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Sample records for high tensile stainless

  1. High temperature tensile properties of 316 stainless steel implanted with helium

    Hasegawa, Akira; Yamamoto, Norikazu; Shiraishi, Haruki

    1993-01-01

    Helium embrittlement is one of the problems in structural materials for fusion reactors. Recently, martensitic steels have been developed which have a good resistance to high-temperature helium embrittlement, but the mechanism has not yet been clarified. In this paper, tensile behaviors of helium implanted austenitic stainless steels, which are sensitive to the helium embrittlement, were studied and compared with those of martensitic steels under the same experimental conditions, and the effect of microstructure on helium embrittlement was discussed. Helium was implanted by 300 appm at 573-623 K to miniature tensile speciments of 316 austenitic steels using a cyclotron accelerator. Solution annealed (316SA) and 20% cold worked (316CW) specimens were used. Post-implantation tensile tests were carried out at 573, 873 and 973 K. Yield stress at 573 K increased with the helium implantation in 316SA and 316CW, but the yield stress changes of 316SA at 873 and 973 K were different from that of 316CW. Black-dots were observed in the as-implanted specimen and bubbles were observed in the speciments tensile-tested at 873 and 973 K. Intergranular fracture was observed at only 973 K in both of the 316SA and 316CW specimens. Therefore, cold work did not suppress the high-temperature helium embrittlement under this experimental condition. The difference in the influence of helium on type 316 steel and 9Cr martensitic steels were discussed. Test temperature change of reduction in are showed clearly that helium embrittlement did not occur in 9Cr martensitic steels but occurred in 316 austenitic steels. Fine microstructures of 9Cr martensitic steels should suppress helium embrittlement at high temperatures. (author)

  2. A comparison of the iraddiated tensile properties of a high-manganese austenitic steel and type 316 stainless steel

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The USSR steel EP-838 is a high-manganese, low-nickel steel that also has lower chromium and molybdenum than type 316 stainless steel. Tensile specimens of 20%-cold-worked EP-838 and type 316 stainless steel were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the coolant temperature (approx.=50 0 C). A displacement damage level of 5.2 dpa was reached for the EP-838 and up to 9.5 dpa for the type 316 stainless steel. Tensile tests at room temperature and 300 0 C on the two steels indicated that the irradiation led to increased strength and decreased ductility compared to the unirradiated steels. Although the 0.2% yield stress of the type 316 stainless steel in the unirradiated condition was greater than that for the EP-838, after irradiation there was essentially no difference between the strength or ductility of the two steels. The results indicate that the replacement of the majority of the nickel by manganese and a reduction of chromium and molybdenum in an austenitic stainless steel of composition near that for type 316 stainless steel has little effect on the irradiated and unirradiated tensile properties at low temperatures. (orig.)

  3. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components

  4. Tensile stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to very high dose

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20--100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. The data bases and mechanistic understanding of, the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high dose, i.e., is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-commotion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-11 reactor after irradiation to {approximately}50 dpa at {approximately}370 C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microcopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at low ECP, and this susceptibility led to poor work-hardening capability and low ductility.

  5. High strain rate tensile curves of hyperquenched Z03 CN18-10 stainless steel

    Vrillon, B.

    1978-01-01

    Tensile tests are presented at constant decreasing speeds, made at room temperature. This type of test can give a better evaluation of the structure behaviour in shock or burst loadings, because in that case the elongation speeds varies from high values to zero [fr

  6. Unstable propagation behavior of a ductile crack in SUS-304 stainless steel under high compliance tensile loading

    Tomoda, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    In relation to the safe maintenance of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to prevent reactor coolant pipings from burst type failure caused by the unstable propagation of defects and cracks, such as stress corrosion cracking and fatigue cracks. In ductile materials, crack propagation is stable in tensile loading under fixed grip condition, when a specimen is controlled to deform in proportion to the increase of tensile load. However, it has been known that the instability of ductile cracks occurs after tensile load reached the maximum, especially under constant loading condition arising in the loading devices with high compliance or low tensile rigidity. In order to confirm the reliability of SUS 304 stainless pipes subjected to SCC, the crack propagation behavior was examined with the specimens having center cracks, using both testing machines with high compliance and low compliance. The instability of ductile cracks and the propagation velocity of unstable cracks were analyzed, and the calculated results were compated with the experimental results. Not only the compliance of testing machines but also the conditions of specimens affected the propagation of cracks. (Kako, I.)

  7. Tensile behavior of borated stainless steels

    Stephens, J.J. Jr.; Sorenson, K.B.

    1991-01-01

    Borated stainless steel tensile testing is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The goal of the test program is to provide data to support a code case inquiry to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III. The adoption by ASME facilitates a material's qualification for structural use in transport cask applications. For transport cask basket applications, the potential advantage to using borated stainless steel arises from the fact that the structural and criticality control functions can be combined into one material. This can result in a decrease in net section thickness of the basket web (increased payload capacity) and eliminates the fabrication process and cost of attaching a discrete boron poison material to the basket web. In addition, adding borate stainless steel to the inventory of acceptable structural material provides the Department of Energy (DOE) and its cask contractors an alternative to current proposed materials which have not been qualified for structural service. The test program at SNL involves procuring material, machining test specimens, and conducting the tensile tests. From test measurements obtained so far, general trends indicate that tensile properties (yield strength and ultimate strength) increase with boron content and are in all cases superior to the minimum required properties established in A-240, Type 304, a typical grade of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, in a designed basket, web thicknesses using borated stainless steel would be comparable to or thinner tan an equivalent basket manufactured from a typical stainless steel without boron additions. General trends from test results indicate that ductilities decrease with increasing boron content

  8. Effects of cyclic tensile loading on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility for sensitized Type 304 stainless steel in 290 C high purity water

    Takaku, H.; Tokiwai, M.; Hirano, H.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of load waveform on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility have been examined for sensitized Type 304 stainless steels in a 290 C high purity water loop. Concerning the strain rate in the trapezoidal stress waveform, it was found that IGSCC susceptibility was higher for smaller values of the strain rate. It was also shown that IGSCC susceptibility became higher when the holding time at the upper stress was prolonged, and when the upper stress was high. The occurrence of IGSCC for sensitized Type 304 stainless steel became easy due to the application of cyclic tensile stress in 290 C high purity water

  9. Tensile and stress corrosion cracking properties of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to a very high dose

    Chung, H.M.; Strain, R.V.; Shack, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20-100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. Our databases and mechanistic understanding of the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high doses, i.e. is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-corrosion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-II reactor after irradiation to ∼50 dpa at ∼370 deg. C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 degree sign C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at a low ECP, and this susceptibility led to a poor work-hardening capability and low ductility

  10. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium

  11. Elevated temperature tensile properties of borated 304 stainless steel

    Stephens, J.J.; Sorenson, K.B.; McConnell, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the tensile properties of Powder Metallurgy (PM) 'Grade A' material with that of the conventional IM 'Grade B' material for two selected Types (i.e., boron contents) as defined by the ASTM A887 specification: Types 304B5 and 304B7. Tensile properties have been generated for these materials at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 400degC (752degF). The data at higher temperatures are required for ASME Code Case purposes, since the use temperature of a basket under 'worst case' cask conditions may be as high as 343degC (650degF), due to self-heating by the activated fuel elements. We will also discuss the current status of efforts aimed at obtaining an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Case for selected grades of borated stainless steel covered by the ASTM A887 specification. (J.P.N.)

  12. Tensile and creep data on type 316 stainless steel

    Sikka, V. K.; Booker, B. L.P.; Booker, M. K.; McEnerney, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes tensile and creep data on 13 heats of type 316 stainless steel. It includes ten different product forms (three plates, four pipes, and three bars) of the reference heat tested at ORNL. Tensile data are presented in tabular form and analyzed as a function of temperature by the heat centering method. This method yielded a measure of variations within a single heat as well as among different heats. The upper and lower scatter bands developed by this method were wider at the lower temperatures than at the high temperatures (for strength properties), a trend reflected by the experimental data. The creep data on both unaged and aged specimens are presented in tabular form along with creep curves for each test. The rupture time data are compared with the ASME Code Case minimum curve at each test temperature in the range from 538 to 704{sup 0}C. The experimental rupture time data are also compared with the values predicted by using the rupture model based on elevated-temperature ultimate tensile strength. A creep ductility trend curve was developed on the basis of the reference heat data and those published in the literature on nitrogen effects. To characterize the data fully, information was also supplied on vendor, product form, fabrication method, material condition (mill-annealed vs laboratory annealed and aged), grain size, and chemical composition for various heats. Test procedures used for tensile and creep results are also discussed.

  13. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    Mabruri, Efendi, E-mail: effe004@lipi.go.id; Anwar, Moch Syaiful, E-mail: moch.syaiful.anwar@lipi.go.id; Prifiharni, Siska, E-mail: siska.prifiharni@lipi.go.id; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang [Research Center for Metallurgy and Materials, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) Kawasan Puspiptek Gd. 470 Serpong, Tangerang Selatan 15314 (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  14. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  15. Cavitation erosion tests of high tensile stainless steels for the Techno-Superliner (TSL-F) hulls; Techno superliner (TSL-F) sentai kozoyo kokyodo stainless ko no cavitation erosion

    Matsuo, M.; Ito, H.; Shibasaki, K. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Mizuta, A.; Sugimoto, H. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Tomono, Y. [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Investigations were given by using the magnetostrictive vibration method and the high-speed fluid testing method on cavitation erosion resistance of high-tensile stainless steels thought to have high applicability to submerged hull structures of Techno-Supeliner (TSL-L). The investigations revealed that these steels have nearly equivalent resistance to even SUS 304 or 15-5PH steel which is thought to have the highest cavitation erosion resistance among the conventional materials used customarily. An experiment using both materials provided a result different quantitatively but similar qualitatively in relative merits between the materials. Correlation between both materials was presented. A cavitation erosion experiment using a 1/6 scale model of the actual TSL-F was carried out to measure the amount of cavitation erosion generated on wing surfaces. Results from the experiment were used to attempt estimation of cavitation erosion amount at the level of the actual TSL-F. 21 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Cavitation erosion tests of high tensile stainless steels for the Techno-Superliner (TSL-F) hulls; Techno superliner (TSL-F) sentai kozoyo kokyodo stainless ko no cavitation erosion

    Matsuo, M; Ito, H; Shibasaki, K [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Mizuta, A; Sugimoto, H [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Tomono, Y [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Investigations were given by using the magnetostrictive vibration method and the high-speed fluid testing method on cavitation erosion resistance of high-tensile stainless steels thought to have high applicability to submerged hull structures of Techno-Supeliner (TSL-L). The investigations revealed that these steels have nearly equivalent resistance to even SUS 304 or 15-5PH steel which is thought to have the highest cavitation erosion resistance among the conventional materials used customarily. An experiment using both materials provided a result different quantitatively but similar qualitatively in relative merits between the materials. Correlation between both materials was presented. A cavitation erosion experiment using a 1/6 scale model of the actual TSL-F was carried out to measure the amount of cavitation erosion generated on wing surfaces. Results from the experiment were used to attempt estimation of cavitation erosion amount at the level of the actual TSL-F. 21 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  18. Handbook for tensile properties of austenitic stainless steel

    Kim, D. W.; Ryu, W. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, W. G.; Chung, M. K.; Han, C. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    Database system of nuclear materials has not been developed and the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in nuclear power plant are not summarized systematically in Korea. Although Korea designs nuclear power plant, many materials used in nuclear power plant are imported because we do not have database system of nuclear material yet and it was hard to select a proper material for the structural materials of nuclear power plant. To develop database system of nuclear materials, data of mechanical, corrosion, irradiation properties are needed. Of theses properties, tensile properties are tested and summarized in this report. Tensile properties of stainless steel used in nuclear reactor internal were investigated. Data between Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and foreign laboratory were compared to determine the precision of the result. To develope database system, materials, chemical composition, heat treatment, manufacturing process, and grain size were classified. Tensile properties were tested and summarized to use input data of database system. 9 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  19. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  20. Tensile Deformation Temperature Impact on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AISI 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Xiong, Yi; He, Tiantian; Lu, Yan; Ren, Fengzhang; Volinsky, Alex A.; Cao, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted on AISI 316LN austenitic stainless steel from - 40 to 300 °C at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the deformed steel were investigated by optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, x-ray diffraction, and microhardness testing. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and microhardness increase with the decrease in the test temperature. The tensile fracture morphology has the dimple rupture feature after low-temperature deformations and turns to a mixture of transgranular fracture and dimple fracture after high-temperature ones. The dominating deformation microstructure evolves from dislocation tangle/slip bands to large deformation twins/slip bands with temperature decrease. The deformation-induced martensite transformation can only be realized at low temperature, and its quantity increases with the decrease in the temperature.

  1. Effect of fluoride mouthwash on tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires

    Fatimah, D. I.; Anggani, H. S.; Ismah, N.

    2017-08-01

    Patients with orthodontic treatment are commonly recommended to use a fluoride mouthwash for maintaining their oral hygiene and preventing dental caries. However, fluoride may affect the characteristics of stainless steel orthodontic archwires used during treatment. The effect of fluoride mouthwash on the tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires is still unknown. The purpose of this study is to know the effect of fluoride mouthwash on the tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires. Examine the tensile strength of 0.016 inch stainless steel orthodontic archwires after immersion in 0.05%, 100 ml fluoride mouthwash for 30, 60, and 90 min. There is no statistically significant difference in the tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires after immersed in fluoride mouthwash. The p-values on immersion fluoride mouthwash for 30, 60, and 90 min consecutively are 0.790; 0.742; and 0.085 (p > 0.05). The use of fluoride mouthwash did not have an effect on the tensile strength of stainless Steel orthodontic archwires.

  2. Assessment of tensile and creep data for types 304 and 316 stainless steel

    Sikka, V.K.; Booker, M.K.

    1976-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels of types 304 and 316 are prime construction materials for nuclear fast breeder reactors and will be used in the temperature range where elevated-temperature, tensile, creep, and fatigue properties are required to calculate the design stress limits. This report examines the possible variations in such properties, using data from several sources including data from Japan and the United Kingdom. United States data were shown to contain the largest variations in both tensile and creep properties, with Japanese data the least. For a given country no distinction could be made in variations in tensile properties of types 304 and 316 stainless steels, but variations in standard error of estimate for all creep properties analyzed were significantly lower for type 316 stainless steel than corresponding variations in creep properties of type 304 stainless steel. The data from each of these countries showed the same creep rupture strength (at 10 4 h) for type 316 stainless steel; this was not true for the type 304 stainless steel. Results of the analysis performed in this paper showed that the U.S. and foreign data on types 304 and 316 stainless steels could possibly be combined for the determination of design stress intensity limits

  3. Tensile properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and the weld joints after neutron irradiation

    Shiba, K.; Ioka, I.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hamada, A.; Hishinuma, A. [and others

    1996-10-01

    Tensile specimens of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and its weldments fabricated with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques were irradiated to a peak dose of 19 dpa and a peak helium level of 250 appm in the temperature range between 200 and 400{degrees}C in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The He/dpa ratio of about 13 appm/dpa is similar to the typical helium/dpa ratio of a fusion reactor environment. The tensile tests were carried out at the irradiation temperature in vacuum. The irradiation caused an increase in yield stress to levels between 670 and 800 MPa depending on the irradiation temperature. Total elongation was reduced to less than 10%, however the specimens failed in a ductile manner. The results were compared with those of the specimens irradiated using irradiation capsules producing larger amount of He. Although the He/dpa ratio affected the microstructural change, the impact on the post irradiation tensile behavior was rather small for not only base metal specimens but also for the weld joint and the weld metal specimens.

  4. Dynamic tensile tests with superimposed ultrasonic oscillations for stainless steel type 321 at room temperature

    Schinke, B.; Malmberg, T.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years various containment codes for Fast Breeder Reactor accidents have been assessed by comparison with explosion tests in water-filled vessels (COVA experiments). Common to the various codes, a systematic underestimation of the circumferential vessel strains was found. In the COVA tests high frequency pressure oscillations in the ultrasonic range were observed and thus it has been conjectured that the phenomenon of ''acoustic softening'' might be relevant in explaining the discrepancies in the strains. To validate this conjecture a hydro-pneumatic tensile test apparatus was developed which allows dynamic tensile testing at room temperature with and without superimposed ultrasonic oscillations. The dynamic tensile tests on the COVA sheet material (stainless steel AISI 321) without ultrasonic insonation show a linear dependence of the flow stress on the logarithm of the strain rate. The results at low strain rates (10 -3 s -1 ) agree favourably with previous measurements but at high rates (50 s -1 ) at 20% lower flow stress is observed. The dynamic tensile tests with continuous and intermittent insonation show the phenomenon of ''acoustic softening'': The average flow stress is reduced by an amount of about half the oscillating amplitude. At high strain rates the reduction is less. A severe ''acoustic softening'' observed by several authors for various metals at low strain rates was not observed. The experimental results were compared with the theory of the superpositon mechanism assuming a rate-independent elastic-plastic and an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive model. Although the rate-independent model is capable to predict qualitatively some of the observed effects, a better description is obtained with the viscoplastic model. The conclusion is that the ''acoustic softening'' of the COVA material is far too small to explain the discrepancies between measured and computed strains found in the containment code validation studies. (orig.)

  5. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of tensile test behavior of austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes in cold worked condition

    Terui, Clarice, E-mail: clarice.terui@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CINA/CTMSP), Iperó, SP (Brazil). Centro Industrial Nuclear da Marinha; Lima, Nelson B. de, E-mail: nblima@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    These austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes are potential candidates to be used in fuel elements of nuclear power plants (as PWR - Pressurized Water Reactor). So, their metallurgical condition and mechanical properties, as the tensile strength and yield strength, normally are very restrict in demanding project and design requirements. Several full size tensile tests at room temperature and high temperature (315 deg C) were performed in these seamless tubes in cold-worked condition. The results of specified tensile and yield strengths were achieved but the elongation of the tube, in the geometry of the component, could not be measured at high temperature due to unconventional mode of rupture (helical mode without separation of parts). The average value of elongation was obtained from stress-strain curves of hot tensile tests and was around 5%. The results obtained in this research show that this behavior of the full size tensile test samples of thin-walled tube (wall thickness less than 0.5 mm) in high temperature (315°C) is due to the combination of the manufacturing process, the material (crystallographic structure and chemical composition) and the final geometry of the component. In other words, the strong crystallographic texture of material induced by tube drawing process in addition with the geometry of the component are responsible for the behavior in hot uniaxial tensile tests. (author)

  7. Low temperature tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking resistance in the super duplex stainless steels weldments

    Lee, Jeung Woo; Sung, Jang Hyun; Lee, Sung Keun

    1998-01-01

    Low temperature tensile properties and SCC resistances of super duplex stainless steels and their weldments are investigated. Tensile strengths increase remarkably with decreasing test temperature, while elongations decrease steeply at -196 .deg. C after showing peak or constant value down to -100 .deg. C. Owing to the low tensile deformation of weld region, elongations of welded specimen decrease in comparison to those of unwelded specimen. The welded tensile specimen is fractured through weld region at -196 .deg. C due to the fact that the finely dispersed ferrite phase in the austenite matrix increases an opportunity to supply the crack propagation path through the brittle ferrite phase at low temperature. The stress corrosion cracking initiates preferentially at the surface ferrite phase of base metal region and propagates through ferrite phase. When the corrosion crack meets with the fibrously aligned austenite phase to the tensile direction, the ferrite phase around austenite continues to corrode. Eventually, fracture of the austenite phase begins without enduring the tensile load. The addition of Cu+W to the super duplex stainless steel deteriorates the SCC resistance in boiling MgCl 2 solution, possibly due to the increment of pits in the ferrite phase and reduction of N content in the austenite phase

  8. Influence of grain size on the tensile and creep properties of a type 316 stainless steel

    Mannan, S.L.; Samuel, K.G.; Rodriguez, P.

    The influence of grain size, on the tensile deformation behaviour in the temperature range 300-1223 K and on the creep rate at 873 and 973 K over a wide range of applied stresses, in a type 316 stainless steel has been investigated. For the tensile results, the Hall-Petch relation was found to be valid up to 1023 K. The variations of flow stress and work hardening rate with temperature and grain size have been found to be influenced by dynamic strain aging which occurs in the temperature range 523-923 K. The creep experiments revealed that grain boundaries contribute to strengthening at high stresses (180-260 MPa) at 873 K but this strengthening does not correlate with the available models which attempt to incorporate the Hall-Petch strengthening effect into creep rate equations. At 973 K the creep rate was generally constant but increased at small grain sizes and at lower stresses due to increased contribution from grain boundary sliding. The difference in the grain size effects on creep at the two temperatures is attributed to the difference in the substructures developed during creep. (author)

  9. Influence of sodium evnironment on the uniaxial tensile behavior of titanium modified type 316 stainless steel

    Natesan, K.; Chopra, O.K.; Kassner, T.F.

    1978-01-01

    True stress-true strain tensile data have been obtained for titanium modified type 316 stainless steel in the solution annealed condition and after exposure to a flowing sodium environment at temperature of 700, 650, 600 and 550 0 C. The specimens were exposed to sodium for times between 120 and 5012 h to produce carbon penetration depths in the range 0.05-0.30 mm. The Voce equation was used to describe tensile flow curves for plastic strains above 0.005. The results showed that, when compared with solution annealed specimens, the tensile flow behavior of the sodium exposed specimens is characterized by a higher strain hardening rate, which decreases rapidly as the flow stress increases. The loss in tensile ductility of the material due to carburization in sodium environment was found to be minimal. (Auth.)

  10. The influence of temperature on the tensile properties of a super duplex stainless steel

    Girones, A.; Mateo, A.; Llanes, L.; Anglada, M

    2001-01-01

    Tensile tests, at temperatures ranging between 275 and 475 degree centigree were performed in a superduplex stainless steel EN 1.4410. The dependence of yield stress and ultimate tensile strength on temperature indicates the existence of dynamic strain aging (DSA). In order to evaluate the influence of strain rate on this phenomenon, tests were conducted at two different strain rates, both at 325 degree centigree, temperature at which DSA is maximum for this materials. The results shows that the flow stress has an inverse strain rate sensitivity which confirms the existence of DSA in the steel under study. (Author) 10 refs

  11. Hydrogen Induced Crack and Phase Transformation in Hydrogen Pressured Tensile Test of 316L Stainless Steel

    Baek, Un Bong; Nam, Sung Hoon [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Byung Hak; Shim, Jong Hun [Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Uk [Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Keyyong [Korea Research Institute of Ship and Ocean Engineering, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    The aim of this investigation is to prove the mechanism of hydrogen induced crack (HIC) of 316L stainless steels in hydrogen pressured tensile test. Microstructures like twin, planar slip, and abnormal phase transformation around the HIC were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Deformation twin accompanied by planar slip could be related to the main cause of HIC in the hydrogen pressured tensile condition, because intragranular HICs were mainly observed along the boundaries of twins and planar slip lines. An abnormal forbidden diffraction was also accompanied by HIC in the hydrogen attacked area. Examination of the HIC mechanism in austenitic stainless steel can be applied to the fitness of use for alloys with the possibility of various susceptible cracks in a hydrogen and stress atmosphere.

  12. Tensile Fracture Behavior of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Manufactured by Hot Isostatic Pressing

    Cooper, A. J.; Brayshaw, W. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2018-02-01

    Herein we investigate how the oxygen content in hot isostatically pressed (HIP'd) 316L stainless steel affects the mechanical properties and tensile fracture behavior. This work follows on from previous studies, which aimed to understand the effect of oxygen content on the Charpy impact toughness of HIP'd steel. We expand on the work by performing room-temperature tensile testing on different heats of 316L stainless steel, which contain different levels of interstitial elements (carbon and nitrogen) as well as oxygen in the bulk material. Throughout the work we repeat the experiments on conventionally forged 316L steel as a reference material. The analysis of the work indicates that oxygen does not contribute to a measureable solution strengthening mechanism, as is the case with carbon and nitrogen in austenitic stainless steels (Werner in Mater Sci Eng A 101:93-98, 1988). Neither does oxygen, in the form of oxide inclusions, contribute to precipitation hardening due to the size and spacing of particles. However, the oxide particles do influence fracture behavior; fractography of the failed tension test specimens indicates that the average ductile dimple size is related to the oxygen content in the bulk material, the results of which support an on-going hypothesis relating oxygen content in HIP'd steels to their fracture mechanisms by providing additional sites for the initiation of ductile damage in the form of voids.

  13. Tensile properties of four types of austenitic stainless steel welded joints

    Balladon, P.

    1990-01-01

    In the field of an LMFBR research programme on austenitic stainless steel welds in a Shared Cost Action Safety, Research Area 8, coordinated by JRC-Ispra, four cooperating laboratories (ECN, IKE/MPA, the Welding Institute and UNIREC) have been involved in the fabrication and extensive characterization of welded joints made from one plate of ICL 167 stainless steel. The materials included parent metal, four vacuum electron beam welds, one non vacuum electron beam weld, one submerged arc weld, one gas metal arc weld and one manual metal arc weld. This report summarizes the 106 tensile tests performed at room temperature and 550 0 C, including the influence of strain rate, specimen orientation and welding procedure. Main results are that electron beam welds have tensile properties close to those of parent metal with higher values of yield strength in longitudinal orientation and lower values of total elongation in transverse orientation but with a similar reduction of area, that filler metal welds own the highest values of yield strength and lowest values of ductility. Most of the welds properties are higher than the minimum specified for parent metal, except for some values of total elongation, mainly in transverse orientation. In view of using electron beam welding for production of components used in LMFBR, results obtained show that tensile properties of electron beam welds compare well to those of classical welds. (author)

  14. Microscopic observation and statics consideration of tensile fracture of TiC coating on stainless steel

    Okawa, Akira; Hasiguti, Ryukiti

    1986-01-01

    We have measured the tensile fracture properties of the TiC coated SUS316L stainless steel, applying a stress perpendicular to the plane of interface between the coating and the substrate. The fracture of the as grown or non-annealed specimens occurred partially within the TiC layer. A tensile fracture of the TiC coated specimens after vacuum annealing at about 1373 K (1100 deg C) presented arc-shape curved fracture surfaces which can be understood by statics consideration taking into account the maximum stress plane theory and the residual thermal stress. The strengths of non-annealed and annealed specimens are 34.4 MPa (350 kgf/cm 2 ) and 30.2 MPa (308 kgf/cm 2 ), respectively, expressed in terms of Weibull's 50 % fracture stresses. (author)

  15. Effects of hydrogen on the tensile strength characteristics of stainless steels

    Blanchard, R.; Pelissier, J.; Pluchery, M.; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay

    1961-01-01

    This paper deals with the effects of hydrogen on stainless steel, that might possibly be used as a canning material in hydrogen-cooled reactors. Apparent ultimate-tensile strength is only 80 per cent of initial value for hydrogen content about 50 cc NTP/ 100 g, and reduction in area decreases from 80 to 55 per cent. A special two-stage replica technique has been developed which allows fracture surface of small tensile specimens (about 0.1 mm diam.) to be examined in an electron microscope. All the specimens showed evidence of ductile character throughout the range of hydrogen contents investigated, but the aspect of the fracture surfaces gradually changes with increasing amounts. (author) [fr

  16. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  17. Influence of temperature and grain size on the tensile ductility of AISI 316 stainless steel

    Mannan, S.L.; Samuel, K.G.; Rodriguez, P.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of tmeperature and grain size on the tensile ductility of AISI 316 stainless steel has been examined in the temperature range 300-1223 K for specimens with grain sizes varying from 0.025 to 0.650 mm at a nominal strain rate of 3 X 10 -4 s -1 . The percentage total elongation and reduction in area at fracture show minimum ductility at an intermediate temperature, and the temperature corresponding to this ductility minimum has been found to increase with increase in grain size. The total elongation is found to decrease with increase in grain size at high temperatures where failures are essentially intergranular in nature. At 300 K, both uniform and total elongation increase with increase in grain size and then show a small decrease for a very coarse grain size. The high ductility observed at low temperatures (300 K) is consistent with the observation of characteristic dimples associated with transgranular ductile fracture. The ductility minimum with respect to temperature is associated with the occurrence of intergranular fracture, as evidenced by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The present results support the suggestion that the ductility minimum coincides with the maximum amount of grain boundary sliding; at temperatures beyond the ductility minimum, grain boundary separation by cavitation is retarded by the occurrence of grain boundary migration, as evidenced by the grain boundary cusps. In tests conducted at various strain rates in the range 10 -3 -10 -6 s -1 at 873 K the ductility was found to decrease with decreasing strain rate, emphasizing the increased importance of grain boundary sliding at lower strain rates. (Auth.)

  18. Elevated temperature tensile properties of borated 304 stainless steel: Effect of boride dispersion on strength and ductility

    Stephens, J.J.; Sorenson, K.B.; McConnell, P.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional cast and wrought (open-quotes Ingot Metallurgyclose quotes) borated 304 stainless steel has been used for a number of years in spent fuel storage applications where a combination of structural integrity and neutron criticality control are required. Similar requirements apply for materials used in transport cask baskets. However, in the high boron contents (>1.0 wt. %) which are most useful for criticality control, the conventional cast and wrought material suffers from low ductility as well as low impact toughness. The microstructural reason for these poor properties is the relatively coarse size of the boride particles in these alloys, which act as sites for crack initiation. Recently, a open-quotes premiumclose quotes grade of borated 304 stainless steel has been introduced (Strober and Smith, 1988) which is made by a Powder Metallurgy (PM) process. This material has greatly improved ductility and impact properties relative to the conventional cast and wrought product. In addition, an ASTM specification (ATSM A887) has been developed for borated stainless steel, containing 8 different material Types with respect to boron content - with the highest level (Type B7) having permissible range from 1.75 to 2.25 wt. % boron - and each Type contains two different Grades of material based on tensile and impact properties. While the ASTM specification is properties-based and does not require a specific production process for a particular grade of material, the PM material qualifies as open-quotes Grade Aclose quotes material while the conventional Ingot Metallurgy (IM) material generally qualifies as open-quotes Grade Bclose quotes material. This paper presents a comparison of the tensile properties of PM open-quotes Grade Aclose quotes material with that of the conventional IM open-quotes Grade Bclose quotes material for two selected Types (i.e., boron contents) as defined by the ASTM A887 specification: Types 304B5 and 304B7

  19. Tensile properties and fracture of (α+γ) two phase stainless steel with fine grained microstructure

    Ogiyama, Hiroyuki; Tsukuda, Hitoshi; Soyama, Yoshiro

    1989-01-01

    The tensile properties and fracture of the (α+γ) two phase stainless steel with very fine γ grains were investigated. Two different microstructures with very fine γ grains can be obtianed by the thermomechanical treatments; One has both very fine γ and α grains, and the other has very fine γ and large α grains. The specimens were prepared in quenched and aged (475degC) conditions. The results obtained are as follows. The 0.2 % proof stress and tensile strength increase with the aging at 475degC for all specimens. The refinement of the γ grains plays an important role for the increase of strength in both quenched and aged conditions, and also for the ductility in the quenched condition. The refinement of α grains, however, contributes to the increase of the ductility in the aged condition. Accordingly, it is found that very good combinations of tensile strength and ductility can be achieved by the aging and the refinement of the γ and α grains (micro duplex structure). (author)

  20. Static tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel studied by in situ neutron diffraction and synchrotron radiation white x-rays

    Tsuchida, Noriyuki; Kawahata, Taiji; Ishimaru, Eiichiro; Takahashi, Akihiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shobu, Takahisa

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel (S32101) from the viewpoints of plastic deformability among phases or grains, we performed static tensile tests, in situ neutron diffraction, and white x-ray diffraction experiments at room temperature. In the static tensile tests, the S32101 steel displayed a larger uniform elongation and a better tensile strength-uniform elongation balance than a commercial SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel. A larger uniform elongation of S32101 is associated with the macroscopic work hardening behavior that a work hardening rate higher than the flow stress can maintain up until high true strains. From the experimental results of synchrotron radiation white x-ray diffraction experiments, the hard phase of S32101 was changed from the ferrite (α) phase to austenite (γ) one during tensile deformation. This led to a larger stress partitioning between the phases at the latter stage of deformation. From the experimental results of in situ neutron diffraction, it was found that the stress partitioning of the γ phase in the S32101 was the largest among the present results. Therefore, the larger work hardening rate of S32101 can be explained by the large stress partitioning of the γ phase, that between γ and α phases and γ volume fraction. (author)

  1. High-Tensile Strength Tape Versus High-Tensile Strength Suture: A Biomechanical Study.

    Gnandt, Ryan J; Smith, Jennifer L; Nguyen-Ta, Kim; McDonald, Lucas; LeClere, Lance E

    2016-02-01

    To determine which suture design, high-tensile strength tape or high-tensile strength suture, performed better at securing human tissue across 4 selected suture techniques commonly used in tendinous repair, by comparing the total load at failure measured during a fixed-rate longitudinal single load to failure using a biomechanical testing machine. Matched sets of tendon specimens with bony attachments were dissected from 15 human cadaveric lower extremities in a manner allowing for direct comparison testing. With the use of selected techniques (simple Mason-Allen in the patellar tendon specimens, whip stitch in the quadriceps tendon specimens, and Krackow stitch in the Achilles tendon specimens), 1 sample of each set was sutured with a 2-mm braided, nonabsorbable, high-tensile strength tape and the other with a No. 2 braided, nonabsorbable, high-tensile strength suture. A total of 120 specimens were tested. Each model was loaded to failure at a fixed longitudinal traction rate of 100 mm/min. The maximum load and failure method were recorded. In the whip stitch and the Krackow-stitch models, the high-tensile strength tape had a significantly greater mean load at failure with a difference of 181 N (P = .001) and 94 N (P = .015) respectively. No significant difference was found in the Mason-Allen and simple stitch models. Pull-through remained the most common method of failure at an overall rate of 56.7% (suture = 55%; tape = 58.3%). In biomechanical testing during a single load to failure, high-tensile strength tape performs more favorably than high-tensile strength suture, with a greater mean load to failure, in both the whip- and Krackow-stitch models. Although suture pull-through remains the most common method of failure, high-tensile strength tape requires a significantly greater load to pull-through in a whip-stitch and Krakow-stitch model. The biomechanical data obtained in the current study indicates that high-tensile strength tape may provide better repair

  2. Low temperature tensile deformation and acoustic emission signal characteristics of AISI 304LN stainless steel

    Barat, K.; Bar, H.N. [Material Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Mandal, D. [Material Processing and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Roy, H., E-mail: himadri9504@gmail.com [NDT and Metallurgy Group, CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Durgapur 713209 (India); Sivaprasad, S.; Tarafder, S. [Material Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2014-03-01

    This investigation examines low temperature tensile deformation behavior of AISI 304LN stainless steel along with synergistic analysis of acoustic emission signals. The tensile tests are done at a range of temperatures starting from 283 K till 223 K. The fracture surfaces of the broken specimens are investigated using scanning electron microscope. The amount of deformation induced martensite is measured using a feritscope. The obtained results reveal that with decrease in test temperature, both strength and ductility increase. The increase in strength and ductility with decreasing temperature is explained in terms of void morphologies and formation of deformation induced martensite. The rapid increment in strength and ductility at 223 K is associated with the burst of martensitic transformation at that temperature; which has been clarified from acoustic emission signals. An additional initiative has been taken to model the evolution of martensite formation from the observed cumulative emission counts using a non linear logarithmic functional form. The fitted curves from the recorded acoustic emission cumulative count data are found to be better correlated compared to earlier obtained results. However, at 223 K normal non-linear logarithmic fit is not found suitable due to presence of burst type signals at intervals, therefore; piecewise logarithmic function to model acoustic emission bursts is proposed.

  3. Welding wires for high-tensile steels

    Laz'ko, V.E.; Starova, L.L.; Koval'chuk, V.G.; Maksimovich, T.L.; Labzina, I.E.; Yadrov, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    Strength of welded joints in arc welding of high-tensile steels of mean and high thickness by welding wires is equal to approximately 1300 MPa in thermohardened state and approximately 600 MPa without heat treatment. Sv-15Kh2NMTsRA-VI (EhK44-VI) -Sv-30Kh2NMTsRA-VI (EkK47-VI) welding wires are suggested for welding of medium-carbon alloyed steels. These wires provide monotonous growth of ultimate strength of weld metal in 1250-1900 MPa range with increase of C content in heat-treated state

  4. Effects of the strain rate on the tensile properties of a TRIP-aided duplex stainless steel

    Choi, Jeom Yong [Stainless Steel Product Group, Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, Pohang 790-785 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaeeun; Lee, Keunho; Koh, Ji-Yeon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, RIAM, Seoul National University, Seoul 151–744 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae-Hyung [Light Metal Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Heung Nam, E-mail: hnhan@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, RIAM, Seoul National University, Seoul 151–744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung-Tae, E-mail: ktpark@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-01

    Factors influencing the strain-rate dependence of the tensile properties of TRIP-aided lean duplex stainless steel were investigated by employing several characterization techniques of EBSD, TEM, and nanoindentation. The steel exhibited excellent tensile strength over 800 MPa and elongation, which exceeded 70% at a strain rate of 10{sup −3} s{sup −1} due to strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT), but both values decreased considerably with an increase in the strain rate. The hardness and the maximum shear stress for dislocation nucleation of the austenite were found to be higher than those of the ferrite by sub-grain scale nanoindentation tests. As a result, strain partitioning to the ferrite rather than the austenite was more significant from an early stage of deformation, suppressing the SIMT in the austenite. An EBSD strain analysis on the intra- and inter-grain scale revealed that this strain partitioning became more pronounced as the strain rate increased. Adiabatic heating, which induces austenite stabilization, also became more significant as the strain rate increased. Therefore, the present results indicate that the diminishing TRIP effects at high strain rates can be attributed to preferential strain partitioning to the soft ferrite phase from an early stage of deformation, as well as adiabatic heating.

  5. Tensile Stress-Strain Results for 304L and 316L Stainless-Steel Plate at Temperature

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; S. D. Snow; T. E. Rahl

    2007-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting moderate strain rate (10 to 200 per second) research on stainless steel materials in support of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). For this research, strain rate effects are characterized by comparison to quasi-static tensile test results. Considerable tensile testing has been conducted resulting in the generation of a large amount of basic material data expressed as engineering and true stress-strain curves. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of quasi-static tensile testing of 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steels in order to add to the existing data pool for these materials and make the data more readily available to other researchers, engineers, and interested parties. Standard tensile testing of round specimens in accordance with ASTM procedure A 370-03a were conducted on 304L and 316L stainless-steel plate materials at temperatures ranging from -20 F to 600 F. Two plate thicknesses, eight material heats, and both base and weld metal were tested. Material yield strength, Young's modulus, ultimate strength, ultimate strain, failure strength and failure strain were determined, engineering and true stress-strain curves to failure were developed, and comparisons to ASME Code minimums were made. The procedures used during testing and the typical results obtained are described in this paper

  6. Acoustic emission during tensile deformation and fracture of nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel specimens with notches

    Mukhopadhyay, C.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission generated during tensile deformation and fracture of nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel specimens with notches has been studied. The extent of acoustic activity generated depends on notch tip severity, notch tip blunting and tearing of the notches. The equation N=AK m applied to the acoustic emission data of the notched specimens has shown good correlation. Acoustic emission technique can be used to estimate the size of an unknown notch. (author)

  7. Influence of thermo-mechanical treatment on the tensile properties of a modified 14Cr–15Ni stainless steel

    Vijayanand, V.D., E-mail: vdvijayanand@igcar.gov.in; Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M.D.

    2014-10-15

    The titanium modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic stainless steel is used as clad and wrapper material for fast breeder nuclear reactor. Thermo-mechanical treatments consisting of solution annealing at two different temperatures of 1273 and 1373 K followed by cold-work and thermal ageing have been imparted to the steel to tailor its microstructure for enhancing strength. Tensile tests have been carried out on the thermo-mechanically treated steel at nominal strain rate of 1.6 × 10{sup −4} s{sup −1} over a temperature range of 298–1073 K. The yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength of the steel increased with increase in solution treatment temperature and this has been attributed to the fine and higher density of Ti(C,N) precipitate. Tensile flow behaviour of the steel has been analysed using Ludwigson and Voce constitutive equations. The steel heat treated at higher solution temperature exhibited earlier onset of cross slip during tensile deformation. The rate of recovery at higher test temperatures was also influenced by variations in solution heat treatment temperature. In addition, dynamic recrystallization during tensile deformation at higher temperatures was profound for steel solution heat-treated at lower temperature. The differences in flow behaviour and softening mechanisms during tensile testing of the steel after different heat treated conditions have been attributed to the nature of Ti(C,N) precipitation.

  8. Influence of thermo-mechanical treatment on the tensile properties of a modified 14Cr–15Ni stainless steel

    Vijayanand, V.D.; Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    The titanium modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic stainless steel is used as clad and wrapper material for fast breeder nuclear reactor. Thermo-mechanical treatments consisting of solution annealing at two different temperatures of 1273 and 1373 K followed by cold-work and thermal ageing have been imparted to the steel to tailor its microstructure for enhancing strength. Tensile tests have been carried out on the thermo-mechanically treated steel at nominal strain rate of 1.6 × 10 −4 s −1 over a temperature range of 298–1073 K. The yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength of the steel increased with increase in solution treatment temperature and this has been attributed to the fine and higher density of Ti(C,N) precipitate. Tensile flow behaviour of the steel has been analysed using Ludwigson and Voce constitutive equations. The steel heat treated at higher solution temperature exhibited earlier onset of cross slip during tensile deformation. The rate of recovery at higher test temperatures was also influenced by variations in solution heat treatment temperature. In addition, dynamic recrystallization during tensile deformation at higher temperatures was profound for steel solution heat-treated at lower temperature. The differences in flow behaviour and softening mechanisms during tensile testing of the steel after different heat treated conditions have been attributed to the nature of Ti(C,N) precipitation

  9. Tensile Property of ANSI 304 Stainless Steel Weldments Subjected to Cavitation Erosion Based on Treatment of Laser Shock Processing.

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Yue-Hua; Luo, Kai-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Zhao, Yong; Huang, Jian-Yun; Wu, Xu-Dong; Zhou, Chuang

    2018-05-16

    Tensile property was one important index of mechanical properties of ANSI 304 stainless steel laser weldments subjected to cavitation erosion (CE). Laser shock processing (LSP) was utilized to strengthen the CE resistance, and the tensile property and fracture morphology were analyzed through three replicated experiment times. Results showed tensile process of treated weldments was composed of elastic deformation, plastic deformation, and fracture. The elastic limit, elastic modulus, elongation, area reduction, and ultimate tensile strength of tensile sample after CE were higher in view of LSP. In the fracture surface, the fiber zone, radiation zone and shear lip zone were generated, and those were more obvious through LSP. The number and size of pores in the fracture surface were smaller, and the fracture surface was smoother and more uniform. The dimples were elongated along the unified direction due to effects of LSP, and the elongated direction was in agreement with the crack propagation direction. Their distribution and shape were uniform with deeper depth. It could be reflected that the tensile property was improved by LSP and the CE resistance was also enhanced.

  10. Effect of cold work on tensile behavior of irradiated type 316 stainless steel

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Tensile specimens were irradiated in ORR at 250, 290, 450, and 500 0 C to produce a displacement damage of approx.5 dpa and 40 at. ppM He. Irradiation at 250 and 290 0 C caused an increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength and a decrease in ductility relative to unaged and thermally aged controls. The changes were greatest for the 20%-cold-worked steel and lowest for the 50%-cold-worked steel. Irradiation at 450 0 C caused a slight relative decrease in strength for all cold-worked conditions. A large decrease was observed at 500 0 C, with the largest decrease occurring for the 50%-cold-worked specimen. No bubble, void, or precipitate formation was observed for specimens examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The irradiation hardening was correlated with Frank-loop and ''black-dot'' loop damage. A strength decrease at 500 0 C was correlated with dislocation network recovery. Comparison of tensile and TEM results from ORR-irradiated steel with those from steels irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Experimental Breeder Reactor indicated consistent strength and microstructure changes

  11. High temperature damage of a re-sulfurized stainless steel

    Tinet, Hougo

    2002-01-01

    After having evoked the industrial problem raised by high-temperature damage in the 303 stainless steel, and outlined that the experimental study of high-temperature damage implies the study of the sane (or non damaged) material, the study of micro-voids germination, growth and coalescence, and the study of the material failure process, the author of this research thesis reports a bibliographical study on the behaviour of sane re-sulfurized stainless steel and different damage models. He presents experimental techniques (thermal-mechanical compression and tensile tests, image analysis in optical microscopy) which have been used in this work, and describes and comments results obtained on axisymmetric samples for micro-void germination, growth and coalescence in case of a damage under low and medium stress triaxiality. The last part addresses the study of the damage of strongly notched samples (stress triaxialities close to those existing at the crack bottom) [fr

  12. High cycle fatigue of austenitic stainless steels

    Gauthier, J.P.; Lehmann, D.; Picker

    1990-01-01

    This study concerns the evaluation of material data to be used in LMFBR design codes. High cycle fatigue properties of three austenitic stainless steels are evaluated: type AISI 316 (UKAEA tests), type AISI 316L (CEA tests) and type AISI 304 (Interatom tests). The data on these steels comprised some 550 data points from 14 casts. This data set covered a wide range of testing parameters: temperature from 20-625 0 C, frequency from 1-20 000 Hz, constant amplitude and random fatigue loading, with and without mean stress, etc. However, the testing conditions chosen by the three partners differed considerably because they had been fixed independently and not harmonized prior to the tests. This created considerable difficulties for the evaluations. Experimental procedures and statistical treatments used for the three subsets of data are described and discussed. Results are presented in tables and graphs. Although it is often difficult to single out the influence of each parameter due to the different testing conditions, several interesting conclusions can be drawn: The HCF properties of the three steels are consistent with the 0.2% proof stress, the fatigue limit being larger than the latter at temperatures above 550 0 C. The type 304 steel has lower tensile properties than the two other steels and hence also lower HCF properties. Parameters which clearly have a significant effect of HCF behaviour are mean stress or R-ratio (less in the non-endurance region than in the endurance region), temperature, cast or product. Other parameters have probably a weak or no effect but it is difficult to conclude due to insufficient data: environment, specimen orientation, frequency, specimen geometry

  13. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  14. Development of new high-performance stainless steels

    Park, Yong Soo

    2002-01-01

    This paper focused on high-performance stainless steels and their development status. Effect of nitrogen addition on super-stainless steel was discussed. Research activities at Yonsei University, on austenitic and martensitic high-performance stainless, steels, and the next-generation duplex stainless steels were introduced

  15. Construction of cryogenic testing system and tensile deformation behavior of AISI 300 series stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures

    Lee, H.M.; Nahm, S.H.; Huh, Y.H.; Lee, J.J.; Bahng, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    For practical application of cryogenic engineering, development and characterization of structural materials for use at low temperatures are essential. For these purposes, a system for mechanical testing at liquid helium temperatures was developed and it was shown that the precision and accuracy of the system met the requirements of standards for materials testing machines. Using this system, tensile deformation behavior of AISI 304,316 and 310S austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures was investigated. Tests were conducted on round, tensile specimens having a 6.25mm diameter at 4,77, and 295 K and loading rate was 0.5mm/min. Serrations were observed in all alloys at 4 K. The stress-displacement curves at 77 and 4 K showed different tendency from those at 298 K. As the testing temperature decreased, ultimate strengths of 304 and 316 were largely increased compared to the increase of yield strengths, but the increase of ultimate strength of 310S was almost the same to that of yield strength. Type 310S had the highest yield strength and the lowest tensile strength at all temperatutes. These tensile characteristics were considered to be strongly affected by austenite stability.(Author)

  16. Effect of tensile pre-strain at different orientation on martensitic transformation and mechanical properties of 316L stainless steel

    Wibowo, F.; Zulfi, F. R.; Korda, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Deformation induced martensite was studied in 316L stainless steel through tensile pre-strain deformation in the rolling direction (RD) and perpendicular to the rolling direction (LT) at various %pre-strain. The experiment was carried out at various given %pre-strain, which were 0%, 4.6%, 12%, 17.4%, and 25.2% for the RD, whereas for LT were 0%, 4.6%, 12%, 18%, and 26% for LT. Changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties were observed using optical microscope, tensile testing, hardness testing, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The experimental results showed that the volume fraction of martensite was increased as the %pre-strain increased. In the same level of deformation by tensile pre-strain, the volume of martensite for RD was higher than that with LT direction. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and hardness of the steel were increased proportionally with the increases in %pre-strain, while the value of elongation and toughness were decreased with the increases in %pre-strain.

  17. Attenuation capability of low activation-modified high manganese austenitic stainless steel for fusion reactor system

    Eissa, M.M. [Steel Technology Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan (Egypt); El-kameesy, S.U.; El-Fiki, S.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Ghali, S.N. [Steel Technology Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan (Egypt); El Shazly, R.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt); Saeed, Aly, E-mail: aly_8h@yahoo.com [Nuclear Power station Department, Faculty of Engineering, Egyptian-Russian University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Improvement stainless steel alloys to be used in fusion reactors. • Structural, mechanical, attenuation properties of investigated alloys were studied. • Good agreement between experimental and calculated results has been achieved. • The developed alloys could be considered as candidate materials for fusion reactors. - Abstract: Low nickel-high manganese austenitic stainless steel alloys, SSMn9Ni and SSMn10Ni, were developed to use as a shielding material in fusion reactor system. A standard austenitic stainless steel SS316L was prepared and studied as a reference sample. The microstructure properties of the present stainless steel alloys were investigated using Schaeffler diagram, optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction pattern. Mainly, an austenite phase was observed for the prepared stainless steel alloys. Additionally, a small ferrite phase was observed in SS316L and SSMn10Ni samples. The mechanical properties of the prepared alloys were studied using Vickers hardness and tensile tests at room temperature. The studied manganese stainless steel alloys showed higher hardness, yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength than SS316L. On the other hand, the manganese stainless steel elongation had relatively lower values than the standard SS316L. The removal cross section for both slow and total slow (primary and those slowed down in sample) neutrons were carried out using {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. Gamma ray attenuation parameters were carried out for different gamma ray energy lines which emitted from {sup 60}Co and {sup 232}Th radioactive sources. The developed manganese stainless steel alloys had a higher total slow removal cross section than SS316L. While the slow neutron and gamma rays were nearly the same for all studied stainless steel alloys. From the obtained results, the developed manganese stainless steel alloys could be considered as candidate materials for fusion reactor system with low activation based on the short life

  18. HIGH TEMPERATURE TENSILE PROPERTIES OF NEW FE-CR-MN DEVELOPED STEEL

    M. Mahmoudiniya; Sh. Kheirandish; M. Asadi Asadabad

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, Ni-free austenitic stainless steels are being developed rapidly and high price of nickel is one of the most important motivations for this development. At present research a new FeCrMn steel was designed and produced based on Fe-Cr-Mn-C system. Comparative studies on microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of  new steel and AISI 316 steel were done. The results showed that new FeCrMn developed steel has single austenite phase microstructure, and its tensile st...

  19. Effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of 304L austenitic stainless steel

    Akinlabi OYETUNJI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of AISI 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS was studied. The tensile strength property of ASS welded samples was evaluated. Prepared samples of the ASS were welded under these three various variables. Tensile test was then carried out on the welded samples. It was found that the reduction in ultimate tensile strength (UTS of the butt joint samples increases with increase in core diameter of the electrode. Also, the best electrode for welding 304L ASS is 308L stainless steel-core electrode of 3.2 mm core diameter. It is recommended that the findings of this work can be applied in the chemical, food and oil industries where 304L ASS are predominantly used.

  20. Preplastic strain effect on chromium carbides precipitation of type 316 stainless steel during high-temperature ageing

    Mao, X.; Zhao, W.

    1992-01-01

    Long exposure of Type 316 stainless steel to elevated temperature (400-900 o C) is known to cause high-temperature embrittlement due to chromium carbides and σ-phase precipitating in grain boundaries. Numerous investigations have been published on the mechanical properties and microstructure changes occurring during such exposure. However, no investigations exist on the preplastic deformation effect on chromium carbide precipitation in the grain matrix and grain boundary during high-temperature ageing of Type 316 stainless steel and then its effects on the room-temperature tensile properties. Since the stainless steel sometimes is deformed before use at high temperatures, it is necessary to study the preplastic strain effect of the stainless steel on the microstructure change and mechanical property change during high-temperature exposure. The purpose of the present investigation was to carry out such a study. The conclusions reached are as follows. First, chromium carbides are precipitated in deformation lines (slip lines) and then the amount of chromium carbides precipitation in the grain boundary is relatively reduced in predeformed stainless steel after ageing. Secondly, plastic strain pretreatments of and subsequent ageing treatments of Type 316 stainless steel can improve its tensile ductility. Finally, secondary cracking of aged stainless steel occurs in a normal tensile test. The secondary cracking can be reduced by adding preplastic strain into the material. (Author)

  1. Additively manufactured hierarchical stainless steels with high strength and ductility

    Wang, Y. Morris; Voisin, Thomas; McKeown, Joseph T.; Ye, Jianchao; Calta, Nicholas P.; Li, Zan; Zeng, Zhi; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Wen; Roehling, Tien Tran; Ott, Ryan T.; Santala, Melissa K.; Depond, Philip J.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Hamza, Alex V.; Zhu, Ting

    2018-01-01

    Many traditional approaches for strengthening steels typically come at the expense of useful ductility, a dilemma known as strength-ductility trade-off. New metallurgical processing might offer the possibility of overcoming this. Here we report that austenitic 316L stainless steels additively manufactured via a laser powder-bed-fusion technique exhibit a combination of yield strength and tensile ductility that surpasses that of conventional 316L steels. High strength is attributed to solidification-enabled cellular structures, low-angle grain boundaries, and dislocations formed during manufacturing, while high uniform elongation correlates to a steady and progressive work-hardening mechanism regulated by a hierarchically heterogeneous microstructure, with length scales spanning nearly six orders of magnitude. In addition, solute segregation along cellular walls and low-angle grain boundaries can enhance dislocation pinning and promote twinning. This work demonstrates the potential of additive manufacturing to create alloys with unique microstructures and high performance for structural applications.

  2. Effect of implanted helium on tensile properties and hardness of 9% Cr martensitic stainless steels

    Jung, P.; Henry, J.; Chen, J.; Brachet, J.-C.

    2003-05-01

    Hundred micrometer thick specimens of 9% Cr martensitic steels EM10 and T91 were homogeneously implanted with He 4 to concentrations up to 0.5 at.% at temperatures from 150 to 550 °C. The specimens were tensile tested at room temperature and at the respective implantation temperatures. Subsequently the fracture surfaces were analysed by scanning electron microscopy and some of the specimens were examined in an instrumented hardness tester. The implanted helium caused hardening and embrittlement which both increased with increasing helium content and with decreasing implantation temperature. Fracture surfaces showed intergranular brittle appearance with virtually no necking at the highest implantation doses, when implanted below 250 °C. The present tensile results can be scaled to tensile data after irradiation in spallation sources on the basis of helium content but not on displacement damage. An interpretation of this finding by microstructural examination is given in a companion paper [J. Nucl. Mater., these Proceedings].

  3. Correlation of fracture toughness with tensile properties for irradiated 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel

    Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-08-01

    A correlation has been developed which allows an estimate to be made of the toughness of austenitic alloys using more easily obtained tensile data. Tensile properties measured on 20% cold-worked AISI 316 specimens made from ducts and cladding irradiated in EBR-II were used to predict values for the plane strain fracture toughness according to a model originally developed by Krafft. Some microstructural examination is required to determine a parameter designated as the process zone size. In contrast to the frequently employed Hahn-Rosenfeld model, this model gives results which agree with recent experimental determinations of toughness performed in the transgranular failure regime

  4. Effect of flowing sodium on corrosion and tensile properties of AISI type 316LN stainless steel at 823 K

    Sivai Bharasi, N.; Thyagarajan, K.; Shaikh, H.; Balamurugan, A. K.; Bera, Santanu; Kalavathy, S.; Gurumurthy, K.; Tyagi, A. K.; Dayal, R. K.; Rajan, K. K.; Khatak, H. S.

    2008-07-01

    AISI type 316LN stainless steel was exposed to flowing sodium in mass transfer loop (MTL) at 823 K for 16 000 h and then examined for changes in the tensile properties due to the mass transfer and corrosion effects. Comparisons in microstructural and mechanical properties were made between annealed, thermally aged and sodium exposed materials. Microstructural examination of thermally aged and sodium exposed materials revealed precipitation of carbides at the grain boundaries. The sodium exposed samples contained a degraded layer at the surface up to a depth of around 10 μm and a surface carburized layer of about 30 μm. There was about 15% increase in yield strength and a decrease of about 20% in ductility for the sodium exposed material vis-a-vis thermally aged material and this was attributed to carburization effects and microstructural changes.

  5. Effect of flowing sodium on corrosion and tensile properties of AISI type 316LN stainless steel at 823 K

    Sivai Bharasi, N.; Thyagarajan, K.; Shaikh, H.; Balamurugan, A.K.; Bera, Santanu; Kalavathy, S.; Gurumurthy, K.; Tyagi, A.K.; Dayal, R.K.; Rajan, K.K.; Khatak, H.S.

    2008-01-01

    AISI type 316LN stainless steel was exposed to flowing sodium in mass transfer loop (MTL) at 823 K for 16 000 h and then examined for changes in the tensile properties due to the mass transfer and corrosion effects. Comparisons in microstructural and mechanical properties were made between annealed, thermally aged and sodium exposed materials. Microstructural examination of thermally aged and sodium exposed materials revealed precipitation of carbides at the grain boundaries. The sodium exposed samples contained a degraded layer at the surface up to a depth of around 10 μm and a surface carburized layer of about 30 μm. There was about 15% increase in yield strength and a decrease of about 20% in ductility for the sodium exposed material vis-a-vis thermally aged material and this was attributed to carburization effects and microstructural changes

  6. Influence of laboratory annealing on tensile properties and design stress intensity limits for Type 304 stainless steel

    Sikka, V.K.; Booker, M.K.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of reannealing (laboratory annealing) on yield and ultimate tensile strength values of 19 heats of type 304 stainless steel was determined. Most heats were reannealed at 1065 0 C for 0.5 hr. The reannealed properties were used to determine the influence of reannealing on time-independent design stress intensity limits (S/sub m/). The major findings are as follows: 1. Reannealing lowered the 0.2 percent yield strength versus temperature curve by approximately 42 MPa over the range from room temperature to 649 0 C. 2. The estimated S/sub m/ values for reannealed material were 24 to 28 MPa lower than the current code values. 3. Reannealing appears to influence the S/sub m/ value sufficiently to warrant the consideration of separate values of S/sub m/ in Sect. III of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and Code Case 1592 for ''as-received'' and reannealed material

  7. Tensile properties of irradiated and fatigue exposed stainless steel DIN X 6 CrNi 1811 (similar to AISI type 304) plate and welded joints

    Vries, M.I. de; Schaaf, B. van der; Elen, J.D.

    1979-10-01

    Test specimens of plate metal and welded joints of stainless steel DIN 1.4948, which is similar to AISI type 304, have been irradiated at 723 K and 823 K up to fluences of 1.10 23 n.m -2 and 5.10 24 n.m -2 (E > 0.1 MeV). These are representative conditions for the SNR-300 reactor vessel and inner components after 16 years of operation. High-rate (depsilon/dt = 1 s -1 ) tensile tests were performed after fatigue exposure up to various fractions of fatigue life (D) ranging from 5% to 95% at the same temperatures as the nominal temperatures of the irradiation series

  8. Empirical relations for tensile properties of austenitic stainless steels irradiated in mixed-spectrum reactors

    Grossbeck, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    An assessment has been made of available tensile property data relevant to the design of fusion reactors, especially near term devices expected to operate at lower temperatures than power reactors. Empirical relations have been developed for the tensile properties as a functions of irradiation temperature for neutron exposures of 10-15, 20, 30, and 50 dpa. It was found that yield strength depends little on the particular austenitic alloy and little on the helium concentration. Strength depends upon initial condition of the alloy only for exposures of less than 30 dpa. Uniform elongation was found to be more sensitive to alloy and condition. It was also more sensitive than strength to helium level. However, below 500deg C, helium only appeared to have an efect at 10-15 dpa. At higher temperatures, helium embrittlement was apparent, and its threshold temperature decreased with increasing neutron exposure level. (orig.)

  9. Experimental assessments of notch ductility and tensile strength of stainless steel weldments after 1200C neutron irradiation

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Menke, B.H.; Awadalla, N.G.; O'Kula, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C/sub v/) properties of AISI 300 series stainless steel plate, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) materials from commercial production weldments in 406-mm-diameter pipe (12.7-mm wall) were investigated in unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Weld and HAZ tensile properties were also assessed in the two conditions. The plates and weld filler wires represent different steel melts; the welds were produced using the multipass MIG process. Weldment properties in two test orientations were evaluated. Specimens were irradiated in the UBR reactor to 1 x 10 20 n/cm 2 , E >0.1 MeV in a controlled temperature assembly. Specimen tests were performed at 25 0 C and 125 0 C. The radiation-induced reductions in C/sub v/ energy absorption at 25 0 C were about 42 percent for the weld and HAZ materials evaluated. A trend of energy increase with temperature was observed. The concomitant elevation in yield strength was about 53%. In contrast, the increase in tensile strength was only 16%. The postirradiation yield strength of the axial test orientation in the pipe was less than that of the circumferential test orientation. Results for the HAZ indicate that this component may be the weakest link in the weldment from a fracture resistant viewpoint

  10. Experimental assessments of notch ductility and tensile strength of stainless steel weldments after 1200C neutron irradiation

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Menke, B.H.; Awadalla, N.G.; O'Kula, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C/sub V/) properties of American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 300 series stainless steel plate, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) materials from commercial production weldments in 406-mm-diameter pipe (12.7-mm wall) were investigated in unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Weld and HAZ tensile properties were also assessed in the two conditions. The plates and weld filler wires represent different steel melts; the welds were produced using the multipass metal inert gas (MIG) process. Weldment properties in two test orientations were evaluated. Specimens were irradiated in a light water cooled and moderated reactor to 1 x 10/sup 20/ n/cm/sup 2/, E > 0.1 MeV, using a controlled temperature assembly. Specimen tests were performed at 25 and 125 0 C. The radiation-induced reductions in C/sub V/ energy absorption at 25 0 C were about 42% for the weld and the HAZ materials evaluated. A trend of energy increase with temperature was observed. The concomitant elevation in yield strength was about 53%. The increase in tensile strength in contrast was only 16%. The postirradiation yield strength of the axial test orientation in the pipe was less than that of the circumferential test orientation. Results for the HAZ indicate that this component may be the weakest link in the weldment from a fracture resistance viewpoint

  11. Elastic interaction between twins during tensile deformation of austenitic stainless steel

    Juul, Nicolai Ytterdal; Winther, Grethe; Dale, Darren

    2016-01-01

    . However, the components of the Type II stress normal to the twin boundary plane exhibit the same large variations as for the grain boundaries. Elastic grain interactions are therefore complex and must involve the entire set of neighbouring grains. The elastic-regime stress along the tensile direction......In austenite, the twin boundary normal is a common elastically stiff direction shared by the two twins, which may induce special interactions. By means of three-dimensional X-ray diffraction this elastic interaction has been analysed and compared to grains separated by conventional grain boundaries...

  12. Influence of dynamic strain ageing on tensile strain energy of type 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel

    Isaac Samuel, B.; Choudhary, B.K.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2010-01-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on type 316 L(N) stainless steel over a wide temperature range of 300-1123 K employing strain rates ranging from 3.16 X 10 -5 to 3.16 X 10 -3/s . The variation of strain energy in terms of modulus of resilience and modulus of toughness over the wide range of temperatures and strain rates were examined. The variation in modulus of resilience with temperature and strain rate did not show the signatures of dynamic strain ageing (DSA). However, the modulus of toughness exhibited a plateau at the intermediate temperatures of 523-1023 K. Further, the distribution of energy absorbed till necking and energy absorbed from necking till fracture were found to characterise the deformation and damage processes, respectively, and exhibited anomalous variations in the temperature range 523-823 K and 823-1023 K, respectively. In addition to the observed manifestations of DSA such as serrated load-elongation curve, peaks/plateaus in flow stress, ultimate tensile strength and work hardening rate, negative strain rate sensitivity and ductility minima, the observed anomalous variations in modulus of toughness at intermediate temperatures (523-1023 K) can be regarded as yet another key manifestation of DSA. At temperatures above 1023 K, a sharp decrease in the modulus of toughness and also in the strain energies up to necking and from necking to fracture observed, with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate, reveal the onset of dynamic recovery leading to early cross slip and climb processes. (author)

  13. Tensile properties and impact toughness of S30408 stainless steel and its welded joints at cryogenic temperatures

    Ding, Huiming; Wu, Yingzhe; Lu, Qunjie; Xu, Ping; Zheng, Jinyang; Wei, Lijun

    2018-06-01

    Designing a cryogenic pressure vessel based on the mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steel (ASS) at its cryogenic operating temperature fully utilizes the potential of the material at low temperatures, resulting in lightweight and compact products. A series of tensile tests and impact tests were carried out in a wide range of 77-293 K, to investigate the mechanical properties of S30408 base metal (BM) and welded joints (WJ) at cryogenic temperatures. As the temperature decreases, yield stress (Rp0.2) and ultimate tensile stress (Rm) increase significantly thanks to the low-temperature strengthening effects. To estimate strengths at cryogenic temperatures, quadratic polynomial model was used to accurately predict the variations of Rp0.2 and Rm from 77 K to 293 K. As an important phase in the WJ, ferrite presents a radial pattern and an inhomogeneity in the WJ's cross-section. Due to the formation of ferrite in the WJ, the WJ has higher Rp0.2 and lower Rm , Charpy absorbed energy and lateral expansion compared with the BM. Strain-induced martensite transformation is an important role influencing the deformation of ASS at low temperatures. In this study, less martensite amount was measured in the weldment zone with higher Nickel equivalents which stabilize the austenite phase at cryogenic temperatures. Additionally, due to higher ferrite content and more precipitates forming, the SAW joints has lower Rm and impact toughness than PAW + GTAW joints. To ensure the structural integrity and safety, the PAW + GTAW method should be chosen and ferrite content be controlled.

  14. Tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of a Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel

    Sivaprasad, P.V.; Venugopal, S.; Venkadesan, S.

    1997-01-01

    The flow-stress data of a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel in the temperature range 300 to 1,023 K was analyzed in terms of Ludwigson and Voce equations. The parameters of these equations were critically examined with respect to the effect of Ti/C ratio and test temperature. It was found that the Ludwigson equation described the flow behavior adequately up to the test temperature of 923 K, whereas the Voce equation could be employed in the full temperature range. The peaks/plateaus observed in the variation of these parameters as a function of temperature in the intermediate temperature range have been identified as one of the manifestations of dynamic strain aging (DSA). Also, the variation of these parameters with temperature clearly could bring out the different domains of DSA observed in this alloy. The work-hardening analysis of the flow-stress data revealed that in the DSA regime, the onset of stage III hardening is athermal

  15. Properties of high temperature low cycle fatigue in austenitic stainless steel

    Kim, D. H.; Han, C. H.; Ryu, W. S.

    2002-01-01

    Tensile and fatigue tests were conducted at R. T. and 300 .deg. C for type 304 and 316 stainless steel. Tensile strength and elongation decreased and fatigue life increased with temperature for both type 304 and 316 stainless steel. Dislocation structures were mixed with cell and planar at R. T. and 300 .deg. C for both type 304 and 316 stainless steel. Strain induced martensite of type 316 stainless steel was less than that of type 304 stainless steel and decreased with temperature. It is considered that strain induced martensite is an important factor to increase fatigue life at 300 .deg. C

  16. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  17. Theoretical and experimental study on unstable fracture for type 304 stainless steel plates with a soft tensile testing machine

    Yagawa, G.; Takahashi, Y.; Ando, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The object of this paper is to show experimental results on stable as well as unstable fractures for Type 304 stainless steel plates with a central crack using a soft tensile testing machine. The test machine was installed specially for the safety study of nuclear piping systems and its maximum loading capacity and maximum displacement are 600 ton and 500 mm, respectively. The compliance of the machine is 1.0 x 10 -4 (mm/N). The transition points from the stable to the unstable crack growth observed in the test were theoretically determined by using three methods. In the first method, the 'applied' value of T was calculated with the simple expression based on the dimensional analysis. In the second method, the fully-plastic solutions were used to calculate the nonlinear value of J, which was added to the linear value of J, thus the 'applied' values of T was determined by differentiating the total value of J, which was obtained for the material with the Ramberg-Osgood type stress-strain relation. In the final method, the finite element method was fully utilized to determine the 'applied' value of T. The value of J in the finite element method was obtained with the use of the path-integral. (orig./GL)

  18. Effect of heat treatment, with and without mechanical work, on the tensile and creep behaviour at 6000C of austenitic stainless steel stabilised with titanium

    Padilha, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of various heat treatments, with and without mechanical work, on the microstructure and the tensile and creep behaviour at 600 0 C of the titanium stabilised austenitic stainless steel DIN 1.4970, as well as the effects of aging temperature, pre-strain and small boron additions on the creep behaviour of these steels are discussed. The most probable mechanism is suggested. (Author) [pt

  19. The effect of a single tensile overload on stress corrosion cracking growth of stainless steel in a light water reactor environment

    Xue He; Li Zhijun; Lu Zhanpeng; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The affect of a single tensile overload on SCC growth rate is investigated. → A single tensile overload would produce a residual plastic strain in the SCC tip. → The residual plastic strain would decrease the plastic strain rate in the SCC tip. → A single tensile overload would cause crack growth rate retardation in the SCC tip. → SCC growth rate in the quasi-stationary crack tip is relatively lower. - Abstract: It has been found that a single tensile overload applied during constant load amplitude might cause crack growth rate retardation in various crack propagating experiments which include fatigue test and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) test. To understand the affecting mechanism of a single tensile overload on SCC growth rate of stainless steel or nickel base alloy in light water reactor environment, based on elastic-plastic finite element method (EPFEM), the residual plastic strain in both tips of stationary and growing crack of contoured double cantilever beam (CDCB) specimen was simulated and analyzed in this study. The results of this investigation demonstrate that a residual plastic strain in the region immediately ahead of the crack tips will be produced when a single tensile overload is applied, and the residual plastic strain will decrease the plastic strain rate level in the growing crack tip, which will causes crack growth rate retardation in the tip of SCC.

  20. Ductility of high chromium stainless steels

    Peretyat'ko, V.N.; Kazantsev, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Aimed to optimize the hot working conditions for high chromium stainless steels the experiments were carried in the temperature range of 800-1300 deg C using hot torsion tests and cylindrical specimens of ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels 08Kh13, 12Kh13, 20Kh13, 30Kh13 and 40Kh13. Testing results showed that steel plasticity varies in a wide range depending on carbon content. Steels of lesser carbon concentration (08Kh13 and 12Kh13) exhibit a sharp increase in plasticity with a temperature rise, especially in the interval of 1200-1250 deg C. Steels 20Kh13 and 30Kh13 display insignificant plasticity increasing, whereas plastic properties of steel 40Kh13 increase noticeably in the range of 1000-1300 deg C. It is shown that optimal hot working conditions for specific steel must be selected with account of steel phase composition at high temperatures

  1. Tensile and high cycle fatigue behaviors of high-Mn steels at 298 and 110 K

    Seo, Wongyu; Jeong, Daeho; Sung, Hyokyung; Kim, Sangshik, E-mail: sang@gnu.ac.kr

    2017-02-15

    Tensile and high cycle fatigue behaviors of high-Mn austenitic steels, including 25Mn, 25Mn0.2Al, 25Mn0.5Cu, 24Mn4Cr, 22Mn3Cr and 16Mn2Al specimens, were investigated at 298 and 110 K. Depending on the alloying elements, tensile ductility of high-Mn steels either increased or decreased with decreasing temperature from 298 to 110 K. Reasonable correlation between the tendency for martensitic tranformation, the critical twinning stress and the percent change in tensile elongation suggested that tensile deformation of high-Mn steels was strongly influenced by SFE determining TRIP and TWIP effects. Tensile strength was the most important parameter in determining the resistance to high cycle fatigue of high-Mn steels with an exceptional work hardening capability at room and cryogenic temperatures. The fatigue crack nucleation mechanism in high-Mn steels did not vary with decreasing tempertature, except Cr-added specimens with grain boundary cracking at 298 K and slip band cracking at 110 K. The EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) analyses suggested that the deformation mechanism under fatigue loading was significantly different from tensile deformation which could be affected by TRIP and TWIP effects. - Highlights: •The resistances to HCF of various high-Mn steels were measured. •The variables affecting tensile and HCF behaviors of high-Mn steels were assessed. •The relationship between tensile and the HCF behaviors of high-Mn steels was established.

  2. Mechanical Properties of High Manganese Austenitic Stainless Steel JK2LB for ITER Central Solenoid Jacket Material

    Saito, Toru; Kawano, Katsumi; Yamazaki, Toru; Ozeki, Hidemasa; Isono, Takaaki; Hamada, Kazuya; Devred, Arnaud; Vostner, Alexander

    A suite of advanced austenitic stainless steels are used for the ITER TF, CS and PF coil systems.These materials will be exposed to cyclic-stress at cryogenic temperature. Therefore, high manganese austenitic stainless steel JK2LB, which has high tensile strength, high ductility and high resistance to fatigue at 4 K has been chosen for the CS conductor. The cryogenic temperature mechanical property data of this material are very important for the ITER magnet design. This study is focused on mechanical characteristics of JK2LB and its weld joint.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water and alternative stainless steel

    Yonezawa, T.

    2015-01-01

    In order to clarify the effect of SFE on SCC resistance of austenitic stainless steels and to develop the alternative material of Type 316LN stainless steel for BWR application, the effect of chemical composition and heat treatment on SFE value and SCCGR in oxygenated high temperature water were studied. The correlation factors between SFE values for 54 heats of materials and their chemical compositions for nickel, molybdenum, chromium, manganese, nitrogen, silicon and carbon were obtained. From these correlation factors, original formulae for SFE values calculation of austenitic stainless steels in the SHTWC, SHTFC and AGG conditions were established. The maximum crack length, average crack length and cracked area of the IGSCC for 33 heats were evaluated as IGSCC resistance in oxygenated high temperature water. The IGSCC resistance of strain hardened nonsensitized austenitic stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water increases with increasing of nickel contents and SFE values. From this study, it is suggested that the SFE value is a key parameter for the IGSCC resistance of non-sensitized strain hardened austenitic stainless steels. As an alternative material of Type 316LN stainless steel, increased SFE value material, which is high nickel, high chromium, low silicon and low nitrogen material, is recommendable. (author)

  4. HIGH TEMPERATURE TENSILE PROPERTIES OF NEW FE-CR-MN DEVELOPED STEEL

    M. Mahmoudiniya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Ni-free austenitic stainless steels are being developed rapidly and high price of nickel is one of the most important motivations for this development. At present research a new FeCrMn steel was designed and produced based on Fe-Cr-Mn-C system. Comparative studies on microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of  new steel and AISI 316 steel were done. The results showed that new FeCrMn developed steel has single austenite phase microstructure, and its tensile strength and toughness were higher than those of 316 steel at 25, 200,350 and 500°C. In contrast with 316 steel, the new FeCrMn steel did not show strain induced transformation and dynamic strain aging phenomena during tensile tests that represented higher austenite stability of new developed steel. Lower density and higher strength of the new steel caused higher specific strength in comparison with the 316 one that can be considered as an important advantage in structural applications but in less corrosive environment

  5. Tensile strength and creep behaviour of austenitic stainless steel type 18Cr - 12Ni with niobium additions at 700{sup 0}C

    Sordi, V L; Bueno, L O, E-mail: sordi@ufscar.b [Federal University of Sao Carlos, Materials Engineering Department, Sao Carlos (SP), 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The effect of niobium additions up to 2.36 wt% on the creep behavior of a series of seven extra low carbon 18Cr-12Ni austenitic stainless steels at 700{sup 0}C has been investigated. Grain size and hardness measurements, hot tensile tests and constant stress creep tests from 90 to 180 MPa were carried out for each alloy, in the solution treated condition at 1050, 1200 and 1300{sup 0}C followed by quench in water. The mechanical behavior at high temperature was related to the amount of NbC precipitation occurring during the tests. Solid solution and intermetallic compound effects were also considered. Creep data analysis was done to determine the parameters of the creep power-law equation {epsilon}-dot = A.{sigma}{sup n} and the Monkman-Grant relation {epsilon}-dot .t{sup m}{sub R} = K. Niobium-carbide precipitation in these steels reduces the secondary stage dependence of strain rate with applied stress, resulting in n-values which indicate the possibility of operation of various creep mechanisms. The creep strength during the secondary stage is primarily controlled by the amount of NbC available for precipitation. However, the rupture times increase progressively with niobium content, as the amount of undissolved carbide particles in grain boundaries and the Laves phase precipitation increase.

  6. Tensile strength and creep behaviour of austenitic stainless steel type 18Cr - 12Ni with niobium additions at 700°C

    Sordi, V. L.; Bueno, L. O.

    2010-07-01

    The effect of niobium additions up to 2.36 wt% on the creep behavior of a series of seven extra low carbon 18Cr-12Ni austenitic stainless steels at 700°C has been investigated. Grain size and hardness measurements, hot tensile tests and constant stress creep tests from 90 to 180 MPa were carried out for each alloy, in the solution treated condition at 1050, 1200 and 1300°C followed by quench in water. The mechanical behavior at high temperature was related to the amount of NbC precipitation occurring during the tests. Solid solution and intermetallic compound effects were also considered. Creep data analysis was done to determine the parameters of the creep power-law equation dot epsilon = A.σn and the Monkman-Grant relation dot epsilon.tmR = K. Niobium-carbide precipitation in these steels reduces the secondary stage dependence of strain rate with applied stress, resulting in n-values which indicate the possibility of operation of various creep mechanisms. The creep strength during the secondary stage is primarily controlled by the amount of NbC available for precipitation. However, the rupture times increase progressively with niobium content, as the amount of undissolved carbide particles in grain boundaries and the Laves phase precipitation increase.

  7. Effect of Sintering Atmosphere and Solution Treatment on Density, Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Duplex Stainless Steels Developed from Pre-alloyed Powders

    Murali, Arun Prasad; Mahendran, Sudhahar; Ramajayam, Mariappan; Ganesan, Dharmalingam; Chinnaraj, Raj Kumar

    2017-10-01

    In this research, Powder Metallurgy (P/M) of Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) of different compositions were prepared through pre-alloyed powders and elemental powders with and without addition of copper. The powder mix was developed by pot mill for 12 h to obtain the homogeneous mixture of pre-alloyed powder with elemental compositions. Cylindrical green compacts with the dimensions of 30 mm diameter and 12 mm height were compacted through universal testing machine at a pressure level of 560 ± 10 MPa. These green compacts were sintered at 1350 °C for 2 h in hydrogen and argon atmospheres. Some of the sintered stainless steel preforms were solution treated at 1050 °C followed by water quenching. The sintered as well as solution treated samples were analysed by metallography examination, Scanning Electron Microscopy and evaluation of mechanical properties. Ferrite content of sintered and solution treated DSS were measured by Fischer Ferritoscope. It is inferred that the hydrogen sintered DSS depicted better density (94% theoretical density) and tensile strength (695 MPa) than the argon sintered steels. Similarly the microstructure of solution treated DSS revealed existence of more volume of ferrite grains than its sintered condition. Solution treated hydrogen sintered DSS A (50 wt% 316L + 50 wt% 430L) exhibited higher tensile strength of 716 MPa and elongation of 17%, which are 10-13% increment than the sintered stainless steels.

  8. High nitrogen stainless steels for nuclear industry

    Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen alloying in stainless steels (SS) has myriad beneficial effects, including solid solution strengthening, precipitation effects, phase control and corrosion resistance. Recent years have seen a rapid development of these alloys with improved properties owing to advances in processing technologies. Furthermore, unlimited demands for high-performance advanced steels for special use in advanced applications renewed the interest in high nitrogen steels (HNS). The combination of numbers of attractive properties such as strength, fracture toughness, wear resistance, workability, magnetic properties and corrosion resistance of HNS has given a unique advantage and offers a number of prospective applications in different industries. Based on extensive studies carried out at IGCAR, nitrogen alloyed type 304LN SS and 316LN SS have been chosen as materials of construction for many engineering components of fast breeder reactor (FBR) and associated reprocessing plants. HNS austenitic SS alloys are used as structural/reactor components, i.e., main vessel, inner vessel, control plug, intermediate heat exchanger and main sodium piping for fast breeder reactor. HNS type 304LN SS is a candidate material for continuous dissolver, nuclear waste storage tanks, pipings, etc. for nitric acid service under highly corrosive conditions. Recent developments towards the manufacturing and properties of HNS alloys for application in nuclear industry are highlighted in the presentation. (author)

  9. Tensile mechanical properties of a stainless steel irradiated up to 19 dpa in the Swiss spallation neutron source

    Saito, Shigeru, E-mail: saito.shigeru@jaea.go.jp [JAEA, J-PARC Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kikuchi, Kenji [Ibaraki Univ., iFRC, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1106 (Japan); Hamaguchi, Dai [JAEA, J-PARC Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Usami, Kouji; Endo, Shinya; Ono, Katsuto; Matsui, Hiroki [JAEA, Dept. of Hot Laboratories, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kawai, Masayoshi [KEK, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305-0801 (Japan); Dai, Yong [PSI, Spallation Source Division, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the lifetime of the beam window of an accelerator-driven transmutation system (ADS), post irradiation examination (PIE) of the STIP (SINQ target irradiation program, SINQ; Swiss spallation neutron source) specimens was carried out. The specimens tested in this study were made from the austenitic steel Japan primary candidate alloy (JPCA). The specimens were irradiated at SINQ Target 4 (STIP-II) with high-energy protons and spallation neutrons. The irradiation conditions were as follows: the proton energy was 580 MeV, irradiation temperatures ranged from 100 to 430 Degree-Sign C, and displacement damage levels ranged from 7.1 to 19.5 dpa. Tensile tests were performed in air at room temperature (RT), 250 Degree-Sign C and 350 Degree-Sign C. Fracture surface observation after the tests was done by Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results of the tensile tests performed at R.T. showed the extra hardening of JPCA at higher dose compared to the fission neutron irradiated data. At the higher temperatures, 250 Degree-Sign C and 350 Degree-Sign C, the extra hardening was not observed. Degradation of ductility bottomed around 10 dpa, and specimens kept their ductility until 19.5 dpa. All specimens fractured in ductile manner.

  10. Modern high strength QT, TM and duplex-stainless steels

    Bocquet, P.; Luxenburger, G.; Porter, D.; Ericsson, C.

    2003-01-01

    Pressure vessels are commonly manufactured with normalised steel grades with a yield strength up to 355 MPa or with austenitic stainless steels when corrosion as to be considered. From three decades, modern steels with higher mechanical properties - up to yield strength of 960 Mpa - are available and largely used for other applications where weight saving is of major importance as per off-shore, bridges, cranes, shipbuilding, line pipes.. The paper presents these modern steel's families - TMCP (Thermo Mechanically Controlled Process), QT (Quenched and Tempered) and Duplex (austeno-ferritic) stainless - in comparison with the normalised and austenitic steel grades. The following aspects are presented: the main mechanical properties (tensile and Charpy) as per the requirements of the standards for pressure equipment; some examples of use of these modern steels in the industry are given; the limitations of the forming conditions are considered; the weldability aspects and welds properties are developed; the interest of the PWHT (Post Weld Heat Treatment) is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Study of interaction of fatigue damage and ratcheting. Effect of a tensile primary load on torsion fatigue resistance of stainless steel 304 L at ambient temperature

    Hakem, N.S.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of ratcheting on fatigue resistance of a stainless steel 304 L, used for reactor vessels, is studied experimentally. Lifetime of samples is reduced if a static constant tensile load (primary loading) is superimposed to cyclic torsion deformations (secondary loading). An equivalent deformation concept is developed to express a criterion of fatigue rupture under primary loading. No effect is noted on the curve of cyclic strain hardening. This fatigue analysis gives no information on cumulated axial deformation. Progressive elongation, observed during testing, is dependent of primary and secondary loading. Rupture is produced by fatigue because cumulated axial deformation is limited ( 4 cycles at rupture cumulated deformation is [fr

  12. Orientation-dependent evolution of the dislocation density in grain populations with different crystallographic orientations relative to the tensile axis in a polycrystalline aggregate of stainless steel

    Ungár, Tamás; Stoica, Alexandru D.; Tichy, Géza; Wang, Xun-Li

    2014-01-01

    Line profile analysis was carried out on neutron diffraction patterns collected by the energy-dispersive method for an in situ tensile-deformed AISI-316 stainless steel specimen. The experiments were carried out at the VULCAN engineering beam line of the spallation neutron source of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both the dislocation densities and the local stresses in grains oriented with different h k l crystal directions along the tensile axis were determined. The work-hardening equation of Taylor was tested for the h k l-dependent phenomenological constant α. The grain-orientation-dependent α values were directly related to the heterogeneity of dislocation distribution in correlation with previous transmission electron microscopy data

  13. Effect of chemistry variations on the short-term rupture life and tensile properties of 20% cold-worked type 316 stainless steel

    Duncan, D.R.; Paxton, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of compositional variations on the rupture life of 20% cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel were investigated at 19-ksi (131-MPa) uniaxial tensile stress and at 1400 0 F (1033 K). Forty-nine different alloys were studied, with compositional variations from nominal in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, boron, manganese, copper, silicon, molybdenum, cobalt, chromium and nickel. This alloy and cold-work level represents the duct and fuel cladding material choice for the first four core loadings of the Fast Flux Test Facility, a key element in the Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. Tensile properties of four of the alloys were studied at temperatures from room temperature to 1600 0 F (1144 K). Boron, nitrogen, and molybdenum plus silicon additions significantly increased rupture life, while chromium and carbon additions decreased rupture life. Molybdenum plus silicon additions increased yield and ultimate strength and ductility at 1200 0 F (922 K) and below

  14. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    Chen, Aiying [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Lu, Jian, E-mail: jianlu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Y. Morris, E-mail: ymwang@llnl.gov [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility, leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.

  15. Strengthening of stainless steel weldment by high temperature precipitation

    Sergio Neves Monteiro; Lucio Fabio Cassiano Nascimento; Édio Pereira Lima, Jr.; Fernanda Santos da Luz; Eduardo Sousa Lima; Fábio de Oliveira Braga

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical behavior and the strengthening mechanism of stainless steel welded joints at 600 °C have been investigated. The welds were composed of AISI 304 stainless steel, as base metal, and niobium containing AISI 347 stainless steel, as weld metal. The investigation was conducted by means of creep tests. The welded specimens were subjected to both high temperature (600 °C) and long periods (up to 2000 h) under constant load, and both mechanical properties and microstructural changes in ...

  16. High temperature tensile testing of modified 9Cr-1Mo after irradiation with high energy protons

    Toloczko, M.B.; Hamilton, M.L.; Maloy, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the effect of tensile test temperatures ranging from 50 to 600 deg. C on the tensile properties of a modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel after high energy proton irradiation at about 35-67 deg. C to doses from 1 to 3 dpa and 9 dpa. For the specimens irradiated to doses between 1 and 3 dpa, it was observed that the yield strength and ultimate strength decreased monotonically as a function of tensile test temperature, whereas the uniform elongation (UE) remained at approximately 1% for tensile test temperatures up to 250 deg. C and then increased for tensile test temperatures up to and including 500 deg. C. At 600 deg. C, the UE was observed to be less than the values at 400 and 500 deg. C. UE of the irradiated material tensile tested at 400-600 deg. C was observed to be greater than the values for the unirradiated material at the same temperatures. Tensile tests on the 9 dpa specimens followed similar trends

  17. High Cycle Fatigue of Metastable Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Fargas Ribas, Gemma; Zapata Dederle, Ana Cristina; Anglada Gomila, Marcos Juan; Mateo García, Antonio Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels are currently used in applications where severe forming operations are required, such as automotive bodies, due to its excellent ductility. They are also gaining interest for its combination of high strength and formability after forming. The biggest disadvantage is the difficulty to predict the mechanical response, which depends heavily on the amount of martensite formed. The martensitic transformation in metastable stainless steels can b...

  18. Strengthening of stainless steel weldment by high temperature precipitation

    Sergio Neves Monteiro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior and the strengthening mechanism of stainless steel welded joints at 600 °C have been investigated. The welds were composed of AISI 304 stainless steel, as base metal, and niobium containing AISI 347 stainless steel, as weld metal. The investigation was conducted by means of creep tests. The welded specimens were subjected to both high temperature (600 °C and long periods (up to 2000 h under constant load, and both mechanical properties and microstructural changes in the material were monitored. It was found that the exposure of the material at 600 °C under load contributes to a strengthening effect on the weld. The phenomenon might be correlated with an accelerated process of second phase precipitation hardening. Keywords: Stainless steel, Weld, AISI 304, Precipitation hardening

  19. Tensile properties of candidate structural materials for high power spallation sources at high helium contents

    Jung, P.; Henry, J.; Chen, J.

    2005-08-01

    Low activation 9%Cr martensitic steels EUROFER97, pure tantalum, and low carbon austenitic stainless steel 316L were homogeneously implanted with helium to concentrations up to 5000 appm at temperatures from 70 °C to 400 °C. The specimens were tensile tested at room temperature and at the respective implantation temperatures. In all materials the helium caused an increased in strength and reduction in ductility, with both changes being generally larger at lower implantation and testing temperatures. After implantation some work hardening was retained in 316L and in tantalum, while it almost completely disappeared in EUROFER97. After tensile testing, fracture surfaces were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Implantation caused reduction of necking, but up to concentrations of 2500 appm He fracture surface still showed transgranular ductile appearance. Completely brittle intergranular fracture was observed in tantalum at 9000 appm He and is also expected for EUROFER97 at this concentration, according to previous results on similar 9%Cr steels.

  20. Irradiation testing of stainless steel plate material and weldments. Report on ITER Task T14, Part B. Tensile properties after 0.5 and 5 dpa at 350 and 500 K

    Rensman, J.W.; Boskeljon, J.; Horsten, M.G.; De Vries, M.I.

    1997-10-01

    The tensile properties of unirradiated and neutron irradiated type 316L(N)-SPH stainless steel plate, EB weldments, 16-8 TIG-weldments, and full 16-8 TIG-deposits have been measured. Miniature 4 mm diameter test specimens of the European Reference Heat 1 and 2 (ERH), and 4 mm and some 8 mm diameter specimens of the weldments mentioned above, were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, simulating the first wall conditions by a combination of high displacement damage with high amounts of helium. The irradiation conditions were 0.5 and 5 displacements per atom (dpa) at 350K and 0.5 and 5 dpa at 500K. Testing temperatures ranged from 300K to 850K. This work was performed as part of the European Fusion Technology Programme for ITER as 'Irradiation testing of stainless steel' The report contains the experimental conditions and summarises the results. The tensile properties of the unirradiated ERH's 1 and 2 plate materials were found to differ slightly but significantly: ERH2 has a lower UTS, but higher yield strength and ductility than ERH1. The plate materials have lower yield strength in the unirradiated condition than all of the weldments (EB, TIG-weld and TIG-deposit), accompanied by a higher ductility of the plate materials. When irradiated at 350K the differences in strength between the plate and weld materials decrease, but the ductility of the plate remains higher than that of the weldments. A saturation of irradiation damage has taken place already at about 0.5 dpa. When irradiated at 500K the plate material continuously hardens up to 5 dpa, where it has lost all uniform plastic ductility. The weldments show similar but less dramatic hardening and loss of ductility as the plate material for both irradiation conditions. 54 figs., 17 tabs., 21 refs

  1. Study on high-cycle fatigue behavior of candidate stainless steels for SCWR

    Xiong Ru; Zhao Yuxiang; Zhang Qiang; Wang Hao; Tang Rui; Qiao Yingjie

    2013-01-01

    The fatigue experiments of commerce stainless steels including 347, 316Ti and 310 were conducted under bending and rotating loadings. The environments were at room temperature (RT) as well as at 550℃ in air. The fracture morphology was observed by SEM, and the S-N curves were processed according to the experimental data. The results indicate the fatigue limited stresses for the 3 stainless steels were in the order of 347 < 316Ti < 310, which consistent with the order of their tensile strength. Elevated temperature would accelerate the oxidation and therefore the fatigue life would decrease, among them 347 was more sensitive to temperature with the maximum decreasing tendency. All the 3 stainless steels have good resistance to high cycle fatigue when comparing their experimental data with the calculated value from the empirical formula. The fracture morphology presents areas of crack initiation, crack growth and fracture, the width of fatigue ripples is about 1 μm, the fracture area has much dimples, and 347 presents much cavities of different sizes in dimples. (authors)

  2. Effects of hydrogen on the tensile strength characteristics of stainless steels; Effets de l'hydrogene sur les caracteristiques de rupture par traction d'aciers inoxydables

    Blanchard, R; Pelissier, J; Pluchery, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    This paper deals with the effects of hydrogen on stainless steel, that might possibly be used as a canning material in hydrogen-cooled reactors. Apparent ultimate-tensile strength is only 80 per cent of initial value for hydrogen content about 50 cc NTP/ 100 g, and reduction in area decreases from 80 to 55 per cent. A special two-stage replica technique has been developed which allows fracture surface of small tensile specimens (about 0.1 mm diam.) to be examined in an electron microscope. All the specimens showed evidence of ductile character throughout the range of hydrogen contents investigated, but the aspect of the fracture surfaces gradually changes with increasing amounts. (author) [French] On etudie les effets de l'hydrogene sur des aciers inoxydables, qui sont des materiaux de gainage possibles pour des reacteurs utilisant l'hydrogene comme gaz de refroidissement. On montre que la charge apparente de rupture a la traction n'est plus que 80 pour cent de sa valeur initiale lorsque la teneur en hydrogene atteint 50 cc TPN/ 100 g, et que la striction passe dans ces conditions de 80 a 55 pour cent. L'examen microfractographique qui a ete effectue avec succes par une technique de double replique malgre la petitesse des echantillons (0,3 mm de diametre environ), revele que tout en gardant un caractere ductile, l'aspect des surfaces de rupture evolue notablement avec la teneur en hydrogene. (auteur)

  3. Modern high strength QT, TM and duplex-stainless steels

    Bocquet, P. [Industeel (France); Luxenburger, G. [Aktiengesellschaft der Dillinger Huettenwerke, Dillingen/Saar (Germany); Porter, D. [Rautaruukki (Finland); Ericsson, C. [Avesta Polarit (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    Pressure vessels are commonly manufactured with normalised steel grades with a yield strength up to 355 MPa or with austenitic stainless steels when corrosion as to be considered. From three decades, modern steels with higher mechanical properties - up to yield strength of 960 Mpa - are available and largely used for other applications where weight saving is of major importance as per off-shore, bridges, cranes, shipbuilding, line pipes.. The paper presents these modern steel's families - TMCP (Thermo Mechanically Controlled Process), QT (Quenched and Tempered) and Duplex (austeno-ferritic) stainless - in comparison with the normalised and austenitic steel grades. The following aspects are presented: the main mechanical properties (tensile and Charpy) as per the requirements of the standards for pressure equipment; some examples of use of these modern steels in the industry are given; the limitations of the forming conditions are considered; the weldability aspects and welds properties are developed; the interest of the PWHT (Post Weld Heat Treatment) is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Yano, Y., E-mail: yano.yasuhide@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Ukai, S.; Oono, N. [Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8628 (Japan); Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hayashi, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Torimaru, T. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900–1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  5. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Yano, Y.; Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Kimura, A.; Hayashi, S.; Torimaru, T.

    2017-04-01

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900-1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  6. Filler metal selection for welding a high nitrogen stainless steel

    Du Toit, Madeleine

    2002-06-01

    Cromanite is a high-strength austenitic stainless steel that contains approximately 19% chromium, 10% manganese, and 0.5% nitrogen. It can be welded successfully, but due to the high nitrogen content of the base metal, precautions have to be taken to ensure sound welds with the desired combination of properties. Although no matching filler metals are currently available, Cromanite can be welded using a range of commercially available stainless steel welding consumables. E307 stainless steel, the filler metal currently recommended for joining Cromanite, produces welds with mechanical properties that are generally inferior to those of the base metal. In wear applications, these lower strength welds would probably be acceptable, but in applications where full use is made of the high strength of Cromanite, welds with matching strength levels would be required. In this investigation, two welding consumables, ER2209 (a duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel) and 15CrMn (an austenitic-manganese hardfacing wire), were evaluated as substitutes for E307. When used to join Cromanite, 15CrMn produced welds displaying severe nitrogen-induced porosity, and this consumable is therefore not recommended. ER2209, however, outperformed E307, producing sound porosity-free welds with excellent mechanical properties, including high ductility and strength levels exceeding the minimum limits specified for Cromanite.

  7. Yttrium addition for high temperatures stainless steel

    Furtado, Nelson Cesar Chaves Pinto

    1997-07-01

    The current work studied the effect of Yttrium on the microstructure of 2% Nb, modified - HP steel, with respect to its mechanical properties. Alloys were prepared with nominal Yttrium additions of 0,1% and 0,25%. Microstructural analyses and mechanical tests were undertaken in the as-cast condition and after ageing for 100 h at 700 deg C, 900 deg C and 1100 deg C. Structural characterization was performed by optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM/EDS), X-ray diffractometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tensile testing was performed at room temperature and 871 deg C and creep testing at 925 deg C at a loading of 55 MPa. The material produced exhibited superior mechanical properties and surface oxidation resistance than traditional alloys of this class, even through gravity cast in a magnetic furnace. Agglomerates of Yttrium-rich phases were identifies in both as-cast and aged specimens, always associated with chromium carbides of characteristic morphologies. These morphologies, combined with the microstructural constituents, may have established the factors which resulted in the improved metallurgical stability of these alloys under the experimental testing conditions and temperatures which simulated real industrial service conditions and temperatures. (author)

  8. G-phase precipitation in austenitic stainless steel deformed by high pressure torsion

    Shuro, I., E-mail: innoshuro@martens.me.tut.ac.jp [Functional Materials Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Kuo, H.H. [Functional Materials Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Sasaki, T.; Hono, K. [National Institute for Materials Sciences, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Todaka, Y.; Umemoto, M. [Functional Materials Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using TEM and APT analyses, G-phase precipitation was observed in HPTed SUS304 with no trace of spinodal decomposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G-phase precipitation occurred much shorter time than previous studies probably due to the elimination of prior SD and enhanced diffusion by severe plastic deformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G-phase composition is a function of aging time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tensile tests showed that in SUS304 embrittlement occurs solely due to G-phase precipitation. - Abstract: G phase an intermetallic silicide has been observed in martensite of precipitation hardened stainless steels and in the ferrite of dual (austenite and ferrite) phase stainless steels. In both cases, before G-phase precipitates, the matrix composition changes due to spinodal decomposition and solute partitioning between ferrite and austenite. Thus in the present study, single bcc phase and high Ni content stainless steel, was selected to study G-phase precipitation expecting elimination of the interference from spinodal decomposition and solute partitioning. Fe-18Cr-8Ni (SUS304) austenitic stainless steel samples were deformed at room temperature by high pressure torsion to obtain 100% volume fraction of deformation induced martensite ({alpha} Prime ). HPT deformation was chosen due to its ability to induce high strength by grain refinement and also attain 100% {alpha} Prime at room temperature. After annealing at 400 Degree-Sign C for 500 h, G-phase precipitation was observed in the fully martensitic matrix without spinodal decomposition. Crystallographic analysis of annealed samples using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detected a Mn-Ni-Si rich G-phase with fcc crystal structure with lattice parameter of 1.16 nm. The value of lattice parameter corresponds well with previously reported values. Chemical analysis by atom probe tomography

  9. G-phase precipitation in austenitic stainless steel deformed by high pressure torsion

    Shuro, I.; Kuo, H.H.; Sasaki, T.; Hono, K.; Todaka, Y.; Umemoto, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Using TEM and APT analyses, G-phase precipitation was observed in HPTed SUS304 with no trace of spinodal decomposition. ► G-phase precipitation occurred much shorter time than previous studies probably due to the elimination of prior SD and enhanced diffusion by severe plastic deformation. ► G-phase composition is a function of aging time. ► Tensile tests showed that in SUS304 embrittlement occurs solely due to G-phase precipitation. - Abstract: G phase an intermetallic silicide has been observed in martensite of precipitation hardened stainless steels and in the ferrite of dual (austenite and ferrite) phase stainless steels. In both cases, before G-phase precipitates, the matrix composition changes due to spinodal decomposition and solute partitioning between ferrite and austenite. Thus in the present study, single bcc phase and high Ni content stainless steel, was selected to study G-phase precipitation expecting elimination of the interference from spinodal decomposition and solute partitioning. Fe–18Cr–8Ni (SUS304) austenitic stainless steel samples were deformed at room temperature by high pressure torsion to obtain 100% volume fraction of deformation induced martensite (α′). HPT deformation was chosen due to its ability to induce high strength by grain refinement and also attain 100% α′ at room temperature. After annealing at 400 °C for 500 h, G-phase precipitation was observed in the fully martensitic matrix without spinodal decomposition. Crystallographic analysis of annealed samples using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detected a Mn–Ni–Si rich G-phase with fcc crystal structure with lattice parameter of 1.16 nm. The value of lattice parameter corresponds well with previously reported values. Chemical analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) showed G-phase of composition Mn 21 Ni 50 Si 24 Fe 4 Cr. Tensile tests showed that G-phase precipitation leads to

  10. submitter Physical Properties of a High-Strength Austenitic Stainless Steel for the Precompression Structure of the ITER Central Solenoid

    Sgobba, Stefano; Arauzo, Ana; Roussel, Pascal; Libeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The ITER central solenoid (CS) consists of six independent coils kept together by a precompression support structure that must react vertical tensile loads and provide sufficient preload to maintain coil-to-coil contact when the solenoid is energized. The CS precompression system includes tie plates, lower and upper key blocks, load distribution and isolation plates and other attachment, support and insulating hardware. The tie plates operating at 4 K are manufactured starting from forgings in a high-strength austenitic stainless steel (FXM-19) with a stringent specification. Moreover, forged components for the lower and upper key blocks have to be provided in the same FXM-19 grade with comparably strict requirements. FXM-19 is a high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel, featuring high strength and toughness, ready weldability, and forgeability. It features as well higher integral thermal contraction down to 4 K compared with the very high Mn steel grade selected for the CS coil jackets, hence providing an ad...

  11. The influence of He on the high temperature fracture of an austenitic stainless steel

    Saguees, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    The Ti-stabilised DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel is an important candidate for high temperature - high neutron fluence applications which will create appreciable amounts of He within the matrix. In order to determine the mechanical effects associated with the presence of He alone a set of tensile specimens was cyclotron implanted to uniform He concentrations in the 10 -6 to 10 -4 at. range and later creep tested at 700 0 C and 800 0 C. The elongation to fracture values of the implanted specimens were reduced with respect to those of unimplanted controls. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) examination revealed that fracture starts as intergranular and subsequently propagates in a transgranular fashion, the intergranular part being much more extended in the implanted material. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) examination revealed He segregation at the grain boundary precipitates. A mechanism of He embrittlement is discussed in terms of the present results

  12. The Statistical Analysis of Relation between Compressive and Tensile/Flexural Strength of High Performance Concrete

    Kępniak M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the tensile and flexural strength of HPC (high performance concrete. The aim of the paper is to analyse the efficiency of models proposed in different codes. In particular, three design procedures from: the ACI 318 [1], Eurocode 2 [2] and the Model Code 2010 [3] are considered. The associations between design tensile strength of concrete obtained from these three codes and compressive strength are compared with experimental results of tensile strength and flexural strength by statistical tools. Experimental results of tensile strength were obtained in the splitting test. Based on this comparison, conclusions are drawn according to the fit between the design methods and the test data. The comparison shows that tensile strength and flexural strength of HPC depend on more influential factors and not only compressive strength.

  13. The High Temperature Tensile and Creep Behaviors of High Entropy Superalloy.

    Tsao, Te-Kang; Yeh, An-Chou; Kuo, Chen-Ming; Kakehi, Koji; Murakami, Hideyuki; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Jian, Sheng-Rui

    2017-10-04

    This article presents the high temperature tensile and creep behaviors of a novel high entropy alloy (HEA). The microstructure of this HEA resembles that of advanced superalloys with a high entropy FCC matrix and L1 2 ordered precipitates, so it is also named as "high entropy superalloy (HESA)". The tensile yield strengths of HESA surpass those of the reported HEAs from room temperature to elevated temperatures; furthermore, its creep resistance at 982 °C can be compared to those of some Ni-based superalloys. Analysis on experimental results indicate that HESA could be strengthened by the low stacking-fault energy of the matrix, high anti-phase boundary energy of the strengthening precipitate, and thermally stable microstructure. Positive misfit between FCC matrix and precipitate has yielded parallel raft microstructure during creep at 982 °C, and the creep curves of HESA were dominated by tertiary creep behavior. To the best of authors' knowledge, this article is the first to present the elevated temperature tensile creep study on full scale specimens of a high entropy alloy, and the potential of HESA for high temperature structural application is discussed.

  14. The influence of grain size on the strain-induced martensite formation in tensile straining of an austenitic 15Cr–9Mn–Ni–Cu stainless steel

    Kisko, A.; Misra, R.D.K.; Talonen, J.; Karjalainen, L.P.

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve understanding on the behavior of ultrafine-grained austenitic stainless steels during deformation, the influence of the austenite grain size and microstructure on the strain-induced martensite transformation was investigated in an austenitic 15Cr–9Mn–Ni–Cu (Type 204Cu) stainless steel. By different reversion treatments of the 60% cold-rolled sheet, varying grain sizes from ultrafine (0.5 μm), micron-scale (1.5 μm), fine (4 μm) to coarse (18 μm) were obtained. Some microstructures also contained a mixture of ultrafine or micron-scale and coarse initially cold-worked austenite grains. Samples were tested in tensile loading and deformation structures were analyzed after 2%, 10% and 20% engineering strains by means of martensite content measurements, scanning electron microscope together with a electron backscatter diffraction device and transmission electron microscope. The results showed that the martensite nucleation sites and the rate of transformation vary. In ultrafine grains strain-induced α′-martensite nucleates at grain boundaries and twins, whereas in coarser grains as well as in coarse-grained retained austenite, α′-martensite formation occurs at shear bands, sometimes via ε-martensite. The transformation rate of strain-induced α′-martensite decreases with decreasing grain size to 1.5 μm. However, the rate is fastest in the microstructure containing a mixture of ultrafine and retained cold-worked austenite grains. There the ultrafine grains transform quite readily to martensite similarly as the coarse retained austenite grains, where the previous cold-worked microstructure is still partly remaining

  15. Measurement and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Austenitic Stainless Steel Sheet under Biaxial Tensile Loading and In-Plane Reverse Loading

    Murakoso, Satoko; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    Biaxial tensile tests of austenitic stainless steel sheet (SUS304) 0.2mm thick have been carried out using cruciform specimens. The specimens are loaded under linear stress paths in a servo-controlled biaxial tensile testing machine. Plastic orthotropy remained coaxial with the principal stresses throughout every experiment. The successive contours of plastic work in biaxial stress space changed their shapes progressively, exemplifying differential work hardening. The geometry of the entire family of the work contours and the directions of plastic strain rates have been precisely measured and compared with those calculated using conventional yield functions. Yld2000-2d [Barlat, F., Brem, J.C., Yoon, J.W., Chung, K., Dick, R.E., Lege, D.J., Pourboghrat, F., Choi, S.H. and Chu, E., International Journal of Plasticity, Vol. 19, (2003), pp. 1297-1319.] with an exponent of 6 was capable of reproducing the general trends of the work contours and the directions of plastic strain rates with good accuracy. Furthermore, in order to quantitatively evaluate the Bauschinger effect of the test material, in-plane tension/compression tests are conducted. It was found that the non-dimensional (σ /σu) - Δɛ /(σu/ E) curves measured during unloading almost fall on a single curve and are not affected by the amount of pre-strain, where σ is the current stress during unloading, σu is the stress immediately before unloading, Δɛ (< 0) is the total strain increment during unloading.

  16. Influence of Thermal Aging on Tensile and Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Type 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Joint

    Suresh Kumar, T.; Nagesha, A.; Ganesh Kumar, J.; Parameswaran, P.; Sandhya, R.

    2018-05-01

    Influence of short-term thermal aging on the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 316LN austenitic stainless steel weld joint with 0.07 wt pct N has been investigated. Prior thermal exposure was found to improve the fatigue life compared with the as-welded condition. Besides, the treatment also imparted a softening effect on the weld metal, leading to an increase in the ductility of the weld joint which had a bearing on the cyclic stress response. The degree of cyclic hardening was seen to increase after aging. Automated ball-indentation (ABI) technique was employed toward understanding the mechanical properties of individual zones across the weld joint. It was observed that the base metal takes most of the applied cyclic strain during LCF deformation in the as-welded condition. In the aged condition, however, the weld also participates in the cyclic deformation. The beneficial effect of thermal aging on cyclic life is attributed to a reduction in the severity of the metallurgical notch leading to a restoration of ductility of the weld region. The transformation of δ-ferrite to σ-phase during the aging treatment was found to influence the location of crack initiation. Fatigue cracks were found to initiate in the base metal region of the joint in most of the testing conditions. However, embrittlement in the weld metal caused a shift in the point of crack initiation with increasing strain amplitude under LCF.

  17. Understanding the effect of uniaxial tensile strain on the early stages of sensitization in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Chowdhury, P.S., E-mail: psc0126@gmail.com [Techno India Agartala, Maheshkhola, Agartala, West Tripura PIN – 799004 (India); Guchhait, S.K.; Mitra, P.K. [Department of Metallurgical and Material Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Mukherjee, P.; Gayathri, N. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Mitra, M.K. [Department of Metallurgical and Material Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to understand the effect of different competing mechanisms controlling the overall degree of sensitization (DOS) of deformed austenitic stainless steel at the early stage of sensitization. The Double Loop Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (DL-EPR) studies were performed to characterize the Degree of Sensitization (DOS) as a function of both pre-defined strain and sensitization temperature. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to explain the phenomena qualitatively. A non monotonous behaviour in the variation of DOS has been observed with deformation and sensitization temperature. The presence of Deformation Induced Martensites (DIM) and their transformation into tempered martensites (α + M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) at higher temperatures was found to play major roles in controlling the overall sensitization and desensitization processes. - Highlights: • Interplay of various dynamic processes (four) in the early sensitization. • Deformation induced martensite (α′) playing major role at low temperature. • α (Tempered martensite) induced processes plays a vital role at higher temperatures. • Results in non monotonous variation in degree of sensitisation (DOS)

  18. Investigations on the tensile strength of high performance concrete incorporating silica fume

    Santanu Bhanja; Bratish Sengupta

    2005-01-01

    Though the literature is rich in reporting on silica fume concrete the technical data on tensile strength is quite limited. The present paper is directed towards developing a better understanding on the isolated contribution of silica fume on the tensile strengths of High Performance Concrete. Extensive experimentation was carried out over water-binder ratios ranging from 0.26 to 0.42 and silica fume binder ratios from 0.0 to 0.3. For all the mixes compressive, flexural and split tensile strengths were determined at 28 days. The results of the present investigation indicate that silica fume incorporation results in significant improvements in the tensile strengths of concrete. It is also observed that the optimum replacement percentage, which led to maximization of strength, is not a constant one but depends on the water- cementitious material ratio of the mix. Compared to split tensile strengths, flexural strengths have exhibited greater percentage gains in strength. Increase in split tensile strength beyond 15% silica fume replacement is almost insignificant whereas sizeable gains in flexural tensile strength have occurred even up to 25% replacements. For the present investigation transgranular failure of concrete was observed which indicate that silica fume incorporation results in significant improvements in the strength of both paste and transition zone. (authors)

  19. Tensile strength and durability characteristics of high-performance fiber reinforced concrete

    Ramadoss, P.; Nagamani, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents investigations towards developing a better understanding of the contribution of steel fibers to the tensile strength of high-performance fiber reinforced concrete (HPFRC). For 32 series of mixes, flexural and splitting tensile strengths were determined at 28 days. The variables investigated were fiber volume fraction (0%, 0.5%, 1% and 1.5% with an aspect of 80), silica fume replacement level (SF/CM=0.05 and 0.10) and matrix composition (w/cm ratios ranging from 0.25 t 0.40). The influence of fiber content in terms of fiber reinforcing index on the flexural and splitting tensile strengths of HPFRC is presented. Comparative studies were performed on the tensile behavior of SFRC measured by two different loading tests: flexural test and splitting test. Based on the test results, using the least square method, empirical expressions were developed to predict 28-day tensile strength of HPFRC in terms of fiber reinforcing index. Durability tests were carried out to examine the performance of the SFRC. Relationship between flexural and splitting tensile strengths has been developed using regression analysis. The experimental values of previous researchers were compared with the values predicted by the empirical equations and the absolute variation obtained was within 6% and 5% for flexural and splitting tensile strengths respectively. (author)

  20. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    Maria Domankova; Katarína Bártová; Ivan Slatkovský; Peter Pinke

    2016-01-01

    The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with ...

  1. High-rate tensile behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete for nuclear power plants

    Kim, Jung Jin; Park, Gi-Joon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Joo, E-mail: djkim75@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jae Heum; Lee, Jang Hwa [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, 2311 Daewha-Dong, Ilsan-Gu, Goyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 411-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • The final goal is to develop a fiber reinforced concrete for containment buildings. • High rate tensile behavior of FRC was investigated. • Strain energy frame impact machine was used for tensile impact tests. • Different rate sensitivity of FRC was found according to the type fiber. • Adding more fibers by increasing S/a is positive for higher impact resistance of FRC. -- Abstract: The direct tensile behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) at high strain rates were investigated for their potential to enhance the resistance of the containment building of nuclear power plants (NPPs) against aircraft impact. Two types of deformed steel, hooked (H) and twisted (T) fibers were employed. To improve the tensile resistance of FRCs even at higher rates by adding more fibers, the mixture of concrete was modified by either increasing the sand-to-coarse aggregate ratio or decreasing the maximum size of coarse aggregate. All FRC specimens produced two to six times greater tensile strength and one to five times higher toughness at high strain rates (4–53 s{sup −1}) than those at a static rate (0.000167 s{sup −1}). T-fiber generally produced higher tensile strength and toughness than H-fiber at both static and high rates. Although both fibers showed favorable rate sensitivity, T-fiber produced much greater enhancement, at higher strain rates, in tensile strength and slightly lower enhancement in toughness than H-fiber. As the maximum size of coarse aggregate decreased from 19 to 5 mm, the tensile strength and toughness of FRCs with T-fibers noticeably increased at both static and high strain rates.

  2. The Characteristics of Welding Joint on Stainless Steel as a Candidate of High Level Waste Canister

    Aisyah; Herlan-Martono

    2000-01-01

    High level waste is the waste generated from reprocessing of the spent fuels. This type of waste is vitrified with borosilicate glass to become waste-glass. This waste glass is contained in a canister made of austenitic stainless steel. The canister material is subjected to be welded during fabrication and utilization. The character of the welding joint that is the function of the electrical current used in the welding process have been studied. The strength of the joint is tested mechanically i.e.: the tensile strength and hardness test. The result shows that the higher the current used in welding process, the better the strength of the joint and as well the tensile strength. The optimum current is 110 A. From the hardness test, it was figured that the length of the HAZ area is 14 mm. The material in HAZ area is the hardest compared to the others, it is due to the appearance of the chrome-carbide. The welding of the canister with such a condition, during fabrication as well as during the utilization of the canister for the container of the high level waste with the PWHT process gives better result. (author)

  3. Nickel alloys and high-alloyed special stainless steels. Properties, manufacturing, applications. 4. compl. rev. ed.

    Heubner, Ulrich; Kloewer, Jutta; Alves, Helena; Behrens, Rainer; Schindler, Claudius; Wahl, Volker; Wolf, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This book contains the following eight topics: 1. Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels - Material overview and metallurgical principles (U. Heubner); 2. Corrosion resistance of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels (U. Heubner); 3. Welding of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels (T. Hoffmann, M. Wolf); 4. High-temperature materials for industrial plant construction (J. Kloewer); 5. Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels as hot roll clad composites-a cost-effective alternative (C. Schindler); 6. Selected examples of the use of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels in chemical plants (H. Alves); 7. The use of nickel alloys and stainless steels in environmental engineering (V. Wahl); 8: Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels for the oil and gas industry (R. Behrens).

  4. Crack initiation behavior of neutron irradiated model and commercial stainless steels in high temperature water

    Stephenson, Kale J., E-mail: kalejs@umich.edu; Was, Gary S.

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Environmental constant extension rate tensile tests were performed on neutron irradiated steel. • Percentage of intergranular cracking quantified the cracking susceptibility. • Cracking susceptibility varied with test environment, solute addition, and cold work. • No singular microstructural change could explain increases in cracking susceptibility with irradiation dose. • The increment of yield strength due to irradiation correlated well with cracking susceptibility. -- Abstract: The objective of this study was to isolate key factors affecting the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) susceptibility of eleven neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steel alloys. Four commercial purity and seven high purity stainless steels were fabricated with specific changes in composition and microstructure, and irradiated in a fast reactor spectrum at 320 °C to doses between 4.4 and 47.5 dpa. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests were performed in normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or primary water (PW) environments to isolate the effects of environment, elemental solute addition, alloy purity, alloy heat, alloy type, cold work, and irradiation dose. The irradiated alloys showed a wide variation in IASCC susceptibility, as measured by the relative changes in mechanical properties and crack morphology. Cracking susceptibility measured by %IG was enhanced in oxidizing environments, although testing in the lowest potential environment caused an increase in surface crack density. Alloys containing solute addition of Ni or Ni + Cr exhibited no IASCC. Susceptibility was reduced in materials cold worked prior to irradiation, and increased with increasing irradiation dose. Irradiation-induced hardening was accounted for by the dislocation loop microstructure, however no relation between crack initiation and radiation hardening was found.

  5. Combining gradient structure and TRIP effect to produce austenite stainless steel with high strength and ductility

    Wu, X.L.; Yang, M.X.; Yuan, F.P.; Chen, L.; Zhu, Y.T.

    2016-01-01

    We report a design strategy to combine the benefits from both gradient structure and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP). The resultant TRIP-gradient steel takes advantage of both mechanisms, allowing strain hardening to last to a larger plastic strain. 304 stainless steel sheets were treated by surface mechanical attrition to synthesize gradient structure with a central coarse-grained layer sandwiched between two grain-size gradient layers. The gradient layer is composed of submicron-sized parallelepiped austenite domains separated by intersecting ε-martensite plates, with increasing domain size along the depth. Significant microhardness heterogeneity exists not only macroscopically between the soft coarse-grained core and the hard gradient layers, but also microscopically between the austenite domain and ε-martensite walls. During tensile testing, the gradient structure causes strain partitioning, which evolves with applied strain, and lasts to large strains. The γ → α′ martensitic transformation is triggered successively with an increase of the applied strain and flow stress. Importantly, the gradient structure prolongs the TRIP effect to large plastic strains. As a result, the gradient structure in the 304 stainless steel provides a new route towards a good combination of high strength and ductility, via the co-operation of both the dynamic strain partitioning and TRIP effect.

  6. High Ni austenite stainless steel resistant to neutron irradiation degradation

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Iwamura, Toshihiko; Kanasaki, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Koji; Nakata, Shizuo; Ajiki, Kazuhide; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro.

    1997-01-01

    The composition of the stainless steel of the present invention comprises from 0.005 to 0.08% of C, up to 3% of Mn, up to 0.2% of Si+P+S, from 25 to 40% of Ni, from 25 to 40% of Cr, up to 3% of Mo, up to 0.3% of Nb+Ta, up to 0.3% of Ti, up to 0.001% of B and the balance of Fe. A solid solubilization treatment at a temperature of from 1,000 to 1,150degC is applied to the stainless steel having the composition. The stainless steel is excellent in stress corrosion cracking-resistance at a working circumstance of a LWR type reactor (high temperature and high pressure water at from 270 to 350degC/from 70 to 160 atm even after undergoing neutron irradiation of about 1 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>1 MeV) which is a maximum neutron irradiation amount undergone till the final stage of the working life of the LWR-type reactor. In addition, the average thermal expansion coefficient at from room temperature to 400degC ranges from 15x10 -6 - 19x10 -6 /K. (I.N.)

  7. Localized corrosion of high alloyed austenitic stainless steels

    Morach, R.; Schmuki, P.; Boehni, H.

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of several high alloyed stainless steels against localized corrosion was investigated by traditional potentiostatic and -kinetic methods and the current transient technique. Different test cells, proposed in literature, were evaluated for use in testing of plate materials. The AVESTA-cell showed to be not useful for potentiokinetic current density potential curves, but useable for pitting experiments. After pickling and prepassivation epoxy embedded materials proved to be resistant to crevice corrosion at the metal-resin interface. The electrode in form of a wire was the most reliable crevice free cell design. The grinding of the samples in the pretreatment procedure was found to have a large effect on the pitting corrosion behaviour. Using different paper types with varying grit, a drop in pitting potential for rougher surfaces and an increase in metastable pitting activity was found. Increasing surface roughness led also to changes in the electronic structure of the passive film reflected by a lower bandgap energy. High alloyed stainless steels showed no breakdown potential within the examined potential range. Compared to 18/8 type stainless steels significantly less transients were found. The number of transients decreases with increasing molybdenum and chromium content

  8. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  9. High strain rate tensile properties of annealed 2 1/4 Cr--1 Mo steel

    Klueh, R.L.; Oakes, R.E. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The high strain rate tensile properties of annealed 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel were determined and the tensile behavior from 25 to 566 0 C and strain rates of 2.67 x 10 -6 to 144/s were described. Above 0.1/s at 25 0 C, both the yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength increased rapidly with increasing strain rate. As the temperature was increased, a dynamic strain aging peak appeared in the ultimate tensile strength-temperature curves. The peak height was a maximum at about 350 0 C and 2.67 x 10 -6 /s. With increasing strain rate, a peak of decreased height occurred at progressively higher temperatures. The major effect of strain rate on ductility occurred at elevated temperatures, where a decrease in strain rate caused an increase in total elongation and reduction in area

  10. Effect of cold working and aging on high temperature deformation of high Mn stainless steel

    Yoshikawa, M.; Habara, Y.; Matsuki, R.; Aoyama, H.

    1999-01-01

    By the addition of N, the strength of high Mn stainless steel can be increased. Cold rolling and aging are effective to increase its strength further, and with those treatments this grade is often used for high temperature applications. In this study, creep deformation behavior and high temperature strength of the high Mn stainless steel in cold rolled and aged conditions are discussed as compared to Type 304 stainless steel. It has been revealed that as-rolled specimens show instant elongation at the beginning of creep tests and its amount is larger in the high Mn grade than in Type 304. Also, the creep rate of the high Mn stainless steel is smaller than that of Type 304. These facts may be related to the change in microstructure. (orig.)

  11. The negative effect of Zr addition on the high temperature strength in alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    Moon, Joonoh; Jang, Min-Ho; Kang, Jun-Yun; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The effect of a Zr addition on the precipitation behavior and mechanical properties in Nb-containing alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels was investigated using tensile tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis. The TEM observation showed that a Zr addition led to the formation of a (Nb,Zr)(C,N) complex particle, which coarsened the Nb-rich carbonitride. Tensile tests were performed at an elevated temperature (700 °C), and both the tensile and yield strengths decreased with a Zr addition. This unexpected result of a Zr addition was due to the reduction of the precipitation strengthening by particle coarsening. - Highlights: • The effect of Zr on high temperature strength in AFA steel containing Nb was studied. • Both the tensile and yield strengths of an AFA steel decreased with Zr-addition. • This is due to the reduction of precipitation strengthening by particle coarsening. • Nb(C,N) and (Nb,Zr)(C,N) particles were precipitated in an AFA and Zr-added AFA steel. • The size of (Nb,Zr)(C,N) particle is much bigger than that of Nb(C,N) particle

  12. On the carbide formation in high-carbon stainless steel

    Mujahid, M.; Qureshi, M.I.

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steels containing high Cr as well as carbon contents in excess of 1.5 weight percent have been developed for applications which require high resistance erosion and environmental corrosion. Formation of carbides is one of important parameters for controlling properties of these materials especially erosion characteristics. Percent work includes the study of different type of carbides which from during the heat treatment of these materials. It has been found that precipitation of secondary carbides and the nature of matrix transformation plays an important role in determining the hardness characteristics of these materials. (author)

  13. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

  14. Mechanical and structural characteristics in high temperature of stainless steel welded joint

    Monteiro, S.N.; Carvalho Mota, A.F. de

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical behavior at 600 0 C of weldments made of type 304 stainless as base metal and niobium containing type 347 stainless as weld metal has been investigated. This was done through tensile and creep tests. Heat treatments at 600 0 C and up to 6000 hours permited a simultaneous follow up of the mechanical and microstructural changes. It was observed that the exposure at 600 0 C under load contributes, from the begining, to the strengthening of the weld. This is due to the acceleration of the second phase precipitation hardening. (Author) [pt

  15. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    Maria Domankova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with the corresponding incubation period 2.5 min.

  16. High cycle fatigue of Type 422 stainless steel

    Soo, P.; Chow, J.G.Y.; Sabatini, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    High cycle fatigue testing has been carried out on Type 422 stainless steel to determine the performance of cyclically stressed disks and blades in the main and auxiliary HTGR helium circulators. Tests were performed at 316, 482, and 538 0 C (600, 900, and 1000 0 F) in air for the fully reversible and mean load conditions. Goodman's analysis is shown to be valid in predicting failure at 316 0 C (600 0 F), marginally valid at 482 0 C (900 0 F), and probably invalid at 538 0 C (1000 0 F). Metallographic analyses were conducted to characterize the nature of failure for the temperatures and loading conditions investigated

  17. Void shrinkage in stainless steel during high energy electron irradiation

    Singh, B.N.; Foreman, A.J.E.

    1976-03-01

    During irradiation of thin foils of an austenitic stainless steel in a high voltage electron microscope, steadily growing voids have been observed to suddenly shrink and disappear at the irradiation temperature of 650 0 Cthe phenomenon has been observed in specimens both with and withoutimplanted helium. Possible mechanisms for void shrinkage during irradiation are considered. It is suggested that the dislocation-pipe-diffusion of vacancies from or of self-interstitial atoms to the voids can explain the shrinkage behaviour of voids observed during our experiments. (author)

  18. Dynamic tensile behaviour and deformational mechanism of C5191 phosphor bronze under high strain rates deformation

    Hu, Dao-chun [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Taizhou Vocational & Technical College, Taizhou 318000 (China); Chen, Ming-he, E-mail: meemhchen@nuaa.edu.cn [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Lei; Cheng, Hu [College of Mechanical Engineering, Taizhou University, Taizhou 318000 (China)

    2016-01-01

    High speed stamping process is used to high strength and high electrical conductivity phosphor bronze with extremely high strain rates more than 10{sup 3} s{sup −1}. This study on the dynamic tensile behaviour and deformational mechanism is to optimise the high speed stamping processes and improve geometrical precision in finished products. Thus, the tensile properties and deformation behaviour of C5191 phosphor bronze under quasi-static tensile condition at a strain rate of 0.001 s{sup −1} by electronic universal testing machine, and dynamic tensile condition at strain rate of 500, 1000 and 1500 s{sup −1} by split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) apparatus were studied. The effects of strain rate and the deformation mechanism were investigated by means of SEM and TEM. The results showed that the yield strength and tensile strength of C5191 phosphor bronze under high strain rates deformation increased by 32.77% and 11.07% respectively compared with quasi-static condition, the strain hardening index increases from 0.075 to 0.251, and the strength of the material strain rates sensitivity index change from 0.005 to 0.022, which presented a clear sensitive to strain rates. Therefore, it is claimed that the dominant deformation mechanism was changed by the dislocation motion under different strain rates, and the ability of plastic deformation of C5191 phosphor bronze increased due to the number of movable dislocations increased significantly, started multi-line slip, and the soft effect of adiabatic temperature rise at the strain rate ranging from 500 to 1500 s{sup −1}.

  19. Experimental study of the flow rules of a 316 stainless steel at high and low stresses

    Delobelle, P.; Oytana, C.

    1984-01-01

    Creep flow rules of 316L stainless steel are studied in tensile and axial-torsion experiments. Through tensile and biaxial proportional loadings it is shown that at low creep values of epsilonkT/DGb a single kinematical variable: the internal stress takes a part in these laws. This is confirmed in non-proportional experiments. The power law with the power of nsup(*)approx.=2 relates applied and internal stresses. At higher creep rates a second scalar internal variable must be introduced and the power law no longer applies. Limiting functions in steady creep are determined for hardening and recovery. (orig.)

  20. High-pressure stainless steel active membrane microvalves

    Sharma, G; Svensson, S; Ogden, S; Klintberg, L; Hjort, K

    2011-01-01

    In this work, high-pressure membrane microvalves have been designed, manufactured and evaluated. The valves were able to withstand back-pressures of 200 bar with a response time of less than 0.6 s. These stainless steel valves, manufactured with back-end batch production, utilize the large volume expansion coupled to the solid–liquid phase transition in paraffin wax. When membrane materials were evaluated, parylene coated stainless steel was found to be the best choice as compared to polydimethylsiloxane and polyimide. Also, the influence of the orifice placement and diameter is included in this work. If the orifice is placed too close to the rim of the membrane, the valve can stay sealed even after turning the power off, and the valve will not open until the pressure in the system is released. The developed steel valves, evaluated for both water and air, provide excellent properties in terms of mechanical stability, ease of fabrication, and low cost. Possible applications include sampling at high pressures, chemical microreactors, high performance liquid chromatography, pneumatics, and hydraulics

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of highly irradiated 316 stainless steels

    Nakano, Morihito; Fukuya, Koji; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Nakajima, Nobuo; Furutani, Gen [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Mechanical property tests, grain boundary (GB) composition analysis and slow strain rate test (SSRT) in simulated PWR primary water changing dissolved hydrogen (DH) and dissolved oxygen (DO) content were carried out on cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steels which were irradiated to 1-8x10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV) in a Japanese PWR in order to evaluate irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) susceptibility. Highly irradiated stainless steels were susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in both hydrogenated water and oxygenated water and to intergranular cracking in inert gas atmosphere. IASCC susceptibility increased with increasing DH content (0-45 ccH{sub 2}/kgH{sub 2}O). Hydrogen content of the section containing fracture surface was higher than that of the section far from fracture surface. These results suggest that hydrogen would have an important role for IASCC. While mechanical property was saturated, GB segregation and IASCC susceptibility increased with an increase in fluence, suggesting that GB segregation would have a dominant role for an increase in IASCC susceptibility at this high fluence region. (author)

  2. The characteristics of ultra-high performance concrete and cracking behavior of reinforced concrete tensile specimens

    H.A. Rahdar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The tensile behavior of concrete depends on some factors such as member dimensions, reinforcement ratio, diameter of rebar, strength and elasticity modulus of material. In this research the experimental method is used to examine the characteristics and the behavior of ultra-high performance concrete on the tensile behavior of concrete members reinforced by steel rebar. The results show that increasing the rebar cover on diameter rebar ratio (C/d increases the initial stiffening before the cracking stage in concrete. Also, by increasing of reinforcement ratio the cracking space decreased.

  3. Effects of high energy nitrogen implantation on stainless steel microstructure

    Pelletier, H.; Mille, P.; Cornet, A.; Grob, J. J.; Stoquert, J. P.; Muller, D.

    1999-01-01

    Low energy ion implantation is known to improve chemical and mechanical surface properties of metals. This treatment is often used to enhance wear and corrosion resistance or mechanical life-time of fatigue test of stainless steel or titanium alloys. The aim of this work is to investigate these effects at higher energy, for which deeper (and still not well understood) modifications occur. High fluence (10 18 cm -2) 15N and 14N implantations at 1 MeV have been performed in the 316LL stainless steel and some specimen have been annealed in the 200-500°C temperature range. Nitrogen concentration distribution, structure, morphology and microhardness have been examined with Nuclear Resonance Analysis, Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction and Nanoindentation, respectively. Precipitates of steel and chromium nitride phases and a superficial martensitic transformation can be observed, leading to a significant increase of hardness. The best result is obtained after one hour annealing at 425°C, due to a larger and more homogeneous repartition of nitride species. In this case, a near surface accumulation is observed and explained in terms of diffusion and precipitation mechanisms.

  4. Effects of mean tensile stresses on high-cycle fatigue life and strain accumulation in some reactor materials

    Soo, P.; Chow, J.G.Y.

    1977-05-01

    An assessment has been made of the effects of mean tensile stresses on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of solution-treated Type 304 stainless steel, normalized and tempered 2 1 / 4 Cr-1Mo steel, Incoloy-800H, and low-carbon Incoloy-800. Mean stresses are usually detrimental to fatigue strength, especially at high temperatures and stress levels, where significant creep can occur during fatigue cycling. Depending on the magnitudes of the alternating and mean stresses, failure may be creep or fatigue controlled. Strain accumulation is also affected by these stress levels and possibly, also, by the cyclic work-hardening characteristics of the material. It is shown that the Goodman Law for estimating mean stress effects is inadequate, since it does not account for time-dependent deformation. An alternative expression not having such a limitation was, therefore, derived and this relates the alternating and mean stresses to the time to failure. Based on limited metallographic observations of fatigue striations in the 2 1 / 4 Cr-1Mo steel an estimate was made of the crack propagation rate. It was found that a crack of critical size could, under certain conditions, propagate through most of the specimen diameter in a matter of seconds. This presents a more significant safety problem than the case for a crack extending under low-cycle conditions since preventative measures probably could not be implemented before the crack had grown to a large size

  5. Welding of nickel free high nitrogen stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Raffi Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen stainless steel (HNS is a nickel free austenitic stainless steel that is used as a structural component in defence applications for manufacturing battle tanks as a replacement of the existing armour grade steel owing to its low cost, excellent mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance. Conventional fusion welding causes problems like nitrogen desorption, solidification cracking in weld zone, liquation cracking in heat affected zone, nitrogen induced porosity and poor mechanical properties. The above problems can be overcome by proper selection and procedure of joining process. In the present work, an attempt has been made to correlate the microstructural changes with mechanical properties of fusion and solid state welds of high nitrogen steel. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW, electron beam welding (EBW and friction stir welding (FSW processes were used in the present work. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction were used to characterize microstructural changes. Hardness, tensile and bend tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of welds. The results of the present investigation established that fully austenitic dendritic structure was found in welds of SMAW. Reverted austenite pools in the martensite matrix in weld zone and unmixed zones near the fusion boundary were observed in GTA welds. Discontinuous ferrite network in austenite matrix was observed in electron beam welds. Fine recrystallized austenite grain structure was observed in the nugget zone of friction stir welds. Improved mechanical properties are obtained in friction stir welds when compared to fusion welds. This is attributed to the refined microstructure consisting of equiaxed and homogenous austenite grains.

  6. High Strength and Ductility of Additively Manufactured 316L Stainless Steel Explained

    Shamsujjoha, Md.; Agnew, Sean R.; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Moore, William R.; Newman, Tabitha A.

    2018-04-01

    Structure-property relationships of an additively manufactured 316L stainless steel were explored. A scanning electron microscope and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis revealed a fine cellular-dendritic (0.5 to 2 μm) substructure inside large irregularly shaped grains ( 100 μm). The cellular structure grows along the crystallographic directions. However, texture analysis revealed that the main texture component is inclined by 15 deg from the building direction. X-ray diffraction line profile analysis indicated a high dislocation density of 1 × 1015 m-2 in the as-built material, which correlates well with the observed EBSD microstructure and high-yield strength, via the traditional Taylor hardening equation. Significant variations in strain hardening behavior and ductility were observed for the horizontal (HB) and vertical (VB) built samples. Ductility of HB and VB samples measured 49 and 77 pct, respectively. The initial growth texture and subsequent texture evolution during tensile deformation are held responsible for the observed anisotropy. Notably, EBSD analysis of deformed samples showed deformation twins, which predominately form in the grains with aligned parallel to the loading direction. The VB samples showed higher twinning activity, higher strain hardening rates at high strain, and therefore, higher ductility. Analysis of annealed samples revealed that the observed microstructures and properties are thermally stable, with only a moderate decrease in strength and very similar levels of ductility and anisotropy, compared with the as-built condition.

  7. Microstructure, tensile properties and fracture behavior of high temperature Al–Si–Mg–Cu cast alloys

    Mohamed, A.M.A., E-mail: madel@uqac.ca [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Samuel, F.H. [Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Chicoutimi, QC, Canada G7H 2B1 (Canada); Al Kahtani, Saleh [Industrial Engineering Program, Mechanical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, Al Kharj (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-08-10

    The high temperature tensile behavior of 354 aluminum cast alloy was investigated in the presence of Zr and Ni. The cast alloys were given a solutionizing treatment followed by artificial aging at 190 °C for 2 h. High temperature tensile tests were conducted at various temperatures from 25 °C to 300 °C. Optical microscopy and electron probe micro-analyzer were used to study the microstructure of different intermetallic phases formed. The fractographic observations of fracture surface were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy to understand the fracture mechanism. The results revealed that the intermetallics phases of (Al, Si){sub 3}(Zr, Ti), Al{sub 3}CuNi and Al{sub 9}NiFe are the main feature in the microstructures of alloys with Zr and Ni additions. The results also indicated that the tensile strength of alloy decreases with an increase in temperature. The combined addition of 0.2 wt% Zr and 0.2 wt% Ni leads to a 30% increase in the tensile properties at 300 °C compared to the base alloy. Zr and Ni bearing phases played a vital role in the fracture mechanism of the alloys studied.

  8. Microstructure, tensile properties and fracture behavior of high temperature Al–Si–Mg–Cu cast alloys

    Mohamed, A.M.A.; Samuel, F.H.; Al Kahtani, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    The high temperature tensile behavior of 354 aluminum cast alloy was investigated in the presence of Zr and Ni. The cast alloys were given a solutionizing treatment followed by artificial aging at 190 °C for 2 h. High temperature tensile tests were conducted at various temperatures from 25 °C to 300 °C. Optical microscopy and electron probe micro-analyzer were used to study the microstructure of different intermetallic phases formed. The fractographic observations of fracture surface were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy to understand the fracture mechanism. The results revealed that the intermetallics phases of (Al, Si) 3 (Zr, Ti), Al 3 CuNi and Al 9 NiFe are the main feature in the microstructures of alloys with Zr and Ni additions. The results also indicated that the tensile strength of alloy decreases with an increase in temperature. The combined addition of 0.2 wt% Zr and 0.2 wt% Ni leads to a 30% increase in the tensile properties at 300 °C compared to the base alloy. Zr and Ni bearing phases played a vital role in the fracture mechanism of the alloys studied

  9. Modelling and Simulation of Tensile Fracture in High Velocity Compacted Metal Powder

    Jonsen, P.; Haeggblad, H.-A.

    2007-01-01

    In cold uniaxial powder compaction, powder is formed into a desired shape with rigid tools and a die. After pressing, but before sintering, the compacted powder is called green body. A critical property in the metal powder pressing process is the mechanical properties of the green body. Beyond a green body free from defects, desired properties are high strength and uniform density. High velocity compaction (HVC) using a hydraulic operated hammer is a production method to form powder utilizing a shock wave. Pre-alloyed water atomised iron powder has been HVC-formed into circular discs with high densities. The diametral compression test also called the Brazilian disc test is an established method to measure tensile strength in low strength material like e.g. rock, concrete, polymers and ceramics. During the test a thin disc is compressed across the diameter to failure. The compression induces a tensile stress perpendicular to the compressed diameter. In this study the test have been used to study crack initiation and the tensile fracture process of HVC-formed metal powder discs with a relative density of 99%. A fictitious crack model controlled by a stress versus crack-width relationship is utilized to model green body cracking. Tensile strength is used as a failure condition and limits the stress in the fracture interface. The softening rate of the model is obtained from the corresponding rate of the dissipated energy. The deformation of the powder material is modelled with an elastic-plastic Cap model. The characteristics of the tensile fracture development of the central crack in a diametrically loaded specimen is numerically studied with a three dimensional finite element simulation. Results from the finite element simulation of the diametral compression test shows that it is possible to simulate fracturing of HVC-formed powder. Results from the simulation agree reasonably with experiments

  10. STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF HIGH NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Jana Bakajová

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the structural stability of an austenitic stainless steel with high nitrogen content. The investigated steel was heat treated at 800°C using different annealing times. Investigation was carried out using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermodynamic calculations. Three phases were identified by electron diffraction: Cr2N, sigma – phase and M23C6. The thermodynamic prediction is in good agreement with the experimental result. The only is the M23C6 carbide phase which is not thermodynamically predicted. Cr2N is the majority secondary phase and occurs in the form of discrete particles or cells (lamellas of Cr2N and austenite.

  11. The high temperature oxidation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels

    Hales, R.

    1977-04-01

    High temperature annealing in a dynamic vacuum has been utilised to induce the growth of duplex oxide over the whole surface of stainless steel specimens. It is found that duplex oxide grows at a rate which does not obey a simple power law. The oxidation kinetics and oxide morphology have also been studied for a series of ternary austenitic alloys which cover a range of composition between 5 and 20% chromium. A model has been developed to describe the formation of duplex oxide and the subsequent formation of a 'healing layer' which virtually causes the oxidation process to stop. This phase tends to form at grain boundaries and a relationship has been derived for the reaction kinetics which relates the reaction rate with grain size of the substrate. (author)

  12. High efficient and continuous surface modification of carbon fibers with improved tensile strength and interfacial adhesion

    Sun, Jingfeng; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Yue; Jin, Zhen; Liu, Xu; Huang, Yudong

    2017-08-01

    Most of the surface modification technologies for carbon fibers, no matter in laboratory scale or for commercial manufacture, are accompanied by a simultaneous decrease in tensile strength. In this paper, a feasible and high efficient strategy for carbon fiber treatment which could obviously improve both tensile strength and interfacial adhesion was proposed. Continuously moving carbon fibers were treated with atmospheric helium plasma for 1 min, followed by a 5 min pyrolytic carbon deposition using ethanol as precursor at 800 °C. The effects of the new approach were characterized by SEM, AFM, nanoindentation, XPS, Raman, wettability analysis, single fiber tensile strength testing and single fiber pull-out testing. After modification, pyrolytic carbon coating was deposited on the fiber surface uniformly, and the roughness and surface energy increased significantly. The single fiber tensile testing results indicate that the resulting fiber strength increased 15.7%, rising from 3.13 to 3.62 GPa. Meanwhile, the interfacial shear strength of its epoxy composites increased from 65.3 to 83.5 MPa. The comparative studies of carbon fibers modified with commercial anodic oxidation and sizing were also carried out. The results demonstrate that the new method can be utilized in the carbon fiber manufacture process and is more efficient than the traditional approaches.

  13. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc welds

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc (SMA) welds made with Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microstructures of the welds were characterized using optical microscopy (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) mainly to determine the morphology, phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Hardness, tensile and ductility bend tests were carried out to determine mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance using a GillAC basic electrochemical system. Constant load type testing was carried out to study stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of welds. The investigation results shown that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in favourable microstructure and completely solidified as single phase coarse austenite. Mechanical properties of SMA welds are found to be inferior when compared to that of base metal and is due to coarse and dendritic structure.

  14. High-cycle fatigue behavior of ultrafine-grained austenitic stainless and TWIP steels

    Hamada, A.S. [Materials Engineering Laboratory (4KOMT), Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Karjalainen, L.P., E-mail: pentti.karjalainen@oulu.fi [Materials Engineering Laboratory (4KOMT), Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2010-08-20

    High-cycle fatigue behavior of ultrafine-grained (UFG) 17Cr-7Ni Type 301LN austenitic stainless and high-Mn Fe-22Mn-0.6C TWIP steels were investigated in a reversed plane bending fatigue and compared to the behavior of steels with conventional coarse grain (CG) size. Optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine fatigue damage mechanisms. Testing showed that the fatigue limits leading to fatigue life beyond 4 x 10{sup 6} cycles were about 630 MPa for 301LN while being 560 MPa for TWIP steel, and being 0.59 and 0.5 of the tensile strength respectively. The CG counterparts were measured to have the fatigue limits of 350 and 400 MPa. The primary damage caused by fatigue took place by grain boundary cracking in UFG 301LN, while slip band cracking occurred in CG 301LN. However, in the case of TWIP steel, the fatigue damage mechanism is similar in spite of the grain size. In the course of cycling neither the formation of a martensite structure nor mechanical twinning occurs, but intense slip bands are created with extrusions and intrusions. Fatigue crack initiates preferentially on grain and twin boundaries, and especially in the intersection sites of slip bands and boundaries.

  15. Effect of high temperature tempering on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the modified 410 martensitic stainless steel

    Mabruri, Efendi; Pasaribu, Rahmat Ramadhan; Sugandi, Moh. Tri; Sunardi

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports the influence of high tempering temperature and holding time on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the recently modified 410 martensitic stainless steel. The modified steel was prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The hardness and tensile strength of the steels decreased with increasing tempering temperature from 600 to 700 °C and with increasing holding time from 1 to 6 h. Based on microstructural images, it was observed the coarsening of lath martensite and of the metal carbides as well. However, a relatively high hardness and strength were still exibited by this steel after tempering at a such high temperature of 600-700 °C. The partition of Mo into the carbides identified by EDS analysis may correlate with this situation.

  16. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Karaman, Ibrahim [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States); Arroyave, Raymundo [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) study deformation twinning, its evolution, thermal stability, and the contribution on mechanical response of the new advanced stainless steels, especially at elevated temperatures; 2) study alumina-scale formation on the surface, as an alternative for conventional chromium oxide, that shows better oxidation resistance, through alloy design; and 3) design new generation of high temperature stainless steels that form alumina scale and have thermally stable nano-twins. The work involved few baseline alloys for investigating the twin formation under tensile loading, thermal stability of these twins, and the role of deformation twins on the mechanical response of the alloys. These baseline alloys included Hadfield Steel (Fe-13Mn-1C), 316, 316L and 316N stainless steels. Another baseline alloy was studied for alumina-scale formation investigations. Hadfield steel showed twinning but undesired second phases formed at higher temperatures. 316N stainless steel did not show signs of deformation twinning. Conventional 316 stainless steel demonstrated extensive deformation twinning at room temperature. Investigations on this alloy, both in single crystalline and polycrystalline forms, showed that deformation twins evolve in a hierarchical manner, consisting of micron–sized bundles of nano-twins. The width of nano-twins stays almost constant as the extent of strain increases, but the width and number of the bundles increase with increasing strain. A systematic thermomechanical cycling study showed that the twins were stable at temperatures as high as 900°C, after the dislocations are annealed out. Using such cycles, volume fraction of the thermally stable deformation twins were increased up to 40% in 316 stainless steel. Using computational thermodynamics and kinetics calculations, we designed two generations of advanced austenitic stainless steels. In the first generation, Alloy 1, which had been proposed as an alumina

  17. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    Erzar, B.; Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 10 4 to 4 × 10 4  s −1 . The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading

  18. Prediction of failure strain and burst pressure in high yield-to-tensile strength ratio linepipe

    Law, M.; Bowie, G.

    2007-01-01

    Failure pressures and strains were predicted for a number of burst tests as part of a project to explore failure strain in high yield-to-tensile strength ratio linepipe. Twenty-three methods for predicting the burst pressure and six methods of predicting the failure strain are compared with test results. Several methods were identified which gave accurate and reliable estimates of burst pressure. No method of accurately predicting the failure strain was found, though the best was noted

  19. Prediction of failure strain and burst pressure in high yield-to-tensile strength ratio linepipe

    Law, M. [Institute of Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: mlx@ansto.gov.au; Bowie, G. [BlueScope Steel Ltd., Level 11, 120 Collins St, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia)

    2007-08-15

    Failure pressures and strains were predicted for a number of burst tests as part of a project to explore failure strain in high yield-to-tensile strength ratio linepipe. Twenty-three methods for predicting the burst pressure and six methods of predicting the failure strain are compared with test results. Several methods were identified which gave accurate and reliable estimates of burst pressure. No method of accurately predicting the failure strain was found, though the best was noted.

  20. High temperature tensile properties and fracture characteristics of bimodal 12Cr-ODS steel

    Chauhan, Ankur; Litvinov, Dimitri; Aktaa, Jarir

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the tensile properties and fracture characteristics of a 12Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with unique elongated bimodal grain size distribution. The tensile tests were carried out at four different temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 700 °C, at a nominal strain rate of 10"−"3 s"−"1. At room temperature the material exhibits a high tensile strength of 1294 MPa and high yield strength of 1200 MPa. At 700 °C, the material still exhibits relatively high tensile strength of 300 MPa. The total elongation-to-failure exceeds 18% over the whole temperature range and has a maximum value of 29% at 600 °C. This superior ductility is attributed to the material's bimodal grain size distribution. In comparison to other commercial, as well as experimental, ODS steels, the material shows an excellent compromise between strength and ductility. The fracture surface studies reveal a change in fracture behavior from a mixed mode fracture at room temperature to fully ductile fracture at 600 °C. At 700 °C, the fracture path changes from intragranular to intergranular fracture, which is associated with a reduced ductility. - Highlights: • The steel has a unique elongated bimodal grain size distribution. • The steel shows an excellent compromise between strength and ductility. • Superior ductility in comparison to other commercial and experimental ODS steels. • Fracture behavior changes from mixed mode fracture at room temperature to fully ductile fracture at 600 °C. • Fracture path changes from intragranular to intergranular fracture at 700 °C.

  1. Strain rate dependent tensile behavior of advanced high strength steels: Experiment and constitutive modeling

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Daeyong; Han, Heung Nam; Barlat, F.; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    High strain rate tensile tests were conducted for three advanced high strength steels: DP780, DP980 and TRIP780. A high strain rate tensile test machine was used for applying the strain rate ranging from 0.1/s to 500/s. Details of the measured stress–strain responses were comparatively analyzed for the DP780 and TRIP780 steels which show similar microstructural feature and ultimate tensile strength, but different strengthening mechanisms. The experimental observations included: usual strain rate dependent plastic flow stress behavior in terms of the yield stress (YS), the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the uniform elongation (UE) and the total elongation (TE) which were observed for the three materials. But, higher strain hardening rate at early plastic strain under quasi-static condition than that of some increased strain rates was featured for TRIP780 steel, which might result from more active transformation during deformation with lower velocity. The uniform elongation that explains the onset of instability and the total elongation were larger in case of TRIP steel than the DP steel for the whole strain rate range, but interestingly the fracture strain measured by the reduction of area (RA) method showed that the TRIP steel has lower values than DP steel. The fractographs using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at the fractured surfaces were analyzed to relate measured fracture strain and the microstructural difference of the two materials during the process of fracture under various strain rates. Finally, constitutive modeling for the plastic flow stresses under various strain rates was provided in this study. The proposed constitutive law could represent both Hollomon-like and Voce-like hardening laws and the ratio between the two hardening types was efficiently controlled as a function of strain rate. The new strength model was validated successfully under various strain rates for several grades of steels such as mild steels, DP780, TRIP780, DP980 steels.

  2. Tensile properties and fracture mechanism of IN-100 superalloy in high temperature range

    Milan T. Jovanović

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties and fracture mechanism of a polycrystalline IN-100 superalloy have been investigated in the range from room temperature to 900°C. Optical microscopy (OM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM applying replica technique were used for microstructural investigation, whereas scanning electron microscopy (SEM was utilized for fracture study. High temperature tensile tests were carried out in vacuumed chamber. Results show that strength increases up to 700°C, and then sharply decreases with further increase in temperature. Elongation increases very slowly (6-7.5% till 500°C, then decreases to 4.5% at 900°C. Change in elongation may be ascribed to a change of fracture mechanism. Appearance of a great number of microvoids prevails up to 500°C resulting in a slow increase of elongation, whereas above this temperature elongation decrease is correlated with intergranular crystallographic fracture and fracture of carbides.

  3. High strain rate tensile behavior of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh; Paman, Ashish; Madhu, V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to perform quasi static and high strain rate tensile tests on Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy under different strain rates ranging from 0.01–3500/s and also at temperatures of 25,100, 200 and 300 °C. The combined effect of strain rate, temperature and stress triaxiality on the material behavior is studied by testing both smooth and notched specimens. Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive and fracture models are established based on high strain rate tensile data obtained from Split hopkinson tension bar (SHTB) and quasi-static tests. By modifying the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms in the Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive model, a new J–C constitutive model of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy was obtained. The improved Johnson–Cook constitutive model matched the experiment results very well. With the Johnson–Cook constitutive and fracture models, numerical simulations of tensile tests at different conditions for Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy were conducted. Numerical simulations are performed using a non-linear explicit finite element code autodyn. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical simulation results and the experiment results. The fracture surfaces of specimens tested under various strain rates and temperatures were studied under scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  4. Multi-resolution Delta-plus-SPH with tensile instability control: Towards high Reynolds number flows

    Sun, P. N.; Colagrossi, A.; Marrone, S.; Antuono, M.; Zhang, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    It is well known that the use of SPH models in simulating flow at high Reynolds numbers is limited because of the tensile instability inception in the fluid region characterized by high vorticity and negative pressure. In order to overcome this issue, the δ+-SPH scheme is modified by implementing a Tensile Instability Control (TIC). The latter consists of switching the momentum equation to a non-conservative formulation in the unstable flow regions. The loss of conservation properties is shown to induce small errors, provided that the particle distribution is regular. The latter condition can be ensured thanks to the implementation of a Particle Shifting Technique (PST). The novel variant of the δ+-SPH is proved to be effective in preventing the onset of tensile instability. Several challenging benchmark tests involving flows past bodies at large Reynolds numbers have been used. Within this a simulation characterized by a deforming foil that resembles a fish-like swimming body is used as a practical application of the δ+-SPH model in biological fluid mechanics.

  5. EFFECT OF ACCELERATED WEATHERING ON TENSILE PROPERTIES OF KENAF REINFORCED HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITES

    Umar A.H.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Umar A.H1, Zainudin E.S1,2 and Sapuan S.M.1,21Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing EngineeringFaculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra MalaysiaSelangor, Malaysia.2Biocomposite LaboratoryInstitute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Product (INTROPUniversiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia.Email: umarhanan@yahoo.com ABSTRACTIn this study, a high-density polyethylene composite reinforced with kenaf (Hibiscus Cannabinus L. bast fibres (K-HDPE was fabricated and tested for durability with regard to weather elements. The material consists of 40% (by weight fibres and 60% matrix. Other additives, such as ultraviolet (UV stabiliser and maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene (MaPE as a coupling agent were added to the composite material. The biocomposite was subjected to 1000 hours (h of accelerated weathering tests, which consisted of heat, moisture and UV light, intended to imitate the outdoor environment. The tensile properties of the K-HDPE composite were recorded after 0, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 h of exposure to the accelerated weathering. Compared with neat high-density polyethylene (HDPE, the K-HDPE composite has 22.7% lower tensile strength when produced but displays a less rapid rate of strength deterioration under weathering (After 1000 h of exposure the tensile strength of K-HDPE drops 29.4%, whereas, for neat HDPE, it falls rapidly by 36%. Due to better stiffness, the Young’s modulus of the K-HDPE composite is much higher than that of neat HDPE. The fibres on the surface of the K-HDPE composite gradually start to whiten after 200 h of exposure and become completely white after 600 h of exposure. For neat HDPE, micro-cracking on the surface can be observed after 200 h of exposure and the stress-strain curve obtained from the tensile test indicates its increase in brittleness proportional to the amount of weathering time.

  6. Effect of prior deformation on microstructural development and Laves phase precipitation in high-chromium stainless steel.

    Hsiao, Z-W; Chen, D; Kuo, J-C; Lin, D-Y

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the influence of deformation on precipitation behaviour and microstructure change during annealing. Here, the prior deformation of high-chromium stainless steel was tensile deformation of 3%, 6% and 10%, and the specimens were then annealed at 700˚C for 10 h. The specimens were subsequently analyzed using backscattered electron image and electron backscattering diffraction measurements with SEM. Compared with the deformation microstructure, the grains revealed no preferred orientation. The precipitates of TiN and NbC were formed homogenously in the grain interior and at grain boundaries after annealing. Fine Laves phase precipitates were observed in grains and along subgrain boundaries as the deformation increased. Furthermore, the volume fraction of Laves phase increased, but the average particle diameter of precipitate was reduced as the deformation increased. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. Tensile and impact testing of an HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] control rod follower

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Schuster, M.H.; Roberts, T.C.; Milian, L.W.

    1989-08-01

    The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) undertook a program to machine and test specimens from a control rod follower from the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Tensile and Charpy impact specimens were machined and tested from non-irradiated aluminum alloys in addition to irradiated 6061-T6 from the HFBR. The tensile test results on irradiated material showed a two-fold increase in tensile strength to a maximum of 100.6 ksi. The impact resistance of the irradiated material showed a six-fold decrease in values (3 in-lb average) compared to similar non-irradiated material. Fracture toughness (K I ) specimens were tested on an unirradiated compositionally and dimensionally similar (to HFBR follower) 6061 T-6 material with K max values of 24.8 ± 1.0 Ksi√in (average) being obtained. The report concludes that the specimens produced during the program yielded reproducible and believable results and that proper quality assurance was provided throughout the program. 9 figs., 6 tabs

  8. Effect of tensile overloads on fatigue crack growth of high strength steel wires

    Haag, J.; Reguly, A.; Strohaecker, T.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A proof load process may be an option to increase the fatigue life of flexible pipelines. • There is possibility to produce plastic deformation at crack tip of tensile armor wires. • Controlled overloads provide effective crack growth retardation. • Crack growth retardation is also evident at higher stress ratios. - Abstract: Fatigue of the tensile armor wires is the main failure mode of flexible risers. Techniques to increase the life of these components are required to improve the processes safety on oil exploration. This work evaluates the crack growth retardation of high strength steel wires used in flexible pipelines. Fracture toughness tests were performed to establish the level of stress intensity factor wherein the wires present significant plastic deformation at the crack tip. The effect of tensile overload on fatigue behavior was assessed by fatigue crack growth testing under constant ΔK control and different overload ratios with two different load ratios. The outcomes show that the application of controlled overloads provides crack retardation and increases the fatigue life of the wires more than 31%. This behavior is also evident at stress ratio of 0.5, in spite of the crack closure effect being minimized by increasing the applied mean stress

  9. Peculiar Features of Thermal Aging and Degradation of Rapidly Quenched Stainless Steels under High-Temperature Exposures

    Shulga, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    This article presents the results of comparative studies of mechanical properties and microstructure of nuclear fuel tubes and semifinished stainless steel items fabricated by consolidation of rapidly quenched powders and by conventional technology after high-temperature exposures at 600 and 700°C. Tensile tests of nuclear fuel tube ring specimens of stainless austenitic steel of grade AISI 316 and ferritic-martensitic steel are performed at room temperature. The microstructure and distribution of carbon and boron are analyzed by metallography and autoradiography in nuclear fuel tubes and semifinished items. Rapidly quenched powders of the considered steels are obtained by the plasma rotating electrode process. Positive influence of consolidation of rapidly quenched powders on mechanical properties after high-temperature aging is confirmed. The correlation between homogeneous distribution of carbon and boron and mechanical properties of the considered steel is determined. The effects of thermal aging and degradation of the considered steels are determined at 600°C and 700°C, respectively.

  10. The effect of molybdenum addition on SCC susceptibility of stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water

    Akashi, Masatsune; Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1978-01-01

    The effect of molybdenum addition on the SCC susceptibility of sensitized stainless steel in oxygenated high temperature water has been studied through the creviced bent beam SCC test (CBB test) and A262E intergranular corrosion test. The molybdenum addition improved the SCC susceptibility of sensitized stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water not only by delaying the sensitization at lower temperatures but also by increasing the material resistance to the SCC under a given degree of sensitization. These laboratory test results reveal that the molybdenum addition is quite beneficial for improving the SCC susceptibility of stainless steel pipe weld joints in boiling water reactor environment. (auth.)

  11. Liquid Phase Sintering of Highly Alloyed Stainless Steel

    Mathiesen, Troels

    1996-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering of stainless steel is usually applied to improve corrosion resistance by obtaining a material without an open pore system. The dense structure normally also give a higher strength when compared to conventional sintered steel. Liquid phase sintrering based on addition...... of boride to AISI 316L type steels have previously been studied, but were found to be sensitive to intergranular corrosion due to formation of intermetallic phases rich in chromium and molybdenum. In order to improve this system further, new investigations have focused on the use of higher alloyed stainless...... steel as base material. The stainless base powders were added different amounts and types of boride and sintered in hydrogen at different temperatures and times in a laboratory furnace. During sintering the outlet gas was analyzed and subsequently related to the obtained microstructure. Thermodynamic...

  12. In-situ tensile test of high strength nanocrystalline bainitic steel

    Haddad, Mike, E-mail: mike.haddad@uni-ulm.de [Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Ivanisenko, Yulia; Courtois-Manara, Eglantine [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Fecht, Hans-Jörg [Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany)

    2015-01-03

    Because of its great importance in modern engineering and technology applications, steel continues to be highly relevant in the modern research field of nanocrystalline materials. Innovative processing methods and procedures are required for the production of such materials, which possess superior properties compared to their conventional counter parts. In this research, the original microstructure of a commercial C45 steel (Fe, 0.42–0.5 wt% C, 0.5–0.8 wt% Mn) was modified from ferritic–pearlitic to bainitic. Warm high pressure torsion for 5 rotations at 6 GPa and 350 °C was used to process the bainitic sample leading to an ultrafine/nano-scale grain size. A unique nano-crystalline microstructure consisting of equiaxed and elongated ferrite grains with a mean size smaller than 150 nm appeared in images taken by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Results of in-situ tensile testing in a scanning electron microscope showed very high tensile strength, on the order of 2100 MPa with a total elongation of 4.5% in comparison with 800 MPa and around 16% in the original state. Fracture occurred abruptly, without any sign of necking, and was typically caused by the stress concentration at a surface flaw. Also, stress concentrations near all surface defects were observed on the sample, visualized by the formation of shear bands. The fracture surface was covered with dimples, indicating ductile fracture. These properties are fully comparable with high strength, high alloyed steels.

  13. Overview of Strategies for High-Temperature Creep and Oxidation Resistance of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Santella, M. L.; Bei, H.; Maziasz, P. J.; Pint, B. A.

    2011-04-01

    A family of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys is under development for structural use in fossil energy conversion and combustion system applications. The AFA alloys developed to date exhibit comparable creep-rupture lives to state-of-the-art advanced austenitic alloys, and superior oxidation resistance in the ~923 K to 1173 K (650 °C to 900 °C) temperature range due to the formation of a protective Al2O3 scale rather than the Cr2O3 scales that form on conventional stainless steel alloys. This article overviews the alloy design approaches used to obtain high-temperature creep strength in AFA alloys via considerations of phase equilibrium from thermodynamic calculations as well as microstructure characterization. Strengthening precipitates under evaluation include MC-type carbides or intermetallic phases such as NiAl-B2, Fe2(Mo,Nb)-Laves, Ni3Al-L12, etc. in the austenitic single-phase matrix. Creep, tensile, and oxidation properties of the AFA alloys are discussed relative to compositional and microstructural factors.

  14. Effect of High Temperature on the Tensile Behavior of CFRP and Cementitious Composites

    Toutanji, Houssam A.

    1999-01-01

    Concrete and other composite manufacturing processes are continuing to evolve and become more and more suited for use in non-Earth settings such as the Moon and Mars. The fact that structures built in lunar environments would experience a range of effects from temperature extremes to bombardment by micrometeorites and that all the materials for concrete production exist on the Moon means that concrete appears to be the most feasible building material. it can provide adequate shelter from the harshness of the lunar environment and at the same time be a cost effective building material. With a return to the Moon planned by NASA to occur after the turn of the century, it will be necessary to include concrete manufacturing as one of the experiments to be conducted in one of the coming missions. Concrete's many possible uses and possibilities for manufacturing make it ideal for lunar construction. The objectives of this research are summarized as follows: i) study the possibility of concrete production on the Moon or other planets, ii) study the effect of high temperature on the tensile behavior of concrete, and iii) study the effect of high temperature on the tensile behavior of carbon fiber reinforced with inorganic polymer composites. Literature review indicates that production of concrete on the Moon or other planets is feasible using the indigenous materials. Results of this study has shown that both the tensile strength and static elastic modulus of concrete decreased with a rise in temperature from 200 to 500 C. The addition of silica fume to concrete showed higher resistance to high temperatures. Carbon fiber reinforced inorganic polymer (CFRIP) composites seemed to perform well up to 300 C. However, a significant reduction in strength was observed of about 40% at 400 C and up to 80% when the specimens were exposed to 700 C.

  15. Deformation Induced Martensitic Transformation and Its Initial Microstructure Dependence in a High Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steel

    Xie, Lin; Huang, Tian Lin; Wang, Yu Hui

    2017-01-01

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT) usually occurs in metastable austenitic stainless steels. Recent studies have shown that DIMT may occur in the austenite phase of low alloyed duplex stainless steels. The present study demonstrates that DIMT can also take place in a high alloyed...... Fe–23Cr–8.5Ni duplex stainless steel, which exhibits an unexpectedly rapid transformation from γ-austenite into α′-martensite. However, an inhibited martensitic transformation has been observed by varying the initial microstructure from a coarse alternating austenite and ferrite band structure...

  16. Evaluation of high temperature mechanical properties and constitutive equation of austenitic stainless steels

    Blanchard, P.; Tortel, J.

    1985-08-01

    A large amount of experimental data (tensile tests, creep tests, cyclic strain tests, relaxation experiments and biaxial experiments) on 17-12 Mo SPH (316 L SPH) stainless steel used for building the primary loop of Super Phenix Reactor have been obtained during the last years. The aim of this paper is to illustrate by a few examples the work done in the constitutive equations area using this powerful data base. Numerous semiempirical equations have been developed to represent tensile, cyclic, creep or relaxation tests on 17-12 Mo SPH (316 L SPH) stainless steel. These equations, althrough not being able to be properly called ''constitutive equations'' in the full sense of the word, are nevertheless very useful for design studies. Actually these semiempirical equations are necessary tools for building elastic analysis's rules. Some examples of these equations are given along with specific applications (creep-fatigue rules). The qualitative and semiquantitative comparisons of the stress-strain behaviour (both uniaxial and biaxial) predicted by the most common constitutive equations (PRAGER, MEIJERS, HART, CHABOCHE, KRIEB, MILLER, ROBINSON) with the actual behaviour of 17-12 Mo SPH (316 L SPH) steel, allows us to shed some light on the strengths and weaknesses of these equations. This comparison is presented and discussed. The way to more realistic equations is shown. A detailed and quantitative comparison of the capabilities of two models, the CHABOCHE model and the multilayer unified model which has been developed is presented

  17. Development and Application of High-Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels as Building Exterior Materials

    Kim, Yeong H.; Lee, Yong H.; Lee, Yong D.

    2008-01-01

    Stainless Steels have been widely used as a building exterior materials in Asian countries for the last decade. It is required for the materials in this field to have an aesthetic appearance,a relatively high strength, and an excellent corrosion resistance. Other metallic materials such as copper, aluminum, and carbon steels have been also used as the exterior materials. Considering the cost of maintenance, stainless steel, having the outstanding corrosion resistance, is replacing other materials in the several parts in the building exteriors. Ferritic stainless steel has been applied as the roofing materials because its thermal expansion is much smaller than that of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, it is suitable for the large-scale construction such as airport terminal, convention center, and football stadium. To improve the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels, the modification of alloy composition has been studied to develop new grade materials and the progress in the surface technology has been introduced. Corrosion properties, of these materials were evaluated in the laboratory and in the field for longer than two years. High-Cr ferritic stainless steel showed excellent corrosion resistance to the atmospheric environments. In the region close to the sea, the corrosion resistance of high-Cr ferritic stainless steel was much superior to that of other materials, which may prove this steel to be the appropriate materials for the construction around seashore. In some of the large constructions around seashore in South Korea, high-Cr ferritic stainless steels have been used as the building exterior materials for six years

  18. Development and Application of High-Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels as Building Exterior Materials

    Kim, Yeong H.; Lee, Yong H.; Lee, Yong D. [POSCO Technical Reseaarch Lab., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Stainless Steels have been widely used as a building exterior materials in Asian countries for the last decade. It is required for the materials in this field to have an aesthetic appearance,a relatively high strength, and an excellent corrosion resistance. Other metallic materials such as copper, aluminum, and carbon steels have been also used as the exterior materials. Considering the cost of maintenance, stainless steel, having the outstanding corrosion resistance, is replacing other materials in the several parts in the building exteriors. Ferritic stainless steel has been applied as the roofing materials because its thermal expansion is much smaller than that of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, it is suitable for the large-scale construction such as airport terminal, convention center, and football stadium. To improve the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels, the modification of alloy composition has been studied to develop new grade materials and the progress in the surface technology has been introduced. Corrosion properties, of these materials were evaluated in the laboratory and in the field for longer than two years. High-Cr ferritic stainless steel showed excellent corrosion resistance to the atmospheric environments. In the region close to the sea, the corrosion resistance of high-Cr ferritic stainless steel was much superior to that of other materials, which may prove this steel to be the appropriate materials for the construction around seashore. In some of the large constructions around seashore in South Korea, high-Cr ferritic stainless steels have been used as the building exterior materials for six years.

  19. Welding of nickel free high nitrogen stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Raffi Mohammed; G. Madhusudhan Reddy; K. Srinivasa Rao

    2017-01-01

    High nitrogen stainless steel (HNS) is a nickel free austenitic stainless steel that is used as a structural component in defence applications for manufacturing battle tanks as a replacement of the existing armour grade steel owing to its low cost, excellent mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance. Conventional fusion welding causes problems like nitrogen desorption, solidification cracking in weld zone, liquation cracking in heat affected zone, nitrogen induced porosity and poo...

  20. High purity ferritic Cr-Mo stainless steel

    Knoth, J.

    1977-01-01

    In five years, E-BRITE 26-1 ferritic stainless steel has won an important place in the spectrum of materials suitable for use in chemical process equipment. It provides, in stainless steel, performance-capability characteristics comparable to more expensive alloys. It has demonstrated cost-effectiveness in equipment used for caustic, nitric-urea, organic chemicals, pulping liquors, refinery streams, and elsewhere. User confidence in the reliability and integrity of Grade XM 27 has increased to the point where large critical systems are now routinely specified in the alloy. The market acceptance of this material has attracted attempts to produce substitute versions of the alloy. Imitation, should be viewed with caution. Stabilized 26-IS must be examined over a lengthy period of time to determine if its own corrosion resistance, ductility, fabricability and reproducibility properties could ever be likened to those of E-BRITE 26-1. (orig.) [de

  1. High temperature tensile properties and deep drawing of fully green composites

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, research and development of materials using biomass sources are much expected to construct a sustainable society. The so-called green composite consisting of natural fibers and biodegradable resin, is one of the most promising materials in developing biomass products. In this study, especially, we focus on the tensile deformation behavior of the green composites reinforced with ramie woven fabrics at high temperature. The results show that the fracture strain at high temperatures increases larger than that of room temperature, and initial deformation resistance of the composites seen at room temperature does not appear at high temperatures. Thus, several conditions to cause more deformability of the green composites were found. Finally, in order to utilize such deformability, Lankford-values of the green composites were clarified, and deep drawing was carried out for sheet materials made of the green composites.

  2. Creep theories compared by means of high sensitivity tensile creep data

    Salim, A.

    1987-01-01

    Commonly used creep theories include time-hardening, strain-hardening and Rabotnov's modified strain-hardening. In the paper they are examined by using high sensitivity tensile creep data produced on 1% CrMoV steel at a temperatue of 565 0 C. A special creep machine designed and developed by the author is briefly described and is compared with other existing machines. Tensile creep data reported cover a stress range of 100-260 MN m -2 ; four variable-creep tests each in duplicate are also reported. Test durations are limited to 3000 h, or failure, whichever occurs earlier. The strain-hardening theory and Rabotnov's modified strain-hardening theory are found to give good prediction of creep strain under variable stress conditions. The time-hardening theory shows a relatively poor agreement and considerably underestimates the accumulated inelastic strain under increasing stress condition. This discrepancy increases with the increased stress rate. The theories failed to predict the variable stress results towards the later part of the test where tertiary effects were significant. The use of creep equations which could account for creep strain at higher stress levels seems to improve the situation considerably. Under conditions of variable stress, it is suggested that a theory based on continuous damage mechanics concepts might give a better prediction. (author)

  3. The analytical description of high temperature tensile creep for cavitating materials subjected to time variable loads

    Bocek, M.

    A phenomenological cavitation model is presented by means of which the life time as well as the creep curve equations can be calculated for cavitating materials subjected to time variable tensile loads. The model precludes the proportionality between the damage A and the damage rate (dA/dt) resp. Both are connected by the life time function tau. The latter is derived from static stress rupture tests and contains the loading conditions. From this model the life fraction rule (LFR) is derived. The model is used to calculate the creep curves of cavitating materials subjected at high temperatures to non-stationary tensile loading conditions. In the present paper the following loading procedures are considered: creep at constant load F and true stress s; creep at linear load increase ((dF/dt)=const) and creep at constant load amplitude cycling (CLAC). For these loading procedures the creep equations for cavitating and non-cavitating specimens are derived. Under comparable conditions the creep rate of cavitating materials are higher than for non-cavitating ones. (author)

  4. Process for preparing polyolefin gel articles as well as for preparing herefrom articles having a high tensile strength and modulus

    1990-01-01

    A process is described for the preparation of highly stretchable high-molecular weight polyolefin gel articles and polyolefin gel articles prepared therefrom having combined high tensile strength and high modulus, wherein an initial shaped article of the polyolefin is exposed to or contacted with a

  5. Study of Creep of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Energy Applications

    Afonina, Natalie Petrovna

    To withstand the high temperature (>700°C) and pressure demands of steam turbines and boilers used for energy applications, metal alloys must be economically viable and have the necessary material properties, such as high-temperature creep strength, oxidation and corrosion resistance, to withstand such conditions. One promising class of alloys potentially capable of withstanding the rigors of aggressive environments, are alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels (AFAs) alloyed with aluminum to improve corrosion and oxidation resistance. The effect of aging on the microstructure, high temperature constant-stress creep behavior and mechanical properties of the AFA-type alloy Fe-20Cr-30Ni-2Nb-5Al (at.%) were investigated in this study. The alloy's microstructural evolution with increased aging time was observed prior to creep testing. As aging time increased, the alloy exhibited increasing quantities of fine Fe2Nb Laves phase dispersions, with a precipitate-free zone appearing in samples with higher aging times. The presence of the L1 2 phase gamma'-Ni3Al precipitate was detected in the alloy's matrix at 760°C. A constant-stress creep rig was designed, built and its operation validated. Constant-stress creep tests were performed at 760°C and 35MPa, and the effects of different aging conditions on creep rate were investigated. Specimens aged for 240 h exhibited the highest creep rate by a factor of 5, with the homogenized sample having the second highest rate. Samples aged for 2.4 h and 24 h exhibited similar low secondary creep rates. Creep tests conducted at 700oC exhibited a significantly lower creep rate compared to those at 760oC. Microstructural analysis was performed on crept samples to explore high temperature straining properties. The quantity and size of Fe2Nb Laves phase and NiAl particles increased in the matrix and on grain boundaries with longer aging time. High temperature tensile tests were performed and compared to room temperature results. The

  6. Preparation of high-performance ultrafine-grained AISI 304L stainless steel under high temperature and pressure

    Peng Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bulk ultra-fine grained (UFG AISI 304L stainless steel with excellent mechanical properties was prepared by a high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP method using nanocrystalline AISI 304L stainless steel powders obtained from ball milling. Samples were sintered in high-pressure conditions using the highest martensite content of AISI 304L stainless steel powders milled for 25 h. Analyses of phase composition and grain size were accomplished by X-ray diffraction and Rietveld refinement. By comparing the reverse martensite transformation under vacuum and HTHP treat, we consider that pressure can effectively promote the change in the process of transformation. Compared with the solid-solution-treated 304L, the hardness and yield strength of the samples sintered under HTHP are considerably higher. This method of preparation of UFG bulk stainless steel may be widely popularised and used to obtain UFG metallic materials with good comprehensive performance.

  7. Effect of heat treatments on the tensile and electrical properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1997-01-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of CuCrZr produced by two different vendors have been measured following different heat treatments. Room temperature electrical resistivity measurements were also performed in order to estimate the thermal conductivity of these specimens. The thermomechanical conditions studied included solution quenched, solution quenched and aged (ITER reference heat treatment), simulated slow HIP thermal cycle (∼1 degrees C/min cooling from solutionizing temperature) and simulated fast HIP thermal cycle (∼100 degrees C/min cooling from solutionizing temperature). Specimens from the last two heat treatments were tested in both the solution-cooled condition and after subsequent precipitate aging at 475 degrees C for 2 h. Both of the simulated HIP thermal cycles caused a pronounced decreases in the strength and electrical conductivity of CuCrZr. The tensile and electrical properties were unchanged by subsequent aging in the slow HIP thermal cycles caused a pronounced decrease in the strength and electrical conductivity of CuCrZr. The tensile and electrical properties were unchanged by subsequent aging in the slow HIP thermal cycle specimens, whereas the strength and conductivity following aging in the fast HIP thermal cycle improved to ∼65% of the solution quenched and aged CuCrZr values. Limited tensile and electrical resistivity measurements were also made on two new heats of Hycon 3HP CuNiBe. High strength but poor uniform and total elongations were observed at 500 degrees C on one of these new heats of CuNiBe, similar to that observed in other heats

  8. Effect of heat treatments on the tensile and electrical properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of CuCrZr produced by two different vendors have been measured following different heat treatments. Room temperature electrical resistivity measurements were also performed in order to estimate the thermal conductivity of these specimens. The thermomechanical conditions studied included solution quenched, solution quenched and aged (ITER reference heat treatment), simulated slow HIP thermal cycle ({approximately}1{degrees}C/min cooling from solutionizing temperature) and simulated fast HIP thermal cycle ({approximately}100{degrees}C/min cooling from solutionizing temperature). Specimens from the last two heat treatments were tested in both the solution-cooled condition and after subsequent precipitate aging at 475{degrees}C for 2 h. Both of the simulated HIP thermal cycles caused a pronounced decreases in the strength and electrical conductivity of CuCrZr. The tensile and electrical properties were unchanged by subsequent aging in the slow HIP thermal cycles caused a pronounced decrease in the strength and electrical conductivity of CuCrZr. The tensile and electrical properties were unchanged by subsequent aging in the slow HIP thermal cycle specimens, whereas the strength and conductivity following aging in the fast HIP thermal cycle improved to {approximately}65% of the solution quenched and aged CuCrZr values. Limited tensile and electrical resistivity measurements were also made on two new heats of Hycon 3HP CuNiBe. High strength but poor uniform and total elongations were observed at 500{degrees}C on one of these new heats of CuNiBe, similar to that observed in other heats.

  9. Effects of thermal - mechanical treatment in the creep - and tensile properties of niobium at high temperature

    Botta Filho, W.J.; Pinatti, Dyonisio G.

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical behavior of Nb at high temperature was studied based upon the samples morfology. The samples were obtainned after thermal mechanical treatment of 50mm diameter and 250mm length ingot produced by electron beam vacuum. A lot of the samples was tensile tested as a function of temperature showing small interstitials solute effect and a matrix hardened probably by substitutionals. Other lot was creep tested at homologous temperature of 0,34 and stress between 80 and 120 MPa. The results of these tests were analysed as a function of the sample morfology and showed a dependence of the percentage of recrystalization and of the grain size on the minimum creep rate. The fracture analysis showed significant effect of the oxygen content although it didn't contribute to the creep results. (Author) [pt

  10. The tensile behavior of Ti36Ni49Hf15 high temperature shape memory alloy

    Wang, Y.Q.; Zheng, Y.F.; Cai, W.; Zhao, L.C.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, ternary Ti-Ni-Hf alloys have attracted great interest in the field of high temperature shape memory materials research and development. Extensive studies have been made on its manufacture process, constitutional phases, phase transformation behavior, the structure, substructure and interface structure of martensite and the precipitation behavior during ageing. Yet up to date there is no report about the fundamental mechanical properties of Ti-Ni-Hf alloys, such as the stress-strain data, the variation laws of the yield strength and elongation with the temperature. In the present study, tensile tests at various temperatures are employed to investigate the mechanical behavior of Ti-Ni-Hf alloy with different matrix structures, from full martensite to full parent phase structure, with the corresponding deformation mechanism discussed

  11. Dynamical recrystallization of high purity austenitic stainless steels

    Gavard, L.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to optimize the performance of structural materials. The elementary mechanisms (strain hardening and dynamical regeneration, germination and growth of new grains) occurring during the hot working of metals and low pile defect energy alloys have been studied for austenitic stainless steels. In particular, the influence of the main experimental parameters (temperature, deformation velocity, initial grain size, impurities amount, deformation way) on the process of discontinuous dynamical recrystallization has been studied. Alloys with composition equal to those of the industrial stainless steel-304L have been fabricated from ultra-pure iron, chromium and nickel. Tests carried out in hot compression and torsion in order to cover a wide range of deformations, deformation velocities and temperatures for two very different deformation ways have allowed to determine the rheological characteristics (sensitivity to the deformation velocity, apparent activation energy) of materials as well as to characterize their microstructural deformations by optical metallography and electron back-scattered diffraction. The influence of the initial grain size and the influence of the purity of the material on the dynamical recrystallization kinetics have been determined. An analytical model for the determination of the apparent mobility of grain boundaries, a semi-analytical model for the dynamical recrystallization and at last an analytical model for the stationary state of dynamical recrystallization are proposed as well as a new criteria for the transition between the refinement state and the state of grain growth. (O.M.)

  12. Oxidation of 304 stainless steel in high-temperature steam

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Harayama, Yasuo; Yaguchi, Sinnosuke

    1986-08-01

    An experiment on oxidation of 304 stainless steel was performed in steam between 900°C and 1350°C, using the spare cladding of the reactor of the nuclear-powered ship Mutsu. The temperature range was appropriate for a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) analysis of a LWR. The oxidation kinetics were found to obey the parabolic law during the first period of 8 min. After the first period, the parabolic reaction rate constant decreased in the case of heating temperatures between 1100°C and 1250°C. At 1250°C, especially, a marked decrease was observed in the oxide scale-forming kinetics when the surface treated initially by mechanical polishing and given a residual stress. This enhanced oxidation resistance was attributed to the presence of a chromium-enriched layer which was detected by use of an X-ray microanalyzer. The oxidation kinetics equation obtained for the first 8 min is applicable to the model calculation of a hypothetical LOCA in a LWR, employing 304 stainless steel cladding.

  13. Tensile testing

    2004-01-01

    A complete guide to the uniaxial tensile test, the cornerstone test for determining the mechanical properties of materials: Learn ways to predict material behavior through tensile testing. Learn how to test metals, alloys, composites, ceramics, and plastics to determine strength, ductility and elastic/plastic deformation. A must for laboratory managers, technicians, materials and design engineers, and students involved with uniaxial tensile testing. Tensile Testing , Second Edition begins with an introduction and overview of the test, with clear explanations of how materials properties are determined from test results. Subsequent sections illustrate how knowledge gained through tensile tests, such as tension properties to predict the behavior (including strength, ductility, elastic or plastic deformation, tensile and yield strengths) have resulted in improvements in materals applications. The Second Edition is completely revised and updated. It includes expanded coverage throughout the volume on a variety of ...

  14. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys to acid fluoride wastes

    Smith, H.D.; Mackey, D.B.; Pool, K.H.; Schwenk, E.B.

    1992-04-01

    TRUEX processing of Hanford Site waste will utilize potentially corrosive acid fluoride processing solutions. Appropriate construction materials for such a processing facility need to be identified. Toward this objective, candidate stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys have been corrosion tested in simulated acid fluoride process solutions at 333K. The high Ni-Cr alloys exhibited corrosion rates as low as 0.14 mm/y in a solution with an HF activity of about 1.2 M, much lower than the 19 to 94 mm/y observed for austenitic stainless steels. At a lower HF activity (about 0.008 M), stainless steels display delayed passivation while high Ni-Cr alloys display essentially no reaction

  15. Study on optimum length of raw material in stainless steel high-lock nuts forging

    Cheng, Meiwen; Liu, Fenglei; Zhao, Qingyun; Wang, Lidong

    2018-04-01

    Taking 302 stainless steel (1Cr18Ni9) high-lock nuts for research objects, adjusting the length of raw material, then using DEFORM software to simulate the isothermal forging process of each station and conducting the corresponding field tests to study the effects of raw material size on the stainless steel high-lock nuts forming performance. The tests show that the samples of each raw material length is basically the same as the results of the DEFORM software. When the length of the raw material is 10mm, the appearance size of the parts can meet the design requirements.

  16. Numerical simulation of Cr2N age-precipitation in high nitrogen stainless steels

    Dai, Q.X.; Yuan, Z.Z.; Luo, X.M.; Cheng, X.N.

    2004-01-01

    At the temperature raging from 700 to 950 deg. C, the Cr 2 N age-precipitation in high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels Fe24Mn18Cr3Ni0.62N was investigated in this paper. A qualitative mathematical model of Cr 2 N age-precipitation, ln t S = f (Me,1/T), was established based on the thermodynamics and kinetics and phase transformation theories. Satisfactory results were obtained by means of the test of artificial neural network. This mathematical model can be applied to the calculation design and predication of Cr 2 N age-precipitation in high nitrogen stainless steels

  17. Effect of overload on SCC growth in stainless steels in high temperature water

    Xue, He; Peng, Qunjia; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2009-01-01

    By incorporating the film slip-dissolution/oxidation model and the elastic-plastic finite element method (EPFEM), the effect of the overload on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) growth rate of stainless steel in high temperature water is discussed in this paper. Results show that SCC growth rate of a 20% cold worked 316L stainless steel in high temperature water decrease in the overload affected zone ahead of the growing crack tip. Therefore, a reasonable overload could availably reduce the SCC growth rate during a certain in-service period. (author)

  18. Corrosion resistance testing of high-boron-content stainless steels

    Petrman, I.; Safek, V.

    1994-01-01

    Boron steels, i.e. stainless steels with boron contents of 0.2 to 2.25 wt.%, are employed in nuclear engineering for the manufacture of baskets or wells in which radioactive fissile materials are stored, mostly spent nuclear fuel elements. The resistance of such steels to intergranular corrosion and uniform corrosion was examined in the Strauss solution and in boric acid; the dependence of the corrosion rate of the steels on their chemical composition was investigated, and their resistance was compared with that of AISI 304 type steel. Corrosion resistance tests in actual conditions of ''wet'' compact storage (demineralized water or a weak boric acid solution) gave evidence that boron steels undergo nearly no uniform corrosion and, as electrochemical measurements indicated, match standard corrosion-resistant steels. Corrosion resistance was confirmed to decrease slightly with increasing boron content and to increase somewhat with increasing molybdenum content. (Z.S.). 3 tabs., 4 figs., 7 refs

  19. Strain-rate dependent fatigue behavior of 316LN stainless steel in high-temperature water

    Tan, Jibo [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning Key Laboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wu, Xinqiang, E-mail: xqwu@imr.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning Key Laboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei; Wang, Xiang [CAS Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning Key Laboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Sun, Haitao [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, SEPA, Beijing 100082 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Low cycle fatigue behavior of forged 316LN stainless steel was investigated in high-temperature water. It was found that the fatigue life of 316LN stainless steel decreased with decreasing strain rate from 0.4 to 0.004 %s{sup −1} in 300 °C water. The stress amplitude increased with decreasing strain rate during fatigue tests, which was a typical characteristic of dynamic strain aging. The fatigue cracks mainly initiated at pits and slip bands. The interactive effect between dynamic strain aging and electrochemical factors on fatigue crack initiation is discussed. - Highlights: •The fatigue lives of 316LN stainless steel decrease with decreasing strain rate. •Fatigue cracks mainly initiated at pits and persistent slip bands. •Dynamic strain aging promoted fatigue cracks initiation in high-temperature water.

  20. Estimation of embrittlement during aging of AISI 316 stainless steel ...

    Unknown

    rical relation connecting the aging temperature, aging time and nitrogen ... strength, high tensile strength, are easy to fabricate and ... However, the ferrite is a metastable phase which ... 2. Experimental. 2.1 Materials. Nuclear grade AISI 316 stainless steel plates ( .... fore, it is desirable to develop empirical relations con-.

  1. Ionic nitriding of high chromium martensitic stainless steels

    Bruhl, S.P; Charadia, R; Vaca, L.S; Cimetta, J

    2008-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are used in industrial applications where resistance to corrosion and mechanical resistance are needed simultaneously. These steels are normally used in tempering and annealing condition which gives them hardnesses of 500 and 600 HV (about 54 HRC). Ionic nitriding is an assisted diffusion technique that has recently been successfully applied to harden austenitic stainless steels without reducing their resistance to corrosion. The application with AISI 420 martensitic steels has not given good results yet, because in most cases, it affects their corrosion resistance. This work presents the results of the pulsed nitriding of martensitic steels with a higher chrome content, such as the M340 and M333 Boehler steels and they are compared with the same materials after tempering and annealing, without nitriding. The influence of the variations in the parameters of the process, such as the percentage of active time in the pulsed wave, partial nitrogen pressure, current density and effective tension in the microstructure, hardness and wear and corrosion resistance was studied. The microstructure was studied with an optic microscope; the wear resistance with abrasion tests following ASTM G-65 and corrosion with 100 hour long saline haze tests, in a device built according to ASTM B117. Hardness was found to rise to values of 1000 to 1350 HV in all the steels after ionic nitriding, the modified layers oscillated from 3 to 15 microns. As a result, wear resistance also increased, with differences depending on the microstructure and the thickness of the modified layer. However, corrosion resistance was not good, except in the case of the M333 steel test piece with less hardness and a less thick nitrided layer without a noticeable interphase (au)

  2. Surface damage of 316 stainless steel irradiated with 4He+ to high doses

    Kaminsky, M.; Das, S.K.

    1978-01-01

    Surface blistering of niobium by implantation with helium ions in the 9 to 15 keV range was investigated. The apparent disappearance of blisters at sufficiently high doses was believed to be an equilibrium effect. To determine whether high temperature annealing causes the equilibrium condition, stainless steel-316 samples were irradiated at a constant 450 0 C. Results are presented

  3. Grain growth behavior and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of iridium alloy DOP-26

    McKamey, C.G.; Gubbi, A.N.; Lin, Y.; Cohron, J.W.; Lee, E.H.; George, E.P.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes results of studies conducted to date under the Iridium Alloy Characterization and Development subtask of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program to characterize the properties of the new-process iridium-based DOP-26 alloy used for the Cassini space mission. This alloy was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the early 1980's and is currently used by NASA for cladding and post-impact containment of the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for interplanetary spacecraft. Included within this report are data generated on grain growth in vacuum or low-pressure oxygen environments; a comparison of grain growth in vacuum of the clad vent set cup material with sheet material; effect of grain size, test temperature, and oxygen exposure on high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility; and grain growth in vacuum and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of welded DOP-26. The data for the new-process material is compared to available old-process data

  4. An experience with in-service fabrication and inspection of austenitic stainless steel piping in high temperature sodium system

    Ravi, S., E-mail: sravi@igcar.gov.in; Laha, K.; Sakthy, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Procedure for changing 304L SS pipe to 316L SS in sodium loop has been established. • Hot leg made of 304L SS was isolated from existing cold leg made of 316LN SS. • Innovative welding was used in joining the new 316L SS pipe with existing 316LN SS. • The old components of 304L SS piping have been integrated with the new piping. - Abstract: A creep testing facility along with dynamic sodium loop was installed at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, India to assess the creep behavior of fast reactor structural materials in flowing sodium. Type 304L austenitic stainless steel was used in the low cross section piping of hot-leg whereas 316LN austenitic stainless steel in the high cross section cold-leg of the sodium loop. The intended service life of the sodium loop was 10 years. The loop has performed successfully in the stipulated time period. To enhance its life time, it has been decided to replace the 304L piping with 316L piping in the hot-leg. There were more than 300 welding joints involved in the integration of cold-leg with the new 316L hot-leg. Continuous argon gas flow was maintained in the loop during welding to avoid contamination of sodium residue with air. Several innovative welding procedures have been adopted for joining the new hot-leg with the existing cold-leg in the presence of sodium residue adopting TIG welding technique. The joints were inspected for 100% X-ray radiography and qualified by performing tensile tests. The components used in the discarded hot-leg were retrieved, cleaned and integrated in the renovated loop. A method of cleaning component of sodium residue has been established. This paper highlights the in-service fabrication and inspection of the renovation.

  5. Microstructure and tensile properties of high strength duplex ferrite-martensite (DFM) steels

    Chakraborti, P.C.; Mitra, M.K.

    2007-01-01

    Duplex ferrite-martensite (DFM) steels containing 38-80% martensite of varying morphologies were developed by batch intercritical annealing of a commercial variety vanadium bearing 0.2% C-Mn steel at different temperatures. Microstructures before intercritical annealing were found to control the morphological distribution of the phase constituents of the developed DFM steels. Tensile test results revealed best strength-ductility combination for finely distributed lamellar ferrite-martensite phase aggregate containing ∼60% martensite developed from a prior martensitic structure. Taking consideration of the modified law of mechanical mixture the experimental tensile strength data of the developed DFM steels has been formulated with some success and very good estimation for tensile strengths of pure ferrite and low carbon martensite has been made from tensile strength data of DFM steels

  6. Degradation of Peel and Tensile Strength of Bonded Panels Exposed to High Humidity

    Rider, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    .... The work presented in this report summarizes honeycomb studies undertaken in AIR task 98/186 that were designed to examine the influence that environmental exposure would have on the peel and tensile...

  7. Influence of magnetic arc oscillation and current pulsing on microstructure and high temperature tensile strength of alloy 718 TIG weldments

    Sivaprasad, K.; Ganesh Sundara Raman, S.; Mastanaiah, P.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the effect of magnetic arc oscillation and current pulsing on the microstructure and high temperature tensile strength of alloy 718 tungsten inert gas weldments. The magnetic arc oscillation technique resulted in refined Laves phase with lesser interconnectivity. The full benefits of current pulsing in breaking the dendrites could not be realized in the present study due to relatively higher heat input used in the welding process. In the direct aged condition weldments prepared using magnetic arc oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength due to the presence of refined and lesser-interconnected Laves particles. In the solution treated and aged condition, magnetic arc oscillated weldments exhibited lower tensile strength compared with the weldments made without arc oscillation due to the presence of large amounts of finer δ needles

  8. Relating high-temperature flow stress of AISI 316 stainless steel to strain and strain rate

    Matteazzi, S.; Paitti, G.; Boerman, D.

    1982-01-01

    The authors have performed an experimental determination of tensile stress-strain curves for different strain rates (4.67 x 10 - 5 , 4.67 x 10 - 2 s - 1 ) and for a variety of temperature conditions (773-1073 K) of AISI 316H stainless steel (annealed conditions) and also a computer analysis of the experimental curves using a fitting program which takes into consideration different constitutive relations describing the plastic flow behaviour of the metals. The results show that the materials tested are clearly affected by strain rate only at the highest temperature investigated (1073 K) and that the plastic strain is the more significant variable. Of the constitutive equations considered, Voce's relation gives the best fit for the true stress-time-strain curves. However, the Ludwik and Ludwigson equations also provide a description of the experimental data, whereas Hollomon's equation does not suitably characterize AISI 316H stainless steel and can be applied with some accuracy only at 1073 K. (author)

  9. Evaluation of high temperature mechanical properties and constitutive equation of austenitic stainless steels

    Blanchard, P.; Tortel, J.

    1986-07-01

    A large amount of experimental data on 17-12 Mo SPH (316 L SPH) stainless steel have been obtained during the last years. The aim of this paper is to illustrate by a few examples the work done in the constitutive equations area using this powerful data base. Numerous semiempirical equations have been developed to represent tensile, cyclic, creep or relaxation tests on 17-12 Mo SPH (316 L SPH) stainless steel used for building the primary loop of the SUPER PHENIX 1 reactor. These equations are necessary tools for building elastic analysis's rules. Some examples are given with specific applications. The qualitative and semiquantitative comparisons of the stress-strain behaviour (both uniaxial and biaxial) predicted by the most common constitutive equations with the actual behaviour of 17-12 Mo SPH (316 L SPH) steel, shed some light on the strengths and weaknesses of these equations. This comparison is presented and discussed. The way to more realistic equations is shown. A detailed and quantitative comparison of the capabilities of two models, the CHABOCHE model and the multilayer unified model, is presented

  10. Corrosion resistance of high performance stainless steels in cooling water and other refinery environments

    Kovach, C.W.; Redmerski, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    The recent successful introduction of high performance stainless steels as tubing for seawater cooled electric utility condensers suggests that these alloys can also provide useful service in refinery heat exchanger applications. Since many of these applications involve higher temperature exposure than steam condensers, a study was conducted to evaluate crevice corrsion resistance over a range of cooling water temperature and chloride concentrations, and also to evaluate general corrosion resistance in some strong chemical and refinery environments. These stainless steels display excellent crevice corrosion resistance as well as good resistance to a variety of chemical environments that may be encountered in refinery, petrochemical and chemical plant service

  11. Corrosion behaviour of high manganese austenitic stainless steels: positive and negative aspects

    Raja, V.S.

    1999-01-01

    Stainless steel 304 has found use as a most versatile engineering material in many industrial applications. Recently, the Indian industries have developed high Mn stainless steels with low C and Ni contents and simultaneously introduced N and Cu in the system. Composition of some of the alloys which are prevalent in the market are given. Individually, the effect of Ni, C, Mn, N and Cu on various forms of corrosion is reasonably understood. However, it will be worthwhile to review the response of these alloys, containing all these elements, towards various forms of corrosion. The objective of this paper is preciously to do this

  12. Experimental study under uniaxial cyclic behavior at room and high temperature of 316L stainless steel

    Kang Guozheng; Gao Qing; Yang Xianjie; Sun Yafang

    2001-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out of the cyclic properties of 316L stainless steel subjected to uniaxial strain and stress at room and high temperature. The effects of cyclic strain amplitude, temperature and their histories on the cyclic deformation behavior of 316L stainless steel are investigated. And, the influences of stress amplitude, mean stress, temperature and their histories on ratcheting are also analyzed. It is shown that either uniaxial cyclic property under cyclic strain or ratcheting under asymmetric uniaxial cyclic stress depends not only on the current temperature and loading state, but also on the previous temperature and loading history. Some significant results are obtained

  13. Tensile behaviour of geopolymer-based materials under medium and high strain rates

    Menna, Costantino; Asprone, Domenico; Forni, Daniele; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Bozza, Anna; Prota, Andrea; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Geopolymers are a promising class of inorganic materials typically obtained from an alluminosilicate source and an alkaline solution, and characterized by an amorphous 3-D framework structure. These materials are particularly attractive for the construction industry due to mechanical and environmental advantages they exhibit compared to conventional systems. Indeed, geopolymer-based concretes represent a challenge for the large scale uses of such a binder material and many research studies currently focus on this topic. However, the behaviour of geopolymers under high dynamic loads is rarely investigated, even though it is of a fundamental concern for the integrity/vulnerability assessment under extreme dynamic events. The present study aims to investigate the effect of high dynamic loading conditions on the tensile behaviour of different geopolymer formulations. The dynamic tests were performed under different strain rates by using a Hydro-pneumatic machine and a modified Hopkinson bar at the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The results are processed in terms of stress-strain relationships and strength dynamic increase factor at different strain-rate levels. The dynamic increase factor was also compared with CEB recommendations. The experimental outcomes can be used to assess the constitutive laws of geopolymers under dynamic load conditions and implemented into analytical models.

  14. SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld heat-affected zone in hydrogenated high temperature water

    Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2010-01-01

    It is known that the SCC growth rate of stainless steels in high-temperature water is accelerated by cold-work (CW). The weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of stainless steels is also deformed by weld shrinkage. However, only little have been reported on the SCC growth of weld HAZ of SUS316 and SUS304 in hydrogenated high-temperature water. Thus, in this present study, SCC growth experiments were performed using weld HAZ of stainless steels, especially to obtain data on the dependence of SCC growth on (1) temperature and (2) hardness in hydrogenated water at temperatures from 250degC to 340degC. And then, the SCC growth behaviors were compared between weld HAZ and CW stainless steels. The following results have been obtained. Significant SCC growth were observed in weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) in hydrogenated water at 320degC. The SCC growth rates of the HAZ are similar to that of 10% CW non-sensitized SUS316, in accordance with that the hardness of weld HAZ is also similar to that of 10% CW SUS316. Temperature dependency of SCC growth of weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) is also similar to that of 10% CW non-sensitized SUS316. That is, no significant SCC were observed in the weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) in hydrogenated water at 340degC. This suggests that SCC growth behaviors of weld HAZ and CW stainless steels are similar and correlated with the hardness or yield strength of the materials, at least in non-sensitized regions. And the similar temperature dependence between the HAZ and CW stainless steels suggests that the SCC growth behaviors are also attributed to the common mechanism. (author)

  15. High cycle fatigue of austenitic stainless steels under random loading

    Gauthier, J.P.; Petrequin, P.

    1987-08-01

    To investigate reactor components, load control random fatigue tests were performed at 300 0 C and 550 0 C, on specimens from austenitic stainless steels plates in the transverse orientation. Random solicitations are produced on closed loop servo-hydraulic machines by a mini computer which generates random load sequence by the use of reduced Markovian matrix. The method has the advantage of taking into account the mean load for each cycle. The solicitations generated are those of a stationary gaussian process. Fatigue tests have been mainly performed in the endurance region of fatigue curve, with scattering determination using stair case method. Experimental results have been analysed aiming at determining design curves for components calculations, depending on irregularity factor and temperature. Analysis in term of mean square root fatigue limit calculation, shows that random loading gives more damage than constant amplitude loading. Damage calculations following Miner rule have been made using the probability density function for the case where the irregularity factor is nearest to 100 %. The Miner rule is too conservative for our results. A method using design curves including random loading effects with irregularity factor as an indexing parameter is proposed

  16. Structural materialization of stainless steel molds and dies by the low temperature high density plasma nitriding

    Aizawa Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various kinds of stainless steels have been widely utilized as a mold substrate material for injection molding and as a die for mold-stamping and direct stamping processes. Since they suffered from high temperature transients and thermal cycles in practice, they must be surface-treated by dry and wet coatings, or, by plasma nitriding. Martensitic stainless steel mold was first wet plated by the nickel phosphate (NiP, which was unstable at the high temperature stamping condition; and, was easy to crystalize or to fracture by itself. This issue of nuisance significantly lowered the productivity in fabrication of optical elements at present. In the present paper, the stainless steel mold was surface-treated by the low-temperature plasma nitriding. The nitrided layer by this surface modification had higher nitrogen solute content than 4 mass%; the maximum solid-solubility of nitrogen is usually 0.1 mass% in the equilibrium phase diagram. Owing to this solid-solution with high nitrogen concentration, the nitrided layer had high hardness of 1400 Hv within its thickness of 40 μm without any formation of nitrides after 14.4 ks plasma nitriding at 693 K. This nitrogen solid-solution treated stainless steel had thermal resistivity even at the mold-stamping conditions up to 900 K.

  17. Tensile toughness test and high temperature fracture analysis of thermal barrier coatings

    Qian, G.; Nakamura, T.; Berndt, C.C.; Leigh, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, an effective fracture toughness test which uses interface fracture mechanics theory is introduced. This method is ideally suited for determining fracture resistance of multilayered thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) consisting of ceramic and bond layers and, unlike other fracture experiments, requires minimal set-up over a simple tensile adhesion test. Furthermore, while other test methods usually use edge cracked specimens, the present test models a crack embedded within the coatings, which is more consistent with actual TBCs where failure initiates from internal voids or defects. The results of combined computational and experimental analysis show that any defects located within the ceramic coating can significantly weaken a TBC, whereas the debonding resistances of the bond coating and its interfaces are found to be much higher. In a separate analysis, the authors have studied fracture behavior of TBCs subjected to thermal loading in a high temperature environment. The computed fracture parameters reveal that when the embedded crack size is on order of the coating thickness, the fracture driving force is comparable to the fracture resistance of the coating found in the toughness test. In addition, the major driving force for fracture derives from the thermal insulating effect across the crack faces rather than the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion. The authors have also investigated the effects of functionally graded material (FGM) within TBCs and found its influences on the fracture parameters to be small. This result implies that the FGM may not contribute toward enhancing the fracture toughness of the TBCs considered here

  18. High strain rate mechanical response of buttress-grooved tensile specimens which have undergone environmental exposure

    Weirick, L.J.

    1976-07-01

    The purpose of the corrosion compatibility program was to identify the effect of corrosion on the mechanical performance of the buttress-grooved section of the 105-mm penetrator, a section which must sustain a load during launch. It is important that the environment not deteriorate the mechanical integrity of these grooves during long-term storage. Both coated and uncoated test specimens which simulate both geometrical shape and residual stress patterns were exposed to corrosive environments of moist air, distilled water, and salt water. Some of these tests also incorporated the galvanic coupling caused by the aluminum sabot. After exposure to the corrosive environments, the specimens were pulled on a high strain rate tensile machine which simulated launch conditions. Results show that the galvanic coupling due to the aluminum sabot caused no deterioration of mechanical properties. Results do indicate that the coating applied caused a significant reduction in the fracture load. There was a dichotomy in the results as affected by the environment. Uncoated test specimens showed no change in fracture load with increasing severity of corrosion environment, whereas the coated specimens indicated a trend of decreasing load-bearing ability with increasing corrosion

  19. Effects of boron addition on tensile and Charpy impact properties in high-phosphorous steels

    Hong, Seokmin; Lee, Junghoon [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyong Su [Next Generation Products Research Group, Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, Pohang 790-785 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sunghak, E-mail: shlee@postech.ac.kr [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide a new possibility for improving the steel-making productivity by fabricating plain carbon steels containing high phosphorous (P), effects of microstructures on tensile and Charpy impact properties were investigated in this study. Nine plain carbon steels were fabricated by controlling the addition of P and boron (B), and isothermal or quench heat-treatments were conducted on these steels to make ferrite–bainite-based or martensite-based microstructures. The addition of B positively influenced the grain refinement and the formation of bainites, thereby leading to the increase in strength. The upper shelf energy (USE) decreased with increasing P content, while the energy transition temperature (ETT) increased, in all the steels. The B addition beneficially affected both the USE and ETT as the dimpled ductile fracture mode prevailed in the B-added steels. This was because B preferentially covered grain boundaries, which reduced the grain boundary segregation of P. Thus, it effectively suppressed the intergranular fracture due to the segregation of P. According to the fractographic results, the increased tendency of intergranular fracture mode was observable in the 20-ppm-B-added steels rather than in the 10-ppm-B-added steels. When an excess amount of B, e.g., 20 ppm of B, was added, the severe segregation of B on grain boundaries occurred, and led to the precipitation of boro-carbides, which could act as intergranular crack initiation sites.

  20. High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of Silver Nanowires: Rate-Dependent Brittle-to-Ductile Transition.

    Ramachandramoorthy, Rajaprakash; Gao, Wei; Bernal, Rodrigo; Espinosa, Horacio

    2016-01-13

    The characterization of nanomaterials under high strain rates is critical to understand their suitability for dynamic applications such as nanoresonators and nanoswitches. It is also of great theoretical importance to explore nanomechanics with dynamic and rate effects. Here, we report in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) tensile testing of bicrystalline silver nanowires at strain rates up to 2/s, which is 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in the literature. The experiments are enabled by a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) with fast response time. It was identified that the nanowire plastic deformation has a small activation volume (ductile failure mode transition was observed at a threshold strain rate of 0.2/s. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that along the nanowire, dislocation density and spatial distribution of plastic regions increase with increasing strain rate. Furthermore, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations show that deformation mechanisms such as grain boundary migration and dislocation interactions are responsible for such ductility. Finally, the MD and experimental results were interpreted using dislocation nucleation theory. The predicted yield stress values are in agreement with the experimental results for strain rates above 0.2/s when ductility is pronounced. At low strain rates, random imperfections on the nanowire surface trigger localized plasticity, leading to a brittle-like failure.

  1. PDS 1-5. Divertor heat sink materials pre- and post-neutron irradiation. Tensile and fatigue tests of brazed joints of molybdenum alloys and 316L stainless steel

    Lind, Anders.

    1994-01-01

    Tensile specimens from brazed joints of molybdenum alloys (TZM or Mo-5%Re) and Type 316L austenitic stainless steel tubes have been tested at ambient temperature and 127 degrees C before and after neutron irradiation at about 40 degrees C to approximately 0.2 dpa. The unirradiated specimens showed generally ductile behaviour, but the irradiated specimens were notch sensitive and failed in a brittle manner with zero elongation; in all cases the fracture occurred in the molybdenum alloy. The brittle behaviour is consistent with previously published data and results from the increase in strength (radiation hardening) and the associated increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (radiation embrittlement) induced in the body-centered-cubic (BCC) molybdenum alloys by irradiation to relatively low displacement doses. The same type of irradiated specimens were also used in fatigue tests. However, the results from the fatigue tests are too limited and complementary studies are needed. During exposure to water locally up to 25% of the wall thickness of the Mo-alloys has corroded away. These observations cast serious doubts on the viability of the molybdenum alloys for divertor applications in fusion systems. 8 refs, 29 figs

  2. Effect of oxyanions on the IGSCC inhibition of sensitized 304 stainless steel in high temperature water

    Tsuge, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Junichiro; Nagano, Hiroo.

    1983-01-01

    Effect of oxyanions such as MoO 4 2- , WO 4 2- , and CrO 4 2- on the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel in high temperature water was studied. The results obtained are as follows: 1) Addition of such oxyanion as MoO 4 2- , WO 4 2- , and CrO 4 2- suppresses IGSCC of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel in high temperature nondeaerated water. The effectiveness of the inhibitive action by the oxyanion is ranked in the order of MoO 4 2- >WO 4 2- >CrO 4 2- . 2) The mechanism of IGSCC inhibition by MoO 4 2- ion for sentized Type 304 stainless steel in high temperature water is considered as follows, i.e., the presence MoO 4 2- ion decreases the dissolution rate of Cr depleted zone at grain boundaries to the level of matrix by helping the formation of the Cr rich film containing MoO 3 or adsorbed MoO 4 2- ion on the surface of Type 304 stainless steel. (author)

  3. Crack growth in an austenitic stainless steel at high temperature

    Polvora, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    This study deals with crack propagation at 650 deg C on an austenitic stainless steel referenced by Z2 CND 17-12 (316L(NN)). It is based on an experimental work concerning two different cracked specimens: CT specimens tested at 650 deg C in fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue with load controlled conditions (27 tests), tube specimens containing an internal circumferential crack tested in four points bending with displacement controlled conditions (10 tests). Using the fracture mechanics tools (K, J and C* parameters), the purpose here is to construct a methodology of calculation in order to predict the evolution of a crack with time for each loading condition using a fracture mechanics global approach. For both specimen types, crack growth is monitored by using a specific potential drop technique. In continuous fatigue, a material Paris law at 650 deg C is used to correlate crack growth rate with the stress intensity factor range corrected with a factor U(R) in order to take into account the effects of crack closure and loading ratio R. In pure creep on CT specimens, crack growth rate is correlated to the evolution of the C* parameter (evaluated experimentally) which can be estimated numerically with FEM calculations and analytically by using a simplified method based on a reference stress approach. A modeling of creep fatigue growth rate is obtained from a simple summation of the fatigue contribution and the creep contribution to the total crack growth. Good results are obtained when C* parameter is evaluated from the simplified expression C* s . Concerning the tube specimens tested in 4 point bending conditions, a simulation based on the actual A 16 French guide procedure proposed at CEA. (authors)

  4. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of copper alloys and their HIP joints with austenitic stainless steel in unirradiated and neutron irradiated condition

    Taehtinen, S.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile strength and ductility of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys decreased continuously with increasing temperature up to 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 alloy decreased continuously with increasing temperature from 20 deg C to 350 deg C whereas the fracture toughness of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy remained almost constant at temperatures up to 100 deg C, was decreased significantly at 200 deg C and slightly increased at 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of HIP joints were lower than that of corresponding copper alloy and fracture path in HIP joint specimen was always within copper alloy side of the joint. Neutron irradiation to a dose level of 0.3 dpa resulted in hardening and reduction in uniform elongation to about 2-4% at 200 deg C in both copper alloys. At higher temperatures softening was observed and uniform elongation increased to about 5% and 16% for CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys, respectively. Fracture toughness of CuAl25 IG0 alloy reduced markedly due to neutron irradiation in the temperature range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated CuCrZr alloy also decreased in the range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C, although it remained almost unaffected at temperatures below 200 deg C and decreased significantly at 350 deg C when compared with that of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy. (orig.)

  5. Direct observation of radial distribution change during tensile deformation of metallic glass by high energy X-ray diffraction method

    Nasu, Toshio, E-mail: nasu@kekexafs.kj.yamagata-u.ac.j [Faculty of Education, Arts and Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Sasaki, Motokatsu [Faculty of Education, Arts and Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Usuki, Takeshi; Sekine, Mai [Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Takigawa, Yorinobu; Higashi, Kenji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Harima Science Garden City, Sayo town, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Sakurai, Masaki; Wei Zhang; Inoue, Akihisa [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-08-26

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the micro-mechanism of deformation behavior of metallic glasses. We report the results of direct observations of short-range and medium-range structural change during tensile deformation of metallic glasses by high energy X-ray diffraction method. Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and Ni{sub 30}Zr{sub 70} metallic glass samples in the ribbon shape (1.5 mm width and 25 mum) were made by using rapid quenching method. Tensile deformation added to the sample was made by using special equipment adopted for measuring the high energy X-ray diffraction. The peaks in pair distribution function g(r) for Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and N{sub 30}iZr{sub 70} metallic glasses move zigzag into front and into rear during tensile deformation. These results of direct observation on atomic distribution change for Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and Ni{sub 30}Zr{sub 70} metallic glass ribbons during tensile deformation suggest that the micro-relaxations occur.

  6. Effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded high strength aluminium alloy

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reveals the effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded AA7075 aluminium alloy. This alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. As welded joint strength is much lower than the base metal strength and hence, a simple aging treatment has been given to improve the tensile strength of the joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Post weld aging treatment is accompanied by an increase in tensile strength and tensile ductility

  7. Properties of aluminum alloys tensile, creep, and fatigue data at high and low temperatures

    1999-01-01

    This book compiles more than 300 tables listing typical average properties of a wide range of aluminum alloys. The individual test results were compiled, plotted in various ways, and analyzed. The average values from the tensile and creep tests were then normalized to the published typical room-temperature tensile properties of the respective alloys for easy comparison. This extensive project was done by Alcoa Laboratories over a period of several years. The types of data presented include: Typical Mechanical Properties of Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys at Various Temperatures, including tensile properties at subzero temperatures, at temperature after various holding times at the test temperature, and at room temperature after exposure at various temperatures for various holding times; creep rupture strengths for various times at various temperatures; stresses required to generate various amounts of creep in various lengths of time; rotating-beam fatigue strengths; modulus of elasticity as a function of t...

  8. Highly porous, low elastic modulus 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by selective laser melting.

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Machová, Markéta; Fousová, Michaela; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Fojt, Jaroslav; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-12-01

    Recently, porous metallic materials have been extensively studied as candidates for use in the fabrication of scaffolds and augmentations to repair trabecular bone defects, e.g. in surroundings of joint replacements. Fabricating these complex structures by using common approaches (e.g., casting and machining) is very challenging. Therefore, rapid prototyping techniques, such as selective laser melting (SLM), have been investigated for these applications. In this study, we characterized a highly porous (87 vol.%) 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by SLM. 316L steel was chosen because it presents a biomaterial still widely used for fabrication of joint replacements and, from the practical point of view, use of the same material for fabrication of an augmentation and a joint replacement is beneficial for corrosion prevention. The results are compared to the reported properties of two representative nonporous 316L stainless steels prepared either by SLM or casting and subsequent hot forging. The microstructural and mechanical properties and the surface chemical composition and interaction with the cells were investigated. The studied material exhibited mechanical properties that were similar to those of trabecular bone (compressive modulus of elasticity ~0.15GPa, compressive yield strength ~3MPa) and cytocompatibility after one day that was similar to that of wrought 316L stainless steel, which is a commonly used biomaterial. Based on the obtained results, SLM is a suitable method for the fabrication of porous 316L stainless steel scaffolds with highly porous structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High temperature crack initiation in an austenitic stainless steel

    Laiarinandrasana, Lucien

    1994-01-01

    The study deals with crack initiation at 600 deg. C and 650 deg. C, on an austenitic stainless steel referenced by Z2 CND 17 12. The behaviour laws of the studied plate were updated in comparison with existing data. Forty tests were carried out on CT specimens, with continuous fatigue with load or displacement controlled, pure creep, pure relaxation, creep-fatigue and creep-relaxation loadings. The practical initiation definition corresponds to a small crack growth of about the grain size, monitored by electrical potential drop technique. The time necessary for the crack to initiate is predicted with fracture mechanics global and local approaches, with the help of microstructural observations and finite element results. An identification of a 'Paris' law' for continuous cyclic loading and of a unique correlation between the initiation time and C h * for creep tests was established. For the local approach, crack initiation by creep can be interpreted as the reaching of a critical damage level, by using a damage incremental rule. For creep-fatigue tests, crack growth rates at initiation are greater than those of Paris' law for continuous fatigue. A calculation of a transition time between elastic-plastic and creep domains shows that crack initiation can be interpreted whether by providing Paris' law with an acceleration term when the dwell period is less than the transition time, or by calculating a creep contribution which relies on C h * parameter when the dwell period and/or the initiation times are greater than the transition time. Creep relaxation tests present crack growth rates at initiation which are less than those for 'equivalent' creep-fatigue tests. These crack growth rates decrease when increasing hold time, but also when temperature decreases. Though, for hold times which are important enough and at lower temperature, there is no effect of the dwell period insofar as crack growth rate is equal to continuous fatigue

  10. Crack initiation at high temperature on an austenitic stainless steel

    Laiarinandrasana, L.

    1994-01-01

    The study deals with crack initiation at 600 degrees Celsius and 650 degrees Celsius, on an austenitic stainless steel referenced by Z2 CND 17 12. The behaviour laws of the studied plate were update in comparison with existing data. Forty tests were carried out on CT specimens, with continuous fatigue with load or displacement controlled, pure creep, pure relaxation, creep-fatigue and creep-relaxation loadings. The practical initiation definition corresponds to a small crack growth of about the grain size, monitored by electrical potential drop technique. The time necessary for the crack to initiate is predicted with fracture mechanics global and local approaches, with the helps of microstructural observations and finite elements results. An identification of a 'Paris'law' for continuous cyclic loading and of a unique correlation between the initiation time and C * k for creep tests was established. For the local approach, crack initiation by creep can be interpreted as the reaching of a critical damage level, by using a damage incremental rule. For creep-fatigue tests, crack growth rates at initiation are greater than those of Paris'law for continuous fatigue. A calculation of a transition time between elastic-plastic and creep domains shows that crack initiation can be interpreted whether by providing Paris'law with an acceleration term when the dwell period is less than the transition time, or by calculating a creep contribution which relies on C * k parameter when the dwell period and/or the initiation times are greater than the transition time. Creep relaxation tests present crack growth rates at initiation which are less than those for 'equivalent' creep-fatigue tests. These crack growth rates when increasing hold time, but also when temperature decreases. Though, for hold times which are important enough and at lower temperature, there is no effect of the dwell period insofar as crack growth rate is equal to continuous fatigue Paris law predicted ones

  11. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    Wei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been found to play an important role for this HSSS due to load transfer and strain partitioning between two phases, and a higher strain rate could cause even higher strain partitioning in the softer austenite grains, delaying the deformation instability. Deformation twins are observed in the austenite grains at all strain rates to facilitate the uniform tensile deformation. The B2 phase (FeAl intermetallic compound is less deformable at higher strain rates, resulting in easier brittle fracture in B2 particles, smaller dimple size and a higher density of phase interfaces in final fracture surfaces. Thus, more energy need be consumed during the final fracture for the experiments conducted at higher strain rates, resulting in better tensile toughness.

  12. Mechanical characterization of polymers and composites with a servohydraulic high-speed tensile tester

    Béguelin, Ph.; Barbezat, M.; Kausch, H. H.

    1991-12-01

    This study is concerned with the measurement of the mechanical behaviour of polymers and composites at intermediate strain rates. It illustrates with two examples, the application of a high speed servohydraulic testing machine and a newly designed optical extensometer. In the first part of the study, the dynamic nature of high speed tensile testing with servohydraulic apparatus is discussed, and a damping technique is proposed. In the second part, this technique has been applied to the measurement of the tensile properties of annealed and unannealed neat PEEK at strain rates between 3 × 10^{-2} and 2,4 × 10^2 s^{-1}. Both materials show increased yield stress and drawing stress with increasing strain rate. However, annealed specimens have been shown to exhibit superior mechanical properties. In the third part, mode I delamination tests have been performed on unidirectional IM6/PEEK composites at nominal strain rates between 1 × 10^{-6} and 8 × 10^{-1} s^{-1}. At the higher velocities the analysis is performed by means of FFT filtering. A moderate reduction in interlaminar fracture toughness was found with increasing loading rate. Cette étude aborde la mesure des propriétés mécaniques des polymères et composites soumis à des vitesses de déformation moyennes. Elle illustre au travers de deux exemples l'utilisation d'une machine d'essais servo-hydraulique à grande vitesse. Elle présente également un capteur optique d'extensométrie de conception nouvelle. Dans la première partie de l'étude, la nature vibratoire des essais de traction à vitesse élevée réalisés sur une machine servo-hydraulique est discutée, et une technique d'amortissement est proposée. Dans une deuxième partie, cette technique est appliquée à l'étude des propriétés en traction du PEEK non recuit et recuit dans le domaine des vitesses de déformation de 3 × 10^{-2} à 2,4 × 10^2 s^{-1}. Les résultats montrent un accroissement systématique de la contrainte au seuil

  13. Material property changes of stainless steels under PWR irradiation

    Fukuya, Koji; Nishioka, Hiromasa; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Kamaya, Masayuki; Miura, Terumitsu; Torimaru, Tadahiko

    2009-01-01

    Structural integrity of core structural materials is one of the key issues for long and safe operation of pressurized water reactors. The stainless steel components are exposed to neutron irradiation and high-temperature water, which cause significant property changes and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in some cases. Understanding of irradiation induced material property changes is essential to predict integrity of core components. In the present study, microstructure and microchemistry, mechanical properties, and IASCC behavior were examined in 316 stainless steels irradiated to 1 - 73 dpa in a PWR. Dose-dependent changes of dislocation loops and cavities, grain boundary segregation, tensile properties and fracture mode, deformation behavior, and their interrelation were discussed. Tensile properties and deformation behavior were well coincident with microstructural changes. IASCC susceptibility under slow strain rate tensile tests, IASCC initiation under constant load tests in simulated PWR primary water, and their relationship to material changes were discussed. (author)

  14. A Short review on wrought austenitic stainless steels at high temperatures: processing, microstructure, properties and performance

    Ronald Lesley Plaut

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Wrought austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high temperature applications. This short review discusses initially the processing of this class of steels, with emphasis on solidification and hot working behavior. Following, a brief summary is made on the precipitation behavior and the numerous phases that may appear in their microstructures. Creep and oxidation resistance are, then, briefly discussed, and finalizing their performance is compared with other high temperature metallic materials.

  15. Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding welds obtained with new high Cr–Mo ferritic stainless steel filler wires

    Villaret, V.; Deschaux-Beaume, F.; Bordreuil, C.; Fras, G.; Chovet, C.; Petit, B.; Faivre, L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • New metal cored filler wires for welding 444 grade stainless steel are manufactured. • The effect of Nb and Ti minor elements on the fusion zone properties is investigated. • The relation between composition of fusion zone and grain structure is investigated. • Oxidation rates of fusion zones and base metal are compared. • High temperature behavior of the welded samples are studied. - Abstract: Several compositions of metal cored filler wire were manufactured to define the best welding conditions for homogeneous welding, by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process, of a modified AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel dedicated to automotive exhaust manifold applications. The patented grade is know under APERAM trade name K44X and has been developed to present improved high temperature fatigue properties. All filler wires investigated contained 19% Cr and 1.8% Mo, equivalent to the base metal K44X chemistry, but various titanium and niobium contents. Chemical analyses and microstructural observations of fusion zones revealed the need of a minimum Ti content of 0.15% to obtain a completely equiaxed grain structure. This structure conferred on the fusion zone a good ductility even in the as-welded state at room temperature. Unfortunately, titanium additions decreased the oxidation resistance at 950 °C if no significant Nb complementary alloying was made. The combined high Ti and Nb additions made it possible to obtain for the welded structure, after optimized heat treatment, high temperature tensile strengths and ductility for the fusion zones and assemblies, rather close to those of the base metal. 950 °C aging heat treatment was necessary to restore significantly the ductility of the as welded structure. Both fusion zone and base metal presented rather homogenized properties. Finally, with the optimized composition of the cored filler wire – 0.3 Ti minimum (i.e. 0.15% in the fusion zone) and high Nb complementary additions, the properties

  16. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  17. Assessment of high-strength stainless steel weldments for fusion energy applications

    Alexander, D.J.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    Primary design considerations for the Compact Ignition Tokomak fusion reactor magnet cases are yield strength and toughness in the temperature range from liquid nitrogen to room temperature (77 to 300K). Type 21-6-9 stainless steel, also known as Nitronic 40, is the proposed alloy for this application. This study documented the mechanical properties, including tensile yield strength and Charpy V-notch impact toughness, at 77K and room temperature, of weldments made using seven different filler metals. Six welds were made with filler metal added as cold filler wire using the argon-shielded gas tungsten arc welding process. Filler metals included Nitronic 35W and 40W, 21-6-9, ERNiCr-3 (Inconel 82), ERNiCrMo-3 (Inconel 625), and Inconel 625 PLUS. All welds were prepared with a double-groove butt-weld geometry. At room temperature, all of the filler metals had yield strengths which exceeded the base metal. However, at 77K only the Nitronics and the 21-6-9 filler metals exceeded the base metals, and the Inconel filler metals were significantly weaker. The impact properties of the weld metals were very good at room temperature, with the exception of Inconel 625. At 77K, impact toughness was greatly reduced for all of the filler metals with the exception of Inconel 82. This alloy had excellent toughness at both temperatures. The severe drop in the impact toughness of the Nitronic and 21-6-9 filler metals was attributed to the amount of ferrite present in these welds. At 77K, fracture occurred by a cleavage mechanism in the ferrite regions which allowed the crack to grow readily. The fully austenitic Inconel 82 material fractured by a microvoid coalescence mode at either test temperature. These results indicate that the Inconel 82 filler metal is the preferred material for welding 21-6-o stainless steel for this application

  18. Thermal Plasma Spheroidization of High-Nitrogen Stainless Steel Powder Alloys Synthesized by Mechanical Alloying

    Razumov, Nikolay G.; Popovich, Anatoly A.; Wang, QingSheng

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies on the treatment of Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys, synthesized by the mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental powders in the flow of a thermal plasma. Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys were prepared by MA in the attritor under an argon atmosphere. For spheroidization of Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys, the TekSphero 15 plant manufactured by Tekna Plasma Systems Inc was used. The studies have shown the possibility of obtaining Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen spherical powders steel alloys from the powder obtained by MA. According to the results of a series of experiments, it was found that the results of plasma spheroidization of powders essentially depend on the size of the fraction due to some difference in the particle shape and flowability, and on the gas regime of the plasma torch. It is established that during the plasma spheroidization process, some of the nitrogen leaves the alloy. The loss rate of nitrogen depends on the size of the initial particles.

  19. Fractography evaluation of impact and tensile specimens from the HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1989-10-01

    The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has performed a fractographic examination of neutron irradiated and unirradiated tensile and Charpy ''V'' notch specimens. The evaluation was carried out using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to evaluate the fracture mode. Photomicrographs were then evaluated to determine the extent of ductility present on the fracture surfaces of the unirradiated specimens. Ductility area measurements ranged from 4.6--9.5% on typical photomicrographs examined. 12 figs

  20. High Temperature Tensile Properties of Unirradiated and Neutron Irradiated 20 Cr-35 Ni Austenitic Steel

    Roy, R B; Solly, B

    1966-12-15

    The tensile properties of an unirradiated and neutron irradiated (at 40 deg C) 20 % Cr, 35 % Ni austenitic steel have been studied at 650 deg C, 750 deg C and 820 deg C. The tensile elongation and mode of fracture (transgranular) of unirradiated specimens tested at room temperature and 650 deg C are almost identical. At 750 deg C and 820 deg C the elongation decreases considerably and a large part of the total elongation is non-uniform. Furthermore, the mode of fracture at these temperatures is intergranular and microscopic evidence suggests that fracture is caused by formation and linkup of grain boundary cavities. YS and UTS decrease monotonically with temperature. Irradiated specimens show a further decrease in ductility and an increase in the tendency to grain boundary cracking. Irradiation has no significant effect on the YS, but the UTS are reduced. The embrittlement of the irradiated specimens is attributed to the presence of He and Li atoms produced during irradiation and the possible mechanisms are discussed. Prolonged annealing of irradiated and unirradiated specimens at 650 deg C appears to have no significant effect on tensile properties.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in high temperature and high pressure water

    Uragami, Ken

    1977-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels used in for equipment in chemical plants have failed owing to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). These failures brought about great problems in some cases. The failures were caused by chloride, sulfide and alkali solution environment, in particular, by chloride solution environment. It was known that SCC was caused not only by high content chloride solution such as 42% MgCl 2 solution but also by high temperature water containing Cl - ions as NaCl. In order to estimate quantitatively the effects of some factors on SCC in high temperature water environment, the effects of Cl - ion contents, oxygen partial pressure (increasing in proportion to dissolved oxygen), pH and temperature were investigated. Moreover SCC sensitivity owing to the difference of materials and heat treatments was also investigated. The experimental results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) Regarding the effect of contaminant Cl - ions in proportion as Cl - ion contents increased, the material life extremely decreased owing to SCC. The tendency of decreasing was affected by the level of oxygen partial pressure. (2) Three regions of SCC sensitivity existed and they depended upon oxygen partial pressure. These were a region that did not show SCC sensitivity, a region of the highest SCC sensitivity and a region of somewhat lower SCC sensitivity. (3) In the case of SUS304 steel and 500 ppm Cl - ion contents SCC did not occur at 150 0 C, but it occurred and caused failures at 200 0 C and 250 0 C. (auth.)

  2. Mechanical analysis of ferritic stainless steel applied in radiation tubes in high temperature; Analise mecanica de acos inoxidaveis ferriticos aplicados em tubos de radiacao em altas temperaturas

    Moreto, J.A.; Ponte, H.A.; Oliveira, V.L.; Silva, C.A. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Nowadays Brazilian oil refineries face an important challenge: to adjust their units to the processing of more aggressive crudes. The use of this kind of oil has caused an increase on corrosion on process streams in high temperatures. This study's objective is to evaluate the changes in mechanic properties and phases processing occurred in tubes from de radiation furnaces type A268/446 Tp ferritic stainless steel tubes used in conditions of high temperatures. For comparison samples of the APM/Kanthal alloy tube were examined. Hot tensile tests were performed in the studied materials evidence bodies. The evidence bodies for the hot tensile tests were extracted from the longitudinal position of the tubes and were machined with cylindrical shape with threads. There was a series of trials for each tube (at different traction speeds) at temperature of 600 deg C. With the traction test it was possible to evaluate resistance and ductility characteristics and was used to establish criteria for quality control to ensure satisfactory performance in certain applications. Data testing creep were performed in the evidence bodies taken from the longitudinal position of the tubes in constant charge form. Data testing creep were executed in the constant stress mode at various levels of temperature. Through data testing creep it was possible to predict for how long the material is good for use. Data from testing creep were treated by the method of Larson and Miller. (author)

  3. Frictional characteristics of stainless steel 440C lubricated with water at pressurized high temperature

    Kim, E. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    The fatigue life of stainless steel bearings is one of the most critical factors to determine the performance of the driving system. Because the bearings which are installed on the driving mechanism in the nuclear reactor are operated at high temperature and high pressure and especially lubricated with water with low viscosity, the friction and wear characteristics of the bearing material should be investigated thoroughly. In many control element drive mechanisms in the nuclear reactor the support bearings are made of the stainless steel and the sliding bearing ceramic material mainly. This study is focused on the characteristics of support bearing which may be used in the SMART. The ball bearings are made of standardized 440C stainless steel, and it supports thrust load including the weight of the driving system and external force. The friction and wear characteristics of this material operating under severe lubrication condition are not well known yet, however it will be changed with respect to temperature and boundary pressure. In this paper the friction characteristics are investigated experimentally using the reciprocating tribometer which can simulate the SMART operating conditions. Highly purified water is used as lubricant, and the water is warmed up and pressurized. Friction forces on the reciprocating specimens are measured insitu strain gages

  4. High strain rate and quasi-static tensile behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V after cyclic damage

    Verleysen P.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is common that energy absorbing structural elements are subjected to a number of loading cycles before a crash event. Several studies have shown that previous fatigue can significantly influence the tensile properties of some materials, and hence the behaviour of structural elements made of them. However, when the capacity of absorbing energy of engineering materials is determined, fresh material without any fatigue damage is most often used. This study investigates the effect of fatigue damage on the dynamic tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V in thin-sheet form. Results are completed with tests at quasi-static strain rates and observations of the fracture surfaces, and compared with results obtained from other alloys and steel grades. The experiments show that the dynamic properties of Ti-6Al-4V are not affected by a number of fatigue loading cycles high enough to significantly reduce the energy absorbing capabilities of EDM machined samples.

  5. Tensile behaviour at room and high temperatures of novel metal matrix composites based on hyper eutectic Al-Si alloys

    Valer, J.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Urcola, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    This work shows the improvement obtained on tensile stress at room and high temperatures of hyper eutectic Al-Si alloys. These alloys are produced by a combination of spray-forming, extrusion and thixoforming process, in comparison with conventional casting alloys.Al-25% Si-5%Cu. Al-25%Si-5%Cu-2%Mg and Al-30%Si-5%Cu alloys have been studied relating their microstructural parameters with tensile stress obtained and comparing them with conventional Al-20%Si. Al-36%Si and Al-50%Si alloys. Al-25%Si-5%Cu alloy-was tested before and after semi-solid forming, in order to distinguish the different behaviour of this alloy due to the different microstructure. The properties obtained with these alloys were also related to Al-SiC composites formed by similar processes. (Author) 20 refs

  6. Influence of the Martensitic Transformation on the Microscale Plastic Strain Heterogeneities in a Duplex Stainless Steel

    Lechartier, Audrey; Martin, Guilhem; Comby, Solène; Roussel-Dherbey, Francine; Deschamps, Alexis; Mantel, Marc; Meyer, Nicolas; Verdier, Marc; Veron, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    The influence of the martensitic transformation on microscale plastic strain heterogeneity of a duplex stainless steel has been investigated. Microscale strain heterogeneities were measured by digital image correlation during an in situ tensile test within the SEM. The martensitic transformation was monitored in situ during tensile testing by high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A clear correlation is shown between the plasticity-induced transformation of austenite to martensite and the development of plastic strain heterogeneities at the phase level.

  7. Utilization of aluminum to obtaining a duplex type stainless steel using high energy ball milling

    Pavlak, I.E.; Cintho, O.M.; Capocchi, J.D.T.

    2010-01-01

    The obtaining of stainless steel using aluminum in its composition - FeMnAl system, has been researches subject since the sixties, by good mechanical properties and resistance to oxidation presented, when compared with conventional FeNiCr stainless steel system. In another point, the aluminum and manganese are low cost then traditional elements. This work, metallic powders of iron, manganese and pure aluminum, were processed in a Spex type high-energy ball mill in nitrogen atmosphere. The milling products were compressed into pastille form and sintered under inert atmosphere. The final products were characterized by optical and electronic microscopy and microhardness test. The metallographic analysis shows a typical austenite and ferrite duplex type microstructure. The presence of these phases was confirmed according X ray diffraction analysis. (author)

  8. An Investigation into Stress Corrosion Cracking of Dissimilar Metal Welds with 304L Stainless Steel and Alloy 82 in High Temperature Pure Water

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Huang, Guan-Ru; Tsai, Chuen-Horng; Wang, Mei-Ya

    For a better understanding toward stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in dissimilar metal welds with 304L stainless steel and Alloy 82, the SCC growth behavior in the transition regions of weld joints was investigated via slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests in 280 oC pure water with a dissolve oxygen level of 300 ppb. Prior to the SSRT tests, samples with dissimilar metal welds were prepared and underwent various pretreatments, including post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), shot peening, solution annealing, and mechanical grinding. In addition to the SSRT tests, measurements of degree of sensitization and micro-hardness on the transition regions of the metal welds were also conducted. According to the test results, the samples having undergone PWHTs exhibited relatively high degrees of sensitization. Distinct decreases in hardness were observed in the heat-affected zones of the base metals in all samples. Furthermore, the fracture planes of all samples after the SSRT tests were located at the stainless steel sides and were in parallel with the fusion lines. Among the treating conditions investigated in this study, a PWHT would pose a detrimental effect on the samples in the aspects of mechanical property and degree of SCC. Solution annealing would lead to the greatest improvement in ductility and SCC retardation, and shot peening would provide the treated samples with a positive improvement in ductility and corrosion retardation, but not to a great extent.

  9. Development of Creep-Resistant and Oxidation-Resistant Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Applications

    Maziasz, Philip J.

    2018-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are cost-effective materials for high-temperature applications if they have the oxidation and creep resistance to withstand prolonged exposure at such conditions. Since 1990, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed advanced austenitic stainless steels with creep resistance comparable to Ni-based superalloy 617 at 800-900°C based on specially designed "engineered microstructures" utilizing a microstructure/composition database derived from about 20 years of radiation effect data on steels. The wrought high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened (HT-UPS) steels with outstanding creep resistance at 700-800°C were developed for supercritical boiler and superheater tubing for fossil power plants in the early 1990s, the cast CF8C-Plus steels were developed in 1999-2001 for land-based gas turbine casing and diesel engine exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications at 700-900°C, and, in 2015-2017, new Al-modified cast stainless steels with oxidation and creep resistance capabilities up to 950-1000°C were developed for automotive exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications. This article reviews and summarizes their development and their properties and applications.

  10. Martensitic transformation of type 304 stainless steel by high-energy ion implantation

    Chayahara, A.; Satou, M.; Nakashima, S.; Hashimoto, M.; Sasaki, T.; Kurokawa, M.; Kiyama, S.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of high-energy ion implantation on the structural changes of type 304 stainless steel were investigated. Gold, copper and silicon ions with an energy of 1.5 MeV was implanted into stainless steel. The fluences were in the range from 5x10 15 to 10 17 ions/cm 2 . It was found that the structure of stainless steel was transformed form the austenitic to the martensitic structure by these ion implantations. This structural change was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The depth profile of the irradiated ions was also analyzed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and glow discharge spectroscopy (GDS). The degree of martensitic transformation was found to be strongly dependent on the surface pretreatment, either mechanical or electrolytic polishing. When the surface damages or strains by mechanical polishing were present, the martensitic transformation was greatly accelerated presumably due to the combined action of ion irradiation and strain-enhanced transformation. Heavier ions exhibit a high efficiency for the transformation. (orig.)

  11. Residual strains in a stainless steel perforated plate subjected to reverse loading at high temperature

    Durelli, A.J.; Buitrago, J.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine strains in a stainless steel perforated plate subjected to a temperature of 1100 0 F and to a successively applied tensile and compressive in-plane loading sufficiently large to produce creep and plastic strains. The duration of the test was 1000 hours. Square grids of lines (at distance of 0.25 in.) and crossed-gratings (500 lines-per-inch) were engraved on both surfaces of the plate before the test. After the plate was unloaded and brought back to room temperature the grids were analyzed using traveling microscopes, and the gratings using the moire effect. Both Cartesian strains were determined from the moire isothetics along the axes of the plate, along the two lines tangent to the hole and parallel to those axes and along the edges of the plate. Grid measurements were made at specific points. The deformed shapes of the hole and of the plate are also given. It is estimated that strains larger than 0.001 can be determined with the techniques and methods used. (U.S.)

  12. Effect of test temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of wrought GlidCop AL25 (ITER grade zero, IGO) solutionized and aged CuCrZr, and cold-worked and aged and solutionized and aged Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500{degrees}C at strain rates between 4 x 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} and 0.06 s{sup {minus}1}. The measured room temperature electrical conductivity ranged from 64 to 90% IACS for the different alloys. All of the alloys were relatively insensitive to strain rate at room temperature, but the strain rate sensitivity of GlidCop Al25 increased significantly with increasing temperature. The CuNiBe alloys exhibited the best combination of high strength and high conductivity at room temperature. The strength of CuNiBe decreased slowly with increasing temperature. However, the ductility of CuNiBe decreased rapidly with increasing temperature due to localized deformation near grain boundaries, making these alloy heats unsuitable for typical structural applications above 300{degrees}C. The strength and uniform elongation of GlidCop Al25 decreased significantly with increasing temperature at a strain rate of 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}, whereas the total elongation was independent of test temperature. The strength and ductility of CuCrZr decreased slowly with increasing temperature.

  13. Evaluation of Joint Performance on High Nitrogen Stainless Steel Which is Expected to Have Higher Allergy Resistance

    Nakano, Kouichi

    Austenitic stainless steel, which includes nickel for stabilizing austenitic structure, is used for various purposes, for example, for structural material, corrosion-resistant material, biomaterial etc. Nickel is set as one of the rare metals and economizing on nickel as the natural resources is required. On the other hand, nickel is one of the metals that cause metallic allergy frequently. Therefore, high nitrogen stainless steel, where nitrogen stabilizes austenitic structure instead of nickel, has been developed in Japan and some of the foreign countries for the above reason. When high nitrogen stainless steel is fused and bonded, dissolved nitrogen is released to the atmospheric area, and some of the material properties will change. In this study, we bonded high nitrogen stainless steel by stud welding process, which is able to bond at short time, and we evaluate joint performance. We have got some interesting results from the other tests and examinations.

  14. Application and analysis of palladium vapor deposited on stainless steel for high temperature electrical contacts

    Jodeh, S.

    2008-01-01

    Using electron beam evaporation. Pd thin films of 300 nm thickness have been deposited on 301 stainless steel for high temperature electrical contact studies. The structure and compost ion of the helms were studied in detail x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (Sem), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S) with sputter depth profiling. The contact properties such as contact resistance, fretting wear resistance, and thermal stability have been measured.The contact resistance rem ins low after heat-aging in air for 168 h at 150 and 200 deg., but increases significantly after heat-aging at 340 deg.. This increase in contact resistance is caused by the formation of about a 27 nm (1 μin.) thick Pdo. In contrast, the thickness of the Pdo is too thin to cause measurable contact resistance increases after heat-aging at 150 and 200 deg.. The fretting wear resistance of Pd coated 301 stainless steel is better than that of electroplated Sn of ser veal thousand nm thickness. Thus, vapor deposited Pd coating on 301 stainless steel may replace electroplated Sn for electrical contact application at elevated temperatures.

  15. The stress corrosion cracking of type 316 stainless steel in oxygenated and chlorinated high temperature water

    Congleton, J.; Shih, H.C.; Shoji, T.; Parkins, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Slow strain rate stress corrosion tests have been performed on Type 316 stainless steel in 265 C water containing from 0 to 45 ppm oxygen and from < 0.1 to 1000 ppm chloride. The main difference between the present data and previously published results, the latter mainly for Type 304 stainless steel, is that as well as cracking occurring in water containing high oxygen and chloride, it is shown that a cracking regime exists at very low oxygen contents for a wide range of chloride contents. The type of cracking varies with the oxygen and chloride content of the water and the most severe cracking was of comparable extent in both the gauge length and the necked region of the specimen. The least severe cracking only caused cracks to occur in the necked region of the specimen and there was a range of oxygen and chloride contents in which no cracking occurred. The rest potential for annealed Type 316 stainless steel has been mapped for a wide range of oxygen and chloride content waters and it is shown that at 265 C the 'no-cracking' regime of the oxygen-chloride diagram corresponds to potentials in the range -200 to +150 mV(SHE). (author)

  16. Nickel-based materials and high-alloy, special stainless steels. 2. new rev. and enl. ed.

    Heubner, U.; Brill, U.; Hoffmann, T.; Jasner, M.; Kirchheiner, R.; Koecher, R.; Richter, H.; Rockel, M.; White, F.

    1993-01-01

    The book is intended as a source of information on nickel-based materials and special stainless steels and apart from the up-to-date materials data presents information on recent developments and knowledge gained, so that it may be a valuable aid to materials engineers looking for cost-effective resolutions of their materials problems in the chemical process industry, power plant operation, and high-temperature applications. The book presents eight individual contributions entitled as follows: (1) Nickel-base alloys and high-alloy, special stainless steels. - Materials survey and data sheets (Ulrich Heubner). (2) Corrosion of nickel-base alloys and special stainless steels (Manfred Rockel). (3) Welding of nickel-base alloys and high-alloy, special stainless steels (Theo Hoffmann). (4) High-temperature resistant materials (Ulrich Brill). (5) Application and processing of nickel-base materials in the chemical process industry and in pollution abatement equipment (Reiner Koecher). (6) Selected examples of applications of nickel-base materials in chemical plant (Manfred Jasner, Frederick White). (7) Applications of nickel-base alloys and special stainless steels in power plant. (8) The use of nickel-base alloys and stainless steels in pollution abatement processes (R. Kirchheiner). (orig./MM). 151 figs., 226 refs [de

  17. Effect of ageing on phase evolution and mechanical properties of a high tungsten super-duplex stainless steel

    Akisanya, Alfred R.; Obi, Udoka; Renton, Neill C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Secondary phases precipitate in a high tungsten SDSS aged between 700 and 900 °C. ► The volume fraction of the sigma phase increases as the holding time increases. ► The evolution of the sigma phase agrees with Johnson–Mehl–Avrami kinetic model. ► The secondary phases enhance the Young's modulus, hardness and strength. ► The ductility decreased significantly with increasing amount of sigma phase. - Abstract: The effect of ageing temperature and holding time on the precipitation of secondary phases and the mechanical properties of a 25Cr–6.7Ni–0.32N–3.0Mo–2.5W super duplex stainless steel is examined. The ageing temperature was varied from 600 to 900 °C and the holding time was varied from 1 to 240 min. Two types of Cr and Mo enriched intermetallic phases, sigma (σ) and chi (χ), were found to precipitate preferentially at the ferrite/austenite interface and within the ferrite grain. The precipitation of the χ-phase occurred preferentially before the σ-phase. The concentration of these secondary phases, which was quantified by a combination of microscopy and image analysis, increases with increasing ageing temperature and holding time, leading to significant reduction in the uniform strain and enhancement of the modulus, hardness and yield and tensile strengths. The measured concentration of the precipitated sigma phase is in agreement with the prediction by the Johnson–Mehl–Avrami kinetic model.

  18. Tensile properties of unirradiated path A PCA

    Braski, D.N.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The tensile properties of PCA in the Al (solution annealed), A3 (25%-cold worked), and B2 (aged, cold worked, and reaged) conditions were determined from room temperature to 600 0 C. The tensile behavior of PCA-A1 and -A3 was generally similar to that of titanium-modified type 316 stainless steel with similar microstructures. The PCA-B2 was weaker than PCA-A3, especially above 500 0 C, but demonstrated slightly better ducility

  19. Comparison of the tensile bond strength of high-noble, noble, and base metal alloys bonded to enamel.

    Sen, D; Nayir, E; Pamuk, S

    2000-11-01

    Although the bond strengths of various resin composite luting materials have been reported in the literature, the evaluation of these systems with various cast alloys of different compositions has not been completely clarified. To evaluate the tensile bond strength of sandblasted high-noble, noble, and base metal alloys bonded to etched enamel by 2 different bonding agents of different chemical composition: Panavia-Ex (BIS-GMA) and Super-Bond (4-META acrylic). Flat enamel surfaces were prepared on buccal surfaces of 60 extracted noncarious human incisors. Teeth were divided into 3 groups of 20 each. Twenty circular disks of 5 mm diameter were prepared for casting for each group. Group I was cast with a high-noble, group II with a noble, and group III with a base metal alloy. The surfaces of the disks were sandblasted with 250 microm Al(2)O(3). Ten disks of each group were bonded to exposed enamel surfaces with Super-Bond and 10 disks with Panavia-Ex as recommended by the manufacturer. The tensile bond strength was measured with an Instron universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred. Two-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the results. The differences in bond strengths of Super-Bond and Panavia-Ex with different alloys were not significant. The highest bond strengths were obtained in base metal alloys, followed by noble and high-noble alloys. These results were significant. Panavia-Ex and Super-Bond exhibited comparable tensile bond strengths. For both luting agents, the highest bond strengths were achieved with base metal alloys and the lowest with high-noble alloys.

  20. Stainless steel component with compressed fiber Bragg grating for high temperature sensing applications

    Jinesh, Mathew; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2016-05-01

    A smart metal component having the potential for high temperature strain sensing capability is reported. The stainless steel (SS316) structure is made by selective laser melting (SLM). A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is embedded in to a 3D printed U-groove by high temperature brazing using a silver based alloy, achieving an axial FBG compression of 13 millistrain at room temperature. Initial results shows that the test component can be used for up to 700°C for sensing applications.

  1. On the High Temperature Deformation Behaviour of 2507 Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    Mishra, M. K.; Balasundar, I.; Rao, A. G.; Kashyap, B. P.; Prabhu, N.

    2017-02-01

    High temperature deformation behaviour of 2507 super duplex stainless steel was investigated by conducting isothermal hot compression tests. The dominant restoration processes in ferrite and austenite phases present in the material were found to be distinct. The possible causes for these differences are discussed. Based on the dynamic materials model, processing map was developed to identify the optimum processing parameters. The microstructural mechanisms operating in the material were identified. A unified strain-compensated constitutive equation was established to describe the high temperature deformation behaviour of the material under the identified processing conditions. Standard statistical parameter such as correlation coefficient has been used to validate the established equation.

  2. Compatibility of different stainless steels in molten Pb-Bi eutectic at high temperatures

    Chandra, K.; Kain, Vivekanand; Laik, A.; Sharma, B.P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Debnath, A.K.

    2005-10-01

    Advanced nuclear reactors and the accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) system require the structural materials to be in contact with the molten metals/lead-bismuth eutectic at 400 degC and higher temperatures. One of the primary concerns in using the molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) as a coolant in the primary circuit of these systems is the degradation of structural materials in contact with LBE. An experimental setup has been fabricated to expose the materials in the molten LBE at high temperatures in stagnant condition under inert atmosphere. Samples from five different stainless steels (types 304L, 316L, 403, duplex SS SAF 2205 and super austenitic SS 2RK65) were exposed in this setup at 450 degC for 200h and at 500 degC for 600 and 2100 h under argon atmosphere. A different setup was prepared in which type 316L SS tube in the as-welded condition was exposed in molten LBE at 500 degC for 1200 h in rotating condition. All the samples showed formation of oxide on their surfaces. The thickness and compositional profiles of these oxides analyzed by EPMA confirmed formation of a double layer oxide on type 316L SS. The oxide thickness was highest on SS 403, while it was lowest on 304L and 316L SS. SEM results showed dissolution of materials at the surface in Sandvik 2RK65 and preferential dissolution of austenite phase in duplex SS. None of the stainless steels, except the duplex and the super austenitic stainless steels, showed any localized or selective corrosion. The composition of LBE before and after the exposure tests was analyzed by XRF technique. The result showed presence of Fe, Cr and Ni in the used LBE but these elements were not present in the virgin Pb-Ei alloy. This showed that the corrosion of stainless steels in LBE at temperatures upto 500 degC is due to oxidation and dissolution of alloying elements through the oxide on stainless steels. (author)

  3. Low temperature high density plasma nitriding of stainless steel molds for stamping of oxide glasses

    Aizawa Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various kinds of stainless steels have been widely utilized as a die for mold- and direct-stamping processes of optical oxide glasses. Since they suffered from high temperature transients and thermal cycles in practice, they must be surface-treated by dry and wet coatings, or, by plasma nitriding. Martensitic stainless steel mold was first wet plated by the nickel phosphate (NiP, which was unstable at the high temperature stamping condition; and, was easy to crystalize or to fracture by itself. This issue of nuisance significantly lowered the productivity in fabrication of optical oxide-glass elements. In the present paper, the stainless steel mold was surface-treated by the low-temperature plasma nitriding. The nitrided layer by this surface modification had higher nitrogen solute content than 4 mass%; the maximum solid-solubility of nitrogen is usually 0.1 mass% in the equilibrium phase diagram. Owing to this solid-solution with high nitrogen concentration, the nitrided layer had high hardness over 1400 HV within its thickness of 50 μm without any formation of nitrides after plasma nitriding at 693 K for 14.4 ks. This plasma-nitrided mold was utilized for mold-stamping of two colored oxide glass plates at 833 K; these plates were successfully deformed and joined into a single glass plate by this stamping without adhesion or galling of oxide glasses onto the nitrided mold surface.

  4. High temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO2

    Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Syarif, Dani Gustaman

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate high temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel SS 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO 2 . The oxidation was performed at high temperatures ranging from 600 to 800°C. The oxidation time was 60 minutes. After oxidation the surface of the samples was analyzed by different methods including, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide scale formed during oxidation of stainless steel AISI 304 alloys is dominated by iron oxide, Fe 2 O 3 . Minor element such as Cr 2 O 3 is also appeared in the diffraction pattern. Characterization by optical microscope showed that cross section microstructure of stainless steel changed after oxidized with the oxide scale on the surface stainless steels. SEM and x-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide of ZrO 2 appeared on the surface of stainless steel. Kinetic rate of oxidation of austenite stainless steel AISI 304 showed that increasing oxidation temperature and time will increase oxidation rate

  5. High temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO2

    Prajitno, Djoko Hadi, E-mail: djokohp@batan.go.id; Syarif, Dani Gustaman, E-mail: djokohp@batan.go.id [Research Center for Nuclear Materials and Radiometry, Jl. Tamansari 71, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    The objective of this study is to evaluate high temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel SS 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO{sub 2}. The oxidation was performed at high temperatures ranging from 600 to 800°C. The oxidation time was 60 minutes. After oxidation the surface of the samples was analyzed by different methods including, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide scale formed during oxidation of stainless steel AISI 304 alloys is dominated by iron oxide, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Minor element such as Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} is also appeared in the diffraction pattern. Characterization by optical microscope showed that cross section microstructure of stainless steel changed after oxidized with the oxide scale on the surface stainless steels. SEM and x-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide of ZrO{sub 2} appeared on the surface of stainless steel. Kinetic rate of oxidation of austenite stainless steel AISI 304 showed that increasing oxidation temperature and time will increase oxidation rate.

  6. Strain direction dependency of martensitic transformation in austenitic stainless steels: The effect of gamma-texture

    Hilkhuijsen, P.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Akkerman, Remko

    2013-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile tests on both a non-textured and a highly textured, fully austenitic stainless steel were performed in both the rolling and the transverse directions. Both materials show mechanically induced phase transformation from the austenitic FCC to the martensitic BCC phase. Differences in

  7. Weldability of Stainless Steels

    Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    It gives an outline of metallographic properties of welding zone of stainless steels, generation and mechanisms of welding crack and decreasing of corrosion resistance of welding zone. It consists of seven chapters such as introduction, some kinds of stainless steels and properties, metallographic properties of welding zone, weld crack, toughness of welding zone, corrosion resistance and summary. The solidification modes of stainless steels, each solidification mode on the cross section of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy phase diagram, each solidification mode of weld stainless steels metal by electron beam welding, segregation state of alloy elements at each solidification mode, Schaeffler diagram, Delong diagram, effects of (P + S) mass content in % and Cr/Ni equivalent on solidification cracking of weld stainless steels metal, solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, effects of trace impurity elements on solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, ductile fracture susceptibility of weld austenitic stainless steels metal, effects of H2 and ferrite content on generation of crack of weld 25Cr-5N duplex stainless steels, effects of O and N content on toughness of weld SUS 447J1 metals, effect of ferrite content on aging toughness of weld austenitic stainless steel metal, corrosion morphology of welding zone of stainless steels, generation mechanism of knife line attack phenomenon, and corrosion potential of some kinds of metals in seawater at room temperature are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  8. Thermal stability of manganese-stabilized stainless steels

    Klueh, R.L.; Kenik, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work on a series of experimental high-manganese reduced-activation austenitic stainless steels demonstrated that they have improved tensile properties relative to type 316 stainless steel in both the annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Steels were tested with an Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C (in weight percent) base composition, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, P, and B were added. Tensile tests have now been completed on these steels after thermal aging at 600 degrees C. Thermal stability varied with composition, but the alloys were as stable or more stable than type 316 stainless steel. the strength of the annealed steels increased slightly after aging to 5000 h, while a strength decrease occurred for the cold worked steel. In both conditions, a steel containing a combination of all the alloying elements was most stable and had the best strength after thermal aging 5000 h at 600 degrees C. Despite having much higher strength than 316 stainless steel after aging, the ductility of the strongest experimental alloy was still as good as that of 316 stainless steel

  9. Preparation and High-temperature Anti-adhesion Behavior of a Slippery Surface on Stainless Steel.

    Zhang, Pengfei; Huawei, Chen; Liu, Guang; Zhang, Liwen; Zhang, Deyuan

    2018-03-29

    Anti-adhesion surfaces with high-temperature resistance have a wide application potential in electrosurgical instruments, engines, and pipelines. A typical anti-wetting superhydrophobic surface easily fails when exposed to a high-temperature liquid. Recently, Nepenthes-inspired slippery surfaces demonstrated a new way to solve the adhesion problem. A lubricant layer on the slippery surface can act as a barrier between the repelled materials and the surface structure. However, the slippery surfaces in previous studies rarely showed high-temperature resistance. Here, we describe a protocol for the preparation of slippery surfaces with high-temperature resistance. A photolithography-assisted method was used to fabricate pillar structures on stainless steel. By functionalizing the surface with saline, a slippery surface was prepared by adding silicone oil. The prepared slippery surface maintained the anti-wetting property for water, even when the surface was heated to 300 °C. Also, the slippery surface exhibited great anti-adhesion effects on soft tissues at high temperatures. This type of slippery surface on stainless steel has applications in medical devices, mechanical equipment, etc.

  10. High dose stainless steel swelling data on interior and peripheral oxide fuel pins

    Boltax, A.; Foster, J.P.; Nayak, U.P.

    1983-01-01

    High dose (2 x 10 23 n/cm 2 , E > 0.1 Mev) swelling data obtained on 20% cold-worked AISI 316 stainless steel (N-lot) cladding from mixed-oxide fuel pins show large differences in swelling incubation dose due to pre-incubation dose temperature changes. Circumferential swelling variations of 1.5 to 4 times were found in peripheral fuel pin cladding which experienced 30 to 60 deg C temperature changes due to movement in a temperature gradient. Consideration is given to the implications of these results to low swelling materials development and core design. (author)

  11. Pyrolytic carbon-coated stainless steel felt as a high-performance anode for bioelectrochemical systems.

    Guo, Kun; Hidalgo, Diana; Tommasi, Tonia; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-07-01

    Scale up of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) requires highly conductive, biocompatible and stable electrodes. Here we present pyrolytic carbon-coated stainless steel felt (C-SS felt) as a high-performance and scalable anode. The electrode is created by generating a carbon layer on stainless steel felt (SS felt) via a multi-step deposition process involving α-d-glucose impregnation, caramelization, and pyrolysis. Physicochemical characterizations of the surface elucidate that a thin (20±5μm) and homogenous layer of polycrystalline graphitic carbon was obtained on SS felt surface after modification. The carbon coating significantly increases the biocompatibility, enabling robust electroactive biofilm formation. The C-SS felt electrodes reach current densities (jmax) of 3.65±0.14mA/cm(2) within 7days of operation, which is 11 times higher than plain SS felt electrodes (0.30±0.04mA/cm(2)). The excellent biocompatibility, high specific surface area, high conductivity, good mechanical strength, and low cost make C-SS felt a promising electrode for BESs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tensile deformation behavior and deformation twinning of an equimolar CoCrFeMnNi high-entropy alloy

    Joo, S.-H.; Kato, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Jang, M.J.; Moon, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Tsai, C.W.; Yeh, J.W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Kim, H.S., E-mail: hskim@postech.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Center for High Entropy Alloys, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-24

    The tensile deformation and strain hardening behaviors of an equimolar CoCrFeMnNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) were investigated and compared with low and medium entropy equiatomic alloys (LEA and MEA). The HEA had a lower yield strength than the MEA because the addition of Mn weakens solid solution hardening in the HEA. However, deformation twinning induced the multiple stage strain hardening behavior of the HEA and enhanced strength and elongation. Using tensile-interrupted electron backscatter diffraction analysis, geometrically necessary dislocations were observed as plume-shaped features in grain interior, and a considerable texture was characterized, which is typical of face centered cubic metals. Moreover, the relationship between favorably oriented grains and twinning in the HEA bore a clear resemblance to the same tendency in TWIP steels. The thickness of the twin bundles was less than 100 nm. A high density of stacking defects was found in the nanotwins. Nano twinning and stacking faults were found to contribute to the remarkable mechanical properties. Deformation induced twinning not only demonstrated the dynamic Hall-Petch effect but also changed dislocation cell substructures into microband structures.

  13. Microstructure Deformation and Fracture Mechanism of Highly Filled Polymer Composites under Large Tensile Deformation

    Tao Zhangjiang; Ping Songdan; Mei Zhang; Cheng Zhaipeng

    2013-01-01

    The microstructure deformation and fracture mechanisms of particulate-filled polymer composites were studied based on microstructure observations in this paper. By using in-situ tensile test system under scanning electron microscopy, three different composites composed of polymer binder filled by three different types of particles, namely Al particles, AP particles and HMX particles, with the same total filler content were tested. The roles of initial microstructure damage and particle type on the microstructure deformation and damage are highlighted. The results show that microstructure damage starts with the growth of the initial microvoids within the binders or along the binder/particle interfaces. With the increase of strain, the microstructure damages including debonding at the particle/binder interface and tearing of the binder lead to microvoid coalescence, and finally cause an abrupt fracture of the samples. Coarse particles lead to an increase of debonding at the particle/binder interface both in the initial state and during the loading process, and angular particles promote interface debonding during the loading process.

  14. High Tensile Strength of Engineered β-Solenoid Fibrils via Sonication and Pulling.

    Peng, Zeyu; Parker, Amanda S; Peralta, Maria D R; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar M; Cox, Daniel L; Toney, Michael D

    2017-11-07

    We present estimates of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) for two engineered β-solenoid protein mutant fibril structures (spruce budworm and Rhagium inquisitor antifreeze proteins) derived from sonication-based measurements and from force pulling molecular dynamics simulations, both in water. Sonication experiments generate limiting scissioned fibrils with a well-defined length-to-width correlation for the mutant spruce budworm protein and the resultant UTS estimate is 0.66 ± 0.08 GPa. For fibrils formed from engineered R. inquisitor antifreeze protein, depending upon geometry, we estimate UTSs of 3.5 ± 3.2-5.5 ± 5.1 GPa for proteins with interfacial disulfide bonds, and 1.6 ± 1.5-2.5 ± 2.3 GPa for the reduced form. The large error bars for the R. inquisitor structures are intrinsic to the broad distribution of limiting scission lengths. Simulations provide pulling velocity-dependent UTSs increasing from 0.2 to 1 GPa in the available speed range, and 1.5 GPa extrapolated to the speeds expected in the sonication experiments. Simulations yield low-velocity values for the Young's modulus of 6.0 GPa. Without protein optimization, these mechanical parameters are similar to those of spider silk and Kevlar, but in contrast to spider silk, these proteins have a precisely known sequence-structure relationship. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Materials

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; T. E. Rahl; S. D. Snow

    2005-01-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates (10 to 200 per second) during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these materials under dynamic (impact) loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. The goal of the work presented in this paper was to improve understanding of moderate strain rate phenomena on these materials. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and relatively large test specimens (1/2-inch thick), initial test efforts focused on the tensile behavior of specific stainless steel materials during impact loading. Impact tests of 304L and 316L stainless steel test specimens at two different strain rates, 25 per second (304L and 316L material) and 50 per second (304L material) were performed for comparison to their quasi-static tensile test properties. Elevated strain rate stress-strain curves for the two materials were determined using the impact test machine and a ''total impact energy'' approach. This approach considered the deformation energy required to strain the specimens at a given strain rate. The material data developed was then utilized in analytical simulations to validate the final elevated stress-strain curves. The procedures used during testing and the results obtained are described in this paper

  16. The Effect of Constant and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Joint Properties of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel to 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Neissi, R.; Shamanian, M.; Hajihashemi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, dissimilar 316L austenitic stainless steel/2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) joints were fabricated by constant and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process using ER2209 DSS as a filler metal. Microstructures and joint properties were characterized using optical and electron scanning microscopy, tensile, Charpy V-notch impact and micro-hardness tests, and cyclic polarization measurements. Microstructural observations confirmed the presence of chromium nitride and delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of DSS and 316L, respectively. In addition, there was some deviation in the austenite/ferrite ratio of the surface welding pass in comparison to the root welding pass. Besides having lower pitting potential, welded joints produced by constant current gas tungsten arc welding process, consisted of some brittle sigma phase precipitates, which resulted in some impact energy reduction. The tensile tests showed high tensile strength for the weld joints in which all the specimens were broken in 316L base metal.

  17. Austenitic stainless steel alloys with high nickel contents in high temperature liquid metal systems

    Konvicka, H.R.; Schwarz, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fe-Cr-Ni base alloys (nickel content: from 15 to 70 wt%, Chromium content: 15 wt%, iron: balance) together with stainless steel (W.Nr. 1.4981) have been exposed to flowing liquid sodium at 730 0 C in four intervals up to a cumulative exposure time of 1500 hours. Weight change data and the results of post-exposition microcharacterization of specimens are reported. The corrosion rates increase with increasing nickel content and tend to become constant after longer exposure times for each alloy. The corrosion rate of stainless steel is considerably reduced due to the presence of the base alloys. Different kinetics of nickel poor (up to 35% nickel) and nickel rich (> 50% nickel) alloys and nickel transport from nickel rich to nickel poor material is observed. (orig.)

  18. Controlling the stainless steel surface wettability by nanosecond direct laser texturing at high fluences

    Gregorčič, P.; Šetina-Batič, B.; Hočevar, M.

    2017-12-01

    This work investigates the influence of the direct laser texturing at high fluences (DLT-HF) on surface morphology, chemistry, and wettability. We use a Nd:YAG laser ( λ = 1064 nm) with pulse duration of 95 ns to process stainless steel surface. The surface morphology and chemistry after the texturing is examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), while the surface wettability is evaluated by measuring the static contact angle. Immediately after the texturing, the surface is superhydrophilic in a saturated Wenzel regime. However, this state is not stable and the superhydrophilic-to-superhydrophobic transition happens if the sample is kept in atmospheric air for 30 days. After this period, the laser-textured stainless steel surface expresses lotus-leaf-like behavior. By using a high-speed camera at 10,000 fps, we measured that the water droplet completely rebound from this superhydrophobic surface after the contact time of 12 ms.

  19. High-temperature strength of TiC-coated SUS316 stainless steel

    Kaneko, K.; Furuya, Y.; Kikuchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    Some ceramics-coated metals are nominated as first-wall material. TiC-coated type 316 stainless steel is expected to be superior to other materials in high-temperature strength and in its endurance properties at heavy irradiation. Delamination between ceramics layer and base-metal is considered to be one of the most important problems when such ceramics-coated metals are used in a temperature field with a gradient such as that of the first wall. In this report, the high-temperature strength of TiC-coated type 316 stainless steel, which should be that of the first wall of the fusion reactor, is investigated experimentally and computationally. A simple and precise thermal-stress testing system is developed. The effects of surface roughness as well as of the thermal stress and the residual stress on the bonding strength are investigated. The experimental and numerical results on the residual-stress distribution are compared with each other to confirm the reliability of the inelastic analysis using the finite-element method (FEM). It is expected that a suitable surface roughness makes the residual stress in the coated film small. The optimum range for the TiC-coating temperature is found using inelastic FEM analysis at the heating conditions used in the experiments. (orig.)

  20. Effect of dissolved hydrogen on corrosion of 316NG stainless steel in high temperature water

    Dong, Lijin [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang City 110819 (China); Peng, Qunjia, E-mail: qunjiapeng@imr.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Zhang, Zhiming [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Shoji, Tetsuo [Frontier Research Initiative, New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-10, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang City 110016 (China); Wang, Lei [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang City 110819 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Dissolved hydrogen (DH) effect on corrosion of stainless steel in high temperature water. • Increasing DH caused decrease of Cr- but increase of Fe-concentrations in the inner oxide layer. • Concentration gradient of Cr and Fe in the inner oxide layer. • DH effect was attributed to the accelerated diffusion of Fe ion in the inner oxide layer. - Abstract: Characterizations of oxide films formed on 316 stainless steel in high temperature, hydrogenated water were conducted. The results show the oxide film consists of an outer layer with oxide particles of Fe–Ni spinel and hematite, and an inner continuous layer of Fe–Cr–Ni spinel. Increasing dissolved hydrogen (DH) concentrations causes decrease of Cr- and increase of Fe-concentrations in the inner layer. A continuous decrease of Cr- and increase of Fe-concentrations was observed from the surface of the inner layer to the oxide/substrate interface. The DH effect is attributed to the enhanced diffusion of Fe ions in the oxide film by hydrogen.

  1. Supercritical CO2 foaming of radiation crosslinked polypropylene/high-density polyethylene blend: Cell structure and tensile property

    Yang, Chenguang; Xing, Zhe; Zhang, Mingxing; Zhao, Quan; Wang, Mouhua; Wu, Guozhong

    2017-12-01

    A blend of isotactic polypropylene (PP) with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in different PP/HDPE ratios was irradiated by γ-ray to induce cross-linking and then foamed using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a blowing agent. Radiation effect on the melting point and crystallinity were analyzed in detail. The average cell diameter and cell density were compared for PP/HDPE foams prepared under different conditions. The optimum absorbed dose for the scCO2 foaming of PP/HDPE in terms of foaming ability and cell structure was 20 kGy. Tensile measurements showed that the elongation at break and tensile strength at break of the crosslinked PP/HDPE foams were higher than the non-crosslinked ones. Of particular interest was the increase in the foaming temperature window from 4 ℃ for pristine PP to 8-12 ℃ for the radiation crosslinked PP/HDPE blends. This implies much easier handling of scCO2 foaming of crosslinked PP with the addition of HDPE.

  2. Comparative study on the high-temperature tensile and creep properties of Alloy 617 base and weld metals

    Kim, Woo Gon; Hong, Sung Deok; Kim, Yong Wan; Kim, Seon Jin; Park, Jae Young; Ekaputra, I. M. W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative investigation on the high-temperature tensile and creep properties of Alloy 617 base metal (BM) and weld metal (WM) fabricated by a gas tungsten arc weld process. The WM had higher yield strength and lower ultimate tensile strength than the BM does; however, its elongation was significantly lower than that of the BM. The creep curve of the BM and WM was somewhat different from that of typical heat-resistance steel, and did not show a textbook creep. The WM exhibited a longer creep rupture life, lower creep rate, and lower rupture ductility than the BM. However, as the creep rupture time reached approximately 36,800 h, the creep life of the WM was expected to be almost similar to that of the BM; and after 36,800 h, its creep life was expected to be worse than the BM. Loner creep tests is needed to investigate the long-term creep life of the WM. The creep failure mode of the BM and WM was obviously an intergranular cracking of the cavity formation and growth mechanisms, although it was more evident in the WM. The BM had a more ductile fracture surface than the WM

  3. High Resolution Temperature Measurement of Liquid Stainless Steel Using Hyperspectral Imaging

    Wim Devesse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A contactless temperature measurement system is presented based on a hyperspectral line camera that captures the spectra in the visible and near infrared (VNIR region of a large set of closely spaced points. The measured spectra are used in a nonlinear least squares optimization routine to calculate a one-dimensional temperature profile with high spatial resolution. Measurements of a liquid melt pool of AISI 316L stainless steel show that the system is able to determine the absolute temperatures with an accuracy of 10%. The measurements are made with a spatial resolution of 12 µm/pixel, justifying its use in applications where high temperature measurements with high spatial detail are desired, such as in the laser material processing and additive manufacturing fields.

  4. Effect of triple ion beam irradiation on mechanical properties of high chromium austenitic stainless steel

    Ioka, Ikuo; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Nanjyo, Yoshiyasu; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi; Anegawa, Takefumi

    2003-01-01

    A high-chromium austenitic stainless steel has been developed for an advanced fuel cladding tube considering waterside corrosion and irradiation embrittlement. The candidate material was irradiated in triple ion (Ni, He, H) beam modes at 573 K up to 50 dpa to simulate irradiation damage by neutron and transmutation product. The change in hardness of the very shallow surface layer of the irradiated specimen was estimated from the slope of load/depth-depth curve which is in direct proportion to the apparent hardness of the specimen. Besides, the Swift's power low constitutive equation (σ=A(ε 0 + ε) n , A: strength coefficient, ε 0 : equivalent strain by cold rolling, n: strain hardening exponent) of the damaged parts was derived from the indentation test combined with an inverse analysis using a finite element method (FEM). For comparison, Type304 stainless steel was investigated as well. Though both Type304SS and candidate material were also hardened by ion irradiation, the increase in apparent hardness of the candidate material was smaller than that of Type304SS. The yield stress and uniform elongation were estimated from the calculated constitutive equation by FEM inverse analysis. The irradiation hardening of the candidate material by irradiation can be expected to be lower than that of Type304SS. (author)

  5. Stress corrosion of very high purity stainless steels in alkaline media

    Hechmat-Dehcordi, Ebrahim

    1981-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of stress corrosion resistance of stainless steels in caustic environments. It notably concerns the electronuclear industrial sector, the production of soda by electrolysis, and the preparation of hydrogen as energy vector. After a presentation of the experimental conditions, the author highlights the influence of purity on stress corrosion cracking of 20Cr-25Ni-type austenitic alloys. The specific action of a high number of addition metallic and non-metallic elements has been studied. Stress corrosion tests have been also performed in autoclave on austeno-ferritic (21 to 25 pc Cr - 6 to 10 pc Ni) as well as ferritic (26 pc Cr) grades. The author reports the study of electrochemical properties of stainless steel in soda by means of potentiostatic techniques with an application of Pourbaix thermodynamic equilibrium diagrams, and the study of the chemical composition of passivation thin layers by Auger spectroscopy. He more particularly studies the influence of electrode potential and of some addition elements on the chemical characteristics of oxides developed at the surface of austenite. Then, the author tries to establish correlations between strain hardening microstructure of the various steels and their sensitivity to stress corrosion [fr

  6. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibilities of various stainless steels in high temperature water

    Shoji, Saburo; Ohnaka, Noriyuki; Kikuchi, Eiji; Minato, Akira; Tanno, Kazuo.

    1980-01-01

    The intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behaviors of several austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water were evaluated using three types of SCC tests, i.e., single U-bend test in chloride containing water, uniaxial constant load and constant extension rate tests (CERT) in pure water. The steels used were SUS 304, 304L, 316, 316L, 321 and 347 and several heats of them to examine heat to heat variations. The three test methods gave the same relative ranking of the steels. The CERT is the most sensitive method to detect the relative IGSCC susceptibilities. The CERT result for relative ranking from poor to good is: SUS 304 - 0.07% C, 304 - 0.06% C, 304L - 0.028% C, 316 - 0.07% C. The IGSCC susceptibilities of SUS 304L - 0.020% C, 316L - 0.023% C, 321 and 347 were not detected. These test results suggest that the use of the low carbon, molybdenum bearing, or stabilized austenitic stainless steel is beneficial for eliminating the IGSCC problem in boiling water reactor environment. (author)

  7. High-speed fiber laser cutting of thick stainless steel for dismantling tasks

    Shin, Jae Sung; Oh, Seong Yong; Park, Hyunmin; Chung, Chin-Man; Seon, Sangwoo; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Lim; Choi, Byung-Seon; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2017-09-01

    A high-speed fiber laser cutting technology of thick steels for dismantling tasks was achieved using a 6-kW fiber laser system. At first, a new cutting head for efficient cutting of thick steels was developed, which was composed by a collimator with a focal length of 160 mm and mirror-type focusing objects with a long focal length of 600 mm. The long focal length of the focusing object made it possible for the beam size to be small through the thick cutting material and the cutting efficiency was expected to increase compared with the short focal length. In addition, folding the beam facilitated the compact cutting head with a size of 160 mm (width) × 80 mm (height) × 640 mm (length) and a weight of 6.9 kg. In the cutting experiment, the laser beam was delivered to the cutting head by a 25-m long process fiber with a core diameter of 100 μm. The cutting performances were studied against the thicknesses of stainless steel plates. A maximum cutting speed of 72 mm/min was obtained for the 60-mm thick stainless steel plate cutting and the cut specimen showed an excellent kerf shape and a narrow kerf width. To the best of our knowledge, this cutting speed was higher than other previously reported results when cutting with a 6-kW laser power.

  8. Decontamination of stainless steel canisters that contain high-level waste

    Bray, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    At the West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSC) in West Valley, New York, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) will be vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into large, stainless steel canisters. During the filling process, volatile fission products, principally 137 Cs, condense on the exterior of the canisters. The smearable contamination that remains on the canisters after they are filled and partially cooled must be removed from the canisters' exterior surfaces prior to their storage and ultimate shipment to a US Department of Energy (DOE) repository for disposal. A simple and effective method was developed for decontamination of HLW canisters. This method of chemical decontamination is applicable to a wide variety of contaminated equipment found in the nuclear industry. The process employs a reduction-oxidation system [Ce(III)/Ce(IV)] in nitric acid solution to chemically mill the surface of stainless steel, similar to the electropolishing process, but without the need for an applied electrical current. Contaminated canisters are simply immersed in the solution at controlled temperature and Ce(IV) concentration levels

  9. The probability distribution of intergranular stress corrosion cracking life for sensitized 304 stainless steels in high temperature, high purity water

    Akashi, Masatsune; Kenjyo, Takao; Matsukura, Shinji; Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1984-01-01

    In order to discuss the probability distribution of intergranular stress corrsion carcking life for sensitized 304 stainless steels, a series of the creviced bent beem (CBB) and the uni-axial constant load tests were carried out in oxygenated high temperature, high purity water. The following concludions were resulted; (1) The initiation process of intergranular stress corrosion cracking has been assumed to be approximated by the Poisson stochastic process, based on the CBB test results. (2) The probability distribution of intergranular stress corrosion cracking life may consequently be approximated by the exponential probability distribution. (3) The experimental data could be fitted to the exponential probability distribution. (author)

  10. Fabrication of spherical high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys by mechanical alloying and thermal plasma spheroidization

    Razumov, Nikolay G.; Wang, Qing Sheng; Popovich, Anatoly A.; Shamshurin, Aleksey I.

    2018-04-01

    This paper describes the results of experimental studies on the treatment of Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys, synthesized by the mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental powders in the flow of a radio frequency thermal plasma. The as-milled powder with irregular particles were successfully converted into spherical high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloy. Measurement of the residual nitrogen content in the obtained powder, shown that during the plasma spheroidization process, part of the nitrogen escapes from the alloy.

  11. High-Temperature Tensile Strength of Al10Co25Cr8Fe15Ni36Ti6 Compositionally Complex Alloy (High-Entropy Alloy)

    Daoud, H. M.; Manzoni, A. M.; Wanderka, N.; Glatzel, U.

    2015-06-01

    Homogenizing at 1220°C for 20 h and subsequent aging at 900°C for 5 h and 50 h of a novel Al10Co25Cr8Fe15Ni36Ti6 compositionally complex alloy (high-entropy alloy) produces a microstructure consisting of an L12 ordered γ' phase embedded in a face-centered cubic solid-solution γ matrix together with needle-like B2 precipitates (NiAl). The volume fraction of γ' phase is ~46% and of needle-like B2 precipitates database; Thermo-Calc Software, Stockholm, Sweden). The high-temperature tensile tests were carried out at room temperature, 600°C, 700°C, 800°C, and 1000°C. The tensile strength as well as the elongation to failure of both heat-treated specimens is very high at all tested temperatures. The values of tensile strength has been compared with literature data of well-known Alloy 800H and Inconel 617, and is discussed in terms of the observed microstructure.

  12. Miniature tensile test specimens for fusion reactor irradiation studies

    Klueh, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Three miniature sheet-type tensile specimens and a miniature rod-type specimen are being used to determine irradiated tensile properties for alloy development for fusion reactors. The tensile properties of type 316 stainless steel were determined with these different specimens, and the results were compared. Reasonably good agreement was observed. However, there were differences that led to recommendations on which specimens are preferred. 4 references, 9 figures, 6 tables

  13. High temperature chlorosilane corrosion of iron and AISI 316L stainless steel

    Aller, Joshua Loren

    Chlorosilane gas streams are used at high temperatures (>500°C) throughout the semiconductor, polycrystalline silicon, and fumed silica industries, primarily as a way to refine, deposit, and produce silicon and silicon containing materials. The presence of both chlorine and silicon in chlorosilane species creates unique corrosion environments due to the ability of many metals to form both metal-chlorides and metal-silicides, and it is further complicated by the fact that many metal-chlorides are volatile at high-temperatures while metal-silicides are generally stable. To withstand the uniquely corrosive environments, expensive alloys are often utilized, which increases the cost of final products. This work focuses on the corrosion behavior of iron, the primary component of low-cost alloys, and AISI 316L, a common low-cost stainless steel, in environments representative of industrial processes. The experiments were conducted using a customized high temperature chlorosilane corrosion system that exposed samples to an atmospheric pressure, high temperature, chlorosilane environment with variable input amounts of hydrogen, silicon tetrachloride, and hydrogen chloride plus the option of embedding samples in silicon during the exposure. Pre and post exposure sample analysis including scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and gravimetric analysis showed the surface corrosion products varied depending on the time, temperature, and environment that the samples were exposed to. Most commonly, a volatile chloride product formed first, followed by a stratified metal silicide layer. The chlorine and silicon activities in the corrosion environment were changed independently and were found to significantly alter the corrosion behavior; a phenomenon supported by computational thermodynamic equilibrium simulations. It was found that in comparable environments, the stainless steel corroded significantly less than the pure iron. This

  14. Evaluation of non-conformities of hip prostheses made of titanium alloys and stainless steel

    Bezerra, Ewerton de Oliveira Teotonio; Nascimento, Jose Jeferson da Silva; Luna, Carlos Bruno Barreto; Morais, Crislene Rodrigues da Silva; Campos, Karla Valeria Miranda de

    2017-01-01

    A large number of metallic alloys has satisfactory behavior when used to manufacture implants for hip prostheses. However, they must be in conformity with standards, to ensure their quality for long periods without losing its functionality. Therefore, this paper aims to study the non-conformities in two hip prostheses, one of titanium and other stainless steel according to standards. The implants studied passed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence, tensile test and optical microscopy (OM). Specimens for the tensile test were made according to ASTM E 8M, as well, MO samples passed by metallographic procedure. The results evidenced that some chemical compositions showed in relation to the standards. The XRD analysis showed peaks of austenite and absence of ferrite for the stainless steel, while the titanium alloy presents an alpha phase (HCP) more significant than the beta phase (BCC). The stainless steel alloys and titanium have yield strength and tensile strength that meet the standards. On the other hand, the elastic modulus of the titanium alloy and stainless steel, comes to be ten times greater than the human bone. Therefore, the high modulus of elasticity of the alloys, favors bone resorption problems. The stainless steel microstructure is typical of an austenitic matrix, while the titanium alloy presents α + β microstructure. (author)

  15. Thermal, tensile and rheological properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) processed and irradiated by gamma-ray in different atmospheres

    Ferreto, H. F. R., E-mail: hferreto@ipen.br, E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Oliveira, A. C. F., E-mail: hferreto@ipen.br, E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Parra, D. F., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.br, E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br; Lugão, A. B., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.br, E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br [Center of Chemistry and Environment, Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research - IPEN (Brazil); Gaia, R., E-mail: renan-gaia7@hotmail.com [Faculdades Oswaldo Cruz (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate structural changes of high density polyethylene (HDPE) modified by ionizing radiation (gamma rays) in different atmospheres. The gamma radiation process for modification of commercial polymers is a widely applied technique to promote new physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Gamma irradiation originates free radicals which can induce chain scission or recombination, providing its annihilation, branching or crosslinking. This polymer was irradiated with gamma source of {sup 60}Co at doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy at a dose rate of 5 kGy/h. The changes in molecular structure of HDPE, after gamma irradiations were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile machine and oscillatory rheology. The results showed the variations of the properties depending on the dose at each atmosphere.

  16. A comparative study of the mechanical properties and the behavior of carbon and boron in stainless steel cladding tubes fabricated by PM HIP and traditional technologies

    Shulga, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    The ring tensile test method was optimized and successfully used to obtain precise data for specimens of the cladding tubes of AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steels and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. The positive modifications in the tensile properties of the stainless steel cladding tubes fabricated by powder metallurgy and hot isostatic pressing of melt atomized powders (PM HIP) when compared with the cladding tubes produced by traditional technology were found. Presently, PM HIP is also used in the fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels. The high degree of homogeneity of the distribution of carbon and boron as well the high dispersivity of the phase-structure elements in the specimens manufactured via PM HIP were determined by direct autoradiography methods. These results correlate well with the increase of the tensile properties of the specimens produced by PM HIP technology.

  17. High Temperature Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions Between TRIGA Fuels and 304 Stainless Steel

    Perez, Emmanuel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keiser, Jr., Dennis D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Forsmann, Bryan [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Janney, Dawn E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Henley, Jody [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Woolstenhulme, Eric C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    High-temperature fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) fuel elements and the 304 stainless steel (304SS) are of interest to develop an understanding of the fuel behavior during transient reactor scenarios. TRIGA fuels are composed of uranium (U) particles dispersed in a zirconium-hydride (Zr-H) matrix. In reactor, the fuel is encased in 304-stainless-steel (304SS) or Incoloy 800 clad tubes. At high temperatures, the fuel can readily interact with the cladding, resulting in FCCI. A number of FCCI can take place in this system. Interactions can be expected between the cladding and the Zr-H matrix, and/or between the cladding and the U-particles. Other interactions may be expected between the Zr-H matrix and the U-particles. Furthermore, the fuel contains erbium-oxide (Er-O) additions. Interactions can also be expected between the Er-O, the cladding, the Zr-H and the U-particles. The overall result is that very complex interactions may take place as a result of fuel and cladding exposures to high temperatures. This report discusses the characterization of the baseline fuel microstructure in the as-received state (prior to exposure to high temperature), characterization of the fuel after annealing at 950C for 24 hours and the results from diffusion couple experiments carries out at 1000C for 5 and 24 hours. Characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with sample preparation via focused ion beam in situ-liftout-technique.

  18. High Temperature Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions Between TRIGA Fuels and 304 Stainless Steel

    Perez, Emmanuel; Keiser Jr, Dennis D.; Forsmann, Bryan; Janney, Dawn E.; Henley, Jody; Woolstenhulme, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) fuel elements and the 304 stainless steel (304SS) are of interest to develop an understanding of the fuel behavior during transient reactor scenarios. TRIGA fuels are composed of uranium (U) particles dispersed in a zirconium-hydride (Zr-H) matrix. In reactor, the fuel is encased in 304-stainless-steel (304SS) or Incoloy 800 clad tubes. At high temperatures, the fuel can readily interact with the cladding, resulting in FCCI. A number of FCCI can take place in this system. Interactions can be expected between the cladding and the Zr-H matrix, and/or between the cladding and the U-particles. Other interactions may be expected between the Zr-H matrix and the U-particles. Furthermore, the fuel contains erbium-oxide (Er-O) additions. Interactions can also be expected between the Er-O, the cladding, the Zr-H and the U-particles. The overall result is that very complex interactions may take place as a result of fuel and cladding exposures to high temperatures. This report discusses the characterization of the baseline fuel microstructure in the as-received state (prior to exposure to high temperature), characterization of the fuel after annealing at 950C for 24 hours and the results from diffusion couple experiments carries out at 1000C for 5 and 24 hours. Characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with sample preparation via focused ion beam in situ-liftout-technique.

  19. High temperature vapor pressures of stainless steel type 1.4970 and of some other pure metals from laser evaporation

    Bober, M.; Singer, J.

    1984-10-01

    For the safety analysis of nuclear reactors vapor pressure data of stainless steel are required up to temperatures exceeding 4000 K. In analogy to the classic boiling point method a new technique was developed to measure the high-temperature vapor pressures of stainless steel and other metals from laser vaporization. A fast pyrometer, an ion current probe and an image converter camera are used to detect incipient boiling from the time-temperature curve. The saturated-vapor pressure curves of stainless steel (Type 1.4970), being a cladding material of the SNR 300 breeder reactor, and of molybdenum are experimentally determined in the temperature ranges of 2800-3900 K and 4500-5200 K, respectively. The normal boiling points of iron, nickel, titanium, vanadium and zirconium are verified. Besides, spectral emissivity values of the liquid metals are measured at the pyrometer wavelengths of 752 nm and/or 940 nm. (orig.) [de

  20. The effect of σ-phase precipitation at 800°C on the corrosion resistance in sea-water of a high alloyed duplex stainless steel

    Wilms, M.E.; Gadgil, V.J.; Krougman, J.M.; Ijsseling, F.P.

    1994-01-01

    Super-duplex stainless steels are recently developed high alloyed stainless steels that combine good mechanical properties with excellent corrosion resistance. Because of a high content of chromium and molybdenum, these alloys are susceptible to σ-phase precipitation during short exposure to

  1. Electrochemical behavior of TIO{sub 2} deposited stainless steel in high temperature water

    Okamura, M.; Yamamoto, S. [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki-city, Kanagawa (Japan); Urata, H.; Takagi, J. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama-city, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    It has previously been confirmed that the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) of stainless steel (SS) shifts in the negative direction by deposition of TiO{sub 2}. Recently we showed that TiO{sub 2} could decrease the ECP of SS in the absence of UV irradiation. In this study we measured the anodic polarization curve in high temperature water under UV irradiation and none irradiation condition and considered the mechanism of the ECP shift by TiO{sub 2} deposition. The anodic current density of the specimen increased with increasing the UV irradiation intensity and with increasing the amount of TiO{sub 2} deposition under none UV irradiation. Furthermore the oxide film of the specimen affects on the anodic current density was clarified. It was verified the ECP shift is caused by the anodic current density increasing with TiO{sub 2} deposition under both conditions of UV and none UV irradiation. (author)

  2. Welding of high-strength stainless steel 03Kh12N10MT for cryogenic engineering

    Pustovit, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is being given to weld resistance to cold and hot cracking at 93 and 77K and to mechanical properties of welded joints of high-strength stainless steel 03Kh12N10MT, produced under the fluxes AN-17M, AN-18, AN-26, AN-45, ANF-5, 48-OF-6, ANK-45 and ANK-49 in combination with various welding wires. It is shown that welds on 03Kh12N10MT steel meet the requirements only when using 48-OF-6 or ANK-49 flux. It is noted that impact strength of welds at 77K is sufficiently affected by the volume fraction of non-metallic inclusions in weld metal

  3. Influence of Carbide Modifications on the Mechanical Properties of Ultra-High-Strength Stainless Steels

    Seo, Joo-Young; Park, Soo-Keun; Kwon, Hoon; Cho, Ki-Sub

    2017-10-01

    The mechanical properties of ultra-high-strength secondary hardened stainless steels with varying Co, V, and C contents have been studied. A reduced-Co alloy based on the chemical composition of Ferrium S53 was made by increasing the V and C content. This changed the M2C-strengthened microstructure to a MC plus M2C-strengthened microstructure, and no deteriorative effects were observed for peak-aged and over-aged samples despite the large reduction in Co content from 14 to 7 wt pct. The mechanical properties according to alloying modification were associated with carbide precipitation kinetics, which was clearly outlined by combining analytical tools including small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) as well as an analytical TEM with computational simulation.

  4. Effect of the oxygen partial pressure on ferritic stainless steel AISI 441 at high temperatures

    Salgado, M.F.; Carvalho, I.S.; Santos, R.S.; Correa, O.V.; Ramanathan, L.V.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels can be exposed to aggressive gases at high temperatures. To understand the behavior of oxidation of the steel AISI 441 was made oxidation at temperatures between 850 ° C and 950 ° C, at two different atmospheres: synthetic air, using tubular furnace and Argon, containing 1ppm O_2, in thermobalance. The kinetics of oxidation of the films was established by measuring the mass gain per unit of area as a function of the oxidation time. The microstructure and chemical composition of the oxides were analyzed by SEM, EDS and XRD. Chemical analysis showed that films formed on steel AISI 441 had mostly chromium oxide and the following elements: Cr, Mn, Fe, Ti and Si. Regarding the kinetics of oxidation, it was observed that in synthetic air, the steel oxidation increased gradually with the temperature, but in argon, it showed the highest oxidation at 900 ° C and the lowest oxidation at 950 ° C. (author)

  5. Microstructure and Hardness of High Temperature Gas Nitrided AISI 420 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Ibrahim Nor Nurulhuda Md.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the microstructure and hardness of as-received and nitrided AISI 420 martensitic stainless steels. High temperature gas nitriding was employed to treat the steels at 1200°C for one hour and four hours using nitrogen gas, followed by furnace cooled. Chromium nitride and iron nitride were formed and concentrated at the outmost surface area of the steels since this region contained the highest concentration of nitrogen. The grain size enlarged at the interior region of the nitrided steels due to nitriding at temperature above the recrystallization temperature of the steel and followed by slow cooling. The nitrided steels produced higher surface hardness compared to as-received steel due to the presence of nitrogen and the precipitation of nitrides. Harder steel was produced when nitriding at four hours compared to one hour since more nitrogen permeated into the steel.

  6. Tensile strength/yield strength (TS/YS) ratios of high-strength steel (HSS) reinforcing bars

    Tavio, Anggraini, Retno; Raka, I. Gede Putu; Agustiar

    2018-05-01

    The building codes such as American Concrete Institute (ACI) 318M-14 and Standard National Indonesia (SNI) 2847:2013 require that the ratio of tensile strength (TS) and yield strength (YS) should not less than 1.25. The requirement is based on the assumption that a capability of a structural member to develop inelastic rotation capacity is a function of the length of the yield region. This paper reports an investigation on various steel grades, namely Grades 420, 550, 650, and 700 MPa, to examine the impact of different TS/YS ratios if it is less or greater than the required value. Grades 550, 650, and 700 MPa were purposely selected with the intention to examine if these higher grades are still promising to be implemented in special structural systems since they are prohibited by the building codes for longitudinal reinforcement, whereas Grade 420 MPa bars are the maximum limit of yield strength of reinforcing bars that is allowable for longitudinal reinforcement of special structural systems. Tensile tests of these steel samples were conducted under displacement controlled mode to capture the complete stress-strain curves and particularly the post-yield response of the steel bars. From the study, it can be concluded that Grade 420 performed higher TS/YS ratios and they were able to reach up to more than 1.25. However, the High Strength Still (HSS) bars (Grades 550, 600, and 700 MPa) resulted in lower TS/YS ratios (less than 1.25) compared with those of Grade 420 MPa.

  7. Effect of different stages of tensile deformation on micromagnetic parameters in high-strength, low-alloy steel

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Moorthy, V.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, B. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group

    1999-08-01

    The influence of tensile deformation on the magnetic Barkhausen emissions (MBE) and hysteresis loop has been studied in a high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA) and its weldment. The magnetic measurements were made both in loaded and unloaded conditions for different stress levels. The root-mean-square (RMS) voltage of the MBE has been used for analysis. This study shows that the preyield and postyield deformation can be identified from the change in the MBE profile. The initial elastic deformation showed a linear increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition, and the MBE level remained constant in the unloaded condition. The microplastic yielding, well below the macroyield stress, significantly reduces the MBE, indicating the operation of grain-boundary dislocation sources below the macroyield stress. This is indicated by the slow increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition and the decrease in the MBE level in the unloaded condition. The macroyielding resulted in a significant increase in the MBE level in the loaded condition and, more clearly, in the unloaded condition. The increase in the MBE level during macroyielding has been attributed to the grain rotation phenomenon, in order to maintain the boundary integrity between adjacent grains, which would preferentially align the magnetic domains along the stress direction. This study shows that MBE during tensile deformation can be classified into four stages: (1) perfectly elastic, (2) microplastic yielding, (3) macroyielding, and (4) progressive plastic deformation. A multimagnetic parameter approach, combining the hysteresis loop and MBE, has been suggested to evaluate the residual stresses.

  8. Effect of grain size on the high temperature mechanical properties of type 316LN stainless steel

    Kim, D. W.; Lee, Y. S.; Ryu, W. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, W. G.; Cho, H. D.; Han, C. H

    2001-02-01

    Nitrogen increases the high temeprature mechanical properties and decreases grain size. The effect of nitrogen on the high temperature mechanical properties was investigated in the viewpoint of grain size. Tensile strength increases with the decrease of grain size and agrees with the Hall-Petch relationship. Effect of grain size on the low cycle fatigue life properties were investigated as measuring the fatigue life from the results which had been obtained by the constant strain rate and various strain range. There was no effect on the low cycle fatigue properties by the grain size. The time to rupture decreased with the increase of grain size. The steady state creep rate decreased to a minimum and then increased as the grain size increased. This result agrees with the result predicted from Garofalo equation. The rupture elongation at the intermediate grain size showed a minimum due to the cavity formed easily by carbide precipitates in the grain boundaries.

  9. Corrosion mechanism of 13Cr stainless steel in completion fluid of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt

    Liu, Yan; Xu, Lining; Lu, Minxu; Meng, Yao; Zhu, Jinyang; Zhang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The corrosion behavior of 13Cr steel exposed to bromine salt completion fluid containing high concentration bromine ions was investigated. • There are passive circles around pits on the 13Cr steel surface after 7 d of exposure. • Macroscopic galvanic corrosion formed between the passive halo and the pit. • The mechanism of pitting corrosion on 13Cr stainless steel exposed to heavy bromine brine was established. - Abstract: A series of corrosion tests of 13Cr stainless steel were conducted in a simulated completion fluid environment of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt. Corrosion behavior of specimens and the component of corrosion products were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that 13Cr steel suffers from severe local corrosion and there is always a passive halo around every pit. The formation mechanism of the passive halo is established. OH − ligand generates and adsorbs in a certain scale because of abundant OH − on the surface around the pits. Passive film forms around each pit, which leads to the occurrence of passivation in a certain region. Finally, the dissimilarities in properties and morphologies of regions, namely the pit and its corresponding passive halo, can result in different corrosion sensitivities and may promote the formation of macroscopic galvanic pairs

  10. Adsorptive behavior and solid-phase microextraction of bare stainless steel sample loop in high performance liquid chromatography.

    Zhang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Zixin; Meng, Jiawei; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Zilin

    2014-10-24

    In this work, we interestingly happened to observe the adsorption of stainless steel sample loop of HPLC. The adsorptive behaviors of the stainless steel loop toward different kinds of compounds were studied, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), halogeno benzenes, aniline derivatives, benzoic acid derivatives, phenols, benzoic acid ethyl ester, benzaldehyde, 1-phenyl-ethanone and phenethyl alcohol. The adsorptive mechanism was probably related to hydrophobic interaction, electron-rich element-metal interaction and hydrogen bond. Universal adsorption of stainless steels was also testified. Inspired by its strong adsorptive capability, bare stainless steel loop was developed as a modification-free in-tube device for solid-phase microextraction (SPME), which served as both the substrate and sorbent and possessed ultra-high strength and stability. Great extraction efficiency toward PAHs was obtained by stainless steel loop without any modification, with enrichment factors of 651-834. By connecting the stainless steel loop onto a six-port valve, an online SPME-HPLC system was set up and an SPME-HPLC method has been validated for determination of PAHs. The method has exceptionally low limits of detection of 0.2-2pg/mL, which is significantly lower than that of reported methods with different kinds of sorbents. Wide linear range (0.5-500 and 2-1000pg/mL), good linearity (R(2)≥0.9987) and good reproducibility (RSD≤2.9%) were also obtained. The proposed method has been applied to determine PAHs in environmental samples. Good recoveries were obtained, ranging from 88.5% to 93.8%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Electrochemical polarization behavior of sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel in high temperature water

    Kushiya, K [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Sugimoto, K; Ejima, T

    1978-11-01

    Anodic polarization curves for a solution-treated or sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel and solution-treated Fe-Ni-Cr ternary alloys containing 10%Ni and 6 to 14%Cr have been measured in deaerated 0.5 mol/l Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions of pH 2.0 to 5.9 at 298, 523 and 553 K. Corrosion potentials for U-bend SCC test specimens of sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel have also been monitored for a long time in the same solutions as those used for the polarization measurements except that they were aerated. It was found that the differences in the current densities in the passive state, i sub(pass), between the solution treated steel and the sensitized one and also between the ternary alloy with higher Cr content and the one with lower Cr content become large with increasing temperature and decreasing pH. This means that the difference in the values of i sub(pass) between grain bodies and Cr-depleted zones along grain boundaries of sensitized steel becomes larger and susceptibility to intergranular corrosion of the sensitized steel in the passivation region becomes higher with increasing temperature and decreasing pH. Since corrosion potentials for the U-bend SCC test specimens in air-satulated solutions lie in the passive region of anodic polarization curves for the sensitized steel in deaerated solutions, the intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of the sensitized steel in high temperature water with dissolved oxygen is considered to be caused by the preferential corrosion in the Cr-depleted zone.

  12. Damping Capacity of High Manganese Austenitic Stainless Steel with a Two Phase Mixed Structure of Martensite and Austenite

    Hwang, Tae Hyun; Kang, Chang-Yong

    2013-01-01

    The damping capacity of high manganese austenitic stainless steel with a two phase mixed structure of deformation-induced martensite and reversed austenite was studied. Reversed austenite with an ultra-fine grain size of less than 0.2 μm was obtained by reversion treatment. The two phase structure of deformation-induced martensite and reversed austenite was obtained by annealing treatment at a range of 500-700 °C and various times in cold rolled high manganese austenitic stainless steel. The damping capacity increased with an increasing annealing temperature and time. In high manganese stainless steel with the two phase mixed structure of martensite and austenite, the damping capacity decreased with an increasing volume fraction of deformation-induced martensite. Thus, the damping capacity was strongly affected by deformation-induced martensite. The results confirmed that austenitic stainless steel with a good combination of strength and damping capacity was obtained from the two phase mixed structure of austenite and martensite.

  13. High-temperature compatibility between liquid metal as PWR fuel gap filler and stainless steel and high-density concrete

    Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong; Jumpee, Chayanit; Jitpukdee, Manit

    2014-08-01

    In conventional nuclear fuel rods for light-water reactors, a helium-filled as-fabricated gap between the fuel and the cladding inner surface accommodates fuel swelling and cladding creep down. Because helium exhibits a very low thermal conductivity, it results in a large temperature rise in the gap. Liquid metal (LM; 1/3 weight portion each of lead, tin, and bismuth) has been proposed to be a gap filler because of its high thermal conductivity (∼100 times that of He), low melting point (∼100 °C), and lack of chemical reactivity with UO2 and water. With the presence of LM, the temperature drop across the gap is virtually eliminated and the fuel is operated at a lower temperature at the same power output, resulting in safer fuel, delayed fission gas release and prevention of massive secondary hydriding. During normal reactor operation, should an LM-bonded fuel rod failure occurs resulting in a discharge of liquid metal into the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel, it should not corrode stainless steel. An experiment was conducted to confirm that at 315 °C, LM in contact with 304 stainless steel in the PWR water chemistry environment for up to 30 days resulted in no observable corrosion. Moreover, during a hypothetical core-melt accident assuming that the liquid metal with elevated temperature between 1000 and 1600 °C is spread on a high-density concrete basement of the power plant, a small-scale experiment was performed to demonstrate that the LM-concrete interaction at 1000 °C for as long as 12 h resulted in no penetration. At 1200 °C for 5 h, the LM penetrated a distance of ∼1.3 cm, but the penetration appeared to stop. At 1400 °C the penetration rate was ∼0.7 cm/h. At 1600 °C, the penetration rate was ∼17 cm/h. No corrosion based on chemical reactions with high-density concrete occurred, and, hence, the only physical interaction between high-temperature LM and high-density concrete was from tiny cracks generated from thermal stress. Moreover

  14. A tensile stage for high-stress low-strain fibre studies

    Pauw, Brian Richard; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Mortensen, Kell

    2011-01-01

    Determining the effects of stress on the internal structure of high-performance fibres may provide insight into their structure-property relationships. The deformation of voids inside a poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA) fibre upon application of stress is one such effect which may be obser...

  15. Microstructure and mechanical properties of resistance upset butt welded 304 austenitic stainless steel joints

    Sharifitabar, M.; Halvaee, A.; Khorshahian, S.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Three different microstructural zones formed at different distances from the joint interface in resistance upset butt welding of 304 austenitic stainless steel. Highlights: → Evaluation of microstructure in resistance upset welding of 304 stainless steel. → Evaluation of welding parameters effects on mechanical properties of the joint. → Introducing the optimum welding condition for joining stainless steel bars. -- Abstract: Resistance upset welding (UW) is a widely used process for joining metal parts. In this process, current, time and upset pressure are three parameters that affect the quality of welded products. In the present research, resistance upset butt welding of 304 austenitic stainless steel and effect of welding power and upset pressure on microstructure, tensile strength and fatigue life of the joint were investigated. Microstructure of welds were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used to distinguish the phase(s) that formed at the joint interface and in heat affected zone (HAZ). Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) linked to the SEM was used to determine chemical composition of phases formed at the joint interface. Fatigue tests were performed using a pull-push fatigue test machine and the fatigue properties were analyzed drawing stress-number of cycles to failure (S-N) curves. Also tensile strength tests were performed. Finally tensile and fatigue fracture surfaces were studied by SEM. Results showed that there were three different microstructural zones at different distances from the joint interface and delta ferrite phase has formed in these regions. There was no precipitation of chromium carbide at the joint interface and in the HAZ. Tensile and fatigue strengths of the joint decreased with welding power. Increasing of upset pressure has also considerable influence on tensile strength of the joint. Fractography of fractured samples showed that formation of hot spots at

  16. Modified stainless steel for high performance and stable anode in microbial fuel cells

    Peng, Xinwen; Chen, Shuiliang; Liu, Lang; Zheng, Suqi; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A high performance and stable anode was prepared for microbial fuel cells by surface modification of stainless steel mesh including steps of acid etching, binder-free carbon black (CB) coating and the low-temperature heat treatment below 400 °C. The modified anode could deliver a stable and high current density of 1.91 mA cm −2 . - Highlights: • A high-performance anode for MFC is prepared by surface modification of SSM. • The modified SSM could generate a high current density of up to 1.91 mA cm −2 . • The formation of Fe 3 O 4 layer enhanced the interaction between the CB and SSM. • The modified SSM was stable under the potential of +0.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). • The modified SSM was an ideal anode for upscaling applications of MFCs. - Abstract: The surface modification of the stainless steel mesh (SSM) was conducted by acid etching, binder-free carbon black (CB) coating and the low-temperature heat treatment below 400 °C to improve the microbial bioelectrocatalytic activity for use as high-performance anode in microbial fuel cells. The modified SSM, such as SSM/CB-400, could generate a high current density of up to 1.91 mA cm −2 , which was nearly three orders of magnitude higher than the untreated SSM electrode (0.0025 mA cm −2 ). Moreover, it was stable and recovered the equal current density after removal of the formed biofilms. Surface characterization results demonstrate that the performance improvement was attributed to the CB/Fe 3 O 4 composite layer formed onto the surface of the SSM, which protected the biofilms from being poisoned by the Cr component in the SSM and ensured a rapid electron transfer from biofilms to the SSM surface. The CB/Fe 3 O 4 composite layer showed excellent corrosion-resistant under the oxidizing potential of + 0.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). Rising the heating temperature to 500 °C, the SSM-500 and SSM/CB-500 electrodes suffered from corrosion due to the formation of α-Fe 2 O 3 crystals.

  17. Microstructure and Tensile Behavior of Al8Co17Cr17Cu8Fe17Ni33 (at.%) High-Entropy Alloy

    Daoud, H. M.; Manzoni, A.; Völkl, R.; Wanderka, N.; Glatzel, U.

    2013-12-01

    Microstructure evolution and tensile behavior of the high-entropy alloy Al8Co17Cr17Cu8Fe17Ni33 (at.%) are investigated at room temperature and at 500°C in the as-cast state and under different heat-treatment conditions. Detailed microstructural characterizations are carried out using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The equilibrium phase evolution as a function of temperature was calculated using the Thermo-Calc software (Thermo-Calc Software, Stockholm, Sweden) integrated with TTNi-7 database. The observed majority phase is a face-centered cubic solid solution for all tested specimens. Tensile ductility at room temperature and at elevated temperature is enhanced by heat treatment at 1150°C. An embrittlement phenomenon has been observed after a heat treatment at 700°C resulting in significant degradation in tensile properties.

  18. High tensile strength fly ash based geopolymer composite using copper coated micro steel fiber

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mehdi; Mehrali, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    -matrix interaction. In this present study, effects of micro steel fibers (MSF) incorporation on mechanical properties of fly ash based geopolymer was investigated at different volume ratio of matrix. Various properties of the composite were compared in terms of fresh state by flow measurement and hardened state......As a ceramic-like material, geopolymers show a high quasi-brittle behavior and relatively low fracture energy. To overcome this, the addition of fibers to a brittle matrix is a well-known method to improve the flexural strength. Moreover, the success of the reinforcements is dependent on the fiber...... by variation of shrinkage over time to assess performance of the composites subjected to flexural and compressive load. The fiber-matrix interface, fiber surface and toughening mechanisms were assessed using field emission scan electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) through a period...

  19. Examination and modeling of void growth kinetics in modern high strength dual phase steels during uniaxial tensile deformation

    Saeidi, N., E-mail: navidsae@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafizadeh, F.; Niroumand, B. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Forouzan, M.R.; Mohseni mofidi, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Barlat, F. [Materials Mechanics Laboratory (MML), Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology (GIFT), Pohang University of Science and Technology - POSTECH, San 31 Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    Ductile fracture mechanisms during uniaxial tensile testing of two different modern high strength dual phase steels, i.e. DP780 and DP980, were studied. Detailed microstructural characterization of the strained and sectioned samples was performed by scanning electron microscopy as well as EBSD examination. The results revealed that interface decohesion, especially at martensite particles located at ferrite grain boundaries, was the most probable mechanism for void nucleation. It was also revealed that the creation of cellular substructure can reduce stored strain energy and thereby, higher true fracture strain was obtained in DP980 than DP780 steel. Prediction of void growth behavior based on some previously proposed models showed unreliable results. Therefore, a modified model based on Rice-Tracey family models was proposed which showed a very lower prediction error compared with other models. - Highlights: • Damage mechanism in two modern high strength dual phase steels was studied. • Creation of cellular substructures can reduce the stored strain energy within the ferrite grains. • The experimental values were examined by Agrawal as well as RT family models. • A modified model was proposed for prediction of void growth behavior of DP steels.

  20. Tensile tests and metallography of brazed AISI 316L specimens after irradiation

    Groot, P.; Franconi, E.

    1994-01-01

    Stainless steel type 316L tensile specimens were vacuum brazed with three kinds of alloys: BNi-5, BNi-6, and BNi-7. The specimens were irradiated up to 0.7 dpa at 353 K in the High Flux Reactor at JRC Petten, the Netherlands. Tensile tests were performed at a constant displacement rate of 10 -3 s -1 at room temperature in the ECN hot cell facility. BNi-5 brazed specimens showed ductile behaviour. Necking and fractures were localized in the plate material. BNi-6 and BNi-7 brazed specimens failed brittle in the brazed zone. This was preceded by uniform deformation of the plate material. Tensile test results of irradiated specimens showed higher stresses due to radiation hardening and a reduction of the elongation of the plate material compared to the reference. SEM examination of the irradiated BNi-6 and BNi-7 fracture surfaces showed nonmetallic phases. These phases were not found in the reference specimens. ((orig.))

  1. Spinodal decomposition in AISI 316L stainless steel via high-speed laser remelting

    Chikarakara, Evans, E-mail: evans.chikarakara2@mail.dcu.ie [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland); Naher, Sumsun, E-mail: sumsun.naher@city.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University London (United Kingdom); Brabazon, Dermot, E-mail: dermot.brabazon@dcu.ie [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland)

    2014-05-01

    A 1.5 kW CO{sub 2} pulsed laser was used to melt the surface of AISI 316L stainless steel with a view to enhancing the surface properties for engineering applications. A 90 μm laser beam spot size focused onto the surface was used to provide high irradiances (up to 23.56 MW/cm{sup 2}) with low residence times (as low as 50 μs) in order to induce rapid surface melting and solidification. Variations in microstructure at different points within the laser treated region were investigated. From this processing refined lamellar and nodular microstructures were produced. These sets of unique microstructures were produced within the remelted region when the highest energy densities were selected in conjunction with the lowest residence times. The transformation from the typical austenitic structure to much finer unique lamellar and nodular structures was attributed to the high thermal gradients achieved using these selected laser processing parameters. These structures resulted in unique characteristics including elimination of cracks and a reduction of inclusions within the treated region. Grain structure reorientation between the bulk alloy and laser-treated region occurred due to the induced thermal gradients. This present article reports on microstructure forms resulting from the high-speed laser surface remelting and corresponding underlying kinetics.

  2. Characterization of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans biofilm on high-alloyed stainless steel: XPS and electrochemical studies

    Dec, Weronika [Institute of Industrial Organic Chemistry, Branch Pszczyna, Doświadczalna Street 27, 43-200 Pszczyna (Poland); Mosiałek, Michał; Socha, Robert P. [Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry PAS, Niezapominajek Street 8, 30-239 Kraków (Poland); Jaworska-Kik, Marzena [Department of Biopharmacy, Medical University of Silesia, Jedności Street 8, 41-200 Sosnowiec (Poland); Simka, Wojciech [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego 6 Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Michalska, Joanna, E-mail: joanna.k.michalska@polsl.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego 6 Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2017-07-01

    Results on D. desulfuricans biofilm formation on austenitic-ferritic duplex (2205 DSS) and superaustenitic (904L) stainless steels are presented. Surface characterization including the structure, configuration and chemical composition of biofilms were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were used to monitor the attachment activity of bacteria on the steels' surface and to determine the effect of bacteria on passivity. It was proved that investigated steels are rapidly colonized by bacteria. The presence of biofilm caused significant ennoblement of 904L steel surface, while retarded the attainment of high passive state of 2205 DSS. XPS analysis revealed significant sulphidation of the biofilm and its layered structure. Accumulation of sulphides and hydroxides was proved in the outermost layer, while the increasing contents of disulphides, organometallic and C-N bonds were detected in the internal part of the biofilm. Irreversible bondings between steel matrix and biofilm had also been observed. - Highlights: • High-alloyed steels are rapidly colonized by sulphate-reducing bacteria. • Higher Ni content stimulates more intensive biofilm growth. • Extracellular polymeric substances indelibly bind to the high-alloyed steels. • Sulphate-reducing bacteria caused irreversible sulphidation of passive films.

  3. Characterization of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans biofilm on high-alloyed stainless steel: XPS and electrochemical studies

    Dec, Weronika; Mosiałek, Michał; Socha, Robert P.; Jaworska-Kik, Marzena; Simka, Wojciech; Michalska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Results on D. desulfuricans biofilm formation on austenitic-ferritic duplex (2205 DSS) and superaustenitic (904L) stainless steels are presented. Surface characterization including the structure, configuration and chemical composition of biofilms were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were used to monitor the attachment activity of bacteria on the steels' surface and to determine the effect of bacteria on passivity. It was proved that investigated steels are rapidly colonized by bacteria. The presence of biofilm caused significant ennoblement of 904L steel surface, while retarded the attainment of high passive state of 2205 DSS. XPS analysis revealed significant sulphidation of the biofilm and its layered structure. Accumulation of sulphides and hydroxides was proved in the outermost layer, while the increasing contents of disulphides, organometallic and C-N bonds were detected in the internal part of the biofilm. Irreversible bondings between steel matrix and biofilm had also been observed. - Highlights: • High-alloyed steels are rapidly colonized by sulphate-reducing bacteria. • Higher Ni content stimulates more intensive biofilm growth. • Extracellular polymeric substances indelibly bind to the high-alloyed steels. • Sulphate-reducing bacteria caused irreversible sulphidation of passive films.

  4. Causes of Failure of High-Tensile Stud Bolts Used for Joining Metal Parts of Tower Crane

    Tingaev, A. K.; Gubaydulin, R. G.; Shaburova, N. A.

    2017-11-01

    The causes of the failure of a high-tensile stud 2M48-6gx500 10.9 made from steel grade 30HGSA which led to a temporary inoperability of a tower crane were investigated. The bolts were used to assemble the tower sections and collapsed after 45 days from the moment the crane was commissioned. The cracks in the fracture are identified as fatigue with the characteristic sites of nucleation, sustainable development and static dolomite. To determine the possible causes of stud bolts destruction, metallographic, durometric and mechanical tests were carried out from which it follows that the stud bolt material in its original state corresponded to the delivery conditions. The destruction of the stud bolt appears to have resulted from a combination of several unfavorable factors: uncertainty about the actual tension of the stud bolt due to the lack of information about the magnitude of the twist factor; partial displacement of the centers of the brackets holes and rotation of the stud bolt axis during the sections’ assembly; no tight contact on the support surfaces of the section brackets. All this led to a discrepancy between the actual design of the stud bolt, the appearance of additional forces and the destruction of the stud bolt.

  5. Effects of grain refinement on cast structure and tensile properties of superalloy K4169 at high pouring temperature

    Zi-qi Jie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the filling ability of large complex thin wall castings, the pouring temperature should be increased, but this will result in the grain coarsening. To overcome this problem, two kinds of grain refiners of Co-Fe-Nb and Cr-Fe-Nb ternary alloys, which contain high stability compound particles, were prepared. The effects of the refiners on the as-cast structures and tensile properties of the K4169 superalloy with different casting conditions were studied by analyzing specimens 110 mm long and 20 mm in diameter. Results showed that the mixture addition of the two refiners in the melt of K4169 can reduce the columnar grain region and decrease the equiaxed grain size greatly. After refinement, the amount of Laves phase decreases and its morphology changes from island to blocky structure. The carbides in the fine grain samples are fine and dispersive. Meanwhile, the porosity in specimens is decreased due to grain refinement. As a result, the yield strength, ultimate strength and the elongation of the specimens are increased. The grain refinement mechanisms are also discussed.

  6. Phase stability and tensile properties of Co-free Al0.5CrCuFeNi2 high-entropy alloys

    Ng, Chun; Guo, Sheng; Luan, Junhua; Wang, Qing; Lu, Jian; Shi, Sanqiang; Liu, C.T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The solid solution phase in the high-entropy alloy was confirmed to be metastable. • The alloy exhibited microstructural and mechanical stability against annealing. • Only as-cast alloys showed sufficient tensile plasticity. • A large variability of the measured tensile properties was recorded. • The alloys showing slip banding behavior did not necessarily have tensile ductility. -- Abstract: High-entropy alloys (HEAs) are becoming new research frontiers in the metallic materials field. The phase stability of HEAs is of critical significance, but a convincing understanding on it has been somewhat held back by the slow diffusion kinetics, which prevents the completion of diffusion assisted phase transformations toward the equilibrium state. Here a unique methodology, combining both the thermomechanical treatments and thermodynamic calculations, was employed to reveal the phase stability of HEAs, exemplified using the newly developed Al 0.5 CrCuFeNi 2 alloy. The metastable nature of the solid solution phases in this high-entropy alloy was uncovered through thermomechanical treatments induced phase transformations, and supported by the thermodynamic calculations. Meanwhile, the tensile properties for both the as-cast and thermomechanically treated alloys were measured, and correlated to their indentation behavior

  7. Effect of initial grain size on dynamic recrystallization in high purity austenitic stainless steels

    El Wahabi, M.; Gavard, L.; Montheillet, F.; Cabrera, J.M.; Prado, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of initial microstructure on discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) has been investigated by using high purity and ultra high purity austenitic stainless steels with various initial grain sizes. After uniaxial compression tests at constant strain rates and various temperatures, the steady state microstructure or the state corresponding to the maximum strain (ε = 1) attained in the test was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy aided with automated electron back scattering diffraction. Recrystallized grain size d rec and twin boundary fraction f TB measurements were carried out. The mechanical behavior was also investigated by comparing experimental stress-strain curves with various initial grain sizes. DDRX kinetics was described by the classical Avrami equation. It was concluded that larger initial grain sizes promoted a delay in the DDRX onset in the two alloys. It was also observed that the softening process progressed faster for smaller initial grain sizes. The effect of initial grain size is larger in the HP material and becomes more pronounced at low temperature

  8. High stored-energy breakdown tests on electrodes made of stainless steel, copper, titanium and molybdenum

    Esch, H. P. L. de, E-mail: hubert.de-esch@cea.fr; Simonin, A.; Grand, C. [CEA-Cadarache, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-04-08

    IRFM have conducted resilience tests on electrodes made of Cu, stainless steel 304L, Ti and Mo against breakdowns up to 170 kV and 300 J. The tests of the 10×10 cm{sup 2} electrodes have been performed at an electrode distance d=11 mm under vacuum (P∼5×10{sup −6} mbar). No great difference in voltage holding between the materials could be identified; all materials could reach a voltage holding between 140 and 170 kV over the 11 mm gap, i.e. results scatter within a ±10% band. After exposure to ∼10000 seconds of high-voltage (HV) on-time, having accumulated ∼1000 breakdowns, the electrodes were inspected. The anodes were covered with large and small craters. The rugosity of the anodes had increased substantially, that of the cathodes to a lesser extent. The molybdenum electrodes are least affected, but this does not show in their voltage holding capability. It is hypothesized that penetrating high-energy electrons from the breakdown project heat below the surface of the anode and cause a micro-explosion of material when melting point is exceeded. Polished electrodes have also been tested. The polishing results in a substantially reduced breakdown rate in the beginning, but after having suffered a relatively small number (∼100) of breakdowns, the polished electrodes behaved the same as the unpolished ones.

  9. A high molybdenum stainless steel and its resistance to chloride environments in the welded condition

    Coppolecchia, V.D.; Jasner, M.; Rockel, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    Highly alloyed stainless steels, such as 1925 hMo UNS N08925 with 6 percent molybdenum, are finding widespread use in high chloride cooling water and process environments. This alloy has good general corrosion resistance to a variety of chloride environments but it's main attraction is excellent resistance to all forms of localized corrosion. In aggressive chloride environments weldments are generally the area of concern with regard to localized corrosion. Temperature-time-sensitization diagrams are presented that demonstrate the resistance of 1925 hMo weldments to intergranular attack. Immersion tests in 10% ferric chloride substantiate that autogenous tube welds, also have excellent pitting resistance. Various filler metals are compared both electrochemically and in immersion tests. These comparisons reveal that an overalloyed filler metal is required to achieve pitting and crevice corrosion resistance equal or better than that of the base metal. Alloy 625 (UNS NO6625) has been selected. Constant extension rate tests in boiling 62% calcium chloride reveal that 1925 hMo weldments are immune to stress corrosion cracking in this environment which virtually guarantees absence of SCC in seawater regardless of temperature as well as in most commercial chemical environments

  10. Analysis of Helical Stainless Steel 08X18H10 Spring Relaxation at High Temperature

    H. Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to study a cylindrical helical spring to be applied at high temperatures. The aim of this work is to study the regularity of relaxation stresses in spring and evaluate its long-term stresses.The work allowed us to establish relaxation dependencies of springs under high temperatures. According to the results of creep tests at 600°, the theoretical equation of steel creep was defined concretely. It was then used for the analysis at 350°.The paper presents a created finite element model of spring relaxation. It is the stainless steel 08Х18Н10 spring to be used at the temperature of 350°.In this paper describes the basic theory of creep, considers the relationship between the creep speed and parameters. The changing compression force of springs is analyzed under fixed compression amount.The paper also analyzes the changing length of springs in the free state after various stages of high-temperature relaxation test. It determines the results of compression forces and free length under different amount of compression.The analysis to compare the theoretical calculation of the compression forces with the experimental results is conducted. Computer modeling is created in Abaqus for calculation. Spring relaxation experiments are carried out under fixed compression amount and at the temperature of 350°. It is shown that the simulation results, which are carried out in Abaqus coincide with experimental results. The study shows that it is possible to use the creep equation parameters, based on the experimental results at high temperatures, to predict creep and relaxation properties of springs, which work at less high temperatures. The work results can be used as a basis in designing the springs working at high temperatures.

  11. Study of an Al-Si-Cu HPDC alloy with high Zn content for the production of components requiring high ductility and tensile properties

    Vicario, Iban; Egizabal, Pedro; Galarraga, Haize; Plaza, Luis Maria; Crespo, Inigo [Fundacion Tecnalia Research and Innovation, Donostia-San Sebastien (Spain). Dept. of foundry processes

    2013-04-15

    Conventional high-pressure die casting aluminium components present certain limitations in terms of mechanical properties attainable due to the intrinsic porosity of the castings as well as the presence of iron-based brittle intermetallic phases. The present work approaches the increase in ductility and tensile strength through the analysis of the effect of the alloying elements of AlSi alloys used for high-pressure die casting. The combination of alloying elements providing the best results in terms of ductility and tensile strength were eventually selected to produce a batch of components that were thoroughly tested. The final alloy had a composition of Si 8.21, Fe 0.78, Cu 1.53, Mn 0.64, Mg 0.46, Ni 0.07, Zn 3.37, Pb 0.34, Sn 0.27, Ti 0.18 and Cr 0.04wt.%. The selected alloy performance was compared to that of the commercial AlSi9Cu3 and Silafont {sup registered} 36 alloys.

  12. Low-cycle fatigue properties of SUS304 stainless steel in high-temperature sodium

    Hirano, M.; Komine, R.; Kitao, K.; Nihei, I.; Yoshitoshi, A.

    Low-cycle fatigue tests in sodium and in air have been performed to investigate the influence of a high-temperature sodium environment on the strain-controlled fatigue behaviour for SUS304 stainless steel. The oxygen concentration in sodium was 2.4 ppm at the cold trap temperature of 145 deg. C. Tests in both environments were conducted at 450 deg. C, 550 deg. C and 650 deg. C at a constant strain rate of 1x10 -3 /sec with a fully-reversed triangular waveform and a zero mean strain. The fatigue life of SUS304 stainless steel in sodium at 450 deg. C, 550 deg. C and 650 deg. C was greater than those in air at the same temperature except at higher strain range (>0.8%) at 650 deg. C, and this difference had a tendency to increase as the total strain range decreases. At the higher total strain range at 650 deg. C, there was no marked difference between both environments. As the temperature increased, the fatigue life in sodium and in air decreased, and the Nsub(f sodium)/Nsub(f air) ratio also decreased. Microscopic examination of specimens tested in sodium and in air at 450 deg. C, 550 deg. C and 650 deg. C revealed no difference in the microstructure, but few surface cracks were observed on specimens tested in sodium than in those tested in air. Fractography of specimens tested in air at 450 deg. C, 550 deg. C and 650 deg. C revealed well-defined striations. But, in sodium, striations on specimens tested at 450 deg. C and 550 deg. C showed obscure configuration and it was difficult to find out, whereas, at 650 deg. C in sodium intergranular fracture was observed. The specimens tested in sodium had a longer fatigue life than those tested in air because the latter are subjected to considerable oxidation, while the former are free of such chemical action. Accordingly, it is concluded that crack initiation and propagation are more likely to occur in air than in sodium. (author)

  13. Femtosecond laser fabrication of highly hydrophobic stainless steel surface with hierarchical structures fabricated by combining ordered microstructures and LIPSS

    Martínez-Calderon, M.; Rodríguez, A.; Dias-Ponte, A.; Morant-Miñana, M.C.; Gómez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Femtosecond laser treatment to achieve highly hydrophobic behavior on stainless steel. • Combination of micro-machined patterns with LIPSS into hierarchical structures. • Contact angles as high as 156° with only the femtosecond laser irradiation. - Abstract: In this work we have developed hierarchical structures that consist of micro-patterned surfaces covered by nanostructures with a femtosecond laser. The first part of this work is a study to determine the microscale modifications produced on a stainless steel alloy (AISI304) surface at high pulse energy, different velocities, and number of overscans in order to obtain microstructures with a selected depth of around 10 μm and line widths of 20 μm. The second part of the work is focused on finding the optimal irradiation parameters to obtain the nanostructure pattern. Nanostructures have been defined by means of Laser Induced Periodical Surface Structures (LIPSS) around 250 nm high and a period of 580 nm, which constitute the nanostructure pattern. Finally, dual scale gratings of 50 mm"2 were fabricated with different geometries and their effect on the measured contact angle. Combining the micro-pattern with the LIPSS nano-pattern, highly hydrophobic surfaces have been developed with measured static contact angles higher than 150° on a stainless steel alloy.

  14. Femtosecond laser fabrication of highly hydrophobic stainless steel surface with hierarchical structures fabricated by combining ordered microstructures and LIPSS

    Martínez-Calderon, M., E-mail: mmcalderon@ceit.es [CEIT-IK4 & Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); Rodríguez, A.; Dias-Ponte, A.; Morant-Miñana, M.C.; Gómez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S.M. [CEIT-IK4 & Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Femtosecond laser treatment to achieve highly hydrophobic behavior on stainless steel. • Combination of micro-machined patterns with LIPSS into hierarchical structures. • Contact angles as high as 156° with only the femtosecond laser irradiation. - Abstract: In this work we have developed hierarchical structures that consist of micro-patterned surfaces covered by nanostructures with a femtosecond laser. The first part of this work is a study to determine the microscale modifications produced on a stainless steel alloy (AISI304) surface at high pulse energy, different velocities, and number of overscans in order to obtain microstructures with a selected depth of around 10 μm and line widths of 20 μm. The second part of the work is focused on finding the optimal irradiation parameters to obtain the nanostructure pattern. Nanostructures have been defined by means of Laser Induced Periodical Surface Structures (LIPSS) around 250 nm high and a period of 580 nm, which constitute the nanostructure pattern. Finally, dual scale gratings of 50 mm{sup 2} were fabricated with different geometries and their effect on the measured contact angle. Combining the micro-pattern with the LIPSS nano-pattern, highly hydrophobic surfaces have been developed with measured static contact angles higher than 150° on a stainless steel alloy.

  15. Modeling of hot tensile and short-term creep strength for LWR piping materials under severe accident conditions

    Harada, Y.; Maruyama, Y.; Chino, E.; Shibazaki, H.; Kudo, T.; Hidaka, A.; Hashimoto, K.; Sugimoto, J.

    2000-01-01

    The analytical study on severe accident shows the possibility of the reactor coolant system (RCS) piping failure before reactor pressure vessel failure under the high primary pressure sequence at pressurized water reactors. The establishment of the high-temperature strength model of the realistic RCS piping materials is important in order to predict precisely the accident progression and to evaluate the piping behavior with small uncertainties. Based on material testing, the 0.2% proof stress and the ultimate tensile strength above 800degC were given by the equations of second degree as a function of the reciprocal absolute temperature considering the strength increase due to fine precipitates for the piping materials. The piping materials include type 316 stainless steel, type 316 stainless steel of nuclear grade, CF8M cast duplex stainless steel and STS410 carbon steel. Also the short-term creep rupture time and the minimum creep rate at high-temperature were given by the modified Norton's Law as a function of stress and temperature considering the effect of the precipitation formation and resolution on the creep strength. The present modified Norton's Law gives better results than the conventional Larson-Miller method. Correlating the creep data (the applied stress versus the minimum creep rate) with the tensile data (the 0.2% proof stress or the ultimate tensile strength versus the strain rate), it was found that the dynamic recrystallization significantly occurred at high-temperature. (author)

  16. Low cycle fatigue: high cycle fatigue damage accumulation in a 304L austenitic stainless steel

    Lehericy, Y.

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of a Low Cycle Fatigue pre-damage on the subsequent fatigue limit of a 304L stainless steel. The effects of hardening and severe roughness (grinding) have also been investigated. In a first set of tests, the evolution of the surface damage induced by the different LCF pre-cycling was characterized. This has permitted to identify mechanisms and kinetics of damage in the plastic domain for different surface conditions. Then, pre-damaged samples were tested in the High Cycle Fatigue domain in order to establish the fatigue limits associated with each level of pre-damage. Results evidence that, in the case of polished samples, an important number of cycles is required to initiate surface cracks ant then to affect the fatigue limit of the material but, in the case of ground samples, a few number of cycles is sufficient to initiate cracks and to critically decrease the fatigue limit. The fatigue limit of pre-damaged samples can be estimated using the stress intensity factor threshold. Moreover, this detrimental effect of severe surface conditions is enhanced when fatigue tests are performed under a positive mean stress (author)

  17. Comparative study of high temperature oxidation behaviour in AISI 304 and AISI 439 stainless steels

    Antônio Claret Soares Sabioni

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with a comparison of high temperature oxidation behaviour in AISI 304 austenitic and AISI 439 ferritic stainless steels. The oxidation experiments were performed between 850 and 950 °C, in oxygen and Ar (100 vpm H2. In most cases, it was formed a Cr2O3 protective scale, whose growth kinetics follows a parabolic law. The exception was for the the AISI 304 steel, at 950 °C, in oxygen atmosphere, which forms an iron oxide external layer. The oxidation resistance of the AISI 439 does not depend on the atmosphere. The AISI 304 has the same oxidation resistance in both atmospheres, at 850 °C, but at higher temperatures, its oxidation rate strongly increases in oxygen atmosphere. Concerning the performance of these steels under oxidation, our results show that the AISI 439 steel has higher oxidation resistance in oxidizing atmosphere, above 850 °C, while, in low pO2 atmosphere, the AISI 304 steel has higher oxidation resistance than the AISI 439, in all the temperature range investigated.

  18. Multiple cracks initiation and propagation behavior of stainless steel in high temperature water environment

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Chiba, Goro; Nakajima, Nobuo; Totsuka, Nobuo

    2001-01-01

    Environmentally assisted crack initiation behavior is greatly affected by applied stress and environmental factors, such as water temperature, contained impurities and so on. On the other hand, crack initiation behavior also influences crack propagation. A typical example of this influence can be observed as the interference effects of multiple cracks, such as the coalescence of approaching crack tips or the arrest phenomena in the relaxation zone of an adjacent crack. To understand these effects of crack initiation on crack propagation behavior is very important to predict the lifetime of components, in which quite a few cracks tend to occur. This study aimed at revealing the crack initiation behavior and the influence of this behavior on propagation. At first, to evaluate the effect of applied stress on crack initiation behavior, sensitized stainless steel was subjected to a four-point bending test in a high temperature water environment at the constant potentials of ECP +50 mV and ECP +150 mV. Secondly, a crack initiation and growth simulation model was developed, in which the interference effect of multiple cracks is evaluated by the finite element method, based on the experimental results. Using this model, the relationship between crack initiation and propagation was studied. From the model, it was revealed that the increasing number of the cracks accelerates crack propagation and reduces life. (author)

  19. Irradiation-induced microchemical changes in highly irradiated 316 stainless steel

    Fujii, K., E-mail: fujiik@inss.co.jp; Fukuya, K.

    2016-02-15

    Cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens irradiated to 74 dpa in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) were analyzed by atom probe tomography (APT) to extend knowledge of solute clusters and segregation at higher doses. The analyses confirmed that those clusters mainly enriched in Ni–Si or Ni–Si–Mn were formed at high number density. The clusters were divided into three types based on their size and Mn content; small Ni–Si clusters (3–4 nm in diameter), and large Ni–Si and Ni–Si–Mn clusters (8–10 nm in diameter). The total cluster number density was 7.7 × 10{sup 23} m{sup −3}. The fraction of large clusters was almost 1/10 of the total density. The average composition (in at%) for small clusters was: Fe, 54; Cr, 12; Mn, 1; Ni, 22; Si, 11; Mo, 1, and for large clusters it was: Fe, 44; Cr, 9; Mn, 2; Ni, 29; Si, 14; Mo,1. It was likely that some of the Ni–Si clusters correspond to γ′ phase precipitates while the Ni–Si–Mn clusters were precursors of G phase precipitates. The APT analyses at grain boundaries confirmed enrichment of Ni, Si, P and Cu and depletion of Fe, Cr, Mo and Mn. The segregation behavior was consistent with previous knowledge of radiation induced segregation.

  20. Environmental degradation of 316 stainless steel in high temperature low cycle fatigue

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Manson, S. Stanford; Halford, Gary R.

    1987-01-01

    Procedures based on modification of the conventional Strainrange Partitioning method are proposed to characterize the time-dependent degradation of engineering alloys in high-temperature, low-cycle fatigue. Creep-fatigue experiments were conducted in air using different waveforms of loading on 316 stainless steel at 816 C (1500 F) to determine the effect of exposure time on cyclic life. Reductions in the partitioned cyclic lives were observed with an increase in the time of exposure (or with the corresponding decrease in the steady-state creep rate) for all the waveforms involving creep strain. Excellent correlations of the experimental data were obtained by modifying the Conventional Strainrange Partitioning life relationships involving creep strain using a power-law term of either: (1) time of exposure, or (2) steady-state creep rate of the creep-fatigue test. Environmental degradation due to oxidation, material degradation due to the precipitation of carbides along the grain boundaries and detrimental deformation modes associated with the prolonged periods of creep were observed to be the main mechanisms responsible for life reductions at long exposure times.

  1. Influence of surface oxide films on the SCC of stainless steel in high temperature water

    Tani, Junichi; Kato, Shunji; Hirano, Hideo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab; Kushida, H.

    2000-06-01

    Effect of pre-filming conditions on the SCC susceptibility of stainless steels (SS) was investigated by SSRT and electrochemical measurement in high temperature water. The IGSCC ratio of a specimen with the oxide film formed in hydrogen-saturated water (R film specimen) was higher than that of a specimen with the oxide film formed in air-saturated water (O film specimen). When the pre-filmed specimens were coupled with a Cr-depleted SS that simulated weld-heat-affected zones, the galvanic couple between the R film specimen and Cr-depleted SS showed higher corrosion current than the couple between the O film specimen and Cr-depleted SS. The film thickness of the Cr-depleted SS was thinner in the couple with the R film specimen after the test. These results clearly show that the SCC susceptibility of R film specimen was higher than that of the O film specimen, in accordance with the SSRT results. (author)

  2. High temperature oxidation behavior of AISI 304L stainless steel—Effect of surface working operations

    Ghosh, Swati; Kumar, M. Kiran; Kain, Vivekanand

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Surface working resulted in thinner oxide on the surface. ► Oxides on machined/ground surfaces richer in Cr, higher in specific resistivity. ► Additional ionic transport process at the metal-oxide for ground sample established. ► Presence of fragmented grains and martensite influenced oxide nature/morphology. - Abstract: The oxidation behavior of grade 304L stainless steel (SS) subjected to different surface finishing (machining and grinding) operations was followed in situ by contact electric resistance (CER) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements using controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) technique in high purity water (conductivity −1 ) at 300 °C and 10 MPa in an autoclave connected to a recirculation loop system. The results highlight the distinct differences in the oxidation behavior of surface worked material as compared to solution annealed material in terms of specific resistivity and low frequency Warburg impedance. The resultant oxide layer was characterized for (a) elemental analyses by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and (b) morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Oxide layers with higher specific resistivity and chromium content were formed in case of machined and ground conditions. Presence of an additional ionic transport process has also been identified for the ground condition at the metal/oxide interface. These differences in electrochemical properties and distinct morphological features of the oxide layer as a result of surface working were attributed to the prevalence of heavily fragmented grain structure and presence of martensite.

  3. Precipitation Kinetics of Cr2N in High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel

    SHI Feng; WANG Li-jun; CUI Wen-fang; LIU Chun-ming

    2008-01-01

    The precipitation behavior of Cr2N during isothermal aging in the temperature range from 700℃to 950℃ in Fe-18Cr-12Mn-0.48N(in mass percent)high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel,including morphology and content of precipitate,was investigated using optical microscopy,scanning electron microscopy,and transmission electron microscopy.The isothermal precipitation kinetics curve of Cr2N and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained.The results show that Cr2N phase precipitates in a cellular way and its morphology is transformed from initial granular precipitates to lamellar ones in the cell with increasing aging time.The nose temperature of Cr2N precipitation is about 800℃,with a corresponding incubation period of 30 min,and the ceiling temperature of Cr2N precipitation is 950℃.The diffusion activation energy of Cr2N precipitation is 296 kJ/mol.

  4. Microstructure characteristics of high borated stainless steel fabricated by hot-pressing sintering

    Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Mingjia, E-mail: mingjiawangysu@126.com; Zhao, Hongchang

    2016-04-25

    The present study investigated the microstructure of powder metallurgy (P/M) high borated stainless steel through hot-pressing sintering in a temperature range of 1000–1150 °C within 30 min under 30 MPa. Microstructure and phase examinations were carried out by applying scanning electron microscope, electron backscatter diffraction and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results of as-atomized powders demonstrated that many powders kept egg-type structure with an austenite outer layer and the eutectic borides were much finer than those in traditional cast products. Microstructure studies revealed that borides suffered Ostwald ripening and were significantly influenced by the sintering temperature. Orientation maps indicated that the inter-particle contact areas consisted of equiaxed grains and the regions consisting of large elongated grains partly inherited the microstructure characteristics of as-atomized powder particles. Furthermore, the mechanisms governing the morphological changes in microstructure were discussed. - Highlights: • Near-complete densification could be obtained through hot-pressing sintering. • There was no phase transformation and present phases were M{sub 2}B and austenite. • Borides suffered Ostwald ripening and were significantly influenced by temperature. • Inter-particle contact areas consisted of equiaxed grains for recrystallization. • Deformation-free zones exhibited elongated grains for dendritic arms coarsening.

  5. Irradiation-induced microchemical changes in highly irradiated 316 stainless steel

    Fujii, K.; Fukuya, K.

    2016-01-01

    Cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens irradiated to 74 dpa in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) were analyzed by atom probe tomography (APT) to extend knowledge of solute clusters and segregation at higher doses. The analyses confirmed that those clusters mainly enriched in Ni–Si or Ni–Si–Mn were formed at high number density. The clusters were divided into three types based on their size and Mn content; small Ni–Si clusters (3–4 nm in diameter), and large Ni–Si and Ni–Si–Mn clusters (8–10 nm in diameter). The total cluster number density was 7.7 × 10"2"3 m"−"3. The fraction of large clusters was almost 1/10 of the total density. The average composition (in at%) for small clusters was: Fe, 54; Cr, 12; Mn, 1; Ni, 22; Si, 11; Mo, 1, and for large clusters it was: Fe, 44; Cr, 9; Mn, 2; Ni, 29; Si, 14; Mo,1. It was likely that some of the Ni–Si clusters correspond to γ′ phase precipitates while the Ni–Si–Mn clusters were precursors of G phase precipitates. The APT analyses at grain boundaries confirmed enrichment of Ni, Si, P and Cu and depletion of Fe, Cr, Mo and Mn. The segregation behavior was consistent with previous knowledge of radiation induced segregation.

  6. Initiation and propagation of multiple cracks of stainless steel in high temperature water environment

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Chiba, Goro; Nakajima, Nobuo; Totsuka, Nobuo [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Environmentally assisted crack initiation behavior is greatly affected by applied stress and environmental factors, such as water temperature, contained impurities and so on. Crack initiation behavior also influences crack propagation. A typical example of this influence can be observed as the interference effects of multiple cracks, such as the coalescence of approaching crack tips or the arrest phenomena in the relaxation zone of an adjacent crack. To understand these effects of crack initiation on crack propagation behavior is very important to predict the lifetime of components, in which relatively large number of cracks tend to occur. This study aimed at revealing the crack initiation behavior and the influence of this behavior on propagation. At first, to evaluate the effect of applied stress on crack initiation behavior, sensitized stainless steel was subjected to a four-point bending test in high temperature water environment at the constant potentials of +50 mV SHE and +150 mV SHE Secondly, a crack initiation and growth simulation model was developed, in which the interference effect of multiple cracks is evaluated by the finite element method, based on the experimental results. Using this model, the relationship between crack initiation and propagation was investigated, and it was revealed that the increasing number of the cracks accelerates crack propagation and reduces life. (author)

  7. Improved austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications. [Improved stress-rupture properties

    Not Available

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; .01-.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; .03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, 0; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P + wt. % B + wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  8. Studies on Fusion Welding of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel: Microstructure, Mechanical and corrosion Behaviour

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made in the present investigation to weld high nitrogen steel of 5mm thick plates using various process i.e., shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and autogenous electron beam welding (EBW) process. Present work is aimed at studying the microstructural changes and its effects on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Microstructure is characterized by optical, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction technique. Vickers hardness, tensile properties, impact toughness and face bend ductility testing of the welds was carried out. Pitting corrosion resistance of welds was determined using potentio-dynamic polarization testing in 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present investigation established that SMA welds made using Cr-Mn-N electrode were observed to have a austenite dendritic grain structure in the weld metal and is having poor mechanical properties but good corrosion resistance. GTA welds made using 18Ni (MDN 250) filler wire were observed to have a reverted austenite in martensite matrix of the weld metal and formation of unmixed zone at the fusion boundary which resulted in better mechanical properties and poor corrosion resistance. Fine grains and uniform distribution of delta ferrite in the austenite matrix and narrow width of weld zone are observed in autogeneous electron beam welds. A good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance was achieved for electron beam welds of high nitrogen steel when compared to SMA and GTA welds.

  9. Production and several properties of single crystal austenitic stainless steels

    Okamoto, Kazutaka; Yoshinari, Akira; Kaneda, Junya; Aono, Yasuhisa; Kato, Takahiko

    1998-01-01

    The single crystal austenitic stainless steels Type 316L and 304L were grown in order to improve the resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) using a unidirectional solidification method which can provide the large size single crystals. The mechanical properties and the chemical properties were examined. The orientation and temperature dependence of tensile properties of the single crystals were measured. The yield stress of the single crystal steels are lower than those of the conventional polycrystal steels because of the grain boundary strength cannot be expected in the single crystal steels. The tensile properties of the single crystal austenitic stainless steel Type 316L depend strongly on the orientation. The tensile strength in orientation are about 200 MPa higher than those in the and orientations. The microstructure of the single crystal consists of a mixture of the continuous γ-austenitic single crystal matrix and the δ-ferrite phase so that the effects of the γ/δ boundaries on the chemical properties were studied. The effects of the δ-ferrite phases and the γ/δ boundaries on the resistance to SCC were examined by the creviced bent beam test (CBB test). No crack is observed in all the CBB test specimens of the single crystals, even at the γ/δ boundaries. The behavior of the radiation induced segregation (RIS) at the γ/δ boundaries in the single crystal austenitic stainless steel Type 316L was evaluated by the electron irradiation test in the high voltage electron microscope (HVEM). The depletion of oversized solute chromium at the γ/δ boundary in the single crystal austenitic stainless steel Type 316L is remarkably lower than that at the grain boundary in the polycrystalline-type 316L. (author)

  10. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel and zirconium in nitric acid containing highly oxidizing species

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Fujita, Tomonari

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of 304ELC, 310Nb stainless steels and Zirconium was investigated in the simulated dissolver solution of a reprocessing plant to obtain fundamental data for life prediction. Corrosion of heat transfer surface was also investigated in nitric acid solutions containing Ce ion. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Stainless steels showed intergranular corrosion in the simulated dissolver solution. The corrosion rate increased with time and reached to a constant value after several hundred hours of immersing time. The constant corrosion rate changed depending on potential suggesting that corrosion potential dominates the corrosion process. 310Nb showed superior corrosion resistance to 304ELC. (2) Corrosion rate of stainless steels increased in the heat transfer condition. The causes of corrosion enhancement are estimated to be higher corrosion potential and higher temperature of heat transfer surface. (3) Zirconium showed perfect passivity in all the test conditions employed. (author)

  11. Glass interface effect on high-strain-rate tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The glass interface effect on dynamic tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material has been investigated by subjecting a glass-polymer system of this polymer material matrix embedded a single 3 mm-diameter glass particle to impact loading in a split Hopkinson tension bar

  12. Mechanical characteristics of welded joints between different stainless steels grades

    Topolska, S.; Łabanowski, J.

    2017-08-01

    Investigation of mechanical characteristics of welded joints is one of the most important tasks that allow determining their functional properties. Due to the very high, still rising, cost of some stainless steels it is justified, on economic grounds, welding austenitic stainless steel with steels that are corrosion-resistant like duplex ones. According to forecasts the price of corrosion resistant steels stil can increase by 26 ÷ 30%. For technical reasons welded joints require appropriate mechanical properties such as: tensile strength, bending, ductility, toughness, and resistance to aggressive media. Such joints are applied in the construction of chemical tankers, apparatus and chemical plants and power steam stations. Using the proper binder makes possible the welds directly between the elements of austenitic stainless steels and duplex ones. It causes that such joits behave satisfactorily in service in such areas like maritime constructions and steam and chemical plants. These steels have high mechanical properties such as: the yield strength, the tensile strength and the ductility as well as the resistance to general corrosion media. They are resistant to both pitting and stress corrosions. The relatively low cost of production of duplex steels, in comparison with standard austenitic steels, is inter alia, the result of a reduced amount of scarce and expensive Nickel, which is seen as a further advantage of these steels.

  13. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1986-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Microstructures of cast materials subjected to long-term aging either in reactor service or in the laboratory have been characterized by TEM, SANS, and APFIM techniques. Two precipitate phases, i.e., the Cr-rich α' and Ni- and Si-rich G phase, have been identified in the ferrite matrix of the aged steels. The results indicate that the low-temperature embrittlement is primarily caused by α' precipitates which form by spinodal decomposition. The relative contribution of G phase to loss of toughness is now known. Microstructural data also indicate that weakening of ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitates has a significant effect on the onset and extent of embrittlement of the high-carbon CF-8 and CF-8M grades of stainless steels, particularly after aging at 400 or 450 0 C. Data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450 0 C are presented and correlated with the microstructural results. Thermal aging of the steels results in an increase in tensile strength and a decrease in impact energy, J/sub IC/, and tearing modulus. The fracture toughness results show good agreement with the Charpy-impact data. The effects of compositional and metallurgical variables on loss of toughness are discussed

  14. Pyrolysis-catalysis of waste plastic using a nickel-stainless-steel mesh catalyst for high-value carbon products.

    Zhang, Yeshui; Nahil, Mohamad A; Wu, Chunfei; Williams, Paul T

    2017-11-01

    A stainless-steel mesh loaded with nickel catalyst was produced and used for the pyrolysis-catalysis of waste high-density polyethylene with the aim of producing high-value carbon products, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The catalysis temperature and plastic-to-catalyst ratio were investigated to determine the influence on the formation of different types of carbon deposited on the nickel-stainless-steel mesh catalyst. Increasing temperature from 700 to 900°C resulted in an increase in the carbon deposited on the nickel-loaded stainless-steel mesh catalyst from 32.5 to 38.0 wt%. The increase in sample-to-catalyst ratio reduced the amount of carbon deposited on the mesh catalyst in terms of g carbon g -1 plastic. The carbons were found to be largely composed of filamentous carbons, with negligible disordered (amorphous) carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of the filamentous carbons revealed them to be composed of a large proportion (estimated at ∼40%) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The optimum process conditions for CNT production, in terms of yield and graphitic nature, determined by Raman spectroscopy, was catalysis temperature of 800°C and plastic-to-catalyst ratio of 1:2, where a mass of 334 mg of filamentous/MWCNTs g -1 plastic was produced.

  15. Influence of Silicon on Swelling and Microstructure in Russian Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated to High Neutron Doses

    Porollo, S.I.; Shulepin, S.V.; Konobeev, Y.V.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: For some applications in fusion devices austenitic stainless steels are still considered to be candidates for use as structural components, but high neutron exposures must be endured by the steels. Operational experience of fast reactors in Western Europe, USA and Japan provides evidence of the possible use of austenitic steels up to ∼ 150 dpa. Studies aimed at improvement of existing Russian austenitic steels are being carried out in Russia. For improvement of irradiation resistance of Russian steels it is necessary to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for deterioration of steel properties. This understanding can be achieved by continuing detailed investigations of the microstructure of cladding steels after irradiation to high doses. By investigating the evolution of radiation-induced microstructure in neutron irradiated steels of different chemical composition one can study the effect of chemical variations on steel properties. Silicon is one of the most important chemical elements that strongly influence the behavior of austenitic steel properties under irradiation. In this paper results are presented of investigations of the effect of silicon additions on void swelling and microstructure of base austenitic stainless steel EI-847 (0.06C-16Cr-15Ni- 3Mo-Nb) irradiated as fuel pin cladding of both regular and experimental assemblies in the BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 fast reactors to neutron doses up to 49 dpa. The possible mechanisms of silicon's effect on void swelling in austenitic stainless steels are presented and analyzed. (authors)

  16. Phases formed to high temperatures in the interface and its influence on the deformation of stainless steel superduplex

    Silva, Isabela Leao Amaral da; Bevitori, Alice Barreto; Terrones, Luis Augusto Hernandez

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In the present study it was observed the effects of aging in superduplex stainless steel 2507. For this, it was analyzed the microstructure and chemical composition of the steel before and after heat treatments. With this purpose heat treatments were performed at 650 deg C/8h, 850 deg C/24h and 1000 deg C/10h. For the analysis of changes occurring in the microstructure of the material it was used the following techniques: Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction. These changes have directly influenced the mechanical properties of the material, and were determined using tensile testing, hardness measurements and microhardness. The aging of the material contributed to the precipitation of various phases in the microstructure of the material. It was identified peaks of sigma phase at the temperature of 850 and 1000°C but it was not identified peaks of ferrite, which indicates partial dissolution of secondary phases. There was a decrease in toughness and ductility of the material when compared with the material in the as received condition. (author)

  17. Effect of Nb and Cu on the high temperature creep properties of a high Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    Lee, Kyu-Ho; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Huh, Joo-Youl; Park, Dae-Bum; Hong, Sung-Min; Shim, Jae-Hyeok; Jung, Woo-Sang

    2013-01-01

    The effect of Nb and Cu addition on the creep properties of a high Mn–N austenitic stainless steel was investigated at 600 and 650 °C. In the original high Mn–N steel, which was initially precipitate-free, the precipitation of M 23 C 6 (M = Cr, Fe) and Cr 2 N took place mostly on grain boudaries during creep deformation. On the other hand, the minor addition of Nb resulted in high number density of Z-phases (CrNbN) and MX (M = Nb; X = C, N) carbonitrides inside grains by combining with a high content of N, while suppressing the formation of Cr 2 N. The addition of Cu gave rise to the independent precipitation of nanometer-sized metallic Cu particles. The combination of the different precipitate-forming mechanisms associated with Z-phase, MX and Cu-rich precipitates turned out to improve the creep-resistance significantly. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the precipitation were discussed using thermo-kinetic simulations. - Highlights: • The creep rupture life was improved by Nb and Cu addition. • The creep resistance of the steel A2 in this study was comparable to that of TP347HFG. • The size of Z-phase and MX carbonitride did not change significantly after creep test. • The nanometer sized Cu-rich precipitate was observed after creep. • The predicted size of precipitates by MatCalc agreed well with measured size

  18. Continuum model of tensile fracture of metal melts and its application to a problem of high-current electron irradiation of metals

    Mayer, Alexander E.; Mayer, Polina N.

    2015-01-01

    A continuum model of the metal melt fracture is formulated on the basis of the continuum mechanics and theory of metastable liquid. A character of temperature and strain rate dependences of the tensile strength that is predicted by the continuum model is verified, and parameters of the model are fitted with the use of the results of the molecular dynamics simulations for ultra-high strain rates (≥1–10/ns). A comparison with experimental data from literature is also presented for Al and Ni melts. Using the continuum model, the dynamic tensile strength of initially uniform melts of Al, Cu, Ni, Fe, Ti, and Pb within a wide range of strain rates (from 1–10/ms to 100/ns) and temperatures (from melting temperature up to 70–80% of critical temperature) is calculated. The model is applied to numerical investigation of a problem of the high-current electron irradiation of Al, Cu, and Fe targets

  19. Self-ion emulation of high dose neutron irradiated microstructure in stainless steels

    Jiao, Z.; Michalicka, J.; Was, G. S.

    2018-04-01

    Solution-annealed 304L stainless steel (SS) was irradiated to 130 dpa at 380 °C, and to 15 dpa at 500 °C and 600 °C, and cold-worked 316 SS (CW 316 SS) was irradiated to 130 dpa at 380 °C using 5 MeV Fe++/Ni++ to produce microstructures and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) for comparison with that from neutron irradiation at 320 °C to 46 dpa in the BOR60 reactor. For the 304L SS alloy, self-ion irradiation at 380 °C produced a dislocation loop microstructure that was comparable to that by neutron irradiation. No voids were observed in either the 380 °C self-ion irradiation or the neutron irradiation conditions. Irradiation at 600 °C produced the best match to radiation-induced segregation of Cr and Ni with the neutron irradiation, consistent with the prediction of a large temperature shift by Mansur's invariant relations for RIS. For the CW 316 SS alloy irradiated to 130 dpa at 380 °C, both the irradiated microstructure (dislocation loops, precipitates and voids) and RIS reasonably matched the neutron-irradiated sample. The smaller temperature shift for RIS in CW 316 SS was likely due to the high sink (dislocation) density induced by the cold work. A single self-ion irradiation condition at a dose rate ∼1000× that in reactor does not match both dislocation loops and RIS in solution-annealed 304L SS. However, a single irradiation temperature produced a reasonable match with both the dislocation/precipitate microstructure and RIS in CW 316 SS, indicating that sink density is a critical factor in determining the temperature shift for self-ion irradiations.

  20. Low friction and high strength of 316L stainless steel tubing for biomedical applications

    Amanov, Auezhan; Lee, Soo–Wohn; Pyun, Young–Sik

    2017-01-01

    We propose herein a nondestructive surface modification technique called ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) to increase the strength and to improve the tribological performance of 316L stainless steel (SS) tubing. Nanocrystallization along nearly the complete tube thickness of 200 μm was achieved by UNSM technique that was confirmed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Nano-hardness of the untreated and UNSM-treated specimens was measured using a nanoindentation. Results revealed that a substantial increase in hardness was obtained for the UNSM-treated specimen that may be attributed to the nanocrystallization and refined grains. Stress-strain behavior of the untreated and UNSM-treated specimens was assessed by a 3-point bending test. It was found that the UNSM-treated specimen exhibited a much higher strength than that of the untreated specimen. In addition, the tribological behavior of the untreated and UNSM-treated specimens with an outer diameter (OD) of 1.6 mm and an inner diameter (ID) of 1.2 mm was investigated using a cylinder-on-cylinder (crossed tubes of equal radius) tribo-tester against itself under dry conditions at ambient temperature. The friction coefficient and wear resistance of the UNSM-treated specimen were remarkably improved compared to that of the untreated specimen. The significant increase in hardness after UNSM treatment is responsible for the improved friction coefficient and wear resistance of the tubing. Thus, the UNSM technique was found to be beneficial to improving the mechanical and tribological properties of 316L SS tubing for various potential biomedical applications, in particular for coronary artery stents. - Highlights: • A newly developed setting for tubing was employed. • A nanocrystalline surface was produced by UNSM technique. • High hardness and strength were obtained by UNSM technique. • Friction and wear behavior was improved by UNSM technique.

  1. Low friction and high strength of 316L stainless steel tubing for biomedical applications

    Amanov, Auezhan, E-mail: aamanov@outlook.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sun Moon University, Asan 31460 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo–Wohn [Department of Metals and Materials Engineering, Sun Moon University, Asan 31460 (Korea, Republic of); Pyun, Young–Sik [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sun Moon University, Asan 31460 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-01

    We propose herein a nondestructive surface modification technique called ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) to increase the strength and to improve the tribological performance of 316L stainless steel (SS) tubing. Nanocrystallization along nearly the complete tube thickness of 200 μm was achieved by UNSM technique that was confirmed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Nano-hardness of the untreated and UNSM-treated specimens was measured using a nanoindentation. Results revealed that a substantial increase in hardness was obtained for the UNSM-treated specimen that may be attributed to the nanocrystallization and refined grains. Stress-strain behavior of the untreated and UNSM-treated specimens was assessed by a 3-point bending test. It was found that the UNSM-treated specimen exhibited a much higher strength than that of the untreated specimen. In addition, the tribological behavior of the untreated and UNSM-treated specimens with an outer diameter (OD) of 1.6 mm and an inner diameter (ID) of 1.2 mm was investigated using a cylinder-on-cylinder (crossed tubes of equal radius) tribo-tester against itself under dry conditions at ambient temperature. The friction coefficient and wear resistance of the UNSM-treated specimen were remarkably improved compared to that of the untreated specimen. The significant increase in hardness after UNSM treatment is responsible for the improved friction coefficient and wear resistance of the tubing. Thus, the UNSM technique was found to be beneficial to improving the mechanical and tribological properties of 316L SS tubing for various potential biomedical applications, in particular for coronary artery stents. - Highlights: • A newly developed setting for tubing was employed. • A nanocrystalline surface was produced by UNSM technique. • High hardness and strength were obtained by UNSM technique. • Friction and wear behavior was improved by UNSM technique.

  2. Highly porous, low elastic modulus 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by selective laser melting

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Machová, M.; Fousová, M.; Kubásek, J.; Vojtěch, D.; Fojt, J.; Jablonská, E.; Lipov, J.; Ruml, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 69, Dec (2016), 631–639 ISSN 0928-4931 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : selective laser melting * 316L stainless steel * porous implants * scaffolds Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  3. Effects of Alloying Elements on Room and High Temperature Tensile Properties of Al-Si Cu-Mg Base Alloys =

    Alyaldin, Loay

    In recent years, aluminum and aluminum alloys have been widely used in automotive and aerospace industries. Among the most commonly used cast aluminum alloys are those belonging to the Al-Si system. Due to their mechanical properties, light weight, excellent castability and corrosion resistance, these alloys are primarily used in engineering and in automotive applications. The more aluminum is used in the production of a vehicle, the less the weight of the vehicle, and the less fuel it consumes, thereby reducing the amount of harmful emissions into the atmosphere. The principal alloying elements in Al-Si alloys, in addition to silicon, are magnesium and copper which, through the formation of Al2Cu and Mg2Si precipitates, improve the alloy strength via precipitation hardening following heat treatment. However, most Al-Si alloys are not suitable for high temperature applications because their tensile and fatigue strengths are not as high as desired in the temperature range 230-350°C, which are the temperatures that are often attained in automotive engine components under actual service conditions. The main challenge lies in the fact that the strength of heat-treatable cast aluminum alloys decreases at temperatures above 200°C. The strength of alloys under high temperature conditions is improved by obtaining a microstructure containing thermally stable and coarsening-resistant intermetallics, which may be achieved with the addition of Ni. Zr and Sc. Nickel leads to the formation of nickel aluminide Al3Ni and Al 9FeNi in the presence of iron, while zirconium forms Al3Zr. These intermetallics improve the high temperature strength of Al-Si alloys. Some interesting improvements have been achieved by modifying the composition of the base alloy with additions of Mn, resulting in an increase in strength and ductility at both room and high temperatures. Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloys such as the 354 (Al-9wt%Si-1.8wt%Cu-0.5wt%Mg) alloys show a greater response to heat treatment as a

  4. Development of CSS-42L{trademark}, a high performance carburizing stainless steel for high temperature aerospace applications

    Burrier, H.I.; Milam, L. [Timken Co., Canton, OH (United States); Tomasello, C.M.; Balliett, S.A.; Maloney, J.L. [Latrobe Steel Co., Latrobe, PA (United States); Ogden, W.P. [MPB Corp., Lebanon, NH (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Today`s aerospace engineering challenges demand materials which can operate under conditions of temperature extremes, high loads and harsh, corrosive environments. This paper presents a technical overview of the on-going development of CSS-42L (US Patent No. 5,424,028). This alloy is a case-carburizable, stainless steel alloy suitable for use in applications up to 427 C, particularly suited to high performance rolling element bearings, gears, shafts and fasteners. The nominal chemistry of CSS-42L includes: (by weight) 0.12% carbon, 14.0% chromium, 0.60% vanadium, 2.0% nickel, 4.75% molybdenum and 12.5% cobalt. Careful balancing of these components combined with VIM-VAR melting produces an alloy that can be carburized and heat treated to achieve a high surface hardness (>58 HRC at 1mm (0.040 in) depth) with excellent corrosion resistance. The hot hardness of the carburized case is equal to or better than all competitive grades, exceeding 60 HRC at 427 C. The fracture toughness and impact resistance of the heat treated core material have likewise been evaluated in detail and found to be better than M50-NiL steel. The corrosion resistance has been shown to be equivalent to that of 440C steel in tests performed to date.

  5. Additive Manufacturing of High-Performance 316L Stainless Steel Nanocomposites via Selective Laser Melting

    AlMangour, Bandar Abdulaziz

    Austenitic 316L stainless steel alloy is an attractive industrial material combining outstanding corrosion resistance, ductility, and biocompatibility, with promising structural applications and biomedical uses. However, 316L has low strength and wear resistance, limiting its high-performance applicability. Adding secondary hard nanoscale reinforcements to steel matrices, thereby forming steel-matrix nanocomposites (SMCs), can overcome these problems, improving the performance and thereby the applicability of 316L. However, SMC parts with complex-geometry cannot be easily achieved limiting its application. This can be avoided through additive manufacturing (AM) by generating layer-by-layer deposition using computer-aided design data. Expanding the range of AM-applicable materials is necessary to fulfill industrial demand. This dissertation presents the characteristics of new AM-processed high-performance 316L-matrix nanocomposites with nanoscale TiC or TiB2 reinforcements, addressing specific aspects of material design, process control and optimization, and physical metallurgy theory. The nanocomposites were prepared by high-energy ball-milling and consolidated by AM selective laser melting (SLM). Continuous and refined ring-like network structures were obtained with homogenously distributed reinforcements. Additional grain refinement occurred with reinforcement addition, attributed to nanoparticles acting as nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation. The influence of reinforcement content was first investigated; mechanical and tribological behaviors improved with increased reinforcement contents. The compressive yield strengths of composites with TiB2 or TiC reinforcements were approximately five or two times those of 316L respectively. Hot isostatic pressing post-treatment effectively eliminated major cracks and pores in SLM-fabricated components. The effects of the SLM processing parameters on the microstructure and mechanical performance were also investigated. Laser

  6. Effect of small additions of silicon, iron, and aluminum on the room-temperature tensile properties of high-purity uranium

    Ludwig, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven binary and ternary alloys of uranium and very low concentrations of iron, silicon, and aluminum were prepared and tested for room-temperature tensile properties after various heat treatments. A yield strength approximately double that of high-purity derby uranium was obtained from a U-400 ppM Si-200 ppM Fe alloy after beta solution treatment and alpha aging. Higher silicon plus iron alloy contents resulted in increased yield strength, but showed an unacceptable loss of ductility

  7. An Electron Microscope Study of the Thermal Neutron Induced Loss in High Temperature Tensile Ductility of Nb Stabilized Austenitic Steels

    Roy, R B

    1965-04-15

    Irradiated {approx}3 x 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (thermal), <3 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) at 40 deg C and the corresponding unirradiated control tensile specimens of a 20 % Cr, 25 % Ni, Nb stabilized steel tested at 650 deg C, 750 deg C and 800 deg C have been examined by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the irradiation induced embrittlement of the tensile specimens at elevated temperatures is preceded by the formation of fine precipitates within the grains. These precipitates may restrict the deformation within the grains such that the stresses are concentrated at the grain boundaries thereby leading to premature failure. It is suggested that the main effect of the irradiation is to promote conditions necessary for the formation of these precipitates, namely, super saturation and fresh nucleation sites within the matrix through the energetic emission of He and Li atoms from boron as an impurity.

  8. An Electron Microscope Study of the Thermal Neutron Induced Loss in High Temperature Tensile Ductility of Nb Stabilized Austenitic Steels

    Roy, R.B.

    1965-04-01

    Irradiated ∼3 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (thermal), 18 n/cm 2 (> 1 MeV) at 40 deg C and the corresponding unirradiated control tensile specimens of a 20 % Cr, 25 % Ni, Nb stabilized steel tested at 650 deg C, 750 deg C and 800 deg C have been examined by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the irradiation induced embrittlement of the tensile specimens at elevated temperatures is preceded by the formation of fine precipitates within the grains. These precipitates may restrict the deformation within the grains such that the stresses are concentrated at the grain boundaries thereby leading to premature failure. It is suggested that the main effect of the irradiation is to promote conditions necessary for the formation of these precipitates, namely, super saturation and fresh nucleation sites within the matrix through the energetic emission of He and Li atoms from boron as an impurity

  9. Influence of torsion and tensile stress on magnetoimpedance effect in Fe-rich amorphous microwires at high frequencies

    Garcia, C. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. Quimicas, UPV/EHU, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)]. E-mail: wubgagac@sc.ehu.es; Chizhik, A. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. Quimicas, UPV/EHU, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Zhukov, A. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. Quimicas, UPV/EHU, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Zhukova, V. [TAMAG Iberica S. L. Parque Tecnologico de Miramon, Paseo Mikeletegi 56, 1a Planta, 20009 San Sebastian (Spain); Gonzalez, J. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. Quimicas, UPV/EHU, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Blanco, J.M. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I. EUPDS, UPV/EHU, Plaza Europa 1, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Panina, L.V. [University of Plymouth, Drakes Circus, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    In this work, we study the magnetoimpedance response under tensile and torsional stress of Fe{sub 76}B{sub 13}Si{sub 11} glass-coated amorphous microwires (with the metallic nucleus diameter of 17 {mu}m) prepared by Taylor-Ulitovski method. The impedance was evaluated using a Network Analyser in the frequency range of 10-500 MHz. In order to induce a helical magnetic anisotropy that modifies the magnetic domain structure and the magnetic response of the sample, the torsion stresses have been applied. The effect of such torsion on giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) has been studied in a Fe-rich amorphous microwire as a function of the driving current frequency. Unusual behaviour of the GMI with torsion has been observed up to 500 MHz: at this frequency, the change from double-peak to single-peak behaviour has been observed. It could be ascribed to changes on domain structures and surface anisotropy induced by applied torsion. For this frequency range, an abrupt decrease of the impedance with torsion has been observed. We have also studied the tensile-induced changes of GMI effect in a Fe-rich amorphous microwire. The GMI effect increases with applied tensile stress and with the frequency of AC current. Observed dependences could be attributed to the change of the overall magnetic anisotropy under applied torsion.

  10. Laser-Beam Welding Impact on the Deformation Properties of Stainless Steels When Used for Automotive Applications

    Evin Emil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Materials other than standard and advanced high strength steels are remarkable for the thin-walled structures of the car-body in recent years in order to safety enhancement, weight and emission reduction, corrosion resistance improvement. Thus, there are presented in the paper the deformation properties of laser welded austenitic AISI 304 and ferritic AISI 430 stainless steels compared to these one measured for the high strength low alloyed steel H220PD. The properties were researched by tensile test and 3-point bending test with fixed ends on specimens made of basic material and laser welded one. The specimens were welded by solid state fiber laser YLS-5000 in longitudinal direction (the load direction. The deformation properties such as strength, stiffness and deformation work were evaluated and compared. The strength and stiffness were calculated from tensile test results and the deformation work was calculated from both, tensile test and 3-point bending test results. There has been found only minor effect of laser welding to the deformation properties for high strength low alloyed steel H220PD and austenitic stainless steel AISI 304. Otherwise, the laser welding strongly influenced the deformation work of the ferritic stainless steel AISI 430 as well as the elongation at tensile test.

  11. The tensile properties and high cyclic fatigue characteristics of Mg-5Li-3Al-1.5Zn-2RE alloy

    Li Tingqu; Liu Yongbing; Cao Zhanyi; Jiang Dongmei; Cheng Liren

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The PLC phenomenon was observed during tensile deformation in LAZ531-2RE alloy. → The negative SRS in high strain rate regime can be explained by the DSA mechanism. → The higher ductility may be associated with finer-grained microstructure and Li addition. → Fatigue crack propagation was characterized by striation-like features. - Abstract: The tensile and fatigue properties of the Mg-5Li-3Al-1.5Zn-2RE (LAZ531-2RE) alloy were presented. The alloy was prepared by hot extrusion after vacuum casting. The Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) phenomenon was observed during tensile deformation. The PLC effect was attributed to the dynamic interaction between solute atoms (Li) and dislocation movement. The abnormal negative strain rate sensitivity (SRS) in high strain rate regime can be explained by the dynamic strain ageing (DSA) mechanism. The higher ductility may be associated with finer-grained microstructure and Li addition. Fatigue crack propagation was characterized by striation-like features. The smaller spacing of fatigue striations and larger fatigue crack propagation zone at the lower total strain amplitude gave rise to a longer fatigue life.

  12. Optimized chemical composition, working and heat treatment condition for resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of cold worked 316 and high-chromium austenitic stainless steel

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Iwamura, Toshihiko; Fujimoto, Koji; Ajiki, Kazuhide

    2000-01-01

    The authors have reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in baffle former bolts made of austenitic stainless steels for PWR after long-term operation is caused by irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation. The resistance to PWSCC of simulated austenitic stainless steels whose chemical compositions are simulated to the grain boundary chemical composition of 316 stainless steel after irradiation increased with decrease of the silicon content, increases of the chromium content, and precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides at the grain boundaries. In order to develop resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels, optimized chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions for 316CW and high-chromium austenitic stainless steels for PWR baffle former bolts were investigated. For 316CW stainless steel, ultra-low-impurities and high-chromium content are beneficial. About 20% cold working before aging and after solution treatment has also been recommended to recover sensitization and make M 23 C 6 carbides coherent with the matrix at the grain boundaries. Heating at 700 to 725degC for 20 to 50 h was selected as a suitable aging procedure. Cold working of 5 to 10% after aging produced the required mechanical properties. The optimized composition of the high-chromium austenitic stainless steel contents 30% chromium, 30% nickel, and ultra-low impurity levels. This composition also reduces the difference between its thermal expansion coefficient and that of 304 stainless steel for baffle plates. Aging at 700 to 725degC for longer than 40 h and cold working of 10 to 15% after aging were selected to meet mechanical property specifications. (author)

  13. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    Chromium-rich nitride precipitates in production of nickel-free austenitic stainless steel plates via pressurised solution nitriding of Fe–22.7Cr–2.4Mo ferritic stainless steel at 1473 K (1200 °C) under a nitrogen gas atmosphere was investigated. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition......, morphology and crystallographic orientation between the resulted austenite and precipitates were investigated using optical microscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). On prolonged nitriding, Chromium-rich nitride...... precipitates were formed firstly close to the surface and later throughout the sample with austenitic structure. Chromium-rich nitride precipitates with a rod or strip-like morphology was developed by a discontinuous cellular precipitation mechanism. STEM-EDS analysis demonstrated partitioning of metallic...

  14. The Mechanical Behavior of a 25Cr Super Duplex Stainless Steel at Elevated Temperature

    Lasebikan, B. A.; Akisanya, A. R.; Deans, W. F.

    2013-02-01

    Super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) is a candidate material for production tubing in oil and gas wells and subsea pipelines used to transport corrosive hydrocarbon fluids. The suitability of this material for high temperature applications is examined in this article. The uniaxial tensile properties are determined for a 25Cr SDSS over a range of temperature relevant to high pressure-high temperature oil and gas wells. It is shown that there is a significant effect of temperature on the uniaxial tensile properties. Elevated temperature was shown to reduce the Young's modulus and increase the strain hardening index; temperature effects on these two parameters are usually neglected in the design of subsea pipelines and oil well tubulars, and this could lead to wrong predictions of the collapse pressure. The manufacturing process of the super duplex tubular did not lead to significant anisotropy in the hardness and the ultimate tensile and uniaxial yield strengths.

  15. SCC growth behavior of cast stainless steels in high-temperature water. Influences of corrosion potential, steel type, thermal aging and cold-work

    Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies on crack growth rate (CGR) measurement in oxygenated high-temperature pure water conditions, such as normal water chemistry (NWC) in BWRs, using compact tension (CT) type specimens have shown that stainless steel weld metal are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). On the other hand, the authors reported that no significant SCC growth was observed on stainless steel weld metals in PWR primary water at temperatures from 250degC to 340degC. Cast austenitic stainless steels are widely used in light water reactors, and there is a similarity between welded and cast stainless steels in terms of the microstructure of the ferrite/austenite duplex structure. However, there are a few reports giving CGR data on cast stainless steels in the BWRs and PWRs. The principal purpose of this study was to examine the SCC growth behavior of cast stainless steels in simulated PWR primary water. A second objective was to examine the effects on SCC growth in hydrogenated and oxygenated water environments at 320degC of: (1) corrosion potential; (2) steels type (Mo in alloy); (3) thermal-aging (up to 400degC x 40 kh); and (4) cold-working (10%). The results were as follows: (1) No significant SCC growth was observed on all types of cast stainless steels: aged (400degC x 40 kh) of SCS14A and SCS13A and 10% cold-working, in hydrogenated (low-potential) water at 320degC. (2) Aging at 400degC x 40 kh SCS14A (10%CW) markedly accelerated the SCC growth of cast material in high-potential water at 320degC, but no significant SCC growth was observed in the hydrogenated water, even after long-term thermal aging (400degC x 40 kh). (3) Thus, cast stainless steels have excellent SCC resistance in PWR primary water. (4) On the other hand, significant SCC growth was observed on all types of cast stainless steels: 10%CW SCS14A and SCS13A, in 8 ppm-oxygenated (high-potential) water at 320degC. (5) No large difference in SCC growth was observed between SCS14A (Mo) and SCS13A. (6) No

  16. Aging behaviour of 25Cr-17Mn high nitrogen duplex stainless steel

    Machado, I. F.; Padilha, A. F.

    2000-01-01

    The precipitation behaviour of a nickel free stainless steel containing 25% chromium, 17% manganese and 0.54% nitrogen, with duplex ferritic-austenitic microstructure, was studied using several complementary techniques of microstructural analysis after aging heat treatments between 600 and 1 000 degrees C for periods of lime between 15 and 6 000 min. During aging heat treatments, ferrite was decomposed into sigma phase and austenite by a eutectoid reaction, like in the Fe-Cr-Ni duplex stainle...

  17. Performance of high molybdenum superaustenitic stainless steel welds in harsh chloride environments

    Stenvall, P.; Liljas, M.; Wallen, B.

    1996-01-01

    Superaustenitic steels are normally welded with nickel-based alloys as filler materials. To clarify the understanding of weld behavior in superaustenitic stainless steels this paper presents the development history of 6Mo and 7Mo steels, and results of laboratory tests and field tests on welds of UNS S31254 (6Mo) and UNS S32654 (7 Mo) in different types of chloride containing environments. The laboratory tests consisted of the well known ferric chloride test (ASTM G 48 Method A). Shielded metal arc welds, gas tungsten arc welds and submerged arc welds in both grades were tested. The critical pitting temperatures were determined and the locations of the attack were noted. Some specimens were sectioned at the position of the attack followed by studies using light optical microscopy. The critical pitting temperatures of the welds in S31254 and S32654 were at normal levels for both grades, i.e., 40--50 C for S31254 and 60--75 C for S32654. The locations of the attack differed depending on the welding process. In shielded metal arc welds the attack was mostly located in the weld metal. In gas tungsten arc welds the attack was predominantly located next to the fusion line. The field tests showed that the behavior of welds and parent metal of superaustenitic stainless steels, as well as of nickel-based alloys, is much dependent on the corrosive environment. In oxidizing chloride solutions, similar results to those of the ferric chloride test, are observed. However, crevice corrosion in the parent material is at a greater risk than pitting corrosion in the welds. In very oxidizing solutions of low chloride concentrations, welds made of nickel-based fillers may corrode faster than the stainless steel base metal due to transpassive uniform corrosion. The opposite situation exists when active uniform corrosion prevails, i.e., welds made of nickel-based fillers corrode less than the stainless steel parent material

  18. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  19. In-situ preparation of Fe2O3 hierarchical arrays on stainless steel substrate for high efficient catalysis

    Yang, Zeheng; Wang, Kun; Shao, Zongming; Tian, Yuan; Chen, Gongde; Wang, Kai; Chen, Zhangxian; Dou, Yan; Zhang, Weixin

    2017-01-01

    Hierarchical array catalysts with micro/nano structures on substrates not only possess high reactivity from large surface area and suitable interface, but intensify mass transfer through shortening the diffusion paths of both reactants and products for high catalytic efficiency. Herein, we first demonstrate fabrication of Fe 2 O 3 hierarchical arrays grown on stainless-steel substrates via in-situ hydrothermal chemical oxidation followed by heat treatment in N 2 atmosphere. As a Fenton-like catalyst, Fe 2 O 3 hierarchical arrays exhibit excellent catalytic activity and life cycle performance for methylene blue (MB) dye degradation in aqueous solution in the presence of H 2 O 2 . The Fe 2 O 3 catalyst with unique hierarchical structures and efficient transport channels, effectively activates H 2 O 2 to generate large quantity of • OH radicals and highly promotes reaction kinetics between MB and • OH radicals. Immobilization of hierarchical array catalysts on stainless-steel can prevent particles agglomeration, facilitate the recovery and reuse of the catalysts, which is expected promising applications in wastewater remediation. - Graphical abstract: The in-situ synthesis of Fe 2 O 3 hierarchical arrays on stainless-steel substrates was reported for the first time, which exhibit excellent catalytic activity performance for methylene blue (MB) dye degradation in aqueous solution in the presence of H 2 O 2 . - Highlights: • Fe 2 O 3 hierarchical arrays was prepared by in-situ hydrothermal chemical oxidation. • F − ions play an important role in the formation of the Fe 2 O 3 hierarchical arrays. • Fe 2 O 3 hierarchical arrays show high catalytic activity to methylene blue degradation.

  20. Austenitic stainless steels and high strength copper alloys for fusion components

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Zinkle, S.J.; Alexander, D.J.; Stubbins, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel (316LN), an oxide-dispersion-strengthened copper alloy (GlidCop A125), and a precipitation-hardened copper alloy (Cu-Cr-Zr) are the primary structural materials for the ITER first wall/blanket and divertor systems. While there is a long experience of operating 316LN stainless steel in nuclear environments, there is no prior experience with the copper alloys in neutron environments. The ITER first wall (FW) consists of a stainless steel shield with a copper alloy heat sink bonded by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The introduction of bi-layer structural material represents a new materials engineering challenge; the behavior of the bi-layer is determined by the properties of the individual components and by the nature of the bond interface. The development of the radiation damage microstructure in both classes of materials is summarized and the effects of radiation on deformation and fracture behavior are considered. The initial data on the mechanical testing of bi-layers indicate that the effectiveness of GlidCop A125 as a FW heat sink material is compromised by its strongly anisotropic fracture toughness and poor resistance to crack growth in a direction parallel to the bi-layer interface. (orig.)

  1. A morphological evaluation of a duplex stainless steel processed by high energy Ball Mill

    Yonekubo, Ariane Emi; Cintho, Osvaldo Mitsuyuki; Aguiar, Denilson Jose Marcolino de; Capocchi, Jose Deodoro Trani

    2009-01-01

    The duplex stainless steels are formed by a ferrite and austenite mixture, giving them a combination of properties. Commercially, these steels are hot rolled, developing an anisotropic, alternated ferrite and austenite elongated lamellae microstructure. In this work, a duplex stainless steel was produced by the mixture of elementary powders with the composition Fe-19.5Cr-5Ni processed in an ATTRITOR ball mill during periods up to 15 hours. The powders obtained were compressed in specimens and were heat treated in the temperatures of 900, 1050 and 1200 °C during 1 hour and analysed by x ray diffraction, optic microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectroscopy. An optimized microstructure with ultrafine, equiaxial and regular duplex microstructure was obtained in the 15 hour milling and 1200 °C heat treatment. Afterwards, a commercially super duplex stainless steel UNS S32520 was aged at 800 °C aiming the precipitation of σ phase in order to reduce its toughness and then, milled in SPEX mill. The resulting microstructure was a very fine duplex type with irregular grain boundary morphology duo to the grain growth barrier promoted by the renascent σ phase particles during sintering process. (author)

  2. Acoustic emission measurements on type 316 stainless steel

    Palmer, I.G.; Holt, J.; Goddard, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Acoustic emission measurements have been made on Type 316 stainless steel in the solution treated condition, as part of a feasibility study for the monitoring of fast reactor components. The work involved testing both plain tensile specimens and precracked compact tension specimens in the temperature range 20-200 deg C. At 20 deg C plastic deformation was a quiet process but ductile crack growth was accompanied by high amplitude emissions capable of detection on plant. At 200 deg C both plastic deformation and ductile crack growth were quiet

  3. Mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels in sodium

    Lloyd, G.J.

    1978-03-01

    A detailed review of the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels in liquid sodium is presented. Consideration has been given to the influence of the of the impurities in reactor sodium and metallurgical variables upon the stress rupture life, the low cycle fatigue and combined creep/fatigue resistance, elastic-plastic crack propagation rates, the high cycle fatigue life, tensile properties and fracture toughness. The effects of exposure to contaminated sodium prior to testing are also discussed. Examples of the success of mechanistic interpretations of materials behaviour in sodium are given and additionally, the extent to which mechanical properties in sodium may be predicted with the use of appropriate data. (author)

  4. The theoretical strength of rubber: numerical simulations of polyisoprene networks at high tensile strains evidence the role of average chain tortuosity

    Hanson, David E; Barber, John L

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate stress and strain of polyisoprene rubber were studied by numerical simulations of three-dimensional random networks, subjected to tensile strains high enough to cause chain rupture. Previously published molecular chain force extension models and a numerical network construction procedure were used to perform the simulations for network crosslink densities between 2 × 10 19 and 1 × 10 20 cm −3 , corresponding to experimental dicumyl-peroxide concentrations of 1–5 parts per hundred. At tensile failure (defined as the point of maximum stress), we find that the fraction of network chains ruptured is between 0.1% and 1%, depending on the crosslink density. The fraction of network chains that are taut, i.e. their end-to-end distance is greater than their unstretched contour length, ranges between 10% and 15% at failure. Our model predicts that the theoretical (defect-free) failure stress should be about twice the highest experimental value reported. For extensions approaching failure, tensile stress is dominated by the network morphology and purely enthalpic bond distortion forces and, in this regime, the model has essentially no free parameters. The average initial chain tortuosity (τ) appears to be an important statistical property of rubber networks; if the stress is scaled by τ and the tensile strain is scaled by τ −1 , we obtain a master curve for stress versus strain, valid for all crosslink densities. We derive an analytic expression for the average tortuosity, which is in agreement with values calculated in the simulations. (paper)

  5. Tensile ductility of an AlCoCrFeNi multi-phase high-entropy alloy through hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and homogenization

    Tang, Zhi, E-mail: Zhi.Tang@alcoa.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Senkov, Oleg N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Parish, Chad M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Fan [CompuTherm LLC, 437 S. Yellowstone Dr., Suite 217, Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Santodonato, Louis J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wang, Gongyao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Zhao, Guangfeng; Yang, Fuqian [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Liaw, Peter K., E-mail: pliaw@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The microstructure and phase composition of an AlCoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) were studied in as-cast (AlCoCrFeNi-AC, AC represents as-cast) and homogenized (AlCoCrFeNi-HP, HP signifies hot isostatic pressed and homogenized) conditions. The AlCoCrFeNi-AC ally has a dendritric structure in the consisting primarily of a nano-lamellar mixture of A2 (disordered body-centered-cubic (BCC)) and B2 (ordered BCC) phases, formed by an eutectic reaction. The homogenization heat treatment, consisting of hot isostatic pressed for 1 h at 1100 °C, 207 MPa and annealing at 1150 °C for 50 h, resulted in an increase in the volume fraction of the A1 phase and formation of a Sigma (σ) phase. Tensile properties in as-cast and homogenized conditions are reported at 700 °C. The ultimate tensile strength was virtually unaffected by heat treatment, and was 396±4 MPa at 700 °C. However, homogenization produced a noticeable increase in ductility. The AlCoCrFeNi-AC alloy showed a tensile elongation of only 1.0%, while after the heat-treatment, the elongation of AlCoCrFeNi-HP was 11.7%. Thermodynamic modeling of non-equilibrium and equilibrium phase diagrams for the AlCoCrFeNi HEA gave good agreement with the experimental observations of the phase contents in the AlCoCrFeNi-AC and AlCoCrFeNi-HP. The reasons for the improvement of ductility after the heat treatment and the crack initiation subjected to tensile loading were discussed.

  6. High-Temperature Tensile Behaviors of Base Metal and Electron Beam-Welded Joints of Ni-20Cr-9Mo-4Nb Superalloy

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Sukumaran, Arjun; Kumar, Vinod

    2018-05-01

    Electron beam welding of Ni-20Cr-9Mo-4Nb alloy sheets was carried out, and high-temperature tensile behaviors of base metal and weldments were studied. Tensile properties were evaluated at ambient temperature, at elevated temperatures of 625 °C to 1025 °C, and at strain rates of 0.1 to 0.001 s-1. Microstructure of the weld consisted of columnar dendritic structure and revealed epitaxial mode of solidification. Weld efficiency of 90 pct in terms of strength (UTS) was observed at ambient temperature and up to an elevated temperature of 850 °C. Reduction in strength continued with further increase of test temperature (up to 1025 °C); however, a significant improvement in pct elongation is found up to 775 °C, which was sustained even at higher test temperatures. The tensile behaviors of base metal and weldments were similar at the elevated temperatures at the respective strain rates. Strain hardening exponent `n' of the base metal and weldment was 0.519. Activation energy `Q' of base metal and EB weldments were 420 to 535 kJ mol-1 determined through isothermal tensile tests and 625 to 662 kJ mol-1 through jump-temperature tensile tests. Strain rate sensitivity `m' was low ( 775 °C) is attributed to the presence of recrystallized grains. Up to 700 °C, the deformation is through slip, where strain hardening is predominant and effect of strain rate is minimal. Between 775 °C to 850 °C, strain hardening is counterbalanced by flow softening, where cavitation limits the deformation (predominantly at lower strain rate). Above 925 °C, flow softening is predominant resulting in a significant reduction in strength. Presence of precipitates/accumulated strain at high strain rate results in high strength, but when the precipitates were coarsened at lower strain rates or precipitates were dissolved at a higher temperature, the result was a reduction in strength. Further, the accumulated strain assisted in recrystallization, which also resulted in a reduction in strength.

  7. Characterization of high temperature tensile and creep–fatigue properties of Alloy 800H for intermediate heat exchanger components of (V)HTRs

    Kolluri, M., E-mail: kolluri@nrg.eu; Pierick, P. ten, E-mail: tenpierick@nrg.eu; Bakker, T., E-mail: t.bakker@nrg.eu

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • High temperature tensile, creep–fatigue (C–F) properties of Alloy 800H are studied. • Strength and uniform elongation properties at 800 °C are much lower than RT values. • Strong influence of hold time and Δε{sub tot} on low cycle fatigue life was observed. • The total allowable C–F damage (D) at 800 °C decreases with the decreasing Δε{sub tot}. • Synergetic effect of C–F interactions showed stronger effect at lower Δε{sub tot} values. - Abstract: Alloy 800H is considered as a candidate material for intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) components of (very) high temperature reactors (V)HTRs. Qualification of the this alloy for the aforementioned nuclear applications requires understanding of its high temperature tensile, low-cycle fatigue behavior and creep–fatigue interactions because the IHX components suffer from combined creep–fatigue loadings resulting from thermally induced strain cycles associated with start-up and shutdown cycles. To this end, in this paper, the tensile properties of the Alloy 800H base and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded materials are studied at three different temperatures, room temperature 21, 700 and 800 °C. Low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of the base material is investigated at 800 °C with no-hold time (no-HT) and hold time (HT) to study creep–fatigue interactions. The tensile test results showed substantial differences between the strength and ductility properties of the base and weld materials at all 3 temperatures, however, the trends in temperature dependence of tensile properties are similar for both base and weld materials. LCF studies with no-HT and HT showed a strong influence of HT on the low cycle fatigue life of this alloy illustrating the substantial influence of creep mechanisms at 800 °C. Finally, cumulative values of creep versus fatigue damage fractions are plotted in a creep–fatigue interaction diagram and these results are discussed with respect to the existing bi

  8. Aspects of dislocation substructures associated with the deformation stages of stainless steel AISI 304 at high temperatures

    Oliveira, J.L.L.; Reis Filho, J.A.B.S.; Almeida, L.H. de; Monteiro, S.N.

    1978-07-01

    The development of dislocation substrutures in type 304 austenitic stainless steel at high temperatures has been associated with the deformation stages through log dσ/d epsilon x log epsilon plots, which show the transition point independently. The mechanisms responsible for the Dynamic Strain Aging particulary the Portevin-LeChatelier effect were related to the appearence of the stages. The results indicate that the deformation stages can be divided into two distinct regions. Each one of these region show particular characteristics with respect to the stress level, transition point, developed substructure and type of crystalline defects interaction with dislocations. (Author) [pt

  9. Tribological properties at 25 C of seven polyimide films bonded to 440 C high-temperature stainless steel

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The tribological properties of seven polyimide films applied to 440 C high temperature stainless steel substrates were studied at 25 C with a pin-on-disk type of friction and were apparatus. The polyimides fell into two groups according to friction and wear properties. Group I polyimides had slightly lower friction but much higher wear than group II polyimides. The wear mechanism was predominately adhesion, but the wear particles were larger for group I polyimides. For most of the polyimides the transfer films consisted of clumps of compacted wear particles. One polyimide composition produced a very thin transfer film that sheared plastically in the contact area.

  10. A XPS study of the Mo effect on passivation behaviors for highly controlled stainless steels in neutral and alkaline conditions

    Mesquita, Thiago J.; Chauveau, Eric; Mantel, Marc; Nogueira, Ricardo P.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the effect of Mo additions on film passive properties of three different stainless steels (SS) types (austenitic, ferritic and duplex alloys). A comparison between Mo containing (3 wt% Mo) and free Mo (0 wt% Mo) grades of highly controlled laboratory heats was done considering their passive film formed in different aggressive conditions, from neutral to alkaline pH. The presence of oxidized Mo on the passive layer was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of Mo within the passive film improved the passivity breakdown potential for the duplex and ferritic SS, but seemed to have no effect for austenitic SS.

  11. A XPS study of the Mo effect on passivation behaviors for highly controlled stainless steels in neutral and alkaline conditions

    Mesquita, Thiago J., E-mail: thiago.mesquita@ugitech.com [Ugitech Research Center, Avenue Paul Girod, 73403 Ugine Cedex (France); Chauveau, Eric; Mantel, Marc [Ugitech Research Center, Avenue Paul Girod, 73403 Ugine Cedex (France); Nogueira, Ricardo P. [LEPMI UMR 5279 CNRS – Grenoble INP–Université de Savoie–Université Joseph Fourier BP 75, 38402 St Martin d’Hères (France)

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study the effect of Mo additions on film passive properties of three different stainless steels (SS) types (austenitic, ferritic and duplex alloys). A comparison between Mo containing (3 wt% Mo) and free Mo (0 wt% Mo) grades of highly controlled laboratory heats was done considering their passive film formed in different aggressive conditions, from neutral to alkaline pH. The presence of oxidized Mo on the passive layer was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of Mo within the passive film improved the passivity breakdown potential for the duplex and ferritic SS, but seemed to have no effect for austenitic SS.

  12. Testing new tribo-systems for sheet metal forming of advanced high strength steels and stainless steels

    Bay, Niels; Ceron, Ermanno

    2014-01-01

    of a methodology for off-line testing of new tribo-systems for advanced high strength steels and stainless steels. The methodology is presented and applied to an industrial case, where different tribo-systems are tested. A universal sheet tribotester has been developed, which can run automatically repetitive......Testing of new tribo-systems in sheet metal forming has become an important issue due to new legislation, which forces industry to replace current, hazardous lubricants. The present paper summarizes the work done in a recent PhD project at the Technical University of Denmark on the development...

  13. Development of austenitic stainless steel PC wire and strand

    Tsubono, Hideyoshi; Kawabata, Yoshinori; Yamaoka, Yukio

    1986-01-01

    The effects of aging and stress-aging (called hot stretching) at the temperatures from 120 deg C to 700 deg C on the mechanical properties, relaxation values, Charpy impact values and SCC behavior of hard drawn SUS 304, SUS 316 stainless steel wires have been studied. The main results obtained are as follows: (1) Yield and tensile strength of the wires increased by aging at 230 deg C and 530 deg C as well as by hot stretching. The strengthening after 230 deg C treatment may be due to the strain aging by C and the increase of strength after 530 deg C treatment results from precipitation of Cr 23 C 6 on dislocations. (2) Stress relaxation values up to 250 deg C are low due to precipitation of Cr 23 C 6 . Almost no difference can be observed between aging and hot stretching. (3) Impact value at -196 deg C of SUS 304 stainless steel wire which was measured with 1 mm V-notched specimen was found to be about the same as that of 9 % Ni steel. (4) It is considered that in comparison with high carbon PC wire SUS 304 stainless steel showing high tensile strength is insensitive to SCC in NH 4 SCN and NH 4 NO 3 solutions. (5) In practice, tension member of the austenitic stainless steel wire and strand which were produced by aging at 500 deg C may be useful in special industrial field, for example, (a) SUS 304, in cryogenic field use (b) SUS 316, in intensive magnetic field use as a nonmagnetic material. (author)

  14. Quantitative analysis of localized stresses in irradiated stainless steels using high resolution electron backscatter diffraction and molecular dynamics modeling

    Johnson, D.C.; Kuhr, B.; Farkas, D.; Was, G.S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of stress near dislocation channel–grain boundary (DC–GB) interaction sites were made using high resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HREBSD) and have been compared with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Tensile stress normal to the grain boundary was significantly elevated at discontinuous DC–GB intersections with peak magnitudes roughly an order of magnitude greater than at sites where slip transfer occurred. These results constitute the first measurement of stress amplification at DC–GB intersections and provide support to the theory that high normal stress at the grain boundary may be a key driver for the initiation of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracks.

  15. A study on the improvement of oxidation resistance of OAE-added stainless steels for high temperature applications

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Gil Moo

    1996-01-01

    Since the manufacturing temperature of stainless steels is relatively high, oxidation at the elevated temperature becomes important. The chemical and physical properties of the protective oxide film which was formed on the stainless steels at high temperature for the oxidation resistance are important in determining the rate of oxidation and the life of equipment exposed to high temperature oxidizing environments. In this study, the oxidation behavior of STS 309S and STS 409L added by a small amount of oxygen active element(each + 0.5wt% Hf and Y) was studied to improve oxidation resistance. In the cyclic oxidation, while OAE-free specimens showed relatively poor oxidation resistance due to spallations and cracks of Cr-rich oxide layer, OAE-added specimens improved cyclic oxidation resistance assumably due to constant oxidation rate with stable oxide layers at high temperature. Especially Hf improved cyclic oxidation resistance by forming Cr-rich oxide layer preventing internal oxidation in STS 309S. (author)

  16. Microstructure of rapidly solidified Al2O3-dispersion-strengthened Type 316 stainless steel

    Megusar, J.; Arnberg, L.; Vander Sande, J.B.; Grant, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    An aluminum oxide dispersion strengthened 316 stainless steel was developed by surface oxidation. Surface oxidation was chosen as a preferred method in order to minimize formation of less stable chromium oxides. Ultra low C+N 316 stainless steel was alloyed with 1 wt % Al, rapidly solidified to produce fine powders and attrited to approximately 0.5 μm thick flakes to provide for surface oxidation. Oxide particles in the extruded material were identified mostly as Al oxides. In the preirradiated condition, oxide dispersion retarded crystallization and grain growth and had an effect on room temperature tensile properties. These structural modifications are expected to have an effect on the swelling resistance, structure stability and high temperature strength of austenitic stainless steels

  17. Improving High-Temperature Tensile and Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Al-Si-Cu-Mg Alloys Through Micro-additions of Ti, V, and Zr

    Shaha, S. K.; Czerwinski, F.; Kasprzak, W.; Friedman, J.; Chen, D. L.

    2015-07-01

    High-temperature tensile and low-cycle fatigue tests were performed to assess the influence of micro-additions of Ti, V, and Zr on the improvement of the Al-7Si-1Cu-0.5Mg (wt pct) alloy in the as-cast condition. Addition of transition metals led to modification of microstructure where in addition to conventional phases present in the Al-7Si-1Cu-0.5Mg base, new thermally stable micro-sized Zr-Ti-V-rich phases Al21.4Si4.1Ti3.5VZr3.9, Al6.7Si1.2TiZr1.8, Al2.8Si3.8V1.6Zr, and Al5.1Si35.4Ti1.6Zr5.7Fe were formed. The tensile tests showed that with increasing test temperature from 298 K to 673 K (25 °C to 400 °C), the yield stress and tensile strength of the present studied alloy decreased from 161 to 84 MPa and from 261 to 102 MPa, respectively. Also, the studied alloy exhibited 18, 12, and 5 pct higher tensile strength than the alloy A356, 354 and existing Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy modified with additions of Zr, Ti, and Ni, respectively. The fatigue life of the studied alloy was substantially longer than those of the reference alloys A356 and the same Al-7Si-1Cu-0.5Mg base with minor additions of V, Zr, and Ti in the T6 condition. Fractographic analysis after tensile tests revealed that at the lower temperature up to 473 K (200 °C), the cleavage-type brittle fracture for the precipitates and ductile fracture for the matrix were dominant while at higher temperature fully ductile-type fracture with debonding and pull-out of cracked particles was identified. It is believed that the intermetallic precipitates containing Zr, Ti, and V improve the alloy performance at increased temperatures.

  18. Predicting Microstructure Development During HighTemperature Nitriding of Martensitic Stainless SteelsUsing Thermodynamic Modeling

    Tschiptschin, André Paulo

    2002-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of the Fe-Cr-N System in the region of the Gas Phase Equilibria have been compared with experimental results of maximum nitrogen absorption during nitriding of two Martensitic Stainless Steels (a 6 mm thick sheet of AISI 410S steel and green powder compacts of AISI 434L steel) under N2 atmospheres. The calculations have been performed combining the Fe-Cr-N System description contained in the SGTE Solid Solution Database and the gas phase for the N System contained i...

  19. The Formation of Multipoles during the High-Temperature Creep of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Howell, J.; Nielsson, O.; Horsewell, Andy

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that multipole dislocation configurations can arise during power-law creep of certain austenitic stainless steels. These multipoles have been analysed in some detail for two particular steels (Alloy 800 and a modified AISI 316L) and it is suggested that they arise either during...... instantaneous loading or during the primary creep stage. Trace analysis has shown that the multipoles are confined to {1 1 1} planes during primary creep but are not necessarily confined to these planes during steady-state creep unless they are pinned by interstitials....

  20. Potential high fluence response of pressure vessel internals constructed from austenitic stainless steels

    Garner, F.A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Harrod, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    Many of the in-core components in pressurized water reactors are constructed of austenitic stainless steels. The potential behavior of these components can be predicted using data on similar steels irradiated at much higher displacement rates in liquid-metal reactors or water-cooled mixed-spectrum reactors. Consideration of the differences between the pressurized water environment and that of the other reactors leads to the conclusion that significant amounts of void swelling, irradiation creep, and embrittlement will occur in some components, and that the level of damage per atomic displacement may be larger in the pressurized water environment

  1. High-Temperature Phase Equilibria of Duplex Stainless Steels Assessed with a Novel In-Situ Neutron Scattering Approach

    Pettersson, Niklas; Wessman, Sten; Hertzman, Staffan; Studer, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Duplex stainless steels are designed to solidify with ferrite as the parent phase, with subsequent austenite formation occurring in the solid state, implying that, thermodynamically, a fully ferritic range should exist at high temperatures. However, computational thermodynamic tools appear currently to overestimate the austenite stability of these systems, and contradictory data exist in the literature. In the present work, the high-temperature phase equilibria of four commercial duplex stainless steel grades, denoted 2304, 2101, 2507, and 3207, with varying alloying levels were assessed by measurements of the austenite-to-ferrite transformation at temperatures approaching 1673 K (1400 °C) using a novel in-situ neutron scattering approach. All grades became fully ferritic at some point during progressive heating. Higher austenite dissolution temperatures were measured for the higher alloyed grades, and for 3207, the temperature range for a single-phase ferritic structure approached zero. The influence of temperatures in the region of austenite dissolution was further evaluated by microstructural characterization using electron backscattered diffraction of isothermally heat-treated and quenched samples. The new experimental data are compared to thermodynamic calculations, and the precision of databases is discussed.

  2. Influence of pre-deformation, sensitization and oxidation in high temperature water on corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel

    Lv, Jinlong, E-mail: ljltsinghua@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Hongyun [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Xueyuan Road 37, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The pre-strain accelerated desensitization and sensitization for austenitic stainless steels. • Low temperature sensitization (carbide precipitation) induced α′-martensite. • The sensitization level could affect directly corrosion resistance of the oxide film. - Abstract: The effects of pre-deformation on sensitization of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated by the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test. The effects of pre-deformation and sensitization on high temperature oxidized film formed in high temperature water were analyzed by a XRD and SEM. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at room temperature was used to study corrosion resistance of oxidized film. The point defect density of oxidized film was calculated by Mott–Schottky plots. The results showed that the value of the degree of sensitization first decreased and then slight increased with the increasing of engineering strain. Moreover, low temperature promoted to form sensitization induced “secondary” α′-martensite. The sample with 20% engineering strain had higher impedance value than other samples. The result was supported by further Mott–Schottky experiments. Considering increased α′-martensite with the increasing of strain, the results of the impedance were more consistent with values of the degree of sensitization.

  3. Effect of tensile dwell on high-temperature low-cycle fatigue and fracture behaviour of cast superalloy MAR-M247

    Šulák, Ivo; Obrtlík, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 185, NOV (2017), s. 92-100 ISSN 0013-7944. [ICMFM 2016 - International Colloquium on Mechanical Fatigue of Metals /18./. Gijón, 05.09.2016-07.09.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20991S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Nickel-based superalloy * High-temperature low-cycle fatigue * Tensile dwell * Fatigue life * Damage mechanisms Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering , reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.151, year: 2016

  4. Tensile and wear properties of TiC reinforced 420 stainless steel fabricated by in situ synthesis%原位合成TiC增强420不锈钢的力学性能和抗磨损性能

    汪黎; 孙扬善; 樊泉; 薛烽; 段志超

    2004-01-01

    TiC particle reinforced 420 stainless steel matrix composites were fabricated, and the microstructure, tensile properties and wear resistance of the composites were studied. The experimental results indicate that the distribution of TiC particles with size of 5 to 10 μm in diameter is uniform if the volume fraction of TiC is lower than 6%. However, slight agglomeration can be observed when the TiC content exceeds 6%. With the increase of TiC content the tensile and yield strength of the composites prepared increases and reaches the maximum when the volume fraction of TiC increases to 5%. Further increase of TiC content causes reductions of yield and tensile strength. The ductility of the composites shows a monotone decrease with the increase of TiC addition. The introduction of TiC into 420 stainless steel results in significant improvement on wear resistance, which reaches a steady level when the volume fraction of TiC increases to 11% and does not show obvious variation if the TiC content is further increased.%用原位合成方法制备了TiC增强420不锈钢基复合材料, 并研究了复合材料的显微组织、力学性能和抗磨损性能. 实验结果表明, 当复合材料中TiC颗粒体积分数低于6%时, 材料中TiC颗粒分布均匀, 颗粒的尺寸在5~10 μm左右; 但颗粒体积分数大于6%后, 显微组织中出现TiC颗粒的轻微偏聚. 随着TiC体积分数的增加, 材料的抗拉强度和屈服强度先是增高, 当TiC体积分数达到5%时, 强度达最大值. 此后增加TiC体积分数会导致强度的下降. 复合材料的塑性随TiC体积分数的增加呈单调下降的趋势. TiC颗粒的引入使材料的抗磨损性能得到显著改善, 但当TiC体积分数达到11%时, 抗磨损性能接近一个稳定的水平. 继续增加TiC含量, 材料的抗磨损性能不再发生明显变化.

  5. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming B.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-10-01

    Chromium-rich nitride precipitates in production of nickel-free austenitic stainless steel plates via pressurised solution nitriding of Fe-22.7Cr-2.4Mo ferritic stainless steel at 1473 K (1200 °C) under a nitrogen gas atmosphere was investigated. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition, morphology and crystallographic orientation between the resulted austenite and precipitates were investigated using optical microscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). On prolonged nitriding, Chromium-rich nitride precipitates were formed firstly close to the surface and later throughout the sample with austenitic structure. Chromium-rich nitride precipitates with a rod or strip-like morphology was developed by a discontinuous cellular precipitation mechanism. STEM-EDS analysis demonstrated partitioning of metallic elements between austenite and nitrides, with chromium contents of about 80 wt.% in the precipitates. XRD analysis indicated that the Chromium-rich nitride precipitates are hexagonal (Cr, Mo)2N. Based on the TEM studies, (Cr, Mo)2N precipitates presented a (1 1 1)γ//(0 0 2)(Cr, Mo)2N, ?γ//?(Cr, Mo)2N orientation relationship with respect to the austenite matrix. EBSD studies revealed that the austenite in the regions that have transformed into austenite and (Cr, Mo)2N have no orientation relation to the untransformed austenite.

  6. Modelling of the interactions between B4C and stainless steel at high temperatures

    Veshchunov, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    Results of detailed chemical-analytical examinations of B 4 C/stainless steel (s.s.) reaction couples obtained at temperatures of 1000, 1100 and 1200 C, and a theoretical model developed on the basis of these results, which describes the reaction layers growth kinetics, are presented. The examinations were carried out by AES and XMA methods to measure concentration profiles of different elements in the various phases and the thicknesses of the formed reaction layers as function of time to determine the growth kinetics. A new approach for modelling of diffusion mass transfer through a two-phase zone in multicomponent systems is further developed for the description of the growth kinetics of the reaction layer consisting of Me 2 B (Me≡Fe, Cr, Ni) precipitates in the stainless steel matrix. Diffusion coefficients of Cr in all phases of the reaction zone are calculated. These data together with the measured boundary concentrations of the elements allow the complete description of the B 4 C/s.s. interaction kinetics at the examined test temperatures by the proposed model. (orig.)

  7. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  8. Strain hardening of cold-rolled lean-alloyed metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels

    Papula, Suvi [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Anttila, Severi [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Talonen, Juho [Outokumpu Oyj, P.O. Box 245, FI-00181 Helsinki (Finland); Sarikka, Teemu; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2016-11-20

    Mechanical properties and strain hardening of two pilot-scale lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels having metastable austenite phase, present at 0.50 and 0.30 volume fractions, have been studied by means of tensile testing and nanoindentation. These ferritic-austenitic stainless steels have high strain-hardening capacity, due to the metastable austenite phase, which leads to an improved uniform elongation and higher tensile strength in comparison with most commercial lean duplex stainless steels. According to the results, even as low as 0.30 volume fraction of austenite seems efficient for achieving nearly 40% elongation. The austenite phase is initially the harder phase, and exhibits more strain hardening than the ferrite phase. The rate of strain hardening and the evolution of the martensite phase were found to depend on the loading direction: both are higher when strained in the rolling direction as compared to the transverse direction. Based on the mechanical testing, characterization of the microstructure by optical/electron microscopy, magnetic balance measurements and EBSD texture analysis, this anisotropy in mechanical properties of the cold-rolled metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels can be explained by the elongated dual-phase microstructure, fiber reinforcement effect of the harder austenite phase and the presence and interplay of rolling textures in the two phases.

  9. High-Temperature Tensile and Tribological Behavior of Hybrid (ZrB2+Al3Zr)/AA5052 In Situ Composite

    Gautam, G.; Kumar, N.; Mohan, A.; Gautam, R. K.; Mohan, S.

    2016-09-01

    During service life, components such as piston, cylinder blocks, brakes, and discs/drums, have to work under high-temperature conditions. In order to have appropriate material for such applications high-temperature studies are important. Hybrid (ZrB2+Al3Zr)/AA5052 in situ composite has been investigated from ambient to 523 K (250 °C) at an interval of 50 deg. (ZrB2+Al3Zr)/AA5052 in situ composite has been fabricated by the direct melt reaction of AA5052 alloy with zirconium and boron salts. Microstructure studies show refinement in the grain size of base alloy on in situ formation of reinforcement particles. Al3Zr particles are observed in rectangular and polyhedron shapes. It is observed from the tensile studies that ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and percentage elongation decrease with increase in test temperature. Similar kind of behavior is also observed for flow curve properties. The tensile results have also been correlated with fractography. Wear and friction results indicate that the wear rate increases with increase in normal load, whereas coefficient of friction shows decreasing trend. With increasing test temperature, wear rate exhibits a typical phenomenon. After an initial increase, wear rate follows a decreasing trend up to 423 K (150 °C), and finally a rapid increase is observed, whereas coefficient of friction increases continuously with increase in test temperature. The mechanisms responsible for the variation of wear and friction with different temperatures have been discussed in detail with the help of worn surfaces studies under scanning electron microscope (SEM) & 3D-profilometer and debris analysis by XRD.

  10. Standard practice for evaluation of disbonding of bimetallic stainless alloy/steel plate for use in high-pressure, high-temperature refinery hydrogen service

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for the evaluation of disbonding of bimetallic stainless alloy/steel plate for use in refinery high-pressure/high-temperature (HP/HT) gaseous hydrogen service. It includes procedures to (1) produce suitable laboratory test specimens, (2) obtain hydrogen charging conditions in the laboratory that are similar to those found in refinery HP/HT hydrogen gas service for evaluation of bimetallic specimens exposed to these environments, and (3) perform analysis of the test data. The purpose of this practice is to allow for comparison of data among test laboratories on the resistance of bimetallic stainless alloy/steels to hydrogen-induced disbonding (HID). 1.2 This practice applies primarily to bimetallic products fabricated by weld overlay of stainless alloy onto a steel substrate. Most of the information developed using this practice has been obtained for such materials. The procedures described herein, may also be appropriate for evaluation of hot roll bonded, explosive bonded...

  11. Local behavior of an AISI 304 stainless steel submitted to in situ biaxial loading in SEM

    Caër, C., E-mail: celia.caer@gmail.com; Pesci, R.

    2017-04-06

    The microstructural response of a coarse grained AISI 304 stainless steel submitted to biaxial tensile loading was investigated using SEM and X-ray diffraction. The specimen geometry was designed to allow for biaxial stress state and incipient crack in the center of the active part under biaxial tensile loading. This complex loading was performed step by step by a micromachine fitting into a SEM chamber. At each loading step FSD pictures and EBSD measurements were carried out to study the microstructural evolution of the alloy, namely grain rotations and misorientations, stress-induced martensite formation and crack propagation. According to their initial orientation, grains are found to behave differently under loading. Approximately 60% of grains are shown to reorient to the [110] Z orientation under biaxial tensile loading, whereas the 40% left undergo high plastic deformation. EBSD and XRD measurements respectively performed under loading and on the post mortem specimen highlighted the formation of about 4% of martensite.

  12. Relationship between oxide film structures and corrosion resistance of SUS 304 L stainless steel in high temperature pure water

    Yamanaka, Kazuo; Matsuda, Yasushi.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of various oxidation conditions on metal release of SUS304L stainless steels in deaerated pure water at 488 K was investigated. The behavior of metal release was also discussed in relation to the surface films which were formed by various oxidation treatments. The results obtained are as follows: (1) The oxidation treatment in high purity argon gas at high temperatures for short time such as 1273 K - 2 min (120S) was effective to decrease the metal dissolution, and the oxide films primarily consisted of spinel type double oxide layer containing high concentration of Mn and Cr. (2) The oxidation treatments in non-deaerated pure water at 561 K for 24∼336 h (86.4∼1209.6 ks) were furthermore effective to decrease the metal dissolution. (3) It may be concluded that the key factors controlling the metal release are thickness, structure and compactness together with compositions of surface oxide films. (author)

  13. Surface Nano crystallization of 3Cr13 Stainless Steel Induced by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam Irradiation

    Han, Z.; Zou, H.; Wang, Z.; Ji, I.; Cai, J.; Guan, Q.

    2013-01-01

    The nanocrystalline surface was produced on 3Cr13 martensite stainless steel surface using high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) technique. The structures of the nano crystallized surface were characterized by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Two nano structures consisting of fine austenite grains (50-150 nm) and very fine carbides precipitates are formed in melted surface layer after multiple bombardments via dissolution of carbides and crater eruption. It is demonstrated that the dissolution of the carbides and the formation of the supersaturated Fe (C) solid solution play a determining role on the microstructure evolution. Additionally, the formation of fine austenite structure is closely related to the thermal stresses induced by the HCPEB irradiation. The effects of both high carbon content and high value of stresses increase the stability of the austenite, which leads to the complete suppression of martensitic transformation.

  14. Rotary bending as a mean for improving micro-cleanliness of stainless steels for high demanding applications

    Sourisseau Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Stainless steels are used for automotive or medical applications which require a high fatigue resistance correlated to a high level of micro-cleanliness. A methodology based on rotary bending tests carried out on wires or bars has been defined to determine the material’s endurance limit (after 100 millions cycles and identify the largest subcutaneous inclusions or precipitates where failures initiate. This methodology has been applied to EN 1.4568 spring wires. Failures were found to initiate both at oxide inclusions and AlN precipitates. For the same size, AlN precipitates were observed to be more critical towards crack initiation than oxide inclusions, due to their angular shape and lower thermal expansion at high temperatures. However, oxide inclusions larger than the AlN maximum size strongly impact the material’s fatigue limit, and their density and size should be reduced.

  15. High-energy-beam welding of type 316LN stainless steel for cryogenic applications

    Siewert, T.A.; Gorni, D.; Kohn, G.

    1988-01-01

    Laser and electron beam welds in 25-mm-thick AISI 316LN specimens containing 0.16 wt.$% N were evaluated for fusion reactor applications and their mechanical properties were compared with those of welds generated by lower productivity processes such as shielded-metal-arc and gas-metal-arc welding. Tensile tests were performed on transverse tensile specimens at 4 K. For both welding processes the fractures occurred in the base metal at a strength level near 950 MPa. This indicated that the weld and heat affected zone had a strength similar to that of the base metal. The 4 K weld fracture toughness was only slightly less than that for the base metal and comparable to the best values achieved with conventional welding processes in 316Ln weld metal. The Charpy V-notch absorbed energies averaged near 70 J at 76 K. Metallographic analysis revealed cellular and fully austenitic solidification with little porosity and no evidence of hot cracking

  16. Characterization and Strain-Hardening Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Sharma, Gaurav; Dwivedi, Dheerendra Kumar; Jain, Pramod Kumar

    2017-12-01

    In this study, friction stir-welded joint of 3-mm-thick plates of 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS) was characterized in light of microstructure, x-ray diffraction analysis, hardness, tensile strength, ductility, corrosion and work hardening properties. The FSW joint made of ferritic stainless steel comprises of three distinct regions including the base metal. In stir zone highly refined ferrite grains with martensite and some carbide precipitates at the grain boundaries were observed. X-ray diffraction analysis also revealed precipitation of Cr23C6 and martensite formation in heat-affected zone and stir zone. In tensile testing of the transverse weld samples, the failure eventuated within the gauge length of the specimen from the base metal region having tensile properties overmatched to the as-received base metal. The tensile strength and elongation of the longitudinal (all weld) sample were found to be 1014 MPa and 9.47%, respectively. However, in potentiodynamic polarization test, the corrosion current density of the stir zone was highest among all the three zones. The strain-hardening exponent for base metal, transverse and longitudinal (all weld) weld samples was calculated using various equations. Both the transverse and longitudinal weld samples exhibited higher strain-hardening exponents as compared to the as-received base metal. In Kocks-Mecking plots for the base metal and weld samples at least two stages of strain hardening were observed.

  17. Corrosion of 316 stainless steel in high temperature molten Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (FLiBe) salt

    Zheng, Guiqiu, E-mail: guiqiuzheng@gmail.com; Kelleher, Brian; Cao, Guoping; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd; Sridharan, Kumar

    2015-06-15

    In support of structural material development for the fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR), corrosion tests of 316 stainless steel were performed in the potential primary coolant, molten Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (FLiBe) at 700 °C for an exposure duration up to 3000 h. Tests were performed in both 316 stainless steel and graphite capsules. Corrosion in both capsule materials occurred by the dissolution of chromium from the stainless steel into the salt which led to the depletion of chromium predominantly along the grain boundaries of the test samples. The samples tested in graphite capsules showed a factor of two greater depth of corrosion attack as measured in terms of chromium depletion, compared to those tested in 316 stainless steel capsules. The samples tested in graphite capsules showed the formation of Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} particulate phases throughout the depth of the corrosion layer. Samples tested in both types of capsule materials showed the formation of MoSi{sub 2} phase due to increased activity of Mo and Si as a result of Cr depletion, and furthermore corrosion promoted the formation of a α-ferrite phase in the near-surface regions of the 316 stainless steel. Based on the corrosion tests, the corrosion attack depth in FLiBe salt was predicted as 17.1 μm/year and 31.2 μm/year for 316 stainless steel tested in 316 stainless steel and in graphite capsules respectively. It is in an acceptable range compared to the Hastelloy-N corrosion in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel salt.

  18. Comparison of Solid and Hollow Torque Transducer Shaft Response in a High Alloy Stainless Steel

    Milby, Christopher L.; Hecox, Bryan G.; Wiewel, Joseph L.; Boley, Mark S.

    2007-03-01

    Recent investigations of the torque transducer response function (ambient field signal versus applied torque or shear stress) have been conducted in a 13% chromium and 8% nickel stainless steel alloy in both the hollow shaft and solid shaft configuration. An understanding of both is needed for applications with differing yield strength and hardness requirements. Axial hysteresis measurements conducted before and after heat treatment exhibited little difference in coercivity and retentivity between the two sample types. However, the field mapping and transducer sensitivity studies showed the hollow shaft configuration to have a far superior degree of polarization in the sensory region and to exhibit an enhanced sensitivity, especially after heat treatment. This is most likely due to its more efficient provision of closed circumferential geometry for the field lines and improved grain alignment during heat treatment.

  19. Microstructural stability and mechanical properties of a high nitrogen super duplex stainless steel

    Nilsson, J.-O. [AB Sandvik Steel, Sandviken (Sweden). Dept. of Phys. Metall.; Kangas, P.; Wilson, A. [AB Sandvik Steel, Sandviken (Sweden). Dept. of Tube Research; Karlsson, T. [Swedish Inst. for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-07-01

    A time temperature transformation (TTT)-diagram with respect to the formation of intermetallic phase in the range 700-1000 C has been assessed by point counting for a 29Cr-6Ni-2Mo-0.38N super duplex stainless steel. Using a computer program developed by the authors a continuous cooling transformation (CCT)-diagram was calculated from the TTT-diagram assuming that the transformation can be described by an Avrami type equation. A comparison of impact toughness and hardness showed that toughness was a very sensitive measure of intermetallic phase formation while hardness was insensitive and showed no significant increase until the material was catastrophically brittle. It was found that Thermo-Calc could be used in a qualitative manner for predicting microstructural changes at various temperatures but was unable to predict variables such as dissolution temperature and volume percentage with accuracy. (orig.)

  20. High temperature interaction between Zircaloy-4 and stainless steel type 304

    Nagase, Fumihisa; Otomo, Takashi; Uetsuka, Hiroshi

    2001-03-01

    The chemical interactions between Zircaloy-4 and stainless steel type 304 were investigated in the temperature range from 1273 to 1573 K to obtain the basic information on the melt progress in the fuel bundle during an LWR severe accident. Reaction layers were formed at the contact interface and grew as the temperature and the time increase. The Zircaloy was preferentially dissolved by the reaction. The SEM/EDX analyses showed that the main process of the reaction was diffusion of Fe, Cr and Ni into the Zircaloy which resulted in the formation of a Zr-rich eutectic through the tested temperature range. Reaction rates for decrease in the materials thickness were evaluated and the reaction generally obeyed a parabolic rate law. The reaction rate constant was determined at every examined temperature and Arrhenius type rate equations were estimated for the temperature range. (author)

  1. Oxidation behavior of 304 stainless steel exposed to steam at high temperature

    Jeong, H.; Ryu, J. R.; Park, G. H. [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, T. G. [FNC Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    An experiment was conducted on 304 stainless steel(SUS304L) at the LOCA(Lost of Coolant Accident) requirement temperature, 800 .deg. C to 1100 deg. C. SUS304L was used as clothing material and structural frame of LWR. Oxidation behavior of SUS304L by temperature and time was examined after the mechanical and chemical polishing of SUS304L plate. After oxidation, change in weight showed a linear pattern for the first 20 minutes and a parabolic pattern afterwards. Then, fine structure and oxidation layer of SUS304L plate were observed through OM photographing and oxidation characteristics of SUS304L were found through hardness measurement by depth of each plate and XRD(X-Ray Diffraction) photographing.

  2. Characterization and corrosion behavior of F6NM stainless steel treated in high temperature water

    Li, Zheng-yang; Cai, Zhen-bing; Yang, Wen-jin; Shen, Xiao-yao; Xue, Guo-hong; Zhu, Min-hao

    2018-03-01

    F6NM martensitic stainless steel was exposed to 350 °C water condition for 500, 1500, and 2500 h to simulate pressurized water reactor (PWR) condition. The characterization and corrosion behavior of the oxide film were investigated. Results indicate that the exposed steel surface formed a double-layer oxide film. The outer oxide film is Fe-rich and contains two type oxide particles. However, the inner oxide film is Cr-rich, and two oxide films, whose thicknesses increase with increasing exposure time. The oxide film reduces the corrosion behavior because the outer oxide film has many crack and pores. Finally, the mechanism and factors affecting the formation of the oxide film were investigated.

  3. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Microstructure, Tensile Properties, and Fracture Behavior of Cold-Rolled High-Mn Light-Weight Steels

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cho, Kyung Mox [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Joonoh; Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    The effects of the annealing temperature on the microstructure and tensile properties of cold-rolled light-weight steels are investigated using two Fe-30Mn-xAl-0.9C alloys that contain different Al content. The initial alloy microstructure is composed of a single austenite or a mixture of austenite and ferrite depending on the nominal aluminum content. For the alloy with 9 wt%Al content, the recrystallization and grain growth of austenite occurrs depending on the annealing temperature. However, for the alloy with 11 wt%Al content, the β-Mn phase is observed after annealing for 10 min at 550~800 ℃. The β-Mn transformation kinetics is the fastest at 700 ℃. The formation of the β-Mn phase has a detrimental effect on the ductility, and this leads to significant decreases in the total elongation. The same alloy also forms κ-carbide and DO3 ordering at 550~900 ℃. The investigated alloys exhibit a fully recrystallized microstructure after annealing at 900 ℃ for 10 min, which results in a high total elongation of 25~55%with a high tensile strength of 900~1170 MPa.

  4. Tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems to primary dentin treated by Er:YAG laser and conventional high-speed drill

    Marques, Barbara A.; Navarro, Ricardo S.; Silvestre, Fellipe D.; Pinheiro, Sergio L.; Freitas, Patricia M.; Imparato, Jose Carlos P.; Oda, Margareth

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of different adhesive systems to primary tooth dentin prepared by high-speed drill and Er:YAG laser (2.94μm). Buccal surfaces of 38 primary canines were ground and flattened with sand paper disks (#120-600 grit) and distributed into five groups (n=15): G1: diamond bur in high-speed drill (HD)+ 35% phosphoric acid (PA)+Single Bond (SB); G2: HD+self-etching One Up Bond F (OUB);G3: Er:YAG laser (KaVo 3- LELO-FOUSP)(4Hz, 80mJ, 25,72J/cm2) (L)+PA+SB, G4: L+SB, G5: L+OUB. The inverted truncated cone samples built with Z-100 composite resin after storage in water (37°C/24h) were submitted to tensile bond strength test on Mini Instron 4442 (0.5mm/min, 500N). The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey Test (pHD+PA+SB and HD+OUB (p=0.000), L+SB showed higher values than L+PA+SB and L+OUB (p=0.0311). Er:YAG laser radiation promoted significant increase of bond strength of different adhesive systems evaluated in the dentin of primary teeth.

  5. Microstructure characterization in the weld joint of a high nickel austenitic alloy and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel

    Wu, Na; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan [Shandong Univ., Jinan (CN). Key Lab. for Liquid - Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education)

    2012-06-15

    High nickel austenitic alloy, 6 mm thick, and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel with a thickness of 0.6 mm were joined by pulsed current tungsten inert gas arc welding without filler metal in this work. Metallographic examination, microhardness measurement and electron microprobe analysis were used to reveal microstructural characteristics in the joint. The results indicated that the weld metal consisted of {gamma}-austenite, {delta}-ferrite and carbides without the appearance of martensite. There were dendrite crystals at the edge of the weld metal near the high nickel austenitic alloy and isometric crystals in the center of the weld metal. The microhardness of the weld metal was the highest due to the existence of carbides and its finer structure. Graphite flakes were still embedded in the austenite matrix of the heat-affected zone without the formation of martensite. (orig.)

  6. 'In-beam' simulation of high temperature helium embrittlement of DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel

    Schroeder, H.; Batfalsky, P.

    1982-01-01

    This work describes a facility for high temperature creep rupture tests during homogeneous helium implantation. This 'in-beam' creep testing facility is used to simulate helium embrittlement effects which will be very important for first wall materials of future fusion reactors operated at high temperatures. First results for DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel clearly demonstrate differences between samples 'in-beam' tested at 1073 K and those creep tested at the same temperature after room temperature helium implantation. The specimens ruptured 'in-beam' have much shorter lifetimes and lower ductility than the specimens tested after room temperature implantation. There are also differences in the microstructures, concerning helium bubble sizes and densities in matrix and grain boundaries. These microstructural differences may be a key for the understanding of the more severe helium embrittlement effects 'in-beam' as compared to creep tests performed after room temperature implantation. (orig.)

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel under deaerated high-temperature water. Influence of cold work and processing orientation

    Terachi, Takumi; Yamada, Takuyo; Chiba, Goro; Arioka, Koji

    2006-01-01

    The influence of cold work and processing orientation on the propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of stainless steel under hydrogenated high-temperature water was examined. It was shown that (1) the crack growth rates increased with heaviness of cold work, and (2) processing orientation affected crack growth rate with cracking direction. Crack growth rates showed anisotropy of T-L>>T-S>L-S, with T-S and L-S branches representing high shear stress direction. Geometric deformation of crystal grains due to cold work caused the anisotropy and shear stress also assisted the SCC propagation. (3) The step intervals of slip like patterns observed on intergranular facets increased cold work. (4) Nano-indentation hardness of the crack tip together with EBSD measurement indicated that the change of hardness due to crack propagation was less than 5% cold-work, even though the distance from the crack tip was 10μm. (author)

  8. Tensile testing of materials at high temperatures above 1700 °C with in situ synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography

    Haboub, Abdel; Nasiatka, James R.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Cox, Brian N.; Marshall, David B.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    A compact ultrahigh temperature tensile testing instrument has been designed and fabricated for in situ x-ray micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It allows for real time x-ray micro-tomographic imaging of test materials under mechanical load at temperatures up to 2300 °C in controlled environments (vacuum or controlled gas flow). Sample heating is by six infrared halogen lamps with ellipsoidal reflectors arranged in a confocal configuration, which generates an approximately spherical zone of high heat flux approximately 5 mm in diameter. Samples are held between grips connected to a motorized stage that loads the samples in tension or compression with forces up to 2.2 kN. The heating chamber and loading system are water-cooled for thermal stability. The entire instrument is mounted on a rotation stage that allows stepwise recording of radiographs over an angular range of 180°. A thin circumferential (360°) aluminum window in the wall of the heating chamber allows the x-rays to pass through the chamber and the sample over the full angular range. The performance of the instrument has been demonstrated by characterizing the evolution of 3D damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials under tensile loading at 1750 °C

  9. Build direction dependence of microstructure and high-temperature tensile property of Co–Cr–Mo alloy fabricated by electron beam melting

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Kurosu, Shingo; Li, Yun-Ping; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Chiba, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The microstructures and high-temperature tensile properties of a Co–28Cr–6Mo–0.23C–0.17N alloy fabricated by electron beam melting (EBM) with cylindrical axes deviating from the build direction by 0°, 45°, 55° and 90° were investigated. The preferred crystal orientations of the γ phase in the as-EBM-built samples with angles of 0°, 45°, 55° and 90° were near [0 0 1], [1 1 0], [1 1 1] and [1 0 0], respectively. M 23 C 6 precipitates (M = Cr, Mo or Si) were observed to align along the build direction with intervals of around 3 μm. The phase was completely transformed into a single ε-hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phase after aging treatment at 800 °C for 24 h, when lamellar colonies of M 2 N precipitates and the ε-hcp phase appeared in the matrix. Among the samples, the one built with 55° deviation had the highest ultimate tensile strength of 806 MPa at 700 °C. The relationship between the microstructure and the build direction dependence of mechanical properties suggested that the conditions of heat treatment to homogenize the microstructure throughout the height of the EBM-built object should be determined by taking into account the thermal history during the post-melt period of the EBM process, especially when the solid–solid transformation is sluggish

  10. Grain boundary segregation and intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water

    Shoji, T.; Yamaki, K.; Ballinger, R.G.; Hwang, I.S.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of grain boundary segregation on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water have been examined as a function of heat treatment. The materials investigated were: (1) two commercial purity Type 304; (2) low sulfur Type 304; (3) nuclear grade Type 304; (4) ultra high purity Type 304L; and (5) Type 316L and Type 347L. Specimens were solution treated at 1050 degrees C for 0.5 hour and given a sensitization heat treatment at 650 degrees C for 50 hours. Some of the specimens were then subjected to an aging heat treatment at 850 degrees C for from one to ten hours to cause Cr recovery at the grain boundaries. The effects of heat treatments on degree of sensitization and grain boundary segregation were evaluated by Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) and Coriou tests, respectively. The susceptibility to stress corrosion (SCC) was evaluated using slow strain rate tests technique (SSRT) in high temperature water. SSRT tests were performed in an aerated pure water (8 ppm dissolved oxygen) at 288 degrees C at a strain rate of 1.33 x 10 -6 /sec. Susceptibility to intergranular stress corrosion cracking was compared with degree of sensitization and grain boundary segregation. The results of the investigation indicate that EPR is not always an accurate indicator of SCC susceptibility. The Coriou test provides a more reliable measure of SCC susceptibility especially for 304L, 304NG, 316L, and 347L stainless steels. The results also indicate that grain boundary segregation as well as degree of sensitization must be considered in the determination of SCC susceptibility

  11. Quantitative influence of minor and impurity elements on hot cracking susceptibility of extra high-purity type 310 stainless steel

    Saida, Kazuyoshi; Matsushita, Hideki; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi; Nakayama, Junpei

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of minor and impurity elements such as C, Mn, P and S on the solidification and ductility-dip cracking susceptibilities of extra high-purity type 310 stainless steels, the transverse-Varestraint test was conducted by using several type 310 stainless steels with different amounts of C, Mn, P and S. Two types of hot cracks occurred in these steels by Varestraint test; solidification and ductility-dip cracks. The solidification cracking susceptibility was significantly reduced as the amounts of C, P and S decreased. The ductility-dip cracking susceptibility also reduced with a decrease in P and S contents. It adversely, however, increased as the C content of the steels was reduced. Mn didn't greatly affect the hot cracking susceptibility of the extra high-purity steels. The characteristic influence on solidification cracking was the ratio of P:S:C=1:1.3:0.56, while Mn negligibly ameliorated solidification cracking in the extra low S (and P) steels. The numerical analysis on the solidification brittle temperature range (BTR) revealed that the reduced solidification cracking susceptibility with decreasing the amounts of C, P and S in steel could be attributed to the reduced BTR due to the suppression of solidification segregation of minor and impurity elements in the finally solidified liquid film between dendrites. On the other hand, a molecular orbital analysis to estimate the binding strength of the grain boundary suggested that the increased ductility-dip cracking susceptibility in extra high-purity steels was caused by grain boundary embrittlement due to the refining of beneficial elements for grain boundary strengthening such as C. (author)

  12. Effect of borides on hot deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of powder metallurgy high borated stainless steel

    Zhou, Xuan [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wang, Mingjia, E-mail: mingjiawangysu@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Fu, Yifeng [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wang, Zixi; Li, Yanmei [Yanming Alloy Roll Co. Ltd, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Yang, Shunkai; Zhao, Hongchang; Li, Hangbo [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate borides effect on the hot deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of powder metallurgy high borated stainless steel, hot compression tests at the temperatures of 950– 1150 °C and the strain rates of 0.01– 10 s{sup −1} were performed. Flow stress curves indicated that borides increased the material's stress level at low temperature but the strength was sacrificed at temperatures above 1100 °C. A hyperbolic-sine equation was used to characterize the dependence of the flow stress on the deformation temperature and strain rate. The hot deformation activation energy and stress exponent were determined to be 355 kJ/mol and 3.2, respectively. The main factors leading to activation energy and stress exponent of studied steel lower than those of commercial 304 stainless steel were discussed. Processing maps at the strains of 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 showed that flow instability mainly concentrated at 950– 1150 °C and strain rate higher than 0.6 s{sup −1}. Results of microstructure illustrated that dynamic recrystallization was fully completed at both high temperature-low strain rate and low temperature-high strain rate. In the instability region cracks were generated in addition to cavities. Interestingly, borides maintained a preferential orientation resulting from particle rotation during compression. - Highlights: •The decrement of activation energy was affected by boride and boron solution. •The decrease of stress exponent was influenced by composition and Cottrell atmosphere. •Boride represented a preferential orientation caused by particle rotation.

  13. A comparative study of the mechanical properties and the behavior of carbon and boron in stainless steel cladding tubes fabricated by PM HIP and traditional technologies

    Shulga, A.V., E-mail: avshulga@mephi.ru [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, State University, 31 Kashirskoe Sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► The ring tensile test method was optimized and successfully used. ► The cladding tubes fabricated by PM HIP and traditional technologies were tested. ► Improvement of the cladding tubes properties fabricated by PM HIP was found. ► Correlation of the homogeneity of carbon, boron with the properties was revealed. -- Abstract: The ring tensile test method was optimized and successfully used to obtain precise data for specimens of the cladding tubes of AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steels and ferritic–martensitic stainless steel. The positive modifications in the tensile properties of the stainless steel cladding tubes fabricated by powder metallurgy and hot isostatic pressing of melt atomized powders (PM HIP) when compared with the cladding tubes produced by traditional technology were found. Presently, PM HIP is also used in the fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic–martensitic steels. The high degree of homogeneity of the distribution of carbon and boron as well the high dispersivity of the phase-structure elements in the specimens manufactured via PM HIP were determined by direct autoradiography methods. These results correlate well with the increase of the tensile properties of the specimens produced by PM HIP technology.

  14. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    Kaluzny, J. A. [Fermilab; Grimm, C. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  15. Concurrent microstructural evolution of ferrite and austenite in a duplex stainless steel processed by high-pressure torsion

    Cao, Y.; Wang, Y.B.; An, X.H.; Liao, X.Z.; Kawasaki, M.; Ringer, S.P.; Langdon, T.G.; Zhu, Y.T.

    2014-01-01

    A duplex stainless steel with approximately equal volume fractions of ferrite and austenite was processed by high-pressure torsion. Nano-indentation, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the hardness and microstructure evolutions of the steel. Despite the different strain-hardening rates of individual ferrite and austenite, the microstructures of the two phases evolved concurrently in such a way that the neighbouring two phases always maintained similar hardness. While the plastic deformation and grain refinement of ferrite occurred mainly via dislocation activities, the plastic deformation and grain refinement process of austenite were more complicated and included deformation twinning and de-twinning in coarse grains, grain refinement by twinning and dislocation–twin interactions, de-twinning in ultrafine grains and twin boundary subdivision

  16. Effect of carbide precipitates on high temperature creep of a 20Cr-25Ni austenitic stainless steel

    Yamane, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakagawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    The high temperature creep of an austenitic stainless steel having carbide precipitates, is different from that of the carbide precipitate-free one. Strain rates of the steady state creep d(epsilonsub(s))/dt, or minimum strain rates of the creep in precipitate hardened and dispersion strengthened alloys at the creep temperature T, can be expressed by Sherby-Dorn's equation d(epsilonsub(s))/dt = Aσsup(n) exp (-Qsub(c)/RT). The stress exponent n, and the activation energy for creep Qsub(c), in a power law creep region, are more than those of unstrengthened alloys, where σ is the creep stress, R the gas constant and A the constant. In this research, the influence of carbide precipitates on steady creep rates, is investigated. Experimental details are given. Results are given and discussed. (author)

  17. Genetic design and characterization of novel ultra-high-strength stainless steels strengthened by Ni3Ti intermetallic nanoprecipitates

    Xu, W.; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.; Wang, W.; Yang, K.; Bliznuk, V.; Kestens, L.A.I.; Zwaag, S. van der

    2010-01-01

    A general computational alloy design approach based on thermodynamic and physical metallurgical principles, and coupled with a genetic optimization scheme, is presented. The method is applied to the design of new ultra-high-strength maraging stainless steels strengthened by Ni 3 Ti intermetallics. In the first design round, the alloy composition is optimized on the basis of precipitate formation at a fixed ageing temperature without considering other steps in the heat treatment. In the second round, the alloy is redesigned, applying an integrated model which allows for the simultaneous optimization of alloy composition and the ageing temperature as well as the prior austenitization temperature. The experimental characterizations of prototype alloys clearly demonstrate that alloys designed by the proposed approach achieve the desired microstructures.

  18. The effect of molten salt on high temperature behavior of stainless steel and titanium alloy with the presence of water vapor

    Baharum, Azila; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Salleh, Emee Marina

    2018-04-01

    The high temperature oxidation experiment was conducted to study the behavior of titanium alloy Ti6A14V and stainless steel 316 in Na2SO4-50%NaCl + Ar-20%O2 (molten salt) and Na2SO4-50%NaCl + Ar-20%O2 + 12% H2O (molten salt + water vapor) environment at 900°C for 30 hours using horizontal tube furnace. The sample then was investigated using weight change measurement analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis to study the weight gained and the phase oxidation that occurred. The weight gained of the titanium alloy was higher in molten salt environment compared to stainless steel due to the rapid growth in the oxide scale but showed almost no change of weight gained upon addition of water vapor. This is due to the alloy was fully oxidized. Stainless steel showed more protection and better effect in molten salt environment compared to mixed environment showed by slower weight gain and lower oxidation rate. Meanwhile, the phase oxidation test of the samples showed that the titanium alloy consist of multi oxide layer of rutile (TiO2) and Al2O3 on the surface of the exposed sample. While stainless steel show the formation of both protective Cr-rich oxide and non-protective Fe-rich oxide layer. This can be concluded that stainless steel is better compared to Ti alloy due to slow growing of chromia oxide. Therefore it is proven that stainless steel has better self-protection upon high temperature exposure.

  19. Study on Tensile Fatigue Behavior of Thermal Butt Fusion in Safety Class III High-Density Polyethylene Buried Piping in Nuclear Power Plants

    Kim, Jong Sung; Lee, Young Ju; Oh, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) piping, which has recently been applied to safety class III piping in nuclear power plants, can be butt-joined through the thermal fusion process, which heats two fused surfaces and then subject to axial pressure. The thermal fusion process generates bead shapes on the butt fusion. The stress concentrations caused by the bead shapes may reduce the fatigue lifetime. Thus, investigating the effect of the thermal butt fusion beads on fatigue behavior is necessary. This study examined the fatigue behavior of thermal butt fusion via a tensile fatigue test under stress-controlled conditions using finite element elastic stress analysis. Based on the results, the presence of thermal butt fusion beads was confirmed to reduce the fatigue lifetime in the low-cycle fatigue region while having a negligible effect in the medium- and high-cycle fatigue regions

  20. Study on Tensile Fatigue Behavior of Thermal Butt Fusion in Safety Class III High-Density Polyethylene Buried Piping in Nuclear Power Plants

    Kim, Jong Sung; Lee, Young Ju [Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young Jin [KEPCO E and C, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) piping, which has recently been applied to safety class III piping in nuclear power plants, can be butt-joined through the thermal fusion process, which heats two fused surfaces and then subject to axial pressure. The thermal fusion process generates bead shapes on the butt fusion. The stress concentrations caused by the bead shapes may reduce the fatigue lifetime. Thus, investigating the effect of the thermal butt fusion beads on fatigue behavior is necessary. This study examined the fatigue behavior of thermal butt fusion via a tensile fatigue test under stress-controlled conditions using finite element elastic stress analysis. Based on the results, the presence of thermal butt fusion beads was confirmed to reduce the fatigue lifetime in the low-cycle fatigue region while having a negligible effect in the medium- and high-cycle fatigue regions.

  1. SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld metals in high-temperature water. Influence of corrosion potential, weld type, thermal aging, cold-work and temperature

    Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies on crack growth rate measurement in oxygenated high-temperature pure water conditions, such as normal water chemistry in boiling water reactors, using compact tension type specimens have shown that weld stainless steels are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. However, to our knowledge, there is no crack growth data of weld stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary water. The principal purpose of this study was to examine the SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld metals in simulated PWR primary water. A second objective was to examine the effect of (1) corrosion potential, (2) thermal-aging, (3) Mo in alloy and (4) cold-working on SCC growth in hydrogenated and oxygenated water environments at 320degC. In addition, the temperature dependence of SCC growth in simulated PWR primary water was also studied. The results were as follows: (1) No significant SCC growth was observed on all types of stainless steel weld metals: as-welded, aged (400degC x 10 kh) 308L and 316L, in 2.7 ppm-hydrogenated (low-potential) water at 320degC. (2) 20% cold-working markedly accelerated the SCC growth of weld metals in high-potential water at 320degC, but no significant SCC growth was observed in the hydrogenated water, even after 20% cold-working. (3) No significant SCC growth was observed on stainless steel weld metals in low-potential water at 250degC and 340degC. Thus, stainless steel weld metals have excellent SCC resistance in PWR primary water. On the other hand, (4) significant SCC growth was observed on all types of stainless steel weld metals: as-weld, aged (400degC x 10 kh) and 20% cold-worked 308L and 316L, in 8 ppm-oxygenated (high-potential) water at 320degC. (5) No large difference in SCC growth was observed between 316L (Mo) and 308L. (6) No large effect on SCC growth was observed between before and after aging up to 400degC for 10 kh. (7) 20% cold-working markedly accelerated the SCC growth of stainless steel weld metals. (author)

  2. Effect of composition on corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    Marshall, P.I.; Gooch, T.G.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel weld metal in the ranges of 17 to 28% chromium (Cr), 6 to 60% nickel (Ni), 0 to 9% molybdenum (Mo), and 0.0 to 0.37% nitrogen (N) was examined. Critical pitting temperatures were determined in ferric chloride (FeCl 3 ). Passive film breakdown potentials were assessed from potentiodynamic scans in 3% sodium chloride (NaCl) at 50 C. Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests were carried out in 30% sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) ar 25 C, which was representative of chloride-free acid media of low redox potential. Metallographic examination and microanalysis were conducted on the test welds. Because of segregation of alloying elements, weld metal pitting resistance always was lower than that of matching composition base steel. The difference increased with higher Cr, Mo, and N contents. Segregation also reduced resistance to general corrosion in H 2 SO 4 , but the effect relative to the base steel was less marked than with chloride pitting. Segregation of Cr, Mo, and N in fully austenitic deposits decreased as the Ni' eq- Cr' eq ratio increased. Over the compositional range studied, weld metal pitting resistance was dependent mainly on Mo content and segregation. N had less effect than in wrought alloys. Both Mo and N enhanced weld metal corrosion resistance in H 2 SO 4

  3. Investigation of high temperature corrosion behavior on 304L austenite stainless steel in corrosive environments

    Sahri, M. I.; Othman, N. K.; Samsu, Z.; Daud, A. R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    In this work, 304L stainless steel samples were exposed at 700 °C for 10hrs in different corrosive environments; dry oxygen, molten salt, and molten salt + dry oxygen. The corrosion behavior of samples was analyzed using weight change measurement technique, optical microscope (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX). The existence phases of corroded sample were determined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The lowest corrosion rate was recorded in dry oxygen while the highest was in molten salt + dry oxygen environments with the value of 0.0062 mg/cm{sup 2} and −13.5225 mg/cm{sup 2} respectively. The surface morphology of sample in presence of salt mixture showed scale spallation. Oxide scales of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were the main phases developed and detected by XRD technique. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was not developed in every sample as protective layers but chromate-rich oxide was developed. The cross-section analysis found the oxide scales were in porous, thick and non-adherent that would not an effective barrier to prevent from further degradation of alloy. EDX analysis also showed the Cr-element was low compared to Fe-element at the oxide scale region.

  4. Predicting Microstructure Development During HighTemperature Nitriding of Martensitic Stainless SteelsUsing Thermodynamic Modeling

    Tschiptschin André Paulo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic calculations of the Fe-Cr-N System in the region of the Gas Phase Equilibria have been compared with experimental results of maximum nitrogen absorption during nitriding of two Martensitic Stainless Steels (a 6 mm thick sheet of AISI 410S steel and green powder compacts of AISI 434L steel under N2 atmospheres. The calculations have been performed combining the Fe-Cr-N System description contained in the SGTE Solid Solution Database and the gas phase for the N System contained in the SGTE Substances Database. Results show a rather good agreement for total nitrogen absorption in the steel and nitrogen solubility in austenite in the range of temperatures between 1273 K and 1473 K and in the range of pressures between 0.1 and 0.36 MPa. Calculations show that an appropriate choice of heat treatment parameters can lead to optimal nitrogen absorption in the alloy. It was observed in the calculations that an increased pressure stabilizes CrN at expenses of Cr2N - type nitrides.

  5. Deformation mechanisms induced under high cycle fatigue tests in a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    Roa, J.J., E-mail: joan.josep.roa@upc.edu [CIEFMA-Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Campus Diagonal Sud, Edificio C’, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fargas, G. [CIEFMA-Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jiménez-Piqué, E. [CIEFMA-Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Campus Diagonal Sud, Edificio C’, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Mateo, A. [CIEFMA-Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    Advanced techniques were used to study the deformation mechanisms induced by fatigue tests in a metastable austenitic stainless steel AISI 301LN. Observations by Atomic Force Microscopy were carried out to study the evolution of a pre-existing martensite platelet at increasing number of cycles. The sub-superficial deformation mechanisms of the austenitic grains were studied considering the cross-section microstructure obtained by Focused Ion Beam and analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The results revealed no deformation surrounding the pre-existing martensitic platelet during fatigue tests, only the growth on height was observed. Martensite formation was associated with shear bands on austenite, mainly in the {111} plane, and with the activation of the other intersecting austenite {111}〈110〉 slip system. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy results showed that the nucleation of ε-martensite follows a two stages phase transformation (γ{sub fcc}→ε{sub hcp}→α'{sub bcc})

  6. High Nb, Ta, and Al creep- and oxidation-resistant austenitic stainless steel

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel HTUPS alloy includes, in weight percent: 15 to 30 Ni; 10 to 15 Cr; 2 to 5 Al; 0.6 to 5 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1 W; up to 0.5 Cu; up to 4 Mn; up to 1 Si; 0.05 to 0.15 C; up to 0.15 B; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni wherein said alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, said particles comprising at least one composition selected from the group consisting of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure, said austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  8. Evaluation of non-conformities of hip prostheses made of titanium alloys and stainless steel; Avaliacao de nao conformidades de proteses de quadril fabricadas com ligas de titanio e aco inox

    Bezerra, Ewerton de Oliveira Teotonio; Nascimento, Jose Jeferson da Silva; Luna, Carlos Bruno Barreto; Morais, Crislene Rodrigues da Silva; Campos, Karla Valeria Miranda de, E-mail: ewerton.teotonio@hotmail.com, E-mail: brunobarretodemaufcg@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academinca de Engenharia de Materiais

    2017-01-15

    A large number of metallic alloys has satisfactory behavior when used to manufacture implants for hip prostheses. However, they must be in conformity with standards, to ensure their quality for long periods without losing its functionality. Therefore, this paper aims to study the non-conformities in two hip prostheses, one of titanium and other stainless steel according to standards. The implants studied passed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence, tensile test and optical microscopy (OM). Specimens for the tensile test were made according to ASTM E 8M, as well, MO samples passed by metallographic procedure. The results evidenced that some chemical compositions showed in relation to the standards. The XRD analysis showed peaks of austenite and absence of ferrite for the stainless steel, while the titanium alloy presents an alpha phase (HCP) more significant than the beta phase (BCC). The stainless steel alloys and titanium have yield strength and tensile strength that meet the standards. On the other hand, the elastic modulus of the titanium alloy and stainless steel, comes to be ten times greater than the human bone. Therefore, the high modulus of elasticity of the alloys, favors bone resorption problems. The stainless steel microstructure is typical of an austenitic matrix, while the titanium alloy presents α + β microstructure. (author)

  9. Intergranular corrosion of 13Cr and 17Cr martensitic stainless steels in accelerated corrosive solution and high-temperature, high-purity water

    Ozaki, Toshinori; Ishikawa, Yuichi

    1988-01-01

    Intergranular corrosion behavior of 13Cr and 17Cr martensitic stainless steels was studied by electrochemical and immersing corrosion tests. Effects of the mEtallurgical and environmental conditions on the intergranular corrosion of various tempered steels were examined by the following tests and discussed. (a) Anodic polarization measurement and electrolytical etching test in 0.5 kmol/m 3 H 2 SO 4 solution at 293 K. (b) Immersion corrosion test in 0.88 kmol/m 3 HNO 3 solution at 293 K. (c) Long-time immersion test for specimens with a crevice in a high purity water at 473 K∼561 K. It was found from the anodic polarization curves in 0.5 kmol/m 3 H 2 SO 4 solution-at 293 K that the steels tempered at 773∼873 K had susceptibility to intergranular corrosion in the potential region indicating a second current maximum (around-0.1 V. vs. SCE). But the steel became passive in the more noble potential region than the second current peak potential, while in the less noble potential region general corrosion occurred independent of its microstructure. The intergranular corrosion occurred due to the localized dissolution along the pre-austenitic grain boundary and the martensitic lath boundary. It could be explained by the same dissolution model of the chromium depleted zone as proposed for the intergranular corrosion of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The intergranular corrosion occurred entirely at the free surface in 0.88 kmol/m 3 HNO 3 solution, while in the high temperature and high purity water only the entrance of the crevice corroded. It was also suggested that this intergranular corrosion might serve as the initiation site for stress corrosion cracking of the martensitic stainless steel. (author)

  10. Role of twinning and transformation in hydrogen embrittlement of austenitic stainless steels

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Internal hydrogen embrittlement may be viewed as an extreme form of environmental embrittlement that arises following prolonged exposure to a source of hydrogen. Smooth bar tensile specimens of three stainless steels saturated with deuterium (approximately 200 mol D 2 /m 3 ) were pulled to failure in air at 200 to 400 0 K or in liquid nitrogen at 78 0 K. In Type 304L stainless steel and Tenelon ductility losses are a maximum around 200 to 273 0 K; Type 310 stainless steel is not embrittled at this hydrogen concentration. A distinct change in fracture mode accompanies hydrogen embrittlement, with fracture proceeding along coherent boundaries of pre-existing annealing twins. This fracture path is observed in Tenelon at 78 0 K even when hydrogen is absent. There is also a change in fracture appearance in specimens with no prior exposure to hydrogen if they are pulled to failure in high-pressure hydrogen. The fracture path is not identifiable, however. Magnetic response measurements and changes in the stress-strain curves show that hydrogen suppresses formation of strain-induced α'-martensite at 198 0 K in both Type 304L stainless steel and Tenelon, but there is little effect in Type 304L stainless at 273 0 K

  11. Initial assessment of the mechanisms and significance of low-temperature embrittlement of cast stainless steels in LWR systems

    Chopra, O.K.; Sather, A.

    1990-08-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems. Metallurgical characterization and mechanical property data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests are presented for several experimental and commercial heats, as well as for reactor-aged CF-3, CF-8, and CF-8M cast stainless steels. The effects of material variables on the embrittlement of cast stainless steels are evaluated. Chemical composition and ferrite morphology strongly affect the extent and kinetics of embrittlement. In general, the low-carbon CF-3 stainless steels are the most resistant and the molybdenum-containing high-carbon CF-8M stainless steels are most susceptible to embrittlement. The microstructural and mechanical-property data are analyzed to establish the mechanisms of embrittlement. The procedure and correlations for predicting the impact strength and fracture toughness of cast components during reactor service are described. The lower bound values of impact strength and fracture toughness for low-temperature-aged cast stainless steel are defined. 39 refs., 56 figs., 8 tabs

  12. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Deposit

    Zappa, Sebastián; Svoboda, Hernán; Surian, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have good weldability and adequate tensile property, toughness and corrosion resistance. They have been developed as an alternative technology, mainly for oil and gas industries. The final properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit depend on its chemical composition and microstructure: martensite, tempered martensite, ferrite, retained austenite and carbides and/or nitrides. In these steels, the post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) are usually double tempering ones, to ensure both complete tempering of martensite and high austenite content, to increase toughness and decrease hardness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of post-weld heat treatments (solution treatment with single and double tempering) on the mechanical properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit. An all-weld metal test coupon was welded according to standard ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 using a GMAW supermartensitic stainless steel metal cored wire, under gas shielding. PWHTs were carried out varying the temperature of the first tempering treatment with and without a second tempering one, after solution treatment. All-weld metal chemical composition analysis, metallurgical characterization, hardness and tensile property measurements and Charpy-V tests were carried out. There are several factors which can be affected by the PWHTs, among them austenite content is a significant one. Different austenite contents (0-42%) were found. Microhardness, tensile property and toughness were affected with up to 15% of austenite content, by martensite tempering and carbide precipitation. The second tempering treatment seemed not to have had an important effect on the mechanical properties measured in this work.

  13. Effects of zinc injection on electrochemical corrosion and cracking behavior of stainless steels in borated and lithiated high temperature water

    Wu Xinqiang; Liu Xiahe; Han Enhou; Ke Wei

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) injection water chemistry (ZWC) adopted in primary coolant system in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is to reduce the radiation buildup as well as retard the corrosion degradation in high temperature pressurized water through improving the characteristics of oxide scales formed on components materials. However, Zn injection involved corrosion and cracking behavior and related mechanisms are still under discussion. The understanding of Zn-bearing oxide scale characteristics and their protective property is of significance to clarify the environmentally assisted material failure problems in PWRs power plants. In the present work, in-situ potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra measurements in high temperature borated and lithiated water as well as ex-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses have been done to investigate the effects of temperature (R.T.-603 K), pH T value at 573 K (6.9-7.4) and Zn-injection concentration (0-150 ppb) on electrochemical corrosion behavior and oxide scale characteristics of nuclear-grade stainless steels. The protective property of oxide scales under Zn-free and Zn-injected conditions degraded with increasing temperature, with Cr-rich oxide layer playing a key role on retarding further corrosion. The composition of oxide scales appeared slightly pH T dependent: rich in chromites and ferrites at pH T =6.9 and pH T =7.4, respectively. The corrosion rate decreased significantly in the high pH T value solution with Zn injection due to the formation of thin and compact oxide scales. The ≤50 ppb Zn injection could significantly affect the formation of Zn-bearing oxides on the surfaces, while >50 ppb Zn injection showed no obvious influence on the oxide scales. A modified point defect model was proposed to discuss the effects of injected Zn concentrations on the oxide scales in high temperature water. A 10 ppb Zn injection obviously decreased the intergranular cracking susceptibility of

  14. Long-term aging of cast stainless steels: Mechanisms and resulting properties

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanical property data are presented from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 450, 400, 350, 320 and 290 deg. C. The results indicate that thermal aging increases the tensile strength and decreases the impact energy, J IC , and tearing modules of the steels. Also, the ductile-to-brittle transition curve shifts to higher temperatures. The ferrite content and concentration of carbon in the steel have a strong effect on the overall process of low-temperature embrittlement. The low-carbon CF-3 steels are the most resistant and the molybdenum-containing high-carbon CF-8M steels are the most susceptible to low-temperature embrittlement. Microstructural data indicate that three processes contribute to embrittlement of cast stainless steels, viz., Cr-rich α' and G-phase precipitation in the ferrite, and carbide precipitation on the austenite/ferrite phase boundary. The influence of nitrogen content and ferrite distribution on loss of toughness are discussed. The data also indicate that existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 280-450 deg. C, i.e., extrapolation of high temperature data to reactor temperatures may not be valid for some compositions of cast stainless steel. (author)

  15. Fast fabrication of long TiO2 nanotube array with high photoelectrochemical property on flexible stainless steel.

    Tao, Jie; Wu, Tao; Gao, Peng

    2012-03-01

    Oriented highly ordered long TiO2 nanotube array films with nanopore structure and high photoelectrochemical property were fabricated on flexible stainless steel substrate (50 microm) by anodization treatment of titanium thin films in a short time. The samples were characterized by means of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoelectrochemical methods, respectively. The results showed that Ti films deposited at the condition of 0.7 Pa Ar pressure and 96 W sputtering power at room temperature was uniform and dense with good homogeneity and high crystallinity. The voltage and the anodization time both played significant roles in the formation of TiO2 nanopore-nanotube array film. The optimal voltage was 60 V and the anodization time is less than 30 min by anodizing Ti films in ethylene glycerol containing 0.5% (w) NH4F and 3% (w) H2O. The growth rate of TiO2 nanotube array was as high as 340 nm/min. Moreover, the photocurrent-potential curves, photocurrent response curves and electrochemical impedance spectra results indicated that the TiO2 nanotube array film with the nanoporous structure exhibited a better photo-response ability and photoelectrochemical performance than the ordinary TiO2 nanotube array film. The reason is that the nanoporous structure on the surface of the nanotube array can separate the photo electron-hole pairs more efficiently and completely than the tubular structure.

  16. Effect of water chemistry on corrosion of stainless steel and deposition of corrosion products in high temperature pressurised water

    Morrison, Jonathan; Cooper, Christopher; Ponton, Clive; Connolly, Brian; Banks, Andrew

    2012-09-01

    In any water-cooled nuclear reactor, the corrosion of the structural materials in contact with the coolant and the deposition of the resulting oxidised species has long been an operational concern within the power generation industry. Corrosion of the structural materials at all points in the reactor leads to low concentrations of oxidised metal species in the coolant water. The oxidised metal species can subsequently be deposited out as CRUD deposits at various points around the reactor's primary and secondary loops. The deposition of soluble oxidised material at any location in the reactor cooling system is undesirable due to several effects; deposits have a porous structure, capable of incorporating radiologically active material (forming out of core radiation fields) and concentrating aggressively corrosive chemicals, which exacerbate environmental degradation of structural and fuel-cladding materials. Deposits on heat transfer surfaces also limit efficiency of the system as a whole. The work in this programme is an attempt to determine and understand the fundamental corrosion and deposition behaviour under controlled, simulated reactor conditions. The rates of corrosion of structural materials within pressurised water reactors are heavily dependent on the condition of the exposed surface. The effect of mechanical grinding and of electropolishing on the corrosion rate and structure of the resultant oxide film formed on grade 316L stainless steel exposed to high purity water, modified to pH 9.5 and 10.5 at temperatures between 200 and 300 deg. C and pressures of up to 100 bar will be investigated. The corrosion of stainless steel in water via electrochemical oxidation leads to the formation of surface iron, nickel and chromium based spinels. Low concentrations of these spinels can be found dissolved in the coolant water. The solubility of magnetite, stainless steels' major corrosion product, in high purity water will be studied at pH 9.5 to 10.5 at

  17. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  18. Effects of laser peening treatment on high cycle fatigue and crack propagation behaviors in austenitic stainless steel

    Masaki, Kiyotaka; Ochi, Yasuo; Matsumura, Takashi; Ikarashi, Takaaki; Sano, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Laser peening without protective coating (LPwC) treatment is one of surface enhancement techniques using an impact wave of high pressure plasma induced by laser pulse irradiation. High compressive residual stress was induced by the LPwC treatment on the surface of low-carbon type austenitic stainless steel SUS316L. The affected depth reached about 1mm from the surface. High cycle fatigue tests with four-points rotating bending loading were carried out to confirm the effects of the LPwC treatment on fatigue strength and surface fatigue crack propagation behaviors. The fatigue strength was remarkably improved by the LPwC treatment over the whole regime of fatigue life up to 10 8 cycles. Specimens with a pre-crack from a small artificial hole due to fatigue loading were used for the quantitative study on the effect of the LPwC treatment. The fracture mechanics investigation on the pre-cracked specimens showed that the LPwC treatment restrained the further propagation of the pre-crack if the stress intensity factor range ΔK on the crack tip was less than 7.6 MPa√m. Surface cracks preferentially propagated into the depth direction as predicted through ΔK analysis on the crack by taking account of the compressive residual stresses due to the LPwC treatment. (author)

  19. Characterisation of Ceramic-Coated 316LN Stainless Steel Exposed to High-Temperature Thermite Melt and Molten Sodium

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Vetrivendan, E.; Shukla, Prabhat Kumar; Das, Sanjay Kumar; Hemanth Rao, E.; Murthy, S. S.; Lydia, G.; Nashine, B. K.; Mallika, C.; Selvaraj, P.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2017-11-01

    Currently, stainless steel grade 316LN is the material of construction widely used for core catcher of sodium-cooled fast reactors. Design philosophy for core catcher demands its capability to withstand corium loading from whole core melt accidents. Towards this, two ceramic coatings were investigated for its application as a layer of sacrificial material on the top of core catcher to enhance its capability. Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier layer of alumina and partially stabilised zirconia (PSZ) with an intermediate bond coat of NiCrAlY are selected as candidate material and deposited over 316LN SS substrates and were tested for their suitability as thermal barrier layer for core catcher. Coated specimens were exposed to high-temperature thermite melt to simulate impingement of molten corium. Sodium compatibility of alumina and PSZ coatings were also investigated by exposing samples to molten sodium at 400 °C for 500 h. The surface morphology of high-temperature thermite melt-exposed samples and sodium-exposed samples was examined using scanning electron microscope. Phase identification of the exposed samples was carried out by x-ray diffraction technique. Observation from sodium exposure tests indicated that alumina coating offers better protection compared to PSZ coating. However, PSZ coating provided better protection against high-temperature melt exposure, as confirmed during thermite melt exposure test.

  20. Damage evolution and failure mechanisms in additively manufactured stainless steel

    Carlton, Holly D., E-mail: carlton4@llnl.gov [Materials Engineering Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Haboub, Abdel [Lincoln University, Life and Physical Sciences Department, 820 Chestnut St, Jefferson City, MO 65101 (United States); Gallegos, Gilbert F. [Materials Engineering Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Parkinson, Dilworth Y.; MacDowell, Alastair A. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    In situ tensile tests were performed on additively manufactured austenitic stainless steel to track damage evolution within the material. For these experiments Synchrotron Radiation micro-Tomography was used to measure three-dimensional pore volume, distribution, and morphology in stainless steel at the micrometer length-scale while tensile loading was applied. The results showed that porosity distribution played a larger role in affecting the fracture mechanisms than measured bulk density. Specifically, additively manufactured stainless steel specimens with large inhomogeneous void distributions displayed a flaw-dominated failure where cracks were shown to initiate at pre-existing voids, while annealed additively manufactured stainless steel specimens, which contained low porosity and randomly distributed pores, displayed fracture mechanisms that closely resembled wrought metal.

  1. Fracture toughness and stress relief response of irradiated Type 347/348 stainless steel

    Haggag, F.M.

    1985-01-01

    A test program has experimentally determined: (1) The fracture toughness of Type 347/348 stainless steel (SS) specimens with high values of irradiation fluence (2.3 to 4.8 x 10 22 n/cm 2 , E > 1.0 MeV) and experiencing different levels of irradiation creep (0.0, 0.6, 1.1, 1.8%), (2) the effect of thermal stress relief on fracture toughness recovery for the highly irradiated material, and (3) the mechanisms associated with fracture toughness recovery due to thermal stress relief. The postirradiation fracture toughness tests and tensile tests were conducted at 427 0 C

  2. Stepwise transformation behavior of the strain-induced martensitic transformation in a metastable stainless steel

    Hedstroem, Peter; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jon; Oden, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    In situ high-energy X-ray diffraction during tensile loading has been used to investigate the evolution of lattice strains and the accompanying strain-induced martensitic transformation in cold-rolled sheets of a metastable stainless steel. At high applied strains the transformation to α-martensite occurs in stepwise bursts. These stepwise transformation events are correlated with stepwise increased lattice strains and peak broadening in the austenite phase. The stepwise transformation arises from growth of α-martensite embryos by autocatalytic transformation

  3. Heat and corrosion resistant cast CN-12 type stainless steel with improved high temperature strength and ductility

    Mazias, Philip J.; McGreevy, Tim; Pollard,Michael James; Siebenaler, Chad W.; Swindeman, Robert W.

    2007-08-14

    A cast stainless steel alloy and articles formed therefrom containing about 0.5 wt. % to about 10 wt. % manganese, 0.02 wt. % to 0.50 wt. % N, and less than 0.15 wt. % sulfur provides high temperature strength both in the matrix and at the grain boundaries without reducing ductility due to cracking along boundaries with continuous or nearly-continuous carbides. Alloys of the present invention also have increased nitrogen solubility thereby enhancing strength at all temperatures because nitride precipitates or nitrogen porosity during casting are not observed. The solubility of nitrogen is dramatically enhanced by the presence of manganese, which also retains or improves the solubility of carbon thereby providing additional solid solution strengthening due to the presence of manganese and nitrogen, and combined carbon. Such solution strengthening enhances the high temperature precipitation-strengthening benefits of fine dispersions of NbC. Such solid solution effects also enhance the stability of the austenite matrix from resistance to excess sigma phase or chrome carbide formation at higher service temperatures. The presence of sulfides is substantially eliminated.

  4. Intergranular penetration of liquid gold into stainless steel

    Favez, Denis; Deillon, Léa; Wagnière, Jean-Daniel; Rappaz, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Intergranular penetration of liquid 18 K gold into a superaustenitic stainless steel, which occurs during laser welding of these two materials, has been studied using a C-ring device which can be put under tensile stresses by a screw. It is shown that liquid gold at 1000 degrees C penetrates the immersed stainless steel C-ring at grain boundaries, but only when tensile stresses are applied. Based on the thickness of the peritectic phase that forms all along the liquid crack and on the transve...

  5. Low-Temperature Nitriding of Deformed Austenitic Stainless Steels with Various Nitrogen Contents Obtained by Prior High-Temperature Solution Nitriding

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, high nitrogen steels (HNS) have been regarded as substitutes for conventional austenitic stainless steels because of their superior mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the main limitation to their wider application is their expensive production process....... As an alternative, high-temperature solution nitriding has been applied to produce HNS from three commercially available stainless steel grades (AISI 304L, AISI 316, and EN 1.4369). The nitrogen content in each steel alloy is varied and its influence on the mechanical properties and the stability of the austenite...... investigated. Both hardness and yield stress increase and the alloys remain ductile. In addition, strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite is suppressed, which is beneficial for subsequent low-temperature nitriding of the surface of deformed alloys. The combination of high- and low...

  6. Phase transformation system of austenitic stainless steels obtained by permanent compressive strain

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: mitsuhiro.okayasu@utoronto.ca; Tomida, Sai

    2017-01-27

    In order to understand more completely the formation of strain-induced martensite, phase structures were investigated both before and after plastic deformation, using austenitic stainless steels of various chemical compositions (carbon C=0.007–0.04 mass% and molybdenum Mo=0–2.10 mass%) and varying pre-strain levels (0–30%). Although the stainless steels consisted mainly of γ austenite, two martensite structures were generated following plastic deformation, comprising ε and α′ martensite. The martensitic structures were obtained in the twin deformation and slip bands. The severity of martensite formation (ε and α′) increased with increasing C content. It was found that α′ martensite was formed mainly in austenitic stainless steel lacking Mo, whereas a high Mo content led to a strong ε martensite structure, i.e. a weak α′ martensite. The formation of α′ martensite occurred from γ austenite via ε martensite, and was related to the slip deformation. Molybdenum in austenitic stainless steel had high slip resistance (or weak stress-induced martensite transformation), because of the stacking fault energy of the stainless steel affecting the austenite stability. This resulted in the creation of weak α′ martensite. Models of the martensitic transformations γ (fcc)→ε (hcp)→α′ (bcc) were proposed on both the microscopic and nanoscopic scales. The α′ martensite content of austenitic stainless steel led to high tensile strength; conversely, ε martensite had a weak effect on the mechanical strength. The influence of martensitic formation on the mechanical properties was evaluated quantitatively by statistical analysis.

  7. In situ observation of high temperature tensile deformation and low cycle fatigue response in a nickel-base superalloy

    Lu, Xudong, E-mail: lxdong0700@hotmail.com; Du, Jinhui; Deng, Qun

    2013-12-20

    High temperature tension and low cycle fatigue experiments of IN718 alloy have been performed in the electro-hydraulic servo system with scanning electron microscope at 455 °C. Fatigue crack initiation and propagation process are investigated in situ. Results show that the carbide and twin grain are the crack source of the low cycle fatigue of IN718 alloy, and the low cycle fatigue life of the alloy increases with the decrease in grain size.

  8. Creep-rupture correlations for type 304 stainless steel heat 9T2796

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    Creep-rupture data are presented for a reference heat of type 304 stainless steel tested at temperatures between 482 and 816 0 C (900-1500 0 F) and for times to 10,000 hr. The ability of several popular time-temperature parameters to correlate the rupture data is examined, and it shows that the Orr-Sherby-Dorn parameter provides a slightly better fit to the data than the Larson-Miller, Manson-Haferd, and Manson-Succop parameters. An alternative model is developed, based on the Barrett-Ardell-Sherby parameter, which makes use of modulus-compensated true stresses. These stresses are approximated on the basis of the strain about halfway through the test. Although the parameter does not fit the data quite as well as the Orr-Sherby-Dorn parameter, the activation energy associated with the parameter approaches the value expected for solute element diffusion in stainless steel. In the very high-stress region the master curve generated by the parameter is used to examine the interface between the results of tensile tests, described in terms of the Voce equation, and the creep-rupture tests. The tensile data can be correlated with the Barrett-Ardel-Sherby parameter when the tensile testing conditions are such that rupture is initiated by grain boundary failures

  9. Plastic deformation and fracture behaviors of nitrogen-alloyed austenitic stainless steels

    Wang Songtao; Yang Ke; Shan Yiyin; Li Laifeng

    2008-01-01

    The plastic deformation and fracture behaviors of two nitrogen-alloyed austenitic stainless steels, 316LN and a high nitrogen steel (Fe-Cr-Mn-0.66% N), were investigated by tensile test and Charpy impact test in a temperature range from 77 to 293 K. The Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel showed ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) behavior, but not for the 316LN steel. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that the strain-induced martensite occurred in the 316LN steel, but no such transformation in the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel. Tensile tests showed that the temperature dependences of the yield strength for the two steels were almost the same. The ultimate tensile strength of the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel displayed less significant temperature dependence than that of the 316LN steel. The strain-hardening exponent increased for the 316LN steel, but decreased for the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel, with decreasing temperature. Based on the experimental results and the analyses, a modified scheme was proposed to explain the fracture behaviors of austenitic stainless steels

  10. Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Friction Stir Welding High Nitrogen Martensitic Stainless Steel 30Cr15Mo1N

    Xin Geng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen martensitic stainless steel 30Cr15Mo1N plates were successfully welded by friction stir welding (FSW at a tool rotation speed of 300 rpm with a welding speed of 100 mm/min, using W-Re tool. The sound joint with no significant nitrogen loss was successfully produced. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of an FSW joint were investigated. The results suggest that the grain size of the stir zone (SZ is larger than the base metal (BM and is much larger the case in SZ-top. Some carbides and nitrides rich in chromium were found in BM while not observed in SZ. The martensitic phase in SZ could transform to austenite phase during the FSW process and the higher peak temperature, the greater degree of transformation. The hardness of SZ is significantly lower than that of the BM. An abrupt change of hardness defined as hard zone (HZ was found in the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ on the advancing side (AS, and the HZ is attributed to a combination result of temperature, deformation, and material flow behavior. The corrosion resistance of SZ is superior to that of BM, which can be attributed to less precipitation and lower angle boundaries (LABs. The corrosion resistance of SZ-bottom is slight higher than that of SZ-top because of the finer grained structure.

  11. PRECIPITATION BEHAVIOR OF M2N IN A HIGH-NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL DURING ISOTHERMAL AGING

    F. Shi; L.J. Wang; W.F. Cui; C.M. Liu

    2007-01-01

    The precipitation behavior of M2N and the microstructural evolution in a Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steel with a high nitrogen content of 0.43mass% during isothermal aging has been investigated using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy ( SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The aging treatments have led to the decomposition of nitrogen supersaturated austenitic matrix through discontinuous cellular precipitation. The precipitated cells comprise alternate lamellae of M2N precipitate and austenitic matrix. This kind of precipitate morphology is similar to that of pearlite. However, owing to the non-eutectoidic mechanism of the reaction, the growth characteristic of the cellular precipitates is different from that of pearlite in Fe-C binary alloys. M2N precipitate in the cell possesses a hexagonal crystal structure with the parameters a=0.4752nm and c=0.4429nm, and the orientation relationship between the MN precipitates and austenite determined from the SADP is [01110]M2N// [101]γ,[2-1-10]M2N// [010]γ.

  12. Austenitic Reversion of Cryo-rolled Ti-Stabilized Austenitic Stainless Steel: High-Resolution EBSD Investigation

    Tiamiyu, A. A.; Odeshi, A. G.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was cryo-rolled and subsequently annealed at 650 and 800 °C to reverse BCC α'-martensite to FCC γ-austenite. The texture evolution associated with the reversion at the selected temperatures was investigated using high-resolution EBSD. After the reversion, TiC precipitates were observed to be more stable in 650 °C-annealed specimens than those reversed at 800 °C. {110} texture was mainly developed in specimens subjected to both annealing temperatures. However, specimens reversed at 650 °C have stronger texture than those annealed at 800 °C, even at the higher annealing time. The strong intensity of {110} texture component is attributed to the ability of AISI 321 ASS to memorize the crystallographic orientation of the deformed austenite, a phenomenon termed texture memory. The development of weaker texture in 800 °C-annealed specimens is attributed to the residual strain relief in grains, dissolution of grain boundary precipitates, and an increase in atomic migration along the grain boundaries. Based on the observed features of the reversed austenite grains and estimation from an existing model, it is suspected that the austenite reversion at 650 and 800 °C undergone diffusional and martensitic shear reversion, respectively.

  13. Influence of electrochemical pre-treatment on highly reactive carbon nitride thin films deposited on stainless steel for electrochemical applications

    Benchikh, A.; Debiemme-Chouvy, C.; Cachet, H.; Pailleret, A.; Saidani, B.; Beaunier, L.; Berger, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a-CNx films prepared by DC magnetron sputtering on stainless steel substrate have been investigated as electrode materials. While their wide potential window was confirmed as a property shared by boron doped diamond (BDD) electrodes, their electrochemical activity with respect to fast and reversible redox systems, [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+/2+ , [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3−/4− and [IrCl 6 ] 2−/3− , was assessed by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) after cathodic or anodic electrochemical pre-treatments or for as grown samples. It was shown for the three systems that electrochemical reactivity of the a-CNx films was improved after the cathodic pre-treatment and degraded after the anodic one, the apparent heterogeneous rate constant k 0app being decreased by at least one order of magnitude for the latter case. A high k 0app value of 0.11 cm s −1 for [IrCl 6 ] 2−/3− was obtained, close to the highest values found for BDD electrodes.

  14. Characteristics of Laser Beam and Friction Stir Welded AISI 409M Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2012-04-01

    This article presents the comparative evaluation of microstructural features and mechanical properties of friction stir welded (solid-state) and laser beam welded (high energy density fusion welding) AISI 409M grade ferritic stainless steel joints. Optical microscopy, microhardness testing, transverse tensile, and impact tests were performed. The coarse ferrite grains in the base material were changed to fine grains consisting duplex structure of ferrite and martensite due to the rapid cooling rate and high strain induced by severe plastic deformation caused by frictional stirring. On the other hand, columnar dendritic grain structure was observed in fusion zone of laser beam welded joints. Tensile testing indicates overmatching of the weld metal relative to the base metal irrespective of the welding processes used. The LBW joint exhibited superior impact toughness compared to the FSW joint.

  15. Combined near- and far-field high-energy diffraction microscopy dataset for Ti-7Al tensile specimen elastically loaded in situ

    Turner, Todd J.; Shade, Paul A.; Bernier, Joel V.; Li, Shiu Fai; Schuren, Jay C.; Lind, Jonathan; Lienert, Ulrich; Kenesei, Peter; Suter, Robert M.; Blank, Basil; Almer, Jonathan

    2016-03-18

    High-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM) constitutes a suite of combined X-ray characterization methods, which hold the unique advantage of illuminating the microstructure and micromechanical state of a material during concurrent in situ mechanical deformation. The data generated from HEDM experiments provides a heretofore unrealized opportunity to validate meso-scale modeling techniques, such as crystal plasticity finite element modeling (CPFEM), by explicitly testing the accuracy of these models at the length scales where the models predict their response. Combining HEDM methods with in situ loading under known and controlled boundary conditions represents a significant challenge, inspiring the recent development of a new high-precision rotation and axial motion system for simultaneously rotating and axially loading a sample. In this paper, we describe the initial HEDM dataset collected using this hardware on an alpha-titanium alloy (Ti-7Al) under in situ tensile deformation at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. We present both near-field HEDM data that maps out the grain morphology and intragranular crystallographic orientations and far-field HEDM data that provides the grain centroid, grain average crystallographic orientation, and grain average elastic strain tensor for each grain. Finally, we provide a finite element mesh that can be utilized to simulate deformation in the volume of this Ti-7Al specimen. The dataset supporting this article is available in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) repository (http://hdl.handle.net/11256/599).

  16. A Modified Constitutive Model for Tensile Flow Behaviors of BR1500HS Ultra-High-Strength Steel at Medium and Low Temperature Regions

    Zhao, Jun; Quan, Guo-Zheng; Pan, Jia; Wang, Xuan; Wu, Dong-Sen; Xia, Yu-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Constitutive model of materials is one of the most requisite mathematical model in the finite element analysis, which describes the relationships of flow behaviors with strain, strain rate and temperature. In order to construct such constitutive relationships of ultra-high-strength BR1500HS steel at medium and low temperature regions, the true stress-strain data over a wide temperature range of 293-873 K and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1 were collected from a series of isothermal uniaxial tensile tests. The experimental results show that stress-strain relationships are highly non-linear and susceptible to three parameters involving temperature, strain and strain rate. By considering the impacts of strain rate and temperature on strain hardening, a modified constitutive model based on Johnson-Cook model was proposed to characterize flow behaviors in medium and low temperature ranges. The predictability of the improved model was also evaluated by the relative error (W(%)), correlation coefficient (R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). The R-value and AARE-value for modified constitutive model at medium and low temperature regions are 0.9915 & 1.56 % and 0.9570 & 5.39 %, respectively, which indicates that the modified constitutive model can precisely estimate the flow behaviors for BR1500HS steel in the medium and low temperature regions.

  17. Time dependent design curves for a high nitrogen grade of 316LN stainless steel for fast reactor applications

    Ganesh Kumar, J.; Ganesan, V.; Laha, K.; Mathew, M.D., E-mail: mathew@igcar.gov.in

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • 316LN SS is an important high temperature structural material for sodium cooled fast reactors. • Creep strength of 316LN SS has been increased substantially by increasing the nitrogen content. • Creep design curves based on RCC-MR code procedures have been generated for this new material. • 100,000 h allowable stress at 600 °C increased by more than 40% as a result of doubling the nitrogen content in the steel. - Abstract: Type 316L(N) stainless steel (SS) containing 0.06–0.08 wt.% nitrogen is the major material for reactor assembly components of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs). With a view to increase the design life of SFRs to 60 years from the current life of 40 years, studies are being carried out to improve the high temperature creep and low cycle fatigue properties of 316LN SS by increasing the nitrogen content above 0.08 wt.%. In this investigation, the creep properties of a high nitrogen grade of 316LN SS containing 0.14 wt.% nitrogen have been studied. Creep tests were carried out at 550 °C, 600 °C and 650 °C at various stress levels in the range of 140–350 MPa. Creep strength was found to be significantly improved by doubling the nitrogen content in this steel. The maximum rupture life in these tests was 33,000 h. The creep data has been analyzed according to RCC-MR nuclear code procedures in order to generate the creep design curves for the high nitrogen grade of 316LN SS. Allowable stress for 100,000 h at 600 °C increased by more than 38% as a result of doubling the nitrogen content in the steel.

  18. Tensile properties of unirradiated PCA from room temperature to 7000C

    Braski, D.N.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The tensile properties of Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) austenitic stainless steel after three different thermomechanical treatments were determined from room temperature to 700 0 C. The solution-annealed PCA had the lowest strength and highest ductility, while the reverse was true for the 25%-cold-worked material. The PCA containing titanium-rich MC particles fell between the other two heats. The cold-worked PCA had nearly the same tensile properties as cold-worked type 316 stainless steel. Both alloys showed ductility minima at 300 0 C

  19. Study of the interaction of liquid with the surface of mass standards of high accuracy stainless steel

    Ramirez Varas, Lautaro; Castro, Claudio S.C.; Cacais, Fabio L.; Pires, Manoel J. M.; Loayza Mendoza, Victor M.

    2011-01-01

    The long term stability of mass standards depends on the interaction between the surface and environment molecules. From this point of view, a study was investigated of the effect on stainless steel surfaces by liquids frequently used in hydrostatic weighing (FC40) and in cleaning procedures of mass standards (isopropyl alcohol). Firstly, mass weighing difference was measured as function of time with a gravimetric method. Additionally, stainless steel samples were analyzed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The standard used for the gravimetric mass difference determination was immersed in FC40. The samples analyzed by XPS were previously immersed in both FC40 and isopropyl alcohol. Mass differences were obtained with an uncertainty of 1 μg when FC40 was used. Preliminary results have suggested that FC40 is not chemically bound to stainless steel surfaces and the mass gain was due to physisorbed molecules on the surface. (author) [es

  20. Interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of brazed aluminum / stainless steel - joints

    Fedorov, V.; Elßner, M.; Uhlig, T.; Wagner, G.

    2017-03-01

    Due to the demand of mass and cost reduction, joints based on dissimilar metals become more and more interesting. Especially there is a high interest for joints between stainless steel and aluminum, often necessary for example for automotive heat exchangers. Brazing offers the possibilities to manufacture several joints in one step at, in comparison to fusion welding, lower temperatures. In the recent work, aluminum / stainless steel - joints are produced by induction brazing using an AlSi10 filler and a non-corrosive flux. The mechanical properties are determined by tensile shear tests as well as fatigue tests at ambient and elevated temperatures. The microstructure of the brazed joints and the fracture surfaces of the tested samples are investigated by SEM.

  1. Grain boundary chromium concentration effects on the IGSCC and IASCC of austenitic stainless steels

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Arey, B.W.; Charlot, L.A.

    1993-08-01

    Comparisons are made between grain boundary composition and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of 304 and 309 austenitic stainless steels in high-temperature water environments. Chromium depletion had the dominant effect on cracking resistance with the extent of IG cracking controlled by the interfacial chromium concentration. The minimum chromium concentration required to promote cracking was a function of the applied strain rate during slow-strain-rate tensile tests in 288 C air-saturated water. Depletion from bulk levels of 18 wt% to ∼13.5 wt% Cr at grain boundaries prompted 100% IG cracking at a strain rate of 1 x 10 -6 s -1 , while embrittlement was observed with only a slight depletion to ∼17 wt% at 2 x 10 -7 s -1 . Insights into critical interfacial compositions promoting IGSCC are discussed in reference to cracking of irradiated stainless steel nuclear reactor core components

  2. Improvement of life time of SCC in type 304 stainless steel by ultrasound irradiation

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Kimura, Hideo

    1985-01-01

    It is well known that the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is controled by compressive stress such as shot-peening treatment. In this study, the effects of ultrasound irradiation to type 304 stainless upon SCC were investigated. The main findings are as follows; (1) Ultrasound irradiation produces the high level compressive stress on the surface of metals. This compressive stress was induced by the cavitation phenomenon. (2) In U-bent specimen, the initial tensile stress was mitigated and converted to compressive stress by ultrasound irradiation. (3) Type 304 stainless steel was subjected to SCC test using sodium thyosulfate solution. It was definitely demonstrated that the ultrasound irradiation was effective for the mitigation of SCC life time. (4) Ultrasound irradiation time was one of the most important factors in irradiation conditions. (author)

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded SAF 2507 super duplex stainless steel

    Sato, Y.S.; Nelson, T.W.; Sterling, C.J.; Steel, R.J.; Pettersson, C.-O.

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir (FS) welded SAF 2507 super duplex stainless steel were examined. High-quality, full-penetration welds were successfully produced in the super duplex stainless steel by friction stir welding (FSW) using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) tool. The base material had a microstructure consisting of the ferrite matrix with austenite islands, but FSW refined grains of the ferrite and austenite phases in the stir zone through dynamic recrystallisation. Ferrite content was held between 50 and 60% throughout the weld. The smaller grain sizes of the ferrite and austenite phases caused increase in hardness and strength within the stir zone. Welded transverse tensile specimen failed near the border between the stir zone and TMAZ at the retreating side as the weld had roughly the same strengths as the base material

  4. Fretting fatigue behaviour of Ni-free high-nitrogen stainless steel in a simulated body fluid

    Norio Maruyama, Sachiko Hiromoto, Eiji Akiyama and Morihiko Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fretting fatigue behaviour of Ni-free high-nitrogen steel (HNS with a yield strength of about 800 MPa, which was prepared by nitrogen gas pressurized electroslag remelting, was studied in air and in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS(-. For comparison, fretting fatigue behaviour of cold-rolled SUS316L steel (SUS316L(CR with similar yield strength was examined. The plain fatigue limit of HNS was slightly lower than that of SUS316L(CR although the former had a higher tensile strength than the latter. The fretting fatigue limit of HNS was higher than that of SUS316L(CR both in air and in PBS(-. A decrease in fatigue limit of HNS by fretting was significantly smaller than that of SUS316L(CR in both environments, indicating that HNS has better fretting fatigue resistance than SUS316L(CR. The decrease in fatigue limit by fretting is discussed taking into account the effect of friction stress due to fretting and the additional influences of wear, tribocorrosion and plastic deformation in the fretted area.

  5. A comparison of the microstructure and high temperature tensile properties of a novel P/M Mo-Hf-Zr-Ta-C alloy and TZM

    Warren, J.; Reznikov, G.

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure and elevated temperature quasi-static tensile yield and ultimate strength observed in a novel, forged Mo-based alloy (Mo-0.25 Hf-0.25 Zr-0.25 Ta-0.025 C) has been analyzed and compared to a standard forged TZM composition (Mo-0.50 Ti-0.08 Zr-0.02 C). The novel material exhibits the desirable forging characteristics typical of the widely used TZM composition yet possess a higher ultimate strength and 0.2 % offset yield strength in both the stress-relieved and recrystallized conditions over a 400 o -1200 o C temperature range. The greater strength measured in the novel composition has been attributed to the combined effects of precipitation of Hf, Zr and Mo-(carbide) precipitates that strengthen the matrix in the classical Orowan fashion and improved resistance to recrystallization after high temperature exposure. Elevated temperature creep behavior, not addressed in the study presented here, will be reported on in a subsequent analysis. (author)

  6. Assessment of the high-temperature crack behavior for a 316L stainless steel structure with defects

    Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, Jae Han [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    An assessment of creep-fatigue crack initiation and growth for a 316L stainless steel structure has been carried out according to the current (2007 edition) and previous (2002 edition) versions of the French RCC-MR A16 procedure. Some significant changes have been made in terms of the formulae and material properties, which may cause big differences in the assessment. In this study, the changes in the A16 guide have been quantified for a 316L austenitic stainless steel structure, and the assessment results were compared with those of the observed images from a structural test for a welded component

  7. High-quality laser cutting of stainless steel in inert gas atmosphere by ytterbium fibre and CO2 lasers

    Golyshev, A A; Malikov, A G; Orishich, A M; Shulyat'ev, V B

    2014-01-01

    Processes of cutting stainless steel by ytterbium fibre and CO 2 lasers have been experimentally compared. The cut surface roughnesses for 3- and 5-mm-thick stainless steel sheets are determined. The absorption coefficient of laser radiation during cutting is measured. It is established that the power absorbed by metal during cutting by the CO 2 laser exceeds that for the ytterbium laser (provided that the cutting speed remains the same). The fact that the maximum cutting speed of the CO 2 laser is lower than that of the ytterbium fibre laser is explained. (laser technologies)

  8. Residual stresses and fatigue in a duplex stainless steel

    Johansson, Johan

    1999-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels, consisting of approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite, often combine the best features of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. They generally have good mechanical properties, including high strength and ductility, and the corrosion resistance is often better than conventional austenitic grades. This has lead to a growing use of duplex stainless steels as a material in mechanically loaded constructions. However, detailed knowledge regarding its mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms are still lacking. In this thesis special emphasis has been placed on the residual stresses and their influence on mechanical behaviour of duplex stainless steels. Due to the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion between the two phases, tensile microstresses are found in the austenitic phase and balancing compressive microstresses in the ferritic phase. The first part of this thesis is a literature survey, which will give an introduction to duplex stainless steels and review the fatigue properties of duplex stainless steels and the influence of residual stresses in two-phase material. The second part concerns the evolution of the residual stress state during uniaxial loading. Initial residual stresses were found to be almost two times higher in the transverse direction compared to the rolling direction. During loading the absolute value of the microstresses increased in the macroscopic elastic regime but started to decrease with increasing load in the macroscopic plastic regime. A significant increase of the microstresses was also found to occur during unloading. Finite element simulations also show stress variation within one phase and a strong influence of both the elastic and plastic anisotropy of the individual phases on the simulated stress state. In the third part, the load sharing between the phases during cyclic loading is studied. X-ray diffraction stress analysis and transmission electron microscopy show that even if

  9. Residual stresses and fatigue in a duplex stainless steel

    Johansson, Johan

    1999-05-01

    Duplex stainless steels, consisting of approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite, often combine the best features of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. They generally have good mechanical properties, including high strength and ductility, and the corrosion resistance is often better than conventional austenitic grades. This has lead to a growing use of duplex stainless steels as a material in mechanically loaded constructions. However, detailed knowledge regarding its mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms are still lacking. In this thesis special emphasis has been placed on the residual stresses and their influence on mechanical behaviour of duplex stainless steels. Due to the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion between the two phases, tensile microstresses are found in the austenitic phase and balancing compressive microstresses in the ferritic phase. The first part of this thesis is a literature survey, which will give an introduction to duplex stainless steels and review the fatigue properties of duplex stainless steels and the influence of residual stresses in two-phase material. The second part concerns the evolution of the residual stress state during uniaxial loading. Initial residual stresses were found to be almost two times higher in the transverse direction compared to the rolling direction. During loading the absolute value of the microstresses increased in the macroscopic elastic regime but started to decrease with increasing load in the macroscopic plastic regime. A significant increase of the microstresses was also found to occur during unloading. Finite element simulations also show stress variation within one phase and a strong influence of both the elastic and plastic anisotropy of the individual phases on the simulated stress state. In the third part, the load sharing between the phases during cyclic loading is studied. X-ray diffraction stress analysis and transmission electron microscopy show that even if

  10. Cluster dynamics modeling of the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    Brimbal, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.brimbal@areva.com [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Fournier, Lionel [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Barbu, Alain [Alain Barbu Consultant, 6 Avenue Pasteur Martin Luther King, 78230 Le Pecq (France)

    2016-01-15

    A mean field cluster dynamics model has been developed in order to study the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructural evolution of metals. In this model, self-interstitial clusters, stacking-fault tetrahedra and helium-vacancy clusters are taken into account, in a configuration well adapted to austenitic stainless steels. For small helium-vacancy cluster sizes, the densities of each small cluster are calculated. However, for large sizes, only the mean number of helium atoms per cluster size is calculated. This aspect allows us to calculate the evolution of the microstructural features up to high irradiation doses in a few minutes. It is shown that the presence of stacking-fault tetrahedra notably reduces cavity sizes below 400 °C, but they have little influence on the microstructure above this temperature. The binding energies of vacancies to cavities are calculated using a new method essentially based on ab initio data. It is shown that helium has little effect on the cavity microstructure at 300 °C. However, at higher temperatures, even small helium production rates such as those typical of sodium-fast-reactors induce a notable increase in cavity density compared to an irradiation without helium. - Highlights: • Irradiation of steels with helium is studied through a new cluster dynamics model. • There is only a small effect of helium on cavity distributions in PWR conditions. • An increase in helium production causes an increase in cavity density over 500 °C. • The role of helium is to stabilize cavities via reduced emission of vacancies.

  11. Stainless steel fabrication for high quality requirements in the nuclear industry

    Wareing, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the author explains the welding procedures and practices adopted within the nuclear industry to achieve the high quality and standards of welds required. The changeover to mechanised welding, orbital TIG welding and synergic MIG welding, has resulted in consistent achievement of high quality standards as well as optimising the productivity. However, the use of mechanised welding machines does require the welder operating them to be fully trained and qualified. The formally organised training courses are described and the cost savings and production rates achieved by utilising the mechanised method are discussed. (author)

  12. Characterization of sensitization and stress corrosion cracking behavior of stabilized stainless steels under BWR conditions

    Kilian, R.; Ilg, U.; Meier, V.; Teichmann, H.; Wachter, O.

    1995-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking occurs if the three parameters -- material condition, tensile stress and water chemistry -- are in a critical range. In this study the material conditions especially of Ti- and Nb-stabilized steels are considered. The purpose of this work is to show the influence of the degree of sensitization of Ti- and Nb-stabilized stainless steels on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility in BWR water chemistry. This is an on-going research program. Preliminary results will be presented. Different types of stabilized, and for comparison unstabilized, stainless steels are examined in various heat treatment conditions with regard to their sensitization behavior by EPR tests (double loop) and TEM. The results are plotted in sensitization diagrams. The sensitization behavior depends on many parameters such as carbon content, stabilization element, stabilization ratio and materials history, e.g. solution heat treatment or cold working. The obtained EPR sensitization diagrams are compared with the well known sensitization diagrams from the literature, which were determined by standard IC test according to e.g. German standard DIN 50914 (equivalent to ASTM A 262, Pract. E). Based on the obtained EPR sensitization diagrams material conditions for SSRT tests were selected. The EPR values (Ir/Ia x 100%) of the tested Ti-stabilized stainless steel are in the range of ∼ 0.1--20%. The SSRT tests are carried out in high-temperature water with 0.4 ppm O 2 , a conductivity of 0.5 microS/cm and a strain rate of 1x10 -6-1 . The test temperature is 280 C. Ti-stabilized stainless steel with Ir/Ia x 100% > 1% suffered intergranular stress corrosion cracking under these conditions. The SCC tests for Nb-stabilized stainless steel are still in progress. The correlation between EPR value, chromium depletion and SSRT result will be shown for a selected material condition of sensitized Ti-stabilized stainless steel

  13. Effect of high-temperature exposure on the mechanical properties of 18Cr–8Ni–W–Nb–V–N stainless steel

    Nikulin, I.; Kipelova, A.; Kaibyshev, R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Niobium stabilized 18Cr–8Ni austenitic steel was subjected to long-time aging. ► The main phases precipitated during aging are Z-phase and Laves-phase. ► Intragranular phases and solid solution are responsible for tensile strength. ► Intergranular particles affect impact toughness. - Abstract: The change in the mechanical properties of 18Cr–8Ni–W–Nb–V–N austenitic stainless steel due to aging was investigated at room temperature and 650 °C. It was shown that long-term aging decreases strength characteristics despite increasing hardness. The impact toughness decreases from 255 J/cm 2 for an un-aged steel to 135 J/cm 2 for the steel aged for 3000 h. However, evidence of ductile fracture was found even after long-term aging. This study suggests that the reduction in impact toughness occurs due to the precipitation of Z-phase and Laves-phase particles at the grain boundaries. The degradation of impact toughness and mechanical properties with aging is discussed in terms of microstructure evolution, secondary phase precipitations and fracture mechanisms.

  14. Mechanical properties and microstructure of copper alloys and copper alloy-stainless steel laminates for fusion reactor high heat flux applications

    Leedy, Kevin Daniel

    A select group of copper alloys and bonded copper alloy-stainless steel panels are under consideration for heat sink applications in first wall and divertor structures of a planned thermonuclear fusion reactor. Because these materials must retain high strengths and withstand high heat fluxes, their material properties and microstructures must be well understood. Candidate copper alloys include precipitate strengthened CuNiBe and CuCrZr and dispersion strengthened Cu-Alsb2Osb3 (CuAl25). In this study, uniaxial mechanical fatigue tests were conducted on bulk copper alloy materials at temperatures up to 500sp°C in air and vacuum environments. Based on standardized mechanical properties measurement techniques, a series of tests were also implemented to characterize copper alloy-316L stainless steel joints produced by hot isostatic pressing or by explosive bonding. The correlation between mechanical properties and the microstructure of fatigued copper alloys and the interface of copper alloy-stainless steel laminates was examined. Commercial grades of these alloys were used to maintain a degree of standardization in the materials testing. The commercial alloys used were OMG Americas Glidcop CuAl25 and CuAl15; Brush Wellman Hycon 3HP and Trefimetaux CuNiBe; and Kabelmetal Elbrodur and Trefimetaux CuCrZr. CuAl25 and CuNiBe alloys possessed the best combination of fatigue resistance and microstructural stability. The CuAl25 alloy showed only minimal microstructural changes following fatigue while the CuNiBe alloy consistently exhibited the highest fatigue strength. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that small matrix grain sizes and high densities of submicron strengthening phases promoted homogeneous slip deformation in the copper alloys. Thus, highly organized fatigue dislocation structure formation, as commonly found in oxygen-free high conductivity Cu, was inhibited. A solid plate of CuAl25 alloy hot isostatically pressed to a 316L stainless steel

  15. Strengthening mechanisms and mechanical properties of high interstitial stainless steel for drill collar and its corrosion resistance

    Lee, Eunkyung

    Two types (CN66, CN71) of high interstitial stainless steels (HISSs) were investigated for down-hole application in sour gas well environments. Experiments were designed to identify factors that have a significant effect on mechanical properties. The three factors examined in the study were carbon + nitrogen content (0.66 or 0.71 mass %), cooling rate in quenching (air or water), and heat treatment time (2 or 4 hours). The results showed that the cooling rate, C+N content, and the two-factor interaction of these variables have a significant effect on the mechanical properties of HISSs. Based on the statistical analysis results on mechanical properties, extensive analyses were undertaken to understand the strengthening mechanisms of HISSs. Microstructure analysis revealed that a pearlite phase with a high carbide and/or nitride content is dissolved in the matrix by heat treatment at 1,200 ºC which is considered the dissolution to increase the concentration of interstitial elements in steels. The distribution of elements in HISSs was investigated by quantitative mapping using EPMA, which showed that the high carbon concentration (carbide/cementite) area was decreased by increases in both the cooling rate and C+N content. The ferrite volume fraction of each specimen is increased by an increase in cooling rate, because there is insufficient time to form austenite from retained ferrite. The lattice expansion of HISS was investigated by the calculation of lattice parameters under various conditions, and these investigations confirm the solid solution strengthening effect on HISSs. CN66 with heat treatment at fast cooling has the highest wear resistance; a finding that was consistent with hardening mechanisms that occur due to an increased ferrite volume fraction. In addition, precipitates on the surface and the chemical bonding of chromium were investigated. As the amount of CrN bonding increased, the wear resistance also increased. This study also assessed the

  16. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    Raffi Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD method was used to determine the phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl environment using a GillAC electrochemical system. The investigation results showed that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in a maximum reduction in delta-ferrite and improvement in pitting corrosion resistance of the weld zone was attributed to the coarse austenite grains owing to the reduction in active sites of the austenite/delta ferrite interface and the decrease in galvanic interaction between austenite and delta-ferrite.

  17. Metal release behavior of surface oxidized stainless steels into flowing high temperature pure water

    Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo; Nakayama, Takenori; Shimogori, Kazutoshi; Ishigure, Kenkichi; Matsuura, Chihiro; Fujita, Norihiko; Ono, Shoichi.

    1987-01-01

    In order to clarify the effect of oxidation treatment of Type 304 SS on the inhibition of metal release into high temperature pure water, metal release rate of individual alloying element into flowing deionized water containing 50 ppb dissolved oxygen was measured as the function of exposure time on representative specimens oxidized in air and steam. The behavior of metal release was also discussed in relation to the structure of surface films. Among the alloying elements the amount of Fe ion, Cr ion and Fe crud in high temperature pure water tended to saturate with the exposure time and that of Ni ion and Co ion tended to increase monotonously with the exposure time for all specimens tested. And the treatment of steam-oxidation was the most effective to decrease the metal release of alloying elements and the treatment by air-oxidation also decreased the metal release. These tendencies were confirmed to correlate well with the structure of the surface films as it was in the results in the static autoclave test. (author)

  18. Effect of both sulphur content and deoxidation degree on the hot ductility of resulphurized austenitic stainless steels in the solidified state

    Botella, J.; Sanchez, R.

    1998-01-01

    The manufacture of free machining austenitic stainless steels features a specific drawback derived from their high sulphur content, which is needed for generating, into the austenitic matrix inclusions to optimize the different machining operations. However, sulphur has ahamfull effect on hot workability. This paper deals with assessing the effect of sulphur content and deoxidation level on the hot ductility of resulphurized austenitic stainless steels in as cast condition. Hot tensile tests were conducted on a Gleeble machine, at temperatures between 1,150 and 1,250 degree celsius, studying a suctility factor as a function of sulphur content, deoxidation degree, as well as type, size and distribution of sulfides. Results point out the harmful effect of increasing sulphur and oxygen contents on the hot workability of resulphurized austenitic stainless steels, and the need to control carefully the level of oxides of these steels. (Author) 5 refs

  19. Effect of heat input on dissimilar welds of ultra high strength steel and duplex stainless steel: Microstructural and compositional analysis

    Tasalloti, H., E-mail: hamed.tasalloti.kashani@student.lut.fi; Kah, P., E-mail: paul.kah@lut.fi; Martikainen, J., E-mail: jukka.martikainen@lut.fi

    2017-01-15

    The effect of heat input on the microstructure and compositional heterogeneity of welds of direct-quenched ultra high strength steel (Optim 960 QC) and duplex stainless steel (UNS S32205) was studied. The dissimilar welds were made using GMAW with a fully austenitic filler wire. In addition to grain coarsening in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic side, it was found that an increase in heat input correlatively increased the proportional volume of bainitic to martensitic phases. Coarse ferritic grains were observed in the duplex HAZ. Higher heat input, however, had a beneficial effect on the nucleation of austenite in the HAZ. Heat input had a regulatory effect on grain growth within the austenitic weld and more favorable equiaxed austenite was obtained with higher heat input. On the ferritic side of the welds, macrosegregation in the form of a martensitic intermediate zone was observed for all the cooling rates studied. However, on the duplex side, macrosegregation in the fusion boundary was only noticed with higher cooling rates. Microstructural observations and compositional analysis suggest that higher heat input could be beneficial for the structural integrity of the weld despite higher heat input increasing the extent of adverse coarse grains in the HAZ, especially on the ferritic side. - Highlights: •The effect of heat input on dissimilar welds of UHSS and DSS was studied. •Transmutation of the microstructure was discussed in detail. •The influence of heat input on compositional heterogeneity of welds was described. •Higher heat input enhanced bainitic transformation on the ferritic side. •Macrosegregation was affected by the amount of heat input on the DSS side.

  20. Local approach: fracture at high temperature in an austenitic stainless steel submitted to thermomechanical loadings. Calculations and experimental validations

    Poquillon, D.

    1997-10-01

    Usually, for the integrity assessment of defective components, well established rules are used: global approach to fracture. A more fundamental way to deal with these problems is based on the local approach to fracture. In this study, we choose this way and we perform numerical simulations of intergranular crack initiation and intergranular crack propagation. This type of damage can be find in components of fast breeder reactors in 316 L austenitic stainless steel which operate at high temperatures. This study deals with methods coupling partly the behaviour and the damage for crack growth in specimens submitted to various thermomechanical loadings. A new numerical method based on finite element computations and a damage model relying on quantitative observations of grain boundary damage is proposed. Numerical results of crack initiation and growth are compared with a number of experimental data obtained in previous studies. Creep and creep-fatigue crack growth are studied. Various specimen geometries are considered: compact Tension Specimens and axisymmetric notched bars tested under isothermal (600 deg C) conditions and tubular structures containing a circumferential notch tested under thermal shock. Adaptative re-meshing technique and/or node release technique are used and compared. In order to broaden our knowledge on stress triaxiality effects on creep intergranular damage, new experiments are defined and conducted on sharply notched tubular specimens in torsion. These isothermal (600 deg C) Mode II creep tests reveal severe intergranular damage and creep crack initiation. Calculated damage fields at the crack tip are compared with the experimental observations. The good agreement between calculations and experimental data shows the damage criterion used can improve the accuracy of life prediction of components submitted to intergranular creep damage. (author)