WorldWideScience

Sample records for high technology facilities

  1. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  2. Shielding technology for high energy radiation production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Heon Il

    2004-06-01

    In order to develop shielding technology for high energy radiation production facility, references and data for high energy neutron shielding are searched and collected, and calculations to obtain the characteristics of neutron shield materials are performed. For the evaluation of characteristics of neutron shield material, it is chosen not only general shield materials such as concrete, polyethylene, etc., but also KAERI developed neutron shields of High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) mixed with boron compound (B 2 O 3 , H 2 BO 3 , Borax). Neutron attenuation coefficients for these materials are obtained for later use in shielding design. The effect of source shape and source angular distribution on the shielding characteristics for several shield materials is examined. This effect can contribute to create shielding concept in case of no detail source information. It is also evaluated the effect of the arrangement of shield materials using current shield materials. With these results, conceptual shielding design for PET cyclotron is performed. The shielding composite using HDPE and concrete is selected to meet the target dose rate outside the composite, and the dose evaluation is performed by configuring the facility room conceptually. From the result, the proper shield configuration for this PET cyclotron is proposed

  3. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....

  4. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabharwall Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX. Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 °C, high-pressure (7 MPa helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4 flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa, at a temperature of ∼450 °C. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  5. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges - 15066

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwall, P.; O'Brien, J.E.; Yoon, S.J.; Sun, X.

    2015-01-01

    A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic, materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The 3 loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuits heat exchangers (PCHEs) at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integrated System Test (ARTIST) facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 C. degrees), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF 4 ) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa), at a temperature of ∼ 450 C. degrees. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift) in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  6. Technology Development Facility (TDF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doggett, J.N.

    1982-01-01

    We have been studying small, driven, magnetic-mirror-based fusion reactors for the Technology Development Facility (TDF), that will test fusion reactor materials, components, and subsystems. Magnetic mirror systems are particularly interesting for this application because of their inherent steady-state operation, potentially high neutron wall loading, and relatively small size. Our design is a tandem mirror device first described by Fowler and Logan, based on the physics of the TMX experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The device produces 20 MW of fusion power with a first-wall, uncollided 14-MeV neutron flux of 1.4 MW/m 2 on an area of approximately 8 m 2 , while consuming approximately 250 MW of electrical power. The work was done by a combined industrial-laboratory-university group

  7. Use of highly pressurized liquid nitrogen technology for concrete scabbling application at SICN nuclear facility - 59282

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, Fabrice; Vaudey, Claire-Emilie; Damerval, Frederique; Varet, Thierry; Toulemonde, Valerie; Richard, Frederic; Anderson, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The decommissioning process is a quite long and complicated stage who may take few years or decades to be achieved. Generally, this process involves the implementation of a large number of technologies dedicated to cutting and decontamination operations. Based on this finding, the Clean- Up Business Unit of AREVA with Air Liquide decided to start the development of a new technology based on the use of liquid nitrogen (-140 deg. C / 3500 bar). The NitroJet R process is a quite interesting and promising technology. It can be used, as we described in this document, for concrete scabbling operations but also for decontamination and cutting applications. The Clean-Up Business Unit, with its partner Air Liquide, realized a complete study of this technology including several tests and optimizations to be able to handle it in a nuclear environment. Thus, we did: - increase of the reliability of the machine, - nuclearization of the system (including the development of efficient shroud system and efficient HP pipes insulation); - development of a dedicated bearer for automatic configuration; - optimization of parameters for D and D applications. As we already mentioned, NitroJet R technology showed promising perspectives as: - economic: increase of rate processing, decrease in site monitoring costs, - environmental: use of an inert gas, no secondary waste generation, non use of chemical, dry process, - social: less strenuous work, decrease of operator dosimetry compatible with ALARA principle The future for the NitroJet R technology will be its implementation in a real high level activity environment. This process will be used in spring 2012 in AREVA nuclear reprocessing facility of La Hague (France) to accomplish concrete scabbling applications. This test will be the last of a long development period before industrial exploitation. (authors)

  8. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted

  9. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  10. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  11. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Functionally within the MDF, ORNL operates DOE’s unique Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF)—a 42,000 ft2 innovative technology facility and works with leading...

  12. Technology developments for ACIGA high power test facility for advanced interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Barton, M [California Institute of Technology, LIGO Project, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Blair, D G [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)] [and others

    2005-05-21

    The High Optical Power Test Facility for Advanced Interferometry has been built by the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy north of Perth in Western Australia. An 80 m suspended cavity has been prepared in collaboration with LIGO, where a set of experiments to test suspension control and thermal compensation will soon take place. Future experiments will investigate radiation pressure instabilities and optical spring effects in a high power optical cavity with {approx}200 kW circulating power. The facility combines research and development undertaken by all consortium members, whose latest results are presented.

  13. Technology developments for ACIGA high power test facility for advanced interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga, P; Barton, M; Blair, D G

    2005-01-01

    The High Optical Power Test Facility for Advanced Interferometry has been built by the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy north of Perth in Western Australia. An 80 m suspended cavity has been prepared in collaboration with LIGO, where a set of experiments to test suspension control and thermal compensation will soon take place. Future experiments will investigate radiation pressure instabilities and optical spring effects in a high power optical cavity with ∼200 kW circulating power. The facility combines research and development undertaken by all consortium members, whose latest results are presented

  14. Tandem mirror technology demonstration facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    This report describes a facility for generating engineering data on the nuclear technologies needed to build an engineering test reactor (ETR). The facility, based on a tandem mirror operating in the Kelley mode, could be used to produce a high neutron flux (1.4 MW/M/sup 2/) on an 8-m/sup 2/ test area for testing fusion blankets. Runs of more than 100 h, with an average availability of 30%, would produce a fluence of 5 mW/yr/m/sup 2/ and give the necessary experience for successful operation of an ETR.

  15. Tandem mirror technology demonstration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This report describes a facility for generating engineering data on the nuclear technologies needed to build an engineering test reactor (ETR). The facility, based on a tandem mirror operating in the Kelley mode, could be used to produce a high neutron flux (1.4 MW/M 2 ) on an 8-m 2 test area for testing fusion blankets. Runs of more than 100 h, with an average availability of 30%, would produce a fluence of 5 mW/yr/m 2 and give the necessary experience for successful operation of an ETR

  16. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  17. Standoff Detection Technology Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Standoff Detection Technology Evaluation facility is the only one of its kind in the country and allows researchers to release a known amount of material while...

  18. Underground Facilities, Technological Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Spooner, N

    2010-01-01

    This report gives a summary overview of the status of international under- ground facilities, in particular as relevant to long-baseline neutrino physics and neutrino astrophysics. The emphasis is on the technical feasibility aspects of creating the large underground infrastructures that will be needed in the fu- ture to house the necessary detectors of 100 kton to 1000 kton scale. There is great potential in Europe to build such a facility, both from the technical point of view and because Europe has a large concentration of the necessary engi- neering and geophysics expertise. The new LAGUNA collaboration has made rapid progress in determining the feasibility for a European site for such a large detector. It is becoming clear in fact that several locations are technically fea- sible in Europe. Combining this with the possibility of a new neutrino beam from CERN suggests a great opportunity for Europe to become the leading centre of neutrino studies, combining both neutrino astrophysics and neutrino beam stu...

  19. A facile approach to manufacturing non-ionic surfactant nanodipsersions using proniosome technology and high-pressure homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najlah, Mohammad; Hidayat, Kanar; Omer, Huner K; Mwesigwa, Enosh; Ahmed, Waqar; AlObaidy, Kais G; Phoenix, David A; Elhissi, Abdelbary

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a niosome nanodispersion was manufactured using high-pressure homogenization following the hydration of proniosomes. Using beclometasone dipropionate (BDP) as a model drug, the characteristics of the homogenized niosomes were compared with vesicles prepared via the conventional approach of probe-sonication. Particle size, zeta potential, and the drug entrapment efficiency were similar for both size reduction mechanisms. However, high-pressure homogenization was much more efficient than sonication in terms of homogenization output rate, avoidance of sample contamination, offering a greater potential for a large-scale manufacturing of noisome nanodispersions. For example, high-pressure homogenization was capable of producing small size niosomes (209 nm) using a short single-step of size reduction (6 min) as compared with the time-consuming process of sonication (237 nm in >18 min) and the BDP entrapment efficiency was 29.65% ± 4.04 and 36.4% ± 2.8. In addition, for homogenization, the output rate of the high-pressure homogenization was 10 ml/min compared with 0.83 ml/min using the sonication protocol. In conclusion, a facile, applicable, and highly efficient approach for preparing niosome nanodispersions has been established using proniosome technology and high-pressure homogenization.

  20. Revolutionize Propulsion Test Facility High-Speed Video Imaging with Disruptive Computational Photography Enabling Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced rocket propulsion testing requires high-speed video recording that can capture essential information for NASA during rocket engine flight certification...

  1. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-01-01

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials

  2. Decommissioning high-level waste surface facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    The protective storage, entombment and dismantlement options of decommissioning a High-Level Waste Surface Facility (HLWSF) was investigated. A reference conceptual design for the facility was developed based on the designs of similar facilities. State-of-the-art decommissioning technologies were identified. Program plans and cost estimates for decommissioning the reference conceptual designs were developed. Good engineering design concepts were on the basis of this work identified

  3. Empowering Facilities Teams through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Facilities departments at colleges and universities are facing the same challenge: how not to do just the most projects, but also the right projects with the limited funds they are given. In order to make the best decisions, they need more control over the capital planning process, which requires accurate, current facility condition data. Each…

  4. High-pressure water facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  5. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Facilities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The library is at the centre of academic activities in every university. It is being transformed from the traditional operations to a service organization with the use of information and communication technology facilities. In this study, the researchers x-rayed ICT facilities and the skills level of the staff in the three universities in ...

  6. High Pressure Industrial Water Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with Space Shuttle Main Engine testing at Stennis, the Nordberg Water Pumps at the High Pressure Industrial Water Facility provide water for cooling the flame deflectors at the test stands during test firings.

  7. Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bolta, C.C.

    1976-03-01

    A scoping study for a Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility (TETF) is presented. The TETF is a tokamak with R = 3 m and I/sub p/ = 1.4 MA based on the counterstreaming-ion torus mode of operation. The primary purpose of TETF is to demonstrate fusion technologies for the Experimental Power Reactor (EPR), but it will also serve as an engineering and radiation test facility. TETF has several technological systems (e.g., superconducting toroidal-field coil, tritium fuel cycle, impurity control, first wall) that are prototypical of EPR.

  8. Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility scoping study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bolta, C.C.

    1976-03-01

    A scoping study for a Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility (TETF) is presented. The TETF is a tokamak with R = 3 m and I/sub p/ = 1.4 MA based on the counterstreaming-ion torus mode of operation. The primary purpose of TETF is to demonstrate fusion technologies for the Experimental Power Reactor (EPR), but it will also serve as an engineering and radiation test facility. TETF has several technological systems (e.g., superconducting toroidal-field coil, tritium fuel cycle, impurity control, first wall) that are prototypical of EPR

  9. On-orbit technology experiment facility definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard A.; Buchan, Robert W.; Gates, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify on-orbit integrated facility needs to support in-space technology experiments on the Space Station and associated free flyers. In particular, the first task was to examine the proposed technology development missions (TDMX's) from the model mission set and other proposed experimental facilities, both individually and by theme, to determine how and if the experiments might be combined, what equipment might be shared, what equipment might be used as generic equipment for continued experimentation, and what experiments will conflict with the conduct of other experiments or Space Station operations. Then using these results, to determine on-orbit facility needs to optimize the implementation of technology payloads. Finally, to develop one or more scenarios, design concepts, and outfitting requirements for implementation of onboard technology experiments.

  10. Experimental Evaluation for the Microvibration Performance of a Segmented PC Method Based High Technology Industrial Facility Using 1/2 Scale Test Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijun Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The precast concrete (PC method used in the construction process of high technology industrial facilities is limited when applied to those with greater span lengths, due to the transport length restriction (maximum length of 15~16 m in Korea set by traffic laws. In order to resolve this, this study introduces a structural system with a segmented PC system, and a 1/2 scale model with a width of 9000 mm (hereafter Segmented Model is manufactured to evaluate vibration performance. Since a real vibrational environment cannot be reproduced for vibration testing using a scale model, a comparative analysis of their relative performances is conducted in this study. For this purpose, a 1/2 scale model with a width of 7200 mm (hereafter Nonsegmented Model of a high technology industrial facility is additionally prepared using the conventional PC method. By applying the same experiment method for both scale models and comparing the results, the relative vibration performance of the Segmented Model is observed. Through impact testing, the natural frequencies of the two scale models are compared. Also, in order to analyze the estimated response induced by the equipment, the vibration responses due to the exciter are compared. The experimental results show that the Segmented Model exhibits similar or superior performances when compared to the Nonsegmented Model.

  11. International Facility for Food Irradiation Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.

    1982-01-01

    The International Facility for Food Irradiation Technology (IFFIT) was set up in November 1978 for a period of five years at the Pilot Plant for Food Irradiation, Wageningen, The Netherlands under an Agreement between the FAO, IAEA and the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries of the Government of the Netherlands. Under this Agreement, the irradiation facilities, office space and services of the Pilot Plant for Food Irradiation are put at IFFIT's disposal. Also the closely located Research Foundation, ITAL, provides certain facilities and laboratory services within the terms of the Agreement. The FAO and IAEA contribute US-Dollar 25,000. Annually for the duration of IFFIT. (orig.) [de

  12. Proceeding of the 7. Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y; Jujuratisbela, Uju; Aziz, Ferhat; Su'ud, Zaki; Suprawhardana, M. Salman

    2002-02-01

    The seventh proceedings of seminar safety and technology of nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities, held by National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Aims of seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about safety and nuclear Power Plant Technology and Nuclear Facilities consist of technology; high temperature reactor and application for national development sustain able and high technology. This seminar level all aspects technology, Power Reactor research reactor, high temperature reactor and nuclear facilities. The article is separated by index

  13. Membrane technology water treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruzdev, E. N.; Starikov, E.N.

    2009-01-01

    The suggested technical solution, in contrast with the traditional treatment methods using pressure filtration and sorption cleaning, can be applied with minimal used for equipment, stable production and the use of reagents, prevention of the formation of waste water with high mineral content and avoid the need for neutralization of the main stream of waste water

  14. High heat flux facility GLADIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuner, H.; Boeswirth, B.; Boscary, J.; McNeely, P.

    2007-01-01

    The new ion beam facility GLADIS started the operation at IPP Garching. The facility is equipped with two individual 1.1 MW power ion sources for testing actively cooled plasma facing components under high heat fluxes. Each ion source generates heat loads between 3 and 55 MW/m 2 with a beam diameter of 70 mm at the target position. These parameters allow effective testing from probes to large components up to 2 m length. The high heat flux allows the target to be installed inclined to the beam and thus increases the heated surface length up to 200 mm for a heat flux of 15 MW/m 2 in the standard operating regime. Thus the facility has the potential capability for testing of full scale ITER divertor targets. Heat load tests on the WENDELSTEIN 7-X pre-series divertor targets have been successfully started. These tests will validate the design and manufacturing for the production of 950 elements

  15. Decommissioning of reactor facilities (2). Required technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Decommissioning of reactor facilities was planned to perform progressive dismantling, decontamination and radioactive waste disposal with combination of required technology in a safe and economic way. This article outlined required technology for decommissioning as follows: (1) evaluation of kinds and amounts of residual radioactivity of reactor facilities with calculation and measurement, (2) decontamination technology of metal components and concrete structures so as to reduce worker's exposure and production of radioactive wastes during dismantling, (3) dismantling technology of metal components and concrete structures such as plasma arc cutting, band saw cutting and controlled demolition with mostly remote control operation, (3) radioactive waste disposal for volume reduction and reuse, and (4) project management of decommissioning for safe and rational work to secure reduction of worker's exposure and prevent the spreading of contamination. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Methodology and technology of decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear facilities is a topic of great interest to many Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) because of the large number of older nuclear facilities which are or soon will be retired from service. In response to increased international interest in decommissioning and to the needs of Member States, the IAEA's activities in this area have increased during the past few years and will be enhanced considerably in the future. A long range programme using an integrated systems approach covering all the technical, regulatory and safety steps associated with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities is being developed. The database resulting from this work is required so that Member States can decommission their nuclear facilities in a safe time and cost effective manner and the IAEA can effectively respond to requests for assistance. The report is a review of the current state of the art of the methodology and technology of decommissioning nuclear facilities including remote systems technology. This is the first report in the IAEA's expanded programme and was of benefit in outlining future activities. Certain aspects of the work reviewed in this report, such as the recycling of radioactive materials from decommissioning, will be examined in depth in future reports. The information presented should be useful to those responsible for or interested in planning or implementing the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

  17. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Chong Hun; Choi, Wang Kyu; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Gye Nam

    2004-02-01

    Technology development of surface decontamination in the uranium conversion facility before decommissioning, technology development of component decontamination in the uranium conversion facility after decommissioning, uranium sludge treatment technology development, radioactive waste soil decontamination technology development at the aim of the temporary storage soil of KAERI, Optimum fixation methodology derivation on the soil and uranium waste, and safety assessment methodology development of self disposal of the soil and uranium waste after decontamination have been performed in this study. The unique decontamination technology applicable to the component of the nuclear facility at room temperature was developed. Low concentration chemical decontamination technology which is very powerful so as to decrease the radioactivity of specimen surface under the self disposal level was developed. The component decontamination technology applicable to the nuclear facility after decommissioning by neutral salt electro-polishing was also developed. The volume of the sludge waste could be decreased over 80% by the sludge waste separation method by water. The electrosorption method on selective removal of U(VI) to 1 ppm of unrestricted release level using the uranium-containing lagoon sludge waste was tested and identified. Soil decontamination process and equipment which can reduce the soil volume over 90% were developed. A pilot size of soil decontamination equipment which will be used to development of real scale soil decontamination equipment was designed, fabricated and demonstrated. Optimized fixation methodology on soil and uranium sludge was derived from tests and evaluation of the results. Safety scenario and safety evaluation model were development on soil and uranium sludge aiming at self disposal after decontamination

  18. Investigative report, science committee of Aggregate corporation Radiological technologist society of the Oita prefecture. Questionnaires research on security control of department of radiological technology of medical facilities in the Oita prefecture. The second report. Research on high risk incident measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Yoshihiro; Mano, Isao; Takagi, Ikuya; Murakami, Yasunori; Sueyoshi, Seiji; Yoshimoto, Asahi

    2007-01-01

    Oita association of radiological technologists carried out the questionnaires about the measures against high lisk incidental in department of radiological technology at the medical facilities in Oita. We distributed the questionnaire to 102 facilities, which are worked by the technologists (member), and got response from 91 facilities (89%). Research contents are Patient verification method'' ''Input and verification of patient attribute'' ''Infection in hospital'' ''Stumbles and falls of patient'' Contrast enhancement CT'' ''Something related to pacemaker'' ''MRI inspection and the magnetic substance'' ''Remedy mistake'' and ''Risk management''. The Result, Low level recognition contents of medical accident measures are ''Contrast enhancement CT'' ''Stumbles and falls of patient'' Risk management of department of radiological technology''. (author)

  19. High Exposure Facility Technical Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Gregory L.; Stithem, Arthur R.; Murphy, Mark K.; Smith, Alex K.

    2008-02-12

    The High Exposure Facility is a collimated high-level gamma irradiator that is located in the basement of the 318 building. It was custom developed by PNNL back in 1982 to meet the needs for high range radiological instrument calibrations and dosimeter irradiations. At the time no commercially available product existed that could create exposure rates up to 20,000 R/h. This document is intended to pass on the design criteria that was employed to create this unique facility, while maintaining compliance with ANSI N543-1974, "General Safety Standard for Installations Using Non-Medical X-Ray and Sealed Gamma-Ray Sources, Energies up to 10 MeV."

  20. ACIGA's high optical power test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, L; Aoun, M; Barriga, P

    2004-01-01

    Advanced laser interferometer detectors utilizing more than 100 W of laser power and with ∼10 6 W circulating laser power present many technological problems. The Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy (ACIGA) is developing a high power research facility in Gingin, north of Perth, Western Australia, which will test techniques for the next generation interferometers. In particular it will test thermal lensing compensation and control strategies for optical cavities in which optical spring effects and parametric instabilities may present major difficulties

  1. Scientific and Technological Facilities in CIEMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaquero Ortiz, E. M.; Cascante Díaz, E.; González Pineda, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    The precise knowledge of the available Resources in an Organization, regardless the work it carries out, is an essential strategic enabler to achieve its goals. Material Resources are part of the resources in an organization, The “Material Resources” expression includes a wide span of elements, because a Material Resource, as a generic concept, is each and every specific physical mean, utilized to get any of the Organization objectives. In CIEMAT, as Public Research Agency, its Material Resources consist of its scientific and technological facilities. These resources are the basis of this Agency numerous amount of technical capabilities, allowing it to carry out its research, development and innovation activity to transfer its results to the society later. This report is a summary on CIEMAT scientific and technological facilities, whose spread can help to show its scientific and technological capabilities, to enable the execution of a wide variety of projects and to open new external cooperation channels. Outstanding among these facilities are two “Unique Scientific and Technological Infrastructures” (ICTS) and the Ionizing Radiations Metrology Laboratory (LMRI) which is the Spanish National Standards Laboratory for ionising radiations.

  2. The application of research and technology in the Highly Active Liquor storage and treatment facilities at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    At the Sellafield nuclear site, Highly Active Liquor (HAL) produced from Magnox and Oxide reprocessing operations is evaporated and interim stored in the Highly Active Liquor Evaporation and Storage (HALES) complex prior to vitrification in one of three Waste Vitrification Plant (WVP) processing lines. These plants are integral to the current commercial activities at Sellafield and also in safely discharging liabilities in the future. The management and operation of HALES and WVP are subject to significant regulatory and public scrutiny and there is the requirement to deliver a reduction in the HAL volumes stored in HALES in accordance with a regulator imposed HAL stock reduction specification. In delivering the required reduction BNFL has faced a number of technical and operational challenges which have resulted in the development and execution of significant programmes of research and development and technical and engineering projects. The key challenges faced are briefly presented. (author)

  3. Development of decommissioning, decontamination and reuse technology for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.; Choi, B. S.

    2012-03-01

    In this project, the foundation of decommissioning technology through the development of core technologies applied to maintenance and decommissioning of nuclear facility was established. First of all, we developed the key technology such as safety assessment technology for decommissioning work needed at the preparatory stage of decommissioning of the highly contaminated facilities and simultaneous measurement technology of the high-level alpha/beta contamination applicable to the operation and decommissioning of the nuclear facilities. Second, we developed a remotely controlled laser ablation decontamination system which is useful for a removal of fixed contaminants and developed a chemical gel decontamination technology for a removal of non-fixed contaminants during the maintenance and decommissioning works of high radiation hot cells which have been used for a recycling or treatment of spent fuels. Third, we developed a volume reduction and self-disposal technology for dismantled concrete wastes. Also, the technology for volume reduction and stabilization of the peculiar wastes(HEPA filter and organic mixed wastes), which have been known to be very difficult to treat and manage, generated from the high radioactive facilities in operation, improvement and repair and under decommissioning was developed. Finally, this research project was developed a system for the reduction of radiotoxicity of several uranium mixtures generated in the front- and back-end nuclear fuel cycles with characteristics of highly enhanced proliferation-resistance and more environmental friendliness, which can make the uranium to be recovered or separated from the mixtures with a high purity level enough for the uranium to be reused and to be classified as C-class level for burial near the surface, and then which result in the much reduction in volume of the uranium mixture wastes

  4. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, W. K.; Jung, C. H.; Oh, W. Z.

    2007-06-01

    The originative CO 2 pellet blasting equipment was developed by improving additional components such as feed screw, idle roller and air-lock feeder to clear up the problems of freezing and discontinuity of blasting and by adopting pneumatically operated vacuum suction head and vacuum cup to prevent recontamination by collecting contaminant particulates simultaneously with the decontamination. The optimum decontamination process was established according to the kind of materials such as metal, concrete and plastic and the type of contaminants such as particulate, fixed chemical compound and oil. An excellent decontamination performances were verified by means of the lab-scale hot test with radioactive specimen and the technology demonstration in IMEF hot cell. The PFC dry decontamination equipment applicable to the surface contaminated with high radioactive particulate was developed. This equipment consists of the unit processes such as spray, collection, filtration and dry distillation designed originatively applicable to inside of dry hot cell. Through the demonstration of PFC spray decontamination process in IMEF hot cell, we secured on-site applicability and the decontamination efficiency more than 90 %. We investigated the characteristics of dismantled metal waste melting and the radionuclide(Co, Cs, U) distribution into ingot and slag by melting decontamination experiments using electric arc melter. We obtained the decontamination factors greater than 100 for Cs and of 10∼100 for uranium. The pilot scale(200 kg/batch) demonstration for melting decontamination was carried out successfully using high temperature melting facility at KAERI. The volume reduction factor of 1/7 and the economical feasibility of the melting decontamination were verified.

  5. Scientific and Technological Facilities in CIEMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaquero Ortiz, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    The precise knowledge of the available Resources in an Organization, regardless the work it carries out, is an essential strategic enable to achieve its goals. Material Resources are part of the resources in an organization, The Material Resources expression includes a wide span of elements, because a Material Resource, as a generic concept, is each and every specific physical mean, utilised to get any of the Organization objectives. In case of CIEMAT, as Public Research Agency, its Material Resources consists of its scientific and technological facilities. These resources are the basis of this Agency numerous amount of technical capabilities, allowing it to carry out its research, development and innovation activity to transfer its results to the society later. This report is a summary on CIEMAT scientific and technological facilities, whose spread can help to show its scientific and technological capabilities, to enable the execution of a wide variety of projects and to open new external cooperation channels. In that list its possible to find the two Unique Scientific and Technological Infrastructures (ICTS) in Spain which are hold by CIEMAT and the Ionizing Radiations Metrology Laboratory (LMRI) which is the Spanish National Standards Laboratory for ionising radiations. (Author)

  6. Highlighting High Performance: National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Thermal Test Facility, Golden, Colorado. Office of Building Technology State and Community Programs (BTS) Brochure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgert, S.

    2001-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Thermal Test Facility in Golden, Colorado, was designed using a whole-building approach-looking at the way the building's systems worked together most efficiently. Researchers monitor the performance of the 11,000-square-foot building, which boasts an energy cost savings of 63% for heating, cooling, and lighting. The basic plan of the building can be adapted to many needs, including retail and warehouse space. The Thermal Test Facility contains office and laboratory space; research focuses on the development of energy-efficiency and renewable energy technologies that are cost-effective and environmentally friendly

  7. Physics and high technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Liqin; Ma Junru.

    1992-01-01

    At present, the development of high technology has opened a new chapter in world's history of science and technology. This review describes the great impact of physics on high technology in six different fields (energy technology, new materials, information technology, biotechnology, space technology, and Ocean technology). It is shown that the new concepts and new methods created in physics and the special conditions and measurements established for physics researches not only deepen human's knowledge about nature but also point out new directions for engineering and technology. The achievements in physics have been more and more applied to high technology, while the development of high technology has explored some new research areas and raised many novel, important projects for physics. Therefore, it is important for us to strengthen the research on these major problems in physics

  8. Cryogenic technology review of cold neutron source facility for localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hun Cheol; Park, D. S.; Moon, H. M.; Soon, Y. P. [Daesung Cryogenic Research Institute, Ansan (Korea); Kim, J. H. [United Pacific Technology, Inc., Ansan (Korea)

    1998-02-01

    This Research is performed to localize the cold neutron source(CNS) facility in HANARO and the report consists of two parts. In PART I, the local and foreign technology for CNS facility is investigated and examined. In PART II, safety and licensing are investigated. CNS facility consists of cryogenic and warm part. Cryogenic part includes a helium refrigerator, vacuum insulated pipes, condenser, cryogenic fluid tube and moderator cell. Warm part includes moderator gas control, vacuum equipment, process monitoring system. Warm part is at high level as a result of the development of semiconductor industries and can be localized. However, even though cryogenic technology is expected to play a important role in developing the 21st century's cutting technology, it lacks of specialists and the research facility since the domestic market is small and the research institutes and government do not recognize the importance. Therefore, it takes a long research time in order to localize the facility. The safety standard of reactor for hydrogen gas in domestic nuclear power regulations is compared with that of the foreign countries, and the licensing method for installation of CNS facility is examined. The system failure and its influence are also analyzed. 23 refs., 59 figs., 26 tabs. (Author)

  9. Research and test facilities required in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Experimental facilities are essential research tools both for the development of nuclear science and technology and for testing systems and materials which are currently being used or will be used in the future. As a result of economic pressures and the closure of older facilities, there are concerns that the ability to undertake the research necessary to maintain and to develop nuclear science and technology may be in jeopardy. An NEA expert group with representation from ten member countries, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the European Commission has reviewed the status of those research and test facilities of interest to the NEA Nuclear Science Committee. They include facilities relating to nuclear data measurement, reactor development, neutron scattering, neutron radiography, accelerator-driven systems, transmutation, nuclear fuel, materials, safety, radiochemistry, partitioning and nuclear process heat for hydrogen production. This report contains the expert group's detailed assessment of the current status of these nuclear research facilities and makes recommendations on how future developments in the field can be secured through the provision of high-quality, modern facilities. It also describes the online database which has been established by the expert group which includes more than 700 facilities. (authors)

  10. Image processing technology for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Yong Beom; Kim, Woong Ki; Park, Soon Young

    1993-05-01

    Digital image processing technique is being actively studied since microprocessors and semiconductor memory devices have been developed in 1960's. Now image processing board for personal computer as well as image processing system for workstation is developed and widely applied to medical science, military, remote inspection, and nuclear industry. Image processing technology which provides computer system with vision ability not only recognizes nonobvious information but processes large information and therefore this technique is applied to various fields like remote measurement, object recognition and decision in adverse environment, and analysis of X-ray penetration image in nuclear facilities. In this report, various applications of image processing to nuclear facilities are examined, and image processing techniques are also analysed with the view of proposing the ideas for future applications. (Author)

  11. Development of Experimental Facilities for Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, G. S.; Jung, W. M.; Ku, J. H. [and others

    2004-07-01

    The advanced spent fuel management process(ACP), proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel, is under research and development. This technology convert spent fuels into pure metal-base uranium with removing the highly heat generating materials(Cs, Sr) efficiently and reducing of the decay heat, volume, and radioactivity from spent fuel by 1/4. In the next phase(2004{approx}2006), the demonstration of this technology will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For this demonstration, the hot cell facilities of {alpha}-{gamma} type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of {beta}-{gamma} type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. In this study, the design requirements are established, and the process detail work flow was analysed for the optimum arrangement to ensure effective process operation in hot cell. And also, the basic and detail design of hot cell facility and process, and safety analysis was performed to secure conservative safety of hot cell facility and process.

  12. Facility for protection of technological, especially power assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichon, S.; Hahn, J.; Malatek, K.; Randak, O.; Vitovec, P.; Zidek, M.

    1987-01-01

    The facility consists of sensors producing analog signals, used as input information for the evaluation of process conditions or equipment failures. The sensors are fitted to partial functional parts of technological assemblies, such as nuclear reactors. The individual sensors are connected via unification converters to the respective protection units. The facility is resistant to breakdowns of the analog sensors and other components including the computer; it features the possibility of in-service failure detection and the capability of immediate regeneration following a failure. This capability prevents, with high probability, the production of non-accident failures of the technological assembly. The block diagram is described of the facility and its operation in the event of an emergency. (J.B.). 1 fig

  13. A Pilot Health Information Technology-Based Effort to Increase the Quality of Transitions From Skilled Nursing Facility to Home: Compelling Evidence of High Rate of Adverse Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jennifer L; Kanaan, Abir O; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Tjia, Jennifer; Cutrona, Sarah L; Garber, Lawrence; Preusse, Peggy; Field, Terry S

    2016-04-01

    Older adults are often transferred from hospitals to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) for post-acute care. Patients may be at risk for adverse outcomes after SNF discharges, but little research has focused on this period. Assessment of the feasibility of a transitional care intervention based on a combination of manual information transmission and health information technology to provide automated alert messages to primary care physicians and staff; pre-post analysis to assess potential impact. A multispecialty group practice. Adults aged 65 and older, discharged from SNFs to home; comparison group drawn from SNF discharges during the previous 1.5 years, matched on facility, patient age, and sex. For the pre-post analysis, we tracked rehospitalization within 30 days after discharge and adverse drug events within 45 days. The intervention was developed and implemented with manual transmission of information between 8 SNFs and the group practice followed by entry into the electronic health record. The process required a 5-day delay during which a large portion of the adverse events occurred. Over a 1-year period, automated alert messages were delivered to physicians and staff for the 313 eligible patients discharged from the 8 SNFs to home. We compared outcomes to those of individually matched discharges from the previous 1.5 years and found similar percentages with 30-day rehospitalizations (31% vs 30%, adjusted HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.80-1.4). Within the adverse drug event (ADE) study, 30% of the discharges during the intervention period and 30% of matched discharges had ADEs within 45 days. Older adults discharged from SNFs are at high risk of adverse outcomes immediately following discharge. Simply providing alerts to outpatient physicians, especially if delivered multiple days after discharge, is unlikely to have any impact on reducing these rates. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  14. Development of the Decommissioning Technology for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, S. G.

    2010-04-01

    The evaluation technology of decommissioning process must be developed and will be used for the ALARA planning tool of decommissioning process and demonstrated for tools of decommissioning equipment. Also, this technology can be used for tools workplaces with high work difficulty such as large-scale chemical plant, under water and space. The monitoring system for high alpha radioactive contamination measurement will be use in the high radioactivity decommissioning sites such as hot-cell or glove box. Also, it will be use in the general nuclear facilities as the radiation monitoring unit. The preparation technology of the radiation sensor for high radioactive contamination measurement will be transferred to the company for the industrialization. The remote monitoring system can prevent the workers exposure using the optical fiber to separate the sensor and electronics

  15. Proceedings of the 9. National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y; Aziz, Ferhat; Untoro, Pudji; Su'ud, Zaki; Zarkasi, Amin Santoso; Lasman, As Natio

    2003-08-01

    The ninth proceedings of seminar safety and technology of nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities held by National Nuclear Energy Agency and PLN-JTK. The aims of seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about Safety and Nuclear Power Plant Technology and Nuclear Facilities consist of Technology High Temperature Reactor and Application for National Development Sustainable and High Technology. This seminar cover all aspects Technology, Power Reactor, Research Reactor High Temperature Reactor and Nuclear Facilities. There are 20 articles have separated index

  16. An outline of research facilities of high intensity proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1995-01-01

    A plan called PROTON ENGINEERING CENTER has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities and a beam shape and storage ring based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average current of 10 mA. The research facilities planned are OMEGA·Nuclear Energy Development Facility, Neutron Facility for Material Irradiation, Nuclear Data Experiment Facility, Neutron Factory, Meson Factory, spallation Radioisotope Beam Facility, and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutrons, π-mesons, muons, and unstable isotopes originated from the protons are available for promoting the innovative research of nuclear energy and basic science and technology. (author)

  17. High Energy Solid State Laser Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A suite of laboratories with advanced spectroscopic and laser equipment, this facility develops materials and techniques for advanced solid state high energy lasers....

  18. Design, Evaluation and Test Technology Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of this facility, which is composed of numerous specialized facilities, is to provide capabilities to simulate a wide range of environments for component...

  19. Effect of Information Communication Technology Facilities on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the effect of ICT facilities on students' performance by comparing ... The comparison was conducted using subtests of English language and ... ICT facilities in all secondary schools to enhance teaching and learning.

  20. Gingin High Optical Power Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, C; Blair, D G; Barrigo, P

    2006-01-01

    The Australian Consortium for Gravitational Wave Astronomy (ACIGA) in collaboration with LIGO is developing a high optical power research facility at the AIGO site, Gingin, Western Australia. Research at the facility will provide solutions to the problems that advanced gravitational wave detectors will encounter with extremely high optical power. The problems include thermal lensing and parametric instabilities. This article will present the status of the facility and the plan for the future experiments

  1. Development of the Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.; Won, C. H.

    2010-04-01

    The research results could be used for a design of a remote ablation decontamination system and ultimately applicable for an decontamination of high radiation facilities such as the DUPIC and PIEF. The evaluation technology of decommissioning process must be developed and will be used for the ALARA planning tool of decommissioning process and demonstrated for tools of decommissioning equipment. Also, this technology can be used for tools workplaces with high work difficulty such as large-scale chemical plant, under water and space. It is expected that the technology for a volume reduction and self-disposal of dismantled concrete wastes can be contributed to the establishment of a management plan for radioactive dismantled concrete wastes through the minimization of final waste volume

  2. Technological Aspects: High Voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faircloth, D C

    2013-01-01

    This paper covers the theory and technological aspects of high-voltage design for ion sources. Electric field strengths are critical to understanding high-voltage breakdown. The equations governing electric fields and the techniques to solve them are discussed. The fundamental physics of high-voltage breakdown and electrical discharges are outlined. Different types of electrical discharges are catalogued and their behaviour in environments ranging from air to vacuum are detailed. The importance of surfaces is discussed. The principles of designing electrodes and insulators are introduced. The use of high-voltage platforms and their relation to system design are discussed. The use of commercially available high-voltage technology such as connectors, feedthroughs and cables are considered. Different power supply technologies and their procurement are briefly outlined. High-voltage safety, electric shocks and system design rules are covered. (author)

  3. Technological Aspects: High Voltage

    CERN Document Server

    Faircloth, D.C.

    2013-12-16

    This paper covers the theory and technological aspects of high-voltage design for ion sources. Electric field strengths are critical to understanding high-voltage breakdown. The equations governing electric fields and the techniques to solve them are discussed. The fundamental physics of high-voltage breakdown and electrical discharges are outlined. Different types of electrical discharges are catalogued and their behaviour in environments ranging from air to vacuum are detailed. The importance of surfaces is discussed. The principles of designing electrodes and insulators are introduced. The use of high-voltage platforms and their relation to system design are discussed. The use of commercially available high-voltage technology such as connectors, feedthroughs and cables are considered. Different power supply technologies and their procurement are briefly outlined. High-voltage safety, electric shocks and system design rules are covered.

  4. Experimental Facilities at the High Energy Frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Jenni, P.

    2016-01-01

    The main theme of the lectures covered the experimental work at hadron colliders, with a clear focus on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and on the roadmap that led finally to the discovery of the Higgs boson. The lectures were not a systematic course on machine and detector technologies, but rather tried to give a physics-motivated overview of many experimental aspects that were all relevant for making the discovery. The actual lectures covered a much broader scope than what is documented here in this write- up. The successful concepts for the experiments at the LHC have benefitted from the experience gained with previous generations of detectors at lower- energy machines. The lectures included also an outlook to the future experimental programme at the LHC, with its machine and experiments upgrades, as well as a short discussion of possible facilities at the high energy frontier beyond LHC.

  5. Remote handling technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Akira; Maekawa, Hiromichi; Ohmura, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    Design and R and D on nuclear fuel cycle facilities has intended development of remote handling and maintenance technology since 1977. IHI has completed the design and construction of several facilities with remote handling systems for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (JNFL). Based on the above experiences, IHI is now undertaking integration of specific technology and remote handling technology for application to new fields such as fusion reactor facilities, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, accelerator testing facilities, and robot simulator-aided remote operation systems in the future. (author)

  6. Achievement report on commissioned research of R and D in fiscal 2000 on micromachine technologies. Development of high function maintenance technology for power generation facilities; 2000 nendo kenkyu seika hokokusho. Hatsuden shisetsu you kokino mentenansu gijutsu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    R and D has been carried out on a high function maintenance system that performs inspection and repair of anomalies such as internal cracks by using micromachines without need of disassembling heat exchangers and piping systems in power generation facilities. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 2000. In the research of a prototype self-propelled system to recognize environment in tubes, the secondary prototype system integrating all of the elemental devices was fabricated, and its functions were verified. In the research of a prototype system to inspect outer surface of fine tube groups, a plurality of single machines that perform movement in narrow spaces on flat surface, interlocking, separation and flaw detection were connected to execute a vertical movement experiment. In the research of a prototype system for works internal to devices, fabrication and functional verification were conducted on the final prototype system which is equipped with functions of measuring very small nicks and performing repair works, which are mounted on the tip of a curved tube unit with multiple degrees of freedom. In the research of a functional device improving technology, a device that puts together artificial muscles, micro-joints, and a suspension device with very low friction was fabricated, and a functional verification was implemented thereon. (NEDO)

  7. Prospects for high-power radioactive beam facilities worldwide

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, Jerry A

    2003-01-01

    Advances in accelerators, targets, ion sources, and experimental instrumentation are making possible ever more powerful facilities for basic and applied research with short-lived radioactive isotopes. There are several current generation facilities, based on a variety of technologies, operating worldwide. These include, for example, those based on the in-flight method such as the recently upgraded National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, the facility at RIKEN in Japan, GANIL in Caen, France, and GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. Present facilities based on the Isotope-Separator On-Line method include, for example, the ISOLDE laboratory at CERN, HRIBF at Oak Ridge, and the new high-power facility ISAC at TRIUMF in Vancouver. Next-generation facilities include the Radioactive-Ion Factory upgrade of RIKEN to higher energy and intensity and the upgrade of ISAC to a higher energy secondary beam; both of these projects are in progress. A new project, LINAG, to upgrade the capabilities at...

  8. Research and development of superhigh-technological processing systems in fiscal 989 (1.2). Development of devices for highly processing power generating facility parts (1.2.3); Chosentan kako system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-03-01

    Described herein are the results of the research and development project for developing superhigh-technological processing systems, and devices for highly processing power generating facility parts.The R and D project for the superhigh-technological processing systems involves short-wavelength exima lasers for the techniques to expand their serviceability and improve their qualities; highly focused, wide-band energy ion beams for gas-phase focused ion beams and large-capacity cluster ion beams; superprecision machining for investigations on superprecision machining elements; techniques for forming and laminating thin films; high-speed surface modification of the stock materials; supporting techniques; and total systems. The R and D for the devices for highly processing power generating facility parts include investigations on the techniques for expanding serviceability of high-output exima lasers serving repeatedly for extended periods, and the techniques allowing the devices serviceable repeatedly for extended periods. The other R and D items include the techniques for light-resistant, high-strength elements, large-current ion beams, and reshaping by exima laser beams. (NEDO)

  9. 8. High power laser and ignition facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramian, A.J.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.

    2002-01-01

    This document gives a review of the various high power laser projects and ignition facilities in the world: the Mercury laser system and Electra (Usa), the krypton fluoride (KrF) laser and the HALNA (high average power laser for nuclear-fusion application) project (Japan), the Shenguang series, the Xingguang facility and the TIL (technical integration line) facility (China), the Vulcan peta-watt interaction facility (UK), the Megajoule project and its feasibility phase: the LIL (laser integration line) facility (France), the Asterix IV/PALS high power laser facility (Czech Republic), and the Phelix project (Germany). In Japan the 100 TW Petawatt Module Laser, constructed in 1997, is being upgraded to the world biggest peta-watt laser. Experiments have been performed with single-pulse large aperture e-beam-pumped Garpun (Russia) and with high-current-density El-1 KrF laser installation (Russia) to investigate Al-Be foil transmittance and stability to multiple e-beam irradiations. An article is dedicated to a comparison of debris shield impacts for 2 experiments at NIF (national ignition facility). (A.C.)

  10. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  11. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: (1) Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements; (2) Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout; (3) Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required; (4) Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems; (5) Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs; and (6) Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs

  12. Utilization Of Information And Communication Technology Facilities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the types of ICT facilities used for the provision of library and information services in Nigerian University libraries. It was also set to determine if there is any significant difference between Southern and Northern Nigeria University libraries of the first, second and third generations in ...

  13. Application of information and communication technology facilities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... technology facilities in technical services operations at Bayero University library, Nigeria. ... Victoria Sokari, Umar Garba Gama, Zanaib Abba Haliru, Kemi J. Olayemi, ... This paper examines the application of Information and Communication ...

  14. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-01-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs

  15. Managing highly flexible facilities: an essential complementary asset at risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tierney, Robert; Tierney, R.; Groen, Arend J.; Harms, Rainer; Luizink, M.; Hetherington, D.; Steward, H.; Walsh, Steven Thomas; Linton, Jonathan; Linton, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Twenty first century problems are increasingly being addressed by multi technology solutions developed by regional entrepreneurial and intreprepreneurial innovators. However, they require an expensive new type of fabrication facility. Multiple technology production facilities (MTPF) have

  16. High-capacity neutron activation analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    A high-capacity neutron activation analysis facility, the Reactor Activation Facility, was designed and built and has been in operation for about a year at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. The facility determines uranium and about 19 other trace elements in hydrogeochemical samples collected in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. The facility has a demonstrated average analysis rate of over 10,000 samples per month, and a peak rate of over 16,000 samples per month. Uranium is determined by cyclic activation and delayed neutron counting of the U-235 fission products; other elements are determined from gamma-ray spectra recorded in subsequent irradiation, decay, and counting steps. The method relies on the absolute activation technique and is highly automated for round-the-clock unattended operation

  17. High-capacity neutron activation analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.; Bowman, W.W.; Zeh, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A high-capacity neutron activation analysis facility, the Reactor Activation Facility, was designed and built and has been in operation for about a year at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. The facility determines uranium and about 19 other elements in hydrogeochemical samples collected in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, which is sponsored and funded by the United States Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office. The facility has a demonstrated average analysis rate of over 10,000 samples per month, and a peak rate of over 16,000 samples per month. Uranium is determined by cyclic activation and delayed neutron counting of the U-235 fission products; other elements are determined from gamma-ray spectra recorded in subsequent irradiation, decay, and counting steps. The method relies on the absolute activation technique and is highly automated for round-the-clock unattended operation

  18. Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology Facility Expedites Manufacturing Innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    The Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology facility (CoMET) at the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) paves the way for innovative wind turbine components and accelerated manufacturing. Available for use by industry partners and university researchers, the 10,000-square-foot facility expands NREL's composite manufacturing research capabilities by enabling researchers to design, prototype, and test composite wind turbine blades and other components -- and then manufacture them onsite. Designed to work in conjunction with NREL's design, analysis, and structural testing capabilities, the CoMET facility expedites manufacturing innovation.

  19. Development of Decontamination and Decommissioning Technologies for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jei Kwon; Lee, Kune Woo; Won, Hui Jun

    2010-04-01

    A laser ablation decontamination technology which is reportedly effective for a removal of fixed contaminants has been developed for three years as the first stage of the development. Lab scale experimental equipment was fabricated and the process variables have been assessed for determination of appropriate decontamination conditions at the laser wave lengths of 1,064 nm and 532 nm, respectively. The decontamination tests using radioactive specimens showed that the decontamination efficiency was about 100 which is quite a high value. An electrokinetic-flushing, an agglomeration leaching and a supercritical CO 2 soil decontamination technology were development for a decontamination of radioactive soil wastes from the decommissioned sites of the TRIGA research reactor and the uranium conversion facilities. An electrokinetic-flushing process was found to be effective for soil wastes aged for a long time and an agglomeration leaching process was effective for soil wastes of surface contamination. On the other hand, a supercritical CO 2 soil decontamination technology was found to be applicable for U or TRU bearing soil wastes. The remediation monitoring key technologies such as a representative sample taking and a measurement concept for the vertical distribution of radionuclides were developed for an assessment of the site remediation. Also an One-Dimensional Water Flow and Contaminant Transport in Unsaturated Zone (FTUNS) code was developed to interpretate the radionuclide migration in the unsaturated zone

  20. Development of Diagnostic Technology for Substation Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, D.J.; Yoon, J.Y. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    This report contains the conceptual design of predictive diagnostic system for KEPCO 765kV substation apparatus which will be operated in 2001. Various kinds of techniques in the world for power transformer and GIS monitoring were examined, then the integrated diagnosis system configuration which will be most effective in our future substation was suggested. In addition, the development of the optimum life management for substation facilities. development of a system to measure the ESDD of substation insulator surfaces at a distance and application study of the degradation sensor(PCS) were described also. (author) 55 refs., 27 figs., 68 tabs.

  1. High temperature high vacuum creep testing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Creep is the term used to describe time-dependent plastic flow of metals under conditions of constant load or stress at constant high temperature. Creep has an important considerations for materials operating under stresses at high temperatures for long time such as cladding materials, pressure vessels, steam turbines, boilers,...etc. These two creep machines measures the creep of materials and alloys at high temperature under high vacuum at constant stress. By the two chart recorders attached to the system one could register time and temperature versus strain during the test . This report consists of three chapters, chapter I is the introduction, chapter II is the technical description of the creep machines while chapter III discuss some experimental data on the creep behaviour. Of helium implanted stainless steel. 13 fig., 3 tab

  2. High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. A. Lopez

    1999-01-01

    A ''Settlement Agreement'' between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates that all radioactive high-level waste now stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a compliance date of 2035. This report investigates vitrification treatment of the high-level waste in a High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility based on the assumption that no more New Waste Calcining Facility campaigns will be conducted after June 2000. Under this option, the sodium-bearing waste remaining in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm, and newly generated liquid waste produced between now and the start of 2013, will be processed using a different option, such as a Cesium Ion Exchange Facility. The cesium-saturated waste from this other option will be sent to the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities to be mixed with existing calcine. The calcine and cesium-saturated waste will be processed in the High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility by the end of calendar year 2035. In addition, the High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility will process all newly-generated liquid waste produced between 2013 and the end of 2035. Vitrification of this waste is an acceptable treatment method for complying with the Settlement Agreement. This method involves vitrifying the waste and pouring it into stainless-steel canisters that will be ready for shipment out of Idaho to a disposal facility by 2035. These canisters will be stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory until they are sent to a national geologic repository. The operating period for vitrification treatment will be from the end of 2015 through 2035

  3. High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Lopez

    1999-08-01

    A ''Settlement Agreement'' between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates that all radioactive high-level waste now stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a compliance date of 2035. This report investigates vitrification treatment of the high-level waste in a High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility based on the assumption that no more New Waste Calcining Facility campaigns will be conducted after June 2000. Under this option, the sodium-bearing waste remaining in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm, and newly generated liquid waste produced between now and the start of 2013, will be processed using a different option, such as a Cesium Ion Exchange Facility. The cesium-saturated waste from this other option will be sent to the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities to be mixed with existing calcine. The calcine and cesium-saturated waste will be processed in the High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility by the end of calendar year 2035. In addition, the High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility will process all newly-generated liquid waste produced between 2013 and the end of 2035. Vitrification of this waste is an acceptable treatment method for complying with the Settlement Agreement. This method involves vitrifying the waste and pouring it into stainless-steel canisters that will be ready for shipment out of Idaho to a disposal facility by 2035. These canisters will be stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory until they are sent to a national geologic repository. The operating period for vitrification treatment will be from the end of 2015 through 2035.

  4. Technological Advances, Human Performance, and the Operation of Nuclear Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Jonathan K.

    Many unfortunate and unintended adverse industrial incidents occur across the United States each year, and the nuclear industry is no exception. Depending on their severity, these incidents can be problematic for people, the facilities, and surrounding environments. Human error is a contributing factor in many such incidents. This dissertation first explored the hypothesis that technological changes that affect how operators interact within the systems of the nuclear facilities exacerbate the cost of incidents caused by human error. I conducted a review of nuclear incidents in the United States from 1955 through 2010 that reached Level 3 (serious incident) or higher on the International Nuclear Events Scale (INES). The cost of each incident at facilities that had recently undergone technological changes affecting plant operators' jobs was compared to the cost of events at facilities that had not undergone changes. A t-test determined a statistically significant difference between the two groups, confirming the hypothesis. Next, I conducted a follow-on study to determine the impact of the incorporation of new technologies into nuclear facilities. The data indicated that spending more money on upgrades increased the facility's capacity as well as the number of incidents reported, but the incident severity was minor. Finally, I discuss the impact of human error on plant operations and the impact of evolving technology on the 21st-century operator, proposing a methodology to overcome these challenges by applying the systems engineering process.

  5. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H.

    2007-06-01

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely

  6. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely.

  7. FY 2000 report on the results of the R and D of femtosecond technology. R and D of high intensity X-ray pulse use power generation facility monitoring system; 2000 nendo femto byo technology no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Kokido X sen pulse riyo hatsuden shisetsu monitoring system no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This project aims at creating new industrial basement technology which supports the highly information-oriented society in the 21st century, conducts the R and D of technology to control the state of light and electron in the femtosecond time domain (10{sup -15} - 10{sup -12} sec), and establishes the basement technology which exceeds the speed limit of the conventional electronics technology and also includes new functionality. Especially, in the R and D of the high intensity X-ray pulse use power generation facility monitoring system, the establishment is aimed at of the basement technology toward the realization of non-stop inspection of high speed moving objects of power generation facilities, etc. using femtosecond high intensity X-ray pulse generated in the interaction between femtosecond optical pulse and high density electron beam pulse. In this fiscal year, femtosecond X-ray was successfully generated. The pulse width of X-ray: 400fs, the wavelength: 6 angstroms, the X-ray dose generated in one collision: 10{sup 4} photons/pulse or more, and the energy of electron beam colliding with laser optical pulse: 12 MeV. Moreover, developed were the laser amplifying system and the stabilized high power femtosecond laser system. (NEDO)

  8. Development of demonstration facility design technology for advanced nuclear fuel cycle process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Il Je; You, G. S.; Choung, W. M.; Lee, E. P.; Hong, D. H.; Lee, W. K.; Ku, J. H.; Moon, S. I.; Kwon, K. C.; Lee, K. I. and other

    2012-04-01

    PRIDE Facility, pyroprocess mock-up facility, is the first facility that is operated in inert atmosphere in the country. By using the facility, the functional requirements and validity of pyroprocess technology and facility related to the advanced fuel cycle can be verified with a low cost. Then, PRIDE will contribute to evaluate the technology viability, proliferation resistance and possibility of commercialization of the pyroprocess technology. It is essential to develop design technologies for the advanced nuclear fuel cycle demonstration facilities and complete the detailed design of PRIDE facility with capabilities of the stringent inert atmosphere control, fully remote operation which are necessary to develop the high-temperature molten salts technology. For these, it is necessary to design the essential equipment of large scale inert cell structure and the control system to maintain the inert atmosphere, and evaluate the safety. To construct the hot cell system which is appropriate for pyroprocess, some design technologies should be developed, which include safety evaluation for effective operation and maintenance, radiation safety analysis for hot cell, structural analysis, environmental evaluation, HVAC systems and electric equipment

  9. Advances in technology transfer at Federal Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    The Hanford Site, located in the southeast portion of the state of Washington, is a 1450-hectare (560 square miles) reservation that was selected by the US Government in 1942 for production of the world's first nuclear weapons materials. For more than 40 years, defense production operations at Hanford generated hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes that for the most part remain there today. Environmental restoration of the Hanford Site is the primary mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and it is also the thrust of the Tri-Party agreement among the US Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy. Restoration will require treatment of about 1400 individual locations that are contaminated by chemically hazardous wastes, radioactive wastes, non-hazardous wastes and mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes. These locations include burial sites, storage facilities, obsolete buildings, settling ponds, waste cribs and large and small areas of near-surface and deep soil contamination. Burial trenches contain an estimated 109,000 cubic meters of low-level solid wastes contaminated with hazardous chemicals and radioactive materials. Approximately 450 sites were contaminated by discharge of liquids to the ground and there are about 250 additional areas where waste materials were spilled. At one time, ditches carried water from processing plants to settling/cooling ponds and 131 cribs were used over the years to dispose of slightly radioactive liquid wastes

  10. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Edgecock

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ^{+} and μ^{-} beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular ^{6}He and ^{18}Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. However, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  11. Nuclear facilities: repair and replacement technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The oldest operating reactors are more than 35 years old and are now facing major maintenance operations. The first replacement of a pressurizer took place in autumn 2005 at the St-Lucie plant (Usa) while steam generators have been currently replaced since 1983. Nuclear industry has to adapt to this new market by proposing innovative technological solutions in the reactor maintenance field. This document gathers the 9 papers presented at the conference. The main improvements concern repair works on internal components of PWR-type reactors, the replacement of major components of the primary coolant circuit and surface treatments to limit the propagation of damages. The first paper shows that adequate design and feedback experience are good assets to manage the ageing of a nuclear unit. Another paper shows that a new repair method of a relief valve can avoid its replacement. (A.C.)

  12. Technical requirement of experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.; Tillak, M.; Gierszwski, P.; Grover, J.; Puigh, R.; Sze, D.K.; Berwald, D.

    1986-06-01

    The technical issues and requirements of experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology (FNT) have been investigated. The nuclear subsystems addressed are: a) blanket, b) radiation shield, c) tritium processing system, and d) plasma interactive components. Emphasis has been placed on the important and complex development problems of the blanket. A technical planning process for FNT has been developed and applied, including four major elements: 1) characterization of issues, 2) quantification of testing requirements, 3) evaluation of facilities, and 4) development of a test plan to identify the role, timing, characteristics and costs of major experiments and facilities

  13. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    Edgecock, T.R.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo-Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chancé, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrzycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T.Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S.K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J.J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernández Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menéndez, J.; Giunti, C.; González García, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; López-Pavón, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L.J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J.J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J.S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-20

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of {\\mu}+ and {\\mu}- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the ph...

  14. ACIGA's high optical power test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, L [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Aoun, M [Computer and Information Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth (Australia); Barriga, P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)] [and others

    2004-03-07

    Advanced laser interferometer detectors utilizing more than 100 W of laser power and with {approx}10{sup 6} W circulating laser power present many technological problems. The Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy (ACIGA) is developing a high power research facility in Gingin, north of Perth, Western Australia, which will test techniques for the next generation interferometers. In particular it will test thermal lensing compensation and control strategies for optical cavities in which optical spring effects and parametric instabilities may present major difficulties.

  15. High-risk facilities. Emergency management in nuclear, chemical and hazardous waste facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloepfer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The book on emergency management in high-risk facilities covers the following topics: Change in the nuclear policy, risk management of high-risk facilities as a constitutional problem - emergency management in nuclear facilities, operational mechanisms of risk control in nuclear facilities, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for nuclear facilities, operational mechanism of the risk control in chemical plants, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for chemical facilities, operational mechanisms of the risk control in hazardous waste facilities, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for hazardous waste facilities, civil law consequences in case of accidents in high-risk facilities, criminal prosecution in case of accidents in high-risk facilities, safety margins as site risk for emission protection facilities, national emergency management - strategic emergency management structures, warning and self-protection of the public in case of CBRN hazards including aspects of the psych-social emergency management.

  16. Robotics for radioactive waste management in AEA technology facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legg, S.A.; Watson, C.J.H.; Staples, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the use of robotic technology in two AEA Technology facilities. In the first application, the task is standardized and repetitive, and is undertaken using a conventional industrial robot, operating in teach-and-repeat mode. In the second application, the task is non-repetitive, and requires the use of a variety of different tools. it is therefore undertaken by a nuclear engineered telerobot, with a tool change station

  17. Technology standards for structure, etc. concerning nuclear power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Based on the Ordinance for the Technology Standards concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities, the technology standards are established for the vessels of class 1 to 4 (including reactor pressure vessels, reactor containment vessels, etc.), the pipes of class 1 to 3, safety valves, pressure test and monitoring test specimens. Those specified are materials, nondestructive tests, structures, shapes, shells, flanges, etc. for the vessels and the pipes, and so on. (Mori, K.)

  18. Physical security technologies for weapons complex reconfiguration facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories was a member of the Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (WCR) Safeguards and Security (S ampersand S) team providing assistance to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Weapons Complex Reconfiguration. The physical security systems in the new and upgraded facilities being considered for the WCR had to meet DOE orders and other requirements set forth in the WCR Programmatic Design Criteria (PDC), incorporate the latest physical security technologies using proven state-of-the-art systems and meet fundamental security principles. The outcome was to avoid costly retrofits and provide effective and comprehensive protection against current and projected threats with minimal impact on operations, costs and schedule. Physical security requirements for WCR facilities include: (1) reducing S ampersand S life-cycle costs, (2) where feasible automating S ampersand S functions to minimize operational costs, access to critical assets and exposure of people to hazardous environments, (3) increasing the amount of delay to outsider adversary attack, (4) compartmentalizing the facility to minimize the number of personnel requiring access to critical areas and (5) having reliable and maintainable systems. To be most effective against threats physical security must be integrated with facility operations, safety and other S ampersand S activities, such as material control and accountability, nuclear measurements and computer and information security. This paper will discuss the S ampersand S issues, requirements, technology opportunities and needs. Physical security technologies and systems considered in the design effort of the Weapons Complex Reconfiguration facilities will be reviewed

  19. Information Technology in Facilities Management - A Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : The aim of this paper is to present the state of the art of research in Information Technology (IT) in Facilities Management (FM). Background : Initial studies indicate that investments into IT in FM often do not add the expected value, neither to the FM department itself nor...

  20. Adding Value to Facilities Management with Information Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    This PhD project investigates implementation and use of Information Systems (IS) and Information Technologies (IT) in the Facilities management (FM) business domain. This investigation is relevant because implementation and use of IS/IT in FM has potentials for improvements which can provide...

  1. Versatile high current metal ion implantation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    A metal ion implantation facility has been developed with which high current beams of practically all the solid metals of the periodic table can be produced. A multicathode, broad-beam, metal vapor vacuum arc ion source is used to produce repetitively pulsed metal ion beams at an extraction voltage of up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred kiloelectronvolts because of the ion charge state multiplicity, and with a beam current of up to several amps peak pulsed and several tens of milliamps time averaged delivered onto a downstream target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line of sight from ion source to target. Here we summarize some of the features of the ion source and the implantation facility that has been built up around it. (orig)

  2. Proceedings of the 8. National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y.; Aziz, Ferhat; Untoro, Pudji; Su'ud, Zaki; Zarkasi, Amin Santosa; Umar, Faraz H.; Teguh Bambang; Hafnan, M.; Mustafa, Bustani; Rosfian, H.

    2002-10-01

    The eight proceeding of National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plant and Nuclear Facilities held by National Atomic Energy Agency and University of Trisakti. The aims of Seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about safety and nuclear Power Plant Temperature Reactor and Application for National Development sustain able and High Technology. This Seminar covers all aspect Technology, Power Reactor : Research Reactor; High Temperature Reactor and Nuclear Facilities. There are 33 articles have separated index

  3. High temperature aircraft research furnace facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James E., Jr.; Cashon, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Focus is on the design, fabrication, and development of the High Temperature Aircraft Research Furnace Facilities (HTARFF). The HTARFF was developed to process electrically conductive materials with high melting points in a low gravity environment. The basic principle of operation is to accurately translate a high temperature arc-plasma gas front as it orbits around a cylindrical sample, thereby making it possible to precisely traverse the entire surface of a sample. The furnace utilizes the gas-tungsten-arc-welding (GTAW) process, also commonly referred to as Tungsten-Inert-Gas (TIG). The HTARFF was developed to further research efforts in the areas of directional solidification, float-zone processing, welding in a low-gravity environment, and segregation effects in metals. The furnace is intended for use aboard the NASA-JSC Reduced Gravity Program KC-135A Aircraft.

  4. Conceptual capital-cost estimate and facility design of the Mirror-Fusion Technology Demonstration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    This report contains contributions by Bechtel Group, Inc. to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the final report on the conceptual design of the Mirror Fusion Technology Demonstration Facility (TDF). Included in this report are the following contributions: (1) conceptual capital cost estimate, (2) structural design, and (3) plot plan and plant arrangement drawings. The conceptual capital cost estimate is prepared in a format suitable for inclusion as a section in the TDF final report. The structural design and drawings are prepared as partial inputs to the TDF final report section on facilities design, which is being prepared by the FEDC

  5. Development of decommissioning technology for nuclear fuel facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Ken-ichi

    1998-01-01

    There are many kinds of objects for decommissioning and their properties are greatly different in respects of morphology, constituent materials, contamination history, etc. Therefore, the techniques for decontamination and dismantlement are required to have a great applicability. In addition, most of contamination nuclides have long half-life and so, it is desirable to rapidly take measures to stop or close a contaminated facility. In consideration of these characteristics developments of elementary techniques for decontamination have been attempted. This report summarized the present states of decommissioning technology for nuclear fuel facility. The function and performance of each elementary technique were examined through test operation and simulation was made for the important techniques of them aiming at generalization and optimization. For remote handling technology, two operation tools; 'metal splitting saw cutting tool' and 'plasma cutting tool' were produced and utilizations of these tools in combination with a robot for conveyance are under investigation now. (M.N.)

  6. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award... TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Facility/Funding Awards § 611.202 Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle...

  7. Moving out. Technology transfer from hospitals to outpatient facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, G

    1991-02-01

    The Temple Radiology Group opened on July 1, 1977 in the Temple Medical Center. The initial 10-room, full-service department has grown with new technology into approximately 25 rooms. The original four-room Temple surgery center has grown to 10 rooms. Additional support facilities that have evolved include: 1) a computer company; 2) physical therapy for orthopedic, neurological and cardiac patients; 3) a brain trauma center; 4) a collection agency; and most recently, 5) a 100-bed medical hotel.

  8. Verification of best available technology for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (310 Facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, R.N.

    1994-01-01

    This compilation of Project L-045H reference materials documents that the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF, also designated the 310 Facility) was designed, built, and will be operated in accordance with the best available technology (BAT) identified in the Engineering Summary Report. The facility is intended for treatment of 300 Area process sewer wastewater. The following unit operations for 300 Area process sewer water treatment are specified as: influent receipt; iron co-precipitation and sludge handling for removal of heavy metals and initial suspended solids; ion exchanged for removal of mercury and other heavy metals; ultraviolet (UV)/peroxide treatment for destruction of organic compounds, cyanide, coliforms, sulfide, and nitrite; and effluent discharge to the Columbia River with pH monitoring/control capability

  9. Laser safety at high profile laser facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, K.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Laser safety has been an active concern of laser users since the invention of the laser. Formal standards were developed in the early 1970's and still continue to be developed and refined. The goal of these standards is to give users guidance on the use of laser and consistent safety guidance and requirements for laser manufacturers. Laser safety in the typical research setting (government laboratory or university) is the greatest challenge to the laser user and laser safety officer. This is due to two factors. First, the very nature of research can put the user at risk; consider active manipulation of laser optics and beam paths, and user work with energized systems. Second, a laser safety culture that seems to accept laser injuries as part of the graduate student educational process. The fact is, laser safety at research settings, laboratories and universities still has long way to go. Major laser facilities have taken a more rigid and serious view of laser safety, its controls and procedures. Part of the rationale for this is that these facilities draw users from all around the world presenting the facility with a work force of users coming from a wide mix of laser safety cultures. Another factor is funding sources do not like bad publicity which can come from laser accidents and a poor safety record. The fact is that injuries, equipment damage and lost staff time slow down progress. Hence high profile/large laser projects need to adapt a higher safety regimen both from an engineering and administrative point of view. This presentation will discuss all these points and present examples. Acknowledgement. This work has been supported by the University of California, Director, Office of Science.

  10. Use of information technology for medication management in residential care facilities: correlates of facility characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Soumitra S; Chandak, Aastha; Powell, M Paige; Kim, Jungyoon; Shiyanbola, Olayinka; Zhu, He; Shiyanbola, Oyewale

    2015-06-01

    The effectiveness of information technology in resolving medication problems has been well documented. Long-term care settings such as residential care facilities (RCFs) may see the benefits of using such technologies in addressing the problem of medication errors among their resident population, who are usually older and have numerous chronic conditions. The aim of this study was two-fold: to examine the extent of use of Electronic Medication Management (EMM) in RCFs and to analyze the organizational factors associated with the use of EMM functionalities in RCFs. Data on RCFs were obtained from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. The association between facility, director and staff, and resident characteristics of RCFs and adoption of four EMM functionalities was assessed through multivariate logistic regression. The four EMM functionalities included were maintaining lists of medications, ordering for prescriptions, maintaining active medication allergy lists, and warning of drug interactions or contraindications. About 12% of the RCFs adopted all four EMM functionalities. Additionally, maintaining lists of medications had the highest adoption rate (34.5%), followed by maintaining active medication allergy lists (31.6%), ordering for prescriptions (19.7%), and warning of drug interactions or contraindications (17.9%). Facility size and ownership status were significantly associated with adoption of all four EMM functionalities. Medicaid certification status, facility director's age, education and license status, and the use of personal care aides in the RCF were significantly associated with the adoption of some of the EMM functionalities. EMM is expected to improve the quality of care and patient safety in long-term care facilities including RCFs. The extent of adoption of the four EMM functionalities is relatively low in RCFs. Some RCFs may strategize to use these functionalities to cater to the increasing demands from the market and also to

  11. Proceedings of the Seminar 'Irradiation Technologies and the IRASM Facility'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponta, Corneliu Catalin; Moise, Ioan Valentin

    1999-01-01

    The seminar devoted to 'Irradiation Technologies and the IRASM Facility' aimed at debating the principal problems related to one of the most important project ever developed in Romania, at the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, in collaboration with IAEA. IRASM (an acronym for Multiple Purpose Irradiation Facility) is using initially a 60 Co of 100 kCi irradiation source (to be replaced after an promotional stage by a 2 MCi Co source). It is designed to irradiate a materials volume of about 35,000 m 3 /year. Health, agriculture, food industry and materials industry are the most targeted customers. It will be used for sterilization of medical materials and pharmaceuticals products, peat and seed (and other agricultural products) decontamination and sterilization, experimental irradiation of food products, irradiation of composite plastics and other industrial products, etc. The seminar was a first meeting of Romanian specialists in radiation processing with potential users of these technologies as well as with decision making persons working with national governmental and regulation authorities. Twelve communications were presented as a basis for discussion. These were: 1. IRASM - a technical assistance IAEA project and the prospects for technological irradiation in Romania (Serban Dobrescu); 2. IRASM facility - goal, present stage, perspectives (Corneliu C. Ponta); 3. Nuclear safeguards and radioprotection at IRASM (Ioan Valentin Moise); 4. Nuclear safeguard policy for IRASM (Mariana Irimia, Gabriela Vladescu, Ion Cristian); 5. Technological dosimetry at IRASM (Rodica Macrin, Rodica Moraru, Nicolae Valcov); 6. Quality assurance in building and exploiting IRASM (Ioana Domsa); 7. Current status of irradiation technologies in IFIN-HH (Mitica Dragusin); 8. Chemical-pharmaceutical, cosmetic and medical product sterilization (Paul Adrian, Eleonora Gheorghiu); 9. The concept of sterilization and the sterilization testing (Ileana Petcu

  12. Scientific and Technological Facilities in CIEMAT; Las Instalaciones del CIEMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaquero Ortiz, E M

    2012-09-13

    The precise knowledge of the available Resources in an Organization, regardless the work it carries out, is an essential strategic enable to achieve its goals. Material Resources are part of the resources in an organization, The Material Resources expression includes a wide span of elements, because a Material Resource, as a generic concept, is each and every specific physical mean, utilised to get any of the Organization objectives. In case of CIEMAT, as Public Research Agency, its Material Resources consists of its scientific and technological facilities. These resources are the basis of this Agency numerous amount of technical capabilities, allowing it to carry out its research, development and innovation activity to transfer its results to the society later. This report is a summary on CIEMAT scientific and technological facilities, whose spread can help to show its scientific and technological capabilities, to enable the execution of a wide variety of projects and to open new external cooperation channels. In that list its possible to find the two Unique Scientific and Technological Infrastructures (ICTS) in Spain which are hold by CIEMAT and the Ionizing Radiations Metrology Laboratory (LMRI) which is the Spanish National Standards Laboratory for ionising radiations. (Author)

  13. High temperature combustion facility: present capabilities and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Ciccarelli, G.

    1995-01-01

    The high-temperature combustion facility constructed and operated by the Department of Advanced Technology of Brookhaven National Laboratory to support and promote research in the area of hydrogen combustion phenomena in mixtures prototypical to light-water reactor containment atmospheres under potential severe accident conditions is reported. The facility can accommodate combustion research activities encompassing the fields of detonation physics, flame acceleration, and low-speed deflagration in a wide range of combustible gas mixtures at initial temperatures up to 700 K and post-combustion pressures up to 100 atmospheres. Some preliminary test results are presented that provide further evidence that the effect of temperature is to increase the sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation [ru

  14. The high-energy dual-beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaletta, D.

    1984-07-01

    This proposal presents a new experimental facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) to study the effects of irradiation on the first wall and blanket materials of a fusion reactor. A special effort is made to demonstrate the advantages of the Dual Beam Technique (DBT) as a future research tool for materials development within the European Fusion Technology Programme. The Dual-Beam-Technique allows the production both of helium and of damage in thick metal and ceramic specimens by simultaneous irradiation with high energy alpha particles and protons produced by the two KfK cyclotrons. The proposal describes the Dual Beam Technique the planned experimental activities and the design features of the Dual Beam Facility presently under construction. (orig.) [de

  15. High resolution VUV facility at INDUS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurty, G.; Saraswathy, P.; Rao, P.M.R.; Mishra, A.P.; Kartha, V.B.

    1993-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) generated in the electron storage rings is an unique source for the study of atomic and molecular spectroscopy especially in the vacuum ultra violet region. Realizing the potential of this light source, efforts are in progress to develop a beamline facility at INDUS-1 to carry out high resolution atomic and molecular spectroscopy. This beam line consists of a fore-optic which is a combination of three cylindrical mirrors. The mirrors are so chosen that SR beam having a 60 mrad (horizontal) x 6 mrad (vertical) divergence is focussed onto a slit of a 6.65 metre off-plane spectrometer in Eagle Mount equipped with horizontal slit and vertical dispersion. The design of the various components of the beam line is completed. It is decided to build the spectrometer as per the requirements of the user community. Details of the various aspects of the beam line will be presented. (author). 3 figs

  16. A High Intensity Hadron Facility, AGS II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.Y.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1988-01-01

    We have present one of several possibilities for the evolution of the AGS complex into a high intensity hadron facility. One could consider other alternatives, such as using the AGS as the Collector and constructing a new 9-30 GeV machine. We believe the most responsible scenario must minimize the cost and downtime to the ongoing physics program. With a stepwise approach, starting with the Booster, the physics program can evolve without a single major commitment in funds. At each step an evaluation of the funds versus physics merit can be made. As a final aside, each upgrade at the AGS and Booster is presently being implemented to support an interleaved operation of both protons and ions. 1 fig., 6 tabs

  17. Fiscal 1997 report under consignment from NEDO on photon measuring/processing technology (development of power generation facility use high-function maintenance technology); 1997 nendo Shin energy Sangyo Gijutsu Sogo Kaihatsu Kiko itaku photon keisoku kako gijutsu (hatsuden shisetsuyo kokino maintenance gijutsu kaihatsu) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    A research/development was conducted on technologies of photon applied measuring/photon applied processing/photon generation which are usable for heightening of reliability and maintenance efficiency of power generation facilities. In fiscal 1997, high melting-point metal particles were manufactured by high energy density laser for formation of high temperature and stabilized fine functional circuit. Further, a wavelength changeable ultra red laser light source was studied which can make in-situ measurement of gas concentration and components. A study was also made to examine the surface composition by measuring fluorescent X-rays emitted by radiating high intensity laser beam on the surface of material. A rod type and a slab type as a high-output complete-solidified laser are under development. There is also a development aiming at high speed/high quality photon processing such as high speed/high precision welding/cutting and laser joining. Besides, a study is being made of high energy pulse/high quality beam complete-solidified laser. The paper made a comprehensive survey of the trend of the photon measuring/monitoring technology, and made a systematical arrangement of the developmental subjects extracted. 142 refs., 357 figs., 62 tabs.

  18. Application technology for optical fiber in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Chul Jung; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Woong Ki; Yoon, Tae Seob; Sohn, Surg Won; Kim, Chang Hoi; Hwang, Suk Yong; Baik, Sung Hum; Kwon, Seong Ouk

    1987-12-01

    Lately, the optical fiber increasingly used in such adverse environments as nuclear power plant, radiation facilities because of their endurant properties against heat, radiation, corrosion, etc. Moreover, the transmission of signal through optical fiber does not induce interference from the electromagnetic wave. Basic theory about the optical fiber technology was studied and the developed techniques for nuclear facilities were reviewed. Since the radiations change the characteristics of the optical fiber, the effects of γ-ray irradiation on single mode and multimode optical fiber were examined. The image transmission system through optical fiber bundle was designed, constructed, and tested. Its software system was also updated. It can be used for remote internal inspection in adverse environment. (Author)

  19. High-temperature helium-loop facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high-temperature helium loop is a facility for materials testing in ultrapure helium gas at high temperatures. The closed loop system is capable of recirculating high-purity helium or helium with controlled impurities. The gas loop maximum operating conditions are as follows: 300 psi pressure, 500 lb/h flow rate, and 2100 0 F temperature. The two test sections can accept samples up to 3.5 in. diameter and 5 ft long. The gas loop is fully instrumented to continuously monitor all parameters of loop operation as well as helium impurities. The loop is fully automated to operate continuously and requires only a daily servicing by a qualified operator to replenish recorder charts and helium makeup gas. Because of its versatility and high degree of parameter control, the helium loop is applicable to many types of materials research. This report describes the test apparatus, operating parameters, peripheral systems, and instrumentation system. The experimental capabilities and test conand presents the results that have been obtained. The study has been conducted using a four-phase approach. The first phase develops the solution to the steady-state radon-diffusion equation in one-dimensieered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent f water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Uranium concentrations in the sediments which were above detection limits ranged from 0.10 t 51.2 ppM. The mean of the logarithms of the uranium concentrations was 0.53. A group of high uranium concentrations occurs near the junctions of quadrangles AB, AC, BB, a 200 mK. In case 2), x-ray studies of isotopic phase separation in 3 He-- 4 He bcc solids were carried out by B. A. Fraass

  20. Solar energy and conservation technologies for Caribbean Tourist Facilities (CTF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary objectives of the Caribbean Tourist Facilities (CTF) project were to develop and publish materials and conduct workshops on solar energy and conservation technologies that would directly address the needs and interests of tourist facilities in the Caribbean basin. Past contacts with the Caribbean and US tourist industries indicated that decision-makers remained unconvinced that renewable technologies could have a significant impact on development and operation costs or that renewable energy products and services suited their needs. In order to assure that the materials and programs developed were responsive to the Caribbean tourist industry and U.S. conservation and renewable energy industries, marketing research with potential end users and the organizations and associations that serve those users was included as an underlying task in the project. The tasks outlined in the CTF Statement of Work included conference planning, gathering of field data, development of educational materials, and conduct of workshop(s). In addition to providing a chronicle of the fulfillment of those tasks, this final report includes suggestions for distributing the documents developed during the project, venues for future workshops, and other technology transfer and market influence strategies.

  1. Maintenance and disassembly considerations for the Technology Demonstration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1983-01-01

    The Technology Demonstration Facility (TDF) is a tandem-mirror design concept carried out under the direction of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It was conceived as a near-term device with a mission of developing engineering technology in a D-T fusion environment. Overall maintenance and component disassembly were among the responsibilities of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC). A configuration evolved that was based on the operational requirements of the components, as well as the requirements for their replacements. Component lifetime estimates were used to estimate the frequency and the number of replacements. In addition, it was determined that the need for remote handling equipment followed within 1.5 years after initial start-up, emphasizing the direct relationship between developing maintenance scenarios/equipment and the device configuration. Many of the scheduled maintenance operations were investigated to first order, and preliminary handling equipment concepts were developed

  2. Engineering and technology in the deconstruction of nuclear materials production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingsley, R.S.; Reynolds, W.E.; Heffner, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    Technology and equipment exist to support nuclear facility deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. In reality, this statement is not surprising because the nuclear industry has been decontaminating and decommissioning production plants for decades as new generations of production technology were introduced. Since the 1950s, the Babcock and Wilcox Company (B ampersand W) has operated a number of nuclear materials processing facilities to manufacture nuclear fuel for the commercial power industry and the U.S. Navy. These manufacturing facilities included a mixed oxide (PuO 2 -UO 2 ) nuclear fuel manufacturing plant, low- and high-enriched uranium (HEU/LEU) chemical and fuel plants, and fuel assembly plants. In addition, B ampersand W designed and build a major nuclear research center in Lynchburg, Virginia, to support these nuclear fuel manufacturing activities and to conduct nuclear power research. These nuclear research facilities included two research reactors, a hot-cell complex for nuclear materials research, four critical experiment facilities, and a plutonium fuels research and development facility. This article describes the B ampersand W deactivation, decomtanimation, and decommisioning program

  3. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

  4. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey Bryant

    2008-01-01

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

  5. Development of High-Level Safety Requirements for a Pyroprocessing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seok Jun; Jo, Woo Jin; You, Gil Sung; Choung, Won Myung; Lee, Ho Hee; Kim, Hyun Min; Jeon, Hong Rae; Ku, Jeong Hoe; Lee, Hyo Jik [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing a pyroproceesing technology to reduce the waste volume and recycle some elements. The pyroprocessing includes several treatment processes which are related with not only radiological and physical but also chemical and electrochemical properties. Thus, it is of importance to establish safety design requirements considering all the aspects of those properties for a reliable pyroprocessing facility. In this study, high-level requirements are presented in terms of not only radiation protection, nuclear criticality, fire protection, and seismic safety but also confinement and chemical safety for the unique characteristics of a pyroprocessing facility. Several high-level safety design requirements such as radiation protection, nuclear criticality, fire protection, seismic, confinement, and chemical processing were presented for a pyroprocessing facility. The requirements must fulfill domestic and international safety technology standards for a nuclear facility. Furthermore, additional requirements should be considered for the unique electrochemical treatments in a pyroprocessing facility.

  6. High performance fuel technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koon, Yang Hyun; Kim, Keon Sik; Park, Jeong Yong; Yang, Yong Sik; In, Wang Kee; Kim, Hyung Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    {omicron} Development of High Plasticity and Annular Pellet - Development of strong candidates of ultra high burn-up fuel pellets for a PCI remedy - Development of fabrication technology of annular fuel pellet {omicron} Development of High Performance Cladding Materials - Irradiation test of HANA claddings in Halden research reactor and the evaluation of the in-pile performance - Development of the final candidates for the next generation cladding materials. - Development of the manufacturing technology for the dual-cooled fuel cladding tubes. {omicron} Irradiated Fuel Performance Evaluation Technology Development - Development of performance analysis code system for the dual-cooled fuel - Development of fuel performance-proving technology {omicron} Feasibility Studies on Dual-Cooled Annular Fuel Core - Analysis on the property of a reactor core with dual-cooled fuel - Feasibility evaluation on the dual-cooled fuel core {omicron} Development of Design Technology for Dual-Cooled Fuel Structure - Definition of technical issues and invention of concept for dual-cooled fuel structure - Basic design and development of main structure components for dual- cooled fuel - Basic design of a dual-cooled fuel rod.

  7. Technology, socio-political acceptance, and the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, L.J.; Domenech, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    The technology which is required to develop and operate low-level radioactive waste disposal sites in the 1990's is available today. The push for best available technology is a response to the political difficulties in securing public acceptance of the site selection process. Advances in waste management technologies include development of High Integrity Containers (HIC), solidification media, liquid volume reduction techniques using GEODE/sub sm/ and DeVoe-Holbein technology of selective removal of target radioisotopes, and CASTOR V storage casks. Advances in technology alone, however, do not make the site selection process easier and without socio-political acceptance there may be no process at all. Chem-Nuclear has been successful in achieving community acceptance at the Barnwell facility and elsewhere. For example, last June in Fall River County, South Dakota, citizens voted almost 2:1 to support the development of a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. In Edgemont, the city nearest the proposed site, 85% of the voters were in favor of the proposed facility

  8. Proceedings of the international workshop on hadron facility technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, H.A. (comp.)

    1987-12-01

    The conference included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, accelerator hardware, and experimental facilities. Individual abstracts were prepared for 43 papers in the conference proceedings. (LEW)

  9. [Technology transfer to the facility for production of medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beregovykh, V V; Spitskiĭ, O P

    2013-01-01

    Innovation development of pharmaceutical industry is close connected to knowledge transfer going to each subsequent life cycle phase of medicinal product. Formal regulation of technology and knowledge transfer is essential for achievement high quality during production of medicines designed during development phase. Conceptual tools, approaches and requirements are considered that are necessary for knowledge and technology transfer across all the life cycle phases of medicines. They are based on scientific knowledge of medicinal products and take into account both international and Russian regulations in the area of development, production and distribution of medicines. Importance of taking into consideration all aspects related to quality of medicines in all steps of technology transfer is shown. An approach is described for technology transfer organization for Russian pharmaceutical manufacturers based on international guides in this area.

  10. Monograph on safety in high power and high energy advanced technologies and medical applications of lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This monograph is intended for creating awareness amongst the safety and health professionals of nuclear and radiation facilities on hazards involved in high power and high energy advanced technologies as well as on how development of advanced technologies can benefit the common people

  11. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  12. Introduction to Technology Export License of Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hana; Lee, Chansuh; Shin, Donghoon

    2014-01-01

    In this regime, the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC) has authority on final decision making. And the Korea Institute of Nuclear nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) has missions to review the classification and export licensing technically. In principle, classification and export licensing are applied and reviewed individually. However, the number of application for classification and licensing has increased geometrically in the last three years. This is largely a due to the contract that the Republic of Korea (ROK) has finalized to build the UAE Barakah Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) and Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). This circumstance brought an administrative burden for the government and related institutes as well as stakeholders. This article introduces the law related to the 'Technology Export License of Nuclear Facility' which was developed and legislated to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of commodities classification and export licensing. This system could significantly reduce the licensing burden for transferring the technologies. However, the classification and license on this system are still requested when transferring the goods. Therefore, KINAC will continue to figure out the needs for the stakeholders and keep searching for solutions to problems inherent in the industry

  13. Introduction to Technology Export License of Nuclear Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hana; Lee, Chansuh; Shin, Donghoon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this regime, the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC) has authority on final decision making. And the Korea Institute of Nuclear nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) has missions to review the classification and export licensing technically. In principle, classification and export licensing are applied and reviewed individually. However, the number of application for classification and licensing has increased geometrically in the last three years. This is largely a due to the contract that the Republic of Korea (ROK) has finalized to build the UAE Barakah Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) and Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). This circumstance brought an administrative burden for the government and related institutes as well as stakeholders. This article introduces the law related to the 'Technology Export License of Nuclear Facility' which was developed and legislated to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of commodities classification and export licensing. This system could significantly reduce the licensing burden for transferring the technologies. However, the classification and license on this system are still requested when transferring the goods. Therefore, KINAC will continue to figure out the needs for the stakeholders and keep searching for solutions to problems inherent in the industry.

  14. Tritium research and technology facilities at the JRC-Ispra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dworschak, H.; Mannone, F.; Perujo, A.; Pierini, G.; Reiter, F.; Vassallo, G.; Viola, A.; Camposilvan, J.; Douglas, K.; Grassi, G.; Lolli Ceroni, P.; Simonetta, A.; Spelta, B.

    1990-01-01

    A set of experiments which are of prominent interest for the development of nuclear fusion technology in Europe are planned by the JRC-Ispra for the near future, in the frame of experimental activities to be performed in ETHEL, the European Tritium Handling Experimental Laboratory under construction at the Ispra site. These experiments already included for the most part as JRC-Task Action Sheets in the 1989-1991 European Technology Programme Actions will initiate in ETHEL on a fully active laboratory scale starting mid-1991. They will concern the following research areas: Recycling of tritium from first wall materials; Tritium recovery from water cooled Pb-17Li blankets; Detritiation of ventilation atmospheres; Plasma exhaust processing; Tritiazed waste management. In view of fully active tritium experiments in ETHEL and to obtain information of the basic processes involved, since 1985 preparatory experimental studies are being performed at the JRC-Ispra laboratories using hydrogen and deuterium. Furthermore, always with regard to ETHEL experiments, particular attention is given to possible technical and managerial problems which potentially may arise in this context. To identify at an early stage such problems a questionnaire has been developed and distributed to researchers in conjunction with an ETHEL information packet. The questionnaire demands information regarding the scope, design and operation of the intended experiment as well as planning and required support to be supplied by ETHEL. A brief description of experimental preparatory studies and future tritium handling experiments in ETHEL as well of the ETHEL facility is here presented. (orig.)

  15. Applicability of water-jet cutting technology to nuclear facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tadashi; Nisizaki, Tadashi; Matumura, Hiroyuki; Ikemoto, Yosikazu; Simizu, Hideki

    1991-01-01

    In nuclear facilities there exist, besides relatively simple components, such as vessels and piping, numerous complex components including the multilayered plate with water layer in between, a bunch of thin tubes and composite lamination of dissimilar materials like metal/non-metal. In conventional development of reactor dismantling technology, the technology development has been made mainly for remote cutting of thick-walled structures like the reactor pressure vessel and the reactor internals. These techniques, however, are not always suitable in cutting the above-mentioned structures. As means of cutting such structures efficiently, these is available the abrasion water-jet cutting technology. This technology is now drawing attention for cutting or shaping new materials like composite material and ceramics in high precision and high efficiency. In the present report by way of its feasibility in nuclear facilities decommissioning the following are described. Principle and features of the water-jet cutting technology, system con-figuration, cutting or shaping performance, and some examples of the cutting and shaping. (author)

  16. Design issues for a laboratory high gain fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    In an inertial fusion laboratory high gain facility, experiments will be carried out with up to 1000 MJ of thermonuclear yield. The experiment area of such a facility will include many systems and structures that will have to operate successfully in the difficult environment created by the sudden large energy release. This paper estimates many of the nuclear effects that will occur, discusses the implied design issues and suggests possible solutions so that a useful experimental facility can be built. 4 figs

  17. Fact Sheet for Friction Materials Manufacturing Facilities Residual Risk and Technology Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    proposed amendments to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Friction Materials Manufacturing Facilities to address the results of the residual risk and technology review

  18. Money for Research, Not for Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High Performance Computer Facility Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drewmark Communications; Sartor, Dale; Wilson, Mark

    2010-07-01

    High-performance computing facilities in the United States consume an enormous amount of electricity, cutting into research budgets and challenging public- and private-sector efforts to reduce energy consumption and meet environmental goals. However, these facilities can greatly reduce their energy demand through energy-efficient design of the facility itself. Using a case study of a facility under design, this article discusses strategies and technologies that can be used to help achieve energy reductions.

  19. Development of Demonstration Facility Design Technology for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Il Je; You, G. S.; Choung, W. M.

    2010-04-01

    The main objective of this R and D is to develop the PRIDE (PyRoprocess Integrated inactive DEmonstration) facility for engineering-scale inactive test using fresh uranium, and to establish the design requirements of the ESPF (Engineering Scale Pyroprocess Facility) for active demonstration of the pyroprocess. Pyroprocess technology, which is applicable to GEN-IV systems as one of the fuel cycle options, is a solution of the spent fuel accumulation problems. PRIDE Facility, pyroprocess mock-up facility, is the first facility that is operated in inert atmosphere in the country. By using the facility, the functional requirements and validity of pyroprocess technology and facility related to the advanced fuel cycle can be verified with a low cost. Then, PRIDE will contribute to evaluate the technology viability, proliferation resistance and possibility of commercialization of the pyroprocess technology. The PRIDE evaluation data, such as performance evaluation data of equipment and operation experiences, will be directly utilized for the design of ESPF

  20. Development of high-level radioactive waste treatment and conversion technologies 'Dry decontamination technology development for highly radioactive contaminants'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K.

    2001-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Dry Decontamination Technology Development for Highly Radioactive Contaminants'. 1.Contaminant Characteristics Analysis of Domestic Nuclear Fuel Cycle Projects(NFCP) and Applicability Study of the Unit Dry-Decontamination Techniques A. Classification of contaminated equipments and characteristics analysis of contaminants B. Applicability study of the unit dry-decontamination techniques 2.Performance Evaluation of Unit Dry Decontamination Technique A. PFC decontamination technique B. CO2 decontamination technique C. Plasma decontamination technique 3.Development of Residual Radiation Assessment Methodology for High Radioactive Facility Decontamination A. Development of radioactive nuclide diffusion model on highly radioactive facility structure B. Obtainment of the procedure for assessment of residual radiation dose 4.Establishment of the Design Concept of Dry Decontamination Process Equipment Applicable to Highly Radioactive Contaminants 5.TRIGA soil unit decontamination technology development A. Development of soil washing and flushing technologies B. Development of electrokinetic soil decontamination technology

  1. Large-scale decontamination and decommissioning technology demonstration project at a former uranium metal production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martineit, R.A.; Borgman, T.D.; Peters, M.S.; Stebbins, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Focus Area, led by the Federal Energy Technology Center, has been charged with improving upon baseline D ampersand D technologies with the goal of demonstrating and validating more cost-effective and safer technologies to characterize, deactivate, survey, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of surplus structures, buildings, and their contents at DOE sites. The D ampersand D Focus Area's approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D ampersand D technologies is to use them in large-scale technology demonstration (LSTD) projects at several DOE sites. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was selected to host one of the first three LSTD's awarded by the D ampersand D Focus Area. The FEMP is a DOE facility near Cincinnati, Ohio, that was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal. The FEMP is a Superfund site which has completed its RUFS process and is currently undergoing environmental restoration. With the FEMP's selection to host an LSTD, the FEMP was immediately faced with some challenges. The primary challenge was that this LSTD was to be integrated into the FEMP's Plant 1 D ampersand D Project which was an ongoing D ampersand D Project for which a firm fixed price contract had been issued to the D ampersand D Contractor. Thus, interferences with the baseline D ampersand D project could have significant financial implications. Other challenges include defining and selecting meaningful technology demonstrations, finding/selecting technology providers, and integrating the technology into the baseline D ampersand D project. To date, twelve technologies have been selected, and six have been demonstrated. The technology demonstrations have yielded a high proportion of open-quotes winners.close quotes All demonstrated, technologies will be evaluated for incorporation into the FEMP's baseline D ampersand D

  2. High Solids Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) Wastes Stabilization with Ceramicrete and Super Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, B.W.

    1999-01-01

    High Solids ash and scrubber solution waste streams were generated at the incinerator facility at SRS by burning radioactive diatomaceous filter rolls which contained small amounts of uranium, and listed solvents (F and U). This report details solidification activities using selected Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) technologies with the High Solids waste streams

  3. High energy beam manufacturing technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geskin, E.S.; Leu, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Technological progress continues to enable us to utilize ever widening ranges of physical and chemical conditions for material processing. The increasing cost of energy, raw materials and environmental control make implementation of advanced technologies inevitable. One of the principal avenues in the development of material processing is the increase of the intensity, accuracy, flexibility and stability of energy flow to the processing site. The use of different forms of energy beams is an effective way to meet these sometimes incompatible requirements. The first important technological applications of high energy beams were welding and flame cutting. Subsequently a number of different kinds of beams have been used to solve different problems of part geometry control and improvement of surface characteristics. Properties and applications of different specific beams were subjects of a number of fundamental studies. It is important now to develop a generic theory of beam based manufacturing. The creation of a theory dealing with general principles of beam generation and beam-material interaction will enhance manufacturing science as well as practice. For example, such a theory will provide a format approach for selection and integration of different kinds of beams for a particular application. And obviously, this theory will enable us to integrate the knowledge bases of different manufacturing technologies. The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells, as well as a number of more technical, although less exciting, publications demonstrate both the feasibility and effectiveness of the generic approach to the description of beam oriented technology. Without any attempt to compete with Wells, we still hope that this volume will contribute to the creation of the theory of beam oriented manufacturing

  4. Export controls on high technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    A overview of the Export Administration Act of 1979 and subsequent regulations and amendments focuses on how licensing requirements and restrictions against boycott affect high technology exports. The purpose of these controls is to limit the export of technology with possible military applications, as well as to advance US foreign policy and protect the economy without imposing too great a restriction on the principles of free trade. Thus, the act encompasses political, economic, and security goals. Problems of predictability arise when embargoes or other controls are imposed for political or foreign policy reasons without regard to economic impacts. Amendments have attempted to streamline the exporting process, particularly in the area of computer and software licensing.

  5. High energy laser facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, N.C.

    1981-06-01

    High energy laser facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described, with special emphasis on their use for equation of state investigations using laser-generated shockwaves. Shock wave diagnostics now in use are described. Future Laboratory facilities are also discussed

  6. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive Information...

  7. The development of robot application technology in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Chang Hoe; Kim, Byung Soo; Sohn, Surg Won; Hwoang, Suk Yeoung; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Woong Ki

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this project is to establish the basic technologies for advanced robotic systems operated in unstructured environment. The developed robotic system, which is remotely controlled, is expected to reduce the radiation dosage for workers who do the maintenance, inspection, and repairing work in nuclear facilities. The two major work scopes of this project in this year are to study the control scheme of advanced robotic system and develop a mobile robot. An inverse kinematic algorithm of 7 degrees of freedom anthropomorphic manipulator is investigated for dexterous control. Extended closed-loop schemes for solving the inverse kinematics of the redundant manipulator have been proposed and decentralized adaptive controller was designed by utilizing a new cartesian space controller. Control architecture of neural network has been developed, which has a strong capability on solving the kinematics of manipulator. The planetary wheel assembly has been implemented in the design to be suitable for plant. The design of manipulator has been implemented to operate with the battery power in the mobile system. This project will continue to be a major technical driver, with nuclear plant maintenance and waste management applications in conjunction with 'Long-term nuclear development program' over the next decade. (Author)

  8. Modular, Reconfigurable, High-Energy Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Connie; Howell, Joe

    2006-01-01

    The Modular, Reconfigurable High-Energy (MRHE) Technology Demonstrator project was to have been a series of ground-based demonstrations to mature critical technologies needed for in-space assembly of a highpower high-voltage modular spacecraft in low Earth orbit, enabling the development of future modular solar-powered exploration cargo-transport vehicles and infrastructure. MRHE was a project in the High Energy Space Systems (HESS) Program, within NASA's Exploration Systems Research and Technology (ESR&T) Program. NASA participants included Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and Glenn Research Center (GRC). Contractor participants were the Boeing Phantom Works in Huntsville, AL, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto, CA, ENTECH, Inc. in Keller, TX, and the University of AL Huntsville (UAH). MRHE's technical objectives were to mature: (a) lightweight, efficient, high-voltage, radiation-resistant solar power generation (SPG) technologies; (b) innovative, lightweight, efficient thermal management systems; (c) efficient, 100kW-class, high-voltage power delivery systems from an SPG to an electric thruster system; (d) autonomous rendezvous and docking technology for in-space assembly of modular, reconfigurable spacecraft; (e) robotic assembly of modular space systems; and (f) modular, reconfigurable distributed avionics technologies. Maturation of these technologies was to be implemented through a series of increasingly-inclusive laboratory demonstrations that would have integrated and demonstrated two systems-of-systems: (a) the autonomous rendezvous and docking of modular spacecraft with deployable structures, robotic assembly, reconfiguration both during assembly and (b) the development and integration of an advanced thermal heat pipe and a high-voltage power delivery system with a representative lightweight high-voltage SPG array. In addition, an integrated simulation testbed would have been developed

  9. High Explosives Research and Development (HERD) Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to provide high explosive formulation, chemical analysis, safety and performance testing, processing, X-ray, quality control and loading support for...

  10. Emerging Concepts, Technologies and Opportunities for Mezzo-scale Terahertz and Infrared Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swapan Chattopadhyay; Steven T. Corneliussen; Gwyn P. Williams

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in high-current particle beam, bright photoinjector, laser and radiofrequency technologies, combined with innovative techniques such as energy recovery and laser-slicing of particle beams, have opened up new scientific opportunities with terahertz and infrared sources. They present new scientific frontiers not just in sources but in basic research applications involving timescale measurements and investigations at the quantum level. Such long-wavelength sources complement high-energy, short-wavelength x-ray sources by allowing collective processes and their ''function'' in complex systems to be probed in a fashion complementary to probing 'structure' via x-rays. This paper outlines and gives examples of the scientific reach of such sources and discusses some actual and envisioned facilities worldwide. Such facilities fall in the mezzo-scale category, bracketed by tabletop lasers and large synchrotrons. They offer unique and directed advances in life, materials and other sciences

  11. Conceptual design of a 6-10 MJ driver for a high gain target development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Commercial application of inertial confinement fusion would require low yield (≅200-500 MJ), high gain (≥80) fusion targets. It is thought that the development off such targets would reqiure a 5-10 year research program utilizing one or more dedicated nuclear facilities with drivers capable of delivering on-target pulses of 6-10 MJ at the rate of several shots per day. The ''Target Development Facility'' (TDF) is the light ion driven version of such a facility. A TDF driver concept based upon reasonable extrapolation from present-day technology is described in this paper

  12. Conceptual design of a 10-MJ driver for a high gain target development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Commercial application of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) will require inexpensive, high gain (>80) fusion targets. It is thought that the development of such targets will require a 5 to 10 year search effort utilizing a dedicated nuclear research facility with a driver capable of providing a 10 MJ, 300 to 1000 TW pulse of on-target energy. The Terget Development Facility (TDF) is a light ion driven concept for such a facility. A TDF driver based upon extrapolations from present-day pulsed power technology is described in the present paper

  13. Applying new safeguards technology to existing nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.; Wagner, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    The application and operation of safeguards instrumentation in a facility containing special nuclear material is most successful when the installation is designed for the operation of the specific facility. Experience at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory demonstrates that installation designs must consider both Safeguards and Production requirements of specific facilities. Equipment selection and installation design influenced by the training and experience of production operations and safeguards personnel at a specific facility help assure successful installation, reliable operation, and minimal operator training. This minimizes impacts on existing plant production activities while maximizing utility of the safeguards information obtained

  14. Applying new safeguards technology to existing nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, W.J.; Wagner, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    The application and operation of safeguards instrumentation in a facility containing special nuclear material is most successful when the installation is desinged for the operation of the specific facility. Experience at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory demonstrates that installation designs must consider both safeguards and production requirements of specific facilities. Equipment selection and installation design influenced by the training and experience of production operations and safeguards personnel at a specific facility help assure successful installation, reliable operation, and minimal operator training. This minimizes impacts on existing plant production activities while maximizing utility of the safeguards information obtained

  15. Biosecurity measures in 48 isolation facilities managing highly infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puro, Vincenzo; Fusco, Francesco M; Schilling, Stefan; Thomson, Gail; De Iaco, Giuseppina; Brouqui, Philippe; Maltezou, Helena C; Bannister, Barbara; Gottschalk, René; Brodt, Hans-Rheinhard; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    Biosecurity measures are traditionally applied to laboratories, but they may also be usefully applied in highly specialized clinical settings, such as the isolation facilities for the management of patients with highly infectious diseases (eg, viral hemorrhagic fevers, SARS, smallpox, potentially severe pandemic flu, and MDR- and XDR-tuberculosis). In 2009 the European Network for Highly Infectious Diseases conducted a survey in 48 isolation facilities in 16 European countries to determine biosecurity measures for access control to the facility. Security personnel are present in 39 facilities (81%). In 35 facilities (73%), entrance to the isolation area is restricted; control methods include electronic keys, a PIN system, closed-circuit TV, and guards at the doors. In 25 facilities (52%), identification and registration of all staff entering and exiting the isolation area are required. Access control is used in most surveyed centers, but specific lacks exist in some facilities. Further data are needed to assess other biosecurity aspects, such as the security measures during the transportation of potentially contaminated materials and measures to address the risk of an "insider attack."

  16. Needs of Advanced Safeguards Technologies for Future Nuclear Fuel Cycle (FNFC) Facilities and a Trial Application of SBD Concept to Facility Design of a Hypothetical FNFC Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seya, M.; Hajima, R.; Nishimori, N.; Hayakawa, T.; Kikuzawa, N.; Shizuma, T.; Fujiwara, M.

    2010-01-01

    Some of future nuclear fuel cycle (FNFC) facilities are supposed to have the characteristic features of very large throughput of plutonium, low decontamination reprocessing (no purification process; existence of certain amount of fission products (FP) in all process material), full minor actinides (MA) recycle, and treatment of MOX with FP and MA in fuel fabrication. In addition, the following international safeguards requirements have to be taken into account for safeguards approaches of the FNFC facilities. -Application of integrated safeguards (IS) approach; -Remote (unattended) verification; - 'Safeguards by Design' (SBD) concept. These features and requirements compel us to develop advanced technologies, which are not emerged yet. In order to realize the SBD, facility designers have to know important parts of design information on advanced safeguards systems before starting the facility design. The SBD concept requires not only early start of R and D of advanced safeguards technologies (before starting preliminary design of the facility) but also interaction steps between researchers working on safeguards systems and nuclear facility designers. The interaction steps are follows. Step-1; researchers show images of advanced safeguards systems to facility designers based on their research. Step-2; facility designers take important design information on safeguards systems into process systems of demonstration (or test) facility. Step-3; demonstration and improvement of both systems based on the conceptual design. Step-4; Construction of a FNFC facility with the advanced safeguards systems We present a trial application of the SBD concept to a hypothetical FNFC facility with an advanced hybrid K-edge densitometer and a Pu NDA system for spent nuclear fuel assembly using laser Compton scattering (LCS) X-rays and γ-rays and other advanced safeguards systems. (author)

  17. The JAERI-KEK joint project on high intensity proton accelerator and overview of nuclear transmutation experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yujiro

    2001-01-01

    A status of the JAERI/KEK joint project on High Intensity Proton Accelerator is overviewed. It is highlighted that Experimental facilities for development of the accelerator driven system (ADS) for nuclear transmutation technology is proposed under the project. (author)

  18. Storage facility for highly radioactive solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Shozo

    1996-01-01

    A heat insulation plate is disposed at an intermediate portion between a ceiling wall of a storage chamber and an upper plate of a storage pit in parallel with them. A large number of highly radioactive solid wastes contained in canisters are contained in the storage pit. Cooling air is introduced from an air suction port, passes a channel on the upper side of the heat insulation plate formed by the ceiling of the storage chamber and the heat insulation plate, and flows from a flow channel on the side of the wall of the storage chamber to the lower portion of the storage pit. Afterheat is removed by the air flown from the lower portion to ventilation tubes at the outer side of container tubes. The air heated to a high temperature through the flow channel on the lower side of the heat insulation plate between the heat insulation plate and the upper plate of the storage pit, and is exhausted to an exhaustion port. Further, a portion of a heat insulation plate as a boundary between the cooling air and a high temperature air formed on the upper portion of the storage pit is formed as a heat transfer plate, so that the heat of the high temperature air is removed by the cooling air flowing the upper flow channel. This can prevent heating of the ceiling wall of the storage chamber. (I.N.)

  19. Radiation monitoring in high energy research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyajima, Mitsuhiro

    1975-01-01

    In High Energy Physics Research Laboratory, construction of high energy proton accelerator is in progress. The accelerator is a cascaded machine comprising Cockcroft type (50 keV), linac (20 MeV), booster synchrotron (500 MeV), and synchrotron (8-12 GeV). Its proton beam intensity is 1x10 13 photons/pulse, and acceleration is carried out at the rate of every 2 minutes. The essential problems of radiation control in high energy accelerators are those of various radiations generated secondarily by proton beam and a number of induced radiations simultaneously originated with such secondary particles. In the Laboratory, controlled areas are divided into color-coded four regions, red, orange, yellow and green, based on each dose-rate. BF 3 counters covered with thick paraffin are used as neutron detectors, and side-window GM tubes, NaI (Tl) scintillators and ionization chambers as γ-detectors. In red region, however, ionization chambers are applied to induced radiation detection, and neutrons are not monitored. NIM standards are adopted for the circuits of all above monitors considering easy maintenance, economy and interchangeability. Notwithstanding the above described systems, these monitors are not sufficient to complete the measurement of whole radiations over wide energy region radiated from the accelerators. Hence separate radiation field measurement is required periodically. An example of the monitoring systems in National Accelerator Laboratory (U.S.) is referred at the last section. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  20. High technology and civil rights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, P.

    1982-01-01

    Court decision reflect the widely felt lack of clarity about the present legal situation in the field of high technology. This confusion is also due to the fact that this legal situation is surrounded by civil rights constellations, which have more and more eroded the contours of our legal system in recent years: Today, civil rights are no longer specific, well-definable bulwarks for the citizen, but are more and more frequently interpreted by the supreme courts as sources of procedural requirements with more or less certain often vague consequences. This shifting of the accent in civil rights towards procedural matters is due to an innate logical necessity, however: The same civil right considered in the same situation, e.g., in planning for high technology, may give rise to very different, even contradictory individual claims. Therefore, one of the main modern objectives of civil rights becoming more and more apparent is the need to reconcile conflicting positions, which makes civil rights a driving force in balancing interests in the easiest possible way. Yet, one of the main deficiencies in this rapidly growing procedural approach is the one-sidedness often to be found as a result of isolated, punctual actions. This misses the objective of achieving adequate harmonization. As examples of such one-sided, isolated civil rights approaches, legal opinions are cited on the so-called public participation (possibility to object for those concerned) in the licensing procedures under the German Atomic Energy Act and for protection against environmental impacts. Quity rightly, this participation of the public is interpreted as an advance protection of civil rights. However, its consequences quite often are exaggerated. (orig.) [de

  1. A Laser Technology Test Facility for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramian, A.J.; Campbell, R.W.; Ebbers, C.A.; Freitas, B.L.; Latkowski, J.; Molander, W.A.; Sutton, S.B.; Telford, S.; Caird, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    A LIFE laser driver needs to be designed and operated which meets the rigorous requirements of the NIF laser system while operating at high average power, and operate for a lifetime of >30 years. Ignition on NIF will serve to demonstrate laser driver functionality, operation of the Mercury laser system at LLNL demonstrates the ability of a diode-pumped solid-state laser to run at high average power, but the operational lifetime >30 yrs remains to be proven. A Laser Technology test Facility (LTF) has been designed to specifically address this issue. The LTF is a 100-Hz diode-pumped solid-state laser system intended for accelerated testing of the diodes, gain media, optics, frequency converters and final optics, providing system statistics for billion shot class tests. These statistics will be utilized for material and technology development as well as economic and reliability models for LIFE laser drivers.

  2. International technology exchange in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility wasteform production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitchen, B.G.

    1989-01-01

    The nearly completed Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility at the Savannah River Site that is designed to immobilize defense high level radioactive waste (HLW) by vitrification in borosilicate glass and containment in stainless steel canisters suitable for storage in the future DOE HLW repository. The DWPF is expected to start cold operation later this year (1990), and will be the first full scale vitrification facility operating in the United States, and the largest in the world. The DOE has been coordinating technology transfer and exchange on issues relating to HLW treatment and disposal through bi-lateral agreements with several nations. For the nearly fifteen years of the vitrification program at Savannah River Laboratory, over two hundred exchanges have been conducted with a dozen international agencies involving about five-hundred foreign national specialists. These international exchanges have been beneficial to the DOE's waste management efforts through confirmation of the choice of the waste form, enhanced understanding of melter operating phenomena, support for paths forward in political/regulatory arenas, confirmation of costs for waste form compliance programs, and establishing the need for enhancements of melter facility designs. This paper will compare designs and schedules of the international vitrification programs, and will discuss technical areas where the exchanges have provided data that have confirmed and aided US research and development efforts, impacted the design of the DWPF and guided the planning for regulatory interaction and product acceptance

  3. Field test of radioactive high efficiency filter and filter exchange techniques of fuel cycle examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yong Hwa; Lee, Hyung Kwon; Chun, Young Bum; Park, Dae Gyu; Ahn, Sang Bok; Chu, Yong Sun; Kim, Eun Ka.

    1997-12-01

    The development of high efficiency filter was started to protect human beings from the contamination of radioactive particles, toxic gases and bacillus, and its gradual performance increment led to the fabrication of Ultra Low Penetration Air Filter (ULPA) today. The application field of ULPA has been spread not only to the air conditioning of nuclear power facilities, semiconductor industries, life science, optics, medical care and general facilities but also to the core of ultra-precision facilities. Periodic performance test on the filters is essential to extend its life-time through effective maintenance. Especially, the bank test on HEPA filter of nuclear facilities handling radioactive materials is required for environmental safety. Nowadays, the bank test technology has been reached to the utilization of a minimized portable detecting instruments and the evaluation techniques can provide high confidence in the area of particle distribution and leakage test efficiency. (author). 16 refs., 13 tabs., 14 figs

  4. Treatment technologies for non-high-level wastes (USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, C.R.; Clark, D.E.

    1976-06-01

    Non-high-level waste arising from operations at nuclear reactors, fuel fabrication facilities, and reprocessing facilities can be treated using one of several technical alternatives prior to storage. Each alternative and the associated experience and status of development are summarized. The technology for treating non-high-level wastes is generally available for industrial use. Improved techniques applicable to the commercial nuclear fuel cycle are being developed and demonstrated to reduce the volume of waste and to immobilize it for storage. 36 figures, 59 references

  5. Control technology for radioactive emissions to the atmosphere at US Department of Energy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, E.B.

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection agency (EPA) on existing technology for the control of radionuclide emissions into the air from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, and to provide EPA with information on possible additional control technologies that could be used to further reduce these emissions. Included in this report are generic discussions of emission control technologies for particulates, iodine, rare gases, and tritium. Also included are specific discussions of existing emission control technologies at 25 DOE facilities. Potential additional emission control technologies are discussed for 14 of these facilities. The facilities discussed were selected by EPA on the basis of preliminary radiation pathway analyses. 170 references, 131 figures, 104 tables.

  6. Control technology for radioactive emissions to the atmosphere at US Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.B.

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection agency (EPA) on existing technology for the control of radionuclide emissions into the air from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, and to provide EPA with information on possible additional control technologies that could be used to further reduce these emissions. Included in this report are generic discussions of emission control technologies for particulates, iodine, rare gases, and tritium. Also included are specific discussions of existing emission control technologies at 25 DOE facilities. Potential additional emission control technologies are discussed for 14 of these facilities. The facilities discussed were selected by EPA on the basis of preliminary radiation pathway analyses. 170 references, 131 figures, 104 tables

  7. The high-temperature helium test facility (HHV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noack, G.; Weiskopf, H.

    1977-03-01

    The report describes the high-temperature helium test facility (HHV). Construction of this plant was started in 1972 by Messrs. BBC, Mannheim, on behalf of the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich. By the end of 1976, the construction work is in its last stage, so that the plant may start operation early in 1977. First of all, the cycle system and the arrangement of components are dealt with, followed by a discussion of individual components. Here, emphasis is laid on components typical for HHT systems, while conventional components are mentioned without further structural detail. The projected test programme for the HHV facility in phase IB of the HHT project is shortly dealt with. After this, the potential of this test facility with regard to the possible use of test components and to fluid- and thermodynamic boundary conditions is pointed out. With the unique potential the facility offers here, aspects of shortened service life at higher cycle temperatures do not remain disregarded. (orig./UA) [de

  8. Facilities & Technology: The Transformation of "Campus." APPA Thought Leaders Series 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Thought Leaders symposium focused on the topic of "Facilities & Technology: The Transformation of 'Campus.'" Educational institutions that master new technologies will have an edge in the increasingly competitive higher education landscape. This report discusses the factors related to integrating technology and the campus…

  9. MicroArray Facility: a laboratory information management system with extended support for Nylon based technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaudoing Emmanuel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput gene expression profiling (GEP is becoming a routine technique in life science laboratories. With experimental designs that repeatedly span thousands of genes and hundreds of samples, relying on a dedicated database infrastructure is no longer an option. GEP technology is a fast moving target, with new approaches constantly broadening the field diversity. This technology heterogeneity, compounded by the informatics complexity of GEP databases, means that software developments have so far focused on mainstream techniques, leaving less typical yet established techniques such as Nylon microarrays at best partially supported. Results MAF (MicroArray Facility is the laboratory database system we have developed for managing the design, production and hybridization of spotted microarrays. Although it can support the widely used glass microarrays and oligo-chips, MAF was designed with the specific idiosyncrasies of Nylon based microarrays in mind. Notably single channel radioactive probes, microarray stripping and reuse, vector control hybridizations and spike-in controls are all natively supported by the software suite. MicroArray Facility is MIAME supportive and dynamically provides feedback on missing annotations to help users estimate effective MIAME compliance. Genomic data such as clone identifiers and gene symbols are also directly annotated by MAF software using standard public resources. The MAGE-ML data format is implemented for full data export. Journalized database operations (audit tracking, data anonymization, material traceability and user/project level confidentiality policies are also managed by MAF. Conclusion MicroArray Facility is a complete data management system for microarray producers and end-users. Particular care has been devoted to adequately model Nylon based microarrays. The MAF system, developed and implemented in both private and academic environments, has proved a robust solution for

  10. High-speed civil transport issues and technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Marle D.

    1992-01-01

    A strawman program plan is presented, consisting of technology developments and demonstrations required to support the construction of a high-speed civil transport. The plan includes a compilation of technology issues related to the development of a transport. The issues represent technical areas in which research and development are required to allow airframe manufacturers to pursue an HSCT development. The vast majority of technical issues presented require flight demonstrated and validated solutions before a transport development will be undertaken by the industry. The author believes that NASA is the agency best suited to address flight demonstration issues in a concentrated effort. The new Integrated Test Facility at NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility is considered ideally suited to the task of supporting ground validations of proof-of-concept and prototype system demonstrations before night demonstrations. An elaborate ground hardware-in-the-loop (iron bird) simulation supported in this facility provides a viable alternative to developing an expensive fill-scale prototype transport technology demonstrator. Drygen's SR-71 assets, modified appropriately, are a suitable test-bed for supporting flight demonstrations and validations of certain transport technology solutions. A subscale, manned or unmanned flight demonstrator is suitable for flight validation of transport technology solutions, if appropriate structural similarity relationships can be established. The author contends that developing a full-scale prototype transport technology demonstrator is the best alternative to ensuring that a positive decision to develop a transport is reached by the United States aerospace industry.

  11. The construction technology of Chinese ancient city drainage facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hequn, Li; Yufengyun

    2018-03-01

    In ancient china, according to the local natural environment, a variety of drainage facilities were built in order to excrete rainwater, domestic sewage, production wastewater and so on. These drainage facilities were mainly made of pottery, bricks, wood, stone, etc. For example, ceramic water pipelines, buried in the ground, connect together one by one, and there was a slight drop from one end to the other in favor of drainage. These measures can also be used for reference in today’s urban drainage and flood control.

  12. High level radioactive waste management facility design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, N.A.; Salaymeh, S.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the engineering systems for the structural design of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). At the DWPF, high level radioactive liquids will be mixed with glass particles and heated in a melter. This molten glass will then be poured into stainless steel canisters where it will harden. This process will transform the high level waste into a more stable, manageable substance. This paper discuss the structural design requirements for this unique one of a kind facility. A special emphasis will be concentrated on the design criteria pertaining to earthquake, wind and tornado, and flooding

  13. Implementation of high-dose chemical dosimetry for industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao, Cirilo Cezar Sant'Anna da

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the implementation of methodology for high dose measurements using chemical dosimeters in liquid phase, traceable to the international metrology system, and make available in the country, the standard of high-dose to industrial irradiation facilities and research irradiators, trough the quality program with comparative measurements and direct use of the standard dosimeters in routine. The use of these low cost dosimetry systems in industrial irradiation facilities, assists to the certification requirements and it can reduce the costs with dosimetry for approximately 20% of the total dosimetry costs, using these systems in routine measurements and validation process, largely substituting the imported PMMA dosimeters, among others. (author)

  14. Thermo-aeraulics of high level waste storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrave, Herve; Gaillard, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Franck; Ranc, Guillaume; Duret, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the research undertaken in response to axis 3 of the 1991 radioactive waste management act, and possible solutions concerning the processes under consideration for conditioning and long-term interim storage of long-lived radioactive waste. The notion of 'long-term' is evaluated with respect to the usual operating lifetime of a basic nuclear installation, about 50 years. In this context, 'long-term' is defined on a secular time scale: the lifetime of the facility could be as long as 300 years. The waste package taken into account is characterized notably by its high thermal power release. Studies were carried out in dedicated facilities for vitrified waste and for spent UOX and MOX fuel. The latter are not considered as wastes, owing to the value of the reusable material they contain. Three primary objectives have guided the design of these long-term interim storage facilities: - ensure radionuclide containment at all times; - permit retrieval of the containers at any time; - minimize surveillance; - maintenance costs. The CEA has also investigated surface and subsurface facilities. It was decided to work on generic sites with a reasonable set of parameters values that should be applicable at most sites in France. All the studies and demonstrations to date lead to the conclusion that long-term interim storage is technically feasible. The paper addresses the following items: - Long-term interim storage concepts for high-level waste; - Design principles and options for the interim storage facilities; - General architecture; - Research topics, Storage facility ventilation, Dimensioning of the facility; - Thermo-aeraulics of a surface interim storage facility; - VALIDA surface loop, VALIDA single container test campaign, Continuation of the VALIDA program; - Thermo-aeraulics of a network of subsurface interim storage galleries; - SIGAL subsurface loop; - PROMETHEE subsurface loop; - Temperature behaviour of the concrete structures; - GALATEE

  15. Thermo-aeraulics of high level waste storage facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrave, Herve; Gaillard, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Franck; Ranc, Guillaume [CEA/Valrho, B.P. 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Duret, Bernard [CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2006-07-01

    This paper discusses the research undertaken in response to axis 3 of the 1991 radioactive waste management act, and possible solutions concerning the processes under consideration for conditioning and long-term interim storage of long-lived radioactive waste. The notion of 'long-term' is evaluated with respect to the usual operating lifetime of a basic nuclear installation, about 50 years. In this context, 'long-term' is defined on a secular time scale: the lifetime of the facility could be as long as 300 years. The waste package taken into account is characterized notably by its high thermal power release. Studies were carried out in dedicated facilities for vitrified waste and for spent UOX and MOX fuel. The latter are not considered as wastes, owing to the value of the reusable material they contain. Three primary objectives have guided the design of these long-term interim storage facilities: - ensure radionuclide containment at all times; - permit retrieval of the containers at any time; - minimize surveillance; - maintenance costs. The CEA has also investigated surface and subsurface facilities. It was decided to work on generic sites with a reasonable set of parameters values that should be applicable at most sites in France. All the studies and demonstrations to date lead to the conclusion that long-term interim storage is technically feasible. The paper addresses the following items: - Long-term interim storage concepts for high-level waste; - Design principles and options for the interim storage facilities; - General architecture; - Research topics, Storage facility ventilation, Dimensioning of the facility; - Thermo-aeraulics of a surface interim storage facility; - VALIDA surface loop, VALIDA single container test campaign, Continuation of the VALIDA program; - Thermo-aeraulics of a network of subsurface interim storage galleries; - SIGAL subsurface loop; - PROMETHEE subsurface loop; - Temperature behaviour of the concrete

  16. Application of information and communication technology facilities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact | Jorunal of Information and Knowledge Management

    Findings also revealed that inadequate training of staff on ICT application to technical services; poor electricity supply and insufficient fund were some of the challenges plaguing the application of ICT facilities to technical unit of the library. The study recommends that there should be adequate straining of staff, provision of ...

  17. Hong kong chemical waste treatment facilities: a technology overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siuwang, Chu [Enviropace Ltd., Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    1993-12-31

    The effective management of chemical and industrial wastes represents one of the most pressing environmental problems confronting the Hong Kong community. In 1990, the Hong Kong government contracted Enviropace Limited for the design, construction and operation of a Chemical Waste Treatment Facility. The treatment and disposal processes, their integration and management are the subject of discussion in this paper

  18. Hong kong chemical waste treatment facilities: a technology overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siuwang, Chu [Enviropace Ltd., Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    1994-12-31

    The effective management of chemical and industrial wastes represents one of the most pressing environmental problems confronting the Hong Kong community. In 1990, the Hong Kong government contracted Enviropace Limited for the design, construction and operation of a Chemical Waste Treatment Facility. The treatment and disposal processes, their integration and management are the subject of discussion in this paper

  19. Hypervelocity Expansion Facility for Fundamental High-Enthalpy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    ii Final Technical Report of Contract ONR N00014-15-1-2260 Entitled: HYPERVELOCITY EXPANSION FACILITY FOR FUNDAMENTAL HIGH-ENTHALPY...previous DoD investments in high-energy pulsed laser diagnostics for instantaneous planar velocimetry and thermometry to perform scientific studies of...capability for fundamental and applied studies of hypervelocity high enthalpy flows. In this document, we report on the progress over the 18-month

  20. Development of remote handling technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Hiromichi; Sakai, Akira; Miura, Noriaki; Kozaka, Tetsuo; Hamada, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Remote handling technology has been systematically developed for nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Japan since 1970s, primarily in parallel with the development of reprocessing and HLLW (High Level Liquid Waste) vitrification process. In case of reprocessing and vitrification process to handle highly radioactive and hazardous materials, the most of components are installed in the radiation shielded hot cells and operators are not allowed to enter the work area in the cells for operation and maintenance. Therefore, a completely remote handling system is adopted for the cells to reduce radiation doses of operators and increase the availability of the facility. The hot cells are generally designed considering the scale of components (laboratory, demonstration, or full-scale), the function of the systems (chemical process, material handling, dismantling, decontamination, or chemical analysis), and the environmental conditions (radiation dose rate, airborne concentration, surface contamination, or fume/mist/dust). Throughout our domestic development work for remote handling technology, the concept of the large scale integrated cell has been adopted rather than a number of small scale separated cells, for the reasons to reduce the total installation space and the number of remote handling equipment required for the each cell as much as possible. In our domestic remote maintenance design, several new concepts have been developed, tested, and demonstrated in the Tokai Virtrification Facility (TVF) and the Rokkasho HLLW Vitrification and Storage Facility (K-facility). Layout in the hot cells, the performance of remote handling equipment, and the structure of the in-cell components are important factors for remote maintenance design. In case of TVF (hot tests started in 1995), piping and vessels are prefabricated in the rack modules and installed in two lines on both sides of the cell. These modules are designed to be remotely replaced in the whole rack. Two overhead cranes

  1. The Mixed Waste Management Facility: Technology selection and implementation plan, Part 2, Support processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, R.D.; Couture, S.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to establish the foundation for the selection and implementation of technologies to be demonstrated in the Mixed Waste Management Facility, and to select the technologies for initial pilot-scale demonstration. Criteria are defined for judging demonstration technologies, and the framework for future technology selection is established. On the basis of these criteria, an initial suite of technologies was chosen, and the demonstration implementation scheme was developed. Part 1, previously released, addresses the selection of the primary processes. Part II addresses process support systems that are considered ''demonstration technologies.'' Other support technologies, e.g., facility off-gas, receiving and shipping, and water treatment, while part of the integrated demonstration, use best available commercial equipment and are not selected against the demonstration technology criteria

  2. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility advancing nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.R.; Thelen, M.C.; Meyer, M.K.; Marshall, F.M.; Foster, J.; Benson, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  3. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.R.; Benson, J.B.; Foster, J.A.; Marshall, F.M.; Meyer, M.K.; Thelen, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  4. Innovative technologies for recycling and reusing radioactively contaminated materials from DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, S.J.; Hyde, J.

    1993-01-01

    Through award of ten contracts under the solicitation, DOE is continuing efforts to develop innovative technologies for decontamination and recycling or reusing of process equipment, scrap metal, and concrete. These ten technologies are describe briefly in this report. There is great economic incentive for recycling or reusing materials generated during D ampersand D of DOE's facilities. If successfully developed, these superior technologies will enable DOE to clean its facilities by 2019. These technologies will also generate a reusable or recyclable product, while achieving D ampersand D in less time at lower cost with reduced health and safety risks to the workers, the public and the environment

  5. Periodic inspections of lightning protection systems in intermediate storage facilities of nuclear technological plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzel, Andre; Schulz, Olav

    2013-01-01

    Especially for nuclear technological plants, periodic inspections of lightning protection systems are of great importance. This article shows the sequence of maintenance programs using the examples of the intermediate storage facilities of the nuclear technological plants Grohnde and Unterweser as well as the central intermediate storage facility in Gorleben and gives a description of the extensive measures of inspecting the external and internal lightning protection and the global earth termination system.

  6. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Yoon W; Campisi, Isidoro E; Champion, Mark; Crofford, Mark; Davis, Kirk; Drury, Michael A; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; McCarthy, Michael P; Powers, Tom; Shajedul Hasan, S M; Stirbet, Mircea; Stout, Daniel; Tang, Johnny Y; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V; Wezensky, Mark

    2005-01-01

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavitites have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducti...

  7. Safeguarding uranium enrichment facilities. Review and analysis of the status of safeguards technology for uranium enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine critically the diversion potential at uranium enrichment facilities and to outline a basic safeguards strategy which counters all identified hazards as completely as possible yet with a minimum of non-essential redundancy. Where existing technology does not appear to be adequate for effective safeguards, the limitations are examined, and suggestions for further R and D effort are made. Parts of this report are generally applicable to all currently known enrichment processes, while other parts are specifically directed toward facilities based on the gas centrifuge process. It is hoped that additional sections discussing a safeguards strategy for gas diffusion facilities can be added later. It should be emphasized that this is a technical report, and does not reflect any legal positions. The safeguards strategy and subsequent inspection procedures are intended as guidelines, not as negotiating positions

  8. Technology requirements to be addressed by the NASA Lewis Research Center Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Rudland, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a scientific program which will provide advance in space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions were identified that require or could benefit from this technology. These fluid management technology needs were prioritized and a shuttle attached reuseable test bed, the cryogenic fluid management facility (CFMF), is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technology development effort.

  9. Information and communications technology facilities at the tertiary level education in some urban universities in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. Shahriar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of digitalization, information and communications technology facilities have become an indispensable part of education especially at the universities. This study has been undertaken with dual purposes - to find the existing scenario of information and communications technology facilities and to gauge the perception of the students onthe quality of those facilities - at the universities in Bangladesh. To that end, a survey was conducted on the undergraduate and graduate students of 9 private and public universities. To assess the quality of information and communications technology services, participants’ views on various aspects like the sufficiency of computers, availability of required software, maintenance and troubleshooting, internet and data sharing facilities, etc. were collected and analyzed. The study finds that although students are on the happier side with the information and communications technology installations and equipment, they are fairly unhappy about the maintenance services and internet facilities available at their universities. It gives some valuable insights about the information and communications technology facilities scenario at the universities that can be taken into consideration while planning future action plan and development of information and communications technology at the universities in Bangladesh.

  10. Physics at high luminosity muon colliders and a facility overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Physics potentials at future colliders including high luminosity μ + μ - colliders are discussed. Luminosity requirement, estimates for Muon collider energies of interest (0.1 TeV to 100 TeV) are calculated. Schematics and an overview of Muon Collider facility concept are also included

  11. A high pressure sample facility for neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.; Glossop, B.H.

    1981-06-01

    Commissioning tests involving deformation studies and tests to destruction as well as neutron diffraction measurements of a standard sample have been carried out on the SERC high pressure sample facility for neutron scattering studies. A detailed description of the pressurising equipment is given. (author)

  12. Operation technology of air treatment system in nuclear facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Chun, Y B; Hwong, Y H; Lee, H K; Min, D K; Park, K J; Uom, S H; Yang, S Y

    2001-01-01

    Effective operation techniques were reviewed on the air treatment system to protect the personnel in nuclear facilities from the contamination of radio-active particles and to keep the environment clear. Nuclear air treatment system consisted of the ventilation and filtering system was characterized by some test. Measurement of air velocity of blowing/exhaust fan in the ventilation system, leak tests of HEPA filters in the filtering, and measurement of pressure difference between the areas defined by radiation level were conducted. The results acquired form the measurements were reflected directly for the operation of air treatment. In the abnormal state of virus parts of devices composted of the system, the repairing method, maintenance and performance test were also employed in operating effectively the air treatment system. These measuring results and techniques can be available to the operation of air treatment system of PIEF as well as the other nuclear facilities in KAERI.

  13. Radiation facilities and irradiation technology for food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunaga, Hiromi

    2005-01-01

    Progress made during these 30 years in the field of radiation treatment of food is reviewed by describing features of the process including elementary processes, quality control of the products and the dosimetric techniques widely employed. The Co-60 gamma-ray irradiation facilities to be used for radiation-sterilization of medical supplies and food preservation are presented. For electron beam irradiation, accelerators for processing with the energy from 0.3 to 10 MeV are generally employed. The electron-guns, the method of acceleration such as rectification, types of acceleration as Cockcroft-Walton, dynamitron, or linear acceleration and X-ray producing facility, with various countermeasures for safety management, are briefly explained. The concepts of dose and traceability are given. The dosimeters including reference dosimeter and routine ones with validation are explained. (S. Ohno)

  14. The technological safety in facilities that manage radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizcano, D.

    2014-10-01

    The sealed radioactive sources are used inside a wide range of applications in the medicine, industry and investigation around the world. These sources can contain a great radionuclides variety, exhibiting a wide spectrum of activities and radiological half lives. This way, we can find pattern sources of radionuclides as Americium-241, Plutonium-238, Plutonium-239, Thorium-228 and Thorium-230, etc., with some activity of kBq in research laboratories, Iridium-192 and Cesium-137 sources used in brachytherapy with GBq activities, until sources with P Bq activities in industrial irradiators of Cobalt-60 and Cesium-137. This document approach the physical safety that entities like the IAEA recommends for the facilities that contain sealed sources, especially the measures that are taking in the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) and others government facilities. (Author)

  15. Creation of a small high-throughput screening facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flak, Tod

    2009-01-01

    The creation of a high-throughput screening facility within an organization is a difficult task, requiring a substantial investment of time, money, and organizational effort. Major issues to consider include the selection of equipment, the establishment of data analysis methodologies, and the formation of a group having the necessary competencies. If done properly, it is possible to build a screening system in incremental steps, adding new pieces of equipment and data analysis modules as the need grows. Based upon our experience with the creation of a small screening service, we present some guidelines to consider in planning a screening facility.

  16. Overview of high intensity proton accelerator facility, J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The J-PARC project of high intensity proton accelerator research complex, conducted jointly by JAERI and KEK, has been completed with demonstration of all beam productions in 2009 as the facility construction phase, and the operation started to offer the secondary beams of neutron, muon, kaon, and neutrino, to the advanced scientific experimental research aiming at making breakthroughs in materials and life science, nuclear and elementary physics, etc. This text describes the overview of the J-PARC present status with emphasis of a performance toward to 1MW power as user facilities. (author)

  17. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Wells, Jack C [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

    2011-08-01

    where appropriate, changes in Center metrics were introduced. This report covers CY 2010 and CY 2011 Year to Date (YTD) that unless otherwise specified, denotes January 1, 2011 through June 30, 2011. User Support remains an important element of the OLCF operations, with the philosophy 'whatever it takes' to enable successful research. Impact of this center-wide activity is reflected by the user survey results that show users are 'very satisfied.' The OLCF continues to aggressively pursue outreach and training activities to promote awareness - and effective use - of U.S. leadership-class resources (Reference Section 2). The OLCF continues to meet and in many cases exceed DOE metrics for capability usage (35% target in CY 2010, delivered 39%; 40% target in CY 2011, 54% January 1, 2011 through June 30, 2011). The Schedule Availability (SA) and Overall Availability (OA) for Jaguar were exceeded in CY2010. Given the solution to the VRM problem the SA and OA for Jaguar in CY 2011 are expected to exceed the target metrics of 95% and 90%, respectively (Reference Section 3). Numerous and wide-ranging research accomplishments, scientific support, and technological innovations are more fully described in Sections 4 and 6 and reflect OLCF leadership in enabling high-impact science solutions and vision in creating an exascale-ready center. Financial Management (Section 5) and Risk Management (Section 7) are carried out using best practices approved of by DOE. The OLCF has a valid cyber security plan and Authority to Operate (Section 8). The proposed metrics for 2012 are reflected in Section 9.

  18. Operation and technology of high pulsed power generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyl, P.; Romary, P.

    1995-01-01

    In order to satisfy the needs of ''components and electronic circuits hardness'', a range of high pulsed power generators is available in the French Atomic Energy Commission. The goal of this paper is to present the general principles of operation and the main characteristics of the irradiation facilities which are operational at the CESTA center. Finally, we give a brief outline of the new technology developments. (authors). 6 refs., 16 figs

  19. Conceptual design of a technology development facility (TDF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doggett, J.N.; Damm, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    We have developed a concept for employing a single-cell mirror machine in a facility for testing and developing fusion reactor materials, components, and subsystems in a fusion reactor environment. Our approach is similar to that of the 1974 FERF study, except that we have added an auxiliary thermal-barrier cell at each end of the yin-yang magnet. In this way, we provide for plasma microstability by confining a warm plasma component between potential peaks at each end of the device (just as in the tandem mirror with auxiliary barrier cells) while we further improve confinement by the inherent reduction in ambipolar potential drop in the central cell

  20. Construction, characteristics and present status of high-fluence irradiation facility at University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabata, Yoneho; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Kouchi, Noriyuki.

    1989-01-01

    New ion accelerator facility (HIT Facility) was constructed at Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Tokyo. This facility, which was equipped with some special apparatus, has been mainly dedicated to the study of radiation effects of ion beams on materials. In this report, the construction, the characteristics and the present status of this facility are described. (author)

  1. A singular facility scientific technological to promote the hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, M.

    2010-01-01

    Declining fossil fuel reserves raises concerns about new energy resources that will lead to energy systems based on distributed generation and active distribution systems that require new energy storage systems. Hydrogen is a good candidate to operate as storage and as energy carrier that still needs scientific and technological breakthroughs to facilitate their integration into this new energy culture. Spain has supported numerous public-private cooperative efforts that have culminated in the creation of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology Experiment and Fuel Cells. (Author)

  2. Development of high burnup nuclear fuel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Ho Chun; Kang, Young Hwan; Jung, Jin Gone; Hwang, Won; Park, Zoo Hwan; Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, Bong Goo; Kim, Il Gone

    1987-04-01

    The objectives of the project are mainly to develope both design and manufacturing technologies for 600 MWe-CANDU-PHWR-type high burnup nuclear fuel, and secondly to build up the foundation of PWR high burnup nuclear fuel technology on the basis of KAERI technology localized upon the standard 600 MWe-CANDU- PHWR nuclear fuel. So, as in the first stage, the goal of the program in the last one year was set up mainly to establish the concept of the nuclear fuel pellet design and manufacturing. The economic incentives for high burnup nuclear fuel technology development are improvement of fuel utilization, backend costs plant operation, etc. Forming the most important incentives of fuel cycle costs reduction and improvement of power operation, etc., the development of high burnup nuclear fuel technology and also the research on the incore fuel management and safety and technologies are necessary in this country

  3. METHODOLOGY-TECHNOLOGICAL BASES AND COMMUNICATION FACILITIES OF COMMUNICATION IN DISTANCE LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    O. Gnedkova; V. Lyakutin

    2010-01-01

    In this article methodical and technological principles of communication process in distance learning, which are the important constituents of the effective distance course, are analyzed. Communication facilities for the conducting communication process in distance learning are examined. Recommendations for teachers (tutors) for organization of successful and effective learning process with the use of modern communication technologies are pointed.

  4. State-of-the-art WEB -technologies and ecological safety of nuclear power engineering facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batij, V.G.; Batij, E.V.; Rud'ko, V.M.; Kotlyarov, V.T.

    2004-01-01

    Prospects of web-technologies using in the field of improvement radiation safety level of nuclear power engineering facilities is seen. It is shown that application of such technologies will enable entirely using the data of all information systems of radiation control

  5. High energy-density science on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, E.M.; Cauble, R.; Remington, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility, as well as its French counterpart Le Laser Megajoule, have been designed to confront one of the most difficult and compelling problem in shock physics - the creation of a hot, compassed DT plasma surrounded and confined by cold, nearly degenerate DT fuel. At the same time, these laser facilities will present the shock physics community with unique tools for the study of high energy density matter at states unreachable by any other laboratory technique. Here we describe how these lasers can contribute to investigations of high energy density in the area of material properties and equations of state, extend present laboratory shock techniques such as high-speed jets to new regimes, and allow study of extreme conditions found in astrophysical phenomena.

  6. Study on the state-of-the-arts technologies and policy trends for the decommissioning of nuclear installations and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, G. J.; Park, J. H.; Jeong, U. S. and others

    2005-12-01

    D and D project of the nuclear facilities is now the one of the biggest projects among the nuclear ones in the world. The nuclear facilities have their unique characteristics so making preparations about technical research in advance is very important in economic side and worker's protection side. Especially, because workers have a high possibility to contact radioactive material directly, an automation technology and shielding technology for worker's protection as well as a system development which can perform D and D work efficiently are necessary for D and D project. The waste reduction technology development, D and D equipment development, container development, and the study related the establishment of the level of the release regulation for radioactive waste are also important. The purpose of this research is to grasp of the national and internal D and D status for the nuclear facilities and to estimate them so we expect to prevent the possibility of a tremendous economical loss as the initiative of the nuclear D and D market is lost due to not understand the situation about the status of the related technologies. And we also expect to practical use the accumulated experience to decommissioning facilities in North

  7. Development programs on decommissioning technology for reactors and fuel cycle facilities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiki, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Science and Technology Agency (STA) of Japan is promoting technology development for decommissioning of nuclear facilities by entrusting various research programs to concerned research organisations: JAERI, PNC and RANDEC, including first full scale reactor decommissioning of JPDR. According to the results of these programs, significant improvement on dismantling techniques, decontamination, measurement etc. has been achieved. Further development of advanced decommissioning technology has been started in order to achieve reduction of duration of decommissioning work and occupational exposures in consideration of the decommissioning of reactors and fuel cycle facilities. (author) 5 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  8. Where is high technology taking nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veall, N.

    1985-01-01

    The question is posed as to whether high technology in nuclear medicine might lead to the nuclear medicine practitioner possibly finishing up working for the machine rather than the improvement of health care in its widest sense. A brief examination of some pros and cons of high technology nuclear medicine is given. (U.K.)

  9. High technology revisited: definition and position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to defining high technology by distinguishing two different aspects. First, complexity, which is a more or less a `static' view on high technology and is applied to both the final product as well as the production process. Second, the newness, relates to a

  10. [Nuclear medicine in Spain: high technology 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano Castrejón, A M; Prats Rivera, E; Alonso Farto, J C; Vallejo Casas, J A; Rodriguez Gasen, A; Setoain Perego, J; Arbizu Lostao, J

    2014-01-01

    This article details the high technology equipment in Spain obtained through a survey sent to the three main provider companies of equipment installed in Spain. The geographical distribution of high technology by Autonomous Communities and its antiquity have been analyzed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  11. HELCZA-High heat flux test facility for testing ITER EU first wall components.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokůpek, J.; Samec, K.; Jílek, R.; Gavila, P.; Neufuss, S.; Entler, Slavomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, November (2017), s. 187-190 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : HELCZA * High heat flux * Electron beam testing * Test facility * Plasma facing components * First wall * Divertora Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379617302818

  12. Fiscal 1998 R and D report on femtosecond technology (power generation facility monitoring system using high- intensity X-ray pulse); 1998 nendo femuto byo technology no kenkyu kaihatsu (kokido X senb pulse riyo hatsuden shisetsu monitoring system no kenkyu kaihatsu) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This report reports the fiscal 1998 R and D result of Femtosecond Technology Research Association (FESTA) supported by NEDO. For creation of industrial basic technologies supporting the advanced information society in the 21st century, ultra-high speed electronics technology including new functions beyond the speed limit of conventional electronics technologies is indispensable. From such viewpoint, this R and D aims at establishment of the basic technology controlling conditions of beams and electrons in a femtosecond (10{sup -15}-10{sup -12} seconds) region. In development of the titled system, this R and D aims at generation of high-intensity X-ray pulse by interaction between femtosecond light pulse and high-density electron beam pulse, and development of measurement technology (non- stop inspection) of high-speed moving objects using such X- ray pulse. In fiscal 1998, this project succeeded in time stabilization of laser oscillators at a 100fs level and generation of low-emittance electron beam pulse through development of ultra-short pulse synchronization, laser stabilization and electron beam pulse generation technologies. (NEDO)

  13. Quality assurance system for sitting high risk facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Aymee; Peralta, Jose L.; Fernandez, Manuel

    1999-01-01

    The paper shows how we have conceived and designed the quality assurance system for the site selection process of an area for sitting the facility of high risk in correspondence with the approved methodology. The results obtained in the implementation of the system have permitted the satisfactory performance of each one the expected stage, defining the most favorable sectors in order to continue the studies of the repository site for the disposal of low and intermedium. (author)

  14. Ion beams from high-current PF facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, M [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Pulsed beams of fast deuterons and impurity or admixture ions emitted from high-current PF-type facilities operated in different laboratories are dealt with. A short comparative analysis of time-integrated and time-resolved studies is presented. Particular attention is paid to the microstructure of such ion beams, and to the verification of some theoretical models. (author). 5 figs., 19 refs.

  15. High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections

  16. High technology for radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Toshiyuki

    2005-03-01

    Fundamentals of radiations, radioactivity, and their applications in recent industrial, medical, agricultural and various research fields are reviewed. The book begins with historical description regarding to discovery of radiation at the end of 19th century and the exploration into the inside of an atom utilizing the radiation discovered, discovery of the neutron which finally leaded to nuclear energy liberation. Developments of radiation sources, including nuclear reactors, and charged-particle accelerators follow with simultaneous description on radiation measurement or detection technology. In medical fields, X-ray diagnosis, interventional radiology (IVR), nuclear medicine (PET and others), and radiation therapy are introduced. In pharmaceutical field, synthesis of labeled compounds and tracer techniques are explained. In industrial application, radiation-reinforced wires and heat-resistant cables whose economic effect can be estimated to amount to more than 10 12 yen, radiation mutation, food irradiation, and applied accelerators such as polymer modifications, decomposition of environmentally harmful substances, and ion-implantations important in semiconductor device fabrication. Finally, problems relating to general public such as radiation education and safety concept are also discussed. (S. Ohno)

  17. Transfer of adapted water supply technologies through a demonstration and teaching facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestmann, F.; Oberle, P.; Ikhwan, M.; Stoffel, D.; Blaß, H. J.; Töws, D.; Schmidt, S.

    2016-09-01

    Water scarcity can be defined as a lack of sufficient water resources or as the limited or even missing access to a safe water supply. Latter can be classified as `economic water scarcity' which among others can commonly be met in tropical and subtropical karst regions of emerging and developing countries. Karst aquifers, mostly consisting of limestone and carbonate rock, show high infiltration rates which leads to a lack of above ground storage possibilities. Thus, the water will drain rapidly into the underground and evolve vast river networks. Considering the lack of appropriate infrastructure and limited human capacities in the affected areas, these underground water resources cannot be exploited adequately. Against this, background innovative and adapted technologies are required to utilize hard-to-access water resources in a sustainable way. In this context, the German-Indonesian joint R&D project "Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) Indonesia" dealt with the development of highly adaptable water technologies and management strategies. Under the aegis of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), these innovative technical concepts were exemplarily implemented to remedy this deficiency in the model region Gunung Sewu, a karst area situated on the southern coast of Java Island, Indonesia. The experiences gained through the interdisciplinary joint R&D activities clearly showed that even in the case of availability of appropriate technologies, a comprising transfer of knowhow and the buildup of capabilities (Capacity Development) is inevitable to sustainably implement and disseminate new methods. In this context, an adapted water supply facility was developed by KIT which hereafter shall serve for demonstration, teaching, and research purposes. The plant's functionality, its teaching and research concept, as well as the design process, which was accomplished in collaboration with the

  18. Development of Design Concept and Applied Technology for RCP Performance Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Jin; Lee, Jung Ho; Yoon, Seok Ho

    2010-02-01

    Performance test facility for RCP (reactor coolant pump) is essential to verify the performance and reliability of RCP before installation in the nuclear power plant. The development of RCP for new-type reactor and the performance verification of hydraulic revolving body also needs the RCP test facility. The design concept of test loop and the technology of flow rate measurement are investigated in this research

  19. HITRAP: A Facility for Experiments with Trapped Highly Charged Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quint, W.; Dilling, J.; Djekic, S.; Haeffner, H.; Hermanspahn, N.; Kluge, H.-J.; Marx, G.; Moore, R.; Rodriguez, D.; Schoenfelder, J.; Sikler, G.; Valenzuela, T.; Verdu, J.; Weber, C.; Werth, G.

    2001-01-01

    HITRAP is a planned ion trap facility for capturing and cooling of highly charged ions produced at GSI in the heavy-ion complex of the UNILAC-SIS accelerators and the ESR storage ring. In this facility heavy highly charged ions up to uranium will be available as bare nuclei, hydrogen-like ions or few-electron systems at low temperatures. The trap for receiving and studying these ions is designed for operation at extremely high vacuum by cooling to cryogenic temperatures. The stored highly charged ions can be investigated in the trap itself or can be extracted from the trap at energies up to about 10 keV/q. The proposed physics experiments are collision studies with highly charged ions at well-defined low energies (eV/u), high-accuracy measurements to determine the g-factor of the electron bound in a hydrogen-like heavy ion and the atomic binding energies of few-electron systems, laser spectroscopy of HFS transitions and X-ray spectroscopy

  20. High temperature vapors science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hastie, John

    2012-01-01

    High Temperature Vapors: Science and Technology focuses on the relationship of the basic science of high-temperature vapors to some areas of discernible practical importance in modern science and technology. The major high-temperature problem areas selected for discussion include chemical vapor transport and deposition; the vapor phase aspects of corrosion, combustion, and energy systems; and extraterrestrial high-temperature species. This book is comprised of seven chapters and begins with an introduction to the nature of the high-temperature vapor state, the scope and literature of high-temp

  1. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the 'seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs

  2. The development of robot application technology in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Chang Hoi; Kim, Byung Soo; Hwang, Suk Young; Sohn, Surg Won; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Woong Ki

    1991-01-01

    The project of this study is intended to develop the application technology for autonomous robotic systems operated in hostile environments where human access is prohibited. The mobile robot, named as KAEROT, has been designed by adopting the controller of multiprocessor of distributed system architecture in order to get flexibility. 2 driving wheel assembles and 1 steering mechanism has been adopted and each of them is made of planetary wheel which is composed of a couple of star-like arms with 3 wheels. The 6 D.O.F of manipulator is controlled by CCD camera mounted on the elbow and base, to provide wide view of the working area for tele-operation. The off-line programming system is being developed for checking robot constraint violations within workspace prior to execution of robot programming. (Author)

  3. Computational Modeling in Support of High Altitude Testing Facilities, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Simulation technology plays an important role in propulsion test facility design and development by assessing risks, identifying failure modes and predicting...

  4. Computational Modeling in Support of High Altitude Testing Facilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Simulation technology plays an important role in rocket engine test facility design and development by assessing risks, identifying failure modes and predicting...

  5. Specific factors influencing information system/information and communication technology sourcing strategies in healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potančok, Martin; Voříšek, Jiří

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare facilities use a number of information system/information and communication technologies. Each healthcare facility faces a need to choose sourcing strategies most suitable to ensure provision of information system/information and communication technology services, processes and resources. Currently, it is possible to observe an expansion of sourcing possibilities in healthcare informatics, which creates new requirements for sourcing strategies. Thus, the aim of this article is to identify factors influencing information system/information and communication technology sourcing strategies in healthcare facilities. The identification was based on qualitative research, namely, a case study. This study provides a set of internal and external factors with their impact levels. The findings also show that not enough attention is paid to these factors during decision-making. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Test facilities for radioactive material transport packages (AEA Technology plc, Winfrith,UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Transport containers for radioactive materials are tested to demonstrate compliance with national and international standards. Transport package design, testing, assessment and approval requires a wide range of skills and facilities. The comprehensive capability of AEA Technology in these areas is described. The facilities described include drop-test cranes and targets (up to 700 tonne); pool fires, furnaces and rigs for thermal tests, including heat dissipation on prototype flasks; shielding facilities; criticality simulations and leak test techniques. These are illustrated with photographs demonstrating the comprehensive nature of package testing services supplied to customers. (author)

  7. Test facilities for radioactive material transport packages (AEA Technology plc, Winfrith,UK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, J.E

    2001-07-01

    Transport containers for radioactive materials are tested to demonstrate compliance with national and international standards. Transport package design, testing, assessment and approval requires a wide range of skills and facilities. The comprehensive capability of AEA Technology in these areas is described. The facilities described include drop-test cranes and targets (up to 700 tonne); pool fires, furnaces and rigs for thermal tests, including heat dissipation on prototype flasks; shielding facilities; criticality simulations and leak test techniques. These are illustrated with photographs demonstrating the comprehensive nature of package testing services supplied to customers. (author)

  8. Environmental assessment report: Nuclear Test Technology Complex. [Construction and operation of proposed facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonnessen, K.; Tewes, H.A.

    1982-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) is planning to construct and operate a structure, designated the Nuclear Test Technology Complex (NTTC), on a site located west of and adjacent to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NTTC is designed to house 350 nuclear test program personnel, and will accommodate the needs of the entire staff of the continuing Nuclear Test Program (NTP). The project has three phases: land acquisition, facility construction and facility operation. The purpose of this environmental assessment report is to describe the activities associated with the three phases of the NTTC project and to evaluate potential environmental disruptions. The project site is located in a rural area of southeastern Alameda County, California, where the primary land use is agriculture; however, the County has zoned the area for industrial development. The environmental impacts of the project include surface disturbance, high noise levels, possible increases in site erosion, and decreased air quality. These impacts will occur primarily during the construction phase of the NTTC project and can be mitigated in part by measures proposed in this report.

  9. Workshop on CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] spectrometer magnet design and technology: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The planned experimental program at CEBAF includes high-resolution, large acceptance spectrometers and a large toroidal magnetic, detector. In order to take full advantage of the high quality beam characteristics, the performances required will make these devices quite unique instruments compared to existing facilities in the same energy range. Preliminary designs have shown that such performances can be reached, but key questions concerning design concepts and most appropriate and cost-effective technologies had to be answered before going further with the designs. It was the purpose of the Workshop on CEBAF Spectrometer Magnet Design and Technology, organized by the CEBAF Research and Engineering Divisions, to provide the most complete information about the state-of-the-art tools and techniques in magnet design and construction and to discuss the ones most appropriate to the CEBAF spectrometers. In addition, it is expected that this Workshop will be the staring point for further interactions and collaborations between international magnet experts and the CEBAF staff, during the whole process of designing and building the spectrometers

  10. Smart facility location planning using GIS technology & facility provision standards for pro-active planning of social facilities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, Cheri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Smart Cities emerge when investments in human and social capital and traditional (transport) and modern (ICTs) communication infrastructure fuel sustainable economic growth and high quality of life, with a wise management of natural resources...

  11. Technology Leadership in Malaysia's High Performance School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yieng, Wong Ai; Daud, Khadijah Binti

    2017-01-01

    Headmaster as leader of the school also plays a role as a technology leader. This applies to the high performance schools (HPS) headmaster as well. The HPS excel in all aspects of education. In this study, researcher is interested in examining the role of the headmaster as a technology leader through interviews with three headmasters of high…

  12. MOOCs, High Technology, and Higher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    In "MOOCs, High Technology, and Higher Learning," Robert A. Rhoads places the OpenCourseWare (OCW) movement into the larger context of a revolution in educational technology. In doing so, he seeks to bring greater balance to increasingly polarized discussions of massively open online courses (MOOCs) and show their ongoing relevance to…

  13. Silicates materials of high vacuum technology

    CERN Document Server

    Espe, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Materials of High Vacuum Technology, Volume 2: Silicates covers silicate insulators of special importance to vacuum technology. The book discusses the manufacture, composition, and physical and chemical properties of technical glasses, quartz glass, quartzware, vycor glass, ceramic materials, mica, and asbestos.

  14. China's High-technology Standards Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    There are several major technology standards, including audio video coding (AVS), automotive electronics, third generation (3G) mobile phones, mobile television, wireless networks and digital terrestrial television broadcasting, that have been released or are currently under development in China. This article offers a detailed analysis of each standard and studies their impact on China's high-technology industry.

  15. Calibration of high-dose radiation facilities (Handbook)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, B.L.; Bhat, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    In India at present several high intensity radiation sources are used. There are 135 teletheraphy machines and 65 high intensity cobalt-60 sources in the form of gamma chambers (2.5 Ci) and PANBIT (50 Ci). Several food irradiation facilities and a medical sterilization plant ISOMED are also in operation. The application of these high intensity sources involve a wide variation of dose from 10 Gy to 100 kGy. Accurate and reproducible radiation dosimetry is essential in the use of these sources. This handbook is especially compiled for calibration of high-dose radiation facilities. The first few chapters discuss such topics as interaction of radiation with matter, radiation chemistry, radiation processing, commonly used high intensity radiation sources and their special features, radiation units and dosimetry principles. In the chapters which follow, chemical dosimeters are discussed in detail. This discussion covers Fricke dosimeter, FBX dosimeter, ceric sulphate dosimeter, free radical dosimetry, coloured indicators for irrdiation verification. A final chapter is devoted to practical hints to be followed in calibration work. (author)

  16. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    Activities of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) have been performed under an IEA collaboration since 1995. IFMIF is an accelerator-based deuteron (D{sup +})-lithium (Li) neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field (2 MW/m{sup 2}, 20 dpa/year for Fe) in a volume of 500 cm{sup 3} for testing candidate fusion materials. In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was started to reduce the key technology risk factors. This interim report summarizes the KEP activities until mid 2001 in the major project work-breakdown areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  17. Air pollution control systems and technologies for waste-to-energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getz, N.P.; Amos, C.K. Jr.; Siebert, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    One of the primary topics of concern to those planning, developing, and operating waste-to-energy (W-T-E) [also known as municipal waste combustors (MWCs)] facilities is air emissions. This paper presents a description of the state-of-the-art air pollution control (APC) systems and technology for particulate, heavy metals, organics, and acid gases control for W-T-E facilities. Items covered include regulations, guidelines, and control techniques as applied in the W-T-E industry. Available APC technologies are viewed in detail on the basis of their potential removal efficiencies, design considerations, operations, and maintenance costs

  18. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2002-03-01

    Activities of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) have been performed under an IEA collaboration since 1995. IFMIF is an accelerator-based deuteron (D + )-lithium (Li) neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field (2 MW/m 2 , 20 dpa/year for Fe) in a volume of 500 cm 3 for testing candidate fusion materials. In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was started to reduce the key technology risk factors. This interim report summarizes the KEP activities until mid 2001 in the major project work-breakdown areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  19. NPP operation and modern high technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Examples are considered of modern high technology introduction into daily practice of NPP operation, namely: satellite communication systems, robots, non-destructive testing, optical-fiber techniques, laser measuring means and others

  20. High-Speed Sealift Technology Development Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... The purpose of the project was to define the technology investments required to enable development of the high-speed commercial and military ships needed to provide realistic future mission capabilities...

  1. Marketing mix for consumer high technology products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovleac, L.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper includes an analysis upon the variables of marketing mix for high technology products used for individual consumption. There are exposed the essential aspects related to marketing policies and strategies used by high technology companies for providing consumers the best solutions tailored to their needs. A special attention is given to the necessity for inclusion in the marketing mix of the fifth element – the assistance and informational support for customers.

  2. Check experiment of the high pressure water washing technology used to the decommissioning of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jianping; Hou Yongming; Fu Yunshan

    2004-01-01

    High pressure water washing technology has been widely applied in the field of the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and it is used to wash the sump for craft conveyance, the craft workshop, the hermetic sump, and some other nuclear equipment as well. The authors have got a set of technical data correlated with high pressure water washing technology by comparing the situations between the test before and after the washing work. At the same time, authors also improve the technique on some special cases, which made the high pressure water washing technology more perfect in the field of the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. (authors)

  3. Evaluation and Selection of Renewable Energy Technologies for Highway Maintenance Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Taylor

    The interest in renewable energy has been increasing in recent years as attempts to reduce energy costs as well the consumption of fossil fuels are becoming more common. Companies and organizations are recognizing the increasing reliance on limited fossil fuels' resources, and as competition and costs for these resources grow, alternative solutions are becoming more appealing. Many federally run buildings and associations also have the added pressure of meeting the mandates of federal energy policies that dictate specific savings or reductions. Federal highway maintenance facilities run by the Department of Transportation fall into this category. To help meet energy saving goals, an investigation into potential renewable energy technologies was completed for the Ohio Department of Transportation. This research examined several types of renewable energy technologies and the major factors that affect their performance and evaluated their potential for implementation at highway maintenance facilities. Facilities energy usage data were provided, and a facility survey and site visits were completed to enhance the evaluation of technologies and the suitability for specific projects. Findings and technology recommendations were presented in the form of selection matrices, which were designed to help make selections in future projects. The benefits of utilization of other tools such as analysis software and life cycle assessments were also highlighted. These selection tools were designed to be helpful guides when beginning the pursuit of a renewable energy technology for highway maintenance facilities, and can be applied to other similar building types and projects. This document further discusses the research strategies and findings as well as the recommendations that were made to the personnel overseeing Ohio's highway maintenance facilities.

  4. R and D strategy on remote response technology for emergency situations of nuclear facilities in KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Eom, Heung Seup; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Hoch Ul; Lee, Sung Uk; Kim, Chang Hoi; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Seung Ho

    2012-01-01

    Generally speaking, robotic technologies are anticipated to be very useful for hazardous works in nuclear facilities because robotic systems are relatively immune to radiation exposure. But the application of robotic systems for such environments has not been increasing during past 20 years. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts in the design and construction of NPPs, there is very little probability of accidents occurring or radioactive materials being released into the environments. As a precaution, however NPPs are prepared with emergency response procedures and routinely conduct exercises for post accident circumstances based on these procedures. The last year's accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant promotes the needs for remote response technologies based on mobile robotic system to recognize the internal status and mitigate the unanticipated events of nuclear power plants in emergency situations. For initial observation of reactor buildings two robots named 'PackBot' were used because the internal conditions were unknown so as to allow human workers for entrance into the reactor building. But there were severe limitations for the robots to perform the given tasks from various obstacles and poor visibility inside though they provided crucial information such as views of internal structures, dose level and temperature that supported the decision for human worker's entrance. The application of robots for emergency response tasks for post accidents in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots were sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could have received a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI 2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. A robot was used for several years equipped with various tools allowing

  5. R and D strategy on remote response technology for emergency situations of nuclear facilities in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Eom, Heung Seup; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Hoch Ul; Lee, Sung Uk; Kim, Chang Hoi; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Seung Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Generally speaking, robotic technologies are anticipated to be very useful for hazardous works in nuclear facilities because robotic systems are relatively immune to radiation exposure. But the application of robotic systems for such environments has not been increasing during past 20 years. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts in the design and construction of NPPs, there is very little probability of accidents occurring or radioactive materials being released into the environments. As a precaution, however NPPs are prepared with emergency response procedures and routinely conduct exercises for post accident circumstances based on these procedures. The last year's accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant promotes the needs for remote response technologies based on mobile robotic system to recognize the internal status and mitigate the unanticipated events of nuclear power plants in emergency situations. For initial observation of reactor buildings two robots named 'PackBot' were used because the internal conditions were unknown so as to allow human workers for entrance into the reactor building. But there were severe limitations for the robots to perform the given tasks from various obstacles and poor visibility inside though they provided crucial information such as views of internal structures, dose level and temperature that supported the decision for human worker's entrance. The application of robots for emergency response tasks for post accidents in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots were sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could have received a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI 2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. A robot was used for several years

  6. High temperature engineering research facilities and experiments in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodochigov, N.G.; Kuzavkov, N.G.; Sukharev, Y.P.; Chudin, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    An overview is given of the characteristics of the experimental facilities and experiments in the Russian Federation: the HTGR neutron-physical investigation facilities ASTRA and GROG; facilities for fuel, graphite and other elements irradiation; and thermal hydraulics experimental facilities. The overview is presented in the form of copies of overhead sheets

  7. Facilities for technology testing of ITER divertor concepts, models, and prototypes in a plasma environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.

    1991-12-01

    The exhaust of power and fusion-reaction products from ITER plasma are critical physics and technology issues from performance, safety, and reliability perspectives. Because of inadequate pulse length, fluence, flux, scrape-off layer plasma temperature and density, and other parameters, the present generation of tokamaks, linear plasma devices, or energetic beam facilities are unable to perform adequate technology testing of divertor components, though they are essential contributors to many physics issues such as edge-plasma transport and disruption effects and control. This Technical Requirements Documents presents a description of the capabilities and parameters divertor test facilities should have to perform accelerated life testing on predominantly technological divertor issues such as basic divertor concepts, heat load limits, thermal fatigue, tritium inventory and erosion/redeposition. The cost effectiveness of such divertor technology testing is also discussed

  8. OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques

  9. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  10. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements. Annex: Individual Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  11. Protection of High Ceiling Nuclear Facilities Using Photoelectric Sensors and Infrared Fire Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadoud, A.A.; El Eissawi, H.M.; Saleh, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    A variety of different security systems and components are commercially available and widely used. Before implementing a security system, it is important to understand the characteristics and requirements of the facility area to be protected. Technology and manufacturers of security devices are rapidly changing. It is necessary to use optimal security equipment suitable for the surrounding environment of the facility to be protected. Several security sensors can be used to protect the nuclear facilities, such as passive infrared detectors and glass breakage sensors, vibration detectors, and microwave sensors. This work introduces technical specifications, operation and method of installation for these detectors in nuclear facilities. Also a comparative study of different security sensors or equipment is provided. The photoelectric detectors and infrared fire beam smoke detectors are reliable, suitable and advanced security equipment. They can be used in special cases because of their advantages, this includes their long ranges and accuracy in performance. This paper presents a new concept for adapting the use infrared optical fire beam smoke detector as intrusion detection equipment in high ceiling buildings or towering height facilities. This is in addition to their main function, namely fire detection.The paper also provides a study for their types and installation method. Focus is made on the installation and operation method for two advanced security systems, and wireless control circuit for the overall system operation

  12. Highly durable and low permeable concrete for LLW facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagibashi, Kunio; Saito, Toshio; Odagawa, Masaro.

    1997-01-01

    Concrete used for LLW facilities is required to be highly durable. The authors evaluated concrete containing glycol ether derivatives and silica fume as admixtures. Compressive strength, diffusion coefficient of water, depth of accelerated carbonation, drying shrinkage, depth of chlorides penetration and resistance to freezing and thawing were investigated using concrete specimens. Compressive strength, depth of accelerated carbonation, diffusion coefficient of 137 Cs were investigated using mortar specimens before and after irradiation of gamma rays. Results showed that using glycol ether derivatives and silica fume was effective in improving the durability. (author)

  13. Progress in high-energy laser technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyanaga, Noriaki; Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Kanabe, Tadashi; Okuda, Isao

    2005-01-01

    The technological development of high-energy lasers is one of the key issues in laser fusion research. This paper reviews several technologies on the Nd:glass laser and KrF excimer laser that are being used in the current laser fusion experiments and related plasma experiments. Based on the GEKKO laser technology, a new high-energy Nd: glass laser system, which can deliver energy from 10 kJ (boad-band operation) to 20 kJ (narrow-band operation), is under construction. The key topics in KrF laser development are improved efficiency and repetitive operation, which aim at the development of a laser driven for fusion reactor. Ultra-intense-laser technology is also very important for fast ignition research. The key technology for obtaining the petawatt output with high beam quality is reviewed. Regarding the uniform laser irradiation required for high-density compression, the beam-smoothing methods on the GEKKO XII laser are reviewed. Finally, we discuss the present status of MJ-class lasers throughout the world, and summarize by presenting the feasibility of various applications of the high-energy lasers to a wide range of scientific and technological fields. (author)

  14. Cost (non)-recovery by platform technology facilities in the Bio21 Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Gerard; Clark, Stella; Quinn, Julieanne; Gleeson, Mary Joy

    2010-04-01

    Platform technologies (PT) are techniques or tools that enable a range of scientific investigations and are critical to today's advanced technology research environment. Once installed, they require specialized staff for their operations, who in turn, provide expertise to researchers in designing appropriate experiments. Through this pipeline, research outputs are raised to the benefit of the researcher and the host institution. Platform facilities provide access to instrumentation and expertise for a wide range of users beyond the host institution, including other academic and industry users. To maximize the return on these substantial public investments, this wider access needs to be supported. The question of support and the mechanisms through which this occurs need to be established based on a greater understanding of how PT facilities operate. This investigation was aimed at understanding if and how platform facilities across the Bio21 Cluster meet operating costs. Our investigation found: 74% of platforms surveyed do not recover 100% of direct operating costs and are heavily subsidized by their home institution, which has a vested interest in maintaining the technology platform; platform managers play a major role in establishing the costs and pricing of the facility, normally in a collaborative process with a management committee or institutional accountant; and most facilities have a three-tier pricing structure recognizing internal academic, external academic, and commercial clients.

  15. Application technology for optical fiber in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Chang Hoi; Hwang, Suk Yeong; Kim, Byung Soo; Sohn, Surg Won

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to study the radiation effects on optical fiber, to develop remote inspection and image processing system, and to apply image processing technique to X-ray radiography analysis and to laser beam diagnostic system. Thermal neutrons cause nuclear radiation with fiber compositions, so secondary ionizing radiations of high energy are generated. These ionizing radiations from color centers, which increase transmission loss of optical fiber by absorbing propagating light in fiber core. As a result of experiment, owing to Ge, P, and B doping effects the induced loss in multimode fibers has been 5 times larger than that in single mode fibers, the loss at 0.85 μm wavelength region more susceptible for radiations has been twice higher than that at 1.3 μm. Remote inspection mechanism captures images remotely, and the images are inhanced by image processing surfaces of bent or long-straight pipe in hostile environment. Laser beam diagnostic system using image processing techniques can be used to observe and analyze laser beam quality. This system will be effectively applied for laser development and application field. X-ray radiographic image analysis by image processing technique make it easier to inspect and measure irradiated fuel rod, and the accuracy of the obtained data is also improved. (author)

  16. New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.

    2013-04-01

    An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilities—in this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVA—hybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

  17. Test facilities for radioactive material transport packages (AEA Technology, Winfrith, UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Transport packages for radioactive materials are tested to demonstrate compliance with national and international regulations. The involvement of AEA Technology is traced from the establishment of the early IAEA Regulations. Transport package design, testing, assessment and approval requires a wide variety of skills and facilities. The comprehensive capability of AEA Technology in these areas is described with references to practical experience in the form of a short bibliography. The facilities described include drop-test cranes and targets (up to 700te); air guns for impacts up to sonic velocities; pool fires, furnaces and rigs for thermal tests including heat dissipation on prototype flasks; shielding facilities and instruments; criticality simulations and leak test instruments. These are illustrated with photographs demonstrating the comprehensive nature of package testing services supplied to customers. (author)

  18. Development of high-level radioactive waste treatment and conversion technologies 'Dry decontamination technology development for highly radioactive contaminants'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2001-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Dry Decontamination Technology Development for Highly Radioactive Contaminants'. 1.Contaminant Characteristics Analysis of Domestic Nuclear Fuel Cycle Projects(NFCP) and Applicability Study of the Unit Dry-Decontamination Techniques A. Classification of contaminated equipments and characteristics analysis of contaminants B. Applicability study of the unit dry-decontamination techniques 2.Performance Evaluation of Unit Dry Decontamination Technique A. PFC decontamination technique B. CO2 decontamination technique C. Plasma decontamination technique 3.Development of Residual Radiation Assessment Methodology for High Radioactive Facility Decontamination A. Development of radioactive nuclide diffusion model on highly radioactive facility structure B. Obtainment of the procedure for assessment of residual radiation dose 4.Establishment of the Design Concept of Dry Decontamination Process Equipment Applicable to Highly Radioactive Contaminants 5.TRIGA soil unit decontamination technology development A. Development of soil washing and flushing technologies B. Development of electrokinetic soil decontamination technology.

  19. Best Available Technology (BAT) guidance for radiological liquid effluents at US Department of Energy Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallo, A. III; Peterson, H.T. Jr.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Baker, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in DOE Order 5400.5 (1990), directs operators of DOE facilities to apply the Best Available Technology (BAT) to control radiological liquid effluents from these facilities when specific conditions are present. DOE has published interim guidance to assist facility operators in knowing when a BAT analysis is needed and how such an analysis should be performed and documented. The purpose of the guidance is to provide a uniform basis in determining BAT throughout DOE and to assist in evaluating BAT determinations during programmatic audits. The BAT analysis process involves characterizing the effluent source; identifying and selecting candidate control technologies; evaluating the potential environmental, operational, resource, and economic impacts of the control technologies; developing an evaluation matrix for comparing the technologies; selecting the BAT; and documenting the evaluation process. The BAT analysis process provides a basis for consistent evaluation of liquid effluent releases, yet allows an individual site or facility the flexibility to address site-specific issues or concerns in the most appropriate manner

  20. Spanish Minister of Science and Technology visits the LHC magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    H.E. Mr Josep Piqué i Camps, Minister for Science and Technology, Spain, toured the test facility for LHC magnets in building SM18 during his visit to CERN in November. Photos 01, 02: Felix Rodriguez Mateos (right) explains some of a cryomagnet's myriad connections to the Minister.

  1. Spanish Minister of Science and Technology visits the LHC magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    H.E. Mr Josep Piqué i Camps, Minister of Science and Technology, Spain, visited CERN in November. Here Felix Rodriguez Mateos (right) explains aspects of the test facility to the Minister (left). Between them are M. Aguilar Benitez, Spanish delegate to CERN Council (left), and Francisco Giménez-Reyna, Spanish delegate to the CERN Finance Committee.

  2. Spanish Minister of Science and Technology visits the LHC magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    H.E. Mr Josep Piqué i Camps, Minister for Science and Technology, Spain, toured the test facility for LHC magnets in building SM18 during his visit to CERN in November. Photo 01: The Minister (left) with M. Cerrada and G. Babé.

  3. Nuclear engineering experiments at experimental facilities of JNC in graduate course of Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Takahashi, Minoru; Aoyama, Takafumi; Onose, Shoji

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear engineering experiments using outside facilities of the campus have been offered for graduate students in the nuclear engineering course in Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech.). The experiments are managed with the collaboration of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KUR). This report presents the new curriculum of the nuclear engineering experiments at JNC since 2002. The change is due to the shutdown of Deuterium Criticality Assembly Facility (DCA) that was used as an experimental facility until 2001. Reactor physics experiment using the training simulator of the experimental fast reactor JOYO is continued from the previous curriculum with the addition of the criticality approach experiment and control rods calibration. A new experimental subject is an irradiated material experiment at the Material Monitoring Facility (MMF). As a result, both are acceptable as the student experiments on the fast reactor. (author)

  4. Radioactive waste package assay facility. Volume 1. Application of assay technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, D.J.S.; Green, T.H.; Molesworth, T.V.; Staniforth, D.; Strachan, N.R.; Rogers, J.D.; Wise, M.O.; Forrest, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    This report, in three volumes, covers the work carried out by Taylor Woodrow Construction Ltd., and two major sub-contractors: Harwell Laboratory (AEA Technology) and Siemens Plessey Controls Ltd., on the development of a radioactive waste package assay facility, for cemented 500 litre intermediate level waste drums. In volume 1, the reasons for assay are considered together with the various techniques that can be used, and the information that can be obtained. The practical problems associated with the use of the various techniques in an integrated assay facility are identified, and the key parameters defined. Engineering and operational features are examined and provisional designs proposed for facilities at three throughput levels: 15,000, 750 and 30 drums per year respectively. The capital and operating costs for such facilities have been estimated. A number of recommendations are made for further work. 16 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  5. Management of the high-level nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, Marin

    2003-05-01

    This thesis approaches current issues in the management of the high power nuclear facilities and as such it appears to be important particularly for nuclear power plant operation topics. Of special interest are the failure events entailing possible catastrophic situations. The contents is structured onto ten chapters. The first chapter describes the operation regimes of the nuclear high power facilities. Highlighted here are the thesis scope and the original features of the work. The second chapter deals with operational policies developed in order to ensure the preventive maintenance of the nuclear installations. Also managing structures are described devoted to practical warranting the equipment safety function of non-classical power stations. In the third chapter cases of nuclear accidents are analyzed especially stressing the probabilistic risk and the operation regimes having in view the elimination of catastrophic events. In the fourth and fifth chapters the control of nuclear radiation emission is treated focusing the quality issue of nuclear installations required to avoid hazardous effects at level of nuclear reactor operation stage. At the same time set of operational measures is given here for preventing risks, catastrophes and chaotic situations. The chapter five presents both theoretical and practical approaches of the nuclear reactor core management concerning particularly the fuel testing, the water primary system and the quality of the involved equipment. In the sixth and seventh chapters issues of risk-quality correlations are approached as well as the structure of expert systems for monitoring the operational regimes of nuclear facilities. The efficiency of the power systems with nuclear injection is discussed and some original ideas developed in this work are evidenced in the eighth and ninth chapters. Presented are here both the operational principles and models of raising the efficiency of the interconnected nuclear stations and prices' policy

  6. Report on the achievements in fiscal 1999 of research and development of a femto-second technology. Research and developing of a electric power generation facility monitoring system utilizing high-luminance X-ray pulses; 1999 nendo femto byo technology no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Kokido X sen riyo hatsuden shisetsu monitoring system no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Researches have been made with an objective to generate femto-second high-luminance X-ray pulses by using interactions between femto-second light pulses and high-density electron ray pulses, and to develop a technology to use the above pulses to measure objects moving at high speeds. This paper reports the achievements in fiscal 1999. In research and development of the ultra short light/electron ray pulse generating and controlling technology, totally solid laser was used as an excitation source for a mode synchronous laser transmitter. A high-accuracy moving stage driven by piezo elements and motor was used to actively control the resonator length by using the RF reference signals, wherein time fluctuation was reduced down to 100 fs level. Design and fabrication were performed on an electron ray accelerator and an electron ray transporter of the electron ray source system for Compton X-ray. Electron energy of 12 MeV and electric charge of 1 nC were achieved in an electron beam acceleration test. In the research and development of a femto-second high-luminance X-ray pulse generating technology, design and fabrication were carried out on a Compton collision chamber that can generate X-ray pulses with high luminance. (NEDO)

  7. Radiation safety program in a high dose rate brachytherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.V.; Hermoso, T.M.; Solis, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. Several accidents, however, have been reported involving high dose-rate brachytherapy system. These events, together with the desire to address the concerns of radiation workers, and the anticipated adoption of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (IAEA, 1996), led to the development of the radiation safety program at the Department of Radiotherapy, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center and at the Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Medical Center. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control/quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. Measures for evaluation of effectiveness of the program include decreased unnecessary exposures of patients and staff, improved accuracy in treatment delivery and increased department efficiency due to the development of staff vigilance and decreased anxiety. The success in the implementation required the participation and cooperation of all the personnel involved in the procedures and strong management support. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program for a high dose rate brachytherapy facility developed at these two institutes which may serve as a guideline for other hospitals intending to install a similar facility. (author)

  8. Background field coils for the High Field Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbasnik, J.P.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Jewell, A.M.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Chaplin, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The High Field Test Facility (HFTF), presently under construction at LLNL, is a set of superconducting coils that will be used to test 1-m-o.d. coils of prototype conductors for fusion magnets in fields up to 12 T. The facility consists of two concentric sets of coils; the outer set is a stack of Nb-Ti solenoids, and the inner set is a pair of solenoids made of cryogenically-stabilized, multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn superconductor, developed for use in mirror-fusion magnets. The HFTF system is designed to be parted along the midplane to allow high-field conductors, under development for Tokamak fusion machines, to be inserted and tested. The background field coils were wound pancake-fashion, with cold-welded joints at both the inner and outer diameters. Turn-to-turn insulation was fabricated at LLNL from epoxy-fiberglass strip. The coils were assembled and tested in our 2-m-diam cryostat to verify their operation

  9. Current high-level waste solidification technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, W.F.; Ross, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    Technology has been developed in the U.S. and abroad for solidification of high-level waste from nuclear power production. Several processes have been demonstrated with actual radioactive waste and are now being prepared for use in the commercial nuclear industry. Conversion of the waste to a glass form is favored because of its high degree of nondispersibility and safety

  10. Superconducting magnet development capability of the LLNL [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory] High Field Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.; Summers, L.T.

    1990-02-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: High-Field Test Facility Equipment at LLNL; FENIX Magnet Facility; High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) 2-m Solenoid; Cryogenic Mechanical Test Facility; Electro-Mechanical Conductor Test Apparatus; Electro-Mechanical Wire Test Apparatus; FENIX/HFTF Data System and Network Topology; Helium Gas Management System (HGMS); Airco Helium Liquefier/Refrigerator; CTI 2800 Helium Liquefier; and MFTF-B/ITER Magnet Test Facility

  11. Development of technology of high density LEU dispersion fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.; Totev, T.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Materials Fabrication Facilities at Argonne National Laboratory have been involved in development of LEU dispersion fuel for research and test reactors from the beginning of RERTR program. This paper presents development of technology of high density LEU dispersion fuel fabrication for full size plate type fuel elements. A brief description of Advanced Materials Fabrication Facilities where development of the technology was carried out is given. A flow diagram of the manufacturing process is presented. U-Mo powder was manufactured by the rotating electrode process. The atomization produced a U-Mo alloy powder with a relatively uniform size distribution and a nearly spherical shape. Test plates were fabricated using tungsten and depleted U-7 wt.% Mo alloy, 4043 Al and Al-2 wt% Si matrices with Al 6061 aluminum alloy for the cladding. During the development of the technology of manufacturing of full size high density LEU dispersion fuel plates special attention was paid to meet the required homogeneity, bonding, dimensions, fuel out of zone and other mechanical characteristics of the plates.

  12. Overview of established and emerging treatment technologies for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at wood preserving facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearon, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    The contamination of soil and groundwater by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is common to wood preserving facilities and manufactured gas plants. Since the inception of RCRA and CERCLA, much attention has been focused upon the remediation of both active and defunct wood preserving facilities. The experiences gleaned from the use of proven technologies, and more importantly, the lessons being learned in the trials of emerging technologies on creosote-derived PAH clean-ups at wood preserving sites, should have direct bearing on the clean-up of similar contaminants at MGP sites. In this paper, a review of several remedial actions using waste removal/disposal, on-site incineration, and bioremediation will be presented. Additionally, emerging technologies for the treatment of PAH-contaminated soil and water will be reviewed. Lastly, recent information on risk assessment results for creosote sites and treated PAH waste will be discussed

  13. Role of high technology in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion of high technology identifies the characteristics which distinguish it from conventional technologies, and the impact high technology will have in the nuclear power industry in the near future. The basic theme is that high technology is an ensemble of competing technological developments that shifts with time and technological innovation. The attributes which current distinguish high technology are compactness, plasticity, convergence, and intelligence. These high technology attributes are presented as a prelude to some examples of high technology developments which are just beginning to penetrate the nuclear industry. Concluding remarks address some of the challenges which must be faced in order to assure that high technology is successfully adapted and used

  14. Italian competitiveness in high technology industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, S.; Palma, D.; Amendola, G.

    1993-01-01

    A sectoral analysis of 1978-1991 trends in the invention, manufacturing and marketing, in Italy, of high technology goods suggests the need for greater R ampersand D investment by government and private industry and a broadening of the number and type of industries now contributing to the strengthening of this nation's overall high technology industrial base. This is especially the case with regard to the electronics sector in view of the strategic importance of this vital industry and the strong competition being given by the newly industrialized countries located on the Pacific Rim. With reference to the European Communities common market strategies, intended as a buffer against future unified efforts by North American and Pacific Rim countries to consolidate global market share in high technology goods, recent investment trends reveal that Italy's response thus far has been slow and asymmetric

  15. Evaluation of a high-level waste radiological maintenance facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Savannah River Site''s (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation''s first and world''s largest high level waste vitrification facility. DWPF began, operations in March 1996 to process radioactive waste, consisting of a matrixed predominantly 137 Cs precipitate and a predominately 90 Sr and alpha emitting sludge, into boro-silicate glass for long term storage. Presently, DWPF is processing only sludge waste and is preparing to process a combination of sludge and precipitate waste. During precipitate operations, canister dose rates are expected to exceed 10 Sv hr -1 (1000 rem hr -1 ). In sludge-only operations, canister contact gamma dose rates are approximately 15 mSv hr -1 (1500 mrem hr -1 ). Transferable contamination levels have been greater than 10 mSv hr -1 (100 cm 2 ) -1 for beta-gamma emitters and into the millions of Bq (100 cm 2 ) -1 for the alpha emitting radionuclides. This paper presents an evaluation of the radiological maintenance areas and their ability to support radiological work

  16. Process cost and facility considerations in the selection of primary cell culture clarification technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felo, Michael; Christensen, Brandon; Higgins, John

    2013-01-01

    The bioreactor volume delineating the selection of primary clarification technology is not always easily defined. Development of a commercial scale process for the manufacture of therapeutic proteins requires scale-up from a few liters to thousands of liters. While the separation techniques used for protein purification are largely conserved across scales, the separation techniques for primary cell culture clarification vary with scale. Process models were developed to compare monoclonal antibody production costs using two cell culture clarification technologies. One process model was created for cell culture clarification by disc stack centrifugation with depth filtration. A second process model was created for clarification by multi-stage depth filtration. Analyses were performed to examine the influence of bioreactor volume, product titer, depth filter capacity, and facility utilization on overall operating costs. At bioreactor volumes 5,000 L, clarification using centrifugation followed by depth filtration offers significant cost savings. For bioreactor volumes of ∼ 2,000 L, clarification costs are similar between depth filtration and centrifugation. At this scale, factors including facility utilization, available capital, ease of process development, implementation timelines, and process performance characterization play an important role in clarification technology selection. In the case study presented, a multi-product facility selected multi-stage depth filtration for cell culture clarification at the 500 and 2,000 L scales of operation. Facility implementation timelines, process development activities, equipment commissioning and validation, scale-up effects, and process robustness are examined. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Analysis of Debris Trajectories at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Jonathan R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burnett, Damon J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility (SWiFT) on behalf of the Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies Office. An analysis was performed to evaluate the hazards associated with debris thrown from one of SWiFT’s operating wind turbines, assuming a catastrophic failure. A Monte Carlo analysis was conducted to assess the complex variable space associated with debris throw hazards that included wind speed, wind direction, azimuth and pitch angles of the blade, and percentage of the blade that was separated. In addition, a set of high fidelity explicit dynamic finite element simulations were performed to determine the threshold impact energy envelope for the turbine control building located on-site. Assuming that all of the layered, independent, passive and active engineered safety systems and administrative procedures failed (a 100% failure rate of the safety systems), the likelihood of the control building being struck was calculated to be less than 5/10,000 and ballistic simulations showed that the control building would not provide passive protection for the majority of impact scenarios. Although options exist to improve the ballistic resistance of the control building, the recommendation is not to pursue them because there is a low probability of strike and there is an equal likelihood personnel could be located at similar distances in other areas of the SWiFT facility which are not passively protected, while the turbines are operating. A fenced exclusion area has been created around the turbines which restricts access to the boundary of the 1/100 strike probability. The overall recommendation is to neither relocate nor improve passive protection of the control building as the turbine safety systems have been improved to have no less than two independent, redundant, high quality engineered safety systems. Considering this, in combination with a control building strike probability of less than 5/10,000, the

  18. Current developments of fuel fabrication technologies at the plutonium fuel production facility, PFPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, K.; Aono, S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Deguchi, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, JNC, designed, constructed and has operated the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility, PFPF, at the JNC Tokai Works to supply MOX fuels to the proto-type Fast Breeder Reactor, FBR, 'MONJU' and the experimental FBR 'JOYO' with 5 tonMOX/year of fabrication capability. Reduction of personal radiation exposure to a large amount of plutonium is one of the most important subjects in the development of MOX fabrication facility on a large scale. As the solution of this issue, the PFPF has introduced automated and/or remote controlled equipment in conjunction with computer controlled operation scheme. The PFPF started its operation in 1988 with JOYO reload fuel fabrication and has demonstrated MOX fuel fabrication on a large scale through JOYO and MONJU fuel fabrication for this decade. Through these operations, it has become obvious that several numbers of equipment initially installed in the PFPF need improvements in their performance and maintenance for commercial utilization of plutonium in the future. Furthermore, fuel fabrication of low density MOX pellets adopted in the MONJU fuel required a complete inspection because of difficulties in pellet fabrication compared with high density pellet for JOYO. This paper describes new pressing equipment with a powder recovery system, and pellet finishing and inspection equipment which has multiple functions, such as grinding measurements of outer diameter and density, and inspection of appearance to improve efficiency in the pellet finishing and inspection steps. Another development of technology concerning an annular pellet and an innovative process for MOX fuel fabrication are also described in this paper. (author)

  19. Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project. Volume 3, Waste treatment technologies (Draft)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

  20. A Measurement Management Technology for Improving Energy Efficiency in Data Centers and Telecommunication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrik Hamann, Levente Klein

    2012-06-28

    Data center (DC) electricity use is increasing at an annual rate of over 20% and presents a concern for the Information Technology (IT) industry, governments, and the society. A large fraction of the energy use is consumed by the compressor cooling to maintain the recommended operating conditions for IT equipment. The most common way to improve the DC efficiency is achieved by optimally provisioning the cooling power to match the global heat dissipation in the DC. However, at a more granular level, the large range of heat densities of today's IT equipment makes the task of provisioning cooling power optimized to the level of individual computer room air conditioning (CRAC) units much more challenging. Distributed sensing within a DC enables the development of new strategies to improve energy efficiency, such as hot spot elimination through targeted cooling, matching power consumption at rack level with workload schedule, and minimizing power losses. The scope of Measurement and Management Technologies (MMT) is to develop a software tool and the underlying sensing technology to provide critical decision support and control for DC and telecommunication facilities (TF) operations. A key aspect of MMT technology is integration of modeling tools to understand how changes in one operational parameter affect the overall DC response. It is demonstrated that reduced ordered models for DC can generate, in less than 2 seconds computational time, a three dimensional thermal model in a 50 kft{sup 2} DC. This rapid modeling enables real time visualization of the DC conditions and enables 'what if' scenarios simulations to characterize response to 'disturbances'. One such example is thermal zone modeling that matches the cooling power to the heat generated at a local level by identifying DC zones cooled by a specific CRAC. Turning off a CRAC unit can be simulated to understand how the other CRAC utilization changes and how server temperature responds

  1. Shuttle Laser Technology Experiment Facility (LTEF)-to-airplane lasercom experiment: Airplane considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Ford

    1990-01-01

    NASA is considering the use of various airplanes for a Shuttle Laser Technology Experiment Facility (LTEF)-to-Airplane laser communications experiment. As supporting documentation, pertinent technical details are included about the potential use of airplanes located at Ames Research Center and Wallops Flight Facility. The effects and application of orbital mechanics considerations are also presented, including slant range, azimuth, elevation, and time. The pros and cons of an airplane equipped with a side port with a bubble window versus a top port with a dome are discussed.

  2. High level waste facilities - Continuing operation or orderly shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, L.A.

    1998-04-01

    Two options for Environmental Impact Statement No action alternatives describe operation of the radioactive liquid waste facilities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The first alternative describes continued operation of all facilities as planned and budgeted through 2020. Institutional control for 100 years would follow shutdown of operational facilities. Alternatively, the facilities would be shut down in an orderly fashion without completing planned activities. The facilities and associated operations are described. Remaining sodium bearing liquid waste will be converted to solid calcine in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) or will be left in the waste tanks. The calcine solids will be stored in the existing Calcine Solids Storage Facilities (CSSF). Regulatory and cost impacts are discussed

  3. Development of structural technology for a high performance spacer grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kee Nam; Kim, H. K.; Kang, H. S.

    2003-03-01

    A spacer grid in a LWR fuel assembly is a key structural component to support fuel rods and to enhance the heat transfer from the fuel rod to the coolant. In this research, the main research items are the development of inherent and high performance spacer grid shapes, the establishment of mechanical/structural analysis and test technology, and the set-up of basic test facilities for the spacer grid. The main research areas and results are as follows. 1. 14 different spacer grid candidates have been invented and applied for domestic and US patents. Among the candidates six are chosen from the patent. 2. Two kinds of spacer grids are finally selected for the advanced LWR fuel after detailed performance tests on the candidates and commercial spacer grids from a mechanical/structural point of view. According to the test results the features of the selected spacer grids are better than those of the commercial spacer grids. 3. Four kinds of basic test facilities are set up and the relevant test technologies are established. 4. Mechanical/structural analysis models and technology for spacer grid performance are developed and the analysis results are compared with the test results to enhance the reliability of the models

  4. Scientific and Technological Facilities in CIEMAT; Informe sobre Instalaciones del CIEMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaquero Ortiz, E. M.; Cascante Díaz, E.; González Pineda, L. M.

    2015-07-01

    The precise knowledge of the available Resources in an Organization, regardless the work it carries out, is an essential strategic enabler to achieve its goals. Material Resources are part of the resources in an organization, The “Material Resources” expression includes a wide span of elements, because a Material Resource, as a generic concept, is each and every specific physical mean, utilized to get any of the Organization objectives. In CIEMAT, as Public Research Agency, its Material Resources consist of its scientific and technological facilities. These resources are the basis of this Agency numerous amount of technical capabilities, allowing it to carry out its research, development and innovation activity to transfer its results to the society later. This report is a summary on CIEMAT scientific and technological facilities, whose spread can help to show its scientific and technological capabilities, to enable the execution of a wide variety of projects and to open new external cooperation channels. Outstanding among these facilities are two “Unique Scientific and Technological Infrastructures” (ICTS) and the Ionizing Radiations Metrology Laboratory (LMRI) which is the Spanish National Standards Laboratory for ionising radiations.

  5. Inspection technology for high pressure pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae H.; Lee, Jae C.; Eum, Heung S.; Choi, Yu R.; Moon, Soon S.; Jang, Jong H

    2000-02-01

    Various kinds of defects are likely to be occurred in the welds of high pressure pipes in nuclear power plants. Considering the recent accident of Zuruga nuclear power plant in Japan, reasonable policy is strongly requested for the high pressure pipe integrity. In this study, we developed the technologies to inspect pipe welds automatically. After development of scanning robot prototype in the first research year, we developed and implemented the algorithm of automatic tracking of the scanning robot along the weld line of the pipes. We use laser slit beam on weld area and capture the image using digital camera. Through processing of the captures image, we finally determine the weld line automatically. In addition, we investigated a new technology on micro systems for developing micro scanning robotic inspection of the pipe welds. The technology developed in this study is being transferred to the industry. (author)

  6. The development of application technology for image processing in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Woog Ki; Sohn, Surg Won; Kim, Seung Ho; Hwang, Suk Yeoung; Kim, Byung Soo

    1991-01-01

    The object of this project is to develop application technology of image processing in nuclear facilities where image signal are used for reliability and safety enhancement of operation, radiation exposure reduce of operator, and automation of operation processing. We has studied such application technology for image processing in nuclear facilities as non-tactile measurement, remote and automatic inspection, remote control, and enhanced analysis of visual information. On these bases, automation system and real-time image processing system are developed. Nuclear power consists in over 50% share of electic power supply of our country nowdays. So, it is required of technological support for top-notch technology in nuclear industry and its related fields. Especially, it is indispensable for image processing technology to enhance the reliabilty and safety of operation, to automate the process in a place like a nuclear power plant and radioactive envionment. It is important that image processing technology is linked to a nuclear engineering, and enhance the reliability abd safety of nuclear operation, as well as decrease the dose rate. (Author)

  7. Study on applying technology of utilizing long-term materials for corrosion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Chul; Park, Young Kyu; Baek, Soo Gon; Lee, Jong Sub [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Soo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Won Suk [Inha University (Korea, Republic of); Song, Rhyo Seong [Hankuk Aviation, University (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    Nowadays, as the pollution in seawater is escalating rapidly because of fast industrialization, corrosion rate and repairing frequency of seawater facilities in power plant are increasing. In addition, new construction is restricted with narrow limits due to the deterioration of social condition, asking for extension of facility life and repairing frequency. The objectives of this study are to select the appropriate new high corrosion resistance materials and apply them in the field, to make the corrosion data base in accordance with their usage conditions and to predict the remaining life and optimum repairing period by predicting the life of facilities. (author). 77 refs., 54 figs.

  8. Advancement of High Temperature Black Liquor Gasification Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig Brown; Ingvar Landalv; Ragnar Stare; Jerry Yuan; Nikolai DeMartini; Nasser Ashgriz

    2008-03-31

    Weyerhaeuser operates the world's only commercial high-temperature black liquor gasifier at its pulp mill in New Bern, NC. The unit was started-up in December 1996 and currently processes about 15% of the mill's black liquor. Weyerhaeuser, Chemrec AB (the gasifier technology developer), and the U.S. Department of Energy recognized that the long-term, continuous operation of the New Bern gasifier offered a unique opportunity to advance the state of high temperature black liquor gasification toward the commercial-scale pressurized O2-blown gasification technology needed as a foundation for the Forest Products Bio-Refinery of the future. Weyerhaeuser along with its subcontracting partners submitted a proposal in response to the 2004 joint USDOE and USDA solicitation - 'Biomass Research and Development Initiative'. The Weyerhaeuser project 'Advancement of High Temperature Black Liquor Gasification' was awarded USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42259 in November 2004. The overall goal of the DOE sponsored project was to utilize the Chemrec{trademark} black liquor gasification facility at New Bern as a test bed for advancing the development status of molten phase black liquor gasification. In particular, project tasks were directed at improvements to process performance and reliability. The effort featured the development and validation of advanced CFD modeling tools and the application of these tools to direct burner technology modifications. The project also focused on gaining a fundamental understanding and developing practical solutions to address condensate and green liquor scaling issues, and process integration issues related to gasifier dregs and product gas scrubbing. The Project was conducted in two phases with a review point between the phases. Weyerhaeuser pulled together a team of collaborators to undertake these tasks. Chemrec AB, the technology supplier, was intimately involved in most tasks, and focused primarily on the

  9. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment 2015: Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Ashley D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Bernholdt, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Bland, Arthur S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Gary, Jeff D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Hack, James J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; McNally, Stephen T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Rogers, James H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Smith, Brian E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Straatsma, T. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Sukumar, Sreenivas Rangan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Thach, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Tichenor, Suzy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Wells, Jack C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    2016-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to surpass its operational target goals: supporting users; delivering fast, reliable systems; creating innovative solutions for high-performance computing (HPC) needs; and managing risks, safety, and security aspects associated with operating one of the most powerful computers in the world. The results can be seen in the cutting-edge science delivered by users and the praise from the research community. Calendar year (CY) 2015 was filled with outstanding operational results and accomplishments: a very high rating from users on overall satisfaction that ties the highest-ever mark set in CY 2014; the greatest number of core-hours delivered to research projects; the largest percentage of capability usage since the OLCF began tracking the metric in 2009; and success in delivering on the allocation of 60, 30, and 10% of core hours offered for the INCITE (Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment), ALCC (Advanced Scientific Computing Research Leadership Computing Challenge), and Director’s Discretionary programs, respectively. These accomplishments, coupled with the extremely high utilization rate, represent the fulfillment of the promise of Titan: maximum use by maximum-size simulations. The impact of all of these successes and more is reflected in the accomplishments of OLCF users, with publications this year in notable journals Nature, Nature Materials, Nature Chemistry, Nature Physics, Nature Climate Change, ACS Nano, Journal of the American Chemical Society, and Physical Review Letters, as well as many others. The achievements included in the 2015 OLCF Operational Assessment Report reflect first-ever or largest simulations in their communities; for example Titan enabled engineers in Los Angeles and the surrounding region to design and begin building improved critical infrastructure by enabling the highest-resolution Cybershake map for Southern

  10. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2010 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

    2010-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Cray XT5 supercomputer, Jaguar, kicked off the era of petascale scientific computing in 2008 with applications that sustained more than a thousand trillion floating point calculations per second - or 1 petaflop. Jaguar continues to grow even more powerful as it helps researchers broaden the boundaries of knowledge in virtually every domain of computational science, including weather and climate, nuclear energy, geosciences, combustion, bioenergy, fusion, and materials science. Their insights promise to broaden our knowledge in areas that are vitally important to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation as a whole, particularly energy assurance and climate change. The science of the 21st century, however, will demand further revolutions in computing, supercomputers capable of a million trillion calculations a second - 1 exaflop - and beyond. These systems will allow investigators to continue attacking global challenges through modeling and simulation and to unravel longstanding scientific questions. Creating such systems will also require new approaches to daunting challenges. High-performance systems of the future will need to be codesigned for scientific and engineering applications with best-in-class communications networks and data-management infrastructures and teams of skilled researchers able to take full advantage of these new resources. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) provides the nation's most powerful open resource for capability computing, with a sustainable path that will maintain and extend national leadership for DOE's Office of Science (SC). The OLCF has engaged a world-class team to support petascale science and to take a dramatic step forward, fielding new capabilities for high-end science. This report highlights the successful delivery and operation of a petascale system and shows how the OLCF fosters application development teams, developing cutting-edge tools

  11. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-micros risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001

  12. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix II research laboratories and facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    This document contains summaries of the research facilities that support the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for FY 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: (1) Advanced materials sciences and technologies; chemistry and materials, explosives, special nuclear materials (SNM), and tritium. (2) Design sciences and advanced computation; physics, conceptual design and assessment, and computation and modeling. (3) Advanced manufacturing technologies and capabilities; system engineering science and technology, and electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components. Section I gives a brief summary of 23 major defense program (DP) research and technology facilities and shows how these major facilities are organized by program elements. Section II gives a more detailed breakdown of the over 200 research and technology facilities being used at the Laboratories to support the Defense Programs mission.

  13. IFMIF-KEP. International fusion materials irradiation facility key element technology phase report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field that will simulate the neutron environment of a D-T fusion reactor. IFMIF will provide a neutron flux equivalent to 2 MW/m{sup 2}, 20 dpa/y in Fe, in a volume of 500 cm{sup 3} and will be used in the development and qualification of materials for fusion systems. The design activities of IFMIF are performed under an IEA collaboration which began in 1995. In 2000, a three-year Key Element Technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was undertaken to reduce the key technology risk factors. This KEP report describes the results of the three-year KEP activities in the major project areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  14. IFMIF-KEP. International fusion materials irradiation facility key element technology phase report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field that will simulate the neutron environment of a D-T fusion reactor. IFMIF will provide a neutron flux equivalent to 2 MW/m 2 , 20 dpa/y in Fe, in a volume of 500 cm 3 and will be used in the development and qualification of materials for fusion systems. The design activities of IFMIF are performed under an IEA collaboration which began in 1995. In 2000, a three-year Key Element Technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was undertaken to reduce the key technology risk factors. This KEP report describes the results of the three-year KEP activities in the major project areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  15. High Spectral Density Optical Communication Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Nakazawa, Masataka; Miyazaki, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    The latest hot topics of high-spectral density optical communication systems using digital coherent optical fibre communication technologies are covered by this book. History and meaning of a "renaissance" of the technology, requirements to the Peta-bit/s class "new generation network" are also covered in the first part of this book. The main topics treated are electronic and optical devices, digital signal processing including forward error correction, modulation formats as well as transmission and application systems. The book serves as a reference to researchers and engineers.

  16. Technology of mirror machines: LLL facilities for magnetic mirror fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batzer, T.H.

    1977-01-01

    Significant progress in plasma confinement and temperature has been achieved in the 2XIIB facility at Livermore. These encouraging results, and their theoretical corroboration, have provided a firm basis for the design of a new generation of magnetic mirror experiments, adding support to the mirror concept of a fusion reactor. Two new mirror experiments have been proposed to succeed the currently operating 2XIIB facility. The first of these called TMX (Tandem Mirror Experiment) has been approved and is currently under construction. TMX is designed to utilize the intrinsic positive plasma potential of two strong, and relatively small, minimum B mirror cells to enhance the confinement of a much larger, magnetically weaker, centrally-located mirror cell. The second facility, MFTF (Mirror Fusion Test Facility), is currently in preliminary design with line item approval anticipated for FY 78. MFTF is designed primarily to exploit the experimental and theoretical results derived from 2XIIB. Beyond that, MFTF will develop the technology for the transition from the present small mirror experiments to large steady-state devices such as the mirror FERF/FTR. The sheer magnitude of the plasma volume, magnetic field, neutral beam power, and vacuum pumping capacity, particularly in the case of MFTF, has placed new and exciting demands on engineering technology. An engineering overview of MFTF, TMX, and associated MFE activities at Livermore will be presented

  17. High-level waste management technology program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs

  18. High-level waste management technology program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Prospective Teachers’ Tendencies to Utilize From the Facilities of Contemporary Educational Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Gizem SAYGILI; Teoman İsmail KESERCİOĞLU

    2015-01-01

    In terms of effectiveness and efficiency, it is important to determine the views of prospective teachers related to taking advantage of the facilities of contemporary educational technology. This study which aims to identify prospective teachers’ attitudes towards computer-assisted learning was conducted with 140 prospective teachers (86 female, 54 male) who have been attending pedagogical formation education at Süleyman Demirel University in the 2013 academic year. In this study, in eight di...

  20. Development of high power CW and pulsed RF test facility based on 1 MW, 352.2 MHz klystron amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badapanda, M.K.; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Upadhyay, Rinki; Rao, J.N.; Tiwari, Ashish; Jain, Akhilesh; Lad, M.R.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    A high power 1 MW, 352.2 MHz RF Test facility having CW and Pulse capability is being developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore for performance evaluation of various RF components, accelerating structures and related subsystems. Thales make 1 MW, 352.2 MHz klystron amplifier (TH 2089) will be employed in this high power test facility, which is thoroughly tested for its performance parameters at rated operating conditions. Auxiliary power supplies like filament, electromagnet, ion pump and mod anode power supply as well as 200 W solid state driver amplifier necessary for this high power test facility have been developed. A high voltage floating platform is created for floating filament and mod anode power supplies. Interconnection of various power supplies and other subsystems of this test facility are being carried out. A high voltage 100 kV, 25 Amp DC crowbar less power supply and low conductivity water (LCW) plant required for this klystron amplifier are in advanced stage of development. NI make cRIO 9081 real time (RT) controller based control and interlock system has been developed to realize proper sequence of operation of various power supplies and to monitor the status of crucial parameters in this test facility. This RF test facility will provide confidence for development of RF System of future accelerators like SNS and ADSS. (author)

  1. Advancing nuclear technology and research. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Jeff B; Marshall, Frances M [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Allen, Todd R [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. Cost free access to the ATR, INL post irradiation examination facilities, and partner facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to United States Department of Energy. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  2. High-Power Ion Thruster Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, J. R.; Matossian, J. N.

    1996-01-01

    Performance data are presented for the NASA/Hughes 30-cm-diam 'common' thruster operated over the power range from 600 W to 4.6 kW. At the 4.6-kW power level, the thruster produces 172 mN of thrust at a specific impulse of just under 4000 s. Xenon pressure and temperature measurements are presented for a 6.4-mm-diam hollow cathode operated at emission currents ranging from 5 to 30 A and flow rates of 4 sccm and 8 sccm. Highly reproducible results show that the cathode temperature is a linear function of emission current, ranging from approx. 1000 C to 1150 C over this same current range. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements obtained from a 30-cm-diam thruster are presented, suggesting that LIF could be a valuable diagnostic for real-time assessment of accelerator-arid erosion. Calibration results of laminar-thin-film (LTF) erosion badges with bulk molybdenum are presented for 300-eV xenon, krypton, and argon sputtering ions. Facility-pressure effects on the charge-exchange ion current collected by 8-cm-diam and 30-cm-diam thrusters operated on xenon propellant are presented to show that accel current is nearly independent of facility pressure at low pressures, but increases rapidly under high-background-pressure conditions.

  3. High resolution muon computed tomography at neutrino beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suerfu, B.; Tully, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pion decay pipe at a neutrino beam facility and what can be achieved for momentum resolution in a muon spectrometer. Such an imaging system can be applied in archaeology, art history, engineering, material identification and whenever there is a need to image inside a transportable object constructed of dense materials

  4. Integrated Electrical and Thermal Grid Facility - Testing of Future Microgrid Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar Raj Thangavelu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Experimental Power Grid Centre (EPGC microgrid test facility, which was developed to enable research, development and testing for a wide range of distributed generation and microgrid technologies. The EPGC microgrid facility comprises a integrated electrical and thermal grid with a flexible and configurable architecture, and includes various distributed energy resources and emulators, such as generators, renewable, energy storage technologies and programmable load banks. The integrated thermal grid provides an opportunity to harness waste heat produced by the generators for combined heat, power and cooling applications, and support research in optimization of combined electrical-thermal systems. Several case studies are presented to demonstrate the testing of different control and operation strategies for storage systems in grid-connected and islanded microgrids. One of the case studies also demonstrates an integrated thermal grid to convert waste heat to useful energy, which thus far resulted in a higher combined energy efficiency. Experiment results confirm that the facility enables testing and evaluation of grid technologies and practical problems that may not be apparent in a computer simulated environment.

  5. Present state of inspection robot technology in nuclear power facilities. Case of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ara, Kuniaki

    1995-01-01

    In the maintenance works in nuclear power facilities such as checkup, inspection and repair, for the main purpose of radiation protection, remote operation technology was introduced since relatively early stage, and at present, the robots that carry out the inspection works for confirming the soundness of main equipment have been developed and put to practical use. At the time of introducing these technologies, in addition to the research and development of robots proper, the coordination with the design of plant machinery and equipment facilities as the premise of introducing robots is an important requirement. In this report, the present state of the development of remote inspection technology for fast breeder reactors is introduced, and the matters to which attention is paid in the plant design for introducing robots are explained. First, fast breeder reactors are described. The needs of robotizing and adopting remote operation in nuclear power facilities are explained, using the examples of the inspection system for a reactor vessel and the inspection system for steam generator heat transfer tubes. (K.I.)

  6. Small scale wind power harnessing in Colombian oil industry facilities: Wind resource and technology issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo, Mauricio; Nieto, Cesar; Escudero, Ana C.; Cobos, Juan C.; Delgado, Fernando

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Looking to improve its national and international standing, Colombia's national oil company, Ecopetrol, has set its goal on becoming involved on the production of energy from multiple sources, most importantly, on having an important percentage of its installed capacity from renewable sources. Part of this effort entices the evaluation of wind power potential on its facilities, including production, transportation and administrative, as well as identifying those technologies most suitable for the specific conditions of an equatorial country such as Colombia. Due to the lack of adequate site information, the first step consisted in superimposing national data to the facilities map of the company; this allowed for the selection of the first set of potential sites. From this set, the terminal at Covenas-Sucre was selected taking into account not only wind resource, but ease of access and power needs, as well as having a more or less representative wind potential in comparison to the rest of the country. A weather station was then installed to monitor wind variables. Measurements taken showed high variations in wind direction, and relatively low velocity profiles, making most commercially available wind turbines difficult to implement. In light of the above, a series of iterative steps were taken, first considering a range of individual Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT), given their capacity to adapt to changing wind directions. However, wind speed variations proved to be a challenge for individual VAWT's, i.e. Darriues turbines do not work well with low wind speeds, and Savonius turbines are not efficient of high wind speeds. As a result, a combined Darrieus- Savonius VAWT was selected given the capacity to adapt to both wind regimes, while at the same time modifying the size and shape of the blades in order to adapt to the lower average wind speeds present at the site. The resulting prototype is currently under construction and is scheduled to

  7. Morality and ethics in high technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeter, K.U.

    2003-01-01

    The ethical debate about what is feasible culminates, for one side, in the indignant moral question whether man is allowed to do all he is able to do and, for the other side, in the very obligation to keep redefining the limits of creation, and to act accordingly. Consequently, the Young Generation, at their meeting in Gronau, Westphalia (about which we reported), discussed about ''High Technology - Responsible on Ethical and Moral Grounds?'' The paper presented to the participants by pastor Kai Uwe Schroeter reflects this dichotomy, but also takes a clear position in favor of the expansion of nuclear power. This issue of atw contains a revised version of the paper. It is published in the hope that it will furnish arguments for the philosophical and ethical debates about high technology. (orig.) [de

  8. Future Vehicle Technologies : high performance transportation innovations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, T. [Future Vehicle Technologies Inc., Maple Ridge, BC (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Battery management systems (BMS) were discussed in this presentation, with particular reference to the basic BMS design considerations; safety; undisclosed information about BMS; the essence of BMS; and Future Vehicle Technologies' BMS solution. Basic BMS design considerations that were presented included the balancing methodology; prismatic/cylindrical cells; cell protection; accuracy; PCB design, size and components; communications protocol; cost of manufacture; and expandability. In terms of safety, the presentation addressed lithium fires; high voltage; high voltage ground detection; crash/rollover shutdown; complete pack shutdown capability; and heat shields, casings, and impact protection. BMS bus bar engineering considerations were discussed along with good chip design. It was concluded that FVTs advantage is a unique skillset in automotive technology and the development of speed and cost effectiveness. tabs., figs.

  9. Electron beam facilities and technologies developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Walis, L.; Zimek, Z.

    1992-01-01

    The operation of the first electron accelerator has been started at Institute /former Institute for Nuclear Research/ in 1971. This LAE-13/9 accelerator is a two-section lineac with adjustable energy of electrons: 5 to 13 MeV and the beam power up to 9 kW. The main technologies developed on the basis of LAE-13/9 are: sterilization, manufacturing of thermoshrinkable materials and modification of semiconductors. The accelerator is operated 4000 hours per year and used for small scale production and services in these fields. The other problems investigated in laboratory scale are: food preservation and hygenization, hygenization of municipal sewage sludge, and bio-conversion of pig-farm wastes into animal fodder. The laboratory experiments are basis for pilot construction and other industrial applications. The mentioned technology of thermoshrinkable tube production was implemented in industrial scale at ZWUT Czluchow which factory is equipped in the accelerator ILU-6 /20 kW, 2 MeV/. On the basis of similar unit a technological installation was built at Institute. The plant is furnished with a conveyer and the rewinding machines for tubes and tapes manufacturing. This allows continuous production of these materials. The plant will start operation next year and linear accelerator /10 MeV, 15 kW/ for this purpose is already delivered. The pilot plant for food preservation and hygenization has been built. It is equipped in small pilot accelerator 10 MeV, 1 kW and will be furnished with 10 MeV, 10 kW lineac this year. Beside of this technological lines Institute is furnished in Van de Graff accelerator /2, MeV, 100 μA/ and another laboratory unit LAE-10 /10 MeV, 10-100 ns 2 us/ is under construction. (J.P.N.)

  10. Electronics, information, Communication and high technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    The contents of this book are summary of investigation, investigation system, purpose of investigation, characteristic of this investigation, important studying and development filed, compare of the level of research and development, policy, characteristic of the respondent, a future illustration in 2025 cause of hindrance of realization, propel method of research and development, the prediction of the realization period the result of investigation in electronics, information communication and high technology.

  11. Supporting Facility Management Processes through End-Users’ Integration and Coordinated BIM-GIS Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Mirarchi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The integration of facility management and building information modelling (BIM is an innovative and critical undertaking process to support facility maintenance and management. Even though recent research has proposed various methods and performed an increasing number of case studies, there are still issues of communication processes to be addressed. This paper presents a theoretical framework for digital systems integration of virtual models and smart technologies. Based on the comprehensive analysis of existing technologies for indoor localization, a new workflow is defined and designed, and it is utilized in a practical case study to test the model performance. In the new workflow, a facility management supporting platform is proposed and characterized, featuring indoor positioning systems to allow end users to send geo-referenced reports to central virtual models. In addition, system requirements, information technology (IT architecture and application procedures are presented. Results show that the integration of end users in the maintenance processes through smart and easy tools can overcome the existing limits of barcode systems and building management systems for failure localization. The proposed framework offers several advantages. First, it allows the identification of every element of an asset including wide physical building elements (walls, floors, etc. without requiring a prior mapping. Second, the entire cycle of maintenance activities is managed through a unique integrated system including the territorial dimension. Third, data are collected in a standard structure for future uses. Furthermore, the integration of the process in a centralized BIM-GIS (geographical information system information management system admit a scalable representation of the information supporting facility management processes in terms of assets and supply chain management and monitoring from a spatial perspective.

  12. High-yield pulping effluent treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, W.X.; Hsieh, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of this report is to examine the high-yield (mechanical) pulp processes with respect to environmental issues affected by the discharge of their waste streams. Various statistics are given that support the view that high-yield pulping processes will have major growth in the US regions where pulp mills are located, and sites for projects in the development phase are indicated. Conventional and innovative effluent-treatment technologies applicable to these processes are reviewed. The different types of mechanical pulping or high-yield processes are explained, and the chemical additives are discussed. The important relationship between pulp yield and measure of BOD in the effluent is graphically presented. Effluent contaminants are identified, along with other important characteristics of the streams. Current and proposed environmental limitations specifically related to mechanical pulp production are reviewed. Conventional and innovative effluent-treatment technologies are discussed, along with their principle applications, uses, advantages, and disadvantages. Sludge management and disposal techniques become an intimate part of the treatment of waste streams. The conclusion is made that conventional technologies can successfully treat effluent streams under current waste-water discharge limitations, but these systems may not be adequate when stricter standards are imposed. At present, the most important issue in the treatment of pulp-mill waste is the management and disposal of the resultant sludge

  13. Space Technology Demonstrations Using Low Cost, Short-Schedule Airborne and Range Facilities at the Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John; Kelly, John; Jones, Dan; Lee, James

    2013-01-01

    There is a national effort to expedite advanced space technologies on new space systems for both government and commercial applications. In order to lower risk, these technologies should be demonstrated in a relevant environment before being installed in new space systems. This presentation introduces several low cost, short schedule space technology demonstrations using airborne and range facilities available at the Dryden Flight Research Center.

  14. Application of laser cutting technology to high radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauley, K.A.; Mitchell, M.R.; Saget, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    A 2 kW Nd:YAG laser system manufactured by the Lumonics Corporation will be used to cut various metals during the fall of 1996 as part of a United States Department of Energy (DOE)-funded technology demonstration at the Hanford Site. The laser cutting demonstration will focus on an evaluation of two issues as the technology applies to the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of aging nuclear facilities. An assessment will be made as to the ability of laser end effectors to be operated using electromechanical remote manipulators and the ability of both end effector and fiber optics to withstand the damage created by a high radiation field. The laser cutting demonstration will be conducted in two phases. The first phase will be a non-radioactive test to ensure the ability of hot cell remote manipulators to use the laser end effector to successfully cut the types of materials and geometries found in the hot cell. The second phase will introduce the laser end effector and the associated fiber optic cable into the hot cell radiation environment. The testing in the hot cell will investigate the degradation of the optical portions of the end effector and transmission cable in the high radiation field. The objective of the demonstration is to assess the cutting efficiency and life limitations of a laser cutting system for radioactive D ampersand D operations. A successful demonstration will, therefore, allow the laser cutting technology to be integrated into the baseline planning for the D ampersand D of DOE facilities throughout the nation

  15. Novel technologies for the detection of undeclared nuclear activities, materials and facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whichello, Julian V.K.; Annese, Cynthia E. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Division of Technical Support

    2008-07-01

    This paper will discuss the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) Novel Technologies Project and its main goal of developing improved methods and technologies that will further enhance the detection of undeclared nuclear activities, materials and facilities. A major and fundamental task within the Project has been the development of methodologies and tools for identifying, documenting and utilizing nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) indicators and signatures (I and S) to facilitate a nuclear safeguards technology gap analysis. The outcome of this work will provide a basis for a novel range of methods and instruments, the development of which will contribute to the IAEA's overall objective of enhanced detection capabilities. (author)

  16. Technology development for high temperature logging tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veneruso, A.F.; Coquat, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    A set of prototype, high temperature logging tools (temperature, pressure and flow) were tested successfully to temperatures up to 275/sup 0/C in a Union geothermal well during November 1978 as part of the Geothermal Logging Instrumentation Development Program. This program is being conducted by Sandia Laboratories for the Department of Energy's Division of Geothermal Energy. The progress and plans of this industry based program to develop and apply the high temperature instrumentation technology needed to make reliable geothermal borehole measurements are described. Specifically, this program is upgrading existing sondes for improved high temperature performance, as well as applying new materials (elastomers, polymers, metals and ceramics) and developing component technology such as high temperature cables, cableheads and electronics to make borehole measurements such as formation temperature, flow rate, high resolution pressure and fracture mapping. In order to satisfy critical existing needs, the near term goal is for operation up to 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi by the end of FY80. The long term goal is for operation up to 350/sup 0/C and 20,000 psi by the end of FY84.

  17. Qualification of Coatings for Launch Facilities and Ground Support Equipment Through the NASA Corrosion Technology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion protection at NASA's Kennedy Space Center is a high priority item. The launch facilities at the Kennedy Space Center are located approximately 1000 feet from the Atlantic Ocean where they are exposed to salt deposits, high humidity, high UV degradation, and acidic exhaust from solid rocket boosters. These assets are constructed from carbon steel, which requires a suitable coating to provide long-term protection to reduce corrosion and its associated costs.

  18. The forced flow high field test facility SULTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.

    1984-01-01

    The construction of the 8 Tesla, 1 m bore Test Facility SULTAN - I, a common action of ENEA (I-Frascati), ECN (NL-Petten) and SIN (CH-Villigen), is completed. Results on assembly, cooldown and the first operation of the whole system are presented. The SULTAN facility provides a wide range of capability of parameter variations (field, current, cooling) for the investigation of steady state performance and stability of technical superconductors unders nominal and limiting conditions

  19. Does High School Facility Quality Affect Student Achievement? A Two-Level Hierarchical Linear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Alex J.; Urick, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to isolate the independent effects of high school facility quality on student achievement using a large, nationally representative U.S. database of student achievement and school facility quality. Prior research on linking school facility quality to student achievement has been mixed. Studies that relate overall…

  20. Asymmetrically cut crystal pair as x-ray magnifier for imaging at high intensity laser facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U. [Artep Inc., 2922 Excelsior Spring Circle, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Seely, J. F. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Curry, J. J.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The potential of an x-ray magnifier prepared from a pair of asymmetrically cut crystals is studied to explore high energy x-ray imaging capabilities at high intensity laser facilities. OMEGA-EP and NIF when irradiating mid and high Z targets can be a source of high-energy x-rays whose production mechanisms and use as backlighters are a subject of active research. This paper studies the properties and potential of existing asymmetric cut crystal pairs from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) built in a new enclosure for imaging x-ray sources. The technique of the x-ray magnifier has been described previously. This new approach is aimed to find a design that could be used at laser facilities by magnifying the x-ray source into a screen far away from the target chamber center, with fixed magnification defined by the crystals' lattice spacing and the asymmetry angles. The magnified image is monochromatic and the imaging wavelength is set by crystal asymmetry and incidence angles. First laboratory results are presented and discussed.

  1. Application of advanced remote systems technology to future waste handling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kring, C.T.; Meacham, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been advancing the technology of remote handling and remote maintenance for in-cell systems planned for future nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Much of the experience and technology developed over the past decade in this endeavor is directly applicable to the proposed in-cell systems being considered for the facilities of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). The application of teleoperated, force-reflecting servomanipulators with television viewing could be a major step forward in waste handling facility design. Primary emphasis in the current program is the operation of a prototype remote handling and maintenance system, the advanced servomanipulator (ASM), which specifically addresses the requirements of fuel reprocessing and waste handling with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, reliability, radiation tolerance, and corrosion resistance. Concurrent with the evolution of dexterous manipulators, concepts have also been developed that provide guidance for standardization of the design of the remotely operated and maintained equipment, the interface between the maintenance tools and the equipment, and the interface between the in-cell components and the facility

  2. Description and Operational Experiences of the Engineering Test Facility - Helium Technology (ETF-HT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zuoyi; Yang Mingde; Bo Hanliang; Duan Riqqiang; Zhu Hongye

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the configuration of the Engineering Test Facility - Helium Technology (ETF-HT) and the information of its key components and subsystems, which is located in the Changping campus of Tsinghua University. The ETF-HT facility began to be constructed in Jan. 2009. The main objective of the facility is to test and verify the thermo-hydraulic performance of one full-sized modular unit of HTR-PM helically coiled SG assembly. In the ETF-HT facility, electricity energy is used to heat the loop helium, centrifugal blower is used to circulate the helium medium, and the heat sink is one would-tested SG module. Up to now, except for the tested SG module, preheater and hot gas duct under way of construction, the other components has been installed in situ. Via the temporary connection of the installed components, the preliminary operation of the loop has been carried out to test its performances as can be done, which include the loop leak tightness, blower pneumatic performance and electrical heater at partial thermal load. (author)

  3. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, A.M.M.; Paulson, C.C.; Peacock, M.A. [Grumman Research and Development Center, Princeton, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G.H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models from earlier Grumman systems codes are being adapted to this framework. Preliminary physics and engineering models for each ADTT beamline component have been constructed. Examples noted include a Bridge Coupled Drift Tube Linac (BCDTL) and the accelerator thermal system. A decision has been made to confine the ASM framework principally to beamline modeling, while detailed target/blanket, balance-of-plant and facility costing analysis will be performed externally. An interfacing external balance-of-plant and facility costing model, which will permit the performance of iterative facility trade studies, is under separate development. An ABC (Accelerator Based Conversion) example is used to highlight the present models and capabilities.

  4. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, Alan M. M.; Paulson, C. C.; Peacock, M. A.; Reusch, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G. H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models from earlier Grumman systems codes are being adapted to this framework. Preliminary physics and engineering models for each ADTT beamline component have been constructed. Examples noted include a Bridge Coupled Drift Tube Linac (BCDTL) and the accelerator thermal system. A decision has been made to confine the ASM framework principally to beamline modeling, while detailed target/blanket, balance-of-plant and facility costing analysis will be performed externally. An interfacing external balance-of-plant and facility costing model, which will permit the performance of iterative facility trade studies, is under separate development. An ABC (Accelerator Based Conversion) example is used to highlight the present models and capabilities

  5. High-Level Functional and Operational Requirements for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles Park

    2006-01-01

    This document describes the principal functional and operational requirements for the proposed Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF is intended to be the world's foremost facility for nuclear fuel cycle research, technology development, and demonstration. The facility will also support the near-term mission to develop and demonstrate technology in support of fuel cycle needs identified by industry, and the long-term mission to retain and retain U.S. leadership in fuel cycle operations. The AFCF is essential to demonstrate a more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and make long-term improvements in fuel cycle effectiveness, performance and economy

  6. Nuclear facilities: repair and replacement technologies; Installations nucleaires: technologies de reparation et de remplacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The oldest operating reactors are more than 35 years old and are now facing major maintenance operations. The first replacement of a pressurizer took place in autumn 2005 at the St-Lucie plant (Usa) while steam generators have been currently replaced since 1983. Nuclear industry has to adapt to this new market by proposing innovative technological solutions in the reactor maintenance field. This document gathers the 9 papers presented at the conference. The main improvements concern repair works on internal components of PWR-type reactors, the replacement of major components of the primary coolant circuit and surface treatments to limit the propagation of damages. The first paper shows that adequate design and feedback experience are good assets to manage the ageing of a nuclear unit. Another paper shows that a new repair method of a relief valve can avoid its replacement. (A.C.)

  7. Facilities for High Resolution Imaging of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Lühe, Oskar

    2018-04-01

    The Sun is the only star where physical processes can be observed at their intrinsic spatial scales. Even though the Sun in a mere 150 million km from Earth, it is difficult to resolve fundamental processes in the solar atmosphere, because they occur at scales of the order of the kilometer. They can be observed only with telescopes which have apertures of several meters. The current state-of-the-art are solar telescopes with apertures of 1.5 m which resolve 50 km on the solar surface, soon to be superseded by telescopes with 4 m apertures with 20 km resolution. The US American 4 m DSI Solar Telescope is currently constructed on Maui, Hawaii, and is expected to have first light in 2020. The European solar community collaborates intensively to pursue the 4 m European Solar Telescope with a construction start in the Canaries early in the next decade. Solar telescopes with slightly smaller are also in the planning by the Russian, Indian and Chinese communities. In order to achieve a resolution which approaches the diffraction limit, all modern solar telescopes use adaptive optics which compensates virtually any scene on the solar disk. Multi-conjugate adaptive optics designed to compensate fields of the order on one minute of arc have been demonstrated and will become a facility feature of the new telescopes. The requirements for high precision spectro-polarimetry – about one part in 104 – makes continuous monitoring of (MC)AO performance and post-processing image reconstruction methods a necessity.

  8. Best available technology for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midkiff, W.S.; Romero, R.L.; Suazo, I.L.; Garcia, R.; Parsons, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    The existing Los Alamos National Laboratory TA-50 liquid radioactive waste treatment plant RLWP has been in service for over thirty years, during this period many technical, regulatory, and processing changes have occurred. The existing facility can no longer comply with the demands and requirements for continued operation, and would not be able to comply with anticipated stringent future contaminant discharge limitations. Either a major upgrading or replacement of the existing facility is required. In order to assess the most appropriate means of providing an adequate facility to comply with predicted requirements for Ta-50, this Best Available Technology (BAT) Study was conducted to compare feasible technical and economic alternatives in order to define the most favorable technology configuration. This report consists of eleven sections. Section 1 provides a general introduction and background of the TA-50 operations and the basis for this study. Section 2 provides a technical discussion of the unit processes at TA-50 and several other comparable operations at other DOE sites. Section 3 addresses the evaluation and selection of appropriate treatment processes. Section 4 provides an analysis of environmental issues and concerns. Section 5 presents the rationale for the selection of preferred process configurations. Section 6 is the evaluation of operational issues. Section 7 addresses energy and resource use topics. Section 8 provides an economic analysis, and Section 9 summarizes the evaluation and the identification of the BAT. These sections are augmented by appendices. The report identifies the construction of a new radioactive liquid waste treatment facility as the BAT. Based on the information analyzed for this study, this option appears to provide the best combination of environmental compliance, operability, and economic value

  9. Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

    1982-08-01

    This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

  10. Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

    1982-08-01

    This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables

  11. Privacy and senior willingness to adopt smart home information technology in residential care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, K L

    2008-01-01

    With large predicted increases of the older adult (65 years and older) population, researchers have been exploring the use of smart home information technologies (IT) in residential care (RC) facilities to enhance resident quality of life and safety. Older adults' perceptions of privacy can inhibit their acceptance and subsequent adoption of smart home IT. This qualitative study, guided by principles of grounded theory research, investigated the relationship between privacy, living environment and willingness of older adults living in residential care facilities to adopt smart home IT through focus groups and individual interviews. The findings from this study indicate that privacy can be a barrier for older adults' adoption of smart home IT; however their own perception of their need for the technology may override their privacy concerns. Privacy concerns, as a barrier to technology adoption, can be influenced by both individual-level and community-level factors. Further exploration of the factors influencing older adults' perceptions of smart home IT need is necessary.

  12. Potential applications of advanced remote handling and maintenance technology to future waste handling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kring, C.T.; Herndon, J.N.; Meacham, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been advancing the technology in remote handling and remote maintenance of in-cell systems planned for future US nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Much of the experience and technology developed over the past decade in this endeavor are directly applicable to the in-cell systems being considered for the facilities of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). The ORNL developments are based on the application of teleoperated force-reflecting servomanipulators controlled by an operator completely removed from the hazardous environment. These developments address the nonrepetitive nature of remote maintenance in the unstructured environments encountered in a waste handling facility. Employing technological advancements in dexterous manipulators, as well as basic design guidelines that have been developed for remotely maintained equipment and processes, can increase operation and maintenance system capabilities, thereby allowing the attainment of two Federal Waste Management System major objectives: decreasing plant personnel radiation exposure and increasing plant availability by decreasing the mean-time-to-repair in-cell maintenance and process equipment

  13. Potential applications of advanced remote handling and maintenance technology to future waste handling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kring, C.T.; Herndon, J.N.; Meacham, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been advancing the technology in remote handling and remote maintenance of in-cell systems planned for future U.S. nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Much of the experience and technology developed over the past decade in this endeavor are directly applicable to the in-cell systems being considered for the facilities of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). The ORNL developments are based on the application of teleoperated force-reflecting servomanipulators controlled by an operator completely removed from the hazardous environment. These developments address the nonrepetitive nature of remote maintenance in the unstructured environments encountered in a waste handling facility. Employing technological advancements in dexterous manipulators, as well as basic design guidelines that have been developed for remotely maintained equipment and processes, can increase operation and maintenance system capabilities, thereby allowing the attainment of two Federal Waste Management System major objectives: decreasing plant personnel radiation exposure and increasing plant availability by decreasing the mean-time-to-repair in-cell maintenance and process equipment

  14. HPCAT: an integrated high-pressure synchrotron facility at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Guoyin; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Meng, Yue; Yang, Wenge; Liermann, Hans-Peter; Shebanova, Olga; Rod, Eric; Bommannavar, Arunkumar; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2008-01-01

    The high pressure collaborative access team (HPCAT) was established to advance cutting edge, multidisciplinary, high-pressure (HP) science and technology using synchrotron radiation at sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. The integrated HPCAT facility has established four operating beamlines in nine hutches. Two beamlines are split in energy space from the insertion device (16ID) line, whereas the other two are spatially divided into two fans from the bending magnet (16BM) line. An array of novel X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques has been integrated with HP and extreme temperature instrumentation at HPCAT. With a multidisciplinary approach and multi-institution collaborations, the HP program at the HPCAT has been enabling myriad scientific breakthroughs in HP physics, chemistry, materials, and Earth and planetary sciences.

  15. High temperature engineering research facilities and experiments in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yuanhui; Liu, Meisheng; Yao, Huizhong; Ju, Huaiming

    1998-01-01

    June 14, 1995, the construction of a pebble bed type high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) started in China. It is a test reactor with 10 MW thermal power output (termed HTR- 10). The test reactor is located on the site of Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in the northwest suburb of Beijing, about 40 km away from the city. Design of the HTR-10 test reactor represents the features of HTR-Modular design: 'side-by-side' arrangement, spherical fuel elements with 'multi-pass' loading scheme, completely passive decay heat removal, reactor shutdown systems in the side reflector, etc. However, in the HTR-10 design some modifications from the HTR-Module were made to satisfy Chinese conditions. For example, the steam generator is composed of a number of modular helical tubes with small diameter, pulse pneumatic discharging apparatus are used in the fuel handling system and step motor driving control rods are designed. These modifications would cause some uncertainty in our design. It is necessary to do engineering experiments to prove these new or modified ideas. Therefore, a program of engineering experiments for HTR-10 key technologies is being conducted at INET. The main aims of these engineering experiments are to verify the designed characteristics and performance of the components and systems, to feedback on design and to obtain operational experiences. Those engineering experiments are depressurization test of the hot gas duct at room temperature and operating pressure, performance test of the hot gas duct at operating helium temperature and pressure, performance test of the pulse pneumatic fuel handling system, test of the control rods driving apparatus, two phase flow stability test for the once through steam generator and cross mixture test at the bottom of the reactor core

  16. Test facilities for radioactive materials transport packages (Transportation Technology Center Inc., Pueblo, Colorado, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, P.C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Transportation Technology Center, Inc. is capable of conducting tests on rail vehicle systems designed for transporting radioactive materials including low level waste debris, transuranic waste, and spent nuclear fuel and high level waste. Services include rail vehicle dynamics modelling, on-track performance testing, full scale structural fatigue testing, rail vehicle impact tests, engineering design and technology consulting, and emergency response training. (author)

  17. High magnetic fields science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, Noboru

    2003-01-01

    This three-volume book provides a comprehensive review of experiments in very strong magnetic fields that can only be generated with very special magnets. The first volume is entirely devoted to the technology of laboratory magnets: permanent, superconducting, high-power water-cooled and hybrid; pulsed magnets, both nondestructive and destructive (megagauss fields). Volumes 2 and 3 contain reviews of the different areas of research where strong magnetic fields are an essential research tool. These volumes deal primarily with solid-state physics; other research areas covered are biological syst

  18. Simulation of Cascaded Longitudinal-Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (Fast) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois U.

    2015-12-01

    Cascaded Longitudinal Space Charge Amplifiers (LSCA) have been proposed as a mechanism to generate density modulation over a board spectral range. The scheme has been recently demonstrated in the optical regime and has confirmed the production of broadband optical radiation. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performance of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility to produce broadband ultraviolet radiation. Our studies are carried out using elegant with included tree-based grid-less space charge algorithm.

  19. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on research and development of technologies for creating high-performance materials under the industrial and scientific technology research and development project. Control of condensation-based precision structures (High-performance materials for power plant facilities); 1998 nendo dokusoteki kokino zairyo sosei gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu (hatsuden shisetsuyo koseinoka zairyo gijutsu kaihatsu) shukugokei seimitsu kozo seigyo no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The goal is to prepare a base for the development of polymerizing catalysts and precision polymerization processes which will enable the arbitrary control of molecular weight, regularity, branching, and primary structures such as terminal groups, which effort will lead to a remarkable advancement in condensation polymerization and open-ring polymeric material performance. Endeavors are on to fulfill two separate purposes, that is, precision condensation polymerization and controlled open-ring polymerization. In the study of precision condensation polymerization, at issue are basic studies and the development of precision control technologies for arrangement, molecular weight, branching, and matrix condensation polymerization. Also at issue are the development of technologies of position selective oxidization polymerization and precision conjugate high-molecular condensation synthesis. Concerning open-ring control polymerization, precision control technologies will be developed involving branching, molecular weight, crosslinking, arrangement, and the structure of cyclocarbonate open-ring polymerization. Open-ring control polymerization technologies are also under study by use of organic metal complexes. A survey of technological trends is also explained. (NEDO)

  20. D and D Toolbox Project - Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied to Hot Cell Facilities via Remote Sprayer Platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagos, L.; Shoffner, P.; Espinosa, E.; Pena, G.; Kirk, P.; Conley, T.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE-EM's) D and D Toolbox Project is to use an integrated systems approach to develop a suite of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies, a D and D toolbox, that can be readily used across the DOE complex to improve safety, reduce technical risks, and limit uncertainty within D and D operations. Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) is supporting this initiative by identifying technologies suitable to meet specific facility D and D requirements, assessing the readiness of those technologies for field deployment, and conducting technology demonstrations of selected technologies at FIU-ARC facilities in Miami, Florida. To meet the technology gap challenge for a technology to remotely apply strippable/fixative coatings, FIU-ARC identified and demonstrated of a remote fixative sprayer platform. During this process, FIU-ARC worked closely with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the selection of typical fixatives and in the design of a hot cell mockup facility for demonstrations at FIUARC. For this demonstration and for future demonstrations, FIU-ARC built a hot cell mockup facility at the FIU-ARC Technology Demonstration/Evaluation site in Miami, Florida. FIU-ARC selected the International Climbing Machines' (ICM's) Robotic Climber to perform this technology demonstration. The selected technology was demonstrated at the hot cell mockup facility at FIU-ARC during the week of November 10, 2008. Fixative products typically used inside hot cells were investigated and selected for this remote application. The fixatives tested included Sherwin Williams' Promar 200 and DTM paints and Bartlett's Polymeric Barrier System (PBS). The technology evaluation documented the ability of the remote system to spray fixative products on horizontal and vertical concrete surfaces. The technology performance, cost, and health and safety issues were evaluated

  1. Los Alamos High-Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelius, W.D.; Bender, S.; Meier, K.; Thode, L.E.; Watson, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The 10-/mu/m Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) facility is being upgraded. The conventional electron gun and bunchers have been replaced with a much more compact 6-MeV photoinjector accelerator. By adding existing parts from previous experiments, the primary beam energy will be doubled to 40 MeV. With the existing 1-m wiggler (/lambda//sub w/ = 2.7 cm) and resonator, the facility can produce photons with wavelengths from 3 to 100 /mu/m when lasing on the fundamental mode and produce photons in the visible spectrum with short-period wigglers or harmonic operation. After installation of a 150/degree/ bend, a second wiggler will be added as an amplifier. The installation of laser transport tubes between the accelerator vault and an upstairs laboratory will provide experimenters with a radiation-free environment for experiments. Although the initial experimental program of the upgraded facility will be to test the single accelerator-master oscillator/power amplifier configuration, some portion of the operational time of the facility can be dedicated to user experiments. 13 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Ethical perspectives on emerging assistive technologies: insights from focus groups with stakeholders in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsten, Aimee-Marie; Sifford, K Susan; Bharucha, Ashok; Mecca, Laurel Person; Wactlar, Howard

    2009-03-01

    ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGIES ARE RELATIVELY novel tools for research and daily care in long-term care (LTC) facilities that are faced with the burgeoning of the older adult population and dwindling staffing resources. The degree to which stakeholders in LTC facilities are receptive to the use of these technologies is poorly understood. Eighteen semi-structured focus groups and one interview were conducted with relevant groups of stakeholders at seven LTC facilities in southwestern Pennsylvania. Common themes identified across all focus groups centered on concerns for privacy, autonomy, cost, and safety associated with implementation of novel technologies. The relative importance of each theme varied by stakeholder group as well as the perceived severity of cognitive and/or physical disability. Our findings suggest that ethical issues are critical to acceptance of novel technologies by their end users, and that stakeholder groups are interdependent and require shared communication about the acceptance of these emerging technologies.

  3. Technology Management within Product Lines in High Technology Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangee, Kumar R.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the nuances of product line management has been of great interest to business scholars and practitioners. This assumes greater significance for firms conducting business in technologically dynamic industries, where they face certain challenges regarding the management of multiple, overlapping technologies within their product lines.…

  4. Possibility of applying large-scale point cloud/mixed reality technology in decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Kimiaki

    2017-01-01

    After the accident at Tokyo Electric Company's Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, decommissioning projects of nuclear power plants exceeding 40 years since the start of operation began to move in full swing. And four nuclear power plants have already been under decommissioning. Several decommissioning engineering systems (ES) have been developed according to these decommissioning projects. Various problems were clarified and many findings were obtained by these efforts. On the other, advanced information technologies and products such as three-dimensional CAD, CG, 3D laser measurement, computer aided engineering (CAE) and mixed reality (MR) are progressing rapidly. By combining these technologies and products, it has become possible not only to enhance the usefulness of existing 3D CAD data but also to enable high-level digital study that combines reality and virtual models. Furthermore, it can be applied to a wide range of fields such as demolition simulation for dismantling works of nuclear facilities, which is expected to increase in future, human resource development and skill transfer. In this paper, focusing on a video see-through method capable of displaying a virtual object at a correct position of a real image accurately reflecting the positional relationship between the real image and the virtual object, we introduce items that should contribute to the feasibility and usefulness of application to decommissioning of nuclear facilities. (author)

  5. Development and manufacture of a Nb3Sn superconductor for the high-field test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanlan, R.M.; Cornish, D.N.; Spencer, C.R.; Gregory, E.; Adam, E.

    1981-01-01

    The High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) project has two primary goals. The first is to establish manufacturing capability for a Nb 3 Sn conductor suitable for use in a mirror fusion coil. The second is to provide a test facility for evaluating other fusion conductor designs at high fields. This paper describes some of the problems encountered and the solutions devised in working toward the first goal. Construction of the test facility coils will be described in a subsequent paper

  6. Environmental Audit at Santa Barbara Operations, Special Technologies Laboratory, Remote Sensing Laboratory, North Las Vegas Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Audit of selected facilities under the jurisdiction of the DOE Nevada Operations Office (NV) that are operated by EG and G Energy Measurements, Incorporated (EG and G/EM). The facilities included in this Audit are those of Santa Barbara Operation (SBO) at Goleta, California; the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) at Santa Barbara, California; and Las Vegas Area Operations (LVAO) including the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, and the North Las Vegas Facilities (NLVF) at North Las Vegas, Nevada. The Environmental Audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Audit, commencing on January 28, 1991 and ending on February 15, 1991. The scope of the Audit was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air, surface water/drinking water, groundwater, waste management, toxic and chemical materials, quality assurance, radiation, inactive waste sites, and environmental management. Also assessed was compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations and requirements; internal operating requirements; DOE Orders; and best management practices. 8 tabs

  7. Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- monitoring technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Molnar, D.L.

    1994-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and evaluate existing proven technologies for the monitoring of hazardous waste sites during remediation activities and to protect the health and safety of all related entities while complying with government regulations. The study began with a literature search to determine manufacturers and related instrumentation which would be applicable to the most complex (in terms of toxicity and mediums affected) sites. Criteria for monitoring and analyses were established and a functional analysis was performed to select the most appropriate instrumentation available. Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry is the most widely accepted method for generating quantitative data given the characterization of the Winfield site. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, while not a new technology, has the distinct advantage of measuring simultaneously hundreds of gaseous pollutants which can also be sparged from water and this technology received the highest score as per the functional analysis. To protect workers and the public surrounding remediation sites which are known to contain VOCs, on site monitoring prior to, and during the excavation operations, is recommended until enough data are obtained to assess the health risks to workers. The conclusion of this study is to recommend evaluation of both the mobile GC/MS and FTIR systems simultaneously in identical operating conditions

  8. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase task description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, M.; Nakamura, H.; Sugimoto, M.; Yutani, T.; Takeuchi, H. [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai Research Establishment, Fusion Neutron Laboratory, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been initiated to reduce the key technology risk factors needed to achieve continuous wave (CW) beam with the desired current and energy and to reach the corresponding power handling capabilities in the liquid lithium target system. In the KEP, the IFMIF team (EU, Japan, Russian Federation, US) will perform required tasks. The contents of the tasks are described in the task description sheet. As the KEP tasks, the IFMIF team have proposed 27 tasks for Test Facilities, 12 tasks for Target, 26 tasks for Accelerator and 18 tasks for Design Integration. The task description by RF is not yet available. The task items and task descriptions may be added or revised with the progress of KEP activities. These task description sheets have been compiled in this report. After 3 years KEP, the results of the KEP tasks will be reviewed. Following the KEP, 3 years Engineering Validation Phase (EVP) will continue for IFMIF construction. (author)

  9. Information technology systems in public sector health facilities in developing countries: the case of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline Gregory B

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The public healthcare sector in developing countries faces many challenges including weak healthcare systems and under-resourced facilities that deliver poor outcomes relative to total healthcare expenditure. Global references demonstrate that information technology has the ability to assist in this regard through the automation of processes, thus reducing the inefficiencies of manually driven processes and lowering transaction costs. This study examines the impact of hospital information systems implementation on service delivery, user adoption and organisational culture within two hospital settings in South Africa. Methods Ninety-four interviews with doctors, nurses and hospital administrators were conducted in two public sector tertiary healthcare facilities (in two provinces to record end-user perceptions. Structured questionnaires were used to conduct the interviews with both qualitative and quantitative information. Results Noteworthy differences were observed among the three sample groups of doctors, nurses and administrators as well as between our two hospital groups. The impact of automation in terms of cost and strategic value in public sector hospitals is shown to have yielded positive outcomes with regard to patient experience, hospital staff workflow enhancements, and overall morale in the workplace. Conclusion The research provides insight into the reasons for investing in system automation, the associated outcomes, and organisational factors that impact the successful adoption of IT systems. In addition, it finds that sustainable success in these initiatives is as much a function of the technology as it is of the change management function that must accompany the system implementation.

  10. Information and Communication Technologies and Supply Chain in Facilities Management in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Anker Jensen, Per

    This report presents the results of a study of factors impacting Information and Communication Technology (ICT) adoption in the supply chain of Facilities Management (FM) in Denmark. The research questions addressed in this study are: What are the key factors that influence adoption and assimilat......This report presents the results of a study of factors impacting Information and Communication Technology (ICT) adoption in the supply chain of Facilities Management (FM) in Denmark. The research questions addressed in this study are: What are the key factors that influence adoption...... important organizational factors are better FM management decisions, better long term and short term planning and forecasting of FM resources, better overview and control over the budget and the activities that need to be done as well as bbetter service provided to the customers.  Among the organizational...... there are improve and control relationships with FM service provider, opportunity to offer single point of contact also in complicated bundled services, government regulation, and critical mass of users. Among the external barriers there are lack of collaboration among software providers, clients and users in order...

  11. Status of NIF mirror technologies for completion of the NIF facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolz, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    The 1600 mirrors required for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are now coated with the last optics currently being installed. The combined surface area of the NIF mirrors is almost 450 square meters, roughly 3.4 times greater than the surface area of the two Keck primary mirrors. Additionally, the power handling specification of NIF mirrors is 19 orders of magnitude greater than that of the Keck mirrors. The NIF laser will be at least 40x greater energy than the previous LLNL fusion laser called NOVA. To manufacture these mirrors, a number of new technologies (electrolytic in-situ dressing, ion figuring, source stabilization) were used that were not available for previous fusion laser optics. Post deposition technologies designed to increase laser resistance (off-line laser conditioning, solarization, air knives) have also been utilized. This paper summarizes the differences in technologies used to manufacture NIF mirrors from those used for previous fusion lasers and examines potential future technologies that would enable higher fluence operations and extend lifetimes

  12. The impact of health information technology adoption by outpatient facilities on pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deily, Mary E; Hu, Tianyan; Terrizzi, Sabrina; Chou, Shin-Yi; Meyerhoefer, Chad D

    2013-02-01

    Examine whether health information technology (HIT) at nonhospital facilities (NHFs) improves health outcomes and decreases resource use at hospitals within the same heath care network, and whether the impact of HIT varies as providers gain experience using the technologies. Administrative claims data on 491,832 births in Pennsylvania during 1998-2004 from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council and HIT applications data from the Dorenfest Institute. Fixed-effects regression analysis of the impact of HIT at NHFs on adverse birth outcomes and resource use. Greater use of clinical HIT applications by NHFs is associated with reduced incidence of obstetric trauma and preventable complications, as well as longer lengths of stay. In addition, the beneficial effects of HIT increase the longer that technologies have been in use. However, we find no consistent evidence on whether or how nonclinical HIT in NHFs affects either resource use or health outcomes. Clinical HIT applications at NHFs may reduce the likelihood of adverse birth outcomes, particularly after physicians and staff gain experience using the technologies. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. THE DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-BASED TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Sarma V. Pisupati; Chunshan Song; Ronald S. Wasco; Ronald T. Wincek; Xiaochun Xu; Alan W. Scaroni; Richard Hogg; Subhash Chander; M. Thaddeus Ityokumbul; Mark S. Klima; Peter T. Luckie; Adam Rose; Richard L. Gordon; Jeffrey Lazo; A. Michael Schaal

    2004-01-30

    The third phase of a three-phase project investigating the development of coal-based technologies for US Department of Defense (DOD) facilities was completed. The objectives of the project were to: decrease DOD's dependence on foreign oil and increase its use of coal; promote public and private sector deployment of technologies for utilizing coal-based fuels in oil-designed combustion equipment; and provide a continuing environment for research and development of coal-based fuel technologies for small-scale applications at a time when market conditions in the US are not favorable for the introduction of coal-fired equipment in the commercial and industrial capacity ranges. The Phase III activities were focused on evaluating deeply-cleaned coals as fuels for industrial boilers and investigating emissions control strategies for providing ultra-low emissions when firing coal-based fuels. This was addressed by performing coal beneficiation and preparation studies, and bench- to demonstration-scale emissions reduction studies. In addition, economic studies were conducted focused on determining cost and market penetration, selection of incentives, and regional economic impacts of coal-based technologies.

  14. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansley, Shannon Leigh

    2002-02-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

  15. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansley, Shannon L.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist

  16. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansley, Shannon L.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist

  17. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, CY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Wells, Jack C [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL; Hudson, Douglas L [ORNL

    2012-02-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.4 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2011 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Users reported more than 670 publications this year arising from their use of OLCF resources. Of these we report the 300 in this review that are consistent with guidance provided. Scientific achievements by OLCF users cut across all range scales from atomic to molecular to large-scale structures. At the atomic scale, researchers discovered that the anomalously long half-life of Carbon-14 can be explained by calculating, for the first time, the very complex three-body interactions between all the neutrons and protons in the nucleus. At the molecular scale, researchers combined experimental results from LBL's light source and simulations on Jaguar to discover how DNA replication continues past a damaged site so a mutation can be repaired later. Other researchers combined experimental results from ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source and simulations on Jaguar to reveal the molecular structure of ligno-cellulosic material used in bioethanol production. This year, Jaguar has been used to do billion-cell CFD calculations to develop shock wave compression turbo machinery as a means to meet DOE goals for reducing carbon sequestration costs. General Electric used Jaguar to calculate the unsteady flow through turbo machinery to learn what efficiencies the traditional steady flow assumption is hiding from designers. Even a 1% improvement in turbine design can save the nation

  18. The SWARF high energy flash X-ray facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, J.F.; Dove, E.W.D.

    1976-06-01

    A description is presented of the SWARF flash radiography facility at AWRE Foulness, which is stated to be the most powerful flash x-ray system available, in the U.K. The machine consists essentially of a Marx generator, a coaxial Blumlein system and an x-ray tube. The voltage output from the Marx generator (about 2.5 MV from an 80 kV input) is applied to a large re-entrant Blumlein pulse-forming line. Near maximum voltage, an adjustable oil switch short-circuits one end of the Blumlein generator and so applies a square voltage pulse of 65 ns duration to the x-ray tube. The x-rays are produced from a tantalum target which forms the anode of a vacuum field emission diode. The facility consists of two field machines positioned so that radiographs can be obtained from different angles. The description is given under the following heads: modus operandi; constructional details; oil installation; electrical details; commissioning, calibration and electrical data; flash radiography in explosives research; operational control of facility, film packs; radiographic results; further developments; overall performance. (U.K.)

  19. THORS: a high-temperature sodium test facility rated at 2.0 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnadt, P.A.; Anderson, A.H.; Clapp, N.E.; Montgomery, B.H.; Collins, C.W.; Stulting, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    The Thermal--Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety (THORS) facility at Oak Ridge Naitonal Laboratory (ORNL) is a high-temperature sodium test facility operated for the United States Breeder Reactor Safety Program. The facility is primarily used for testing large simulated Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel subassemblies. The facility has recently been upgraded to provide a 2.0-MW test bundle power input and heat removal capability. A new test section, which will be capable of operating at 980 0 C and which will accommodate a 217-pin bundle, has also been added. A 61-pin bundle is currently under test in the facility. A description of the test facility is presented, along with a brief summary of the 8-year operating history of this safety-related test facility

  20. Design concept of radiation control system for the high intensity proton accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yukihiro; Ikeno, Koichi; Akiyama, Shigenori; Harada, Yasunori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    Description is given for the characteristic radiation environment for the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility and the design concept of the radiation control system of it. The facility is a large scale accelerator complex consisting of high energy proton accelerators carrying the highest beam intensity in the world and the related experimental facilities and therefore provides various issues relevant to the radiation environment. The present report describes the specifications for the radiation control system for the facility, determined in consideration of these characteristics. (author)

  1. The CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field (CERF) facility: applications and latest developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silari, Marco; Pozzi, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    The CERF facility at CERN provides an almost unique high-energy workplace reference radiation field for the calibration and test of radiation protection instrumentation employed at high-energy accelerator facilities and for aircraft and space dosimetry. This paper describes the main features of the facility and supplies a non-exhaustive list of recent (as of 2005) applications for which CERF is used. Upgrade work started in 2015 to provide the scientific and industrial communities with a state-of-the-art reference facility is also discussed.

  2. Design Technique for the High-Boiling Propellant Storage and Preparation Facility at the Cosmodrome «Vostochny»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Denisov

    2014-01-01

    to tanks of the rocket-carriers through the pipeline.A direct supply of the prepared component to the rocket-carrier tanks allows a significantly decreasing equipment demand at the launch complex (LC owing to almost full abandonment of the near-launch storehouses and propellant-feed systems.The pipeline fuel remnants are discharged through the branch in the sump from which fuel can be directed to the storage capacities to have its future preparation again.Existing LC versus LC with the storage facility:- Each LC has a separate near-launch storehouse;- Each near-launch storehouse contains several charges to feed fuel tanks of rocket-carrier;- Each LC has the unique systems of propellant preparation.Application of storage facility:- storage facility allows bulk receipt and storage of high-boiling propellant to meet needs of all LC of the spaceport;- there are all means at the storage facility to prepare high-boiling propellant in all required parameters;- high-boiling propellant can be supplied from the storage facility using both transport capacities, and pipelines directly to the rocket-carrier tanks.Advantages:+ possibility to receive and store the bulk high-boiling propellant+ decreasing total demand of technological systems+ simplified spaceport infrastructureDisadvantages:- decreasing reliability rates caused by a lack of reservation of technological systems

  3. Remote mixed oxide fabrication facility development. Volume 2. State-of-the-art review of remote maintenance system technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horgos, R.M.; Masch, M.L.

    1979-06-01

    This report provides a state-of-the-art review of remote systems technology, which includes manipulators, process connectors, vision systems and specialized process systems. A proposed mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility was reviewed and evaluated for identification of major remote maintenance and repair tasks. The technological areas were evaluated on the basis of their suitability or applicability for remote maintenance and repair of a proposed fully remote operating mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility. A technological base exists from which the design criteria for a reliable, remote operating facility can be established. Commercially available systems and components, along with those remote technologies now in development, will require modifications to adapt them to specific plant designs and requirements

  4. Lecture note on circuit technology for high energy physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hirokazu.

    1992-07-01

    This lecture gives basic ideas and practice of the circuit technology for high energy physics experiment. The program of this lecture gives access to the integrated circuit technology to be applied for a high luminosity hadron collider experiment. (author)

  5. Association Between Treatment at High-Volume Facilities and Improved Overall Survival in Soft Tissue Sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venigalla, Sriram; Nead, Kevin T; Sebro, Ronnie; Guttmann, David M; Sharma, Sonam; Simone, Charles B; Levin, William P; Wilson, Robert J; Weber, Kristy L; Shabason, Jacob E

    2018-03-15

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare malignancies that require complex multidisciplinary management. Therefore, facilities with high sarcoma case volume may demonstrate superior outcomes. We hypothesized that STS treatment at high-volume (HV) facilities would be associated with improved overall survival (OS). Patients aged ≥18 years with nonmetastatic STS treated with surgery and radiation therapy at a single facility from 2004 through 2013 were identified from the National Cancer Database. Facilities were dichotomized into HV and low-volume (LV) cohorts based on total case volume over the study period. OS was assessed using multivariable Cox regression with propensity score-matching. Patterns of care were assessed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Of 9025 total patients, 1578 (17%) and 7447 (83%) were treated at HV and LV facilities, respectively. On multivariable analysis, high educational attainment, larger tumor size, higher grade, and negative surgical margins were statistically significantly associated with treatment at HV facilities; conversely, black race and non-metropolitan residence were negative predictors of treatment at HV facilities. On propensity score-matched multivariable analysis, treatment at HV facilities versus LV facilities was associated with improved OS (hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.95; P = .001). Older age, lack of insurance, greater comorbidity, larger tumor size, higher tumor grade, and positive surgical margins were associated with statistically significantly worse OS. In this observational cohort study using the National Cancer Database, receipt of surgery and radiation therapy at HV facilities was associated with improved OS in patients with STS. Potential sociodemographic disparities limit access to care at HV facilities for certain populations. Our findings highlight the importance of receipt of care at HV facilities for patients with STS and warrant further study into improving access to

  6. NASA's Suborbital Missions Teach Engineering and Technology: Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterton, Joyce L.

    2016-01-01

    A 50 minute-workshop based on NASA publicly available information will be conducted at the International Technology and Engineering Educator Association annual conference. Attendees will include middle and high school teachers and university teacher educators. Engineering and technology are essential to NASA's suborbital missions including sounding rockets, scientific balloon and airborne science. The attendees will learn how to include NASA information on these missions in their teaching.

  7. Research and development project in fiscal 1990 for large industrial technologies. Achievement report on research and development of ultra-advanced processing systems (Development of high-level processing devices for electric power generation facility members); 1990 nendo chosentan kako system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Hatsuden shisetsuyo buzai kodo kako sochi kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-03-01

    Research and development has been performed with an objective to establish the processing technology using excitation beam required for the advanced technology industries, and the ultra-precision machining technology to realize the nano-technology. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 1990. In the research on the large output and long life technology for excimer laser, an average output of 500 W or more was demonstrated achieving the intermediate target by developing and improving the technologies for low electric power gas circulation, high efficiency discharge and excitation, and large output oscillation control. In the research on intensity resistant optical element technology, a prototype device was fabricated to create and process axially symmetrical aspherical shapes, whereas SiC aspherical shape creation and processing were demonstrated at the shape accuracy of three microns or better, and surface roughness of 20 nanometers or less, having achieved the intermediate target. Regarding the large current ion beam, a demonstration device was completed based on improvements and test results on the sheet plasma generator. In the research and development of the high-level processing technology, low-temperature forming technology was developed for oxide ceramic thin films by using the excimer laser abrasion method. (NEDO)

  8. Nuclear material facilities - security systems and technology R and D trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, D.; Steele, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the US, physical security research and development (R and D) during the 1970s and 1980s created a body of technology and systems engineering that largely defined the industry for several decades. However, despite today's terrorists threats and risks, the overall funding of new and innovative physical security solutions is relatively very small. Such factors constraining physical security R and D include the expansion of overall security responsibilities, the emphasis on programmatic and business performance, in addition to evolving (mis)perceptions that 'the problem has been solved' or that 'anyone can do security'. Underlying these factors, the lack of robust standards and certifications has limited the development and application of physical security products, systems, and services. The research and development of new security technologies must be evaluated against very demanding constraints - including costs/benefits, emerging threats, and policies. Going forward, the goal will be to create a more comprehensive approach to physical security of nuclear material facilities that matches evolving threats and that will complement the transition to an integrated security/operations management environment. Such a management model evaluates the additional value of increasing security alternatives in addition to determining trade-offs between the programmatic mission and security issues. Correspondingly, more explicit and strategically useful measures must be developed to determine importance that, in turn, will influence security-related R and D efforts. The research and development of security technologies should be based upon identified needs and requirements resulting from a systematic analysis of the threat and other conditions. In particular, security technologies and systems must be evaluated in terms of current and long-term impacts. Such needs are (will be) diverse and will depend upon sustained research investments in a broad range of technologies

  9. A State-of-the-Art Report on Technologies of a Safety Assessment and a Radioactivity Exposure Assessment for the Decommissioning Process of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Kang, Young Ae; Lee, Dong Gyu; Lee, Kune Woo; Jung, Chong Hun

    2007-09-01

    This report is to provide the reference contents of research and development for technologies of radioactivity exposure and safety assessment for development of the decommissioning technology for nuclear facilities. This report consists of as follows: - Analyzing and discussing on state-of-the-art technologies of a radioactivity exposure assessment of a decommissioning for nuclear facilities - Analyzing and discussing on state-of-the-art technologies of a safety assessment of a decommissioning for nuclear facilities

  10. A State-of-the-Art Report on Technologies of a Safety Assessment and a Radioactivity Exposure Assessment for the Decommissioning Process of Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Kang, Young Ae; Lee, Dong Gyu; Lee, Kune Woo; Jung, Chong Hun

    2007-09-15

    This report is to provide the reference contents of research and development for technologies of radioactivity exposure and safety assessment for development of the decommissioning technology for nuclear facilities. This report consists of as follows: - Analyzing and discussing on state-of-the-art technologies of a radioactivity exposure assessment of a decommissioning for nuclear facilities - Analyzing and discussing on state-of-the-art technologies of a safety assessment of a decommissioning for nuclear facilities.

  11. Development of Very High Temperature Reactor Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jae; Noh, J. M.; Kim, Y. H.

    2009-04-01

    For an efficient production of nuclear hydrogen, the VHTR (Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) of 950 .deg. C outlet temperature and the interfacing system for the hydrogen production are required. We have developed various evaluation technologies for the performance and safety of VHTR through the accomplishment of this project. First, to evaluate the performance of VHTR, a series of analyses has been performed such as core characteristics at 950 .deg. C, applicability of cooled-vessel, intermediate loop system and high temperature structural integrity. Through the analyses of major accidents such as HPCC and LPCC and the analysis of the risk/performance-informed method, VHTR safety evaluation has been also performed. In addition, various design analysis codes have been developed for a nuclear design, system loop design, system performance analysis, air-ingress accident analysis, fission product/tritium transport analysis, graphite structure seismic analysis and hydrogen explosion analysis, and they are being verified and validated through a lot of international collaborations

  12. LHC collars - 12 million high technology gems

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Some 12 million steel collars will keep the LHC dipole magnet structures rigid. Their production has just begun. A huge job began last week: the high speed manufacturing of twelve million steel collars for the 1250 dipole magnets of the future Large Hadron Collider, LHC. The challenge is not only a matter of quantity: these collars are very high technology components because of the important role they play in the way the collider works. One of the main difficulties with the accelerator is that the magnetic field that keeps particles in orbit must have the same configuration and intensity in all the dipoles. But when the 8.33 tesla magnetic field is on -100.000 times the earth magnetic field - it produces a very strong force that can deform the 'soft' parts of the magnets, such as superconducting coils. The force loading one metre of dipole is almost comparable with the weight of a Boeing 747 - about 400 tonnes - so a huge deformation would occur without a mechanical component to keep the whole structure rigid...

  13. Spanish Minister of Science and Technology visits the LHC magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    H.E. Mr Josep Piqué i Camps, Minister of Science and Technology, Spain, toured the test facility for LHC magnets in building SM18 during his visit to CERN in November. In this series of photos Felix Rodriguez Mateo explains the operation of the test facilty to the ministerial party. Photo 01: (left to right) Felix Rodriguez Mateo; the Minister; Francisco Giménez-Reyna, Spanish delegate to the CERN Finance Committee; M. Aguilar Benitez, Spanish delegate to the CERN Council; G. Babé and G. Léon. Photo 02: (left to right) Felix Rodriguez Mateos; César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology); the Minister; G. Babé; M. Aguilar Benitez; and G. Léon. Photo 03: Francisco Giménez-Reyna; Felix Rodriguez Mateos; César Dopazo; the Minister; Juan Antonio Rubio, leader of the Education and Technology Transfer division at CERN; G. Babé behind M. Aguilar Benitez. Photo 04: Francisco Giménez-Reyna, partially hidden behind Felix Rodriguez Mateos; César Dop...

  14. Spanish Minister of Science and Technology visits the LHC magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    H.E. Mr Josep Piqué i Camps, Minister for Science and Technology, Spain, toured the test facility for LHC magnets in building SM18 during his visit to CERN in November. Photos 01, 02: (left to right) M. Cerrada, CERN; Francisco Giménez-Reyna, Spanish delegate to the CERN Finance Committee; G. Léon; Juan Antonio Rubio, leader of the Education and Technology Transfer division at CERN; M. Aguilar-Benitez, Spanish delegate to CERN Council; (behind) H.E. Mr Joaquin Pérez-Villanueva y Tovar, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Spain to the United Nations in Geneva; the Minister; Manuel Delfino, leader of the Information Technology division at CERN; bodyguard; Matteo Cavalli-Sforza, ATLAS national contact physicist for Spain; Felix Rodriguez Mateos, CERN; G. Babé. Visible in the left background is one of the test benches where magnets are prepared for installation in String 2: the full-scale model of an LHC cell of the regular part of the arc. The extremity of String 2, which measures 120 m and runs the ...

  15. Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, Thomas; Nelles, Michael; Flamme, Sabine; Jinming, Cai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We outline the differences of Chinese MSW characteristics from Western MSW. ► We model the requirements of four clusters of plant owner/operators in China. ► We examine the best technology fit for these requirements via a matrix. ► Variance in waste input affects result more than training and costs. ► For China technology adaptation and localisation could become push, not pull factors. - Abstract: Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don’t sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no ‘best’ plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four

  16. Physics and Technology for the Next Generation of Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities: EURISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Kadi, Y; Catherall, R; Giles, T; Stora, T; Wenander, F K

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of artificial radioactivity in 1935, nuclear scientists have developed tools to study nuclei far from stability. A major breakthrough came in the eighties when the first high energy radioactive beams were produced at Berkeley, leading to the discovery of neutron halos. The field of nuclear structure received a new impetus, and the major accelerator facilities worldwide rivalled in ingenuity to produce more intense, purer and higher resolution rare isotope beams, leading to our much improved knowledge and understanding of the general evolution of nuclear properties throughout the nuclear chart. However, today, further progress is hampered by the weak beam intensities of current installations which correlate with the difficulty to reach the confines of nuclear binding where new phenomena are predicted, and where the r-process path for nuclear synthesis is expected to be located. The advancement of Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) science calls for the development of so-called next-generation facil...

  17. Advanced high throughput MOX fuel fabrication technology and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krellmann, Juergen

    2005-01-01

    The MELOX plant in the south of France together with the La Hague reprocessing plant, are part of the two industrial facilities in charge of closing the nuclear fuel cycle in France. Started up in 1995, MELOX has since accumulated a solid know-how in recycling plutonium recovered from spent uranium fuel into MOX: a fuel blend comprised of both uranium and plutonium oxides. Converting recovered Pu into a proliferation-resistant material that can readily be used to power a civil nuclear reactor, MOX fabrication offers a sustainable solution to safely take advantage of the plutonium's high energy content. Being the first large-capacity industrial facility dedicated to MOX fuel fabrication, MELOX distinguishes itself from the first generation MOX plants with high capacity (around 200 tHM versus around 40 tHM) and several unique operational features designed to improve productivity, reliability and flexibility while maintaining high safety standards. Providing an exemplary reference for high throughput MOX fabrication with 1,000 tHM produced since start-up, the unique process and technologies implemented at MELOX are currently inspiring other MOX plant construction projects (in Japan with the J-MOX plant, in the US and in Russia as part of the weapon-grade plutonium inventory reduction). Spurred by the growing international demand, MELOX has embarked upon an ambitious production development and diversification plan. Starting from an annual level of 100 tons of heavy metal (tHM), MELOX demonstrated production capacity is continuously increasing: MELOX is now aiming for a minimum of 140 tHM by the end of 2005, with the ultimate ambition of reaching the full capacity of the plant (around 200 tHM) in the near future. With regards to its activity, MELOX also remains deeply committed to sustainable development in a consolidated involvement within AREVA group. The French minister of Industry, on August 26th 2005, acknowledged the benefits of MOX fuel production at MELOX: 'In

  18. Electra Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The Electra Laser Facility is used to develop the science and technology needed to develop a reliable, efficient, high-energy, repetitively pulsed krypton...

  19. Joint Computing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raised Floor Computer Space for High Performance ComputingThe ERDC Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) provides a robust system of IT facilities to develop and...

  20. Intelligent technologies in process of highly-precise products manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhidova, K. L.; Khakimov, Z. L.; Isaeva, M. R.; Shukhin, V. V.; Labazanov, M. A.; Ignatiev, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    One of the main control methods of the surface layer of bearing parts is the eddy current testing method. Surface layer defects of bearing parts, like burns, cracks and some others, are reflected in the results of the rolling surfaces scan. The previously developed method for detecting defects from the image of the raceway was quite effective, but the processing algorithm is complicated and lasts for about 12 ... 16 s. The real non-stationary signals from an eddy current transducer (ECT) consist of short-time high-frequency and long-time low-frequency components, therefore a transformation is used for their analysis, which provides different windows for different frequencies. The wavelet transform meets these conditions. Based on aforesaid, a methodology for automatically detecting and recognizing local defects in bearing parts surface layer has been developed on the basis of wavelet analysis using integral estimates. Some of the defects are recognized by the amplitude component, otherwise an automatic transition to recognition by the phase component of information signals (IS) is carried out. The use of intelligent technologies in the manufacture of bearing parts will, firstly, significantly improve the quality of bearings, and secondly, significantly improve production efficiency by reducing (eliminating) rejections in the manufacture of products, increasing the period of normal operation of the technological equipment (inter-adjustment period), the implementation of the system of Flexible facilities maintenance, as well as reducing production costs.

  1. Role of information and communication technology in promoting oral health at residential aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, Bola; Durey, Angela; Slack-Smith, Linda M

    2017-07-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) can provide knowledge and clinical support to those working in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). This paper aims to: (1) review literature on ICT targeted at residents, staff and external providers in RACFs including general practitioners, dental and allied health professionals on improving residents' oral health; (2) identify barriers and enablers to using ICT in promoting oral health at RACFs; and (3) investigate evidence of effectiveness of these approaches in promoting oral health. Findings from this narrative literature review indicate that ICT is not widely used in RACFs, with barriers to usage identified as limited training for staff, difficulties accessing the Internet, limited computer literacy particularly in older staff, cost and competing work demands. Residents also faced barriers including impaired cognitive and psychosocial functioning, limited computer literacy and Internet use. Findings suggest that more education and training in ICT to upskill staff and residents is needed to effectively promote oral health through this medium.

  2. Experimental investigations of the accelerator-driven transmutation technologies at the subcritical facility ''Yalina''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigrinov, S.E.; Kiyavitskaya, H.I.; Serafimovich, I.G.; Rakhno, I.L.; Rutkovskaia, Ch.K.; Fokov, Y.; Khilmanovich, A.M.; Marstinkevich, B.A.; Bournos, V.V.; Korneev, S.V.; Mazanik, S.E.; Kulikovskaya, A.V.; Korbut, T.P.; Voropaj, N.K.; Zhouk, I.V.; Kievec, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    The investigations on accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) focus on the reduction of the amount of long-lived wastes and the physics of a subcritical system driven with an external neutron source. This paper presents the experimental facility 'Yalina' which was designed and created at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus in the framework of the ISTC project no. B-070 to study the peculiarities of ADTT in thermal spectrum. A detailed description of the assembly, neutron generator and a preliminary analysis of some calculated and experimental data (multiplication factor, neutron flux density distribution in the assembly, transmutation rates of some long-lived fission products and minor actinides) are presented. (authors)

  3. A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

    1998-01-01

    A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

  4. National Ignition Facility quality assurance plan for laser materials and optical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1996-05-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This subtier Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) applies to activities of the Laser Materials & Optical Technology (LM&OT) organization and its subcontractors. It responds to the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, L-15958-2, NIF-95-499) and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C. This Plan is organized according to 10 Quality Assurance (QA) criteria and subelements of a management system as outlined in the NIF QAPP. This Plan describes how those QA requirements are met. This Plan is authorized by the Associate Project Leader for the LM&OT organization, who has assigned responsibility to the Optics QA engineer to maintain this plan, with the assistance of the NIF QA organization. This Plan governs quality-affecting activities associated with: design; procurement; fabrication; testing and acceptance; handling and storage; and installation of NIF Project optical components into mounts and subassemblies.

  5. Identifying concepts for studying implementation of information technology in facilities management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Poul; Bonke, Sten

    2014-01-01

    . Background: Experiences from the FM sector indicate that IT systems meant to support FM operations and workflows often do not generate the expected added value neither to the FM department itself nor to the basic organization supported by the FM department. Approach (Theory/Methodology): Based on findings......Purpose: To contribute to identifying a conceptual framework for describing and understanding the processes involved when implementing and using Information Technology (IT) in Facilities Management (FM). This paper discusses how basic concepts from different theories can be applied in parallel when...... from exciting research on IT implementation a range of more generic theoretical concepts applicable to the typical setting or situation of IT implementation in FM has been found. These theoretical concepts all clarify and describe different aspects of the implementation process and they may all...

  6. Development of corrective measures technology for shallow land burial facilities at arid sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Abeele, W.V.; Perkins, B.A.; Lane, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The field research program involving corrective measure technologies for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments was measured and compared with similar data from agricultural systems across the United States. Field testing of biointrustion barriers at closed-out waste disposal sites at Los Alamos and in the experimental clusters are reported. The final results of an experiment designed to measure the extent of contaminant transport to the surface of a SLB facility, and the influence of plants on this relationship, are presented. An experiment designed to determine the effects of subsidence on the performance of a cobble-gravel biobarrier system is described and current field data are presented. 11 references, 11 figures, 5 tables

  7. Beam Position Monitor and Energy Analysis at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, David Juarez [Univ. of Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-08-01

    Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility has produced its first beam with an energy of 20 MeV. This energy is obtained by the acceleration at the Electron Gun and the Capture Cavity 2 (CC2). When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one International Liner Collider (ILC)-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We calculated the total energy of the beam and the corresponding energy to the Electron Gun and CC2. Subsequently, a Beam Position Monitors (BPM) error analysis was done, to calculate the device actual resolution.

  8. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  9. Distribution and behavior of tritium in the Coolant-Salt Technology Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Smith, A.N.; Engel, J.R.

    1977-04-01

    A 1000-MW(e) Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) is expected to produce 2420 Ci/day of tritium. As much as 60 percent of the tritium produced may be transported to the reactor steam system (assuming no retention by the secondary coolant salt), where it would be released to the environment. Such a release rate would be unacceptable. Experiments were conducted in an engineering-scale facility--the Coolant-Salt Technology Facility (CSTF)--to examine the potential of sodium fluoroborate, the proposed coolant salt for an MSBR, for sequestering tritium. The salt was believed to contain chemical species capable of trapping tritium. A series of 5 experiments--3 transient and 2 steady-state experiments--was conducted from July of 1975 through June of 1976 where tritium was added to the CSTF. The CSTF circulated sodium fluoroborate at temperatures and pressures typical of MSBR operating conditions. Results from the experiments indicated that over 90 percent of tritium added at steady-state conditions was trapped by sodium fluoroborate and appeared in the off-gas system in a chemically combined (water-soluble) form and that a total of approximately 98 percent of the tritium added at steady-state conditions was removed through the off-gas system overall

  10. Advances in technology for the construction of deep-underground facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-31

    The workshop was organized in order to address technological issues important to decisions regarding the feasibility of strategic options. The objectives of the workshop were to establish the current technological capabilities for deep-underground construction, to project those capabilities through the compressed schedule proposed for construction, and to identify promising directions for timely allocation of existing research and development resources. The earth has been used as a means of protection and safekeeping for many centuries. Recently, the thickness of the earth cover required for this purpose has been extended to the 2,000- to 3,000-ft range in structures contemplated for nuclear-waste disposal, energy storage, and strategic systems. For defensive missile basing, it is now perceived that the magnitude of the threat has increased through better delivery systems, larger payloads, and variable tactics of attack. Thus, depths of 3,000 to 8,000 ft are being considered seriously for such facilities. Moreover, it appears desirable that the facilities be operational (if not totally complete) for defensive purposes within a five-year construction schedule. Deep excavations such as mines are similar in many respects to nearsurface tunnels and caverns for transit, rail, sewer, water, hydroelectric, and highway projects. But the differences that do exist are significant. Major distinctions between shallow and deep construction derive from the stress fields and behavior of earth materials around the openings. Different methodologies are required to accommodate other variations resulting from increased depth, such as elevated temperatures, reduced capability for site exploration, and limited access during project execution. This report addresses these and other questions devoted to geotechnical characterization, design, construction, and excavation equipment.

  11. Sodium and cover gas chemistry in the high temperature sodium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, J.J.; Duncan, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    The equipment and procedures used in following sodium and cover gas chemistry changes in the High Temperature Sodium Facility are presented. The methods of analysis and results obtained are given. Impurity trends which have been measured during the facility operations are discussed

  12. ORNL shielded facilities capable of remote handling of highly radioactive beta--gamma emitting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitson, W.R.

    1977-09-01

    A survey of ORNL facilities having adequate shielding and containment for the remote handling of experimental quantities of highly radioactive beta-gamma emitting materials is summarized. Portions of the detailed descriptions of these facilities previously published in ORNL/TM-1268 are still valid and are repeated

  13. Systems Design and Experimental Evaluation of a High-Altitude Relight Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Brendan

    Novel advances in gas turbine engine combustor technology, led by endeavors into fuel efficiency and demanding environmental regulations, have been fraught with performance and safety concerns. While the majority of low emissions gas turbine engine combustor technology has been necessary for power generation applications, the push for ultra-low NOx combustion in aircraft jet engines has been ever present. Recent state-of-the-art combustor designs notably tackle historic emissions challenges by operating at fuel-lean conditions, which are characterized by an increase in the amount of air flow sent to the primary combustion zone. While beneficial in reducing NOx emissions, the fuel-lean mechanisms that characterize these combustor designs rely heavily upon high-energy and high-velocity air flows to sufficiently mix and atomize fuel droplets, ultimately leading to flame stability concerns during low-power operation. When operating at high-altitude conditions, these issues are further exacerbated by the presence of low ambient air pressures and temperatures, which can lead to engine flame-out situations and hamper engine relight attempts. To aid academic and industrial research ventures into improving the high-altitude lean blow-out and relight performance of modern gas turbine engine combustor technologies, the High-Altitude Relight Test Facility (HARTF) was designed and constructed at the University of Cincinnati (UC) Combustion and Fire Research Laboratory (CFRL). Following its construction, an experimental evaluation of its abilities to facilitate optically-accessible ignition, combustion, and spray testing for gas turbine engine combustor hardware at simulated high-altitude conditions was performed. In its evaluation, performance limit references were established through testing of the HARTF vacuum and cryogenic air-chilling capabilities. These tests were conducted with regard to end-user control---the creation and the maintenance of a realistic high

  14. Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Thomas; Nelles, Michael; Flamme, Sabine; Jinming, Cai

    2012-11-01

    Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the

  15. Development of 3D Visualization Technology for Medium-and Large-sized Radioactive Metal Wastes from Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A Rim; Park, Chan Hee; Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Rinah; Moon, Joo Hyun [Dongguk Univ., Gyongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The most important point of decommissioning nuclear facilities and nuclear power plants is to spend less money and do this process safely. In order to perform a better decommissioning nuclear facilities and nuclear power plants, a data base of radioactive waste from decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities should be constructed. This data base is described herein, from the radioactive nuclide to the shape of component of nuclear facilities, and representative results of the status and analysis are presented. With the increase in number of nuclear facilities at the end of their useful life, the demand of decommissioning technologies will continue to grow for years to come. This analysis of medium-and large-sized radioactive metal wastes and 3D visualization technology of the radioactive metal wastes using the 3D-SCAN are planned to be used for constructing data bases. The data bases are expected to be used on development of the basic technologies for decommissioning nuclear facilities 4 session.

  16. Fuels and materials research under the high neutron fluence using a fast reactor Joyo and post-irradiation examination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Tomonori; Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi; Suzuki, Soju

    2009-01-01

    The experimental fast reactor Joyo at Oarai Research and Development Center (ORDC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is Japan's sodium-cooled fast reactor (FR). In 2003, this reactor's upgrade to the 140MWt MK-III core was completed to increase the irradiation testing capability. The MK-III core provides the fast neutron flux of 4.0x10 15 n/cm 2 s as an irradiation test bed for improving the fuels and material of FR in Japan. Three post-irradiation examination (PIE) facilities named FMF, MMF and AGF related to Joyo are in ORDC. Irradiated subassemblies and core components are carried into the FMF (Fuel Monitoring Facility) and conducted nondestructive examinations. Each subassembly is disassembled to conduct some destructive examinations and to prepare the fuel and material samples for further detailed examinations. Fuel samples are sent to the AGF (Alpha-Gamma Facility), and material samples are sent to the MMF (Materials Monitoring Facility). These overall and elaborate data provided by PIE contribute to investigate the irradiation effect and behavior of fuels and materials. This facility complex is indispensable to promote the R and D of FR in Japan. And, the function and technology of irradiation test and PIE enable to contribute to the R and D of innovative fission or fusion reactor material which will be required to use under the high neutron exposure. (author)

  17. Strategic avionics technology definition studies. Subtask 3-1A3: Electrical Actuation (ELA) Systems Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J. P.; Cureton, K. L.; Olsen, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Future aerospace vehicles will require use of the Electrical Actuator systems for flight control elements. This report presents a proposed ELA Test Facility for dynamic evaluation of high power linear Electrical Actuators with primary emphasis on Thrust Vector Control actuators. Details of the mechanical design, power and control systems, and data acquisition capability of the test facility are presented. A test procedure for evaluating the performance of the ELA Test Facility is also included.

  18. Climbing Up the Technology Ladder? High-Technology Exports in China and Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Kevin P.; Porzecanski, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we determine the “dynamic revealed competitiveness position” (DRCP) of nations for high technology exports between 1980 and 2005. We find that the developed world has lost significant market share in high technology and that China has climbed the high technology ladder during this period. In 1980 China was ranked 99th of all nations in terms of the percentage of global exports in high technology. By 2005 China climbed to second place in the world, first place if high technology ...

  19. High efficiency combined heat and power facilities - benefits and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.

    2001-01-01

    There are important linkages between the economy, energy production, the environment and our health. Where thermal energy is needed, distributed Combined Heat and Power facilities, using gas turbines, reciprocating engines and future fuel cells can provide significant improvements to our long term mix of energy production. Local generation can also have benefits in security of energy supply and economic savings. This paper is intended to discuss the relevant air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from modem CHP plants, the emission prevention and reduction methods available, and their operating experience and cost-effectiveness. Mention is made of recently constructed industrial and commercial plants, and institutional barriers to further development. Solutions described for these barriers include the need for more awareness of opportunities, improved access to the electricity grid, the proper design balance between thermal and electric for CHP systems rather than large combined cycles, improved corporate taxation incentives, and the assessment of all environmental and economic benefits when considering such cleaner sources in a restructured energy market. (author)

  20. High temperature facility for atomic physics studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop a laser heated plasma sample for atomic physics studies in the 30 to 100 eV range of electron temperature and the 3 x 10 17 to 10 18 cm -3 range in electron density are presented. The approach used was discussed in detail in Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc., (MSNW) Proposal 1660, that is, the laser breakdown mode of heating in a slow solenoid. An extensive rework of the plasma sample facility was done in order to use this mode of heating. Specifically, a new solenoid magnet was constructed to allow higher field operation and the plasma chamber was modified to allow the use of puff filling orifices and small bore tube liners. The vacuum system and focussing optics were changed to allow the use of an on-axis Cassagranian system capable of focussing the laser radiation to a nearly diffraction limited spot as is necessary when heating through a small aperture. The 10 liter CO 2 laser optics were charged to an unstable oscillator configuration and additional windows were provided into the optical cavity for alignment purposes

  1. Recovery of spent high intensity neutron sources in Atalante Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, P.; Boyer Deslys, V.; Millet, A.; Solinhac, I.; Donnet, L.; Maillard, C.; Paillard, S.; Ranchoux, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Atalante facility is required by law to recover both neutron and gamma sources with activity levels exceeding 300 mCi. Most of the neutron sources consist of mixtures of alpha-emitters (238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am or 244Cm) and beryllium. Several processes now under consideration are based on routine chemical separation techniques (selective precipitation, extraction chromatography, ion exchange). The treatment produces an actinide oxide (which is used later for R and D studies) and solid beryllium nitrate, which is considered as a waste and transferred to a surface interim storage site if the overall activity of the package after 300 years is less than 50 MBq (ANDRA specifications). The Material Analysis and Metrology Laboratory of Atalante validate the residual alpha activity in the waste. The techniques used include alpha spectrometry and L-line X-ray fluorescence for alpha emitters, and plasma torch measurements (ICP-AES and ICP-MS) for beryllium analysis. Specific equipment for transport (B type cask), storage and treatment (hot shielded cells) are used for this activity. (Author)

  2. Person-centered care and engagement via technology of residents with dementia in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Anita M Y; Loi, Samantha M; Westphal, Alissa; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2017-12-01

    Touchscreen technology (TT) is a resource that can improve the quality of life of residents with dementia, and care staff, in residential aged care facilities (RACF) through a person-centered care approach. To enable the use of TTs to engage and benefit people with dementia in RACFs, education is needed to explore how these devices may be used, what facilitates use, and how to address barriers. We sought to provide education and explore RACF staff views and barriers on using TT to engage their residents with dementia. An educational session on using TT with residents with dementia was given to staff from three long-term RACFs in Melbourne, Australia. A cross-sectional convenience sample of 17 staff members (personal care attendants, registered nurses, enrolled nurses, allied health clinicians, and domestic staff) who attended were administered questionnaires pre- and post-sessions. As a result of the education seminar, they were significantly more confident in their ability to use TT devices with residents. TT, and education to staff about its use with residents with dementia, is a useful strategy to enhance RACF staff knowledge and confidence, thereby enhancing the use of technology in RACFs in order to improve care standards in people with dementia.

  3. The development of a mobile hot cell facility for the conditioning of spent high activity radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebenberg, G.R.; Al-Mughrabi, M.

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Waste Technology Section with additional support from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) through the IAEA Nuclear Security Fund has funded the design, fabrication, evaluation, and testing of a portable hot cell intended to address the problem of disused Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) in obsolete irradiation devices such as teletherapy heads and dry irradiators. The project is initially targeting the African continent but expected soon to expand to Latin America and Asia. This hot cell allows source removal, characterization, consolidation, repackaging in modern storage shields, and secure storage of high risk SHARS at national radioactive waste storage facilities. (authors)

  4. High-adiabat high-foot inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the national ignition facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H-S; Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Casey, D T; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Döppner, T; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; Patel, P K; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Salmonson, J D; Kline, J L

    2014-02-07

    This Letter reports on a series of high-adiabat implosions of cryogenic layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser drive pulse at the National Ignition Facility. High-foot implosions have high ablation velocities and large density gradient scale lengths and are more resistant to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot. Indeed, the observed hot spot mix in these implosions was low and the measured neutron yields were typically 50% (or higher) of the yields predicted by simulation. On one high performing shot (N130812), 1.7 MJ of laser energy at a peak power of 350 TW was used to obtain a peak hohlraum radiation temperature of ∼300  eV. The resulting experimental neutron yield was (2.4±0.05)×10(15) DT, the fuel ρR was (0.86±0.063)  g/cm2, and the measured Tion was (4.2±0.16)  keV, corresponding to 8 kJ of fusion yield, with ∼1/3 of the yield caused by self-heating of the fuel by α particles emitted in the initial reactions. The generalized Lawson criteria, an ignition metric, was 0.43 and the neutron yield was ∼70% of the value predicted by simulations that include α-particle self-heating.

  5. GIF++: A new CERN Irradiation Facility to test large-area particle detectors for the High-Luminosity LHC program

    CERN Document Server

    Guida, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade is setting a new challenge for particle detector technologies. The increase in luminosity will produce a higher particle background with respect to present conditions. To study performance and stability of detectors at LHC and future HL-LHC upgrades, a new dedicated facility has been built at CERN: the new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++). The GIF++ is a unique place where high energy charged particle beams (mainly muons) are combined with gammas from a 14 TBq 137Cesium source which simulates the background radiation expected at the LHC experiments. Several centralized services and infrastructures are made available to the LHC detector community to facilitate the different R&D; programs.

  6. Smart facility location planning for Smart Cities: using GIS technology and facility provision standards for pro-active planning of social facilities to support smart growth

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, Chéri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available step toward “smart” planning processes to support smart cities of the future. A case study application in Cape Town is used to illustrate the application of the methodology of spatially matching supply and demand for facilities using GIS tools...

  7. Prospective Teachers’ Tendencies to Utilize From the Facilities of Contemporary Educational Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizem SAYGILI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In terms of effectiveness and efficiency, it is important to determine the views of prospective teachers related to taking advantage of the facilities of contemporary educational technology. This study which aims to identify prospective teachers’ attitudes towards computer-assisted learning was conducted with 140 prospective teachers (86 female, 54 male who have been attending pedagogical formation education at Süleyman Demirel University in the 2013 academic year. In this study, in eight different fields of prospective teachers' attitudes towards computer assisted education were examined with different variables such as gender, major and graduation year. As a data collection tool, the "Computer Assisted Education Attitude Scale" was used in order to determine the tendencies of prospective teachers towards the use of computer-assisted learning in different fields such as physical sciences, social sciences, health sciences, fine arts, theology, mathematics and Turkish language. In the statistical analysis, frequency analysis, descriptive statistics, nonparametric statistical technics were used. As a result of the analysis it was identified that teachers participating our study exhibited substandard attitudes towards computer-assisted education. In computer-assisted education, female prospective teachers had higher attitude level than men prospective teachers. In addition, attitude scores of participants of mathematics, health sciences, fine arts and science was higher than the participants of the Turkish language, foreign languages, social sciences and theology departments. There were statistically significant difference between attitude scores of participants of different disciplines. Results of the research findings are expected to contribute to the widespread use of instructional technology, and are expected to lead to applications in other fields.Keywords: Teaching Profession, Education, Technology, Computer-Assisted Education, Attitude

  8. Design and operation of high level waste vitrification and storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The conversion of high level wastes (HLW) into solids has been studied for the past 30 years, primarily in those countries engaged in the reprocessing of nuclear fuels. Production and demonstration calcination and solidification plants have been operated by using waste solutions from fuels irradiated at various burnup rates, depending on the reactor type. Construction of more advanced solidification processes is now in progress in several countries to permit the handling of high burnup power reactor fuel wastes. The object of this report is to provide detailed information and references for those vitrification systems in advanced stages of implementation. Some less detailed information will be provided for previously developed immobilization systems. The report will examine the HLLW arising from the various locations, the features of each process as well as the stage of development, scale-up potential and flexibility of the processes. Since the publication of IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 176, Techniques for the Solidification of High-Level Wastes great progress on this subject has been made. The AVM in France has been operated successfully for 11 years and France has completed construction at La Hague of two vitrification plants that are based on the AVM rotary calciner/metallic melter process. A similar plant is under construction at Sellafield. The ceramic melter process has been chosen by several countries. Germany has successfully operated the PAMELA vitrification plant. Since 1986, Belgoprocess has continued to operate this facility. The former USSR operated the EP-500 plant from 1986 to 1988. In addition, two ceramic melter vitrification plants are nearing completion in the USA at Savannah River and West Valley and plans are being made to use this technology at Hanford as well as in Japan, Germany and India. This major progress attests to the maturity of these technologies for vitrifying HLLW to make a borosilicate glass for disposal of the waste. 67

  9. Material-related issues at high-power and high-energy ion beam facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bender, M.; Tomut, M.; Trautmann, C.

    2015-01-01

    When solids are exposed to energetic ions (MeV-GeV), their physical and chemical structure can be severely modified. The change is governed by ultrafast dynamical processes starting from the deposition of large energy densities, electronic excitation and ionization processes, and finally damage creation in the atomic lattice system. In many materials, each projectile creates a cylindrical track with a few nanometers in diameter and up to many μm in length. To study and monitor the creation of damage, the GSI irradiation facility dedicated to materials science provides different in-situ and on-line techniques such as high resolution microscopy, X-ray diffraction, optical absorption spectroscopy, thermal imaging and residual gas analysis. The irradiation experiments can be performed under various gas atmospheres and under cryogenic or elevated temperature.

  10. HIGH ENERGY, HIGH BRIGHTNESS X-RAYS PRODUCED BY COMPTON BACKSCATTERING AT THE LIVERMORE PLEIADES FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremaine, A M; Anderson, S G; Betts, S; Crane, J; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Jacob, J S; Frigola, P; Lim, J; Rosenzweig, J; Travish, G

    2005-01-01

    PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron Interaction for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) produces tunable 30-140 keV x-rays with 0.3-5 ps pulse lengths and up to 10 7 photons/pulse by colliding a high brightness electron beam with a high power laser. The electron beam is created by an rf photo-injector system, accelerated by a 120 MeV linac, and focused to 20 (micro)m with novel permanent magnet quadrupoles. To produce Compton back scattered x-rays, the electron bunch is overlapped with a Ti:Sapphire laser that delivers 500 mJ, 100 fs, pulses to the interaction point. K-edge radiography at 115 keV on Uranium has verified the angle correlated energy spectrum inherent in Compton scattering and high-energy tunability of the Livermore source. Current upgrades to the facility will allow laser pumping of targets synchronized to the x-ray source enabling dynamic diffraction and time-resolved studies of high Z materials. Near future plans include extending the radiation energies to >400 keV, allowing for nuclear fluorescence studies of materials

  11. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    The National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL Presentation to: IEEE Pulsed Power and Plasma Science...Conference C. J. Keane Director, NIF User Office June 21, 2013 1491978-1-4673-5168-3/13/$31.00 ©2013 IEEE Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  12. Thermocouple calibration facility for 2900 deg C high temperature and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daolong

    1991-01-01

    The construction and the performance characteristic of a 2900 deg C high temperature thermocouple calibration facility are described. The calibration error analysis is made. The test results of the calibration characteristics of high temperature thermocouples Mo/Nb, W-3Re/W-25Re, and W-1Mo/W-25Mo are given. The test result of temperature dependent resistivity of BeO made by this facility is given

  13. The high pressure gas Cerenkov counter at the Omega Facility.

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The high-pressure gas Cerenkov was used to measure reactions as pion (or kaon)- hydrogen --> forward proton - X. It was built by the Ecole Polytechnique (Palaiseu). Here Peter Sonderegger and Patrick Fleury,

  14. ICT security- aspects important for nuclear facilities; Information and Communication Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thunem, Atoosa P-J.

    2005-09-15

    Rapid application growth of complex Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in every society and state infrastructure as well as industry has revealed vulnerabilities that eventually have given rise to serious security breaches. These vulnerabilities together with the course of the breaches from cause to consequence are gradually about to convince the field experts that ensuring the security of ICT-driven systems is no longer possible by only relying on the fundaments of computer science, IT, or telecommunications. Appropriating knowledge from other disciplines is not only beneficial, but indeed very necessary. At the same time, it is a common observation today that ICT-driven systems are used everywhere, from the nuclear, aviation, commerce and healthcare domains to camera-equipped web-enabled cellular phones. The increasing interdisciplinary and inter-sectoral aspects of ICT security worldwide have been providing updated and useful information to the nuclear domain, as one of the emerging users of ICT-driven systems. Nevertheless, such aspects have also contributed to new and complicated challenges, as ICT security for the nuclear domain is in a much more delicate manner than for any other domains related to the concept of safety, at least from the public standpoint. This report addresses some important aspects of ICT security that need to be considered at nuclear facilities. It deals with ICT security and the relationship between security and safety from a rather different perspective than usually observed and applied. The report especially highlights the influence on the security of ICT-driven systems by all other dependability factors, and on that basis suggests a framework for ICT security profiling, where several security profiles are assumed to be valid and used in parallel for each ICT-driven system, sub-system or unit at nuclear facilities. The report also covers a related research topic of the Halden Project with focus on cyber threats and

  15. The Annual Neutron School: Program and Facility for Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingle, C.A.M.; Bautista, U.M.; Jecong, J.F.M.; Hila, F.C.; Astronomo, A.A.; Olivares, R.U.; Guillermo, N.R.D.; Ramo, M.E.S.K.V.; Saligan, P.P.

    2015-01-01

    The core realization of the mandate of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) is the establishment and utilization of major nuclear facilities in lieu of the decommissioned research reactor. To address the need for manpower in the future, the applied physics research section (APRS) of the PNRI has initiated capacity building in the use and operation of small neutron sources which attempts to re-establish, develop and sustain expertise in nuclear science and technology. These activities have provided the theoretical and experimental training of young professionals and scientist of the institute which, consequently, resulted in the conceptualization of the Annual Neutron School (ANS).The ANS provides training and teaching environments for the young generation who will operate, utilize and regulate future nuclear facilities. More importantly, it demonstrates and presents the acquired knowledge and research outputs by the staff via “train a trainer” concept to an audience of junior undergraduate students. The successful implementation of the ANS has been participated by selected universities within Metro Manila and was able to train a number of students since its establishment in 2013. The program offers training, education, and R & D in the basic nuclear instrumentation and techniques which includes (1) characterization of different neutron sources – AmBe, PuBe and Cf-252; (2) development of Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique using a portable neutron source for non-destructive elemental analysis; (3) utilization of MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code for verification of experimental data on neutron characterization, radiation dosimetry, detector design, calibration and efficiency and TRIGA fuel assembly configuration for sub-critical experiments. (author)

  16. National Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the National Cryo-EM Facility at NCI, created to provide researchers access to the latest cryo-EM technology for high resolution imaging. Includes timeline for installation and how to access the facility.

  17. HIGH VOLTAGE ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS, INC.ELECTRON BEAM TECHNOLOGY - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report evaluates a high-voltage electron beam (E-beam) technology's ability to destroy volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other contaminants present in liquid wastes. Specifically, this report discusses performance and economic data from a Superfund Innovative Technology...

  18. High-current Rhodotron for X-ray facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezu, Toru; Tsujiura, Yuichiro; Bol, Jean Louis

    2009-01-01

    The Rhodotron is a widely employed high-power industrial accelerator developed and exclusively distributed by IBA. Most early examples of the accelerator were optimized to operate at 10 MeV. A new Rhodotron configuration recently advanced produces a lower-energy higher-current beam dedicated with x-ray to sterilize and enhancement materials. Core elements of this system's evolution include a higher performance RF electron gun (operating range, response control, and cathode lifetime). This operational machine is now producing 100 mA at 7 MeV (700 kW of beam) and treat medical devices, thick cable and pipes with a high efficiency. (author)

  19. Integrating innovative technology into remedial action at a US Department of Energy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diggs, I.W.

    1992-01-01

    The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department Energy (DOE), established a production complex in the early 1950's for processing uranium and its compounds from natural uranium ore concentrates for the purpose of producing high purity uranium metal for various uses in defense reactor and nuclear weapons programs. This complex, previously known as the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), is now known as the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). In 1989, production was stopped at the feed materials facility due to a decision by the DOE. In December of 1989, the site was placed on the US EPA's National Priorities List (NPL) of sites requiring environmental cleanup. As a result, in April of 1990 the DOE and the US EPA signed a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Consent Agreement which augmented the FFCA. The DOE recently decided that production at the facility would not be resumed, and therefore, the main scope of work would change to remediation and closure of the site. In response to the FFCA and consistent with the modifications agreed to in the amended Consent Agreement, a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) is in progress pursuant to CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). A RI/FS is a comprehensive environmental investigation systematically conducted according to US EPA regulations and guidelines used to identify and select an action plan for the cleanup of CERCLA sites. The RI phase incorporates a broad-based study to evaluate as completely as possible existing environmental and public health risks associated with past or existing facility operations. The FS phase develops and evaluates corrective action alternatives to mitigate identified environmental concerns

  20. A New High-intensity Proton Irradiation Facility at the CERN PS East Area

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, B; Lima, P; Matli, E; Moll, M; Ravotti, F

    2014-01-01

    and IRRAD2), were heavily and successfully used for irradiation of particle detectors, electronic components and materials since 1992. These facilities operated with particle bursts - protons with momentum of 24GeV/c - delivered from the PS accelerator in “spills” of about 400ms (slow extraction). With the increasing demand of irradiation experiments, these facilities suffered from a number of restrictions such as the space availability, the maximum achievable particle flux and several access constraints. In the framework of the AIDA project, an upgrade of these facilities has been realized during the CERN long shutdown (LS1). While the new proton facility (IRRAD) will continue to be mainly devoted to the radiation hardness studies for the High Energy Physics (HEP) experimental community, the new mixed-field facility (CHARM) will mainly host irradiation experiments for the validation of electronic systems used in a...

  1. Superconducting solenoids for suspension of high-speed overhead transportation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omel' yanenko, V I [Kharkov Polytechnical Inst., USSR; Bocharov, V I; Dolgosheev, E A; Usichenko, Y G

    1977-08-01

    A superconducting solenoid is the most important component of a suspension for overhead transportation facilities operating on the repulsion principle. Its design is aimed at producing an adequate magnetic field within the active zone, to ensure a high ratio of lifting force to braking force, the necessary speed dependence of both forces, and a high ratio of lifting force to solenoid mass. The design must also be both technologically and economically feasible. For safety considerations, the magnetic field intensity inside the passenger compartment must be minimum. A survey of existing designs indicates a preference for race track solenoids of quasi-rectangular shape. While all designers already agree on a coil width within 0.25 to 0.6 m, the optimum coil length has not yet been established. Intrinsic stabilization of superconductors by stranding and twisting has pushed the maximum allowable current density to 200 A/mm/sup 2/ and the energy storing capacity of magnets to 100 kJ, a capacity of 1 MJ being within reach. The recommended coil dimensions for laboratory models are 1 m length and 0.3 m width, to carry magnetizing currents up to 0.3 MA.

  2. Facile fabrication of highly flexible graphene paper for photocatalytic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    potential as a carbon-based catalyst in high-performance flexible catalytic ... resultant GOs/PAA/Au composite paper was applied as a catalytic material ... Graphene, as closely packed into two-dimensional (2D) ... only display the properties of metal nanoparticles and ... the morphology and the size of AuNPs, respectively.

  3. US DOE surplus facilities management program (SFMP). International technology exchange activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broderick, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program is one of five remedial action programs established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to eliminate potential hazards to the public and environment from radioactive contamination. These programs provide remedial actions at various facilities and sites previously used by the US Government in national atomic energy programs. Included are uranium ore milling sites, nuclear materials production plants, and research and development facilities. The DOE's five remedial action programs are: the Grand Junction Remedial Action Project; the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Project; the West Valley Demonstration Project; and the Surplus Facilities Management Program. The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SWMP) was established by DOE in 1978. There are presently over 300 shutdown facilities in the SFMP located at sites across the United States and in Puerto Rico. In some cases, remedial action involves decontaminating and releasing a facility for some other use. In other instances, facilities are completely demolished and removed from the site

  4. Report to Congress on innovative safety and security technology solutions for alternative transportation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This research collected information on the frequency and impact of safety and security incidents (threats) at selected facilities and identified priority incidents at each facility. A customized all hazards approach was used to determine the ha...

  5. Influences of Inadequate Instructional Materials and Facilities in Teaching and Learning of Electrical/Electronics Technology Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbu, James E.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influences of inadequate instructional materials and facilities in the teaching and learning of electrical/electronics (E/E) technology education courses. The study was guided by two research questions and two null hypotheses which were tested at 0.05 level of significance. The design employed was descriptive survey…

  6. Sandia Wake Imaging System Field Test Report: 2015 Deployment at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naughton, Brian Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herges, Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report presents the objectives, configuration, procedures, reporting , roles , and responsibilities and subsequent results for the field demonstration of the Sandia Wake Imaging System (SWIS) at the Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility near Lubbock, Texas in June and July 2015.

  7. Benefits and Barriers of Information and Communication Technologies Adoption in Facilities Management Services Supply Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada

      This paper presents the results of a study of factors impacting information and communication technology (ICT) adoption in the supply chain of facilities management services. The research questions addressed in this study are: What are the key factors that influence adoption and assimilation of...

  8. High-intensity, subkilovolt x-ray calibration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckuck, R.W.; Gaines, J.L.; Ernst, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    A high-intensity subkilovolt x-ray calibration source utilizing proton-induced inner-shell atomic fluorescence of low-Z elements is described. The high photon yields and low bremsstrahlung background associated with this phenomenon are ideally suited to provide intense, nearly monoenergetic x-ray beams. The proton accelerator is a 3 mA, 300 kV Cockroft-Walton using a conventional rf hydrogen ion source. Seven remotely-selectable targets capable of heat dissipation of 5 kW/cm 2 are used to provide characteristic x-rays with energies between 100 and 1000 eV. Source strengths are of the order of 10 13 to 10 14 photons/sec. Methods of reducing spectral contamination due to hydrocarbon build-up on the target are discussed. Typical x-ray spectra (Cu-L, C-K and B-K) are shown

  9. The Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF): portfolio growth and technology development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    The Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF) (www.rnai.group.shef.ac.uk) was established in 2008 with Wellcome Trust and University of Sheffield funding, with the task to provide the first UK RNAi screening resource for academic groups interested in identifying genes required in a diverse range of biological processes using Drosophila cell culture. The SRSF has carried out a wide range of screens varying in sizes from bespoke small-scale libraries, targeting a few hundred genes, to high-throughput, genome-wide studies. The SRSF has grown and improved with a dedicated partnership of its academic customers based mainly in the UK. We are part of the UK Academics Functional Genomics Network, participating in organizing an annual meeting in London and are part of the University of Sheffield's D3N (www.d3n.org.uk), connecting academics, biotech and pharmaceutical companies with a multidisciplinary network in Drug Discovery and Development. Recently, the SRSF has been funded by the Yorkshire Cancer Research Fund to perform genome-wide RNAi screens using human cells as part of a core facility for regional Yorkshire Universities and screens are now underway. Overall the SRSF has carried out more than 40 screens from Drosophila and human cell culture experiments.

  10. Agile Port and High Speed Ship Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-31

    Alternative Shipboard Powering Systems for Naval and Regulatory Review • The Evaluation and Implementation Plan for Southern California Maglev ...Ackerman". CSULB Foundation Annual Report. CSULB Foundation, Long Beach, CA. December 2005. " Maglev Technology ’Conveys’ Port Transportation Solutions...34. Newsflash. College of Engineering, California State University, Long Beach. Cover page. Spring 2006 Hanson, Kristopher. "Engineers Tout Maglev at

  11. Experimental research subject and renovation of chemical processing facility (CPF) for advanced fast reactor fuel reprocessing technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tomozo; Shinozaki, Tadahiro; Nomura, Kazunori; Koma, Yoshikazu; Miyachi, Shigehiko; Ichige, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Tsuguyuki; Nemoto, Shin-ichi

    2002-01-01

    In order to enhance economical efficiency, environmental impact and nuclear nonproliferation resistance, the Advanced Reprocessing Technology, such as simplification and optimization of process, and applicability evaluation of the innovative technology that was not adopted up to now, has been developed for the reprocessing of the irradiated fuel taken out from a fast reactor. Renovation of the hot cell interior equipments, establishment and updating of glove boxes, installation of various analytical equipments, etc. in the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was done to utilize the CPF more positivity which is the center of the experimental field, where actual fuel can be used, for research and development towards establishment of the Advanced Reprocessing Technology development. The hot trials using the irradiated fuel pins of the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' for studies on improved aqueous reprocessing technology, MA separation technology, dry process technology, etc. are scheduled to be carried out with these new equipments. (author)

  12. Design elements and quantitative results of synchronous longstator linear motors for high-speed magnetic trains taking the TRANSRAPID test facility in Emsland as an example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerst, R [Industrieanlagen-Betriebsgesellschaft mbH, Magnetbahn-Versuchsanlage, Lathen/Ems (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    In German high-speed magnetic train technology, iron-clad synchronous long-stator linear motors of levitation stator design are used to propel and brake the vehicles. This paper uses the propulsion design of the Transrapid test facility in Emsland (TVE) to illustrate in practical terms the dimensioning parameters for thrust calculations and their interdependencies. The paper is based on description conventions common for rotating electrical machines and rail technology. (orig.)

  13. Present status of high quality beam facility at Waseda University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washio, M.; Kawai, H.; Hama, Y.; Kudo, N.; Kobayashi, M.; Kuribayasi, T.; Kawaguchi, M.; Kuroda, R.; Maeda, K.; Nagasawa, F.; Ueyama, D.; Hizume, K.; Wang, X.J.; Hayano, H.; Urakawa, J.; Kashiwagi, S.

    2004-01-01

    A research project named High-Tech Research Center Project has been conducted at Waseda University. In this project, an RF gun system has been used for production of low emittance and short bunched electron beam. The experiments for the electron beam quality measurement have been carried out by slit scan techniques, etc. Short pulsed x-ray with the energy range of so-called water window has been generation by the inverse compton scattering. Further, the pulse radiolysis system has been constructed, and the stroboscopic pulse radiolysis has been applied for the detection of hydrated electron in picosecond time region. (author)

  14. TU-G-BRCD-01: Will the High Cost of Proton Therapy Facilities Limit the Availability of Proton Therapy Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, R

    2012-06-01

    The potential dose distribution advantages associated with proton therapy, and particularly with pencil beam scanning (PBS) techniques, have lead to considerable interest in this modality in recent years. However, the large capital expenditure necessary for such a project requires careful financial consideration and business planning. The complexity of the beam delivery systems impacts the capital expenditure and the PBS only systems presently being advocated can reduce these costs. Also several manufacturers are considering "one-room" facilities as less expensive alternatives to multi-room facilities. This presentation includes a brief introduction to beam delivery options (passive scattering, uniform and modulated scanning) and some of the new technologies proposed for providing less expensive proton therapy systems. Based on current experience, data on proton therapy center start-up costs, running costs and the financial challenges associated with making this highly conformal therapy more widely available will be discussed. Issues associated with proton therapy implementation that are key to project success include strong project management, vendor cooperation and collaboration, staff recruitment and training. Time management during facility start up is a major concern, particularly in multi-room systems, where time must be shared between continuing vendor system validation, verification and acceptance testing, and user commissioning and patient treatments. The challenges associated with facility operation during this period and beyond are discussed, focusing on how standardization of process, downtime and smart scheduling can influence operational efficiency. 1. To understand the available choices for proton therapy facilities, the different beam delivery systems and the financial implications associated with these choices. 2. To understand the key elements necessary for successfully implementing a proton therapy program. 3. To understand the challenges

  15. High-Gain Shock Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. J.; Lafortune, K.; Bailey, D.; Lambert, M.; MacKinnon, A.; Blackfield, D.; Comley, A.; Schurtz, G.; Ribeyre, X.; Lebel, E.; Casner, A.; Craxton, R. S.; Betti, R.; McKenty, P.; Anderson, K.; Theobald, W.; Schmitt, A.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.

    2010-11-01

    Shock ignition offers the possibility for a near-term test of high-gain ICF on the NIF at less than 1MJ drive energy and with day-1 laser hardware. We will summarize the status of target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the R&D program to be performed in order to test the potential of a shock-ignited target on NIF. In shock ignition, compressed fuel is separately ignited by a late-time laser-driven shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, simulations indicate that fusion energy gains of 60 may be achievable at laser energies around 0.5MJ. Like fast ignition, shock ignition offers high gain but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and focusing requirements. Conventional symmetry and stability constraints apply, thus a key immediate step towards attempting shock ignition on NIF is to demonstrate adequacy of low-mode uniformity and shock symmetry under polar drive

  16. Fusion technology development: role of fusion facility upgrades and fission test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Schmunk, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The near term national fusion program is unlikely to follow the aggressive logic of the Fusion Engineering Act of 1980. Faced with level budgets, a large, new fusion facility with an engineering thrust is unlikely in the near future. Within the fusion community the idea of upgrading the existing machines (TFTR, MFTF-B) is being considered to partially mitigate the lack of a design data base to ready the nation to launch an aggressive, mission-oriented fusion program with the goal of power production. This paper examines the cost/benefit issues of using fusion upgrades to develop the technology data base which will be required to support the design and construction of the next generation of fusion machines. The extent of usefulness of the nation's fission test reactors will be examined vis-a-vis the mission of the fusion upgrades. The authors show that while fission neutrons will provide a useful test environment in terms of bulk heating and tritium breeding on a submodule scale, they can play only a supporting role in designing the integrated whole modules and systems to be used in a nuclear fusion machine

  17. National Ignition Facility quality assurance plan for laser materials and optical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1996-05-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This subtier Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) applies to activities of the Laser Materials ampersand Optical Technology (LM ampersand OT) organization and its subcontractors. It responds to the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, L-15958-2, NIF-95-499) and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C. This Plan is organized according to 10 Quality Assurance (QA) criteria and subelements of a management system as outlined in the NIF QAPP. This Plan describes how those QA requirements are met. This Plan is authorized by the Associate Project Leader for the LM ampersand OT organization, who has assigned responsibility to the Optics QA engineer to maintain this plan, with the assistance of the NIF QA organization. This Plan governs quality-affecting activities associated with: design; procurement; fabrication; testing and acceptance; handling and storage; and installation of NIF Project optical components into mounts and subassemblies

  18. NFC like wireless technology for monitoring purposes in scientific/industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badillo, I.; Eguiraun, M.; Jugo, J.

    2012-01-01

    Wireless technologies are becoming more and more used in large industrial and scientific facilities like particle accelerators for facilitating the monitoring and indeed sensing in these kind of large environments. Cabled equipment means little flexibility in placement and is very expensive in both money and effort whenever reorganization or new installation is needed. So, when cabling is not really needed for performance reasons wireless monitoring and control is a good option, due to the speed of implementation. There are several wireless flavors to choose, as Bluetooth, Zigbee, WiFi, etc. depending on the requirements of each specific application. In this work a wireless monitoring system for EPICS (Experimental and Industrial Control System) is presented. The desired control system variables are acquired over the network and published in a mobile device, allowing the operator to check process variables everywhere the signal spreads. In this approach, a Python based server will be continuously getting EPICS Process Variables via Channel Access protocol and sending them through a WiFi standard 802.11 network using ICE middle-ware. ICE is a tool-kit oriented to build distributed applications. Finally, the mobile device will read the data and show it to the operator. The security of the communication can be improved by means of a weak wireless signal, following the same idea as in Near Field Communication (NFC), but for more large distances. With this approach, local monitoring and control applications, as for example a vacuum control system for several pumps, are currently implemented. (authors)

  19. Fusion technology development: role of fusion facility upgrades and fission test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.; Longhurst, G.R.; Schmunk, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The near term national fusion program is unlikely to follow the aggressive logic of the Fusion Engineering Act of 1980. Faced with level budgets, a large, new fusion facility with an engineering thrust is unlikely in the near future. Within the fusion community the idea of upgrading the existing machines (TFTR, MFTF-B) is being considered to partially mitigate the lack of a design data base to ready the nation to launch an aggressive, mission-oriented fusion program with the goal of power production. This paper examines the cost/benefit issues of using fusion upgrades to develop the technology data base which will be required to support the design and construction of the next generation of fusion machines. The extent of usefulness of the nation's fission test reactors will be examined vis-a-vis the mission of the fusion upgrades. We will show that while fission neutrons will provide a useful test environment in terms of bulk heating and tritium breeding on a submodule scale, they can play only a supporting role in designing the integrated whole modules and systems to be used in a nuclear fusion machine

  20. Overview of remote handling technologies developed for inspection and maintenance of spent fuel management facilities in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desbats, Philippe [CEA - Direction de la Recherche Technologique / LIST, BP 6 - 92265, Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Piolain, Gerard [COGEMA-HAG/DMCO, AREVA NC SA, 2, rue Paul Dautier, BP 4, 78 141 Velizy Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    In the facilities of the end of the nuclear fuel cycle, like spent fuel storage pools, reprocessing plants, Plutonium-based fuel manufacturing plants or waste temporary storage units, materials handling must be carried out remotely, taking into account the nuclear radiating environment. In addition to the automation requirement, robotics equipment in the nuclear industry must be substituted to human operators in order to respect the ALARA principle. More over, remote handling technologies aim to improve the working conditions, as well as the quality of the work achieved by the operators. Ten years ago, COGEMA (AREVA Group) and CEA (French Atomic Energy Agency) started an ambitious R and D program in robotics and remote handling technologies applied to COGEMA spent fuel management facilities in France, with the aim to cover the requirements of the different plant life cycle steps. The paper gives an overview of the important developments that have been carried out by CEA and then transferred to the COGEMA industrial group. The range includes the next generation of servo-manipulators, long range inspection tools and carriers, nuclear versions of industrial robots, radiation hardened electronic systems, interactive environment modeling tools, as well as force-feedback master-slave generic control software for tele-operation systems. Some applications of this development are presented in the paper: - rad-hard electronic modules for robotic equipment which are used by COGEMA in high radiating environment; - long reach articulated carrier for inspection of spent full management blind cells; - new electrical force feedback master/slave system to improve the tele-operation of standard tele-manipulators; - generic control software for tele-manipulators. The results of the robotic program carried out by COGEMA and CEA have been very valuable for the introduction of new technologies inside nuclear industry. Innovative products and sub-systems can be integrated now in a large

  1. The Upgrade Programme for the Structural Biology beamlines at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility - High throughput sample evaluation and automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theveneau, P.; Baker, R.; Barrett, R.; Beteva, A.; Bowler, M. W.; Carpentier, P.; Caserotto, H.; de Sanctis, D.; Dobias, F.; Flot, D.; Guijarro, M.; Giraud, T.; Lentini, M.; Leonard, G. A.; Mattenet, M.; McCarthy, A. A.; McSweeney, S. M.; Morawe, C.; Nanao, M.; Nurizzo, D.; Ohlsson, S.; Pernot, P.; Popov, A. N.; Round, A.; Royant, A.; Schmid, W.; Snigirev, A.; Surr, J.; Mueller-Dieckmann, C.

    2013-03-01

    Automation and advances in technology are the key elements in addressing the steadily increasing complexity of Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) experiments. Much of this complexity is due to the inter-and intra-crystal heterogeneity in diffraction quality often observed for crystals of multi-component macromolecular assemblies or membrane proteins. Such heterogeneity makes high-throughput sample evaluation an important and necessary tool for increasing the chances of a successful structure determination. The introduction at the ESRF of automatic sample changers in 2005 dramatically increased the number of samples that were tested for diffraction quality. This "first generation" of automation, coupled with advances in software aimed at optimising data collection strategies in MX, resulted in a three-fold increase in the number of crystal structures elucidated per year using data collected at the ESRF. In addition, sample evaluation can be further complemented using small angle scattering experiments on the newly constructed bioSAXS facility on BM29 and the micro-spectroscopy facility (ID29S). The construction of a second generation of automated facilities on the MASSIF (Massively Automated Sample Screening Integrated Facility) beam lines will build on these advances and should provide a paradigm shift in how MX experiments are carried out which will benefit the entire Structural Biology community.

  2. Innovative and basic researches for high temperature technologies at HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozawa, Shusaku

    1995-01-01

    The HTTR is the first HTGR which is under construction at JAERI. The objectives of the HTTR are to establish basic technologies for HTGRs, to upgrade technologies for HTGRs and to conduct innovative and basic researches for high temperature technologies. The first two are concerned with HTGR developments. The last one is not necessarily for HTGR developments, but for future innovative researches which are expected to be applied to various technologies. (author)

  3. Nuclear Regulatory Commission directory of high-technology 8(a) firms. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    An overview is given for each of the high-technology small business firms qualifying under section 8(a) of the Small Business Act for consideration under Minority Business Development Plans. Each overview gives detailed profiles of relevant technical classification data, client contacts, and information on the professional personnel of each firm. In addition, the directory contains information about average gross receipts and facilities, including testing capabilities and computer availability

  4. Evaluation of environmental-control technologies for commercial nuclear fuel-conversion (UF6) facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, B.L.

    1982-10-01

    At present in the United States, there are two commercial conversion facilities. These facilities process uranium concentrate into UF 6 for shipment to the enrichment facilities. One conversion facility uses a dry hydrofluor process, whereas the other facility uses a process known as the wet solvent extraction-fluorination process. Because of the different processes used in the two plants, waste characteristics, quantities, and treatment practices differ at each facility. Wastes and effluent streams contain impurities found in the concentrate (such as uranium daughters, vanadium, molybdenum, selenium, arsenic, and ammonia) and process chemicals used in the circuit (including fluorine, nitrogen, and hydrogen), as well as small quantities of uranium. Studies of suitable disposal options for the solid wastes and sludges generated at the facilities and the long-term effects of emissions to the ambient environment are needed. 30 figures, 34 tables

  5. KAERI Underground Research Facility (KURF) for the Demonstration of HLW Disposal Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, P. S.; Cho, W. J.; Kwon, S.

    2006-01-01

    In order to dispose of high-level radioactive waste(HLW) safely in geological formations, it is necessary to assess the feasibility, safety, appropriateness, and stability of the disposal concept at an underground research site, which is constructed in the same geological formation as the host rock. In this paper, the current status of the conceptual design and the construction of a small scale URL, which is named as KURF, were described. To confirm the validity of the conceptual design of the underground facility, a geological survey including a seismic refraction survey, an electronic resistivity survey, a borehole drilling, and in situ and laboratory tests had been carried out. Based on the site characterization results, it was possible to effectively design the KURF. The construction of the KURF was started in May 2005 and the access tunnel was successfully completed in March 2006. Now the construction of the research modules is under way

  6. Emerging technologies for high performance infrared detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Tan Chee Leong; Mohseni Hooman

    2018-01-01

    Infrared photodetectors (IRPDs) have become important devices in various applications such as night vision, military missile tracking, medical imaging, industry defect imaging, environmental sensing, and exoplanet exploration. Mature semiconductor technologies such as mercury cadmium telluride and III–V material-based photodetectors have been dominating the industry. However, in the last few decades, significant funding and research has been focused to improve the performance of IRPDs such as...

  7. Possibilities of technologies that replace in-patient facilities in uroandrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Derevyanko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main directions in improvement of medical service became invasion of stationary substitute technologies. In Stavropol since 2007 has been organized the Men, s health protection service based on Regional clinical specialized uroandrological center. In uroandrological short stay surgical department successfully provides treatment in all forms of male genital in children and adult pathology with using minimally invasive methodics in short stay conditions and absence postsurgical complications. The operation rooms are staffed with all necessary equipment for carry out activities in full volume. All patients treated in urological department had sorted by anaesthesiological and somatic criterias.The main strategical directions are male reproductive health, pediatric urology-andrology, oncouroandrology. Human resources, high technology staff and intelligent work organization are fundamental for modern stationary substitute service. Human resource conception is urologist-andrologist – urologist – surgeon with laparoscopic, transurethral, microsurgery, reconstructive and plastic technique with endocrinology and psychiatric skills.Work indicators of medical center tells about high effectiveness and possibility of release profile urological beds for “big” surgical help and transfer male genital surgery on stationary substitute technologies.

  8. Report of the 1983 HEPAP Subpanel on New Facilities for the US high-energy physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    The 1983 Subpanel on New Facilities of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) was formed in February 1983 and completed its report in July 1983. During the intervening 5 months the Subpanel held site meetings at three major accelerator laboratories, heard formal presentations from a number of prominent physicists, received almost 200 letters from members of the high energy physics community, and studied in depth all of the relevant written material. The final recommendations were arrived at after two lengthy deliberative meetings held in June and July at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Study Center at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and at the Nevis Laboratory, Columbia University. The recommendations arrived at by the Subpanel are as follows: (1) the Subpanel unanimously recommends the immediate initiation of a multi-TeV high-luminosity proton-proton collider project with the goal of physics experiments at this facility at the earliest possible date; (2) the Subpanel recommends the rapid completion of current construction projects, Tevatron and the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC), the upgrading of the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) and associated detectors, and the thorough utilization of all existing facilities; (3) the Subpanel recommends that Fermilab not proceed at this time with the Dedicated Collider (DC); (4) by a majority vote, the Subpanel recommends that the Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) project at Brookhaven not be approved; (5) the Subpanel recommends that technology research and development, particularly advanced accelerator research and development, be strongly supported

  9. State investments in high-technology job growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht, Kevin T; Jenkins, J Craig

    2017-07-01

    Since the early 1970's state and local governments have launched an array of economic development programs designed to promote high-technology development. The question our analysis addresses is whether these programs promote long-term high-technology employment growth net of state location and agglomeration advantages. Proponents talk about an infrastructure strategy that promotes investment in public research and specialized infrastructure to attract and grow new high technology industries in specific locations, and a more decentralized entrepreneurial strategy that reinforces local agglomeration capacities by investing in new enterprises and products, promoting the development of local networks and partnerships. Our results support the entrepreneurial strategy, suggesting that state governments can accelerate high technology development by adopting market-supportive programs that complement private sector initiatives. In addition to positive direct benefits of technology deployment/transfer programs and SBIR programs, entrepreneurial programs affect change in high-technology employment in concert with existing locational and agglomeration advantages. Rural (i.e. low population density) states tend to benefit by technology development programs. Infrastructure strategy programs also facilitate high technology job growth in places where local advantages already exist. Our results suggest that critics of industrial policy are correct that high technology growth is organic and endogenous, yet state governments are able to "pick winners and losers" in ways that grow their local economy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficient handling of high-level radioactive cell waste in a vitrification facility analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, D.W.; Collins, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Savannah River Site''s (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, South Carolina, is the world''s largest and the United State''s first high level waste vitrification facility. For the past 1.5 years, DWPF has been vitrifying high level radioactive liquid waste left over from the Cold War. The vitrification process involves the stabilization of high level radioactive liquid waste into borosilicate glass. The glass is contained in stainless steel canisters. DWPF has filled more than 200 canisters 3.05 meters (10 feet) long and 0.61 meters (2 foot) diameter. Since operations began at DWPF in March of 1996, high level radioactive solid waste continues to be generated due to operating the facility''s analytical laboratory. The waste is referred to as cell waste and is routinely removed from the analytical laboratories. Through facility design, engineering controls, and administrative controls, DWPF has established efficient methods of handling the high level waste generated in its laboratory facility. These methods have resulted in the prevention of undue radiation exposure, wasted man-hours, expenses due to waste disposal, and the spread of contamination. This level of efficiency was not reached overnight, but it involved the collaboration of Radiological Control Operations and Laboratory personnel working together to devise methods that best benefited the facility. This paper discusses the methods that have been incorporated at DWPF for the handling of cell waste. The objective of this paper is to provide insight to good radiological and safety practices that were incorporated to handle high level radioactive waste in a laboratory setting

  11. Innovative and adaptive technologies in decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Final report of a coordinated research project 2004-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    There are dozens of old reactors and other nuclear facilities worldwide that are either being actively dismantled or are candidates for decommissioning in the near term. A significant proportion of these facilities are situated in Member States or institutions that do not have adequate expertise and technologies for planning and implementing state of the art decommissioning projects. The technology selection process is critical in that regard. The main objective of the IAEA technical activities on decommissioning is to promote the exchange of lessons learned in order to improve the technologies, thereby contributing to successful planning and implementation of decommissioning. This should be achieved through a better understanding of the decision making process in technology comparison and selection and relevant issues affecting the entire decommissioning process. The specific objectives of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Innovative and Adaptive Technologies in Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities include the following general aspects: (a) To establish methodologies and data needs for developing concepts and approaches relevant to technology comparison and selection in decommissioning; (b) To improve and expand the database on applications and performance of various types of decommissioning technologies; (c) To address specific issues for individual decommissioning technologies and generate data relevant to their comparison and selection. It is also expected that this project, and in particular the papers collected in this TECDOC, will draw Member States' attention to the practicality and achievability of timely planning and implementation of decommissioning, especially for many smaller projects. Concluding reports that summarized the work undertaken under the aegis of the CRP were presented at the third and final research coordination meeting held in Rez, Czech Republic, 3-7 December 2007, and collected in this technical publication. Operating

  12. Cutting and decontamination technologies for nuclear facility dismantling; Technologien zur Zerlegung und zur Dekontamination von kerntechnischen Anlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, Felix; Grone, Georg von; Schultmann, Frank

    2017-03-15

    The German Government's decision to phase-out nuclear power will lead to a substantial increase of the number of nuclear decommissioning and dismantling projects. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities must meet the requirements of the radiation protection ordinance. This study deals with the decontamination and dismantling technologies available to meet radiation protection requirements. The aim of this study is to determine the state of the art in the field of decommissioning and dismantling technologies. Furthermore, future trends in the development and application of such technologies should be identified. A detailed study of current literature provides an overview of established decommissioning technologies. Moreover, experts were consulted in order to facilitate a practical assessment. The experts' statements indicate that (apart from the chemical decontamination of the primary circuit) the use of mechanical methods is generally preferred. Abrasive methods are rated as particularly efficient. According to the experts, the development of new decontamination technologies may allow a more efficient decontamination. However, the success of a new technology will be subject to its application costs. Mechanical technologies are preferred for the dismantling of nuclear facilities. The band saw has been identified as a standard tool in nuclear dismantling. The survey has concluded that there is no need for new dismantling technologies. The potential lies in the optimization of existing processes and techniques. With regard to remotely operated systems, experts' opinions vary on whether the use of these systems will increase in future. Most areas inside a nuclear facility have low radiation levels that allow the use of human labour for the dismantling. However, there is a need for an improvement in the allocation and management of decommissioning projects.

  13. Features of the design for highly hazardous facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telichenko Valeriy Ivanovich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the part 1 of the article 48.1 of the town planning code of the Russian Federation we can find a list of objects that are especially dangerous. Article 2 paragraph 59 of the contract system establishes the responsibility of the customer to conduct electronic auction, provided that the purchase of goods, works, services is included in the list established by the Government of the Russian Federation, or in an additional list approved by the highest body of the Executive power of the subject of the Russian Federation. By order of the Government of the Russian Federation dated 31.10.2013 no. 2019-r there was approved a list of goods and services, in case of procurement of which the customer is obligated to conduct an auction in electronic form. The list included "Building works", related to the code 45 (excluding code 45.12 according to the all-Russian classifier of products by economic activity (OKPD OK 034-2007. The exception is the construction, reconstruction, overhaul of high-risk, technically complex objects of capital construction, provided that the cost of the purchase contract for the State needs is more than 150 million rubles; to provide municipal - 50 million rubles. Thus, the customer is obliged to conduct electronic auction in the case of procurement of construction works (code 45 OKPD OK 034-20071, besides the works relating to the code of 45.12 (drilling, if the initial (maximal cost of purchase for State needs does not exeed 150 million rubles, for municipal needs - 50 million rubles. Here is an example. In St. Petersburg, three competitions were announced by the customer on the site for the construction of four underground stations with total value of 940 million rubles. How to place an order-public audition with limited participation? The results of the audit conducted by the OFAS around St. Petersburg, led to the cancellation of the tender. In particular, due to an incorrect choice of customer ways to purchase. According to

  14. Global climate change: Mitigation opportunities high efficiency large chiller technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanga, M.V.

    1997-12-31

    This paper, comprised of presentation viewgraphs, examines the impact of high efficiency large chiller technology on world electricity consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Background data are summarized, and sample calculations are presented. Calculations show that presently available high energy efficiency chiller technology has the ability to substantially reduce energy consumption from large chillers. If this technology is widely implemented on a global basis, it could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 65 million tons by 2010.

  15. Stabilization of high and low solids Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) waste with super cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, B.W.

    2000-01-01

    This report details solidification activities using selected Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies with the High and Low Solid waste streams. Ceramicrete and Super Cement technologies were chosen as the best possible replacement solidification candidates for the waste streams generated by the SRS incinerator from a list of several suggested Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies. These technologies were tested, evaluated, and compared to the current Portland cement technology being employed. Recommendation of a technology for replacement depends on waste form performance, process flexibility, process complexity, and cost of equipment and/or raw materials

  16. The materials production and processing facility at the Spanish National Centre for fusion technologies (TechnoFusion)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R.; Hernandez, M.T.; Jimenez-Rey, D.; Roman, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Perlado, M.; Ibarra, A.

    2011-01-01

    In response to the urgent request from the EU Fusion Program, a new facility (TechnoFusion) for research and development of fusion materials has been planned with support from the Regional Government of Madrid and the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain. TechnoFusion, the National Centre for Fusion Technologies, aims screening different technologies relevant for ITER and DEMO environments while promoting the contribution of international companies and research groups into the Fusion Programme. For this purpose, the centre will be provided with a large number of unique facilities for the manufacture, testing (a triple-beam multi-ion irradiation, a plasma-wall interaction device, a remote handling for under ionizing radiation testing) and analysis of critical fusion materials. Particularly, the objectives, semi-industrial scale capabilities and present status of the TechnoFusion Materials Production and Processing (MPP) facility are presented. Previous studies revealed that the MPP facility will be a very promising infrastructure for the development of new materials and prototypes demanded by the fusion technology and therefore some of them will be here briefly summarized.

  17. The materials production and processing facility at the Spanish National Centre for fusion technologies (TechnoFusion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A., E-mail: rpp@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica, UC3M, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Fisica, UC3M, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Hernandez, M.T. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Jimenez-Rey, D. [CMAM, UAM, C/Faraday 3, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Roman, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Garcia-Cortes, I. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Perlado, M. [IFN, ETSII, UPM, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ibarra, A. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In response to the urgent request from the EU Fusion Program, a new facility (TechnoFusion) for research and development of fusion materials has been planned with support from the Regional Government of Madrid and the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain. TechnoFusion, the National Centre for Fusion Technologies, aims screening different technologies relevant for ITER and DEMO environments while promoting the contribution of international companies and research groups into the Fusion Programme. For this purpose, the centre will be provided with a large number of unique facilities for the manufacture, testing (a triple-beam multi-ion irradiation, a plasma-wall interaction device, a remote handling for under ionizing radiation testing) and analysis of critical fusion materials. Particularly, the objectives, semi-industrial scale capabilities and present status of the TechnoFusion Materials Production and Processing (MPP) facility are presented. Previous studies revealed that the MPP facility will be a very promising infrastructure for the development of new materials and prototypes demanded by the fusion technology and therefore some of them will be here briefly summarized.

  18. FY 1999 research and development of technologies for creating original high-function materials. Development of technologies for functionalized materials for power generating facilities (Report on the R and D results of controlling precise structures of polycondesed systems); 1999 nendo dokusoteki kokino zairyo sosei gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Hatsuden shisetsuyo koseinoka zairyo gijutsu kaihatsu (shukugokei seimitsu kozo seigyo no kenkyu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The research and development project is implemented for the polymerization catalysts and precise polymerization processes which can freely control the primary structures, e.g., molecular weight, regularity, branching and terminal group structures, of the polymers produced by polycondensation and ring-opening polymerization, in order to drastically improve their functions, and the FY 1999 results are reported. The basic studies on the precise polycondensation successfully lead to chemoselective synthesis of polymers by the direct polymerization, and synthesis of polyamides of narrow molecular weight distribution and high-molecular-weight aliphatic polyesters. The other items studied include precisely, regularly sequential polymerization by amine activation, innovative synthesis of polycarbonate, precise control of branching structures, regioselective oxidative coupling polymerization, and matrix polycondensation. The basic studies on the controlled ring-opening polymerization cover cationic ring-opening polymerization behavior of 6-membered thiocarbonate derivative having an ester group, to generalize the polymerization controlled by neighboring group participation. The other items studied include precise control of branching structures, molecular weights, network polymer structures, and polymer unit sequences. (NEDO)

  19. Very high plasma switches. Basic plasma physics and switch technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, H.J.; Roche, M.; Buzzi, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A review of some high power switches recently developed for very high power technology is made with a special attention to the aspects of plasma physics involved in the mechanisms, which determine the limits of the possible switching parameters

  20. Artificial Intelligence Applications to High-Technology Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of artificial intelligence to improve occupational instruction in complex subjects with high performance goals, such as those required for high-technology jobs. Highlights include intelligent computer assisted instruction, examples in space technology training, intelligent simulation environments, and the need for adult training…

  1. High contrast high intensity petawatt J-KAREN-P laser facility at QST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Sakaki, Hironao; Dover, Nicholas P.; Kondo, Kotaro; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Sagisaka, Akito; Fukuda, Yuji; Nishitani, Keita; Miyahara, Takumi; Ogura, Koichi; Alkhimova, Mariya A.; Pikuz, Tatiana A.; Faenov, Anatoly Y.; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Koga, James; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Kiminori

    2017-05-01

    We report on the J-KAREN-P laser facility at QST, which can provide PW peak power at 0.1 Hz on target. The system can deliver short pulses with an energy of 30 J and pulse duration of 30 fs after compression with a contrast level of better than 1012. Such performance in high field science will give rise to the birth of new applications and breakthroughs, which include relativistic particle acceleration, bright x-ray source generation, and nuclear activation. The current achieved laser intensity on target is up to > 9x1021 Wcm-2 with an energy of 9 J on target. The interaction with a 3 to 5- μm stainless steel tape target provides us electrons with a typical temperature of more than 10 MeV and energetic proton beams with typical maximum energies of > 40 MeV with good reproducibility. The protons are accelerated in the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration regime, which is suitable for many applications including as an injector into a beamline for medical use, which is one of our objectives.

  2. Research and development of power reactor technology supporting work, 3; Development of utility facility operation management technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Demands on utility facilities for nuclear technology development are increasingly sophisticated and diversified. It is important to meet requirements of securing the reliability of utility supply and ensuring the safety of facility operation and maintenance by means of technical supporting, data supply and quick contingency responses. A New computer system to make practicable man-machine interface, real-time data acquisition and operation data centralization has been developed based on the knowledge. Obtained from data base information and operation experience for the purpose of operation efficiency and labor saving. (author).

  3. The technological study on the decommissioning of nuclear facility, etc. in the Tokai Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomii, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Shiraishi, Kunio; Kato, Rokuro; Watabe, Kozou; Higashiyama, Yutaka; Nagane, Satoru

    2005-03-01

    Since JPDR is dismantled and is removed, in Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the dismantling of nuclear facility which finished the mission, etc. is advanced. At present, nuclear facility as a dismantling object count the approximately 20 facilities, and decommissioning plan of these facilities becomes an important problem, when the decommissioning countermeasure is considered. However, decommissioning techniques in proportion to various nuclear facility, etc. are clearly, and it has not been determined. In this report, the technical consideration on decommissioning techniques of nuclear facility promoted on the basis of this experience in future, while until now decommissioning experience and technical knowledge are arranged, etc. was added in order to appropriately and surely carry out decommissioning techniques and legal procedures, etc. (author)

  4. Low technology high tritium breeding blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Baker, C.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1987-10-01

    The main function of this low technology blanket is to produce the necessary tritium for INTOR operation with minimum first wall coverage. The INTOR first wall, blanket, and shield are constrained by the dimensions of the reference design and the protection criteria required for different reactor components and dose equivalent after shutdown in the reactor hall. It is assumed that the blanket operation at commercial power reactor conditions and the proper temperature for power generation can be sacrificed to achieve the highest possible tritium breeding ratio with minimum additional research and developments and minimal impact on reactor design and operation. A set of blanket evaluation criteria has been used to compare possible blanket concepts. Six areas: performance, operating requirements, impact on reactor design and operation, safety and environmental impact, technology assessment, and cost have been defined for the evaluation process. A water-cooled blanket was developed to operate with a low temperature and pressure. The developed blanket contains a 24 cm of beryllium and 6 cm of solid breeder both with a 0.8 density factor. This blanket provides a local tritium breeding ratio of ∼2.0. The water coolant is isolated from the breeder material by several zones which eliminates the tritium buildup in the water by permeation and reduces the changes for water-breeder interaction. This improves the safety and environmental aspects of the blanket and eliminates the costly process of the tritium recovery from the water. 12 refs., 13 tabs

  5. ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HIGH-TECH FACILITIES OP-ERATION SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olexandr O. Matusevych

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article, based on the analysis of actual materials, highlights the importance of taking into account the influence of the human factor in occurrence of emergency situations in terms of transport infrastructure. Methodology. The research is based on the interdisciplinary system analysis. It was comprehended how the service technicians of high-tech systems can create latent unsafe conditions that combined with other hazardous activities can cause an emergency and injury. The authors attempt to dramatize the issue in order to find a solution – on the one hand, man is the most crucial part of a complex technological system, on the other hand – he is the most unreliable part of the system, especially in terms of the extreme power of modern vehicles and their speeds. The above situation demonstrates the need for a new level of anthropic comprehension of the high-tech systems in the schematic set "human-system-environment". Originality. The paper analysed the problems and conditions of human factors that allow detecting the causes of technicians’ errors. The authors highlighted proposals for psychocorrective work among the personnel of the facilities. The problem of further development of continuous improvement of the equipment maintenance systems, based on integrated approach taking into account the human factor, is also not overlooked. Conclusion. In the course of understanding the human factor and its influence on the processes, the most urgent tasks are as follows: implementation of new system software, automation of vehicles and development of high production culture based on moral qualities of experts.

  6. Electron beam irradiation facility for low to high dose irradiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petwal, V.C.; Wanmode, Yashwant; Verma, Vijay Pal; Bhisikar, Abhay; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Shrivastava, P.; Gupta, P.D.

    2013-01-01

    Electron beam based irradiation facilities are becoming more and more popular over the conventional irradiator facilities due to many inherent advantages such as tunability of beam energy, availability of radiation both in electron mode and X-ray mode, wide range of the dose rate, control of radiation from a ON-OFF switch and other safety related merits. A prototype experimental facility based on electron accelerator has been set-up at RRCAT to meet the low-dose, medium dose and high-dose requirements for radiation processing of food, agricultural and medical products. The facility can be operated in the energy range from 7-10 MeV at variable power level from 0.05-3 kW to meet the dose rate requirement of 100 Gy to kGy. The facility is also equipped with a Bremsstrahlung converter optimized for X-ray irradiation at 7.5 MV. Availability of dose delivery in wide range with precision control and measurement has made the facility an excellent tool for researchers interested in electron/X-ray beam irradiation. A precision dosimetry lab based on alanine EPR and radiochromic film dosimetry system have been established to characterize the radiation field and precise dose measurements. Electron beam scattering technique has been developed to achieve low dose requirement for EB irradiation of various seeds such as groundnut, wheat, soybeans, moong beans, black gram etc. for mutation related studies. This paper describes various features of the facility together with the dosimetric measurements carried out for qualification of the facility and recent irradiation experiments carried out using this facility. (author)

  7. High Energy Ion Bombardment Simulation Facility at the University of Pittsburgh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGruer, J.N.; Choyke, W.J.; Doyle, N.J.; Spitznagel, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The High Energy Ion Bombardment Simulation (HEIBS) Facility located at the University of Pittsburgh is now operational. The E-22 tandem accelerator of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory, fitted with a UNIS source, provides the heavy high energy ions. An auxiliary Van de Graaff accelerator is used for the simultaneous production of He ions. Special features of the simulation laboratory are reported

  8. Facile Synthesis of Gold Nanorice Enclosed by High- Index Facets and Its Application for CO Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Y.; Tao, J.; Liu, H.; Zeng, J.; Yu, T.; Ma, Y.; Moran, C.; Wu, L.; Zhu, Y.; Liu, J.; Xia, Y.

    2011-01-01

    A facile method for generating Au nanorice enclosed by high-index facets in high purity. The nanorice shows much higher catalytic activity for CO oxidation than multiply twinned particles of Au enclosed by {111} facets at temperatures below 300 C.

  9. Achievement report for fiscal 2000 on development of technology to evaluate reliability of petroleum refining facilities; 2000 nendo sekiyu seisei setsubi shinraisei hyoka nado gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This paper reports the achievements in fiscal 2000 in development of a technology to evaluate reliability of petroleum refining facilities. The development efforts were made mainly on analyses by simulation and neural net (NN) that utilize computers. In the high-temperature system facilities, the creep damage generation is governed by different factors including impurities. The evaluation on joint life requires simultaneous use of low temperature zone long-time test. Verification was made on application of non-destructive inspection, such as use of ultrasonic waves in the accelerated creep zone. Defect detecting capability was identified when an ultrasonic wave flaw detection model is used for buried piping. In the pulse eddy current flaw detection, a coil most superb in totality was selected by means of simulation, by which corrosion and wall thickness of piping and devices were detected from outside the sheathing materials. Development was made on a technology to diagnose and evaluate corrosion of tank in operation by using the AE method. The remaining life of transformers is determined by how seriously the coil insulating paper has been deteriorated, and furfural in the oil was found effective for the parameters. Particularly, application of the NN was revealed to be effective in estimating electric motor deterioration. A high-temperature sulfide corrosion rate estimating model was developed from the operation and measurement data of the facilities by applying the NN and TCBM. (NEDO)

  10. Overview of new, upgraded, or proposed high energy physics facilities in the United States and Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews six new, proposed, or upgraded accelerator facilities in the United States and Canada. All of the accelerators that are presented here in one form or fashion challenge the validity of the Standard Model of high energy physics which ''currently explains'' all experimentally know phenomena. These facilities include the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Newport News, Virginia, the Kaon Factory at TRIUMF in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, the Asymmetric B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in Palo Alto, California, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, the injector upgrade project at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, Illinois, and the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) in Waxachachie, Texas

  11. Radiation protection of the operation of accelerator facilities. On high energy proton and electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Kenjiro

    1997-01-01

    Problems in the radiation protection raised by accelerated particles with energy higher than several hundreds MeV in strong accelerator facilities were discussed in comparison with those with lower energy in middle- and small-scale facilities. The characteristics in the protection in such strong accelerator facilities are derived from the qualitative changes in the interaction between the high energy particles and materials and from quantitative one due to the beam strength. In the former which is dependent on the emitting mechanism of the radiation, neutron with broad energy spectrum and muon are important in the protection, and in the latter, levels of radiation and radioactivity which are proportional to the beam strength are important. The author described details of the interaction between high energy particles and materials: leading to the conclusion that in the electron accelerator facilities, shielding against high energy-blemsstrahlung radiation and -neutron is important and in the proton acceleration, shielding against neutron is important. The characteristics of the radiation field in the strong accelerator facilities: among neutron, ionized particles and electromagnetic wave, neutron is most important in shielding since it has small cross sections relative to other two. Considerations for neutron are necessary in the management of exposure. Multiplicity of radionuclides produced: which is a result of nuclear spallation reaction due to high energy particles, especially to proton. Radioactivation of the accelerator equipment is a serious problem. Other problems: the interlock systems, radiation protection for experimenters and maintenance of the equipment by remote systems. (K.H.). 11 refs

  12. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Wildlife Detection and Observation Technologies at a Solar Power Tower Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Robert H; Valdez, Ernest W; Preston, Todd M; Wellik, Michael J; Cryan, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Solar power towers produce electrical energy from sunlight at an industrial scale. Little is known about the effects of this technology on flying animals and few methods exist for automatically detecting or observing wildlife at solar towers and other tall anthropogenic structures. Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light ("solar flux") in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine. In this observational pilot study at the world's largest solar tower facility, we assessed the efficacy of using radar, surveillance video, and insect trapping to detect and observe animals flying near the towers. During site visits in May and September 2014, we monitored the airspace surrounding towers and observed insects, birds, and bats under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. We detected and broadly differentiated animals or objects moving through the airspace generally using radar and near solar towers using several video imaging methods. Video revealed what appeared to be mostly small insects burning in the solar flux. Also, we occasionally detected birds flying in the solar flux but could not accurately identify birds to species or the types of insects and small objects composing the vast majority of smoking targets. Insect trapping on the ground was somewhat effective at sampling smaller insects around the tower, and presence and abundance of insects in the traps generally trended with radar and video observations. Traps did not tend to sample the larger insects we sometimes observed flying in the solar flux or found dead on the ground beneath the towers. Some of the methods we tested (e.g., video surveillance) could be further assessed and potentially used to automatically detect and observe flying animals in the vicinity of solar towers to advance understanding about their effects on wildlife.

  13. Applications of remote sensing and GIS technologies to wetland assessment and monitoring at a DOE facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), a 777-km 2 site, located in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, was established in the early 1950s for the production of nuclear materials to support the defense needs of the United States. The SRS was closed to the public and shortly after its formation, much of the uplands and previous farmlands were planted to managed pine plantations for the US Department of Energy by the US Forest Service. More than 7500 hectares of wetlands, ranging from a large, 3000-hectare swamp, to extensive bottomland hardwood forests, to isolated upland Carolina bays, were present on the SRS at the time of its formation. During the subsequent 40-yr operation of the site, five stream systems and portions of the Savannah River swamp on the SRS were influenced by discharges of once-through cooling water from site operations. In addition, two large cooling lakes were constructed, Par Pond in 1958 and L Lake in 1985, to support reactor operations. Thus, the wetlands of the SRS have had a variety of influences, ranging from the protection afforded by the exclusion of the public from the site, past construction of major facilities, and discharges from site operations. Evaluation, assessment, and monitoring long-term changes to the extensive and varied wetlands of the SRS are formidable tasks. Archived remote sensing data of a variety of types, along with the advances in computer technologies that allow the integration of land-use/land-cover geographic information system (GIS) data layer and related GIS data bases, are providing the necessary tools and information to integrate wetlands protection and management into an effective operational environment

  14. Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife detection and observation technologies at a solar power tower facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Robert H.; Valdez, Ernest W.; Preston, Todd M.; Wellik, Mike J.; Cryan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Solar power towers produce electrical energy from sunlight at an industrial scale. Little is known about the effects of this technology on flying animals and few methods exist for automatically detecting or observing wildlife at solar towers and other tall anthropogenic structures. Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light (“solar flux”) in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine. In this observational pilot study at the world’s largest solar tower facility, we assessed the efficacy of using radar, surveillance video, and insect trapping to detect and observe animals flying near the towers. During site visits in May and September 2014, we monitored the airspace surrounding towers and observed insects, birds, and bats under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. We detected and broadly differentiated animals or objects moving through the airspace generally using radar and near solar towers using several video imaging methods. Video revealed what appeared to be mostly small insects burning in the solar flux. Also, we occasionally detected birds flying in the solar flux but could not accurately identify birds to species or the types of insects and small objects composing the vast majority of smoking targets. Insect trapping on the ground was somewhat effective at sampling smaller insects around the tower, and presence and abundance of insects in the traps generally trended with radar and video observations. Traps did not tend to sample the larger insects we sometimes observed flying in the solar flux or found dead on the ground beneath the towers. Some of the methods we tested (e.g., video surveillance) could be further assessed and potentially used to automatically detect and observe flying animals in the vicinity of solar towers to advance understanding about their effects on wildlife.

  15. Fusion technology development: first wall/blanket system and component testing in existing nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.S.; Bohn, T.S.; Deis, G.A.; Judd, J.L.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Millsap, D.A.; Scott, A.J.; Wessol, D.E.

    1980-12-01

    A novel concept to produce a reasonable simulation of a fusion first wall/blanket test environment employing an existing nuclear facility, the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, is presented. Preliminary results show that an asymmetric, nuclear test environment with surface and volumetric heating rates similar to those expected in a fusion first wall/blanket or divertor chamber surface appears feasible. The proposed concept takes advantage of nuclear reactions within the annulus of an existing test space (15 cm in diameter and approximately 100 cm high) to provide an energy flux to the surface of a test module. The principal reaction considered involves 3 He in the annulus as follows: n + 3 He → p + t + 0.75 MeV. Bulk heating in the test module is accomplished by neutron thermalization, gamma heating, and absorption reactions involving 6 Li in the blanket breeding region. The concept can be extended to modified core configurations that will accommodate test modules of different sizes and types. It makes possible development testing of first wall/blanket systems and other fusion components on a scale and in ways not otherwise available until actual high-power fusion reactors are built

  16. Beam Test for Evaluating Applicabillity of High - Strength Reinforcement in Structure of Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Sangjun; Lee, Byungsoo; Bang, Changjoon

    2014-01-01

    The high-strength rebar which has high yield strength can reduce the amount of rebar in concrete and widen its spacing so that it has better workability and higher economic benefits for the structure. However, the maximum yield strength of rebar is limited to 420MPa in the design criteria for structure of nuclear facility in Korea and USA. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power is progressing research to revise the limitation in the yield strength of rebar, which is suggested in the criteria of KEPIC and ACI, in order to apply 550 MPa high-strength rebar for the construction of a nuclear facility. This study is to review the applicability of high strength rebar in structure of a nuclear facility through a model beam test. After reviewing the shear capacity and reinforcement yield to assess the applicability of high-strength reinforcement in the structure of a nuclear facility, we make the following conclusions. When using high shear reinforcement with wider spacing, it has a similar shear capacity to normal reinforcement with narrower spacing. This means better workability and economic benefits can be achieved by widening the rebar spacing without brittle fracture in the elements. For future plans, the results of this test and supplementary test will be submitted to ACI349 committee as backup data to revise the standard for yield strength of high-strength rebar

  17. Beam Test for Evaluating Applicabillity of High - Strength Reinforcement in Structure of Nuclear Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Sangjun; Lee, Byungsoo; Bang, Changjoon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The high-strength rebar which has high yield strength can reduce the amount of rebar in concrete and widen its spacing so that it has better workability and higher economic benefits for the structure. However, the maximum yield strength of rebar is limited to 420MPa in the design criteria for structure of nuclear facility in Korea and USA. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power is progressing research to revise the limitation in the yield strength of rebar, which is suggested in the criteria of KEPIC and ACI, in order to apply 550 MPa high-strength rebar for the construction of a nuclear facility. This study is to review the applicability of high strength rebar in structure of a nuclear facility through a model beam test. After reviewing the shear capacity and reinforcement yield to assess the applicability of high-strength reinforcement in the structure of a nuclear facility, we make the following conclusions. When using high shear reinforcement with wider spacing, it has a similar shear capacity to normal reinforcement with narrower spacing. This means better workability and economic benefits can be achieved by widening the rebar spacing without brittle fracture in the elements. For future plans, the results of this test and supplementary test will be submitted to ACI349 committee as backup data to revise the standard for yield strength of high-strength rebar.

  18. Fiscal 1999 research report. Research on photonic measurement and processing technology (Development of advanced maintenance technology for power plant facilities); 1999 nendo foton keisoku kako gijutsu seika hokokusho. Hatsuden shisetsuyo kokino maintenance gijutsu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal 1999 research result on R and D of measurement technology, laser welding and surface treatment technology, and generation technology of photon beam, for improvement of the quality and maintenance efficiency for power plant facilities. In the study on fabrication of functional micro-composite circuits, the equipment for forming circuits on substrates by carrying particles with gas was developed whose geometric standard deviation is 1.17 for 26nm particles. In the study on gas concentration measurement technology, development of the variable-wavelength laser beam source for measurement, fabrication of thin films by epitaxial growth equipment, and computer simulation of sensitivities for quantum IR photo- detectors were promoted. In the study on photon wavefront compensation device technology, the technology for fabricating such device with (411)A surface orientations and asymmetric quantum well structures was developed. In the study on high-sensitivity detection technology using short- wavelength photon, to develop a high-energy resolution fluorescent X-ray detector, favorable electric properties of superconducting X-ray detecting devices were confirmed at nearly 0.1K. (NEDO)

  19. Seismic technology of nuclear fuel cycle facilities: A view of BNFL's approach and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, I.R.

    2001-01-01

    The approach BNFL employs in the seismic qualification of its nuclear fuel cycle facilities is described in this paper. The overall seismic qualification process from design to installation and commissioning is considered. The approach for new facilities, such as the Sellafield Mixed Oxide Fuel Plant and Windscale Vitrification Plant Line 3 currently under construction, is examined. (author)

  20. Evaluation of environmental control technologies for commercial uranium nuclear fuel fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    At present in the United States, there are seven commercial light-water reactor uranium fuel fabrication facilities. Effluent wastes from these facilities include uranium, nitrogen, fluorine, and organic-containing compounds. These effluents may be either discharged to the ambient environment, treated and recycled internally, stored or disposed of on-site, sent off-site for treatment and/or recovery, or sent off-site for disposal (including disposal in low-level waste burial sites). Quantities of waste generated and treatment techniques vary greatly depending on the facility and circuits used internally at the facility, though in general all the fluorine entering the facility as UF 6 is discharged as waste. Further studies to determine techniques and procedures that might minimize dose (ALARA) and to give data on possible long-term effects of effluent discharge and waste disposal are needed

  1. Conceptual design report for the spent fuel management technology research and test (SMATER) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S W; Ro, S G; Lee, J S; Min, D K; Shin, Y J [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    This study was intended to develop concept for a pilot-scale remote operation facility for longer term management of spent fuel and therefrom to provide technical requirement for later basic design of the facility. Main scope of work for the study was to revise the past (1990) conceptual design in functions, scale, hot cell layout etc. based on user requirements. Technical reference was made to the PKA facility in Germany, through collaboration with appropriate partner, to elaborate the design and requirements. The study was focused on establishing design criteria and conceptual design of the SMATER facility. The results of this study should be an essential and useful basis upon optimization for further work to basic design of the facility. (author). 17 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Design of a high-flux test assembly for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.; Vogel, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Material Test Facility (FMIT) will provide a high flux fusion-like neutron environment in which a variety of structural and non-structural materials irradiations can be conducted. The FMIT experiments, called test assemblies, that are subjected to the highest neutron flux magnitudes and associated heating rates will require forced convection liquid metal cooling systems to remove the neutron deposited power and maintain test specimens at uniform temperatures. A brief description of the FMIT facility and experimental areas is given with emphasis on the design, capabilities and handling of the high flux test assembly

  3. Summary of informal meeting on ''facilities for atomic physics research with highly ionized atoms''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocke, C.L.; Jones, K.W.

    1984-01-01

    An informal meeting to discuss ''Facilities for Atomic Physics Research with Highly Ionized Atoms'' was held during the APS DEAP meeting at the University of Connecticut on May 30, 1984. The meeting was motivated by the realization that the status of facilities for studies of highly ionized atoms is unsettled and that it might be desirable to take action to ensure adequate resources for research over the whole range of charge states and energies of interest. It was assumed that the science to be done with these beams has been amply documented in the literature

  4. Emerging technologies for high performance infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Leong; Mohseni, Hooman

    2018-01-01

    Infrared photodetectors (IRPDs) have become important devices in various applications such as night vision, military missile tracking, medical imaging, industry defect imaging, environmental sensing, and exoplanet exploration. Mature semiconductor technologies such as mercury cadmium telluride and III-V material-based photodetectors have been dominating the industry. However, in the last few decades, significant funding and research has been focused to improve the performance of IRPDs such as lowering the fabrication cost, simplifying the fabrication processes, increasing the production yield, and increasing the operating temperature by making use of advances in nanofabrication and nanotechnology. We will first review the nanomaterial with suitable electronic and mechanical properties, such as two-dimensional material, graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and metal oxides. We compare these with more traditional low-dimensional material such as quantum well, quantum dot, quantum dot in well, semiconductor superlattice, nanowires, nanotube, and colloid quantum dot. We will also review the nanostructures used for enhanced light-matter interaction to boost the IRPD sensitivity. These include nanostructured antireflection coatings, optical antennas, plasmonic, and metamaterials.

  5. Emerging technologies for high performance infrared detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Chee Leong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared photodetectors (IRPDs have become important devices in various applications such as night vision, military missile tracking, medical imaging, industry defect imaging, environmental sensing, and exoplanet exploration. Mature semiconductor technologies such as mercury cadmium telluride and III–V material-based photodetectors have been dominating the industry. However, in the last few decades, significant funding and research has been focused to improve the performance of IRPDs such as lowering the fabrication cost, simplifying the fabrication processes, increasing the production yield, and increasing the operating temperature by making use of advances in nanofabrication and nanotechnology. We will first review the nanomaterial with suitable electronic and mechanical properties, such as two-dimensional material, graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and metal oxides. We compare these with more traditional low-dimensional material such as quantum well, quantum dot, quantum dot in well, semiconductor superlattice, nanowires, nanotube, and colloid quantum dot. We will also review the nanostructures used for enhanced light-matter interaction to boost the IRPD sensitivity. These include nanostructured antireflection coatings, optical antennas, plasmonic, and metamaterials.

  6. Final report of the HFIR [High Flux Isotope Reactor] irradiation facilities improvement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, B.H.; Thoms, K.R.; West, C.D.

    1987-09-01

    The High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has outstanding neutronics characteristics for materials irradiation, but some relatively minor aspects of its mechanical design severely limited its usefulness for that purpose. In particular, though the flux trap region in the center of the annular fuel elements has a very high neutron flux, it had no provision for instrumentation access to irradiation capsules. The irradiation positions in the beryllium reflector outside the fuel elements also have a high flux; however, although instrumented, they were too small and too few to replace the facilities of a materials testing reactor. To address these drawbacks, the HFIR Irradiation Facilities Improvement Project consisted of modifications to the reactor vessel cover, internal structures, and reflector. Two instrumented facilities were provided in the flux trap region, and the number of materials irradiation positions in the removable beryllium (RB) was increased from four to eight, each with almost twice the available experimental space of the previous ones. The instrumented target facilities were completed in August 1986, and the RB facilities were completed in June 1987

  7. Simplified static method for determining seismic loads on equipment in moderate and high hazard facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.A.; Holmes, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    A simplified static analysis methodology is presented for qualifying equipment in moderate and high-hazard facility-use category structures, where the facility use is defined in Design and Evaluation Guidelines for Department of Energy Facilities Subjected to Natural Phenomena Hazards, UCRL-15910. Currently there are no equivalent simplified static methods for determining seismic loads on equipment in these facility use categories without completing dynamic analysis of the facility to obtain local floor accelerations or spectra. The requirements of UCRL-15910 specify the use of open-quotes dynamicclose quotes analysis methods, consistent with Seismic Design Guidelines for Essential Buildings, Chapter 6, open-quotes Nonstructural Elements,close quotes TM5-809-10-1, be used for determining seismic loads on mechanical equipment and components. Chapter 6 assumes that the dynamic analysis of the facility has generated either floor response spectra or model floor accelerations. These in turn are utilized with the dynamic modification factor and the actual demand and capacity ratios to determine equipment loading. This complex methodology may be necessary to determine more exacting loads for hard to qualify equipment but does not provide a simple conservative loading methodology for equipment with ample structural capacity

  8. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS for high throughput screening facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nale Jennifer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. Results We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS, to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. Conclusions The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities.

  9. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS) for high throughput screening facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolopko, Andrew N; Sullivan, John P; Erickson, Sean D; Wrobel, David; Chiang, Su L; Rudnicki, Katrina; Rudnicki, Stewart; Nale, Jennifer; Selfors, Laura M; Greenhouse, Dara; Muhlich, Jeremy L; Shamu, Caroline E

    2010-05-18

    Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS) facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS), to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities.

  10. Technologies for highly miniaturized autonomous sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baert, K.; Gyselinckx, B.; Torfs, T.; Leonov, V.; Yazicioglu, F.; Brebels, S.; Donnay, S.; Vanfleteren, J.; Beyne, E.; Hoof, C. van

    2006-01-01

    Recent results of the autonomous sensor research program HUMAN++ will be summarized in this paper. The research program aims to achieve highly miniaturized and (nearly) autonomous sensor systems that assist our health and comfort. Although the application examples are dedicated to human

  11. Use of Savannah River Site facilities for blend down of highly enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, W.E.; McKibben, J.M.

    1994-02-01

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company was asked to assess the use of existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities for the conversion of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). The purpose was to eliminate the weapons potential for such material. Blending HEU with existing supplies of depleted uranium (DU) would produce material with less than 5% U-235 content for use in commercial nuclear reactors. The request indicated that as much as 500 to 1,000 MT of HEU would be available for conversion over a 20-year period. Existing facilities at the SRS are capable of producing LEU in the form of uranium trioxide (UO 3 ) powder, uranyl nitrate [UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ] solution, or metal. Additional processing, and additional facilities, would be required to convert the LEU to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) or uranium hexafluoride (UF 3 ), the normal inputs for commercial fuel fabrication. This study's scope does not include the cost for new conversion facilities. However, the low estimated cost per kilogram of blending HEU to LEU in SRS facilities indicates that even with fees for any additional conversion to UO 2 or UF 6 , blend-down would still provide a product significantly below the spot market price for LEU from traditional enrichment services. The body of the report develops a number of possible facility/process combinations for SRS. The primary conclusion of this study is that SRS has facilities available that are capable of satisfying the goals of a national program to blend HEU to below 5% U-235. This preliminary assessment concludes that several facility/process options appear cost-effective. Finally, SRS is a secure DOE site with all requisite security and safeguard programs, personnel skills, nuclear criticality safety controls, accountability programs, and supporting infrastructure to handle large quantities of special nuclear materials (SNM)

  12. REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O' Leary, E. M.

    2002-02-25

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

  13. Alternative disposal technologies for new low-level radioactive waste disposal/storage facilities at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Waste Management Activities for groundwater protection has been prepared for the Savannah River Plant. Support documentation for the DEIS included an Environmental Information Document on new radioactive waste disposal and storage facilities in which possible alternative disposal technologies were examined in depth. Six technologies that would meet the needs of the Savannah River Plant that selected for description and analysis include near surface disposal, near surface disposal with exceptions, engineered storage, engineered disposal, vault disposal of untreated waste, and a combination of near surface disposal, engineered disposal, and engineered storage. 2 refs

  14. Biological restoration of major transportation facilities domestic demonstration and application project (DDAP): technology development at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, James L., Jr. (.,; .); Melton, Brad; Finley, Patrick; Brockman, John; Peyton, Chad E.; Tucker, Mark David; Einfeld, Wayne; Griffith, Richard O.; Brown, Gary Stephen; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Knowlton, Robert G.; Ho, Pauline

    2006-06-01

    The Bio-Restoration of Major Transportation Facilities Domestic Demonstration and Application Program (DDAP) is a designed to accelerate the restoration of transportation nodes following an attack with a biological warfare agent. This report documents the technology development work done at SNL for this DDAP, which include development of the BROOM tool, an investigation of surface sample collection efficiency, and a flow cytometry study of chlorine dioxide effects on Bacillus anthracis spore viability.

  15. Specialized, multi-user computer facility for the high-speed, interactive processing of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maples, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    A proposal has been made to develop a specialized computer facility specifically designed to deal with the problems associated with the reduction and analysis of experimental data. Such a facility would provide a highly interactive, graphics-oriented, multi-user environment capable of handling relatively large data bases for each user. By conceptually separating the general problem of data analysis into two parts, cyclic batch calculations and real-time interaction, a multi-level, parallel processing framework may be used to achieve high-speed data processing. In principle such a system should be able to process a mag tape equivalent of data, through typical transformations and correlations, in under 30 sec. The throughput for such a facility, assuming five users simultaneously reducing data, is estimated to be 2 to 3 times greater than is possible, for example, on a CDC7600

  16. Specialized, multi-user computer facility for the high-speed, interactive processing of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maples, C.C.

    1979-05-01

    A proposal has been made at LBL to develop a specialized computer facility specifically designed to deal with the problems associated with the reduction and analysis of experimental data. Such a facility would provide a highly interactive, graphics-oriented, multi-user environment capable of handling relatively large data bases for each user. By conceptually separating the general problem of data analysis into two parts, cyclic batch calculations and real-time interaction, a multilevel, parallel processing framework may be used to achieve high-speed data processing. In principle such a system should be able to process a mag tape equivalent of data through typical transformations and correlations in under 30 s. The throughput for such a facility, for five users simultaneously reducing data, is estimated to be 2 to 3 times greater than is possible, for example, on a CDC7600. 3 figures

  17. Trend on High-speed Power Line Communication Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Osamu

    High-speed power line communication (PLC) is useful technology to easily build the communication networks, because construction of new infrastructure is not necessary. In Europe and America, PLC has been used for broadband networks since the beginning of 21th century. In Japan, high-speed PLC was deregulated only indoor usage in 2006. Afterward it has been widely used for home area network, LAN in hotels and school buildings and so on. And recently, PLC is greatly concerned as communication technology for smart grid network. In this paper, the author surveys the high-speed PLC technology and its current status.

  18. Development of control technology for HTTR hydrogen production system with mock-up test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Inaba, Yoshitomo; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Takeda, Tetsuaki; Hayashi, Koji; Takada, Shoji; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki

    2006-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been planning the demonstration test of hydrogen production with the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). In a HTTR hydrogen production system (HTTR-H2), it is required to control a primary helium temperature within an allowable value at a reactor inlet to prevent a reactor scram. A cooling system for a secondary helium with a steam generator (SG) and a radiator is installed at the downstream of a chemical rector in a secondary helium loop in order to mitigate the thermal disturbance caused by the hydrogen production system. Prior to HTTR-H2, the simulation test with a mock-up test facility has been carried out to establish the controllability on the helium temperature using the cooling system against the loss of chemical reaction. It was confirmed that the fluctuations of the helium temperature at chemical reactor outlet, more than 200 K, at the loss of chemical reaction could be successfully mitigated within the target of ±10 K at SG outlet. A dynamic simulation code of the cooling system for HTTR-H2 was verified with the obtained test data

  19. Developing a clinical proton accelerator facility: Consortium-assisted technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, J.M.; Miller, D.W.; Slater, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    A hospital-based proton accelerator facility has emerged from the efforts of a consortium of physicists, engineers and physicians from several high-energy physics laboratories, industries and universities, working together to develop the requirements and conceptual design for a clinical program. A variable-energy medical synchrotron for accelerating protons to a prescribed energy, intensity and beam quality, has been placed in a hospital setting at Loma Linda University Medical Center for treating patients with localized cancer. Treatments began in October 1990. Scientists from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory; Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories; the Paul Scherrer Institute; Uppsala, Sweden; Argonne, Brookhaven and Los Alamos National Laboratories; and Loma Linda University, all cooperated to produce the conceptual design. Loma Linda University contracted with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to design and build a 250 MeV synchrotron and beam transport system, the latter to guide protons into four treatment rooms. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories consulted with Loma Linda University on the design of the beam delivery system (nozzle). A gantry concept devised by scientists at Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory, was adapted and fabricated by Science Applications International Corporation. The control and safety systems were designed and developed by Loma Linda University Radiation Research Laboratory. Presently, the synchrotron, beam transport system and treatment room hardware have been installed and tested and are operating satisfactorily

  20. Technology | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Laboratory develops and applies advanced, next-generation technologies to solve basic and applied problems in the biomedical sciences, and serves as a national resource of shared high-tech facilities.