlinear-fracture-mechanics. Pt. 1. Tensile test by large scaled test pieces with surface crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaki, Akio; Ajima, Tatsuro; Inohara, Yasuto

    1999-01-01

    The ductile fracture tests of Ductile Cast Iron and Forged Steel under a tensile stress condition were conducted using large-scaled flat test specimens with a surface crack and were evaluated by the J-integral values, in order to propose an evaluation method of initiation of ductile fracture of a cask body with crack by nonlinear-fracture-mechanics. Following results were obtained. 1) 1 -strain relations of Ductile Cast Iron and Forged Steel under the tensile stress condition were obtained, which is necessary for the development of J-integral design curves for evaluating the initiation of ductile fracture of the cask body. 2) In case of Ductile Cast Iron, the experimental J-integral values obtained from strain-gauges showed a good agreement with the linear-elastic-theory by Raju and Newman at room temperature, in both elastic and plastic regions. But, at 70degC in plastic region, the experimental i-integral values showed middle values between those predicted by the linear-elastic-theory and by the non- linear-elastic- theory (based on the fully plastic solution by Yagawa et al.). 3) In case of Forged Steel at both -25degC and room temperature, the experimental i-integral values obtained from strain-gauges showed a good agreement with those predicted by the linear-elastic-theory by Raju and Newman, in the elastic region. In the plastic region, however, the experimental i-integral values fell apart from the curve predicted by the linear-elastic-theory by Raju and Newman, and also approached to those by the non-linear-elastic-theory with increasing strain.(author)

  11. Copper infiltrated high speed steels based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madej, M.; Lezanski, J.

    2003-01-01

    High hardness, mechanical strength, heat resistance and wear resistance of M3/2 high speed steel (HSS) make it an attractive material. Since technological and economical considerations are equally important, infiltration of high-speed steel skeleton with liquid cooper has proved to be a suitable technique whereby fully dense material is produced at low cost. Attempts have been made to describe the influence of the production process parameters and alloying additives, such as tungsten carbide on the microstructure and mechanical properties of copper infiltrated HSS based composites. The compositions of powder mixtures are 100% M3/2, M3/2+10% Wc, M3/2=30% WC. The powders were uniaxially cold compacted in a cylindrical die at 800 MPa. The green compacts were sintered in vacuum at 1150 o C for 60 minutes. Thereby obtained porous skeletons were subsequently infiltrated with cooper, by gravity method, in vacuum furnace at 1150 o C for 15 minutes. (author)

  12. Tensile and impact testing of an HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] control rod follower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Schuster, M.H.; Roberts, T.C.; Milian, L.W.

    1989-08-01

    The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) undertook a program to machine and test specimens from a control rod follower from the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Tensile and Charpy impact specimens were machined and tested from non-irradiated aluminum alloys in addition to irradiated 6061-T6 from the HFBR. The tensile test results on irradiated material showed a two-fold increase in tensile strength to a maximum of 100.6 ksi. The impact resistance of the irradiated material showed a six-fold decrease in values (3 in-lb average) compared to similar non-irradiated material. Fracture toughness (K I ) specimens were tested on an unirradiated compositionally and dimensionally similar (to HFBR follower) 6061 T-6 material with K max values of 24.8 ± 1.0 Ksi√in (average) being obtained. The report concludes that the specimens produced during the program yielded reproducible and believable results and that proper quality assurance was provided throughout the program. 9 figs., 6 tabs

  13. 76 FR 38697 - High Pressure Steel Cylinders From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... imports from China of high pressure steel cylinders, provided for in subheading 7311.00.00 of the... threatened with material injury by reason of LTFV and subsidized imports of high pressure steel cylinders... contained in USITC Publication 4241 (July 2011), entitled High Pressure Steel Cylinders from China...

  14. 77 FR 37712 - High Pressure Steel Cylinders From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ...), that an industry in the United States is materially injured by reason of imports of high pressure steel... preliminary determinations by Commerce that imports of high pressure steel cylinders from China were... Publication 4328 (June 2012), entitled High Pressure Steel Cylinders from China: Investigation Nos. 701-TA-480...

  15. A numerical study on the mechanical properties and the processing behaviour of composite high strength steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenstermann, Sebastian [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Ferrous Metallurgy; Vajragupta, Napat [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Materials Mechanics Group; Weisgerber, Bernadette [ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe AG (Germany). Patent Dept.; Kern, Andreas [ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe AG (Germany). Dept. of Quality Affairs

    2013-06-01

    The demand for lightweight construction in mechanical and civil engineering has strongly promoted the development of high strength steels with excellent damage tolerance. Nowadays, the requirements from mechanical and civil engineering are even more challenging, as gradients in mechanical properties are demanded increasingly often for components that are utilized close to the limit state of load bearing capacity. A metallurgical solution to this demand is given by composite rolling processes. In this process components with different chemical compositions were jointed, which develop after heat treatment special properties. These are actually evaluated in order to verify that structural steels with the desired gradients in mechanical properties can be processed. A numerical study was performed aiming to numerically predict strenght and toughness properties, as well as the procesing behaviour using Finite Element (FE) simulations with damage mechanics approaches. For determination of mechanical properties, simulations of tensile specimen, SENB sample, and a mobile crane have been carried out for different configurations of composite rolled materias out of high strebght structural steels. As a parameter study, both the geometrical and the metallurgical configurations of the composite rolled steels were modified. Thickness of each steel layer and materials configuration have been varied. Like this, a numerical procedure to define optimum tailored configurations of high strenght steels could be established.

  16. Development of Low Carbon Niobium Bearing High Strength F-B Dual Phase Steel with High Hole Expansion Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Xia, Ming-sheng; Xiong, Zi-liu; Du, Yan-bing; Qiao, Zhi-ming; Zhang, Hong-bo

    In the study a low carbon niobium bearing high strength F-B dual phase automobile steel with high hole expansion property has been investigated. Steels of different chemical composition have been investigated by simulation experiments of controlled rolling and cooling process to study the influences of chemical elements, especially for C,Nb and Ti, and cooling pattern on the mechanical properties, flangeability and microstructure of strips. So-called 3-stages cooling pattern was adopted in simulation experiments, combining ultra fast cooling in first stage, air cooling in middle stage and fast cooling in the last stage, and at the end of run-out table the temperature of rolled pieces drop to below Bs point. Optical microstructure and SEM morphology have been observed. Results indicate that it is possible to obtain dual phase microstructure of polygonal ferrite plus bainite in adopting 3-stages cooling pattern. The low temperature coiling method using 3-step controlled cooling pattern after hot rolling is effective to produce low carbon Nb bearing steel with high balance of strength-ductility-flangeability, in addition, higher carbon content of steel tend to be detrimental to flangeability of steel, due to much carbide precipitation at ferrite boundary. Based on the results of simulation experiments mill trial has been carried out and hot rolled high strength steel with tensile strength higher as 600Mpa and hole expansion ratio higher as 100% has been developed successfully.

  17. Properties of high temperature low cycle fatigue in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. H.; Han, C. H.; Ryu, W. S.

    2002-01-01

    Tensile and fatigue tests were conducted at R. T. and 300 .deg. C for type 304 and 316 stainless steel. Tensile strength and elongation decreased and fatigue life increased with temperature for both type 304 and 316 stainless steel. Dislocation structures were mixed with cell and planar at R. T. and 300 .deg. C for both type 304 and 316 stainless steel. Strain induced martensite of type 316 stainless steel was less than that of type 304 stainless steel and decreased with temperature. It is considered that strain induced martensite is an important factor to increase fatigue life at 300 .deg. C

  18. Tensile properties of duplex UNS S32205 and lean duplex UNS S32304 steels and the influence of short duration 475 ºC aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Souto Maior Tavares

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Duplex stainless steels are high strength and corrosion resistant steels extensively used in the petrochemical and chemical industries. The aging at 475 ºC for long periods of time provokes embrittlement and deterioration of corrosion resistance. However, short duration aging at 475 ºC may be used as heat treatment to improve mechanical resistance with small decrease in the other properties. In this work the flow stress curves of lean duplex UNS S32304 and duplex UNS S32205 steels were modeled with Hollomon's equation and work hardening exponents (n were determined. The analyses were conducted in specimens annealed and heat treated at 475 ºC for short periods of time. The aging at 475 ºC for 4 hours, 8 hours and 12 hours promoted significant hardening with small decrease of ductility. The work hardening exponents of both steels were compared, being higher in the duplex steel than in the lean duplex grade.

  19. The problems of high-nitrogen steels production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svyazhin, A.G.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Efimenko, S.P.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of existing technologies of high-nitrogen steel production shows that rational nitrogen content in mass production corresponds to moderate high values. Such steels can be smelted under normal or slightly elevated pressure in steelmaking units, using processes of mass- and special metallurgy. High-nitrogen steels with ''overequilibrium'' nitrogen content are promising, but technology and equipment for production of them are complicated, and production of such steels is therefore limited. (orig.)

  20. High Fragmentation Steel Production Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    J/ FTA c« ;« MO G SO KM s s P WS W-U Hi ; T 14 434 CASK G S3 K 11 ma WM MM MM ACTS 1 TC*4 U S7« ill GC 135 V M NTA «M FT...relative feed range 2nd digit -relative force range FMd 1 Very Low Fore* t 2 Low 2 3 Medium Low 3 4 Medium 4 5 Medium 5 6 Medium High 6 7 Medium

  1. Influence of liquid lead and lead-bismuth eutectic on tensile, fatigue and creep properties of ferritic/martensitic and austenitic steels for transmutation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorse, D., E-mail: dominique.gorse-pomonti@polytechnique.edu [CNRS-LSI, Ecole Polytechnique, route de Saclay, 91128, Palaiseau Cedex (France); Auger, T. [CNRS-MSSMAT, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290, Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Vogt, J.-B.; Serre, I. [CNRS-LMPGM, 59655, Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Weisenburger, A. [ForschungszentrumKarlsruheGmbH, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gessi, A.; Agostini, P. [ENEA, CR Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, Bologna (Italy); Fazio, C. [ForschungszentrumKarlsruheGmbH, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hojna, A.; Di Gabriele, F. [Ustav jaderneho vyzkumu Rez a.s., Husinec 130, Rez 25068 (Czech Republic); Van Den Bosch, J.; Coen, G.; Almazouzi, A. [SCK-CEN (Belgian Nuclear Research Centre), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Serrano, M. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-31

    In this paper, the tensile, fatigue and creep properties of the Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steel T91 and of the Austenitic Stainless (AS) Steel 316L in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or lead, obtained in the different organizations participating to the EUROTRANS-DEMETRA project are reviewed. The results show a remarkable consistency, referring to the variety of metallurgical and surface state conditions studied. Liquid Metal Embrittlement (LME) effects are shown, remarkable on heat-treated hardened T91 and also on corroded T91 after long-term exposure to low oxygen containing Liquid Metal (LM), but hardly visible on passive or oxidized smooth T91 specimens. For T91, the ductility trough was estimated, starting just above the melting point of the embrittler (T{sub M,E} = 123.5 deg. C for LBE, 327 deg. C for lead) with the ductility recovery found at 425 deg. C. LME effects are weaker on 316L AS steel. Liquid Metal Assisted Creep (LMAC) effects are reported for the T91/LBE system at 550 deg. C, and for the T91/lead system at 525 deg. C. Today, if the study of the LME effects on T91 and 316L in LBE or lead can be considered well documented, in contrast, complementary investigations are necessary in order to quantify the LMAC effects in these systems, and determine rigorously the threshold creep conditions.

  2. Possibilities for using higher-tensile, water quenched and tempered AlSiMn fine-grained structural steel for reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, F.

    1976-01-01

    On water quenching and tempering of weldable AlSiMn structural steels, particularly the grain refining process is made use of, i.e. that measure with the poorest influence on the weldability of steel. Precipitation hardening due to water quenching is, on subsequent tempering, set off to a large extent by means of precipitation resp. coagulation of iron carbides. Minimum yield points up to 580 N/mm 2 and, simultaneously, good viscosity can be obtained by means of water quenching from austeritic temperature and tempering between 550 0 C and 650 0 C, depending on tempering temperatures and sheet thickness. In the paper at hand, results are given, obtained from tests and experience with the steel Aldur 50/65 (the first figure indicates minimum yield points, the second one minimum tensile strength on sheet thickness up to 30 mm). These results are assumed to be essential, also in connection with the construction and working conditions of nuclear power plants. (orig./RW) [de

  3. Compactibility of atomized high-speed steel and steel 3 powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, L.D.; Gavrilenko, A.P.; Pikozh, A.P.; Kuz'menko, N.N.

    1985-01-01

    Spherical powders and powders of lammellar-scaly shape of high-speed R6M5K5 steel and steel 3 produced by the method of centrifugal atomization of a rotating billet under conditions of cold pressing in steel moulds are studied for thier compactability. Compacting pressure dependnences are establsihed for density of cold-pressed compacts of spherical and scaly powders. The powders of lammellar-scaly shape both of high-speed steel and steel 3 are found to possess better compactibility within a wide range of pressures as compared to powders of spherical shape. Compacts of the lammellar-scaly powders possess also higher mechanical strength

  4. High nitrogen stainless steels for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen alloying in stainless steels (SS) has myriad beneficial effects, including solid solution strengthening, precipitation effects, phase control and corrosion resistance. Recent years have seen a rapid development of these alloys with improved properties owing to advances in processing technologies. Furthermore, unlimited demands for high-performance advanced steels for special use in advanced applications renewed the interest in high nitrogen steels (HNS). The combination of numbers of attractive properties such as strength, fracture toughness, wear resistance, workability, magnetic properties and corrosion resistance of HNS has given a unique advantage and offers a number of prospective applications in different industries. Based on extensive studies carried out at IGCAR, nitrogen alloyed type 304LN SS and 316LN SS have been chosen as materials of construction for many engineering components of fast breeder reactor (FBR) and associated reprocessing plants. HNS austenitic SS alloys are used as structural/reactor components, i.e., main vessel, inner vessel, control plug, intermediate heat exchanger and main sodium piping for fast breeder reactor. HNS type 304LN SS is a candidate material for continuous dissolver, nuclear waste storage tanks, pipings, etc. for nitric acid service under highly corrosive conditions. Recent developments towards the manufacturing and properties of HNS alloys for application in nuclear industry are highlighted in the presentation. (author)

  5. Progress in the development of niobium alloyed high speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, J.R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of economy-grades of niobium alloyed high speed steel is described. Both the metallurgical concepts behind the steel design and the results of performance tests are presented. (Author) [pt

  6. Simulation of press-forming for automobile part using ultra high tension steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanabe I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ultra high tension steel has gradually been used in the automobile industry. The development of press-forming technology is now essential by reason of its high productivity and high product quality. In this study, tensile tests were performed with a view to understanding the material properties. Press-forming tests were then carried out with regard to the behaviors of spring back and deep-drawability, and manufacturing a real product. The ultra high tension steel used in the experiments had a thickness of 1 mm and a tensile strength of 1000 MPa. Finally, simulations of spring back, deep-drawability and manufacturing a real product in ultra high tension steel were conducted and evaluated in order to calculate the optimum-press-forming conditions and the optimum shape of the die. FEM with non-linear and dynamic analysis using Euler-Lagrange’s element was used for the simulations. It is concluded from the results that (1 the simulations conformed to the results of the experiments (2 the simulations proved very effective for calculating the optimum press conditions and die shape.

  7. Tensile Fracture Behavior and Failure Mechanism of Additively-Manufactured AISI 4140 Low Alloy Steel by Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyeol Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available AISI 4140 powder was directly deposited on AISI 4140 wrought substrate using laser engineered net shaping (LENS to investigate the compatibility of a LENS-deposited part with the substrate. Tensile testing at room temperature was performed to evaluate the interface bond performance and fracture behavior of the test specimens. All the samples failed within the as-deposited zone, indicating that the interfacial bond is stronger than the interlayer bond inside the deposit. The fracture surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy disperse X-ray spectrometry (EDS. Results show that the tensile fracture failure of the as-deposited part is primarily affected by lack-of-fusion defects, carbide precipitation, and oxide particles inclusions, which causes premature failure of the deposit by deteriorating the mechanical properties and structural integrity.

  8. Effect of corrosion and sandblasting on the high cycle fatigue behavior of reinforcing B500C steel bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina C. Vasco

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In a series of applications, steel reinforced concrete structures are subjected to fatigue loads during their service life, what in most cases happens in corrosive environments. Surface treatments have been proved to represent proper processes in order to improve both fatigue and corrosion resistances. In this work, the effect of corrosion and sandblasting on the high cycle fatigue behavior reinforcing steel bars is investigated. The investigated material is the reinforcing steel bar of technical class B500C, of nominal diameter of 12 mm. Steel bars specimens were first exposed to corrosion in alternate salt spray environment for 30 and 60 days and subjected to both tensile and fatigue tests. Then, a series of specimens were subjected to common sandblasting, corroded and mechanically tested. Metallographic investigation and corrosion damage evaluation regarding mass loss and martensitic area reduction were performed. Tensile tests were conducted after each corrosion exposure period prior to the fatigue tests. Fatigue tests were performed at a stress ratio, R, of 0.1 and loading frequency of 20 Hz. All fatigue tests series as well as tensile test were also performed for as received steel bars to obtain the reference behavior. The results have shown that sandblasting hardly affects the tensile behavior of the uncorroded material. The effect of sandblasting on the tensile behavior of pre-corroded specimens seems to be also limited. On the other hand, fatigue results indicate an improved fatigue behavior for the sandblasted material after 60 days of corrosion exposure. Martensitic area reductions, mass loss and depth of the pits were significantly smaller for the case of sandblasted materials, which confirms an increased corrosion resistance

  9. Mechanical Properties of High Manganese Austenitic Stainless Steel JK2LB for ITER Central Solenoid Jacket Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Toru; Kawano, Katsumi; Yamazaki, Toru; Ozeki, Hidemasa; Isono, Takaaki; Hamada, Kazuya; Devred, Arnaud; Vostner, Alexander

    A suite of advanced austenitic stainless steels are used for the ITER TF, CS and PF coil systems.These materials will be exposed to cyclic-stress at cryogenic temperature. Therefore, high manganese austenitic stainless steel JK2LB, which has high tensile strength, high ductility and high resistance to fatigue at 4 K has been chosen for the CS conductor. The cryogenic temperature mechanical property data of this material are very important for the ITER magnet design. This study is focused on mechanical characteristics of JK2LB and its weld joint.

  10. Causes of Failure of High-Tensile Stud Bolts Used for Joining Metal Parts of Tower Crane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingaev, A. K.; Gubaydulin, R. G.; Shaburova, N. A.

    2017-11-01

    The causes of the failure of a high-tensile stud 2M48-6gx500 10.9 made from steel grade 30HGSA which led to a temporary inoperability of a tower crane were investigated. The bolts were used to assemble the tower sections and collapsed after 45 days from the moment the crane was commissioned. The cracks in the fracture are identified as fatigue with the characteristic sites of nucleation, sustainable development and static dolomite. To determine the possible causes of stud bolts destruction, metallographic, durometric and mechanical tests were carried out from which it follows that the stud bolt material in its original state corresponded to the delivery conditions. The destruction of the stud bolt appears to have resulted from a combination of several unfavorable factors: uncertainty about the actual tension of the stud bolt due to the lack of information about the magnitude of the twist factor; partial displacement of the centers of the brackets holes and rotation of the stud bolt axis during the sections’ assembly; no tight contact on the support surfaces of the section brackets. All this led to a discrepancy between the actual design of the stud bolt, the appearance of additional forces and the destruction of the stud bolt.

  11. Effect of High Temperature on the Tensile Behavior of CFRP and Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, Houssam A.

    1999-01-01

    Concrete and other composite manufacturing processes are continuing to evolve and become more and more suited for use in non-Earth settings such as the Moon and Mars. The fact that structures built in lunar environments would experience a range of effects from temperature extremes to bombardment by micrometeorites and that all the materials for concrete production exist on the Moon means that concrete appears to be the most feasible building material. it can provide adequate shelter from the harshness of the lunar environment and at the same time be a cost effective building material. With a return to the Moon planned by NASA to occur after the turn of the century, it will be necessary to include concrete manufacturing as one of the experiments to be conducted in one of the coming missions. Concrete's many possible uses and possibilities for manufacturing make it ideal for lunar construction. The objectives of this research are summarized as follows: i) study the possibility of concrete production on the Moon or other planets, ii) study the effect of high temperature on the tensile behavior of concrete, and iii) study the effect of high temperature on the tensile behavior of carbon fiber reinforced with inorganic polymer composites. Literature review indicates that production of concrete on the Moon or other planets is feasible using the indigenous materials. Results of this study has shown that both the tensile strength and static elastic modulus of concrete decreased with a rise in temperature from 200 to 500 C. The addition of silica fume to concrete showed higher resistance to high temperatures. Carbon fiber reinforced inorganic polymer (CFRIP) composites seemed to perform well up to 300 C. However, a significant reduction in strength was observed of about 40% at 400 C and up to 80% when the specimens were exposed to 700 C.

  12. Behavior of surface residual stress in explosion hardened high manganese austenitic cast steel due to repeated impact loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Akira; Miyagawa, Hideaki

    1985-01-01

    Explosion hardened high manganese austenitic cast steel is being tried for rail crossing recently. From the previous studies, it became clear that high tensile residual stress was generated in the hardened surface layer by explosion and microcracks were observed. In this study, therefore, the behavior of surface residual stress in explosion hardened steel due to repeated impact loads was examined and compared with those of the original and shot peened steels. The results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) In the initial stage of the repetition of impact, high tensile surface residual stress in explosion hardened steel decreased rapidly with the repetition of impact, while those of the original and shot peened steels increased rapidly. This difference was attributed to the difference in depth of the work hardened layer in three testing materials. (2) Beyond 20 impacts the residual stress of three test specimens decreased gradually, and at more than 2000 impacts the compressive stress of about 500 MPa was produced regardless of the histories of working of testing materials. (3) The linear law in the second stage of residual stress fading was applicable to this case, and the range of the linear relationship was related to the depth of the work hardened layer of testing material. (4) From the changes in half-value breadth and peak intensity of diffraction X-ray, it was supposed that a peculiar microscopic strain exists in explosion hardened steel. (author)

  13. APT characterization of high nickel RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.; Russell, K.F

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The microstructures of several high nickel content pressure vessel steels have been characterized by atom probe tomography. The purposes of this study were to investigate the influence of high nickel levels on the response to neutron irradiation of high and low copper pressure vessel steels and to establish whether any additional phases were present after neutron irradiation. The nickel levels in these steels were at least twice that typically found in Western pressure vessel steels. Two different types of pressure vessel steels with low and high copper contents were selected for this study. The first set of alloys was low copper (∼0.05% Cu) base (15Ch2NMFAA) and weld (12Ch2N2MAA) materials used in a VVER-1000 reactor. The composition of the lower nickel VVER-1000 base material was Fe- 0.17 wt% C, 0.30% Si, 0.46% Mn, 2.2% Cr, 1.26% Ni, 0.05% Cu, 0.01% S, 0.008% P, 0.10% V and 0.50% Mo. The composition of the higher nickel VVER-1000 weld material was Fe- 0.06 wt % C, 0.33% Si, 0.80% Mn, 1.8% Cr, 1.78% Ni, 0.07% Cu, 0.009% S, 0.005% P, and 0.63% Mo. The VVER-1000 steels were irradiated in the HSSI Program's irradiation facilities at the University of Michigan, Ford Nuclear Reactor at a temperature of 288 o C for 2,137 h at an average flux of 7.08 x 10 11 cm 2 s -1 for a fluence of 5.45 x 10 18 n cm -2 (E >1 MeV) and for 5,340 h at an average flux of 4.33 x 10 11 cm -2 s -1 for a fluence of 8.32 x 10 1 28 n cm -2 (E >1 MeV). Therefore, the total fluence was 1.38 x 10 19 n cm -2 (E >1 MeV). The second type of pressure vessel steel was a high copper (0.20% Cu) weld from the Palisades reactor. The average composition of the Palisades weld was Fe- 0.11 wt% C, 0.18% Si, 1.27% Mn, 0.04% Cr, 1.20% Ni, 0.20% Cu, 0.017% S, 0.014% P, 0.003% V and 0.55% Mn. The Palisades weld, designated weldment 'B' from weld heat 34B009, was irradiated at a temperature of 288 o C and a flux of ∼7 x 10 11 cm -2 s -1 to a fast fluence of 1.4 x 10 19 n cm -2 (E >1 MeV). These three

  14. Irradiation testing of stainless steel plate material and weldments. Report on ITER Task T14, Part B. Tensile properties after 0.5 and 5 dpa at 350 and 500 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rensman, J.W.; Boskeljon, J.; Horsten, M.G.; De Vries, M.I.

    1997-10-01

    The tensile properties of unirradiated and neutron irradiated type 316L(N)-SPH stainless steel plate, EB weldments, 16-8 TIG-weldments, and full 16-8 TIG-deposits have been measured. Miniature 4 mm diameter test specimens of the European Reference Heat 1 and 2 (ERH), and 4 mm and some 8 mm diameter specimens of the weldments mentioned above, were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, simulating the first wall conditions by a combination of high displacement damage with high amounts of helium. The irradiation conditions were 0.5 and 5 displacements per atom (dpa) at 350K and 0.5 and 5 dpa at 500K. Testing temperatures ranged from 300K to 850K. This work was performed as part of the European Fusion Technology Programme for ITER as 'Irradiation testing of stainless steel' The report contains the experimental conditions and summarises the results. The tensile properties of the unirradiated ERH's 1 and 2 plate materials were found to differ slightly but significantly: ERH2 has a lower UTS, but higher yield strength and ductility than ERH1. The plate materials have lower yield strength in the unirradiated condition than all of the weldments (EB, TIG-weld and TIG-deposit), accompanied by a higher ductility of the plate materials. When irradiated at 350K the differences in strength between the plate and weld materials decrease, but the ductility of the plate remains higher than that of the weldments. A saturation of irradiation damage has taken place already at about 0.5 dpa. When irradiated at 500K the plate material continuously hardens up to 5 dpa, where it has lost all uniform plastic ductility. The weldments show similar but less dramatic hardening and loss of ductility as the plate material for both irradiation conditions. 54 figs., 17 tabs., 21 refs

  15. Fractal characteristics of fracture morphology of steels irradiated with high-energy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xian, Yongqiang; Liu, Juan [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Chonghong, E-mail: c.h.zhang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chen, Jiachao [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Yang, Yitao; Zhang, Liqing; Song, Yin [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Fractal dimensions of fracture surfaces of steels before and after irradiation were calculated. • Fractal dimension can effectively describe change of fracture surfaces induced by irradiation. • Correlation of change of fractal dimension with embrittlement of irradiated steels is discussed. - Abstract: A fractal analysis of fracture surfaces of steels (a ferritic/martensitic steel and an oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic steel) before and after the irradiation with high-energy ions is presented. Fracture surfaces were acquired from a tensile test and a small-ball punch test (SP). Digital images of the fracture surfaces obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to calculate the fractal dimension (FD) by using the pixel covering method. Boundary of binary image and fractal dimension were determined with a MATLAB program. The results indicate that fractal dimension can be an effective parameter to describe the characteristics of fracture surfaces before and after irradiation. The rougher the fracture surface, the larger the fractal dimension. Correlation of the change of fractal dimension with the embrittlement of the irradiated steels is discussed.

  16. An inverse method based on finite element model to derive the plastic flow properties from non-standard tensile specimens of Eurofer97 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Knitel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new inverse method was developed to derive the plastic flow properties of non-standard disk tensile specimens, which were so designed to fit irradiation rods used for spallation irradiations in SINQ (Schweizer Spallations Neutronen Quelle target at Paul Scherrer Institute. The inverse method, which makes use of MATLAB and the finite element code ABAQUS, is based upon the reconstruction of the load-displacement curve by a succession of connected small linear segments. To do so, the experimental engineering stress/strain curve is divided into an elastic and a plastic section, and the plastic section is further divided into small segments. Each segment is then used to determine an associated pair of true stress/plastic strain values, representing the constitutive behavior. The main advantage of the method is that it does not rely on a hypothetic analytical expression of the constitutive behavior. To account for the stress/strain gradients that develop in the non-standard specimen, the stress and strain were weighted over the volume of the deforming elements. The method was validated with tensile tests carried out at room temperature on non-standard flat disk tensile specimens as well as on standard cylindrical specimens made of the reduced-activation tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97. While both specimen geometries presented a significant difference in terms of deformation localization during necking, the same true stress/strain curve was deduced from the inverse method. The potential and usefulness of the inverse method is outlined for irradiated materials that suffer from a large uniform elongation reduction.

  17. 76 FR 33239 - High Pressure Steel Cylinders From the People's Republic of China; Initiation of Countervailing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-570-978] High Pressure Steel... countervailing duty (``CVD'') petition concerning imports of high pressure steel cylinders (``steel cylinders... of Antidumping Duties and Countervailing Duties on High Pressure Steel Cylinders from the People's...

  18. Tensile and low cycle fatigue properties of EUROFER97-steel after 16.3 dpa neutron irradiation at 523, 623 and 723 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Materna-Morris, E., E-mail: edeltraud.materna-morris@kit.edu; Möslang, A., E-mail: anton.moeslang@kit.edu; Schneider, H.-C., E-mail: hans-christian.schneider@kit.edu

    2013-11-15

    Neutron-irradiated specimens of the reduced-activation tempered martensitic steel EUROFER97 were tested by tensile and low cycle conditions to detect the impact of irradiation on strength and lifetime. The irradiation temperature ranged from 523 to 723 K with an accumulated dose of up to 16.3 dpa. Tensile tests revealed a significant irradiation-induced hardening below 673 K with a peak of ∼430 MPa at 573 K but none was seen at 723 K, as expected. Despite the significant irradiation-induced reduction of uniform elongation, the total elongation is only reduced by about 50% below 673 K. Post-irradiation strain-controlled fatigue tests have been carried out at T{sub irrad} = T{sub test} = 523, 623 and 723 K. Pronounced cyclic softening was observed in all specimens. At 623 and 723 K, neutron irradiation had no effect on fatigue life within the data scatter. A significant lifetime increase has been observed at T{sub irrad} = T{sub test} = 523 K that advances with decreasing stress amplitude Δε (1% → 0.5%) up to a factor of ten. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis revealed ductile fracture and fatigue striations on the fracture surfaces. After push–pull fatigue testing, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations showed the typical sub-cell formation, even at T{sub irrad} = T{sub test} = 523 K.

  19. Effects of hydrogen on the tensile strength characteristics of stainless steels; Effets de l'hydrogene sur les caracteristiques de rupture par traction d'aciers inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, R; Pelissier, J; Pluchery, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    This paper deals with the effects of hydrogen on stainless steel, that might possibly be used as a canning material in hydrogen-cooled reactors. Apparent ultimate-tensile strength is only 80 per cent of initial value for hydrogen content about 50 cc NTP/ 100 g, and reduction in area decreases from 80 to 55 per cent. A special two-stage replica technique has been developed which allows fracture surface of small tensile specimens (about 0.1 mm diam.) to be examined in an electron microscope. All the specimens showed evidence of ductile character throughout the range of hydrogen contents investigated, but the aspect of the fracture surfaces gradually changes with increasing amounts. (author) [French] On etudie les effets de l'hydrogene sur des aciers inoxydables, qui sont des materiaux de gainage possibles pour des reacteurs utilisant l'hydrogene comme gaz de refroidissement. On montre que la charge apparente de rupture a la traction n'est plus que 80 pour cent de sa valeur initiale lorsque la teneur en hydrogene atteint 50 cc TPN/ 100 g, et que la striction passe dans ces conditions de 80 a 55 pour cent. L'examen microfractographique qui a ete effectue avec succes par une technique de double replique malgre la petitesse des echantillons (0,3 mm de diametre environ), revele que tout en gardant un caractere ductile, l'aspect des surfaces de rupture evolue notablement avec la teneur en hydrogene. (auteur)

  20. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Aiying [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Lu, Jian, E-mail: jianlu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Y. Morris, E-mail: ymwang@llnl.gov [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility, leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.

  1. Design of Helical Self-Piercing Rivet for Joining Aluminum Alloy and High-Strength Steel Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, W. Y.; Kim, D. B.; Park, J. G; Kim, D. H.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, I. H.; Cho, H. Y. [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    A self-piercing rivet (SPR) is a mechanical component for joining dissimilar material sheets such as those of aluminum alloy and steel. Unlike conventional rivets, the SPR directly pierces sheets without the need for drilling them beforehand. However, the regular SPR can undergo buckling when it pierces a high-strength steel sheet, warranting the design of a helical SPR. In this study, the joining and forging processes using the helical SPR were simulated using the commercial FEM code, DEFORM-3D. High-tensile-strength steel sheets of different strengths were joined with aluminum alloy sheets using the designed helical SPR. The simulation results were found to agree with the experimental results, validating the optimal design of a helical SPR that can pierce high-strength steel sheets.

  2. Design of Helical Self-Piercing Rivet for Joining Aluminum Alloy and High-Strength Steel Sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W. Y.; Kim, D. B.; Park, J. G; Kim, D. H.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, I. H.; Cho, H. Y.

    2014-01-01

    A self-piercing rivet (SPR) is a mechanical component for joining dissimilar material sheets such as those of aluminum alloy and steel. Unlike conventional rivets, the SPR directly pierces sheets without the need for drilling them beforehand. However, the regular SPR can undergo buckling when it pierces a high-strength steel sheet, warranting the design of a helical SPR. In this study, the joining and forging processes using the helical SPR were simulated using the commercial FEM code, DEFORM-3D. High-tensile-strength steel sheets of different strengths were joined with aluminum alloy sheets using the designed helical SPR. The simulation results were found to agree with the experimental results, validating the optimal design of a helical SPR that can pierce high-strength steel sheets

  3. Effect of high temperature tempering on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the modified 410 martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Pasaribu, Rahmat Ramadhan; Sugandi, Moh. Tri; Sunardi

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports the influence of high tempering temperature and holding time on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the recently modified 410 martensitic stainless steel. The modified steel was prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The hardness and tensile strength of the steels decreased with increasing tempering temperature from 600 to 700 °C and with increasing holding time from 1 to 6 h. Based on microstructural images, it was observed the coarsening of lath martensite and of the metal carbides as well. However, a relatively high hardness and strength were still exibited by this steel after tempering at a such high temperature of 600-700 °C. The partition of Mo into the carbides identified by EDS analysis may correlate with this situation.

  4. Properties of Reinforced Concrete Steel Rebars Exposed to High Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Topçu, İlker Bekir; Karakurt, Cenk

    2008-01-01

    The deterioration of the mechanical properties of yield strength and modulus of elasticity is considered as the primary element affecting the performance of steel structures under fire. In this study, hot-rolled S220 and S420 reinforcement steel rebars were subjected to high temperatures to investigate the fire performance of these materials. It is aimed to determine the remaining mechanical properties of steel rebars after elevated temperatures. Steels were subjected to 20, 100, 200, 300, 5...

  5. Flexural Behavior of High-Volume Steel Fiber Cementitious Composite Externally Reinforced with Basalt FRP Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (HPFRCCs are characterized by unique tensile strain hardening and multiple microcracking behaviors. The HPFRCC, which demonstrates remarkable properties such as strength, ductility, toughness, durability, stiffness, and thermal resistance, is a class of fiber cement composite with fine aggregates. It can withstand tensile stresses by forming distributed microcracks owing to the embedded fibers in the concrete, which improve the energy absorption capacity and apparent ductility. This high energy absorbing capacity can be enhanced further by an external stiff fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP. Basalt fabric is externally bonded as a sheet on concrete materials to enhance the durability and resistance to fire and other environmental attacks. This study investigates the flexural performance of an HPFRCC that is externally reinforced with multiple layers of basalt FRP. The HPFRCC considered in the study contains steel fibers at a volume fraction of 8%.

  6. Large inelastic deformation analysis of steel pressure vessels at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikonen, K.

    2001-01-01

    This publication describes the calculation methodology developed for a large inelastic deformation analysis of pressure vessels at high temperature. Continuum mechanical formulation related to a large deformation analysis is presented. Application of the constitutive equations is simplified when the evolution of stress and deformation state of an infinitesimal material element is considered in the directions of principal strains determined by the deformation during a finite time increment. A quantitative modelling of time dependent inelastic deformation is applied for reactor pressure vessel steels. Experimental data of uniaxial tensile, relaxation and creep tests performed at different laboratories for reactor pressure vessel steels are investigated and processed. An inelastic deformation rate model of strain hardening type is adopted. The model simulates well the axial tensile, relaxation and creep tests from room temperature to high temperature with only a few fitting parameters. The measurement data refined for the inelastic deformation rate model show useful information about inelastic deformation phenomena of reactor pressure vessel steels over a wide temperature range. The methodology and calculation process are validated by comparing the calculated results with measurements from experiments on small scale pressure vessels. A reasonably good agreement, when taking several uncertainties into account, is obtained between the measured and calculated results concerning deformation rate and failure location. (orig.)

  7. High temperature tensile properties and deep drawing of fully green composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, research and development of materials using biomass sources are much expected to construct a sustainable society. The so-called green composite consisting of natural fibers and biodegradable resin, is one of the most promising materials in developing biomass products. In this study, especially, we focus on the tensile deformation behavior of the green composites reinforced with ramie woven fabrics at high temperature. The results show that the fracture strain at high temperatures increases larger than that of room temperature, and initial deformation resistance of the composites seen at room temperature does not appear at high temperatures. Thus, several conditions to cause more deformability of the green composites were found. Finally, in order to utilize such deformability, Lankford-values of the green composites were clarified, and deep drawing was carried out for sheet materials made of the green composites.

  8. The Influence of Lath, Block and Prior Austenite Grain (PAG) Size on the Tensile, Creep and Fatigue Properties of Novel Maraging Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, Steven; Hill, Paul; Rawson, Martin; Perkins, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The influence of martensitic microstructure and prior austenite grain (PAG) size on the mechanical properties of novel maraging steel was studied. This was achieved by looking at two different martensitic structures with PAG sizes of approximately 40 µm and 80 µm, produced by hot rolling to different reductions. Two ageing heat-treatments were considered: both heat-treatments consisted of austenisation at 960 °C, then aging at 560 °C for 5 h, but while one was rapidly cooled the other was slow cooled and then extended aged at 480 °C for 64 h. It is shown that for the shorter ageing treatment the smaller PAG size resulted in significant improvements in strength (increase of more than 150 MPa), ductility (four times increase), creep life (almost four times increase in creep life) and fatigue life (almost doubled). Whereas, the extended aged sample showed similar changes in the fatigue life, elongation and hardness it displayed yet showed no difference in tensile strength and creep. These results display the complexity of microstructural contributions to mechanical properties in maraging steels. PMID:28773086

  9. The Influence of Lath, Block and Prior Austenite Grain (PAG) Size on the Tensile, Creep and Fatigue Properties of Novel Maraging Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simm, Thomas; Sun, Lin; McAdam, Steven; Hill, Paul; Rawson, Martin; Perkins, Karen

    2017-06-30

    The influence of martensitic microstructure and prior austenite grain (PAG) size on the mechanical properties of novel maraging steel was studied. This was achieved by looking at two different martensitic structures with PAG sizes of approximately 40 µm and 80 µm, produced by hot rolling to different reductions. Two ageing heat-treatments were considered: both heat-treatments consisted of austenisation at 960 °C, then aging at 560 °C for 5 h, but while one was rapidly cooled the other was slow cooled and then extended aged at 480 °C for 64 h. It is shown that for the shorter ageing treatment the smaller PAG size resulted in significant improvements in strength (increase of more than 150 MPa), ductility (four times increase), creep life (almost four times increase in creep life) and fatigue life (almost doubled). Whereas, the extended aged sample showed similar changes in the fatigue life, elongation and hardness it displayed yet showed no difference in tensile strength and creep. These results display the complexity of microstructural contributions to mechanical properties in maraging steels.

  10. The analytical description of high temperature tensile creep for cavitating materials subjected to time variable loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocek, M.

    A phenomenological cavitation model is presented by means of which the life time as well as the creep curve equations can be calculated for cavitating materials subjected to time variable tensile loads. The model precludes the proportionality between the damage A and the damage rate (dA/dt) resp. Both are connected by the life time function tau. The latter is derived from static stress rupture tests and contains the loading conditions. From this model the life fraction rule (LFR) is derived. The model is used to calculate the creep curves of cavitating materials subjected at high temperatures to non-stationary tensile loading conditions. In the present paper the following loading procedures are considered: creep at constant load F and true stress s; creep at linear load increase ((dF/dt)=const) and creep at constant load amplitude cycling (CLAC). For these loading procedures the creep equations for cavitating and non-cavitating specimens are derived. Under comparable conditions the creep rate of cavitating materials are higher than for non-cavitating ones. (author)

  11. Modern high strength QT, TM and duplex-stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocquet, P. [Industeel (France); Luxenburger, G. [Aktiengesellschaft der Dillinger Huettenwerke, Dillingen/Saar (Germany); Porter, D. [Rautaruukki (Finland); Ericsson, C. [Avesta Polarit (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    Pressure vessels are commonly manufactured with normalised steel grades with a yield strength up to 355 MPa or with austenitic stainless steels when corrosion as to be considered. From three decades, modern steels with higher mechanical properties - up to yield strength of 960 Mpa - are available and largely used for other applications where weight saving is of major importance as per off-shore, bridges, cranes, shipbuilding, line pipes.. The paper presents these modern steel's families - TMCP (Thermo Mechanically Controlled Process), QT (Quenched and Tempered) and Duplex (austeno-ferritic) stainless - in comparison with the normalised and austenitic steel grades. The following aspects are presented: the main mechanical properties (tensile and Charpy) as per the requirements of the standards for pressure equipment; some examples of use of these modern steels in the industry are given; the limitations of the forming conditions are considered; the weldability aspects and welds properties are developed; the interest of the PWHT (Post Weld Heat Treatment) is discussed. (orig.)

  12. A Fine Grain, High Mn Steel with Excellent Cryogenic Temperature Properties and Corresponding Constitutive Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhui Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A Fe-34.5 wt % Mn-0.04 wt % C ultra-high Mn steel with a fully recrystallised fine-grained structure was produced by cold rolling and subsequent annealing. The steel exhibited excellent cryogenic temperature properties with enhanced work hardening rate, high tensile strength, and high uniform elongation. In order to capture the unique mechanical behaviour, a constitutive model within finite strain plasticity framework based on Hill-type yield function was established with standard Armstrong-Frederick type isotropic hardening. In particular, the evolution of isotropic hardening was determined by the content of martensite; thus, a relationship between model parameters and martensite content is built explicitly.

  13. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400-450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0-1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3-5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  14. The potential significance of microalloying with niobium in governing very high cycle fatigue behavior of bainite/martensite multiphase steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, P.; Cheng, C.; Gao, G.; Hui, W.; Misra, R.D.K.; Bai, B.; Weng, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We elucidate here the effect of microalloying with niobium (Nb) on very high cycle fatigue (VHCF) behavior in high-strength C–Mn–Si–Cr bainite/martensite (B/M) multiphase steels studied through ultrasonic fatigue testing. The tensile strength (R_m) and fatigue limit strength after 10"9 cycles (σ_w_9) and in the non-failure condition of the steel microalloyed with Nb were 1640 MPa and 900 MPa, respectively. Thus, the value of σ_w_9/R_m exceeded in comparison to conventional steels and was approximate 0.55. Three types of failure modes were observed in Nb-bearing steels depending on the surface condition, inclusion, and the matrix microstructure, i.e., surface defect-induced failure mode (S-mode), inclusion-induced failure mode (I-mode), and non-inclusion induced failure mode (N-mode). Only two failure modes were observed in Nb-free steels, the S-mode and the N-mode. The study clearly suggests that Nb had a distinct effect on the VHCF properties of B/M steels. The VHCF limit of Nb-bearing steel was enhanced by 200 MPa because of refinement of the microstructure and pinning of dislocations by randomly distributed nanometer-sized Nb(C, N) precipitates. It is underscored that microalloying with Nb is a potential approach to enhance VHCF properties in advanced high-strength steels.

  15. Inclusion control in high-performance steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holappa, L.E.K.; Helle, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    Progress of clean steel production, fundamentals of oxide and sulphide inclusions as well as inclusion morphology in normal and calcium treated steels are described. Effects of cleanliness and inclusion control on steel properties are discussed. In many damaging constructional and engineering applications the nonmetallic inclusions have a quite decisive role in steel performance. An example of combination of good mechanical properties and superior machinability by applying inclusion control is presented. (author)

  16. Process for preparing polyolefin gel articles as well as for preparing herefrom articles having a high tensile strength and modulus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1990-01-01

    A process is described for the preparation of highly stretchable high-molecular weight polyolefin gel articles and polyolefin gel articles prepared therefrom having combined high tensile strength and high modulus, wherein an initial shaped article of the polyolefin is exposed to or contacted with a

  17. Frequency interpretation of hold-time experiments on high temperature low-cycle fatigue of steels for LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udoguchi, T.; Asada, Y.; Ichino, I.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of frequency or hold-time on the low-cycle fatigue strength of AISI 316 stainless steel and SCM 3 Cr--Mo steel for fuel cladding, piping, and other structural members of LMFBR is investigated under high temperature conditions. Push-pull fatigue tests are conducted in air under conditions of fully reversed axial strain-control with a tensile strain hold-time ranging fromm 0 to 120 min for AISI 316, and with a tensile and an equal compressive strain hold-time ranging from 0 to 995 s for SCM 3. In these tests, a decrease of fatigue life is observed as the hold-time is increased. An empirical formula is presented which can predict well the effect of hold-time on high temperature low-cycle fatigue life in terms of frequency. The formula is a little different from those in the literature

  18. A frequency interpretation of hold-time experiments on high temperature low-cycle fatigue of steels for LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udoguchi, T.; Asada, Y.; Ichino, I.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of frequency or hold-time on the low-cycle fatigue strength of AISI 316 stainless steel and SCM 3 Cr-Mo steel for fuel cladding, piping and other structural members of LMFBR is investigated under high temperature conditions. Push-pull fatigue tests are conducted in air under conditions of fully reversed axial strain-control with a tensile strain hold-time ranging from 0 to 120 min for AISI 316, and with a tensile and an equal compressive strain hold-time ranging from 0 to 995 s for SCM 3. In these tests, a considerable decrease of fatigue life is observed as the hold-time is increased. An empirical formula is presented which can predict well the effect of hold-time on high temperature low-cycle fatigue life in terms of frequency. The formula is a little different from those in the literature. (author)

  19. Transformation of localized necking of strain space into stress space for advanced high strength steel sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakwattanaset, Aeksuwat; Suranuntchai, Surasak

    2018-03-01

    Normally, Forming Limit Curves (FLCs) can’t explain for shear fracture better than Damage Curve, this article aims to show the experimental of Forming Limit Curve (FLC) for Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) sheets grade JAC780Y with the Nakazima forming test and tensile tests of different sample geometries. From these results, the Forming Limit Curve (strain space) was transformed to damage curve (stress space) between plastic strain and stress triaxiality. Therefore, Stress space transformed using by Hill-48 and von-Mises yield function. This article shows that two of these yield criterions can use in the transformation.

  20. Ductile failure analysis of high strength steel in hot forming based on micromechanical damage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The damage evolution of high strength steel at elevated temperature is investigated by using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN model. A hybrid method integrated thermal tensile test and numerical technique is employed to identify the damage parameters. The analysis results show that the damage parameters are different at different temperature as the variation of tested material microstructure. Furthermore, the calibrated damage parameters are implemented to simulate a bugling forming at elevated temperature. The experimental results show the availability of GTN damage model in analyzing sheet formability in hot forming.

  1. Development of high strength hot rolled low carbon copper-bearing steel containing nanometer sized carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaniraj, M.P. [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Young-Min [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joonho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Nam Hoon [Sheet Product Design Group, Hyundai Steel Co., North Industrial Street 1400, 343-823, DangJin 343-823 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Ik; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Jung, Woo-Sang [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae-Hyeok, E-mail: jhshim@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, In-Suk, E-mail: insukchoi@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    A low carbon ferritic steel was alloyed with Ti, Mo and Cu with the intention of achieving greater increment in strength by multiple precipitate strengthening. The steel is hot rolled and subjected to interrupted cooling to enable precipitation of Ti–Mo carbides and copper. Thermodynamic calculations were carried out to determine equilibrium phase fractions at different temperatures. Microstructure characterization using transmission electron microscopy and composition analysis revealed that the steel contains ~5 nm size precipitates of (Ti,Mo)C. Precipitation kinetics calculations using MatCalc software showed that mainly body centered cubic copper precipitates of size < 5nm form under the cooling conditions in the present study. The steel has the high tensile strength of 853 MPa and good ductility. The yield strength increases by 420 MPa, which is more than that achieved in hot rolled low carbon ferritic steels with only copper precipitates or only carbide precipitates. The precipitation and strengthening contribution of copper and (Ti,Mo)C precipitates and their effect on the work hardening behavior is discussed.

  2. Effect of heat treatments on the tensile and electrical properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1997-01-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of CuCrZr produced by two different vendors have been measured following different heat treatments. Room temperature electrical resistivity measurements were also performed in order to estimate the thermal conductivity of these specimens. The thermomechanical conditions studied included solution quenched, solution quenched and aged (ITER reference heat treatment), simulated slow HIP thermal cycle (∼1 degrees C/min cooling from solutionizing temperature) and simulated fast HIP thermal cycle (∼100 degrees C/min cooling from solutionizing temperature). Specimens from the last two heat treatments were tested in both the solution-cooled condition and after subsequent precipitate aging at 475 degrees C for 2 h. Both of the simulated HIP thermal cycles caused a pronounced decreases in the strength and electrical conductivity of CuCrZr. The tensile and electrical properties were unchanged by subsequent aging in the slow HIP thermal cycles caused a pronounced decrease in the strength and electrical conductivity of CuCrZr. The tensile and electrical properties were unchanged by subsequent aging in the slow HIP thermal cycle specimens, whereas the strength and conductivity following aging in the fast HIP thermal cycle improved to ∼65% of the solution quenched and aged CuCrZr values. Limited tensile and electrical resistivity measurements were also made on two new heats of Hycon 3HP CuNiBe. High strength but poor uniform and total elongations were observed at 500 degrees C on one of these new heats of CuNiBe, similar to that observed in other heats

  3. Effect of heat treatments on the tensile and electrical properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of CuCrZr produced by two different vendors have been measured following different heat treatments. Room temperature electrical resistivity measurements were also performed in order to estimate the thermal conductivity of these specimens. The thermomechanical conditions studied included solution quenched, solution quenched and aged (ITER reference heat treatment), simulated slow HIP thermal cycle ({approximately}1{degrees}C/min cooling from solutionizing temperature) and simulated fast HIP thermal cycle ({approximately}100{degrees}C/min cooling from solutionizing temperature). Specimens from the last two heat treatments were tested in both the solution-cooled condition and after subsequent precipitate aging at 475{degrees}C for 2 h. Both of the simulated HIP thermal cycles caused a pronounced decreases in the strength and electrical conductivity of CuCrZr. The tensile and electrical properties were unchanged by subsequent aging in the slow HIP thermal cycles caused a pronounced decrease in the strength and electrical conductivity of CuCrZr. The tensile and electrical properties were unchanged by subsequent aging in the slow HIP thermal cycle specimens, whereas the strength and conductivity following aging in the fast HIP thermal cycle improved to {approximately}65% of the solution quenched and aged CuCrZr values. Limited tensile and electrical resistivity measurements were also made on two new heats of Hycon 3HP CuNiBe. High strength but poor uniform and total elongations were observed at 500{degrees}C on one of these new heats of CuNiBe, similar to that observed in other heats.

  4. Effect of the thermal ageing on the tensile and impact properties of a 18%Cr ODS ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouffié, A.L., E-mail: anne-laure.rouffie@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMA, Bât 453, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mines ParisTech, Centre des Matériaux P.M. Fourt, UMR CNRS 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry (France); Crépin, J.; Sennour, M. [Mines ParisTech, Centre des Matériaux P.M. Fourt, UMR CNRS 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry (France); Tanguy, B. [CEA, DEN, DANS, DMN, SEMI, Bât 625, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Pineau, A. [Mines ParisTech, Centre des Matériaux P.M. Fourt, UMR CNRS 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry (France); Hamon, D.; Wident, P.; Vincent, S. [CEA, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMA, Bât 453, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Garat, V. [AREVA NP, 10 rue J. Récamier, 69006 Lyon (France); Fournier, B. [Manoir Industries – Petrochem and Nuclear, Metallurgy Dpt., 12 rue des Ardennes, BP 8401 Pitres, 27108 Val de Reuil Cedex (France)

    2014-02-01

    The effects of the thermal ageing at 400 °C, 500 °C and 600 °C during 5000 h on the mechanical properties of a 18%Cr ODS ferritic steel are investigated. A hardening effect is observed after ageing at 400 °C and 500 °C, probably due to the presence of chromium rich α′ particles as suggested by the literature. The impact resistance and the ductility of the material are strongly lowered by the ageing at 600 °C. This embrittlement is characterized on the fracture surfaces by the presence of cleavage facets on the whole range of testing temperatures. The intermetallic σ phase is found to be responsible for the occurrence of cleavage fracture on the material aged at 600 °C, and thus for the significant embrittlement of this material. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides are also observed before and after thermal ageing. The lattice parameters of the σ phase and the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides observed in this 18%Cr ODS steel aged at 600 °C during 5000 h are measured.

  5. High temperature deformation of silicon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Calvillo, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.rodriguez@ctm.com.es [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Cataluna (Spain); Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain); Houbaert, Yvan, E-mail: Yvan.Houbaert@UGent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium); Petrov, Roumen, E-mail: Roumen.Petrov@ugent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium); Kestens, Leo, E-mail: Leo.kestens@ugent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium); Colas, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.colas@uanl.edu.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Centro de Innovacion, Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The microstructure and texture development during high temperature plane strain compression of 2% in weight silicon steel was studied. The tests were carried out at a constant strain rate of 5 s{sup -1} with reductions of 25, 35 and 75% at temperatures varying from 800 to 1100 Degree-Sign C. The changes in microstructure and texture were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction. The microstructure close to the surface of the samples was equiaxed, which is attributed to the shear caused by friction, whereas that at the centre of the specimens was made of a mixture of elongated and fine equiaxed grains, the last ones attributed to the action of dynamic recovery followed by recrystallization. It was found that the volume fraction of these equiaxed grains augmented as reduction and temperature increased; a 0.7 volume fraction was accomplished with a 75% reduction at 1100 Degree-Sign C. The texture of the equiaxed and elongated grains was found to vary with the increase of deformation and temperature, as the {gamma}-fibre tends to disappear and the {alpha}-fibre to increase towards the higher temperature range. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The plastic deformation of a silicon containing steel is studied by plane strain compression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Equiaxed and elongated grains develop in different regions of the sample due to recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Texture, by EBSD, is revealed to be similar in either type of grains.

  6. High temperature deformation of silicon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Calvillo, Pablo; Houbaert, Yvan; Petrov, Roumen; Kestens, Leo; Colás, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    The microstructure and texture development during high temperature plane strain compression of 2% in weight silicon steel was studied. The tests were carried out at a constant strain rate of 5 s −1 with reductions of 25, 35 and 75% at temperatures varying from 800 to 1100 °C. The changes in microstructure and texture were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction. The microstructure close to the surface of the samples was equiaxed, which is attributed to the shear caused by friction, whereas that at the centre of the specimens was made of a mixture of elongated and fine equiaxed grains, the last ones attributed to the action of dynamic recovery followed by recrystallization. It was found that the volume fraction of these equiaxed grains augmented as reduction and temperature increased; a 0.7 volume fraction was accomplished with a 75% reduction at 1100 °C. The texture of the equiaxed and elongated grains was found to vary with the increase of deformation and temperature, as the γ-fibre tends to disappear and the α-fibre to increase towards the higher temperature range. -- Highlights: ► The plastic deformation of a silicon containing steel is studied by plane strain compression. ► Equiaxed and elongated grains develop in different regions of the sample due to recrystallization. ► Texture, by EBSD, is revealed to be similar in either type of grains.

  7. Effects of thermal - mechanical treatment in the creep - and tensile properties of niobium at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botta Filho, W.J.; Pinatti, Dyonisio G.

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical behavior of Nb at high temperature was studied based upon the samples morfology. The samples were obtainned after thermal mechanical treatment of 50mm diameter and 250mm length ingot produced by electron beam vacuum. A lot of the samples was tensile tested as a function of temperature showing small interstitials solute effect and a matrix hardened probably by substitutionals. Other lot was creep tested at homologous temperature of 0,34 and stress between 80 and 120 MPa. The results of these tests were analysed as a function of the sample morfology and showed a dependence of the percentage of recrystalization and of the grain size on the minimum creep rate. The fracture analysis showed significant effect of the oxygen content although it didn't contribute to the creep results. (Author) [pt

  8. The tensile behavior of Ti36Ni49Hf15 high temperature shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.Q.; Zheng, Y.F.; Cai, W.; Zhao, L.C.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, ternary Ti-Ni-Hf alloys have attracted great interest in the field of high temperature shape memory materials research and development. Extensive studies have been made on its manufacture process, constitutional phases, phase transformation behavior, the structure, substructure and interface structure of martensite and the precipitation behavior during ageing. Yet up to date there is no report about the fundamental mechanical properties of Ti-Ni-Hf alloys, such as the stress-strain data, the variation laws of the yield strength and elongation with the temperature. In the present study, tensile tests at various temperatures are employed to investigate the mechanical behavior of Ti-Ni-Hf alloy with different matrix structures, from full martensite to full parent phase structure, with the corresponding deformation mechanism discussed

  9. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of low alloy and carbon steels in high temperature pure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Tsuzuki, R.

    1993-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of low alloy steels (A508 and SNCM630) and a carbon steel (SGV480) in high temperature water has been examined with relation to the heat treatment condition, including a long time aging, and the mechanical properties. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as observed in the highly hardened specimens, and there was observed in the highly hardened specimens, and there was observed in the highly hardened specimens, and there was observed a close relationship between hardness and SCC susceptibility. From the engineering point of view, it was concluded that adequate SR (stress relief) or tempering heat treatment is necessary to avoid the IGSCC of the welded structures made of low alloy and carbon steels. A508 heat treated with specified quench and temper did not show the SCC susceptibility, even after aging 10000 hours at 350, 400 and 450 degrees C. Tensile properties corresponding to the critical hardness for SSC susceptibility coincided with the values at the 'necking point' in the true stress-strain curve. Ductile-brittle transition observed in the fracture toughness test also occurred at around the critical hardness for SCC susceptibility. Therefore, it was conjectured that the limitation of plasticity was an absolute cause for the SCC susceptibility of the steels

  10. Influence of Ti on the Hot Ductility of High-manganese Austenitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Jianhua; Wu, Bowei; Su, Xiaofeng; Li, Shiqi; Ding, Hao

    2017-07-01

    The influence of Ti addition ( 0.10 wt%) on hot ductility of as-cast high-manganese austenitic steels has been examined over the temperature range 650-1,250 °C under a constant strain rate of 10-3 s-1 using Gleeble3500 thermal simulation testing machine. The fracture surfaces and particles precipitated at different tensile temperatures were characterized by means of scanning electron microscope and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS). Hot ductility as a function of reduction curves shows that adding 0.10 wt% Ti made the ductility worse in the almost entire range of testing temperatures. The phases' equilibrium diagrams of precipitates in Ti-bearing high-Mn austenitic steel were calculated by the Thermo-Calc software. The calculation result shows that 0.1 wt% Ti addition would cause Ti(C,N) precipitated at 1,499 °C, which is higher than the liquidus temperature of high-Mn austenitic steel. It indicated that Ti(C,N) particles start forming in the liquid high-Mn austenitic steel. The SEM-EDS results show that Ti(C,N) and TiC particles could be found along the austenite grain boundaries or at triple junction, and they would accelerate the extension of the cracks along the grain boundaries.

  11. Measurement and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Austenitic Stainless Steel Sheet under Biaxial Tensile Loading and In-Plane Reverse Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoso, Satoko; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    Biaxial tensile tests of austenitic stainless steel sheet (SUS304) 0.2mm thick have been carried out using cruciform specimens. The specimens are loaded under linear stress paths in a servo-controlled biaxial tensile testing machine. Plastic orthotropy remained coaxial with the principal stresses throughout every experiment. The successive contours of plastic work in biaxial stress space changed their shapes progressively, exemplifying differential work hardening. The geometry of the entire family of the work contours and the directions of plastic strain rates have been precisely measured and compared with those calculated using conventional yield functions. Yld2000-2d [Barlat, F., Brem, J.C., Yoon, J.W., Chung, K., Dick, R.E., Lege, D.J., Pourboghrat, F., Choi, S.H. and Chu, E., International Journal of Plasticity, Vol. 19, (2003), pp. 1297-1319.] with an exponent of 6 was capable of reproducing the general trends of the work contours and the directions of plastic strain rates with good accuracy. Furthermore, in order to quantitatively evaluate the Bauschinger effect of the test material, in-plane tension/compression tests are conducted. It was found that the non-dimensional (σ /σu) - Δɛ /(σu/ E) curves measured during unloading almost fall on a single curve and are not affected by the amount of pre-strain, where σ is the current stress during unloading, σu is the stress immediately before unloading, Δɛ (< 0) is the total strain increment during unloading.

  12. Tensile testing

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A complete guide to the uniaxial tensile test, the cornerstone test for determining the mechanical properties of materials: Learn ways to predict material behavior through tensile testing. Learn how to test metals, alloys, composites, ceramics, and plastics to determine strength, ductility and elastic/plastic deformation. A must for laboratory managers, technicians, materials and design engineers, and students involved with uniaxial tensile testing. Tensile Testing , Second Edition begins with an introduction and overview of the test, with clear explanations of how materials properties are determined from test results. Subsequent sections illustrate how knowledge gained through tensile tests, such as tension properties to predict the behavior (including strength, ductility, elastic or plastic deformation, tensile and yield strengths) have resulted in improvements in materals applications. The Second Edition is completely revised and updated. It includes expanded coverage throughout the volume on a variety of ...

  13. Tensile Strength of GFRP Reinforcing Bars with Hollow Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jun You

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP has been proposed to replace steel as a reinforcing bar (rebar due to its high tensile strength and noncorrosive material properties. One obstacle in using FRP rebars is high price. Generally FRP is more expensive than conventional steel rebar. There are mainly two ways to reduce the cost. For example, one is making the price of each composition cost of FRP rebar (e.g., fibers, resin, etc. lower than steel rebar. Another is making an optimized design for cross section and reducing the material cost. The former approach is not easy because the steel price is very low in comparison with component materials of FRP. For the latter approach, the cost could be cut down by reducing the material cost. Therefore, an idea of making hollow section over the cross section of FRP rebar was proposed in this study by optimizing the cross section design with acceptable tensile performance in comparison with steel rebar. In this study, glass reinforced polymer (GFRP rebars with hollow section and 19 mm of outer diameter were manufactured and tested to evaluate the tensile performance in accordance with the hollowness ratio. From the test results, it was observed that the tensile strength decreased almost linearly with increase of hollowness ratio and the elastic modulus decreased nonlinearly.

  14. Age-hardening susceptibility of high-Cr ODS ferritic steels and SUS430 ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dongsheng, E-mail: chen.dongsheng85@gmail.com [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko; Han, Wentuo; Je, Hwanil [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The role of oxide particles in α/α′ phase decomposition behavior; microstructure of phase decomposition observed by TEM. • The characteristics of ductility loss caused by age-hardening. • Correlation of phase decomposition and age-hardening explained by dispersion strengthened models. • Age-hardening susceptibility of ODS steels and SUS430 steel. - Abstract: The effect of aging on high-Cr ferritic steels was investigated with focusing on the role of oxide particles in α/α′ phase decomposition behavior. 12Cr-oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel, 15Cr-ODS steel and commercial SUS430 steel were isothermally aged at 475 °C for up to 10,000 h. Thermal aging caused a larger hardening in SUS430 than 15Cr-ODS, while 12Cr-ODS showed almost no hardening. A characteristic of the ODS steels is that the hardening was not accompanied by the significant loss of ductility that was observed in SUS430 steel. After aging for 2000 h, SUS430 steel shows a larger ductile–brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift than 15Cr-ODS steel, which suggests that the age-hardening susceptibility is lower in 15Cr-ODS steel than in conventional SUS430 steel. Thermal aging leaded to a large number of Cr-rich α′ precipitates, which were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlation of age-hardening and phase decomposition was interpreted by Orowan type strengthening model. Results indicate that oxide particles cannot only suppress ductility loss, but also may influence α/α′ phase decomposition kinetics.

  15. Effect of Deformation Temperature on Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Low-Carbon High-Mn Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grajcar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the influence of deformation temperature in a range from −40°C to 200°C on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of a low-carbon high-manganese austenitic steel. The temperature range was chosen to cope at the time during sheet processing or car crash events. Experimental results show that yield stress and ultimate tensile strength gradually deteriorate with an increase in the tensile testing temperature. The dominant mechanism responsible for the strain hardening of steel changes as a function of deformation temperature, which is related to stacking fault energy (SFE changes. When the deformation temperature rises, twinning decreases while a role of dislocation slip increases.

  16. Microstructural control and high temperature mechanical property of ferritic/martensitic steels for nuclear reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adetunji, G.J.

    1991-04-01

    The materials under study are 9-12% Cr ferritic/martensitic steels, alternative candidate materials for application in core components of nuclear power reactors. This work involves (1) Investigation of high temperature fracture mechanism during slow tensile and limited creep testing at 600 o C (2) Extensive study of solute element segregation both theoretically and experimentally (3) Investigation of effects by thermal ageing and irradiation on microstructural developments in relation to high temperature mechanical behaviour. From (1) the results obtained indicate that the important microstructural characteristics controlling the fracture of 9-12% Cr ferritic/martensitic steels at high temperature are (a) solute segregation to inclusion-matrix interfaces (b) hardness of the martensitic matrix and (c) carbide particle size distribution. From (2) the results indicate a strong concentration gradient of silicon and molybdenum near lath packet boundaries for certain quenching rates from the austenitizing temperature. From (3) high temperature tensile data were obtained for irradiated samples with thermally aged ones as control. (author)

  17. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a new type of austempered boron alloyed high silicon cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a new type of austempered boron alloyed high silicon cast steel has been developed, and its microstructures and mechanical properties at different temperatures were investigated. The experimental results indicate that the boron alloyed high silicon cast steel comprises a dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectic borides in as-cast condition. The dendritic matrix is made up of pearlite, ferrite, and the interdendritic eutectic boride is with a chemical formula of M2B (M represents Fe, Cr, Mn or Mo which is much like that of carbide in high chromium white cast iron. Pure ausferrite structure that consists of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite can be obtained in the matrix by austempering treatment to the cast steel. No carbides precipitate in the ausferrite structure and the morphology of borides remains almost unchanged after austempering treatments. Secondary boride particles precipitate during the course of austenitizing. The hardness and tensile strength of the austempered cast steel decrease with the increase of the austempering temperature, from 250 篊 to 400 篊. The impact toughness is 4-11 J昪m-2 at room temperature and the impact fracture fractogragh indicates that the fracture is caused by the brittle fracture of the borides.

  18. On the performance of circular concrete-filled high strength steel columns under axial loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahmoud El-Heweity

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a numerical study to investigate the performance of circular high-strength steel tubes filled with concrete (CFT under monotonic axial loading. A model is developed to implement the material constitutive relationships and non-linearity. Calibration against previous experimental data shows good agreement. A parametric study is then conducted using the model and compared with codes provisions. Strength and ductility of confined concrete are of primary concern. Variables considered are yield stress of steel tube and column diameter. The assessment of column performance is based on axial load carrying capacities and enhancements of both strength and ductility due to confinement. Two parameters namely strength enhancement factor (Kf and ductility index (μ are clearly defined and introduced for assessment. Results indicate that both concrete strength and ductility of CFT columns are enhanced but to different extents. The ductile behaviors are significantly evident. The increase in yield stress of steel tube has a minimal effect on concrete strength but pronounced effect on concrete ductility. However, reduction in ductility is associated with using high-tensile steel of Grade 70. The overall findings indicate that the use of high-strength tube in CFT columns is not promising. This finding may seriously be considered in seismic design.

  19. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2017-01-31

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, copper, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  20. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2015-11-13

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6 carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  1. Effect of prestrain on ductility and toughness in high strength line pipe steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, Y.; Besson, J. [Paristech, Evry (France). Centre des Materiaux, Mines Paris; Madi, Y. [Ecole d' Ingenieurs, Sceaux (France). Ermess EPF; Paristech, Evry (France). Centre des Materiaux, Mines Paris

    2009-07-01

    The anisotropic plasticity, ductility and toughness of an X100 steel pipeline was investigated both before and after a series of prestraining experiments. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of prestraining on ductility and toughness in high strength pipe steels. Results of the study showed that primary void growth and coalescence was dependent on initial plastic anisotropy and not dependent on tensile prestrain. Secondary void nucleation and growth was not influenced by either the initial plastic anisotropy or by prestraining. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed that the main damage mechanism was the void growth of primary dimples. Dimples in the prestrained materials were larger than those observed in materials that had not been prestrained. However, the effect on prestrain on dimple size was limited. Results showed both plastic and rupture anisotropies. It was concluded that prestraining induces a decrease in ductility, but has a significant impact on toughness. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  2. submitter Physical Properties of a High-Strength Austenitic Stainless Steel for the Precompression Structure of the ITER Central Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Arauzo, Ana; Roussel, Pascal; Libeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The ITER central solenoid (CS) consists of six independent coils kept together by a precompression support structure that must react vertical tensile loads and provide sufficient preload to maintain coil-to-coil contact when the solenoid is energized. The CS precompression system includes tie plates, lower and upper key blocks, load distribution and isolation plates and other attachment, support and insulating hardware. The tie plates operating at 4 K are manufactured starting from forgings in a high-strength austenitic stainless steel (FXM-19) with a stringent specification. Moreover, forged components for the lower and upper key blocks have to be provided in the same FXM-19 grade with comparably strict requirements. FXM-19 is a high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel, featuring high strength and toughness, ready weldability, and forgeability. It features as well higher integral thermal contraction down to 4 K compared with the very high Mn steel grade selected for the CS coil jackets, hence providing an ad...

  3. Mechanical Characterization of High-Performance Steel-Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites with Self-Healing Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Joo; Kang, Seok Hee; Ahn, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The crack self-healing behavior of high-performance steel-fiber reinforced cement composites (HPSFRCs) was investigated. High-strength deformed steel fibers were employed in a high strength mortar with very fine silica sand to decreasing the crack width by generating higher interfacial bond strength. The width of micro-cracks, strongly affected by the type of fiber and sand, clearly produced the effects on the self-healing behavior. The use of fine silica sand in HPSFRCs with high strength deformed steel fibers successfully led to rapid healing owing to very fine cracks with width less than 20 μm. The use of very fine silica sand instead of normal sand produced 17%–19% higher tensile strength and 51%–58% smaller width of micro-cracks. PMID:28788471

  4. The influence of grain size on the strain-induced martensite formation in tensile straining of an austenitic 15Cr–9Mn–Ni–Cu stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisko, A.; Misra, R.D.K.; Talonen, J.; Karjalainen, L.P.

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve understanding on the behavior of ultrafine-grained austenitic stainless steels during deformation, the influence of the austenite grain size and microstructure on the strain-induced martensite transformation was investigated in an austenitic 15Cr–9Mn–Ni–Cu (Type 204Cu) stainless steel. By different reversion treatments of the 60% cold-rolled sheet, varying grain sizes from ultrafine (0.5 μm), micron-scale (1.5 μm), fine (4 μm) to coarse (18 μm) were obtained. Some microstructures also contained a mixture of ultrafine or micron-scale and coarse initially cold-worked austenite grains. Samples were tested in tensile loading and deformation structures were analyzed after 2%, 10% and 20% engineering strains by means of martensite content measurements, scanning electron microscope together with a electron backscatter diffraction device and transmission electron microscope. The results showed that the martensite nucleation sites and the rate of transformation vary. In ultrafine grains strain-induced α′-martensite nucleates at grain boundaries and twins, whereas in coarser grains as well as in coarse-grained retained austenite, α′-martensite formation occurs at shear bands, sometimes via ε-martensite. The transformation rate of strain-induced α′-martensite decreases with decreasing grain size to 1.5 μm. However, the rate is fastest in the microstructure containing a mixture of ultrafine and retained cold-worked austenite grains. There the ultrafine grains transform quite readily to martensite similarly as the coarse retained austenite grains, where the previous cold-worked microstructure is still partly remaining

  5. Liquid Zn assisted embrittlement of advanced high strength steels with different microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Geunsu; Woo, In Soo; Suh, Dong Woo; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, liquid metal embrittlement (LME) phenomenon during high temperature deformation was investigated for 3 grades of Zn-coated high strength automotive steel sheets consisting of different phases. Hot tensile tests were conducted for each alloy to compare their LME sensitivities at temperature ranges between 600 and 900 °C with different strain rates. The results suggest that Zn embrittles all the Fe-alloy system regardless of constituent phases of the steel. As hot tensile temperature and strain rate increase, LME sensitivity increases in every alloy. Furthermore, it is observed that the critical strain, which is experimentally thought to be 0.4% of strain at temperatures over 700 °C, is needed for LME to occur. It is observed via TEM work that Zn diffuses along grain boundaries of the substrate alloy when the specimen is strained at high temperatures. When the specimen is exposed to the strain more than 0.4% at over 700 °C, the segregation level of Zn at grain boundaries seems to become critical, leading to occurrence of LME cracks.

  6. High quality steel casting for energy technics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, F.; Koefler, G.

    1982-01-01

    The casting of several chromium-molybdenum steels for steam and hydraulic turbines is discussed. Non-destructive testing of the castings is performed demonstrating the safety for use in nuclear technology. The effect of metallurgical parameters on steel casting quality, the heat treatment, and the effect of construction design on costs for fettling and repair weldings are considered. (Auth.)

  7. Grain growth behavior and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of iridium alloy DOP-26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKamey, C.G.; Gubbi, A.N.; Lin, Y.; Cohron, J.W.; Lee, E.H.; George, E.P.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes results of studies conducted to date under the Iridium Alloy Characterization and Development subtask of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program to characterize the properties of the new-process iridium-based DOP-26 alloy used for the Cassini space mission. This alloy was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the early 1980's and is currently used by NASA for cladding and post-impact containment of the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for interplanetary spacecraft. Included within this report are data generated on grain growth in vacuum or low-pressure oxygen environments; a comparison of grain growth in vacuum of the clad vent set cup material with sheet material; effect of grain size, test temperature, and oxygen exposure on high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility; and grain growth in vacuum and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of welded DOP-26. The data for the new-process material is compared to available old-process data

  8. Influence of Thermal Aging on Tensile and Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Type 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Kumar, T.; Nagesha, A.; Ganesh Kumar, J.; Parameswaran, P.; Sandhya, R.

    2018-05-01

    Influence of short-term thermal aging on the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 316LN austenitic stainless steel weld joint with 0.07 wt pct N has been investigated. Prior thermal exposure was found to improve the fatigue life compared with the as-welded condition. Besides, the treatment also imparted a softening effect on the weld metal, leading to an increase in the ductility of the weld joint which had a bearing on the cyclic stress response. The degree of cyclic hardening was seen to increase after aging. Automated ball-indentation (ABI) technique was employed toward understanding the mechanical properties of individual zones across the weld joint. It was observed that the base metal takes most of the applied cyclic strain during LCF deformation in the as-welded condition. In the aged condition, however, the weld also participates in the cyclic deformation. The beneficial effect of thermal aging on cyclic life is attributed to a reduction in the severity of the metallurgical notch leading to a restoration of ductility of the weld region. The transformation of δ-ferrite to σ-phase during the aging treatment was found to influence the location of crack initiation. Fatigue cracks were found to initiate in the base metal region of the joint in most of the testing conditions. However, embrittlement in the weld metal caused a shift in the point of crack initiation with increasing strain amplitude under LCF.

  9. Understanding the effect of uniaxial tensile strain on the early stages of sensitization in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, P.S., E-mail: psc0126@gmail.com [Techno India Agartala, Maheshkhola, Agartala, West Tripura PIN – 799004 (India); Guchhait, S.K.; Mitra, P.K. [Department of Metallurgical and Material Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Mukherjee, P.; Gayathri, N. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Mitra, M.K. [Department of Metallurgical and Material Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to understand the effect of different competing mechanisms controlling the overall degree of sensitization (DOS) of deformed austenitic stainless steel at the early stage of sensitization. The Double Loop Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (DL-EPR) studies were performed to characterize the Degree of Sensitization (DOS) as a function of both pre-defined strain and sensitization temperature. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to explain the phenomena qualitatively. A non monotonous behaviour in the variation of DOS has been observed with deformation and sensitization temperature. The presence of Deformation Induced Martensites (DIM) and their transformation into tempered martensites (α + M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) at higher temperatures was found to play major roles in controlling the overall sensitization and desensitization processes. - Highlights: • Interplay of various dynamic processes (four) in the early sensitization. • Deformation induced martensite (α′) playing major role at low temperature. • α (Tempered martensite) induced processes plays a vital role at higher temperatures. • Results in non monotonous variation in degree of sensitisation (DOS)

  10. High-cycle fatigue behavior of ultrafine-grained austenitic stainless and TWIP steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, A.S. [Materials Engineering Laboratory (4KOMT), Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Karjalainen, L.P., E-mail: pentti.karjalainen@oulu.fi [Materials Engineering Laboratory (4KOMT), Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2010-08-20

    High-cycle fatigue behavior of ultrafine-grained (UFG) 17Cr-7Ni Type 301LN austenitic stainless and high-Mn Fe-22Mn-0.6C TWIP steels were investigated in a reversed plane bending fatigue and compared to the behavior of steels with conventional coarse grain (CG) size. Optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine fatigue damage mechanisms. Testing showed that the fatigue limits leading to fatigue life beyond 4 x 10{sup 6} cycles were about 630 MPa for 301LN while being 560 MPa for TWIP steel, and being 0.59 and 0.5 of the tensile strength respectively. The CG counterparts were measured to have the fatigue limits of 350 and 400 MPa. The primary damage caused by fatigue took place by grain boundary cracking in UFG 301LN, while slip band cracking occurred in CG 301LN. However, in the case of TWIP steel, the fatigue damage mechanism is similar in spite of the grain size. In the course of cycling neither the formation of a martensite structure nor mechanical twinning occurs, but intense slip bands are created with extrusions and intrusions. Fatigue crack initiates preferentially on grain and twin boundaries, and especially in the intersection sites of slip bands and boundaries.

  11. Degradation of Peel and Tensile Strength of Bonded Panels Exposed to High Humidity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rider, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    .... The work presented in this report summarizes honeycomb studies undertaken in AIR task 98/186 that were designed to examine the influence that environmental exposure would have on the peel and tensile...

  12. Influence of magnetic arc oscillation and current pulsing on microstructure and high temperature tensile strength of alloy 718 TIG weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaprasad, K.; Ganesh Sundara Raman, S.; Mastanaiah, P.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the effect of magnetic arc oscillation and current pulsing on the microstructure and high temperature tensile strength of alloy 718 tungsten inert gas weldments. The magnetic arc oscillation technique resulted in refined Laves phase with lesser interconnectivity. The full benefits of current pulsing in breaking the dendrites could not be realized in the present study due to relatively higher heat input used in the welding process. In the direct aged condition weldments prepared using magnetic arc oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength due to the presence of refined and lesser-interconnected Laves particles. In the solution treated and aged condition, magnetic arc oscillated weldments exhibited lower tensile strength compared with the weldments made without arc oscillation due to the presence of large amounts of finer δ needles

  13. Improving Strength-Ductility Balance of High Strength Dual-Phase Steels by Addition of Vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yu; Hua, M.; Uusitalo, J.; DeArdo, A. J.

    For galvanized or galvannealed steels to be commercially successful, they must exhibit several attributes: (i) easy and inexpensive processing in the hot mill, cold mill and on the coating line, (ii) high strength with good formability and spot weldability, and (iii) good corrosion resistance, especially after cold forming. For good corrosion resistance, the coating must have sufficient coverage, be of uniform thickness, and most importantly, the coating must survive the cold stamping or forming operation. The purpose of this paper is to present research aiming at improving the steel substrate, such that high strength can be obtained while maintaining good global formability (tensile ductility), local formability (sheared-edge ductility), and good spot weldability. It is well-known that the strength of DP steels is controlled by several factors, including the amount of martensite found in the final microstructure. Recent research has revealed that the amount of austenite formed during intercritical annealing can be strongly influenced by the annealing temperature and the pre-annealing conditions of the hot band (coiling temperature) and cold band (% cold reduction). Current experiments have explored the combination of pre-annealing conditions and four annealing practices to help define the best practice to optimize the strength-formability balance in these higher strength DP steels. The steels used in these experiments contained (i) low carbon content for good spot weldability, (ii) the hardenability additions Mo and Cr for strength, and (iii) V for grain refinement, precipitation hardening and temper resistance. When processed correctly, these steels exhibited UTS levels up to 1000MPa, total elongation to 25%, reduction in area to 45%, and Hole Expansion Ratios to 50%. The results of this program will be presented and discussed.

  14. Tensile behaviour of geopolymer-based materials under medium and high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menna, Costantino; Asprone, Domenico; Forni, Daniele; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Bozza, Anna; Prota, Andrea; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Geopolymers are a promising class of inorganic materials typically obtained from an alluminosilicate source and an alkaline solution, and characterized by an amorphous 3-D framework structure. These materials are particularly attractive for the construction industry due to mechanical and environmental advantages they exhibit compared to conventional systems. Indeed, geopolymer-based concretes represent a challenge for the large scale uses of such a binder material and many research studies currently focus on this topic. However, the behaviour of geopolymers under high dynamic loads is rarely investigated, even though it is of a fundamental concern for the integrity/vulnerability assessment under extreme dynamic events. The present study aims to investigate the effect of high dynamic loading conditions on the tensile behaviour of different geopolymer formulations. The dynamic tests were performed under different strain rates by using a Hydro-pneumatic machine and a modified Hopkinson bar at the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The results are processed in terms of stress-strain relationships and strength dynamic increase factor at different strain-rate levels. The dynamic increase factor was also compared with CEB recommendations. The experimental outcomes can be used to assess the constitutive laws of geopolymers under dynamic load conditions and implemented into analytical models.

  15. Evaluation of creep rupture property of high strength ferritic/martensitic steel (PNC-FMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehira, Akihiro; Mizuno, Tomoyasu; Ukai, Shigeharu; Yoshida, Eiichi

    1999-04-01

    High Strength Ferritic/Martensitic Steel (PNC-FMS : 11Cr-0.5Mo-2W,Nb,V), developed by JNC, is one of the candidate materials for the long-life core of large-scale fast breeder reactor. The material design base standard (tentative) of PNC-FMS was established and the creep rupture strength reduction factor in the standard was determined in 1992. This factor was based on only evaluation of decarburization effect on tensile strength after sodium exposure. In this study, creep rupture properties of PNC-FMS under out of pile sodium exposure and in pile were evaluated, using recent test results as well as previous ones. The evaluation results are summarized as follows : a. Decarburization rate constant of pressurized tubes under sodium exposure is identical with stress free specimens. b. In case of the same decarburization content under out of pile sodium exposure, creep strength tends to decrease more significantly than tensile strength. c. Creep strength under out of pile sodium exposure showed significant decrease in high temperature and long exposure time, but in pile (MOTA) creep strength showed little decrease. A new creep rupture strength reduction factor, which is the ratio of creep rupture strength under sodium exposure or in pile to in air, was made by correlating the creep rupture strength. This new method directly using the ratio of creep rupture strength was evaluated and discussed from the viewpoint of design applicability, compared with the conventional method based on decarburization effect on tensile strength. (author)

  16. Ferrite channel effect on ductility and strain hardenability of ultra high strength dual phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi, Kumar B., E-mail: ravik@nmlindia.org [CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Patel, Nand Kumar [O.P Jindal University, Raigarh 496001 (India); Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Walunj, Mahesh; Mandal, Gopi Kishor [CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Venugopalan, T. [Tata Steel Limited, Jamshedpur 831001 (India)

    2017-02-08

    This study describes an effect of controlled austenite decomposition on microstructure evolution in dual phase steel. Steel sheets austenitized at various annealing temperatures were rapidly cooled to the inter-critical annealing temperature of 800 °C for the isothermal decomposition of austenite and then ultra fast cooled to room temperature. The scanning electron microscope analysis of evolving microstructure revealed ferrite nucleation and growth along prior austenite grain boundaries leading to ferrite network/channel formation around martensite. The extent of ferrite channel formation showed a strong dependence on the degree of undercooling in the inter-critical annealing temperature regime. Uniaxial tensile deformation of processed steel sheets showed extensive local inter-lath martensite damage activity. Extension/propagation of these local micro cracks to neighboring martensite grains was found to be arrested by ferrite channels. This assisted in delaying the onset of global damage which could lead to necking and fracture. The results demonstrated an alternate possible way of inducing ductility and strain hardenability in ultra high strength dual phase steels.

  17. Deterioration of mechanical properties of high strength structural steel S460N under transient state fire condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, Xuhong; Bijlaard, Frans S.K.; Kolstein, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mechanical properties of S460N under transient state fire condition are obtained. ► Elevated-temperature mechanical properties of steels are dependent on steel grades. ► No design standard is applicable to HSS S460N under transient state fire condition. ► Specific statements on various HSS in fire should be proposed in design standards. ► Research results offer accurate material property for structural design engineers. -- Abstract: 911 World Trade Centre Tragedy put fire safety of constructional steel structures into question. Since then, more and more research attention has been paid to the elevated-temperature mechanical properties of structural steels, which is a critical basis of evaluating the fire performance of steel structures. In the literature the available mechanical properties of structural steels under fire conditions were mainly obtained from steady state test method, as steady state test method is easier to perform than transient state test method and offers stress–strain curves directly. However, the transient state fire condition is considered to be more realistic to represent the real condition when constructions are exposed to fire. In order to reveal the deterioration of mechanical properties of the commonly used high strength structural steel S460N under transient state fire condition, tensile tests were conducted under various constant stress levels up to 800 MPa. The reduction factors of elastic modulus, yield and ultimate strengths of S460N under transient state fire condition were obtained and compared with current leading design standards and available literature. The application of such accurate elevated-temperature mechanical properties reduction factors of S460N can ensure a safe fire-resistance design and evaluation of steel structures with high strength steel S460N under transient state fire condition. This experimental study also supports other relative research on fire performance of steel structures with

  18. A study of microstructure, quasi-static response, fatigue, deformation and fracture behavior of high strength alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Manigandan

    The history of steel dates back to the 17th century and has been instrumental in the betterment of every aspect of our lives ever since, from the pin that holds the paper together to the Automobile that takes us to our destination steel touches everyone every day. Path breaking improvements in manufacturing techniques, access to advanced machinery and understanding of factors like heat treatment, corrosion resistance have aided in the advancement in the properties of steel in the last few years. In this dissertation document, the results of a study aimed at the influence of alloy chemistry, processing and influence of the quasi static and fatigue behavior of seven alloy steels is discussed. The microstructure of the as-received steel was examined and characterized for the nature and morphology of the grains and the presence of other intrinsic features in the microstructure. The tensile, cyclic fatigue and bending fatigue tests were done on a fully automated closed-loop servo-hydraulic test machine at room temperature. The failed samples of high strength steels were examined in a scanning electron microscope for understanding the fracture behavior, especially the nature of loading be it quasi static, cyclic fatigue or bending fatigue . The quasi static and cyclic fatigue fracture behavior of the steels examined coupled with various factors contributing to failure are briefly discussed in light of the conjoint and mutually interactive influences of intrinsic microstructural effects, nature of loading, and stress (load)-deformation-microstructural interactions.

  19. Solid-state diffusion bonding of high-Cr ODS ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon, E-mail: sh-noh@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta; Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel joined by solid-state diffusion bonding. > Free of precipitates and micro-voids at the bonding interface was existed. > Joints had the same tensile properties with anisotropy of the base material. > USE of joints was fully reserved in L-R bonding orientation. > Cracks did not propagate on the bonding interface at the Charpy impact test. - Abstract: Solid-state diffusion bonding (SSDB) was employed to join high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel (Fe-15Cr-2W-0.2Ti-0.35Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) blocks under uniaxial hydrostatic pressure using a high-vacuum hot press, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were investigated. High-Cr ODS ferritic steels were successfully diffusion bonded at 1200 deg. C for 1 h, without precipitates and microvoids at the bonding interface or degradation in the base materials. Transmission electron microscopic observation revealed that the nano-oxide particles near the bonding interface were uniformly distributed in the matrix and that the chemical composition across the bonding interface was virtually constant. At room temperature, the joint had nearly the same tensile properties and exhibited anisotropic behavior similar to that of the base material. The tensile strength of the joint region at elevated temperatures is nearly the same as that of the base material, with necking behavior at several micrometers from the bonding interface. The total elongation of the joint region decreased slightly at 700 {sup o}C, with an exfoliation fracture surface at the bonding interface. Although a small ductile-brittle transition temperature shift was observed in the joints, the upper shelf energy was fully reserved in the case of joints with L-R bonding orientation, for which cracks did not propagate on the bonding interface. Therefore, it is concluded that SSDB can be potentially employed as a joining method for high-Cr ODS ferritic steel owing to

  20. APPLICATION OF POWDER HIGH-SPEED STEEL AS ANTIFRICTION MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Beznak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of disulphide molybdenum additives on antifriction characteristics of powder high-speed steel produced by means of hot hydrostatic pressing is investigated. It is shown that disulphide molybdenum additives promote the decrease of coefficient of friction and temperature in hearth of friction as a result the increase of wear resistance of steel.

  1. Tensile toughness test and high temperature fracture analysis of thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, G.; Nakamura, T.; Berndt, C.C.; Leigh, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, an effective fracture toughness test which uses interface fracture mechanics theory is introduced. This method is ideally suited for determining fracture resistance of multilayered thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) consisting of ceramic and bond layers and, unlike other fracture experiments, requires minimal set-up over a simple tensile adhesion test. Furthermore, while other test methods usually use edge cracked specimens, the present test models a crack embedded within the coatings, which is more consistent with actual TBCs where failure initiates from internal voids or defects. The results of combined computational and experimental analysis show that any defects located within the ceramic coating can significantly weaken a TBC, whereas the debonding resistances of the bond coating and its interfaces are found to be much higher. In a separate analysis, the authors have studied fracture behavior of TBCs subjected to thermal loading in a high temperature environment. The computed fracture parameters reveal that when the embedded crack size is on order of the coating thickness, the fracture driving force is comparable to the fracture resistance of the coating found in the toughness test. In addition, the major driving force for fracture derives from the thermal insulating effect across the crack faces rather than the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion. The authors have also investigated the effects of functionally graded material (FGM) within TBCs and found its influences on the fracture parameters to be small. This result implies that the FGM may not contribute toward enhancing the fracture toughness of the TBCs considered here

  2. High strain rate mechanical response of buttress-grooved tensile specimens which have undergone environmental exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weirick, L.J.

    1976-07-01

    The purpose of the corrosion compatibility program was to identify the effect of corrosion on the mechanical performance of the buttress-grooved section of the 105-mm penetrator, a section which must sustain a load during launch. It is important that the environment not deteriorate the mechanical integrity of these grooves during long-term storage. Both coated and uncoated test specimens which simulate both geometrical shape and residual stress patterns were exposed to corrosive environments of moist air, distilled water, and salt water. Some of these tests also incorporated the galvanic coupling caused by the aluminum sabot. After exposure to the corrosive environments, the specimens were pulled on a high strain rate tensile machine which simulated launch conditions. Results show that the galvanic coupling due to the aluminum sabot caused no deterioration of mechanical properties. Results do indicate that the coating applied caused a significant reduction in the fracture load. There was a dichotomy in the results as affected by the environment. Uncoated test specimens showed no change in fracture load with increasing severity of corrosion environment, whereas the coated specimens indicated a trend of decreasing load-bearing ability with increasing corrosion

  3. High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of Silver Nanowires: Rate-Dependent Brittle-to-Ductile Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandramoorthy, Rajaprakash; Gao, Wei; Bernal, Rodrigo; Espinosa, Horacio

    2016-01-13

    The characterization of nanomaterials under high strain rates is critical to understand their suitability for dynamic applications such as nanoresonators and nanoswitches. It is also of great theoretical importance to explore nanomechanics with dynamic and rate effects. Here, we report in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) tensile testing of bicrystalline silver nanowires at strain rates up to 2/s, which is 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in the literature. The experiments are enabled by a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) with fast response time. It was identified that the nanowire plastic deformation has a small activation volume (ductile failure mode transition was observed at a threshold strain rate of 0.2/s. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that along the nanowire, dislocation density and spatial distribution of plastic regions increase with increasing strain rate. Furthermore, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations show that deformation mechanisms such as grain boundary migration and dislocation interactions are responsible for such ductility. Finally, the MD and experimental results were interpreted using dislocation nucleation theory. The predicted yield stress values are in agreement with the experimental results for strain rates above 0.2/s when ductility is pronounced. At low strain rates, random imperfections on the nanowire surface trigger localized plasticity, leading to a brittle-like failure.

  4. 77 FR 37384 - High Pressure Steel Cylinders From the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-570-978] High Pressure Steel...''), the Department is issuing a countervailing duty order on high pressure steel cylinders (``steel... investigation of steel cylinders from the PRC. See High Pressure Steel Cylinders From the People's Republic of...

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water and alternative stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.

    2015-01-01

    In order to clarify the effect of SFE on SCC resistance of austenitic stainless steels and to develop the alternative material of Type 316LN stainless steel for BWR application, the effect of chemical composition and heat treatment on SFE value and SCCGR in oxygenated high temperature water were studied. The correlation factors between SFE values for 54 heats of materials and their chemical compositions for nickel, molybdenum, chromium, manganese, nitrogen, silicon and carbon were obtained. From these correlation factors, original formulae for SFE values calculation of austenitic stainless steels in the SHTWC, SHTFC and AGG conditions were established. The maximum crack length, average crack length and cracked area of the IGSCC for 33 heats were evaluated as IGSCC resistance in oxygenated high temperature water. The IGSCC resistance of strain hardened nonsensitized austenitic stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water increases with increasing of nickel contents and SFE values. From this study, it is suggested that the SFE value is a key parameter for the IGSCC resistance of non-sensitized strain hardened austenitic stainless steels. As an alternative material of Type 316LN stainless steel, increased SFE value material, which is high nickel, high chromium, low silicon and low nitrogen material, is recommendable. (author)

  6. Direct observation of radial distribution change during tensile deformation of metallic glass by high energy X-ray diffraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasu, Toshio, E-mail: nasu@kekexafs.kj.yamagata-u.ac.j [Faculty of Education, Arts and Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Sasaki, Motokatsu [Faculty of Education, Arts and Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Usuki, Takeshi; Sekine, Mai [Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Takigawa, Yorinobu; Higashi, Kenji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Harima Science Garden City, Sayo town, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Sakurai, Masaki; Wei Zhang; Inoue, Akihisa [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-08-26

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the micro-mechanism of deformation behavior of metallic glasses. We report the results of direct observations of short-range and medium-range structural change during tensile deformation of metallic glasses by high energy X-ray diffraction method. Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and Ni{sub 30}Zr{sub 70} metallic glass samples in the ribbon shape (1.5 mm width and 25 mum) were made by using rapid quenching method. Tensile deformation added to the sample was made by using special equipment adopted for measuring the high energy X-ray diffraction. The peaks in pair distribution function g(r) for Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and N{sub 30}iZr{sub 70} metallic glasses move zigzag into front and into rear during tensile deformation. These results of direct observation on atomic distribution change for Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and Ni{sub 30}Zr{sub 70} metallic glass ribbons during tensile deformation suggest that the micro-relaxations occur.

  7. Effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded high strength aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reveals the effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded AA7075 aluminium alloy. This alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. As welded joint strength is much lower than the base metal strength and hence, a simple aging treatment has been given to improve the tensile strength of the joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Post weld aging treatment is accompanied by an increase in tensile strength and tensile ductility

  8. Effects Of Anodic Protection On SCC Behavior Of X80 Pipeline Steel In High-pH Carbonate-Bicarbonate Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao W.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The potentiodynamic polarization test and slow strain rate tensile tests of X80 pipeline steel were performed in 0.5M Na2CO3-1M NaHCO3 solution to study the electrochemical and stress corrosion cracking properties. The results of potentiodynamic polarization test show that there is an obvious stable passive region, about from 0v to 0.8V (SCE, indicating that anodic protection is feasible. The results of slow strain rate tensile tests show that the stress corrosion cracking sensibility is high and cathodic protection effect is restricted due to the hydrogen permeation. However, the elongation, yielding strength and tensile strength all increase with anodic protection. The higher anodic protection potential in the stable passive region is benefit to improve tensile strength and yielding strength. However, the higher elongation is obtained at 0.5V (SCE anodic protection potential.

  9. Properties of aluminum alloys tensile, creep, and fatigue data at high and low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    This book compiles more than 300 tables listing typical average properties of a wide range of aluminum alloys. The individual test results were compiled, plotted in various ways, and analyzed. The average values from the tensile and creep tests were then normalized to the published typical room-temperature tensile properties of the respective alloys for easy comparison. This extensive project was done by Alcoa Laboratories over a period of several years. The types of data presented include: Typical Mechanical Properties of Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys at Various Temperatures, including tensile properties at subzero temperatures, at temperature after various holding times at the test temperature, and at room temperature after exposure at various temperatures for various holding times; creep rupture strengths for various times at various temperatures; stresses required to generate various amounts of creep in various lengths of time; rotating-beam fatigue strengths; modulus of elasticity as a function of t...

  10. Analysis of Deformation and Failure Behaviors of TIG Welded Dissimilar Metal Joints Using Miniature Tensile Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji-Hwan; Jahanzeb, Nabeel; Kim, Min-Seong; Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Shi-Hoon [Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The deformation and failure behaviors of dissimilar metal joints between SS400 steel and STS316L steel were investigated. The dissimilar metal joints were fabricated using the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process with STS309 steel as a filler metal. The microstructures of the dissimilar metal joints were investigated using an optical microscope and EBSD technique. The mechanical properties of the base metal (BM), heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal (WM) were measured using a micro-hardness and micro-tension tester combined with the digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The HAZ of the STS316L steel exhibited the highest micro-hardness value, and yield/tensile strengths, while the BM of the SS440 steel exhibited the lowest micro-hardness value and yield /tensile strengths. The grain size refinement in the HAZ of SS400 steel induced an enhancement of micro-hardness value and yield/tensile strengths compared to the BM of the SS400 steel. The WM, which consists of primary δ-ferrite and a matrix of austenite phase, exhibited relatively a high micro-hardness value, yield /tensile strengths and elongation compared to the BM and HAZ of the SS400 steel.

  11. Development of High Heat Input Welding High Strength Steel Plate for Oil Storage Tank in Xinyu Steel Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hemin; Dong, Fujun; Liu, Xiaolin; Xiong, Xiong

    This essay introduces the developed high-heat input welding quenched and tempered pressure vessel steel 12MnNiVR for oil storage tank by Xinyu Steel, which passed the review by the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Standards Technical Committee in 2009. The review comments that compared to the domestic and foreign similar steel standard, the key technical index of enterprise standard were in advanced level. After the heat input of 100kJ/cm electro-gas welding, welded points were still with excellent low temperature toughness at -20°C. The steel plate may be constructed for oil storage tank, which has been permitted by thickness range from 10 to 40mm, and design temperature among -20°C-100°C. It studied microstructure genetic effects mechanical properties of the steel. Many production practices indicated that the mechanical properties of products and the steel by stress relief heat treatment of steel were excellent, with pretreatment of hot metal, converter refining, external refining, protective casting, TMCP and heat treatment process measurements. The stability of performance and matured technology of Xinyu Steel support the products could completely service the demand of steel constructed for 10-15 million cubic meters large oil storage tank.

  12. Peculiar Features of Thermal Aging and Degradation of Rapidly Quenched Stainless Steels under High-Temperature Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulga, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    This article presents the results of comparative studies of mechanical properties and microstructure of nuclear fuel tubes and semifinished stainless steel items fabricated by consolidation of rapidly quenched powders and by conventional technology after high-temperature exposures at 600 and 700°C. Tensile tests of nuclear fuel tube ring specimens of stainless austenitic steel of grade AISI 316 and ferritic-martensitic steel are performed at room temperature. The microstructure and distribution of carbon and boron are analyzed by metallography and autoradiography in nuclear fuel tubes and semifinished items. Rapidly quenched powders of the considered steels are obtained by the plasma rotating electrode process. Positive influence of consolidation of rapidly quenched powders on mechanical properties after high-temperature aging is confirmed. The correlation between homogeneous distribution of carbon and boron and mechanical properties of the considered steel is determined. The effects of thermal aging and degradation of the considered steels are determined at 600°C and 700°C, respectively.

  13. Study on Fatigue Characteristics of High-Strength Steel Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hong Suk; Yoo, Seung Won; Park, Jong Chan [Hyundai Motor Group, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    High-strength steel has replaced mild steel as the material of choice for truck decks or frames, owing to the growing demand for lightweight vehicles. Although studies on the weld fatigue characteristics of mild steel are available, studies on high-strength steels have been seldom conducted. In this study, firstly, we surveyed a chosen number of approaches and selected the Radaj method, which uses the notch factor approach, as the one suitable for evaluating the fatigue life of commercial vehicles. Secondly, we obtained the S-N curves of HARDOX and ATOS60 steel welds, and the F-N curves of the T-weld and overlapped-weld structures. Thirdly, we acquired a general S-N curve of welded structures made of high-strength steel from the F-N curve, using the notch factor approach. Fourthly, we extracted the weld fatigue characteristics of high-strength steel and incorporated the results in the database of a commercial fatigue program. Finally, we compared the results of the fatigue test and the CAE prediction of the example case, which demonstrated sufficiently good agreement.

  14. Mechanical characterization of polymers and composites with a servohydraulic high-speed tensile tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béguelin, Ph.; Barbezat, M.; Kausch, H. H.

    1991-12-01

    This study is concerned with the measurement of the mechanical behaviour of polymers and composites at intermediate strain rates. It illustrates with two examples, the application of a high speed servohydraulic testing machine and a newly designed optical extensometer. In the first part of the study, the dynamic nature of high speed tensile testing with servohydraulic apparatus is discussed, and a damping technique is proposed. In the second part, this technique has been applied to the measurement of the tensile properties of annealed and unannealed neat PEEK at strain rates between 3 × 10^{-2} and 2,4 × 10^2 s^{-1}. Both materials show increased yield stress and drawing stress with increasing strain rate. However, annealed specimens have been shown to exhibit superior mechanical properties. In the third part, mode I delamination tests have been performed on unidirectional IM6/PEEK composites at nominal strain rates between 1 × 10^{-6} and 8 × 10^{-1} s^{-1}. At the higher velocities the analysis is performed by means of FFT filtering. A moderate reduction in interlaminar fracture toughness was found with increasing loading rate. Cette étude aborde la mesure des propriétés mécaniques des polymères et composites soumis à des vitesses de déformation moyennes. Elle illustre au travers de deux exemples l'utilisation d'une machine d'essais servo-hydraulique à grande vitesse. Elle présente également un capteur optique d'extensométrie de conception nouvelle. Dans la première partie de l'étude, la nature vibratoire des essais de traction à vitesse élevée réalisés sur une machine servo-hydraulique est discutée, et une technique d'amortissement est proposée. Dans une deuxième partie, cette technique est appliquée à l'étude des propriétés en traction du PEEK non recuit et recuit dans le domaine des vitesses de déformation de 3 × 10^{-2} à 2,4 × 10^2 s^{-1}. Les résultats montrent un accroissement systématique de la contrainte au seuil

  15. Spark Plasma Co-Sintering of Mechanically Milled Tool Steel and High Speed Steel Powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzari, Massimo; Fedrizzi, Anna; Zadra, Mario

    2016-06-16

    Hot work tool steel (AISI H13) and high speed steel (AISI M3:2) powders were successfully co-sintered to produce hybrid tool steels that have properties and microstructures that can be modulated for specific applications. To promote co-sintering, which is made difficult by the various densification kinetics of the two steels, the particle sizes and structures were refined by mechanical milling (MM). Near full density samples (>99.5%) showing very fine and homogeneous microstructure were obtained using spark plasma sintering (SPS). The density of the blends (20, 40, 60, 80 wt % H13) was in agreement with the linear rule of mixtures. Their hardness showed a positive deviation, which could be ascribed to the strengthening effect of the secondary particles altering the stress distribution during indentation. A toughening of the M3:2-rich blends could be explained in view of the crack deviation and crack arrest exerted by the H13 particles.

  16. Biaxial direct tensile tests in a large range of strain rates. Results on a ferritic nuclear steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertini, C.; Labibes, K.; Montagnani, M.; Pizzinato, E.V.; Solomos, G.; Viaccoz, B. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre

    2000-09-01

    Constitutive equations are usually calibrated only trough the experimental results obtained by means of unixial tests because of the lack of adequate biaxial experimental data especially at high strain rate conditions. These data are however important for the validation of analytical models and also for the predictions of mechanical behaviour of real structures subjected to multiaxial loading by numerical simulations. In this paper some developments are shown concerning biaxial cruciform specimens and different experimental machines allowing biaxial tests in a large range of strain rates. This experimental campaign has also allowed study of the influence of changing the strain paths. Diagrams of equivalent stress versus straining direction and also equivalent plastic fracture strain versus straining direction are shown. (orig.)

  17. Microstructure, mechanical properties and microtexture of friction stir welded S690QL high yield steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paillard, Pascal [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, UMR 6205, Polytech Nantes, Site de la Chantrerie, BP 50609, 44306 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Bertrand, Emmanuel, E-mail: emmanuel.bertrand@univ-nantes.fr [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, UMR 6205, Polytech Nantes, Site de la Chantrerie, BP 50609, 44306 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Allart, Marion; Benoit, Alexandre [Institut de Recherche Technologique Jules Verne, Chemin du Chaffault, 44340 Bouguenais (France); Ruckert, Guillaume [DCNS Research, Technocampus Ocean, 5 rue de l' Halbrane, 44340 Bouguenais (France)

    2016-12-15

    Two try-out campaigns of friction stir welding (FSW) were performed with different friction parameters to join S690QL high yield strength steel. The welds were investigated at macroscopic and microscopic scales using optical and electronic microscopy and microhardness mapping. Welds of the second campaign exhibit microstructures and mechanical properties in accordance with requirements for service use. Microtexture measurements were carried out in different zones of welds by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). It is shown that that texture of the bottom of the weld is similar to that of the base metal, suggesting a diffusion bonding mechanism. Finally, the mechanical properties (tensile strength, resilience, bending) were established on the most promising welds. It is shown that it is possible to weld this high yield strength steel using FSW process with satisfactory geometric, microstructural and mechanical properties. - Highlights: •1000 mm ∗ 400 mm ∗ 8 mm S690QL steel plates are joined by friction stir welding (FSW). •Maximum hardness is reduced by optimization of process parameters. •Various microstructures are formed but no martensite after process optimization. •Texture is modified in mechanically affected zones of the weld. •Texture in the bottom of the weld is preserved, suggesting diffusion bonding.

  18. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  19. High temperature deformation behavior, thermal stability and irradiation performance in Grade 92 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsagabi, Sultan

    The 9Cr-2W ferritic-martensitic steel (i.e. Grade 92 steel) possesses excellent mechanical and thermophysical properties; therefore, it has been considered to suit more challenging applications where high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties are required. The high temperature deformation mechanism was investigated through a set of tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Hence, the threshold stress concept was applied to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. It was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations due to the particle-dislocation interactions and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed. In addition, the microstructural evolution at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. For instance, the microstructural evolution under loading was more pronounced and carbide precipitation showed more coarsening tendency. The growth of these carbide precipitates, by removing W and Mo from matrix, significantly deteriorates the solid solution strengthening. The MX type carbonitrides exhibited better coarsening resistance. To better understand the thermal microstructural stability, long tempering schedules up to 1000 hours was conducted at 560, 660 and 760°C after normalizing the steel. Still, the coarsening rate of M23C 6 carbides was higher than the MX-type particles. Moreover, the Laves phase particles were detected after tempering the steel for long periods before they dissolve back into the matrix at high temperature (i.e. 720°C). The influence of the tempering temperature and time was studied for Grade 92 steel via Hollomon-Jaffe parameter. Finally, the irradiation performance of Grade 92 steel was evaluated to examine the feasibility of its eventual reactor use. To that end, Grade 92 steel was irradiated with iron (Fe2+) ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 and 500°C. Overall, the irradiated samples showed some irradiation-induced hardening which was more noticeable at 30°C. Additionally

  20. Crack initiation behavior of neutron irradiated model and commercial stainless steels in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, Kale J., E-mail: kalejs@umich.edu; Was, Gary S.

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Environmental constant extension rate tensile tests were performed on neutron irradiated steel. • Percentage of intergranular cracking quantified the cracking susceptibility. • Cracking susceptibility varied with test environment, solute addition, and cold work. • No singular microstructural change could explain increases in cracking susceptibility with irradiation dose. • The increment of yield strength due to irradiation correlated well with cracking susceptibility. -- Abstract: The objective of this study was to isolate key factors affecting the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) susceptibility of eleven neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steel alloys. Four commercial purity and seven high purity stainless steels were fabricated with specific changes in composition and microstructure, and irradiated in a fast reactor spectrum at 320 °C to doses between 4.4 and 47.5 dpa. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests were performed in normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or primary water (PW) environments to isolate the effects of environment, elemental solute addition, alloy purity, alloy heat, alloy type, cold work, and irradiation dose. The irradiated alloys showed a wide variation in IASCC susceptibility, as measured by the relative changes in mechanical properties and crack morphology. Cracking susceptibility measured by %IG was enhanced in oxidizing environments, although testing in the lowest potential environment caused an increase in surface crack density. Alloys containing solute addition of Ni or Ni + Cr exhibited no IASCC. Susceptibility was reduced in materials cold worked prior to irradiation, and increased with increasing irradiation dose. Irradiation-induced hardening was accounted for by the dislocation loop microstructure, however no relation between crack initiation and radiation hardening was found.

  1. Enhancement of Impact Toughness by Delamination Fracture in a Low-Alloy High-Strength Steel with Al Alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junjie; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Hongji; Guo, Shengwu; Liu, Yongning

    2016-12-01

    The effect of delamination toughening of martensitic steel was investigated both at room and low temperatures [253 K and 233 K (-20 °C and -40 °C)]. Two low-alloy martensitic steels with and without Al alloying were both prepared. Layered structure with white band and black matrix was observed in Al alloyed steel, while a homogeneous microstructure was displayed in the steel without Al. Both steels achieved high strength (tensile strength over 1600 MPa) and good ductility (elongation over 11 pct), but they displayed stark contrasts on impact fracture mode and Charpy impact energy. Delamination fracture occurred in Al alloyed steel and the impact energies were significantly increased both at room temperature (from 75 to 138 J, i.e., nearly improved up to 2 times) and low temperatures [from 47.9 to 71.3 J at 233 K (-40 °C)] compared with the one without Al. Alloying with Al promotes the segregation of Cr, Mn, Si and C elements to form a network structure, which is martensite with higher carbon content and higher hardness than that of the matrix. And this network structure evolved into a band structure during the hot rolling process. The difference of yield stress between the band structure and the matrix gives rise to a delamination fracture during the impact test, which increases the toughness greatly.

  2. Strain hardening by dynamic slip band refinement in a high-Mn lightweight steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsch, E.; Ponge, D.; Hafez Haghighat, S.M.; Sandlöbes, S.; Choi, P.; Herbig, M.; Zaefferer, S.; Raabe, D.

    2016-01-01

    The strain hardening mechanism of a high-Mn lightweight steel (Fe-30.4Mn-8Al-1.2C (wt%)) is investigated by electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The alloy is characterized by a constant high strain hardening rate accompanied by high strength and high ductility (ultimate tensile strength: 900 MPa, elongation to fracture: 68%). Deformation microstructures at different strain levels are studied in order to reveal and quantify the governing structural parameters at micro- and nanometer scales. As the material deforms mainly by planar dislocation slip causing the formation of slip bands, we quantitatively study the evolution of the slip band spacing during straining. The flow stress is calculated from the slip band spacing on the basis of the passing stress. The good agreement between the calculated values and the tensile test data shows dynamic slip band refinement as the main strain hardening mechanism, enabling the excellent mechanical properties. This novel strain hardening mechanism is based on the passing stress acting between co-planar slip bands in contrast to earlier attempts to explain the strain hardening in high-Mn lightweight steels that are based on grain subdivision by microbands. We discuss in detail the formation of the finely distributed slip bands and the gradual reduction of the spacing between them, leading to constantly high strain hardening. TEM investigations of the precipitation state in the as-quenched state show finely dispersed atomically ordered clusters (size < 2 nm). The influence of these zones on planar slip is discussed.

  3. TRP 9904 - Constitutive Behavior of High Strength Multiphase Sheel Steel Under High Strain Rate Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Matlock; John Speer

    2005-03-31

    The focus of the research project was to systematically assess the strain rate dependence of strengthening mechanisms in new advanced high strength sheet steels. Data were obtained on specially designed and produced Duel Phase and TRIP steels and compared to the properties of automotive steels currently in use.

  4. 76 FR 33213 - High Pressure Steel Cylinders from the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-570-977)] High Pressure Steel... (``Department'') received a petition concerning imports of high pressure steel cylinders (``steel cylinders...\\ (``Petitioner''). See Petitions for the Imposition of Antidumping and Countervailing Duties: High Pressure Steel...

  5. Interphase and intergranular stress generation in carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, E.C.; Daymond, M.R.; Withers, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron diffraction spectra have been acquired during tensile straining of high and low carbon steels, in order to compare the evolution of internal stress in ferritic steel with and without a reinforcing phase. In low carbon steel, the generation of intergranular stresses predominates, while in high carbon steel similar intergranular stresses among ferrite grain families are superposed upon a large redistribution of stress between phases. Comparison is made to calculations using elastoplastic self-consistent and finite element methods

  6. Strengthening of stainless steel weldment by high temperature precipitation

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Neves Monteiro; Lucio Fabio Cassiano Nascimento; Édio Pereira Lima, Jr.; Fernanda Santos da Luz; Eduardo Sousa Lima; Fábio de Oliveira Braga

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical behavior and the strengthening mechanism of stainless steel welded joints at 600 °C have been investigated. The welds were composed of AISI 304 stainless steel, as base metal, and niobium containing AISI 347 stainless steel, as weld metal. The investigation was conducted by means of creep tests. The welded specimens were subjected to both high temperature (600 °C) and long periods (up to 2000 h) under constant load, and both mechanical properties and microstructural changes in ...

  7. Study on high-cycle fatigue behavior of candidate stainless steels for SCWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Ru; Zhao Yuxiang; Zhang Qiang; Wang Hao; Tang Rui; Qiao Yingjie

    2013-01-01

    The fatigue experiments of commerce stainless steels including 347, 316Ti and 310 were conducted under bending and rotating loadings. The environments were at room temperature (RT) as well as at 550℃ in air. The fracture morphology was observed by SEM, and the S-N curves were processed according to th