WorldWideScience

Sample records for high shock pressures

  1. Low Pressure Evidence of High Pressure Shock: Thermal Histories and Annealing in Shocked Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, T. G.; Hu, J.

    2016-08-01

    In this study we look at the mineralogy associated with shock veins in several highly shocked L chondrites to better understand shock conditions and the importance of thermal history in creating and destroying high-pressure minerals.

  2. High-pressure minerals in shocked meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Naotaka; Miyahara, Masaaki

    2017-09-01

    Heavily shocked meteorites contain various types of high-pressure polymorphs of major minerals (olivine, pyroxene, feldspar, and quartz) and accessory minerals (chromite and Ca phosphate). These high-pressure minerals are micron to submicron sized and occur within and in the vicinity of shock-induced melt veins and melt pockets in chondrites and lunar, howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED), and Martian meteorites. Their occurrence suggests two types of formation mechanisms (1) solid-state high-pressure transformation of the host-rock minerals into monomineralic polycrystalline aggregates, and (2) crystallization of chondritic or monomineralic melts under high pressure. Based on experimentally determined phase relations, their formation pressures are limited to the pressure range up to 25 GPa. Textural, crystallographic, and chemical characteristics of high-pressure minerals provide clues about the impact events of meteorite parent bodies, including their size and mutual collision velocities and about the mineralogy of deep planetary interiors. The aim of this article is to review and summarize the findings on natural high-pressure minerals in shocked meteorites that have been reported over the past 50 years.

  3. High-pressure phases in shock-induced melt of the unique highly shocked LL6 chondrite Northwest Africa 757

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinping; Sharp, Thomas G.

    2016-07-01

    Northwest Africa 757 is unique in the LL chondrite group because of its abundant shock-induced melt and high-pressure minerals. Olivine fragments entrained in the melt transform partially and completely into ringwoodite. Plagioclase and Ca-phosphate transform to maskelynite, lingunite, and tuite. Two distinct shock-melt crystallization assemblages were studied by FIB-TEM analysis. The first melt assemblage, which includes majoritic garnet, ringwoodite plus magnetite-magnesiowüstite, crystallized at pressures of 20-25 GPa. The other melt assemblage, which consists of clinopyroxene and wadsleyite, solidified at ~15 GPa, suggesting a second veining event under lower pressure conditions. These shock features are similar to those in S6 L chondrites and indicate that NWA 757 experienced an intense impact event, comparable to the impact event that disrupted the L chondrite parent body at 470 Ma.

  4. Generation of high pressure shocks relevant to the shock-ignition intensity regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batani, D.; Antonelli, L.; Atzeni, S.; Badziak, J.; Baffigi, F.; Chodukowski, T.; Consoli, F.; Cristoforetti, G.; De Angelis, R.; Dudzak, R.; Folpini, G.; Giuffrida, L.; Gizzi, L. A.; Kalinowska, Z.; Koester, P.; Krousky, E.; Krus, M.; Labate, L.; Levato, T.; Maheut, Y.; Malka, G.; Margarone, D.; Marocchino, A.; Nejdl, J.; Nicolai, Ph.; O'Dell, T.; Pisarczyk, T.; Renner, O.; Rhee, Y. J.; Ribeyre, X.; Richetta, M.; Rosinski, M.; Sawicka, M.; Schiavi, A.; Skala, J.; Smid, M.; Spindloe, Ch.; Ullschmied, J.; Velyhan, A.; Vinci, T.

    2014-03-01

    An experiment was performed using the PALS laser to study laser-target coupling and laser-plasma interaction in an intensity regime ≤1016 W/cm2, relevant for the "shock ignition" approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion. A first beam at low intensity was used to create an extended preformed plasma, and a second one to create a strong shock. Pressures up to 90 Megabars were inferred. Our results show the importance of the details of energy transport in the overdense region.

  5. Generation of high pressure shocks relevant to the shock-ignition intensity regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batani, D.; Folpini, G.; Giuffrida, L.; Maheut, Y.; Malka, G.; Nicolai, Ph.; Ribeyre, X. [Université Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Antonelli, L. [Université Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Roma (Italy); Atzeni, S.; Marocchino, A.; Schiavi, A. [Dipartimento SBAI, Université di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Roma (Italy); Badziak, J.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Pisarczyk, T.; Rosinski, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Baffigi, F.; Cristoforetti, G.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, INO-CNR, Pisa (Italy); and others

    2014-03-15

    An experiment was performed using the PALS laser to study laser-target coupling and laser-plasma interaction in an intensity regime ≤10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}, relevant for the “shock ignition” approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion. A first beam at low intensity was used to create an extended preformed plasma, and a second one to create a strong shock. Pressures up to 90 Megabars were inferred. Our results show the importance of the details of energy transport in the overdense region.

  6. High-Pressure Minerals in Meteorites: Constraints on Shock Conditions and Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Thomas G.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this research was to better understand the conditions and duration of shock metamorphism in meteorites through microstructural and microanalytical characterization of high-pressure minerals. A) Continue to investigate the mineralogy and microstructures of melt-veins in a suite of chondritic samples ranging from shock grades S3 through S6 to determine how the mineral assemblages that crystallize at high-pressure and are related to shock grade. B) Investigate the chemical, mineralogical, and microstructural heterogeneities that occur across melt veins to interpret crystallization histories. C) Use static high-pressure experiments to simulate crystallization of melt veins for mineralogical and textural comparisons with the melt veins of naturally shocked samples. D) Characterize the compositions and defect microstructures of polycrystalline ringwoodite, wadsleyite, majorite, (Mg,Fe)Si03-ilmenite and (Mg,Fe)SiO3-perovskite in S6 samples to understand the mechanisms of phase transformations that occur during shock. These results will combined with kinetic data to constrain the time scales of kinetic processes. E) Investigate the transformations of metastable high-pressure minerals back to low- pressure forms to constrain post-shock temperatures and estimates of the peak shock pressure. Of these objectives, we have obtained publishable data on A, B and D. I am currently doing difficult high-pressure melting and quench experiments on an L chondrite known as Mbale. These experiments will provide additional constraints on the mineral assemblages that are produced during rapid quench of an L chondrite at pressures of 16 to 25 GPa. Results from published or nearly published research is presented below. Lists of theses, dissertations and publications are given below.

  7. Shock Melting Temperature of Initially Porous Iron and Indication for Melting Curve of Iron at High Pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xi-Jun; ZHANG Dai-Yu; LIU Fu-Sheng; JING Fu-Qian

    2004-01-01

    The melting curve ofiron is crucial for modelling of the earth's internal heat structures and to understand melting of solids at high pressures. However, the measured melting temperatures of iron at high pressures are disparate so far. We measured the shocked interface (porous iron/sapphire window) temperatures of a kind of porous iron. By using a model for shock temperature measurement [High Pressures Res. 2 (1990) 159] and the previous results of sound velocity measurements [Chin. Phys. Lett. 18 (2001) 852], we determine the melting temperatures of iron at shock compression high pressures of 145 and 171 Gpa. They are consistent with the results reported by other shock compression experiments. Based on the possible different melting mechanisms of iron in diamond anvil cell and in shock compression, the corrected melting temperatures of iron at high pressures become more consistent.

  8. Effects of high shock pressures and pore morphology on hot spot mechanisms in HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, H. K.; Tarver, C. M.; Bastea, S.

    2017-01-01

    The shock initiation and detonation behavior of heterogeneous solid explosives is governed by its microstructure and reactive properties. New additive manufacturing techniques offer unprecedented control of explosive microstructures previously impossible, enabling us to develop novel explosives with tailored shock sensitivity and detonation properties. Since microstructure-performance relationships are not well established for explosives, there is little material design guidance for these manufacturing techniques. In this study, we explore the effects of high shock pressures (15-38 GPa) with long shock durations and different pore morphologies on hot spot mechanisms in HMX. HMX is chosen as the model material because we have experimental data on many of the chemical-thermal-mechanical properties required for pore collapse simulations. Our simulations are performed using the multi-physics arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian finite element hydrocode, ALE3D, with Cheetah-based models for the unreacted and the product equation-of-states. We use a temperature-dependent specific heat with the unreacted equation-of-state and a temperature-dependent viscosity model to ensure accurate shock temperatures for subsequent chemistry. The Lindemann Law model is used for shock melting in HMX. In contrast to previous pore collapse studies at lower shock pressures (≤10 GPa) in HMX and shorter post-collapse burning times, our calculations show that shock melting occurs above 15 GPa due to higher bulk heating and a prominent elongated ("jet-like") hot spot region forms at later times. The combination of the elongated, post-collapse hot spot region and the higher bulk heating with increasing pressure dramatically increases the growth rate of reaction. Our calculations show that the reaction rate, dF/dt, increases with increasing shock pressure. We decompose the reaction rate into ignition ((dF/dt)ig) and growth ((dF/dt)gr) phases to better analyze our results. We define the ignition phase

  9. Pressure Hull Analysis under Shock Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Ya-Jung Lee; Chia-Hao Hsu; Chien-Hua Huang

    2008-01-01

    The hull of high performance submarines must resist underwater shock loading due to exploding torpedoes or depth bombs. An underwater shock involving an initial shock wave and successive bubble pulsating waves is so complex that a theoretical technique for deriving shock pressure distribution is required for improving simulation efficiency. Complete shock loading is obtained theoretically in this work, and responses of a submarine pressure hull are calculated using ABAQUS USA (Underwater Shoc...

  10. High-pressure shock behavior of WC and Ta2O5 powders.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudson, Marcus D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Reinhart, William Dodd (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Root, Seth (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-10-01

    Planar shock experiments were conducted on granular tungsten carbide (WC) and tantalum oxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) using the Z machine and a 2-stage gas gun. Additional shock experiments were also conducted on a nearly fully dense form of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The experiments on WC yield some of the highest pressure results for granular materials obtained to date. Because of the high distention of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, the pressures obtained were significantly lower, but the very high temperatures generated led to large contributions of thermal energy to the material response. These experiments demonstrate that the Z machine can be used to obtain accurate shock data on granular materials. The data on Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} were utilized in making improvements to the P-{lambda} model for high pressures; the model is found to capture the results not only of the Z and gas gun experiments but also those from laser experiments on low density aerogels. The results are also used to illustrate an approach for generating an equation of state using only the limited data coming from nanoindentation. Although the EOS generated in this manner is rather simplistic, for this material it gives reasonably good results.

  11. Pressure Hull Analysis under Shock Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Jung Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The hull of high performance submarines must resist underwater shock loading due to exploding torpedoes or depth bombs. An underwater shock involving an initial shock wave and successive bubble pulsating waves is so complex that a theoretical technique for deriving shock pressure distribution is required for improving simulation efficiency. Complete shock loading is obtained theoretically in this work, and responses of a submarine pressure hull are calculated using ABAQUS USA (Underwater Shock Analysis codes. In the long run, this deflection and stress data will assist in examining the structural arrangement of the submarine pressure hull.

  12. Shock wave reflection induced detonation (SWRID) under high pressure and temperature condition in closed cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Qi, Y.; Liu, H.; Zhang, P.; He, X.; Wang, J.

    2016-09-01

    Super-knock is one of the major obstacles for improving power density in advanced internal combustion engines (ICE). This work studied the mechanism of super-knock initiation using a rapid compression machine that simulated conditions relevant to ICEs and provided excellent optical accessibility. Based on the high-speed images and pressure traces of the stoichiometric iso-octane/oxygen/nitrogen combustion under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions, it was observed that detonation was first initiated in the near-wall region as a result of shock wave reflection. Before detonation was initiated, the speed of the combustion wave front was less than that of the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation speed (around 1840 m/s). In the immediate vicinity of the initiation, the detonation speed was much higher than that of the C-J detonation.

  13. Shell-structure effects on high-pressure Rankine-Hugoniot shock adiabats

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, J C

    2007-01-01

    Rankine-Hugoniot shock adiabats are calculated in the pressure range 1 Mbar-10 Gbar with two atomic-structure models: the atom in a spherical cell and the atom in a jellium of charges. These quantum self-consistent-field models include shell effects, which have a strong impact on pressure and shock velocity along the shock adiabat. Comparisons with experimental data are presented and quantum effects are interpreted in terms of electronic specific heat. A simple analytical estimate for the maximum compression is proposed, depending on initial density, atomic weight and atomic number.

  14. Equations of state and melting curve of boron carbide in the high-pressure range of shock compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molodets, A. M., E-mail: molodets@icp.ac.ru; Golyshev, A. A.; Shakhrai, D. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    We have constructed the equations of state for crystalline boron carbide B{sub 11}C (C–B–C) and its melt under high dynamic and static pressures. A kink on the shock adiabat for boron carbide has been revealed in the pressure range near 100 GPa, and the melting curve with negative curvature in the pressure range 0–120 GPa has been calculated. The results have been used for interpreting the kinks on the shock adiabat for boron carbide in the pressure range of 0–400 GPa.

  15. Effects of Shock Pressure on Transition Pressure in Zr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying-Hua; ZHANG Lin; CAI Ling-Cang

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of free surface velocity profiles of high-purity Zr samples under shock-wave loading are performed to study the dynamic strength and phase transition parameters. The peak pressure of the compression waves is within the range from 9 to 14 GPa, and the Hugoniot elastic limit is 0.5 GPa. An anomalous structure of shock waves is observed due to the α - ω phase transition in Zr. Shock pressure has effects on transition pressure which increases with increasing compression strength, and the stronger shocks have a lower transit time.

  16. Quantum-statistical equation-of-state models of dense plasmas: high-pressure Hugoniot shock adiabats

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, Jean-Christophe

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison of two self-consistent equation-of-state models which differ from their electronic contribution: the atom in a spherical cell and the atom in a jellium of charges. It is shown that both models are well suited for the calculation of Hugoniot shock adiabats in the high pressure range (1 Mbar-10 Gbar), and that the atom-in-a-jellium model provides a better treatment of pressure ionization. Comparisons with experimental data are also presented. Shell effects on shock adiabats are reviewed in the light of these models. They lead to additional features not only in the variations of pressure versus density, but also in the variations of shock velocity versus particle velocity. Moreover, such effects are found to be responsible for enhancement of the electronic specific heat.

  17. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-09

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  18. Developing a 3-shock, low-adiabat drive for high pressure material science experiments on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrenberg, Christopher; Prisbrey, Shon; Graham, Peter; Park, Hye-Sook; Huntington, Channing; Maddox, Brian; Benedetti, Robin; Rudd, Robert; Arsenlis, Tom; Remington, Bruce

    2014-10-01

    We describe a series of experiments for basic materials science on NIF to develop a planar, 3-shock, low-adiabat drive to reach peak pressures of 5 Mbar, while keeping the physics samples well below their melt temperatures. The primary diagnostic is VISAR, which measures the compression waves as they travel through a Ta witness plate. X-ray ablation from an indirect drive launches a strong (>10 Mbar) shock through a precision fabricated ``reservoir,'' consisting of a CH ablator, followed by layers of Al, CH(18.75%I), 350 mg/cc CRF foam, and a final layer of 10-30 mg/cc foam. This reservoir releases as plasma across a 1.5 mm vacuum gap, then stagnates on the 15 micron thick Ta witness plate, which is backed by a LiF or quartz window. The lowest density reservoir layer sets the strength of the leading shock, which needs to be controlled to keep the physics samples solid, and to control the dislocation density created by this leading shock. We will describe an extensive series of experiments done on NIF to develop this drive. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. I - Pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic solutions are derived for the pressure distribution in the interaction of a weak normal shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. The undisturbed boundary layer is characterized by the law of the wall and the law of the wake for compressible flow. In the limiting case considered, for 'high' transonic speeds, the sonic line is very close to the wall. Comparisons with experiment are shown, with corrections included for the effect of longitudinal wall curvature and for the boundary-layer displacement effect in a circular pipe.

  20. THE EFFECTS OF AREA CONTRACTION ON SHOCK WAVE STRENGTH AND PEAK PRESSURE IN SHOCK TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mohsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the effects of area contraction on shock wave strength and peak pressure in a shock tube. The shock tube is an important component of the short duration, high speed fluid flow test facility, available at the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN, Malaysia. The area contraction was facilitated by positioning a bush adjacent to the primary diaphragm section, which separates the driver and driven sections. Experimental measurements were performed with and without the presence of the bush, at various diaphragm pressure ratios, which is the ratio of air pressure between the driver (high pressure and driven (low pressure sections. The instantaneous static pressure variations were measured at two locations close to the driven tube end wall, using high sensitivity pressure sensors, which allow the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure to be analysed. The results reveal that the area contraction significantly reduces the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure. At a diaphragm pressure ratio of 10, the shock wave strength decreases by 18%, the peak pressure decreases by 30% and the shock wave speed decreases by 8%.

  1. Shock Effects and High Pressure Polymorphs in Polymict Eucrite Northwest Africa 10658

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudge, C.; Wittmann, A.; Garvie, L. A. J.; Sharp, T. G.

    2016-08-01

    We report the presence of coesite in polymict eucrite NWA 10658. High pressure silica phases have previously been described to coexist with silica glass in the Béréba eucrite. We will present data from transmission electron microscope investigations.

  2. Shock Induced Emission from Sapphire in High-Pressure Phase of Rh2O3 (Ⅱ) Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dai-Yu; LIU Fu-Sheng; HAO Gao-Yu; SUN Yu-Huai

    2007-01-01

    @@ A distinct optical emission from the Rh2 O3 (Ⅱ) structural sapphire is observed under shock compression of 125,132, and 143 Gpa. The emission intensity continuously increases with the thickness of shocked sapphire. The colour temperature is determined to be about 4000K, which is obviously smaller than the reported value of the alpha phase alumina at the pressures below 80 Gpa. The present results suggest that the structural transformation will cause an obvious change of optical property in sapphire.

  3. NaAlSi3O8-hollandite and other high-pressure minerals in the shock melt veins of the Suizhou meteorite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Suizhou L6 chondrite contains a few very thin shock melt veins of 0.02-0.09 mm in width. In spite of small width of the veins, shock-induced high-pressure phases, such as coarse-grained NaAlSi3O8-hollandite, ringwoodite, majorite and fine-grained matrix majorite-pyropess have been discovered in these veins. NaAlSi3O8-hollandite, the high-pressure phase of plagioclase, in Suizhou shock veins occurs as a single phase mineral, no silicate glassy phase, such as albitic glass, was incorporated with it. The presence of above-mentioned high-pressure phases constrains the high pressure (up to 23-24 GPa) and high temperature (up to 1900-2000℃) regime in Suizhou shock veins, and indicates that the duration of high-pressure regime in the veins should be long enough (a few seconds) for phase transformation and crystallization of minerals under pressure. The discovery of the first natural single-phase crystalline NaAlSi3O8- hollan-dite in Suizhou meteorite is of important significance in un-derstanding the Earth's mantle geochemistry.

  4. High pressure phases in NWA 8711, a shock melted L6 chondrite from Northwest Africa: a combined Raman and EMPA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moggi Cecchi, V.; Pratesi, G.; Caporali, S.; Zoppi, M.

    We report the occurrence of two coexisting high-pressure assemblages in shock-induced black veins of NWA 8711, an L6 chondrite recently found in Northwest Africa. The main phases of the host rock are olivine, enstatite, diopside, plagioclase, iron-nickel alloy and troilite. The presence of typical shock metamorphic features both in olivine and pyroxene, as well as of maskelynite and melt veins point to a shock stage S6. Two coexisting distinct assemblages were observed in the shock-melted areas: (1) a very fine-grained intergrowth of silicate phases sprinkled with fine-grained metal and troilite blebs and (2) a coarser-grained polycrystalline aggregate consisting of ringwoodite crystals. EMPA analyses were performed on both the chondritic matrix and on individual grains of the shock-melted area to characterize their mineralogical composition. EMPA analyses on the coarse-grained area suggested the presence of shock-generated ringwoodite and low-Ca majorite. These data are confirmed by Micro-Raman point analyses. The analyses performed on the fine-grained portion of the veins allowed to determine the presence of a majorite-pyrope solid solution. According to literature data the majorite-pyrope solid solution suggests a crystallization from a shock-melted chondritic matrix under high pressures and temperatures. Ringwoodite and low-Ca majorite were instead formed by solid state transformation of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene originally present in the meteorite.

  5. High-Pressure Shock Compression of Solids VIII The Science and Technology of High-Velocity Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Chhabildas, Lalit C; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2005-01-01

    Research in the field of shock physics and ballistic impact has always been intimately tied to progress in development of facilities for accelerating projectiles to high velocity and instrumentation for recording impact phenomena. The chapters of this book, written by leading US and European experts, cover a broad range of topics and address researchers concerned with questions of material behaviour under impulsive loading and the equations of state of matter, as well as the design of suitable instrumentation such as gas guns and high-speed diagnostics. Applications include high-speed impact dynamics, the inner composition of planets, syntheses of new materials and materials processing. Among the more technologically-oriented applications treated is the testing of the flight characteristics of aeroballistic models and the assessment of impacts in the aerospace industry.

  6. New investigations on shock-wave synthesized high-pressure phases in the system Si-Al-O-N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlothauer, T.; Greif, A.; Keller, K.; Schwarz, M. R.; Kroke, E.; Heide, G.

    2012-12-01

    The shock-wave synthesis of nanostructured high-pressure phases at a gram-scale permits the analysis of spinel type nitrides with different chemical composition using methods not suitable for microgram amounts of material. Methods with a significant mass loss through the analytical process like TG-MS or FT-IR or bulk methods at the g-scale like 29Si-MAS-NMR or neutron diffraction were used. The synthesis of pure high-pressure modifications (gamma-phases) of different SiAlON-compounds using amorphous H-bearing precursors at pressures of 30-40 GPa is a necessary prerequisite for precise determinations of crystal chemical features. Etching with HF is a well-known method to purify the high-pressure nitrides (Sekine 2002). The etched parts were analyzed by neutron diffraction, TG-MS, and carrier gas hot extraction (CGHE). Volatile elements like H2 and Cl2, as well as non-stoichiometric oxygen and nitrogen, and NOx, H2O are enriched in the disordered rims. This degassing process ends at temperatures of approximately 600°C, while the spinel structure remains well preserved up to 1300°C. Under these conditions the gamma-phases stay unchanged under air, argon and vacuum. Furthermore chlorine, an important impurity of the H-bearing precursors neither influences the synthesized products nor the synthesis process itself. IR-spectroscopy of gamma-Si3(O,N)4 shows that peak shifts of octahedral lattice vibrations (≈ 680 cm-1) and both tetrahedral vibrations (ny3 and ny4) (Jeanloz 1980, Preudhomme & Tarte 1971) to higher frequencies with decreasing oxygen content occur. This effect is also visible in samples contaminated with impurities of low pressure modifications. The more complex structure of gamma-SiAlON and the simultaneously exchange of the cation- and the anion-positions prevents the appearance of this important feature. Yet to be synthesized pure gamma-SiAlON using similar H-bearing precursors is necessary to resolve its structure. Sekine, T., H. He, T. Kobayashi, K

  7. A miniature high repetition rate shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, R S; Lynch, P T

    2013-09-01

    A miniature high repetition rate shock tube with excellent reproducibility has been constructed to facilitate high temperature, high pressure, gas phase experiments at facilities such as synchrotron light sources where space is limited and many experiments need to be averaged to obtain adequate signal levels. The shock tube is designed to generate reaction conditions of T > 600 K, P shock waves with predictable characteristics are created, repeatably. Two synchrotron-based experiments using this apparatus are also briefly described here, demonstrating the potential of the shock tube for research at synchrotron light sources.

  8. Shock wave velocity and shock pressure for low density powders : A novel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, D.K.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new mod

  9. SHOCK-WAVE VELOCITY AND SHOCK PRESSURE FOR LOW-DENSITY POWDERS - A NOVEL-APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKEN, DK; DEHOSSON, JTM

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new mod

  10. Quasiperpendicular high Mach number Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, A H; Dougherty, M K; Burgess, D; Fujimoto, M; Hospodarsky, G B

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasi-perpendicular shocks across two orders of magnitude in Alfven Mach number (MA) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted timescale of ~0.3 {\\tau}c, where {\\tau}c is the ion gyroperio...

  11. Arterial blood pressure and heart rate regulation in shock state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaVolpe, Jeffrey D; Moore, Jason E; Pinsky, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    Circulatory shock is a complicated problem that carries a high risk of complications and mortality for critically ill patients. The heart rate and blood pressure targets to which a patient in shock should be resuscitated remain a challenge to intensivists. While the ideal blood pressure and heart rate in circulatory shock are still not definitive, recent studies have begun to refine these targets. A recent trial comparing a mean arterial pressure target of 80-85 mmHg with a target of 65-70 mmHg showed no difference in mortality, with a decreased need for renal replacement therapy in patients with pre-existing hypertension based on subgroup analysis. Regulation of heart rate was defined by a trial demonstrating that heart rate control in patients with severe sepsis on high-dose norepinephrine with esmolol titration did not result in additional adverse events. The ideal target blood pressure in the resuscitation of circulatory shock is variable and likely depends on prior blood pressure. Heart rate regulation with β-blockade appears to be safe in selected patients when accompanied by adequate resuscitation and monitoring.

  12. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Burgess, D.; Fujimoto, M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (MA ) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ˜0.3 τc , where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and MA and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same MA , a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming.

  13. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurements of Transient Shock Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kontis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the global pressure field created by shock wave diffraction have been captured optically using a porous pressure-sensitive paint. The pressure field created by a diffracting shock wave shows large increases and decreases in pressure and can be reasonably accurately captured using CFD. The substrate, a thin-layer chromatography (TLC plate, has been dipped in a luminophore solution. TLC plates are readily available and easy to prepare. Illumination comes from two high-intensity broadband Xenon arc light sources with short-pass filters. The sample is imaged at 100 kHz using a Vision Research Phantom V710 in conjunction with a pair of long and short pass filters, creating a band. The PSP results are compared with numerical simulations of the flow using the commercial CFD package Fluent as part of ANSYS 13 for two Mach numbers.

  14. Towards a shock tube method for the dynamic calibration of pressure sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Stephen; Knott, Andy; Robinson, Ian

    2014-08-28

    In theory, shock tubes provide a pressure change with a very fast rise time and calculable amplitude. This pressure step could provide the basis for the calibration of pressure transducers used in highly dynamic applications. However, conventional metal shock tubes can be expensive, unwieldy and difficult to modify. We describe the development of a 1.4 MPa (maximum pressure) shock tube made from unplasticized polyvinyl chloride pressure tubing which provides a low-cost, light and easily modifiable basis for establishing a method for determining the dynamic characteristics of pressure sensors.

  15. Analysis of oligomeric transition of silkworm small heat shock protein sHSP20.8 using high hydrostatic pressure native PAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Tetsuro; Ueda, Toshifumi; Kameyama, Keiichi; Aso, Yoichi; Ishiguro, Ryo

    2013-06-01

    The small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) solubilize thermo-denatured proteins without adenosine triphosphate energy consumption to facilitate protein refolding. sHSP20.8 is one of the silkworm (Bombyx mori) sHSPs having only one cystein in the N-terminal domain: Cys43. We report a simple measurement of oligomeric transition of sHSP20.8 using high hydrostatic pressure native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (high hydrostatic pressure (HP) native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE)). At ambient pressure under oxydative condition, the native PAGE of thermal transition of sHSP20.8 oligomer displayed a cooperative association. In contrast, HP native PAGE clearly demonstrated that sHSP20.8 dissociated at 80 MPa and 25°C, and the resultant molecular species gradually reassociated with time under that condition. In addition, the reassociation process was suppressed in the presence of the reductant. These results are consistent with the idea that sHSP20.8 oligomer temporally dissociates at the first thermo-sensing step and reassociates with the oxidation of Cys43.

  16. Time-dependent pressure distribution in microstructured shocked materials using fluorescent dye probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Christensen, James M.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    We have used fluorescent probes for time-resolved microscopy of shocked particulate media. By embedding rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye in silica nano- and micro-particles, we have created superemissive ultrafast pressure probes. We used silica-embedded dye particles to obtain stroboscopic fluorescence images of shocked sand-like media. Shock effects on microstructured media and micropressure distributions can be determined from shock-induced emission intensity loss, with high time and space resolution.

  17. High pressure generation by laser driven shock waves: application to equation of state measurement; Generation de hautes pressions par choc laser: application a la mesure d'equations d'etat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benuzzi, A

    1997-12-15

    This work is dedicated to shock waves and their applications to the study of the equation of state of compressed matter.This document is divided into 6 chapters: 1) laser-produced plasmas and abrasion processes, 2) shock waves and the equation of state, 3) relative measuring of the equation of state, 4) comparison between direct and indirect drive to compress the target, 5) the measurement of a new parameter: the shock temperature, and 6) control and measurement of the pre-heating phase. In this work we have reached relevant results, we have shown for the first time the possibility of generating shock waves of very high quality in terms of spatial distribution, time dependence and of negligible pre-heating phase with direct laser radiation. We have shown that the shock pressure stays unchanged as time passes for targets whose thickness is over 10 {mu}m. A relative measurement of the equation of state has been performed through the simultaneous measurement of the velocity of shock waves passing through 2 different media. The great efficiency of the direct drive has allowed us to produce pressures up to 40 Mbar. An absolute measurement of the equation of state requires the measurement of 2 parameters, we have then performed the measurement of the colour temperature of an aluminium target submitted to laser shocks. A simple model has been developed to infer the shock temperature from the colour temperature. The last important result is the assessment of the temperature of the pre-heating phase that is necessary to know the media in which the shock wave propagates. The comparison of the measured values of the reflectivity of the back side of the target with the computed values given by an adequate simulation has allowed us to deduce the evolution of the temperature of the pre-heating phase. (A.C.)

  18. Birch's law for high-pressure metals and ionic solids: Sound velocity data comparison between shock wave experiments and recent diamond anvil cell experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boness, David A.; Ware, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    Sound velocity-density systematics has long been a fruitful way to take shock wave measurements on elements, alloys, oxides, rocks, and other materials, and allow reasonable extrapolation to densities found deep in the Earth. Recent detection of super-Earths has expanded interest in terrestrial planetary interiors to an even greater range of materials and pressures. Recent published diamond anvil cell (DAC) experimental measurements of sound velocities in iron and iron alloys, relevant to planetary cores, are inconsistent with each other with regard to the validity of Birch's Law, a linear relation between sound velocity and density. We examine the range of validity of Birch's Law for several shocked metallic elements, including iron, and shocked ionic solids and make comparisons to the recent DAC data.

  19. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Print ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  20. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical solutions are derived which incorporate additional physical effects as higher order terms for the case when the sonic line is very close to the wall. The functional form used for the undisturbed velocity profile is described to indicate how various parameters will be calculated for later comparison with experiment. The basic solutions for the pressure distribution are derived. Corrections are added for flow along a wall having longitudinal curvature and for flow in a circular pipe, and comparisons with available experimental data are shown.

  1. Shock induced porous barrier flows, with underlying wall pressure amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skews, B. W.; Bugarin, S.

    The flow field resulting from the impact of a shock wave on a variety of sheets of permeable material is studied. Earlier studies examined the flow through stationary sheets. It has, however, been found that if the sheet is placed a short distance in front of a surface, and can move under the shock loading, the pressure on the surface is amplified following shock impact, compared to the pressures that would be experienced with no covering. An important application to consider is the effect that textile clothing may have on a persons body when exposed to a blast environment. Single and multiple layers of a range of textiles have been tested. It was established that the heavier, more impermeable textiles such as Kevlar can amplify the shock wave pressure by as much as 400%. Experiments were also done with the textiles placed at an angle to the incoming shock wave and the mechanism for the amplification established through schlieren photography and pressure measurements.

  2. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  3. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  4. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) A ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  5. High pressure technology 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapp, J.A.; Picqueuer, L.M. (eds.)

    1994-01-01

    This volume is divided into four sessions: fracture mechanics applications to high pressure vessels; high pressure code issues; high pressure design, analysis, and safety concerns; and military and other high pressure applications. Separate abstracts were prepared for eleven papers of this conference.

  6. An empirical mixing model for pressurized thermal shock applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chexal, V.K.; Chao, J.; Griesbach, T.J.; Nickell, R.E.

    1985-04-01

    Empirical correlations are developed for the local temperature and velocity distributions in the pressurized water reactor downcomer for pressurized thermal shock scenarios. The correlation is based on Creare test data and has been validated with Science Applications, Inc., experiments and COMMIX code calculations. It provides good agreement under pump flow and natural circulation conditions and gives a conservative estimate under stagnation conditions.

  7. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  8. Shock Hugoniot measurements of CH at Gbar pressures at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritcher, A. L.; Doeppner, T.; Swift, D.; Hawreliak, J.; Nilsen, J.; Hammer, J.; Bachmann, B.; Collins, G.; Landen, O.; Keane, C.; Glenzer, S.; Rothman, S.; Chapman, D.; Kraus, D.; Falcone, R. W.

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory measurements of the shock Hugoniot at high pressure, exceeding several hundred Mbar, are of great importance in the understanding and accurate modeling of matter at extreme conditions. In this work we present a platform to measure the material properties, specifically the single shock Hugoniot and electron temperature, at extreme pressures of ∼Gbar at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In these experiments we launch spherically convergent shocks into solid CH, using a Hohlraum radiation drive. X-ray radiography is applied to measure the shock speed and infer the mass density profile, enabling determining of the material pressure and Hugoniot equation of state. X-ray scattering is applied to measure the electron temperature through measurement of the electron velocity distribution.

  9. Shock compaction of high- Tc superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, S.T.; Nellis, W.J.; McCandless, P.C.; Brocious, W.F. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Seaman, C.L.; Early, E.A.; Maple, M.B. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Kramer, M.J. (Ames Lab., IA (USA)); Syono, Y.; Kikuchi, M. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan))

    1990-09-01

    We present the results of shock compaction experiments on high-{Tc} superconductors and describe the way in which shock consolidation addresses critical problems concerning the fabrication of high J{sub c} bulk superconductors. In particular, shock compaction experiments on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} show that shock-induced defects can greatly increase intragranular critical current densities. The fabrication of crystallographically aligned Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} samples by shock-compaction is also described. These experiments demonstrate the potential of the shock consolidation method as a means for fabricating bulk high-{Tc} superconductors having high critical current densities.

  10. Evaluation of fracture models through pressurized-thermal-shock testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C.E.; Bryan, R.H.; Bass, B.R.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Two multiple-transient pressurized-thermal-shock experiments (PTSEs) have been conducted under the NRC-sponsored Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) program. The first test (PTSE-1) employed an SA-508 class 2 steel with high Charpy upper-shelf energy level and a relatively high brittle-to-ductile transition temperature. The second test (PTSE-2) used a 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel (SA-387 grade 22) that had been given a special heat treatment to yield a low Charpy upper-shelf energy level and attendant low tearing resistance. Each experiment included two combined thermal and pressure transients that give rise to propagation and arrest of an initial long flaw that extended about 10% through the thick wall of the test cylinder. Both materials exhibited the ability to inhibit crack propagation by warm prestressing, high initiation toughness values and high crack-arrest toughness values. Cleavage initiation and arrest are modeled well by available fracture theories. However, calculations of ductile tearing based on resistance curves did not consistently predict the observed tearing.

  11. High blood pressure medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007484.htm High blood pressure medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Treating high blood pressure will help prevent problems such as heart disease, ...

  12. Treating High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    About High Blood Pressure Many people in the United States die from high blood pressure. This condition usually does not cause symptoms. Most ... until it is too late. A person has high blood pressure when the blood pushes against Visit your doctor ...

  13. High blood pressure - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... number is the diastolic pressure. This measures the pressure in the arteries when the heart is at rest. Blood pressure ... Medical Professional Call your child's provider if home monitoring shows that your child's blood pressure is still high. Prevention Your child's provider will ...

  14. High-pressure apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepdael, van L.J.M.; Bartels, P.V.; Berg, van den R.W.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a high-pressure device (1) having a cylindrical high-pressure vessel (3) and prestressing means in order to exert an axial pressure on the vessel. The vessel (3) can have been formed from a number of layers of composite material, such as glass, carbon or aramide fibers which

  15. Shock response of the commercial high explosive Detasheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asay, B. W.; Ramsay, J. B.; Anderson, M. U.; Graham, R. A.

    1994-12-01

    The mechanical and chemical response of the flexible commercial high explosive DetasheetR is studied under controlled impact and plane-wave, high explosive loading. Results on nonreactive material behavior, sound speed, shock-initiation sensitivity and detonation pressure are presented. The material is found to respond in a viscous manner reminiscent of viscoelastic response of polymeric materials. Time-resolved pressure and pressure-rate measurements with PVDF piezoelectric polymer gauges are presented along with Manganin pressure and plate-dent test measurements of detonation pressure. Detonation pressures of 18GPa are indicated. Pressure measurements show initiation of reaction between 3 and 8 mm for an impact stress of 3.1 GPa. Plane wave loading wedge tests show run distances to detonation consistent with the pressure measurements, and with behavior like that of XTX8003 (80 % PETN/20 % Sylgard 182R).

  16. Energetic Particle Pressure at Interplanetary Shocks: STEREO-A Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lario, D; Roelof, E C; Vinas, A -F

    2015-01-01

    We study periods of elevated energetic particle intensities observed by STEREO-A when the partial pressure exerted by energetic ($\\geq$83 keV) protons ($P_{EP}$) is larger than the pressure exerted by the interplanetary magnetic field ($P_{B}$). In the majority of cases, these periods are associated with the passage of interplanetary shocks. Periods when $P_{EP}$ exceeds $P_{B}$ by more than one order of magnitude are observed in the upstream region of fast interplanetary shocks where depressed magnetic field regions coincide with increases of the energetic particle intensities. When solar wind parameters are available, $P_{EP}$ also exceeds the pressure exerted by the solar wind thermal population ($P_{TH}$). Prolonged periods ($>$12 h) with both $P_{EP}$$>$$P_{B}$ and $P_{EP}$$>$$P_{TH}$ may also occur when energetic particles accelerated by an approaching shock encounter a region well-upstream of the shock characterized by low magnetic field magnitude and tenuous solar wind density. Quasi-exponential incre...

  17. Simple mixing model for pressurized thermal shock applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chexal, B.; Chao, J.; Nickell, R.; Griesbach, T. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

    1983-02-01

    The phenomenon of fluid/thermal mixing in the cold leg and downcomer of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been a critical issue related to the concern of pressurized thermal shock. The question of imperfect mixing arises when the possibility of cold emergency core cooling water contacting the vessel wall during an overcooling transient could produce thermal stresses large enough to initiate a flaw in a radiation embrittled vessel wall. The temperature of the fluid in contact with the vessel wall is crucial to a determination of vessel integrity since temperature affects both the stresses and the material toughness of the vessel material. A simple mixing model is described which was developed as part of the EPRI pressurized thermal shock program for evaluation of reactor vessel integrity.

  18. High Blood Pressure Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More black women than men have high blood pressure. 2 Race of Ethnic Group Men (%) Women (%) African Americans 43.0 45.7 Mexican Americans 27.8 28.9 Whites 33.9 31.3 All 34.1 32.7 Top of Page Why Blood Pressure Matters View this graphic snapshot of blood pressure ...

  19. Equation of State for Shock Compression of High Distension Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    Shock Hugoniot data for full-density and porous compounds of boron carbide, silicon dioxide, tantalum pentoxide, uranium dioxide and playa alluvium are investigated for the purpose of equation-of-state representation of intense shock compression. Complications of multivalued Hugoniot behavior characteristic of highly distended solids are addressed through the application of enthalpy-based equations of state of the form originally proposed by Rice and Walsh in the late 1950's. Additivity of cold and thermal pressure intrinsic to the Mie-Gruneisen EOS framework is replaced by isobaric additive functions of the cold and thermal specific volume components in the enthalpy-based formulation. Additionally, experimental evidence supports acceleration of shock-induced phase transformation on the Hugoniot with increasing levels of initial distention for silicon dioxide, uranium dioxide and possibly boron carbide. Methods for addressing this experimentally observed facet of the shock compression are introduced into the EOS model.

  20. Shock behavior of carbon nanotubes at pressures up to 100 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan'ev, Sergey; Milyavskiy, Vladimir; Schlothauer, Thomas; Mases, Mattias; Waldbock, Jeremy; Dossot, Manuel; Devaux, Xavier; McRae, Edward; Soldatov, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    Recent experiments in a diamond anvil cell demonstrate high structural stability of double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) exposed to a static pressure of 35 GPa. Here we report on the study of DWNTs after application of stepwise shock compression in a recovery assembly. Peak shock pressures in the specimens were achieved by several reverberations of waves between the walls of the recovery ampoules and were 14, 19, 26, 36, 52 and 98 GPa. The recovered samples were characterized by Raman, XPS and HRTEM and revealed outer wall disruption along with shortening of the DWNTs and unzipping of the DWNTs accompanying by the formation of gpaphene sheets. Structural damage of the DWNTs increases with the shock pressure. Simultaneously, the Raman data exhibit a steep increase of D/G-band intensity ratio. The work was supported by RFBR (12-08-01284-a), by Swedish Institute (00906-2009), and by the French National Research Agency (ANR-10-BLAN-0819-01-SPRINT).

  1. Effect of internal gas pressure on the shock consolidation of 304 stainless steel powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, N.E.; Staudhammer, K.P.

    1990-01-01

    Capsules of 304 SS powders having a pre-compacted density of 67% were shock consolidated at peak pressures of 100 GPa. Initial internal N{sub 2} gas pressures from 7 {times} 10 {sup {minus}4} Pa to 0.1 Gpa were employed. However, as the internal N{sub 2} gas pressure in the powders was increased, the quality of the compacted density decreased. While it is intuitive that high internal gas pressures in porous materials do not enhance their consolidation, a greater understanding of the consolidation process and the part entrapped (intentional or unintentional) gas plays is elucidated. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  2. High blood pressure - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Certain tumors Inherited conditions (problems that run in families) Thyroid problems Blood pressure rises as the baby grows. The average blood ... vomiting constantly Prevention Some causes of high blood pressure run in families. Talk to your provider before you get pregnant ...

  3. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Stroke Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir By living a healthy lifestyle, you can help keep your blood pressure in ...

  4. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... already been diagnosed with high blood pressure. Try yoga and meditation. Yoga and meditation not only can strengthen your body ... Accessed Sept. 21, 2015. Hu B, et al. Effects of psychological stress on hypertension in middle-aged ...

  5. Laser-Shock Experiments: Calorimetry Measurements to TPa Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, R.

    2012-12-01

    Laser-driven shock experiments are more like calorimetry measurements, characterized by determinations of Hugoniot temperature (TH) as a function of shock velocity (US), rather than the equation-of-state measurements afforded by mechanical-impact experiments. This is because particle velocity (up) is often not accessible to direct measurement in laser-shock experiments, so must be inferred with reference to a material having a well-determined, independently calibrated Hugoniot equation of state (up is obtained from the impact velocity in traditional shock experiments, and the combination of US and up yields the pressure-density equation of state for the sample). Application of a Mie-Grüneisen model shows that the isochoric specific heat for a given phase is: CV = (US - c0)2 {s2US (dTH/dUS) + γ0 c0 s (TH/US)}-1 with US = c0 + s up, and γ0 is the zero-pressure Grüneisen parameter (γ/V = constant is assumed here). This result is a generalization to TH-US variables of the Walsh and Christian (1955) formula for the temperature rise along the Hugoniot of a given phase (identified here with a US - up relation that is locally linear); it can be analytically integrated to give TH(US) in terms of an average value of CV, if no phase transition takes place. Analysis of the TH-US slopes obtained from laser-shock measurements on MgO yields specific-heat values ranging from 1.02 (± 0.05) kJ/kg/K at 320-345 GPa and TH = 7700-9000 K to 1.50 (± 0.05) kJ/kg/K at 350-380 GPa and TH = 8700-9500 K. A fit to the absolute values of TH(US) in this pressure-temperature range gives CV = 1.26 (± 0.10) kJ/kg/K, in good accord with the Dulong-Petit value CV = 1.24 kJ/kg/K.

  6. Shock effects and argon loss in samples of the Leedey L6 chondrite experimentally shocked to 29-70 GPa pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Donald; Horz, Fred; Johnson, Pratt

    1987-01-01

    The recovery of polished 600-micron-thick 7-mm-diameter disk samples and powder samples of the Leedey L6 chondrite from 29-70-GPa experimental shocks is investigated experimentally under vacuum conditions, with a focus on the possible direct shock loss of radiogenic Ar. The results of petrographic examination of the shocked samples and Ar isotope measurements are presented in tables, graphs, and micrographs and characterized in detail. The principal damage mechanisms are identified as mechanical disaggregation and increasing cataclasis, with little melting. The degassing of radiogenic Ar is found to be relatively modest and to increase with shock pressure and sample porosity; it is attributed to a combination of mechanical grain disruption and feldspar melting. It is inferred that Ar loss in naturally shocked materials (especially those showing few signs of melting) probably occurs during extended exposure to high temperatures during impact formation.

  7. Pressure Distribution for Piezoelectric Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Yuji; Iwama, Nobuyuki; Okazaki, Kiyoshi

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a safer and more effective extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter. The first stage of the study shows the sound pressure field of the shock wave made by an ECHOLITH ESL-500A. The sound pressure distribution is in a ring configuration on a 60 mm plane in front of the focal plane. As the plane approaches the focal plane, the sound pressure relatively increases at the cross point with the axis of the transducer and decreases at the ring. The focal zone is 2.5 mm × 16.1 mm at 60 V driving voltage and 1.8 mm × 14.2 mm at “INTENSITY 2.” In the next stage we propose a method for changing the field by electronic driving control of each piezoceramic element for effective therapy. The focal zone can be changed from 3.1 mm × 19.1 mm to 3.9 mm × 32.4 mm at 60 V driving voltage with this method. These focal zones are calculated by means of computer simulation.

  8. Pheochromocytoma supporting blood pressure in the setting of cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditkofsky, Noah; Workman, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Sixty-seven-year-old male presented with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and decreasing level of consciousness. He was tachycardic but not hypotensive. Computed tomography scan revealed a peripherally enhancing adrenal mass and evidence of low cardiac output state. He was admitted to the intensive care unit but expired within 12 h. Autopsy determined the cause of death as acute coronary insufficiency and identified the adrenal mass as a pheochromocytoma. The pheochromocytoma may have maintained blood pressure in the setting of cardiogenic shock and delayed diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

  9. Prevention of High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Prevention of High Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle habits, proper use of medicines, and ... prevent high blood pressure or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high ...

  10. High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... time. High blood pressure is also called hypertension. High Blood Pressure in the United States Having high blood pressure ...

  11. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure For most patients, health care providers diagnose high ... 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless ...

  12. High Pressure Biomass Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Pradeep K [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-29

    According to the Billion Ton Report, the U.S. has a large supply of biomass available that can supplement fossil fuels for producing chemicals and transportation fuels. Agricultural waste, forest residue, and energy crops offer potential benefits: renewable feedstock, zero to low CO2 emissions depending on the specific source, and domestic supply availability. Biomass can be converted into chemicals and fuels using one of several approaches: (i) biological platform converts corn into ethanol by using depolymerization of cellulose to form sugars followed by fermentation, (ii) low-temperature pyrolysis to obtain bio-oils which must be treated to reduce oxygen content via HDO hydrodeoxygenation), and (iii) high temperature pyrolysis to produce syngas (CO + H2). This last approach consists of producing syngas using the thermal platform which can be used to produce a variety of chemicals and fuels. The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of the gasification of biomass at high pressure conditions and how various gasification parameters might affect the gasification behavior. Since most downstream applications of synags conversion (e.g., alcohol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis etc) involve utilizing high pressure catalytic processes, there is an interest in carrying out the biomass gasification at high pressure which can potentially reduce the gasifier size and subsequent downstream cleaning processes. It is traditionally accepted that high pressure should increase the gasification rates (kinetic effect). There is also precedence from coal gasification literature from the 1970s that high pressure gasification would be a beneficial route to consider. Traditional approach of using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) or high-pressure themogravimetric analyzer (PTGA) worked well in understanding the gasification kinetics of coal gasification which was useful in designing high pressure coal gasification processes. However

  13. Historical Background of Ultrahigh Pressure Shock Compression Experiments at LLNL: 1973 to 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nellis, W.J.

    2000-10-09

    My purpose is to recount the historical development of ultrahigh pressure shock compression experiments at LLNL, which I experienced in the period 1973 to 2000. I used several experimental techniques: shock-impedance-match experiments using planar shock waves driven by nuclear explosives (NIMs), the Janus Laser, a railgun, and a two-stage light-gas gun.

  14. Temperature measurements of partially-melted tin as a function of shock pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifter, Achim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Furlanetto, Michael R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Obst, Andrew W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Payton, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stone, J B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tabaka, L J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grover, M [NST; Macrum, G [NST; Stevens, G D [NST; Swift, D C [LLNL; Turley, W D [NST; Veeser, L R [NST

    2009-01-01

    Equilibrium equation of state theory predicts that the free surface release temperature of shock loaded tin will show a plateau of 505 K in the pressure range from 19.5 to 33.0 GPa, corresponding to the solid-liquid mixed-phase region. In this paper we report free surface temperature measurements on shock-loaded tin from 15 to 31 GPa using multi-wavelength optical pyrometry. The shock waves were generated by direct contact of detonating high explosive with the sample. The pressure in the sample was determined by free surface velocity measurements using Photon Doppler Velocimetry. The emitted thermal radiance was measured at four wavelength bands in the near IR region from 1.5 to 5.0 {micro}m. The samples in most of the experiments had diamond-turned surface finishes, with a few samples being polished or ball rolled. At pressures higher than 25 GPa the measured free surface temperatures were higher than the predicted 505 K and increased with increasing pressure. This deviation could be explained by hot spots and/or variations in surface emissivity and requires a further investigation.

  15. The relation between post-shock temperature, cosmic-ray pressure, and cosmic-ray escape for non-relativistic shocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.; Yamazaki, R.; Helder, E.A.; Schure, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are thought to be the dominant source of Galactic cosmic rays. This requires that at least 5% of the available energy is transferred to cosmic rays, implying a high cosmic-ray pressure downstream of SNR shocks. Recently, it has been shown that the downstream temperature in

  16. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Pressure » Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure Explore High Blood Pressure What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical ...

  17. PNL technical review of pressurized thermal-shock issues. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, L.T.; Apley, W.J.; Bian, S.H.; Defferding, L.J.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Pelto, P.J.; Simonen, E.P.; Simonen, F.A.; Stevens, D.L.; Taylor, T.T.

    1982-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked to develop and recommend a regulatory position that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) should adopt regarding the ability of reactor pressure vessels to withstand the effects of pressurized thermal shock (PTS). Licensees of eight pressurized water reactors provided NRC with estimates of remaining effective full power years before corrective actions would be required to prevent an unsafe operating condition. PNL reviewed these responses and the results of supporting research and concluded that none of the eight reactors would undergo vessel failure from a PTS event before several more years of operation. Operator actions, however, were often required to terminate a PTS event before it deteriorated to the point where failure could occur. Therefore, the near-term (less than one year) recommendation is to upgrade, on a site-specific basis, operational procedures, training, and control room instrumentation. Also, uniform criteria should be developed by NRC for use during future licensee analyses. Finally, it was recommended that NRC upgrade nondestructive inspection techniques used during vessel examinations and become more involved in the evaluation of annealing requirements.

  18. High Temperature Phenomena in Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The high temperatures generated in gases by shock waves give rise to physical and chemical phenomena such as molecular vibrational excitation, dissociation, ionization, chemical reactions and inherently related radiation. In continuum regime, these processes start from the wave front, so that generally the gaseous media behind shock waves may be in a thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium state. This book presents the state of knowledge of these phenomena. Thus, the thermodynamic properties of high temperature gases, including the plasma state are described, as well as the kinetics of the various chemical phenomena cited above. Numerous results of measurement and computation of vibrational relaxation times, dissociation and reaction rate constants are given, and various ionization and radiative mechanisms and processes are presented. The coupling between these different phenomena is taken into account as well as their interaction with the flow-field. Particular points such as the case of rarefied flows an...

  19. Living with High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With High Blood Pressure If you have high blood pressure, the best thing to do is to talk ... help you track your blood pressure. Pregnancy Planning High blood pressure can cause problems for mother and baby. High ...

  20. Use of Pressure Sensitive Paint for Diagnostics in Turbomachinery Flows With Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepicovsky, Jan; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    The technology of pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is well established in external aerodynamics. In internal flows in narrow channels and in turbomachinery cascades, however, there are still unresolved problems. In particular, the internal flows with complex shock structures inside highly curved channels present a challenge. It is not always easy and straightforward to distinguish between true signals and "ghost" images due to multiple internal reflections in narrow channels. To address some of the problems, investigations were first carried out in a narrow supersonic channel of Mach number 2.5. A single wedge or a combination of two wedges were used to generate a complex shock wave structure in the flow. The experience gained in a small supersonic channel was used for surface pressure measurements on the stator vane of a supersonic throughflow fan. The experimental results for several fan operating conditions are shown in a concise form, including performance map points, midspan static tap pressure distributions, and vane suction side pressure fields. Finally, the PSP technique was used in the NASA transonic flutter cascade to compliment flow visualization data and to acquire backwall pressure fields to assess the cascade flow periodicity. A summary of shortcomings of the pressure sensitive paint technology for internal flow application and lessons learned are presented in the conclusion of the paper.

  1. A diaphragmless shock tube for high temperature kinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, Robert S; Giri, Binod R

    2008-09-01

    A novel, diaphragmless shock tube (DFST) has been developed for use in high temperature chemical kinetic studies. The design of the apparatus is presented along with performance data that demonstrate the range and reproducibility of reaction conditions that can be generated. The ability to obtain data in the fall off region, confined to much narrower pressure ranges than can be obtained with a conventional shock tube is shown, and results from laser schlieren densitometry experiments on the unimolecular dissociation of phenyl iodide (P(2)=57+/-9 and 122+/-7 torr, T(2)=1250-1804 K) are presented. These are compared with results similar to those that would be obtained from a classical shock tube and the implications for extrapolation by theoretical methods are discussed. Finally, the use of the DFST with an online mass spectrometer to create reproducible experiments that can be signal averaged to improve signal/noise and the quality of mass peaks is demonstrated; something that is not possible with a conventional shock tube where each experiment has to be considered unique.

  2. Shock propagation and attenuation in high-power excimer lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzwarth, Achim; Berger, Peter; Huegel, Helmut

    1993-05-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations on the propagation, reflection, and attenuation of shock waves as they occur in excimer lasers have been performed. The numerical simulations have been carried out using a two-dimensional, unsteady finite difference scheme. The experimental setup is a piston driven shock tube with a rectangular cross section working in air at atmospheric pressure. The shocks were detected interferometrically as well as by means of pressure transducers. This shock tube allows us to investigate basic phenomena of shock diffraction which can be used to confirm the computational results in the range of weak shock waves. In particular, the influence of the shape of the wall contour on the reflection of shock waves has been investigated theoretically. The decay time of pressure and density perturbations differs for various wall configurations in such a way that short electrodes accelerate the attenuation as well as does a strong area increase in the vicinity of them. After each laser pulse there is a shock travelling into the laser channel. Experiments have been carried out on the reflection of this shock at a specially formed bend that is able to focus the shock into a muffling element.

  3. Shock Compression of Liquid Noble Gases to Multi-Mbar Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth

    2011-10-01

    The high pressure - high temperature behavior of noble gases is of considerable interest because of their use in z-pinch liners for fusion studies and for understanding astrophysical and planetary evolution. However, our understanding of the equation of state (EOS) of the noble gases at extreme conditions is limited. A prime example of this is the liquid xenon Hugoniot. Previous EOS models rapidly diverged on the Hugoniot above 1 Mbar because of differences in the treatment of the electronic contribution to the free energy. Similar divergences are observed for krypton EOS. Combining shock compression experiments and density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we can determine the thermo-physical behavior of matter under extreme conditions. The experimental and DFT results have been instrumental to recent developments in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Shock compression experiments are performed using Sandia's Z-Accelerator to determine the Hugoniot of liquid xenon and krypton in the Mbar regime. Under strong pressure, krypton and xenon undergo an insulator to metal transition. In the metallic state, the shock front becomes reflective allowing for a direct measurement of the sample's shock velocity using laser interferometry. The Hugoniot state is determined using a Monte Carlo analysis method that accounts for systematic error in the standards and for correlations. DFT simulations at these extreme conditions show good agreement with the experimental data - demonstrating the attention to detail required for dealing with elements with relativistic core states and d-state electrons. The results from shock compression experiments and DFT simulations are presented for liquid xenon to 840 GPa and for liquid krypton to 800 GPa, decidedly increasing the range of known behavior of both gases. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company

  4. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... High Blood Pressure Explore High Blood Pressure What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living ... Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless and can be done in ...

  5. Shock Formation by Plasma Filaments of Microwave Discharge under Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-03-01

    A one-dimensional compressible fluid calculation was coupled with a finite- difference time-domain code and a particle-in-cell code with collision to reproduce propagation of electromagnetic wave, ionization process of plasma, and shock wave formation in atmospheric microwave discharge. Plasma filaments are driven toward the microwave source at 1 atm, and the distance between each filament is one-fifth of the wavelength of the incident microwave. The strong shock wave is generated due to the high plasma density at the atmospheric pressure. A simple analysis of the microwave propagation into the plasma shows that cut-off density of the microwave becomes smaller with the pressure decrease in a collisional plasma. At the lower pressure, the smaller density plasma is obtained with a diffusive pattern because of the smaller cut-off density and the larger diffusion effect. In contrast with the 1-atm case, the weak shock wave is generated at a rarefied condition, which lowers performance of microwave thruster.

  6. Dynamic Shock Compression of Copper to Multi-Megabar Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haill, T. A.; Furnish, M. D.; Twyeffort, L. L.; Arrington, C. L.; Lemke, R. W.; Knudson, M. D.; Davis, J.-P.

    2015-11-01

    Copper is an important material for a variety of shock and high energy density applications and experiments. Copper is used as a standard reference material to determine the EOS properties of other materials. The high conductivity of copper makes it useful as an MHD driver layer in high current dynamic materials experiments on Sandia National Laboratories Z machine. Composite aluminum/copper flyer plates increase the dwell time in plate impact experiments by taking advantage of the slower wave speeds in copper. This presentation reports on recent efforts to reinstate a composite Al/Cu flyer capability on Z and to extend the range of equation-of-state shock compression data through the use of hyper-velocity composite flyers and symmetric planar impact with copper targets. We will present results from multi-dimensional ALEGRA MHD simulations, as well as experimental designs and methods of composite flyer fabrication. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... providers diagnose high blood pressure when blood pressure readings are consistently 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming ... minutes before the test. To track blood pressure readings over a period of time, the health care ...

  8. Integrated Software Environment for Pressurized Thermal Shock Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Araneo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes the main features and an application to a real Nuclear Power Plant (NPP of an Integrated Software Environment (in the following referred to as “platform” developed at University of Pisa (UNIPI to perform Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS analysis. The platform is written in Java for the portability and it implements all the steps foreseen in the methodology developed at UNIPI for the deterministic analysis of PTS scenarios. The methodology starts with the thermal hydraulic analysis of the NPP with a system code (such as Relap5-3D and Cathare2, during a selected transient scenario. The results so obtained are then processed to provide boundary conditions for the next step, that is, a CFD calculation. Once the system pressure and the RPV wall temperature are known, the stresses inside the RPV wall can be calculated by mean a Finite Element (FE code. The last step of the methodology is the Fracture Mechanics (FM analysis, using weight functions, aimed at evaluating the stress intensity factor (KI at crack tip to be compared with the critical stress intensity factor KIc. The platform automates all these steps foreseen in the methodology once the user specifies a number of boundary conditions at the beginning of the simulation.

  9. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  10. Use of pressure-sensitive paint for diagnostics in turbomachinery flows with shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bencic, T. J.

    2002-07-01

    The technology of pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is well established in external aerodynamics. In internal flows in narrow channels and in turbomachinery cascades, however, there are still unresolved problems. In particular, the internal flows with complex shock structures inside highly curved channels present a challenge. It is not always easy and straightforward to distinguish between true signals and 'ghost' images due to multiple internal reflections in narrow channels. To address some of the problems, investigations were first carried out in a narrow supersonic channel of Mach number 2.5. A single wedge or a combination of two wedges was used to generate a complex shock wave structure in the flow. The experience gained in a small supersonic channel was used for surface pressure measurements on the stator vane of a supersonic throughflow fan. The experimental results for several fan operating conditions are shown in a concise form, including performance map test points, midspan static tap pressure distributions, and vane suction side pressure fields. Finally, the PSP technique was used in the NASA transonic flutter cascade to compliment flow visualization data and to acquire backwall pressure fields to assess the cascade flow periodicity. Lessons learned from this investigation and shortcomings of the PSP technology for internal flow application are presented in the conclusion of the paper.

  11. Chromium at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  12. Universal High Order Subroutine with New Shock Detector for Shock Boundary Layer Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveria, M; Liu, X; Liu, C

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a new universal high order subroutine for shock boundary layer interaction. First, an effective shock/discontinuity detector has been developed.The detector has two steps.The first step is to check the ratio of the truncation errors on the coarse and fine grids and the second step is to check the local ratio of the left and right slopes. The currently popular shock/discontinuity detectors can detect shock, but mistake high frequency waves and critical points as shock and then damp the physically important high frequency waves.Preliminary results show the new shock/discontinuity detector is very delicate and can detect all shocks including strong, weak and oblique shocks or discontinuity in function and the first, second, and third order derivatives without artificial constants, but never mistake high frequency waves and critical points, expansion waves as shock. This will overcome the bottle neck problem with numerical simulation for the shock-boundary layer interaction, sh...

  13. Experimental study on pressure, stress state, and temperature-dependent dynamic behavior of shear thickening fluid subjected to laser induced shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianqian; Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments by measuring the back free surface velocities of aluminum-shear thickening fluid (STF)-aluminum assembled targets. The results showed that the attenuation behavior of shock wave in the STF was dependent on shock pressure, stress state, and test temperature. The measured back free particle velocities of the targets and shock wave velocities in the STF decreased with the decrease in shock pressure while shocked at the same stress state and the same test temperature. In addition, two types of dragging mechanisms in the STF were observed while shocked at different stress states. For a uniaxial strain state, the impact induced jamming behavior in the STF is the dragging mechanism for the attenuation of shock wave, and a critical shock pressure was required for the impact induced thickening behavior. However, while the shock wave transformed from a uniaxial strain state to a dilatation state after transmitted to a certain distance, beside the dragging effect of impact induced jamming behavior, a strong dragging effect, induced by shear induced thickening behavior, was also observed.

  14. On high explosive launching of projectiles for shock physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Damian C; Forest, Charles A; Clark, David A; Buttler, William T; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Rightley, Paul

    2007-06-01

    The hydrodynamic operation of the "Forest Flyer" type of explosive launching system for shock physics projectiles was investigated in detail using one and two dimensional continuum dynamics simulations. The simulations were numerically converged and insensitive to uncertainties in the material properties; they reproduced the speed of the projectile and the shape of its rear surface. The most commonly used variant, with an Al alloy case, was predicted to produce a slightly curved projectile, subjected to some shock heating and likely exhibiting some porosity from tensile damage. The curvature is caused by a shock reflected from the case; tensile damage is caused by the interaction of the Taylor wave pressure profile from the detonation wave with the free surface of the projectile. The simulations gave only an indication of tensile damage in the projectile, as damage is not understood well enough for predictions in this loading regime. The flatness can be improved by using a case of lower shock impedance, such as polymethyl methacrylate. High-impedance cases, including Al alloys but with denser materials improving the launching efficiency, can be used if designed according to the physics of oblique shock reflection, which indicates an appropriate case taper for any combination of explosive and case material. The tensile stress induced in the projectile depends on the relative thickness of the explosive, expansion gap, and projectile. The thinner the projectile with respect to the explosive, the smaller the tensile stress. Thus if the explosive is initiated with a plane wave lens, the tensile stress is lower than that for initiation with multiple detonators over a plane. The previous plane wave lens designs did, however, induce a tensile stress close to the spall strength of the projectile. The tensile stress can be reduced by changes in the component thicknesses. Experiments verifying the operation of explosively launched projectiles should attempt to measure

  15. Shock wave equation of state experiments at multi-TPa pressures on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, P. M.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Peterson, J. L.; Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Braun, D. G.; Millot, M.; Fry, J.; Boehm, K. J.; Sterne, P. A.; Collins, G. W.; Nikroo, A.; Fitzsimmons, P.

    2015-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility provides an unprecedented capability to generate steady, planar, ultra-high pressure shock waves (up to 10 TPa or more) in solid samples. Building on successful laser shock equation of state experiments performed on a variety of other laser facilities, we have designed and fielded experiments to perform impedance match experiments on samples of C, Be, SiO2 and CH, in the range of 3 to 7 TPa. The experiments use a line-imaging VISAR as the primary diagnostic to measure the shock velocity in an Al reference standard and in an array of the four samples. Initial tests with the line-imaging VISAR show that the NIF is capable of driving shocks that are steady to better than 2% in velocity for several ns, with smooth planar breakout patterns over a 2 mm diameter spot. Hugoniot data points will be compared to current equation-of-state models for the various materials under study. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mmHg People read "118 over 76" millimeters of mercury. Normal Blood Pressure Normal blood pressure for adults ... health. Share your story with other women on Facebook . The Heart Truth campaign offers a variety of ...

  17. High Blood Pressure Increasing Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162977.html High Blood Pressure Increasing Worldwide And health risks may appear even ... of people around the world with elevated or high blood pressure increases, so do the number of deaths linked ...

  18. Medications for High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Medications for High Blood Pressure Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... age and you cannot tell if you have high blood pressure by the way you feel, so have your ...

  19. What Causes High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Causes of High Blood Pressure Changes, either from genes or the environment, in ... and blood vessel structure and function. Biology and High Blood Pressure Researchers continue to study how various changes in ...

  20. Shock Mechanism Analysis and Simulation of High-Power Hydraulic Shock Wave Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiu Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of regular shock wave (e.g., half-sine can be achieved by the traditional rubber shock simulator, but the practical high-power shock wave characterized by steep prepeak and gentle postpeak is hard to be realized by the same. To tackle this disadvantage, a novel high-power hydraulic shock wave simulator based on the live firing muzzle shock principle was proposed in the current work. The influence of the typical shock characteristic parameters on the shock force wave was investigated via both theoretical deduction and software simulation. According to the obtained data compared with the results, in fact, it can be concluded that the developed hydraulic shock wave simulator can be applied to simulate the real condition of the shocking system. Further, the similarity evaluation of shock wave simulation was achieved based on the curvature distance, and the results stated that the simulation method was reasonable and the structural optimization based on software simulation is also beneficial to the increase of efficiency. Finally, the combination of theoretical analysis and simulation for the development of artillery recoil tester is a comprehensive approach in the design and structure optimization of the recoil system.

  1. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure For most patients, health care providers diagnose high ... are consistently 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless ...

  2. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure For most patients, health care providers diagnose high ... are consistently 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless ...

  3. Controlling your high blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000101.htm Controlling your high blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Hypertension is another term used to describe high blood pressure. High blood pressure can lead to: Stroke Heart ...

  4. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure For most patients, health care providers diagnose high ... are consistently 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless ...

  5. [High Pressure Gas Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Rolando

    2002-01-01

    Four high-pressure gas tanks, the basis of this study, were especially made by a private contractor and tested before being delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center. In order to insure 100% reliability of each individual tank the staff at KSC decided to again submit the four tanks under more rigorous tests. These tests were conducted during a period from April 10 through May 8 at KSC. This application further validates the predictive safety model for accident prevention and system failure in the testing of four high-pressure gas tanks at Kennedy Space Center, called Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology (CHTFPM). It is apparent from the variety of barriers available for a hazard control that some barriers will be more successful than others in providing protection. In order to complete the Barrier Analysis of the system, a Task Analysis and a Biomechanical Study were performed to establish the relationship between the degree of biomechanical non-conformities and the anomalies found within the system on particular joints of the body. This relationship was possible to obtain by conducting a Regression Analysis to the previously generated data. From the information derived the body segment with the lowest percentage of non-conformities was the neck flexion with 46.7%. Intense analysis of the system was conducted including Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), and Barrier Analysis. These analyses resulted in the identification of occurrences of conditions, which may be becoming hazardous in the given system. These conditions, known as dendritics, may become hazards and could result in an accident, system malfunction, or unacceptable risk conditions. A total of 56 possible dendritics were identified. Work sampling was performed to observe the occurrence each dendritic. The out of control points generated from a Weighted c control chart along with a Pareto analysis indicate that the dendritics "Personnel not

  6. Review of pressurized thermal shock studies of large scale reactor pressure vessels in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Fekete

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In Hungary, four nuclear power units were constructed more than 30 years ago; they are operating to this day. In every unit, VVER-440 V213-type light-water cooled, light-water moderated, ressurized water reactors are in operation. Since the mid-1980s, numerous researches in the field of Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS analyses of Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs have been conducted in Hungary; in all of them, the concept of structural integrity was the basis of research and development. During this time, four large PTS studies with industrial relevance have been completed in Hungary. Each used different objectives and guides, and the analysis methodology was also changing. This paper gives a comparative review of the methodologies used in these large PTS Structural Integrity Analysis projects, presenting the latest results as well

  7. Integrity analysis of reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized thermal shocks by XFEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Albuixech, V.F., E-mail: vicente.gonzalez@psi.ch; Qian, G.; Niffenegger, M.

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We did fracture mechanics computations for an RPV with XFEM thermal shocks. • We introduce guidelines for using XFEM in RPV studies. • We did a comparison between FEM and XFEM results for an RPV analysis. • Some limitations of the eXtended Finite Element Methods are commented. - Abstract: The integrity of an reactor pressure vessel (RPV) related to Pressurized Thermal Shocks (PTSs) has been widely studied. However, due to the difficulties associated with the crack modeling with the 3-D finite element method (FEM), it is preferred to use models with simple geometries and crack configurations. In the last years new improved FEMs were developed which include the singularities and discontinuities and simplify the computational fracture mechanics studies. One of those methods, the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) relies on the introduction of the crack effect with an enrichment of the finite element approximation space. This paper introduces the use of XFEM to the structural analysis of an RPV subjected to PTSs. The analysis compares the stress intensity factor (SIF) calculated with XFEM with results obtained by conventional FEM calculations.

  8. Characterization of a High Temporal Resolution TDLAS System for Measurements in a Shock Tube Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, F.; O'Byrne, Sean; Kleine, H.; Weigand, B.

    Transient heating and pressurization of a gas by shock waves can be useful for a variety of purposes, particularly for configurations involving shock wave focussing. Unless the geometry is particularly simple, the time history of temperature can be difficult to predict accurately. Hence, a non-intrusive measurement technique with high temporal resolution is required to record the time history of the very rapidly changing temperature of a shock-heated flow. One promising measurement techniques for these high-speed flows is Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS)

  9. In-situ Raman spectroscopy and high-speed photography of a shocked triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Amans, C.; Hébert, P.; Doucet, M.; de Resseguier, T.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiment to study at the molecular level the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a triaminotrinitrobenzene-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Reflectivity measurements under shock compression show that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  10. Shock initiation studies on high concentration hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gibson, L. Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. TV cameras are attached to the target so the cell filling can be monitored. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; initiation has been observed in some experiments that shows homogeneous shock initiation behavior. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these measurements, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot information, times (distances) to detonation (Pop-plot points) that indicate low sensitivity, and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions that agree with earlier estimates.

  11. Shock initiation studies on high concentration hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gibson, L. Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. TV cameras are attached to the target so the cell filling can be monitored. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; initiation has been observed in some experiments that shows homogeneous shock initiation behavior. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these measurements, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot information, times (distances) to detonation (Pop-plot points) that indicate low sensitivity, and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions that agree with earlier estimates.

  12. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hongwu [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  13. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Obesity Smoking and Your Heart Stroke Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... 90 mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless and ...

  14. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... blood pressure is due to other conditions or medicines or if you have primary high blood pressure. ...

  15. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to keep a written log of all your results. Whenever you have an appointment with the health ... appointments to diagnose high blood pressure. Using the results of your blood pressure test, your health care ...

  16. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the baby. Controlling your blood pressure during pregnancy and getting regular prenatal care are important for ... your baby. Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle ...

  17. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ask for your readings. Blood Pressure Severity and Type Your health care provider usually takes 2–3 ... any other location. Health care providers diagnose this type of high blood pressure by reviewing readings in ...

  18. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ask for your readings. Blood Pressure Severity and Type Your health care provider usually takes 2–3 ... any other location. Health care providers diagnose this type of high blood pressure by reviewing readings in ...

  19. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless and can be done ... provider’s office or clinic. To prepare for the test: Don’t drink coffee or smoke cigarettes for ...

  20. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... readings. Blood Pressure Severity and Type Your health care provider usually takes 2–3 readings at several medical appointments to diagnose high blood pressure. Using the ...

  1. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Obesity Smoking and Your Heart Stroke Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... 90 mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless and ...

  2. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless and can be done ... provider’s office or clinic. To prepare for the test: Don’t drink coffee or smoke cigarettes for ...

  3. Applied pressure-dependent anisotropic grain connectivity in shock consolidated MgB{sub 2} samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Wataru [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4-3-11, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Takenaka, Kenta [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4-3-11, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Kondo, Tadashi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4-3-11, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Tamaki, Hideyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4-3-11, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Matsuzawa, Hidenori [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4-3-11, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan)]. E-mail: matuzawa@mx3.nns.ne.jp; Kai, Shoichiro [Advanced Materials and Process Development Group, Explosive Division, Asahi Kasei Chemicals Corporation, Oita 870-0392 (Japan); Kakimoto, Etsuji [Advanced Materials and Process Development Group, Explosive Division, Asahi Kasei Chemicals Corporation, Oita 870-0392 (Japan); Takano, Yoshihiko [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Minehara, Eisuke [FEL Laboratory, Tokai Site, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Shirakata-shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    Three different cylindrical MgB{sub 2} bulk samples were prepared by the underwater shock consolidation method in which shock waves of several GPa, generated by detonation of explosives, were applied to a metallic cylinder containing commercially available MgB{sub 2} powders with no additives. Resistivity anisotropy of the samples increased with shock pressure. The highest- and medium-pressure applied samples had finite resistivities in the radial direction for the whole temperature range down to 12 K, whereas their axial and azimuthal resistivities dropped to zero at 32-35 K. By contrast, the lowest-pressure applied sample was approximately isotropic with a normal-state resistivity of {approx}40 {mu}{omega} cm, an onset temperature of {approx}38.5 K, and a transition width of {approx}4.5 K. These extremely anisotropic properties would have resulted from the distortion of grain boundaries and grain cores, caused by the shock pressures and their repeated bouncing.

  4. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... giving Gift and estate planning Circle of Champions Corporate sponsorship Join us at an event The Hope ... blood pressure is the #2 cause of kidney failure. It accounts for about one-fourth of all ...

  5. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... possible. Practice healthy coping techniques, such as muscle relaxation, deep breathing or meditation. Getting regular physical activity ... you monitor your blood pressure at home. Practice relaxation or slow, deep breathing. Practice taking deep, slow ...

  6. Revisiting the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock Studies of an Aging Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; Malik, S.N.M.; Simonen, F.A.

    1999-08-01

    The Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) studies were a series of studies performed in the early-mid 1980s as part of an NRC-organized comprehensive research project to confirm the technical bases for the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) rule, and to aid in the development of guidance for licensee plant-specific analyses. The research project consisted of PTS pilot analyses for three PWRs: Oconee Unit 1, designed by Babcock and Wilcox; Calvert Cliffs Unit 1, designed by Combustion Engineering; and H.B. Robinson Unit 2, designed by Westinghouse. The primary objectives of the IPTS studies were (1) to provide for each of the three plants an estimate of the probability of a crack propagating through the wall of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) due to PTS; (2) to determine the dominant overcooling sequences, plant features, and operator actions and the uncertainty in the plant risk due to PTS; and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective actions. The NRC is currently evaluating the possibility of revising current PTS regulatory guidance. Technical bases must be developed to support any revisions. In the years since the results of IPTS studies were published, the fracture mechanics model, the embrittlement database, embrittlement correlation, inputs for flaw distributions, and the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) computer code have been refined. An ongoing effort is underway to determine the impact of these fracture-technology refinements on the conditional probabilities of vessel failure calculated in the IPTS Studies. This paper discusses the results of these analyses performed for one of these plants.

  7. The shock tube as a device for testing transonic airfoils at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A performance analysis of gas-driven shock tubes shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers in the range of 100 million can be generated behind the primary shock in a large shock tube. A study of flow over simple airfoils has been carried out at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photos and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those observed for the airfoils in wind tunnels can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with either properly-contoured test section walls or a properly-designed slotted-wall test section. The study indicates that the shock tube is a useful facility for studying two-dimensional high Reynolds number transonic airfoil flows.

  8. High Blood Pressure and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure during a previous pregnancy, have a family history of high blood pressure or mild kidney disease. The combination of birth ... Print (PDF) | Online How to Measure Your Blood Pressure (PDF) Questions To Ask ... FREE digital-only, quarterly magazine for patients, families, and caregivers, which focuses on the prevention and ...

  9. What Is High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More What is High Blood Pressure? Updated:Oct 31,2016 First, let’s define high ... resources . This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  10. High-Energy Molecular Beam Source Using a Non-Diaphragm Type Small Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Miyoshi, Nobuya; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2010-11-01

    The molecular beam technique is one of the powerful tools to analyze gas-surface interactions. In order to generate high-energy molecular beam in a range of 1 - 5 eV, which corresponds to the typical activation energy of surface reactions, we are developing a beam source using a non-diaphragm type shock tube, which can operate at a repetition rate high enough for efficient data acquisition. We made the volume of a tube much smaller than that of conventional ones so that the evacuation time between each shot becomes as short as possible. Our measurement of shock Mach numbers showed that even small diameter (2 or 4 mm) tubes, in which the wall boundary layer has a large influence on the propagation of shock waves, could generate molecular beam with the translational energy of more than 1 eV. This is because the reduction of shock formation distance by rapid opening of the valve, which separates a high pressure room from a low pressure room, weakened the effect of viscous damping on the accelerating shock wave. In addition, the convergent shock tubes of which diameters linearly decrease from 4 to 2 mm exhibited higher Mach numbers than straight ones. This indicates that the application of the convergent tube with the optimized geometry would be promising for generating high-energy molecular beam.

  11. Common High Blood Pressure Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Common High Blood Pressure Myths Updated:Dec 9,2016 Knowing the facts ... health. This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  12. Stroke and High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to Stroke Updated:Dec 2,2016 Stroke and high blood ... Changes That Matter • Find Tools & Resources Show Your Stroke Support! Show your stroke support with our new ...

  13. Nanomaterials under high-pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2006-10-01

    The use of high-pressure for the study and elaboration of homogeneous nanostructures is critically reviewed. Size effects, the interaction between nanostructures and guest species or the interaction of the nanosystem with the pressure transmitting medium are emphasized. Phase diagrams and the possibilities opened by the combination of pressure and temperature for the elaboration of new nanomaterials is underlined through the examination of three different systems: nanocrystals, nano-cage materials which include fullerites and group-14 clathrates, and single wall nanotubes. This tutorial review is addressed to scientist seeking an introduction or a panoramic view of the study of nanomaterials under high-pressure.

  14. Two-Dimensional Regular Shock Reflection for the Pressure Gradient System of Conservation Laws

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxi Zheng

    2006-01-01

    We establish the existence of a global solution to a regular reflection of a shock hitting a ramp for the pressure gradient system of equations. The set-up of the reflection is the same as that of Mach's experiment for the compressible Euler system, i.e., a straight shock hitting a ramp. We assume that the angle of the ramp is close to 90 degrees. The solution has a reflected bow shock wave, called the diffraction of the planar shock at the compressive corner, which is mathematically regarded as a free boundary in the self-similar variable plane.The pressure gradient system of three equations is a subsystem, and an approximation, of the full Euler system,and we offer a couple of derivations.

  15. Design, Simulation and Fabrication of Triaxial MEMS High Shock Accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhai; Shi, Zhiguo; Yang, Zhan; Xie, Zhihong; Zhang, Donghong; Cai, De; Li, Kejie; Shen, Yajing

    2015-04-01

    On the basis of analyzing the disadvantage of other structural accelerometer, three-axis high g MEMS piezoresistive accelerometer was put forward in order to apply to the high-shock test field. The accelerometer's structure and working principle were discussed in details. The simulation results show that three-axis high shock MEMS accelerometer can bear high shock. After bearing high shock impact in high-shock shooting test, three-axis high shock MEMS accelerometer can obtain the intact metrical information of the penetration process and still guarantee the accurate precision of measurement in high shock load range, so we can not only analyze the law of stress wave spreading and the penetration rule of the penetration process of the body of the missile, but also furnish the testing technology of the burst point controlling. The accelerometer has far-ranging application in recording the typical data that projectile penetrating hard target and furnish both technology guarantees for penetration rule and defend engineering.

  16. Clinical review: Interpretation of arterial pressure wave in shock states

    OpenAIRE

    Lamia, Bouchra; Chemla, Denis; Richard, Christian; Teboul, Jean-Louis

    2005-01-01

    In critically ill patients monitored with an arterial catheter, the arterial pressure signal provides two types of information that may help the clinician to interpret haemodynamic status better: the mean values of systolic, diastolic, mean and pulse pressures; and the magnitude of the respiratory variation in arterial pressure in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. In this review we briefly discuss the physiological mechanisms responsible for arterial pressure generation, with specia...

  17. High-Pressure Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogson, Mark

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The study of solids at high pressure and variable temperature enables development of accurate interatomic potential functions over wide ranges of interatomic distances. A review of the main models used in the determination of these potentials is given in Chapter one. A discussion of phonon frequency as a variable physical parameter reflecting the interatomic potential is given. A high pressure Raman study of inorganic salts of the types MSCN, (M = K,Rb,Cs & NH_4^+ ) and MNO_2, (M = K,Na) has been completed. The studies have revealed two new phases in KNO_2 and one new phase in NaNO _2 at high pressure. The accurate phonon shift data have enabled the determination of the pure and biphasic stability regions of the phases of KNO _2. A discussion of the B1, B2 relationship of univalent nitrites is also given. In the series of thiocyanates studied new phases have been found in all four materials. In both the potassium and rubidium salts two new phases have been detected, and in the ceasium salt one new phase has been detected, all at high pressure, from accurate phonon shift data. These transitions are discussed in terms of second-order mechanisms with space groups suggested for all phases, based on Landau's theory of second-order phase transitions. In the ammonium salt one new phase has been detected. This new phase transition has been interpreted as a second-order transition. The series of molecular crystals CH_3 HgX, (X = Cl,Br & I) has been studied at high pressure and at variable temperature. In Chapter five, their phase behaviour at high pressure is detailed along with the pressure dependencies of their phonon frequencies. In the chloride and the bromide two new phases have been detected. In the bromide one has been detected at high temperature and one at high pressure, and latter being interpreted as the stopping of the methyl rotation. In the chloride one phase has been found at

  18. Hypertonic/Hyperoncotic Resuscitation from Shock: Reduced Volume Requirement and Lower Intracranial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    Volume 15, No. 4 ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS 433 INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE FOLLOWING RESUSCITATION FROM HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK John H. Whitley, Donald S. Prough, Michael ...SHOCK: COMPARISON OF FLUIDS John M. Whitley, PhD, Michael A. Olympio, MD, Donald S. Prough, MD Department of Anesthesia, Bowman Gray School of Medicine...fluid infused within the range of sodium and colloid concentrations examined in this study. In contrast, Gunnar et al.7’ 2 and Ducey et al.,8

  19. Comparison of noninvasive blood pressure monitoring with invasive arterial pressure monitoring in medical ICU patients with septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Leonard E; Chen, Guoqing John; Latham, Heath E

    2017-08-01

    In the critically ill, the insertion of peripheral arterial catheters to monitor hemodynamics is a low-risk procedure, but carries the potential for complications. This study was designed to compare invasive and noninvasive blood pressure measurements in patients with septic shock in a medical ICU. We carried out a prospective observational study of patients admitted with septic shock and a radially inserted peripheral arterial catheter in the medical ICU with 31 adult patients who underwent four pairs of simultaneous noninvasive and invasive blood pressure measurements (124 comparisons), with the invasive blood pressure taken as the gold standard. Agreements between invasive and noninvasive blood pressure methods were assessed using Bland-Altman analysis, and clinical significance was determined by the European Society of Hypertension criteria. In all patients, noninvasive systolic (P=0.0385), diastolic (Parterial pressures (Ppressure measurements did not correlate clinically according to the European Society of Hypertension criteria. In our patients admitted to the medical ICU with septic shock, noninvasive blood pressure monitoring did not clinically correlate with invasive blood pressure measurements.

  20. Raman Spectroscopy at High Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander F. Goncharov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is one of the most informative probes for studies of material properties under extreme conditions of high pressure. The Raman techniques have become more versatile over the last decades as a new generation of optical filters and multichannel detectors become available. Here, recent progress in the Raman techniques for high-pressure research and its applications in numerous scientific disciplines including physics and chemistry of materials under extremes, earth and planetary science, new materials synthesis, and high-pressure metrology will be discussed.

  1. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhitao; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Xiao, Pan; Christensen, James; Zhou, Min; Summers, Christopher J.; Dlott, Dana D.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2016-07-01

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  2. Steam Oxidation at High Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL; Carney, Casey [URS

    2013-07-19

    A first high pressure test was completed: 293 hr at 267 bar and 670{degrees}C; A parallel 1 bar test was done for comparison; Mass gains were higher for all alloys at 267 bar than at 1 bar; Longer term exposures, over a range of temperatures and pressures, are planned to provide information as to the commercial implications of pressure effects; The planned tests are at a higher combination of temperatures and pressures than in the existing literature. A comparison was made with longer-term literature data: The short term exposures are largely consistent with the longer-term corrosion literature; Ferritic steels--no consistent pressure effect; Austenitic steels--fine grain alloys less able to maintain protective chromia scale as pressure increases; Ni-base alloys--more mass gains above 105 bar than below. Not based on many data points.

  3. High Blood Pressure Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or "no added salt." Look for the sodium content in milligrams and the Percent Daily Value. Aim for foods that are less than 5 percent of the Daily Value of sodium. Foods with 20 percent or more Daily Value of sodium are considered high. To learn more about reading nutrition labels, see ...

  4. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over the years led to verification of the important role of high blood pressure—especially in concert with ... is specific for that person will be an important key to improving prevention, ... an international team of investigators, funded in part by the NIH, ...

  5. High pressure ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  6. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs Contact Us FAQs Home » Health Information for the Public » Health Topics » High ... also may ask you to check readings at home or at other locations that have blood pressure ...

  7. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Explore High Blood Pressure What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis DASH Eating Plan Overweight and Obesity Smoking and Your Heart ...

  8. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health care providers diagnose this type of high blood pressure by reviewing readings in the office and readings taken anywhere else. ... The Heart Truth ® —a national heart disease awareness campaign for ...

  9. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to check readings at home or at other locations that have blood pressure equipment and to keep ... office compared with readings taken in any other location. Health care providers diagnose this type of high ...

  10. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provider usually takes 2–3 readings at several medical appointments to diagnose high blood pressure. Using the ... Researchers believe stress, which can occur during the medical appointment, causes white coat hypertension. Rate This Content: ...

  11. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs Contact Us FAQs Home » Health Information for the Public » Health Topics » High Blood Pressure » ...

  12. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR DYNAMIC INITIAL SHOCK PARAMETERS OF COUPLING CHARGE ON BOREHOLE WALL UNDER THE ACTION OF HIGH EXPLOSIVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪芝芳; 李玉民

    1996-01-01

    According to detonation theory and hydrodynamic principle, a physical model has been set up in this paper. Based on the model a methodology for calculating dynamic initial shock parameters such as shock pressure p,,, shock wave velosity Dm etc. of coupling charge on borehole wall has ben developed. The shock parameters have been calculated when high explosives works on granite, limestone and marble respectively. The magnitude of every parameter on borehole wall has been obtained from ignited dot to the end of borehole along axial direction. Some important conclusions are also gained.

  13. High pressure rinsing parameters measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaliere, E. [INFN Milano - LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (MI) (Italy); Fusetti, M. [INFN Milano - LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (MI) (Italy); Michelato, P. [INFN Milano - LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (MI) (Italy); Pagani, C. [INFN Milano - LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (MI) (Italy)]. E-mail: carlo.pagani@mi.infn.it; Pierini, P. [INFN Milano - LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (MI) (Italy); Paulon, R. [INFN Milano - LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (MI) (Italy); Sertore, D. [INFN Milano - LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (MI) (Italy)

    2006-07-15

    High pressure rinsing with ultra pure water jet is an essential step in the high field superconducting cavity production process. In this paper, we illustrate the experimental characterization of a HPR system, in terms of specific power and energy deposition on the cavity surfaces and on the damage threshold for niobium. These measurements are used to tentatively derive general rules for the optimization of the free process parameters (nozzle geometry, speeds and water pressure)

  14. Shock tube study of n-decane ignition at low pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Fei Nie; Ping Li; Chang-Hua Zhang; Wei Xie; Cong-Shan Li; Xiang-Yuan Li

    2012-01-01

    Ignition delay times for n-decane/O2/Ar mixtures were measured behind reflected shock waves using endwall pressure and CH* emission measurements in a heated shock tube.The initial postshock conditions cover pressures of 0.09-0.26 MPa,temperatures of 1 227-1 536 K,and oxygen mole fractions of 3.9%-20.7% with an equivalence ratio of 1.0.The correlation formula of ignition delay dependence on pressure,temperature,and oxygen mole fraction was obtained.The current data are in good agreement with available low-pressure experimental data,and they are then compared with the prediction of a kinetic mechanism.The current measurements extend the kinetic modeling targets for the n-decane combustion at low pressures.

  15. Experimental Study on Peak Pressure of Shock Waves in Quasi-Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxiong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the similarity laws of the explosion, this research develops similarity requirements of the small-scale experiments of underwater explosions and establishes a regression model for peak pressure of underwater shock waves under experimental condition. Small-scale experiments are carried out with two types of media at the bottom of the water and for different water depths. The peak pressure of underwater shock waves at different measuring points is acquired. A formula consistent with the similarity law of explosions is obtained and an analysis of the regression precision of the formula confirms its accuracy. Significance experiment indicates that the influence of distance between measuring points and charge on peak pressure of underwater shock wave is the greatest and that of water depth is the least within the range of geometric parameters. An analysis of data from experiments with different media at the bottom of the water reveals an influence on the peak pressure, as the peak pressure of a shock wave in a body of water with a bottom soft mud and rocks is about 1.33 times that of the case where the bottom material is only soft mud.

  16. The deterministic structural integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels under pressurized thermal shock loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingya, E-mail: chenmingya@cgnpc.com.cn; Lu, Feng; Wang, Rongshan; Huang, Ping; Liu, Xiangbin; Zhang, Guodong; Xu, Chaoliang

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The conservative and non-conservative assumptions in the codes were shown. • The influence of different loads on the SM was given. • The unloading effect of the cladding was studied. • A concentrated reflection of the safety was shown based on 3-D FE analyses. - Abstract: The deterministic structural integrity of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) related to pressurized thermal shocks (PTSs) has been extensively studied. While the nil-ductility-transition temperature (RT{sub NDT}) parameter is widely used, the influence of fluence and temperature distributions along the thickness of the base metal wall cannot be reflected in the comparative analysis. This paper introduces the method using a structure safety margin (SM) parameter which is based on a comparison between the material toughness (the fracture initiation toughness K{sub IC} or fracture arrest toughness K{sub Ia}) and the stress intensity factor (SIF) along the crack front for the integrity analysis of a RPV subjected to PTS transients. A 3-D finite element model is used to perform fracture mechanics analyses considering both crack initiation assessment and arrest assessment. The results show that the critical part along the crack front is always the clad-base metal interface point (IP) rather than the deepest point (DP) for either crack initiation assessment or crack arrest assessment under the thermal load. It is shown that the requirement in Regulatory Guide 1.154 that ‘axial flaws with depths less than 20% of the wall thickness and all circumferential flaws should be modeled in infinite length’ may be non-conservative. As the assessment result is often poor universal for a given material, crack and transient, caution is recommended in the safety assessment, especially for the IP. The SIF reduces under the thermal or pressure load if the map cracking (MC) effect is considered. Therefore, the assumption in the ASME and RCCM codes that the cladding should be taken into account in

  17. High-pressure creep tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Lamoureux, J.; Hales, C.

    1986-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, presently being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and NASA, uses high-pressure hydrogen as a working fluid; its long-term effects on the properties of alloys are relatively unknown. Hence, creep-rupture testing of wrought and cast high-temperature alloys in high-pressure hydrogen is an essential part of the research supporting the development of the Stirling cycle engine. Attention is given to the design, development, and operation of a 20 MPa hydrogen high-temperature multispecimen creep-rupture possessing high sensitivity. This pressure vessel allows for the simultaneous yet independent testing of six specimens. The results from one alloy, XF-818, are presented to illustrate how reported results are derived from the raw test data.

  18. Shock tube investigation of dynamic response of pressure transducers for validation of rotor performance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershader, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    For some time now, NASA has had a program under way to aid in the validation of rotor performance and acoustics codes associated with the UH-60 rotary-wing aircraft; and to correlate results of such studies with those obtained from investigations of other selected aircraft rotor performance. A central feature of these studies concerns the dynamic measurement of surface pressure at various locations up to frequencies of 25 KHz. For this purpose, fast-response gauges of the Kulite type are employed. The latter need to be buried in the rotor; they record surface pressures which are transmitted by a pipette connected to the gauge. The other end of the pipette is cut flush with the surface. In certain locations, the pipette configuration includes a rather sharp right-angle bend. The natural question has arisen in this connection: In what way are the pipettes modifying the signals received at the rotor surface and subsequently transmitted to the sensitive Kulite transducer element. The basic details and results of the program performed and recently completed in the High Pressure Shock Tube Laboratory of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University are given.

  19. Influence of shock pressure and profile on the microjetting from a grooved Pb surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jian-Li; Wang, Pei; He, An-Min

    2017-01-01

    This work investigates the shock-induced microjetting from a grooved surface (10 nm, 120 degree) of low-melting metal Pb with molecular dynamics simulations. The microjetting processes under surface/release melting conditions are presented in detail, and some properties on the microjet mass and velocity are revealed for different shock pressure and profile cases. It is found that the increase of microjet mass with shock pressure experiences three stages: rapid increase (solid phase), slowdown increase (release melting) and almost no increase (shock melting). For all cases, the ratio of the maximal jetting velocity to the surface velocity approximately keeps a constant (1.5-1.55), but this value undergoes a degree of exponential decay with time for the solid release cases. In addition, the temperature of the microjet is found to be always above the melting point (zero pressure) and keep a continuous increase towards the microjet tip. When introducing slow decaying profiles, the microjet mass begins to increase with the decay rate, which is dominated by the deformation of bubble during pull-back. When the decay rate becomes fast enough, the microspall occurs as expected, meanwhile the microjet appears to reduce because of the shock energy reduction. But that cannot cut off the microjet completely. The velocity distribution along the loading direction shows two linear regions corresponding to the microspall and microjet, and the latter seems to have a greater velocity gradient.

  20. MAGNETIC METHOD FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, V.

    1960-01-26

    A device is described for producing high-energy plasmas comprising a tapered shock tube of dielectric material and having a closed small end, an exceedingly low-inductance coll supported about and axially aligned with the small end of the tapered tube. an elongated multiturn coil supported upon the remninder of the exterior wall of the shock tube. a potential source and switch connected in series with the low-inductance coil, a potential source and switch connected in series with the elongated coil, means for hermetically sealing the large end of the tube, means for purging the tube of gases, and means for admitting a selected gas into the shock tube.

  1. Validation of the activity expansion method with ultrahigh pressure shock equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Forrest J.; Young, David A.

    1997-11-01

    Laser shock experiments have recently been used to measure the equation of state (EOS) of matter in the ultrahigh pressure region between condensed matter and a weakly coupled plasma. Some ultrahigh pressure data from nuclear-generated shocks are also available. Matter at these conditions has proven very difficult to treat theoretically. The many-body activity expansion method (ACTEX) has been used for some time to calculate EOS and opacity data in this region, for use in modeling inertial confinement fusion and stellar interior plasmas. In the present work, we carry out a detailed comparison with the available experimental data in order to validate the method. The agreement is good, showing that ACTEX adequately describes strongly shocked matter.

  2. Validation of the activity expansion method with ultrahigh pressure shock equations of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, F.J.; Young, D.A. [Physics Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Laser shock experiments have recently been used to measure the equation of state (EOS) of matter in the ultrahigh pressure region between condensed matter and a weakly coupled plasma. Some ultrahigh pressure data from nuclear-generated shocks are also available. Matter at these conditions has proven very difficult to treat theoretically. The many-body activity expansion method (ACTEX) has been used for some time to calculate EOS and opacity data in this region, for use in modeling inertial confinement fusion and stellar interior plasmas. In the present work, we carry out a detailed comparison with the available experimental data in order to validate the method. The agreement is good, showing that ACTEX adequately describes strongly shocked matter. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Explosive volcanism and associated pressures - Implications for models of endogenically shocked quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, S. L.; Wolff, J. A.; Sharpton, V. L.

    1990-01-01

    The nature of explosive volcanic phenomena and associated pressures, both from field and theoretical perspectives, is discussed. An endogenic origin for shocked quartz at the K/T boundary requires impulsive pressures greater than 60 kbars to be generated during explosive volcanism. Explosive volcanic eruptions which are events of sustained decompression may be initiated by impulsive explosions while the magnitudes of the overpressures are small. These maximum overpressures can be controlled mainly by the tensile strength of the rock surrounding the magma chamber-conduit system. Thus maximum overpressures in the volcanic environment are limited to less than 500 bars which are orders of magnitude less than those required for shock quartz (greater than 60 kbars). This observation is found to be consistent with the complete lack of field or petrographic evidence in support of shock metamorphism associated with volcanic eruptions and their products.

  4. Influence of air pressure on mechanical effect of laser plasma shock wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yu-Zhu; Wang Guang-An; Zhu Jin-Rong; Shen Zhong-Hua; Ni Xiao-Wu; Lu Jian

    2007-01-01

    The influence of air pressure on mechanical effect of laser plasma shock wave in a vacuum chamber produced by a Nd:YAG laser has been studied. The laser pulses with pulse width of 10ns and pulse energy of about 320mJ at 1.06μm wavelength is focused on the aluminium target mounted on a ballistic pendulum, and the air pressure in the chamber changes from 2.8 × 103 to 1.01×105pa. The experimental results show that the impulse coupling coefficient changes as the air pressure and the distance of the target from focus change. The mechanical effects of the plasma shock wave on the target are analysed at different distances from focus and the air pressure.

  5. Influence of air pressure on mechanical effect of laser plasma shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Zhu; Wang, Guang-An; Zhu, Jin-Rong; Shen, Zhong-Hua; Ni, Xiao-Wu; Lu, Jian

    2007-09-01

    The influence of air pressure on mechanical effect of laser plasma shock wave in a vacuum chamber produced by a Nd:YAG laser has been studied. The laser pulses with pulse width of 10ns and pulse energy of about 320mJ at 1.06μm wavelength is focused on the aluminium target mounted on a ballistic pendulum, and the air pressure in the chamber changes from 2.8 × 103 to 1.01 × 105Pa. The experimental results show that the impulse coupling coefficient changes as the air pressure and the distance of the target from focus change. The mechanical effects of the plasma shock wave on the target are analysed at different distances from focus and the air pressure.

  6. Early Fluid Resuscitation and High Volume Hemofiltration Decrease Septic Shock Progression in Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Xue, Lu; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of early fluid resuscitation (EFR) combined with high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the cardiopulmonary function and removal of inflammatory mediators in a septic shock swine model. Eighteen swine were randomized into three groups: control (n = 6) (extracorporeal circulating blood only), continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 25 mL/Kg/h), and HVHF (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 85 mL/Kg/h). The septic shock model was established by intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharides (50 µg/kg/h). Hemodynamic parameters (arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume variability, left ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and central venous pressure), vasoactive drug parameters (dose and time of norepinephrine and hourly fluid intake), pulmonary function (partial oxygen pressure and vascular permeability), and cytokines (interleukin-6 and interleukin-10) were observed. Treatment resulted in significant changes at 4-6 h. HVHF was beneficial, as shown by the dose of vasoactive drugs, fluid intake volume, left ventricular contractility index, and partial oxygen pressure. Both CRRT and HVHF groups showed improved removal of inflammatory mediators compared with controls. In conclusion, EFR combined with HVHF improved septic shock in this swine model. The combination decreased shock progression, reduced the need for vasoactive drugs, and alleviated the damage to cardiopulmonary functions.

  7. Delta Shocks and Vacuum States in Vanishing Pressure Limits of Solutions to the Relativistic Euler Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan YIN; Wancheng SHENG

    2008-01-01

    The Riemann problems for the Euler system of conservation laws of energy and momentum in special relativity as pressure vanishes are considered. The Riemann solutions for the pressureless relativistic Euler equations are obtained constructively. There are two kinds of solutions, the one involves delta shock wave and the other involves vacuum. The authors prove that these two kinds of solutions are the limits of the solutions as pressure vanishes in the Euler system of conservation laws of energy and momentum in special relativity.

  8. 75 FR 5495 - Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... (75 FR 13), that amends the NRC's regulations to provide alternate fracture toughness requirements for....Lesar@nrc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In FR doc. E9-31146, published on January 4, 2010, make the... Pressurized Thermal Shock Events; Correction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Final...

  9. High pressure neon arc lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  10. High-pressure investigations of Earth's interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jennifer

    2007-03-01

    In the first half of the talk, the electronic structure of iron in ferromagnesium silicate perovskite will be discussed. Knowledge of iron valences and spin states in silicate perovskite is relevant to our understanding of the physical and chemical properties of Earth's lower mantle such as transport properties, mechanical behavior, and element partitioning. In this study, we have measured the electronic structure of the iron component of an aluminous Fe-bearing silicate perovskite sample, (Mg0.88Fe0.09)(Si0.94Al0.10)O3, close to a pyrolite composition, using synchrotron M"ossbauer spectroscopy (SMS) and laser heated diamond anvil cells at high-pressure and temperatures at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source. Evaluation of the spectra provided the isomer shift and the quadrupole splitting of the iron component in silicate perovskite, which gives information on valence and spin states under lower mantle conditions. In the second half of the talk, experiments on the melting curve of iron at high-pressures will be presented. Seismological observations indicate that Earth's iron-dominated core consists of a solid inner region surrounded by a liquid outer core. Previously, melting studies of iron metal at high-pressures and temperatures were performed by shock-compression, resistive- and laser-heating in diamond anvil cells using visual observations or synchrotron x-ray diffraction and theoretical methods. However, the melting curve of iron is still controversial. Here, we will present a new method of detecting the solid-liquid phase boundary of iron at high-pressure using ^57Fe SMS. The characteristic SMS time signature is observed by fast detectors and vanishes suddenly when melting occurs. This process is described by the Lamb-M"ossbauer factor f = exp(-k^2), where k is the wave number of the resonant x-rays and is the mean-square displacement of the iron atoms.

  11. Vacuum high harmonic generation in the shock regime

    CERN Document Server

    Böhl, P; Ruhl, H

    2015-01-01

    Electrodynamics becomes nonlinear and permits the self-interaction of fields when the quantised nature of vacuum states is taken into account. The effect on a plane probe pulse propagating through a stronger constant crossed background is calculated using numerical simulation and by analytically solving the corresponding wave equation. The electromagnetic shock resulting from vacuum high harmonic generation is investigated and a nonlinear shock parameter identified.

  12. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-04-22

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable.

  13. Intermolecular Interactions at high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eikeland, Espen Zink

    2016-01-01

    In this project high-pressure single crystal X-ray diffraction has been combined with quantitative energy calculations to probe the energy landscape of three hydroquinone clathrates enclosing different guest molecules. The simplicity of the hydroquinone clathrate structures together with their st......In this project high-pressure single crystal X-ray diffraction has been combined with quantitative energy calculations to probe the energy landscape of three hydroquinone clathrates enclosing different guest molecules. The simplicity of the hydroquinone clathrate structures together...... with their structural chemistry, controlled largely by subtle interactions between the host and the enclosed guest molecules, makes them attractive to study as model systems. Quantifying the numerous superimposed interactions in these clathrates will advance our understanding of more complex supramolecular aggregates....... High-pressure crystallography is the perfect method for studying intermolecular interactions, by forcing the molecules closer together. In all three studied hydroquinone clathrates, new pressure induced phase transitions have been discovered using a mixture of pentane and isopentane as the pressure...

  14. Modeling Hot-Spot Contributions in Shocked High Explosives at the Mesoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrier, Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-12

    When looking at performance of high explosives, the defects within the explosive become very important. Plastic bonded explosives, or PBXs, contain voids of air and bonder between the particles of explosive material that aid in the ignition of the explosive. These voids collapse in high pressure shock conditions, which leads to the formation of hot spots. Hot spots are localized high temperature and high pressure regions that cause significant changes in the way the explosive material detonates. Previously hot spots have been overlooked with modeling, but now scientists are realizing their importance and new modeling systems that can accurately model hot spots are underway.

  15. High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder View All Content High Blood Pressure & Kidney Disease What is high blood pressure? Blood pressure is the force of blood ... million filtering units called nephrons. How does high blood pressure affect the kidneys? High blood pressure can ...

  16. High-power laser experiments to study collisionless shock generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Morita, T.; Kato, T.; Tanji, H.; Ide, T.; Nishio, K.; Kuwada, M.; Tsubouchi, T.; Ide, H.; Norimatsu, T.; Gregory, C.; Woolsey, N.; Schaar, K.; Murphy, C.; Gregori, G.; Diziere, A.; Pelka, A.; Koenig, M.; Wang, S.; Dong, Q.; Li, Y.; Park, H.-S.; Ross, S.; Kugland, N.; Ryutov, D.; Remington, B.; Spitkovsky, A.; Froula, D.; Takabe, H.

    2013-11-01

    A collisionless Weibel-instability mediated shock in a self-generated magnetic field is studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation [Kato and Takabe, Astophys. J. Lett. 681, L93 (2008)]. It is predicted that the generation of the Weibel shock requires to use NIF-class high-power laser system. Collisionless electrostatic shocks are produced in counter-streaming plasmas using Gekko XII laser system [Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011)]. A NIF facility time proposal is approved to study the formation of the collisionless Weibel shock. OMEGA and OMEGA EP experiments have been started to study the plasma conditions of counter-streaming plasmas required for the NIF experiment using Thomson scattering and to develop proton radiography diagnostics.

  17. High-power laser experiments to study collisionless shock generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakawa Y.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A collisionless Weibel-instability mediated shock in a self-generated magnetic field is studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation [Kato and Takabe, Astophys. J. Lett. 681, L93 (2008]. It is predicted that the generation of the Weibel shock requires to use NIF-class high-power laser system. Collisionless electrostatic shocks are produced in counter-streaming plasmas using Gekko XII laser system [Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011]. A NIF facility time proposal is approved to study the formation of the collisionless Weibel shock. OMEGA and OMEGA EP experiments have been started to study the plasma conditions of counter-streaming plasmas required for the NIF experiment using Thomson scattering and to develop proton radiography diagnostics.

  18. Anxiety: A Cause of High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions High blood pressure (hypertension) Can anxiety cause high blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Anxiety doesn't cause long-term high blood pressure (hypertension). But episodes of anxiety can cause dramatic, ...

  19. High Blood Pressure Often Undiagnosed, Untreated

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162996.html High Blood Pressure Often Undiagnosed, Untreated Half of mobile clinic patients ... that's often referred to as a "silent killer" -- high blood pressure, a new Canadian study reveals. High blood pressure, ...

  20. Shock tube/time-of-flight mass spectrometer for high temperature kinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, Robert S; Giri, Binod R; Kiefer, John H

    2007-03-01

    A shock tube (ST) with online, time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOF-MS) detection has been constructed for the study of elementary reactions at high temperature. The ST and TOF-MS are coupled by a differentially pumped molecular beam sampling interface, which ensures that the samples entering the TOF-MS are not contaminated by gases drawn from the cold end wall thermal boundary layer in the ST. Additionally, the interface allows a large range of postshock pressures to be used in the shock tube while maintaining high vacuum in the TOF-MS. The apparatus and the details of the sampling system are described along with an analysis in which cooling of the sampled gases and minimization of thermal boundary layer effects are discussed. The accuracy of kinetic measurements made with the apparatus has been tested by investigating the thermal unimolecular dissociation of cyclohexene to ethylene and 1,3-butadiene, a well characterized reaction for which considerable literature data that are in good agreement exist. The experiments were performed at nominal reflected shock wave pressures of 600 and 1300 Torr, and temperatures ranging from 1260 to 1430 K. The rate coefficients obtained are compared with the earlier shock tube studies and are found to be in very good agreement. As expected no significant difference is observed in the rate constant between pressures of 600 and 1300 Torr.

  1. Pressure measurements and an analytical model for laser-generated shock waves in solids at low irradiance

    CERN Document Server

    Romain, J P; Dayma, G; Boustie, M; Resseguier, T D; Combis, P

    2002-01-01

    Low amplitude shock waves (from 1 to 300 bar) have been generated in gold layers deposited on a quartz substrate, by laser pulses at an incident fluence from 0.4 to 4.0 J cm sup - sup 2. The quartz was used as a pressure gauge for recording the induced shock profile. At a fluence <1.4 J cm sup - sup 2 , the shock pressure does not exceed 10 bar and the shock front is followed by a tension peak typical of an absorption in solid state. An analytical model of the compression-tension process has been developed, accounting for shock pressure and shock profile evolution as a function of irradiation conditions and material properties. From this model a mechanical interpretation is given to previous observations of spalling of the irradiated target surface.

  2. Vital Signs - High Blood Pressure

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-02

    In the U.S., nearly one third of the adult population have high blood pressure, the leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke - two of the nation's leading causes of death.  Created: 10/2/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/17/2012.

  3. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any other location. Health care providers diagnose this type of high blood pressure by reviewing readings in the office and readings taken anywhere else. Researchers believe stress, which can occur during the medical appointment, causes white coat hypertension. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: ...

  4. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Explore High Blood Pressure What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis DASH Eating Plan Overweight and Obesity Smoking and Your Heart Stroke Send a link ...

  5. Superconductivity of Cu/CuOx interface formed by shock-wave pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhray, D. V.; Avdonin, V. V.; Palnichenko, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    A mixture of powdered Cu and CuO has been subjected to shock-wave pressure of 350 kbar with following quenching of the vacuum-encapsulated product to 77 K. The ac magnetic susceptibility measurements of the samples have revealed metastable superconductivity with Tc ≈ 19 K, characterized by glassy dynamics of the shielding currents below Tc . Comparison of the ac susceptibility and the DC magnetization measurements infers that the superconductivity arises within the granular interfacial layer formed between metallic Cu and its oxides due to the shock-wave treatment.

  6. Scaling laws of impact induced shock pressure and particle velocity in planetary mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteux, J.; Arkani-Hamed, J.

    2016-01-01

    While major impacting bodies during accretion of a Mars type planet have very low velocities (propagation and, hence, the derived scaling laws are poorly known for these low velocity impacts. Here, we use iSALE-2D hydrocode simulations to calculate shock pressure and particle velocity in a Mars type body for impact velocities ranging from 4 to 10 km/s. Large impactors of 100-400 km in diameter, comparable to those impacted on Mars and created giant impact basins, are examined. To better represent the power law distribution of shock pressure and particle velocity as functions of distance from the impact site at the surface, we propose three distinct regions in the mantle: a near field regime, which extends to 1-3 times the projectile radius into the target, where the peak shock pressure and particle velocity decay very slowly with increasing distance, a mid field region, which extends to ∼4.5 times the impactor radius, where the pressure and particle velocity decay exponentially but moderately, and a more distant far field region where the pressure and particle velocity decay strongly with distance. These scaling laws are useful to determine impact heating of a growing proto-planet by numerous accreting bodies.

  7. The dynamic properties of shock-waves formed during laser ablation at sub-atmospheric pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitan, D.; Coutts, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    The Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann (STN) theory has been shown to accurately describe the dynamic properties of shock-waves generated during pulsed-laser ablation of solid aluminium targets at visible wavelengths (510/578 nm) with 40 ns pulses with energies up to 3.5 mJ. A ballistic pendulum is used to measure the integrated recoil pressure in various inert atmospheres (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, CO2, SF6) with pressures of 10-2 - 103 mbar. This recoil momentum is found to scale linearly with the background gas pressure P1 and with the square root of the molecular weight M1. More interestingly, the scaling with the ratio of heat capacities γ is verified to be a monotonically increasing function dependent on the form factor of the shock-wave. The validity of a modified STN theory which accounts for the piston mass is assessed.

  8. The effect of hydrostatic vs. shock pressure treatment on plant seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustey, Adrian; Leighs, James; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Wood, David; Hazael, Rachael; McMillan, Paul; Hazell, Paul

    2013-06-01

    The hydrostatic pressure and shock response of plant seeds have both been previously investigated (primarily driven by an interest in reducing bacterial contamination of crops and the theory of panspermia respectively). However, comparisons have not previously been made between these two methods of applying pressure to plant seeds. Here such a comparison has been undertaken based on the premise that any correlations in such data may provide a route to inform understanding of damage mechanisms in the seeds under test. In this work two varieties of plant seeds were subjected to hydrostatic pressure via a non-end-loaded piston cylinder set-up and shock compression via employment of a 50-mm bore, single stage gas gun using the flyer-plate technique. Results from germination tests of recovered seed samples have been compared and contrasted, and initial conclusions made regarding causes of trends in the resultant data-set.

  9. Antiknock Performance of Interlayered High-Damping-Rubber Blast Door under Thermobaric Shock Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiudi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The long duration and high impulse shock wave of thermobaric bomb threatens the security of underground structures. To obtain high resistance blast door against thermobaric shock wave, firstly, the dynamic mechanic property of high damping rubber was studied by split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB equipment and the stress-strain relationship of high damping rubber under average strain rate of 5200/s was obtained. Secondly, the numerical model of interlayered high-damping-rubber blast door was established with ANSYS/LS-DYNA code based on test results, and the antiknock performance of interlayered high-damping-rubber blast door under thermobaric shock wave was analyzed by contrast with ordinary blast door. The results showed that the midspan displacement of the blast door decreased firstly and then increased with the increase of thickness of the high-damping-rubber interlayer, and the optimal thickness of the high-damping-rubber interlayer for energy consuming was 150 mm in the calculation condition of this paper. With the increase of the distance between the interlayer and the front surface of the door, the midspan displacement of the blast door decreased continually. The midspan maximum displacement of interlayered high-damping-rubber blast door decreased 74.5% in comparison to ordinary blast door. It showed that the high-damping-rubber structure can effectively improve the antiknock performance of blast door under thermobaric shock wave.

  10. High Pressure Treatment in Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Edwin Fabian Torres; Martínez, Gerardo González; Ceberio, Bernadette F Klotz; Rodrigo, Dolores; López, Antonio Martínez

    2014-08-19

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP), a non-thermal technology, which typically uses water as a pressure transfer medium, is characterized by a minimal impact on food characteristics (sensory, nutritional, and functional). Today, this technology, present in many food companies, can effectively inactivate bacterial cells and many enzymes. All this makes HHP very attractive, with very good acceptance by consumers, who value the organoleptic characteristics of products processed by this non-thermal food preservation technology because they associate these products with fresh-like. On the other hand, this technology reduces the need for non-natural synthetic additives of low consumer acceptance.

  11. High Pressure Treatment in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Fabian Torres Bello

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High hydrostatic pressure (HHP, a non-thermal technology, which typically uses water as a pressure transfer medium, is characterized by a minimal impact on food characteristics (sensory, nutritional, and functional. Today, this technology, present in many food companies, can effectively inactivate bacterial cells and many enzymes. All this makes HHP very attractive, with very good acceptance by consumers, who value the organoleptic characteristics of products processed by this non-thermal food preservation technology because they associate these products with fresh-like. On the other hand, this technology reduces the need for non-natural synthetic additives of low consumer acceptance.

  12. High pressure rinsing system comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Sertore; M. Fusetti; P. Michelato; Carlo Pagani; Toshiyasu Higo; Jin-Seok Hong; K. Saito; G. Ciovati; T. Rothgeb

    2007-06-01

    High pressure rinsing (HPR) is a key process for the surface preparation of high field superconducting cavities. A portable apparatus for the water jet characterization, based on the transferred momentum between the water jet and a load cell, has been used in different laboratories. This apparatus allows to collected quantitative parameters that characterize the HPR water jet. In this paper, we present a quantitative comparison of the different water jet produced by various nozzles routinely used in different laboratories for the HPR process

  13. Reynolds stress turbulence model applied to two-phase pressurized thermal shocks in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mérigoux, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.merigoux@edf.fr; Laviéville, Jérôme; Mimouni, Stéphane; Guingo, Mathieu; Baudry, Cyril

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • NEPTUNE-CFD is used to model two-phase PTS. • k-ε model did produce some satisfactory results but also highlights some weaknesses. • A more advanced turbulence model has been developed, validated and applied for PTS. • Coupled with LIM, the first results confirmed the increased accuracy of the approach. - Abstract: Nuclear power plants are subjected to a variety of ageing mechanisms and, at the same time, exposed to potential pressurized thermal shock (PTS) – characterized by a rapid cooling of the internal Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) surface. In this context, NEPTUNE-CFD is used to model two-phase PTS and give an assessment on the structural integrity of the RPV. The first available choice was to use standard first order turbulence model (k-ε) to model high-Reynolds number flows encountered in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary circuits. In a first attempt, the use of k-ε model did produce some satisfactory results in terms of condensation rate and temperature field distribution on integral experiments, but also highlights some weaknesses in the way to model highly anisotropic turbulence. One way to improve the turbulence prediction – and consequently the temperature field distribution – is to opt for more advanced Reynolds Stress turbulence Model. After various verification and validation steps on separated effects cases – co-current air/steam-water stratified flows in rectangular channels, water jet impingements on water pool free surfaces – this Reynolds Stress turbulence Model (R{sub ij}-ε SSG) has been applied for the first time to thermal free surface flows under industrial conditions on COSI and TOPFLOW-PTS experiments. Coupled with the Large Interface Model, the first results confirmed the adequacy and increased accuracy of the approach in an industrial context.

  14. Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock can be caused by any condition that reduces blood flow, including: Heart problems (such as heart attack or heart failure ) Low blood volume (as with heavy bleeding or dehydration ) Changes in blood vessels (as with infection ...

  15. Dispersive nature of high mach number collisionless plasma shocks: Poynting flux of oblique whistler waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundkvist, David; Krasnoselskikh, V; Bale, S D; Schwartz, S J; Soucek, J; Mozer, F

    2012-01-13

    Whistler wave trains are observed in the foot region of high Mach number quasiperpendicular shocks. The waves are oblique with respect to the ambient magnetic field as well as the shock normal. The Poynting flux of the waves is directed upstream in the shock normal frame starting from the ramp of the shock. This suggests that the waves are an integral part of the shock structure with the dispersive shock as the source of the waves. These observations lead to the conclusion that the shock ramp structure of supercritical high Mach number shocks is formed as a balance of dispersion and nonlinearity.

  16. A Review of Large-Scale Fracture Experiments Relevant to Pressure Vessel Integrity Under Pressurized Thermal Shock Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C.E.

    2001-01-29

    Numerous large-scale fracture experiments have been performed over the past thirty years to advance fracture mechanics methodologies applicable to thick-wall pressure vessels. This report first identifies major factors important to nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) conditions. It then covers 20 key experiments that have contributed to identifying fracture behavior of RPVs and to validating applicable assessment methodologies. The experiments are categorized according to four types of specimens: (1) cylindrical specimens, (2) pressurized vessels, (3) large plate specimens, and (4) thick beam specimens. These experiments were performed in laboratories in six different countries. This report serves as a summary of those experiments, and provides a guide to references for detailed information.

  17. MacCormack's technique-based pressure reconstruction approach for PIV data in compressible flows with shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shun; Xu, Jinglei; Yu, Kaikai

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposes an improved approach for extraction of pressure fields from velocity data, such as obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV), especially for steady compressible flows with strong shocks. The principle of this approach is derived from Navier-Stokes equations, assuming adiabatic condition and neglecting viscosity of flow field boundaries measured by PIV. The computing method is based on MacCormack's technique in computational fluid dynamics. Thus, this approach is called the MacCormack method. Moreover, the MacCormack method is compared with several approaches proposed in previous literature, including the isentropic method, the spatial integration and the Poisson method. The effects of velocity error level and PIV spatial resolution on these approaches are also quantified by using artificial velocity data containing shock waves. The results demonstrate that the MacCormack method has higher reconstruction accuracy than other approaches, and its advantages become more remarkable with shock strengthening. Furthermore, the performance of the MacCormack method is also validated by using synthetic PIV images with an oblique shock wave, confirming the feasibility and advantage of this approach in real PIV experiments. This work is highly significant for the studies on aerospace engineering, especially the outer flow fields of supersonic aircraft and the internal flow fields of ramjets.

  18. Suppression of first cleavage in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) by heat shock or hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.L.; Armstrong, J.B.

    1981-12-01

    Androgenetic diploid axolotls were produced by ultraviolet inactivation of the egg pronucleus shortly after fertilization, followed by suppression of the first cleavage division by hydrostatic pressure or heat shock. After treatment at 14,000 psi for 8 minutes, diploidy was restored in 74% of the embryos, but only 0.8% survived to hatching. A 36-37 degrees C heat shock of 10-minutes duration, applied 5.5 hours after the eggs were collected, yielded a slightly lower percentage of diploids. However, the proportion surviving to hatching was significantly greater (up to 4.6%). A second generation of androgenetic diploids was produced from one of the oldest of the first generation males with a similar degree of success. The lack of significant improvement suggests that the low survival is due to the heat shock per se and not to the uncovering of recessive lethal genes carried by the parent.

  19. High Blood Pressure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z High Blood Pressure Hypertension Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... Pressure Targets are Different for Very Old Adults High blood pressure (also called hypertension) increases your chance of having ...

  20. Cluster observations of sudden impulses in the magnetotail caused by interplanetary shocks and pressure increases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. J. Huttunen

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Sudden impulses (SI in the tail lobe magnetic field associated with solar wind pressure enhancements are investigated using measurements from Cluster. The magnetic field components during the SIs change in a manner consistent with the assumption that an antisunward moving lateral pressure enhancement compresses the magnetotail axisymmetrically. We found that the maximum variance SI unit vectors were nearly aligned with the associated interplanetary shock normals. For two of the tail lobe SI events during which Cluster was located close to the tail boundary, Cluster observed the inward moving magnetopause. During both events, the spacecraft location changed from the lobe to the magnetospheric boundary layer. During the event on 6 November 2001 the magnetopause was compressed past Cluster. We applied the 2-D Cartesian model developed by collier98 in which a vacuum uniform tail lobe magnetic field is compressed by a step-like pressure increase. The model underestimates the compression of the magnetic field, but it fits the magnetic field maximum variance component well. For events for which we could determine the shock normal orientation, the differences between the observed and calculated shock propagation times from the location of WIND/Geotail to the location of Cluster were small. The propagation speeds of the SIs between the Cluster spacecraft were comparable to the solar wind speed. Our results suggest that the observed tail lobe SIs are due to lateral increases in solar wind dynamic pressure outside the magnetotail boundary.

  1. High pressure processing of meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Alberto; Christensen, Mette; Ertbjerg, Per

    in the myofibrillar protein pattern and HP-induced change in activity of cathepsin B and L were investigated. Results: In this study we showed that HP treatment of pork meat emulsion, ranging from 0.1 to 800 MPa, induced protein gel formation as shown by the increased Young’s modulus (Fig.1). Analysis of SDS...... the rheological properties of pork meat batters by inducing formation of protein gels. HP induced protein gels are suggested to be formed by high molecular weight myofibrillar protein aggregates and by peptides formed by lysosomal enzyme-induced cleavage of myofibrillar proteins. Perspectives: The data presented......Abstract Background: The research of high pressure (HP) processing of meat based foods needs to address how pressure affects protein interactions, aggregation and/or gelation. The understanding of the gel forming properties of myofibrillar components is fundamental for the development of muscle...

  2. High pressure effects on fruits and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, R.A.H.; Matser, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter provides an overview on different high pressure based treatments (high pressure pasteurization, blanching, pressure-assisted thermal processing, pressure-shift freezing and thawing) available for the preservation of fruits and vegetable products and extending their shelf life. Pressure t

  3. High pressure effects on fruits and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, R.A.H.; Matser, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter provides an overview on different high pressure based treatments (high pressure pasteurization, blanching, pressure-assisted thermal processing, pressure-shift freezing and thawing) available for the preservation of fruits and vegetable products and extending their shelf life. Pressure

  4. High Pressure Sensing and Dynamics Using High Speed Fiber Bragg Grating Interrogation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, G. [LANL; Sandberg, R. L. [LANL; Lalone, B. M. [NSTec; Marshall, B. R. [NSTec; Grover, M. [NSTec; Stevens, G. D. [NSTec; Udd, E. [Columbia Gorge Research

    2014-06-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are developing into useful sensing tools for measuring high pressure dynamics in extreme environments under shock loading conditions. Approaches using traditional diode array coupled FBG interrogation systems are often limited to readout speeds in the sub-MHz range. For shock wave physics, required detection speeds approaching 100 MHz are desired. We explore the use of two types of FBG sensing systems that are aimed at applying this technology as embedded high pressure probes for transient shock events. Both approaches measure time resolved spectral shifts in the return light from short (few mm long) uniform FBGs at 1550 nm. In the first approach, we use a fiber coupled spectrometer to demultiplex spectral channels into an array (up to 12) of single element InGaAs photoreceivers. By monitoring the detectors during a shock impact event with high speed recording, we are able to track the pressure induced spectral shifting in FBG down to a time resolution of 20 ns. In the second approach, developed at the Special Technologies Lab, a coherent mode-locked fiber laser is used to illuminate the FBG sensor. After the sensor, wavelength-to-time mapping is accomplished with a chromatic dispersive element, and entire spectra are sampled using a single detector at the modelocked laser repetition rate of 50 MHz. By sampling with a 12 GHz InGaAs detector, direct wavelength mapping in time is recorded, and the pressure induced FBG spectral shift is sampled at 50 MHz. Here, the sensing systems are used to monitor the spectral shifts of FBGs that are immersed into liquid water and shock compressed using explosives. In this configuration, the gratings survive to pressures approaching 50 kbar. We describe both approaches and present the measured spectral shifts from the shock experiments.

  5. Effects of the aluminum content on the shock wave pressure and the acceleration ability of RDX-based aluminized explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z. Q.; Nie, J. X.; Ou, Z. C.; Qin, J. F.; Jiao, Q. J.

    2014-10-01

    To better understand the influence of the aluminum content on the performance of aluminized explosives, experiments in concrete and cylinder tests were performed. Three types of RDX-based aluminized explosives, in which the mass ratio of aluminum content was 0%, 15%, and 30% were considered in this paper. The shock wave pressures of the aluminized explosives in the affected concrete bodies were measured using manganin pressure sensors. The acceleration ability was obtained using a high-speed camera and a rotating mirror streak camera. The peak pressure attenuation characteristics of the explosives with various aluminum contents indicated that a higher aluminum content is associated with a slower peak pressure attenuation of the shock wave. In addition, the results of the cylinder tests and the metal-rod acceleration tests revealed the influence of the aluminum content on the acceleration ability of explosives in three different time periods. The test data presented in this paper verified the relationship between the aluminum content and explosive performance, which is of great significance for optimizing the properties of aluminized explosives.

  6. Questions and Answers about High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... checked out by a doctor. Am I at risk for high blood pressure? Anyone can develop high blood pressure. But there are several factors that increase your risk: Being overweight or obese Not ... if I have high blood pressure? High blood pressure is often called "the silent ...

  7. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) KidsHealth > For Parents > High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) A ... posture, and medications. continue Long-Term Effects of High Blood Pressure When someone has high blood pressure, the heart ...

  8. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) KidsHealth > For Parents > High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) ... posture, and medications. continue Long-Term Effects of High Blood Pressure When someone has high blood pressure, the heart ...

  9. High Pressure Particulate Physics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-26

    material will introduce a release wave or re-shock wave in the material. Re-shock/release wave experiments are necessary tools/ techniques to probe...interaction to occur with minimal impact misalignment (17). Techniques have been developed to ensure that the target mount is precisely normal to the...obtained by copper wire. In the future x-ray cinematography , line VISAR and time indexed spectroscopy are planned. SECTION III SUMMARY We are

  10. Interactions of Delta Shock Waves for Zero-Pressure Gas Dynamics with Energy Conservation Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the interactions of delta shock waves and vacuum states for the system of conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy in zero-pressure gas dynamics. The Riemann problems with initial data of three piecewise constant states are solved case by case, and four different configurations of Riemann solutions are constructed. Furthermore, the numerical simulations completely coinciding with theoretical analysis are shown.

  11. Shock-induced chemical reactions in titanium-silicon powder mixtures of different morphologies: Time-resolved pressure measurements and materials analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadhani, N. N.; Graham, R. A.; Royal, T.; Dunbar, E.; Anderson, M. U.; Holman, G. T.

    1997-08-01

    The response of porous titanium (Ti) and silicon (Si) powder mixtures with small, medium, and coarse particle morphologies is studied under high-pressure shock loading, employing postshock materials analysis as well as nanosecond, time-resolved pressure measurements. The objective of the work was to provide an experimental basis for development of models describing shock-induced solid-state chemistry. The time-resolved measurements of stress pulses obtained with piezoelectric polymer (poly-vinyl-di-flouride) pressure gauges provided extraordinary sensitivity for determination of rate-dependent shock processes. Both techniques showed clear evidence for shock-induced chemical reactions in medium-morphology powders, while fine and coarse powders showed no evidence for reaction. It was observed that the medium-morphology mixtures experience simultaneous plastic deformation of both Ti and Si particles. Fine morphology powders show particle agglomeration, while coarse Si powders undergo extensive fracture and entrapment within the plastically deformed Ti; such processes decrease the propensity for initiation of shock-induced reactions. The change of deformation mode between fracture and plastic deformation in Si powders of different morphologies is a particularly critical observation. Such a behavior reveals the overriding influence of the shock-induced, viscoplastic deformation and fracture response, which controls the mechanochemical nature of shock-induced solid-state chemistry. The present work in conjunction with our prior studies, demonstrates that the initiation of chemical reactions in shock compression of powders is controlled by solid-state mechanochemical processes, and cannot be qualitatively or quantitatively described by thermochemical models.

  12. Heart period and blood pressure characteristics in splanchnic arterial occlusion shock-induced collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletti, Federico; Gambarotta, Nicolò; Penn, Alexander H; Ferrario, Manuela; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2017-02-01

    The nature of hemodynamic instability typical of circulatory shock is not well understood, but an improved interpretation of its dynamic features could help in the management of critically ill patients. The objective of this work was to introduce new metrics for the analysis of arterial blood pressure (ABP) in order to characterize the risk of catastrophic outcome in splanchnic arterial occlusion (SAO) shock. Continuous ABP (fs = 1 kHz) was measured in rats during experimental SAO shock, which induced a fatal pressure drop (FPD) in ABP. The FPD could either be slow (SFPD) or fast (FFPD), with the latter causing cardiovascular collapse. Time series of mean arterial pressure, systolic blood pressure and heart period were derived from ABP. The sample asymmetry-based algorithm Heart Rate Characteristics was adapted to compute the Heart Period Characteristics (HPC) and the Blood Pressure Characteristics (BPC). Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was assessed by means of a bivariate model. The approach to FPD of the animals who collapsed (FFPD) was characterized by higher BRS in the low frequency band versus SFPD animals (0.36 ± 0.15 vs. 0.19 ± 0.12 ms/mmHg, p value = 0.0196), bradycardia as indicated by the HPC (0.76 ± 0.57 vs. 1.94 ± 1.27, p value = 0.0179) and higher but unstable blood pressure as indicated by BPC (3.02 ± 2.87 vs. 1.47 ± 1.29, p value = 0.0773). The HPC and BPC indices demonstrated promise as potential clinical markers of hemodynamic instability and impending cardiovascular collapse, and this animal study suggests their test in data from intensive care patients.

  13. Electrostatic Instabilities at High Frequency in a Plasma Shock Front

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV Jian-Hong; HE Yong; HU Xi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    New electrostatic instabilities in the plasma shock front are reported.These instabilities are driven by the electrostatic field which is caused by charge separation and the parameter gradients in a plasma shock front.The linear analysis to the high frequency branch of electrostatic instabilities has been carried out and the dispersion relations are obtained numerically.There are unstable disturbing waves in both the parallel and perpendicular directions of shock propagation.The real frequencies of both unstable waves are similar to the electron electrostatic wave,and the unstable growth rate in the parallel direction is much greater than the one in the perpendicular direction.The dependence of growth rates on the electric field and parameter gradients is also presented.

  14. Heat shock response and mammal adaptation to high elevation (hypoxia)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaolin; XU Cunshuan; WANG Xiujie; WANG Dongjie; WANG Qingshang; ZHANG Baochen

    2006-01-01

    The mammal's high elevation (hypoxia) adaptation was studied by using the immunological and the molecular biological methods to understand the significance of Hsp (hypoxia) adaptation in the organic high elevation, through the mammal heat shock response. (1) From high elevation to low elevation (natural hypoxia): Western blot and conventional RT-PCR and real-time fluorescence quota PCR were adopted. Expression difference of heat shock protein of 70 (Hsp70) and natural expression of brain tissue of Hsp70 gene was determined in the cardiac muscle tissue among the different elevation mammals (yak). (2)From low elevation to high elevation (hypoxia induction):The mammals (domestic rabbits) from the low elevation were sent directly to the areas with different high elevations like 2300, 3300 and 5000 m above sea level to be raised for a period of 3 weeks before being slaughtered and the genetic inductive expression of the brain tissue of Hsp70 was determined with RT-PCR. The result indicated that all of the mammals at different elevations possessed their heat shock response gene. Hsp70 of the high elevation mammal rose abruptly under stress and might be induced to come into being by high elevation (hypoxia). The speedy synthesis of Hsp70 in the process of heat shock response is suitable to maintain the cells' normal physiological functions under stress. The Hsp70 has its threshold value. The altitude of 5000 m above sea level is the best condition for the heat shock response, and it starts to reduce when the altitude is over 6000 m above sea level. The Hsp70 production quantity and the cell hypoxia bearing capacity have their direct ratio.

  15. Controlled tissue emulsification produced by high intensity focused ultrasound shock waves and millisecond boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Canney, Michael S; Khokhlova, Vera A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2011-11-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications, tissue may be thermally necrosed by heating, emulsified by cavitation, or, as was recently discovered, emulsified using repetitive millisecond boiling caused by shock wave heating. Here, this last approach was further investigated. Experiments were performed in transparent gels and ex vivo bovine heart tissue using 1, 2, and 3 MHz focused transducers and different pulsing schemes in which the pressure, duty factor, and pulse duration were varied. A previously developed derating procedure to determine in situ shock amplitudes and the time-to-boil was refined. Treatments were monitored using B-mode ultrasound. Both inertial cavitation and boiling were observed during exposures, but emulsification occurred only when shocks and boiling were present. Emulsified lesions without thermal denaturation were produced with shock amplitudes sufficient to induce boiling in less than 20 ms, duty factors of less than 0.02, and pulse lengths shorter than 30 ms. Higher duty factors or longer pulses produced varying degrees of thermal denaturation combined with mechanical emulsification. Larger lesions were obtained using lower ultrasound frequencies. The results show that shock wave heating and millisecond boiling is an effective and reliable way to emulsify tissue while monitoring the treatment with ultrasound.

  16. Robinson 2 reactor vessel: pressurized thermal shock analysis for a small-break LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marston, T.; Griesbach, T.; Chao, J.; Chexal, B.; Norris, D.; Nickell, B.; Layman, B.

    1984-08-01

    A best-estimate Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) analysis was performed for a three-inch diameter hot-leg small-break loss-of-coolant accident for the Robinson 2 plant. This plant specific analysis was performed using EPRI's linked set of codes for PTS analysis. The analysis shows that with the H.B. Robinson 2 reactor pressure vessel, a hot-leg small-break loss-of-coolant accident does not pose a significant health or safety concern to the public for at least 40 years of operation.

  17. High pressure generation by hot electrons driven ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriz, A. R. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, CYTEMA, and Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Piriz, S. A. [Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tahir, N. A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    A previous model [Piriz et al. Phys. Plasmas 19, 122705 (2012)] for the ablation driven by the hot electrons generated in collisionless laser-plasma interactions in the framework of shock ignition is revisited. The impact of recent results indicating that for a laser wavelength λ = 0.35 μm the hot electron temperature θ{sub H} would be independent of the laser intensity I, on the resulting ablation pressure is considered. In comparison with the case when the scaling law θ{sub H}∼(Iλ{sup 2}){sup 1/3} is assumed, the generation of the high pressures needed for driving the ignitor shock may be more demanding. Intensities above 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} would be required for θ{sub H}=25−30 keV.

  18. Investigation on the Determination of Initial Shock Pressure at Near Interface Field of TNT Charge and Water for Underwater Explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Cheng; ZHANG Xiang-rong; HUANG Feng-lei; SHI Jing-zhu; ZHANG Yu-xia

    2007-01-01

    There are few report on the directly measurement of the initial shock pressure of explosive charge at its interface of water for underwater explosion.The special technologies have been taken to the measurement system with manganin piezoresistive gauge (PRG) in order to measure the initial shock pressure at the interface and its near field of TNT chare and water.The free-holding PRG film gauge can directly determine the shock peak pressure at the interface and near field of TNT charge up to 12.85GPa, which is satisfying for the good agreement to the 12.97GPa with one dimensional theoretical analysis and 12.86GPa with numerical simulation.The maximum discrepancy is 0.93%.The results show that it is precise and reliable to determine the initial shock pressure of underwater explosion charge with the PRG technology.

  19. Pressure Drop in Cyclone Separator at High Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    For the design of pressurized circulating fluidized beds, experiments were conducted in a small cyclone with 120 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height at high pressures and at atmospheric temperatures. Influence of air leakage from the stand pipe into the cyclone was specially focused. A semi-empirical model was developed for the predic tion of the pressure drop of the cyclone separator at different operate pressures with the effect of air leakage and inlet solid loading. The operate pressure, air leakage and inlet solid loading act as significant roles in cyclone pressure drop. The pressure drop increases with the increasing of pressure and decreases with the increasing of the flow rate of air leakage from the standpipe and with the increasing of the inlet solid loading.

  20. The effect of hydrostatic vs. shock pressure treatment of plant seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustey, A.; Leighs, J. A.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Hazael, R.; McMillan, P. F.; Hazell, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    The hydrostatic pressure and shock response of plant seeds has been investigated antecedently, primarily driven by interest in reducing bacterial contamination of crops and the theory of panspermia, respectively. However, comparisons have not previously been made between these two methods ofapplying pressure to plant seeds. Here such a comparison has been undertaken based on the premise that any correlations in collected data may provide a route to inform understanding of damage mechanisms in the seeds under test. In this work two varieties of plant seeds were subjected to hydrostatic pressure via a non-end-loaded piston cylinder setup and shock compression via employment of a 50 mm bore, single stage gas gun using the flyer plate technique. Results from germination tests of recovered seed samples have been compared and contrasted, and initial conclusions made regarding causes of trends in the resultant data-set. Data collected has shown that cress seeds are extremely resilient to static loading, whereas the difference in the two forms of loading is negligible for lettuce seeds. Germination time has been seen to extend dramatically following static loading of cress seeds to greater than 0.4 GPa. In addition, the cut-off pressure previously seen to cause 0% germination in dynamic experiments performed on cress seeds has now also been seen in lettuce seeds.

  1. Exact and numerical elastodynamic solutions for thick-walled functionally graded cylinders subjected to pressure shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shariyat, M., E-mail: m_shariyat@yahoo.co [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Pardis Street, Molla-Sadra Avenue, Vanak Square, P.O. Box: 19395-1999, Tehran 19991 43344 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikkhah, M.; Kazemi, R. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Pardis Street, Molla-Sadra Avenue, Vanak Square, P.O. Box: 19395-1999, Tehran 19991 43344 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    In the present paper, analytical and numerical elastodynamic solutions are developed for long thick-walled functionally graded cylinders subjected to arbitrary dynamic and shock pressures. Both transient dynamic response and elastic wave propagation characteristics are studied in these non-homogeneous structures. Variations of the material properties across the thickness are described according to both polynomial and power law functions. A numerically consistent transfinite element formulation is presented for both functions whereas the exact solution is presented for the power law function. The FGM cylinder is not divided into isotropic sub-cylinders. An approach associated with dividing the dynamic radial displacement expression into quasi-static and dynamic parts and expansion of the transient wave functions in terms of a series of the eigenfunctions is employed to propose the exact solution. Results are obtained for various exponents of the functions of the material properties distributions, various radius ratios, and various dynamic and shock loads.

  2. Manually operated piston-driven shock tube

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, KPJ; Sharath, N

    2013-01-01

    A simple hand-operated shock tube capable of producing Mach 2 shock waves is described. Performance of this miniature shock tube using compressed high pressure air created by a manually operated piston in the driver section of the shock tube as driver gas with air at 1 atm pressure as the test gas in the driven tube is presented. The performance of the shock tube is found to match well with the theoretically estimated values using normal shock relations. Applications of this shock tube named ...

  3. High-pressure microhydraulic actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, Bruce P [San Francisco, CA; Crocker, Robert W [Fremont, CA; Patel, Kamlesh D [Dublin, CA

    2008-06-10

    Electrokinetic ("EK") pumps convert electric to mechanical work when an electric field exerts a body force on ions in the Debye layer of a fluid in a packed bed, which then viscously drags the fluid. Porous silica and polymer monoliths (2.5-mm O.D., and 6-mm to 10-mm length) having a narrow pore size distribution have been developed that are capable of large pressure gradients (250-500 psi/mm) when large electric fields (1000-1500 V/cm) are applied. Flowrates up to 200 .mu.L/min and delivery pressures up to 1200 psi have been demonstrated. Forces up to 5 lb-force at 0.5 mm/s (12 mW) have been demonstrated with a battery-powered DC-DC converter. Hydraulic power of 17 mW (900 psi@ 180 uL/min) has been demonstrated with wall-powered high voltage supplies. The force and stroke delivered by an actuator utilizing an EK pump are shown to exceed the output of solenoids, stepper motors, and DC motors of similar size, despite the low thermodynamic efficiency.

  4. Application backwards characteristics analysis method to dynamic response of metals under high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Hao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic yield strength of metals/alloys depends on loading pressure and rates sensitively. With the development of laser interferometer measurement system, extracting strength information from window/free surface velocity profiles in shock and ramp loading experiments is becoming an important method to investigate materials’ dynamic response under high pressure and high strain rates. Backwards characteristics analysis method (BCAM can analyze the velocity profiles more reasonable because it accounts for bending of the incoming characteristics due to impedance mismatch between the sample and window. Synthetic analyses of reverse impact experiment and graded-density impactor loading-releasing experiment suggest that BCAM can give more accurate results including sound speed-particle velocity and yield strength at high pressure than incremental impedance matching method. We use BCAM to analyze velocity profiles of Sn in shock-release experiments and obtain its shear modulus and yield strength at different shock pressure and investigate its phase transition and dynamic unloading response.

  5. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood pressure test is easy and painless and can be done in a health care provider’s office ... severity of your blood pressure, he or she can order additional tests to determine if your blood ...

  6. Managing Stress to Control High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aneurysm More Managing Stress to Control High Blood Pressure Updated:Jan 10,2017 The importance of stress ... content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  7. Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure Infographic Updated:Oct 31,2016 View a downloadable version of this infographic High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  8. High Blood Pressure: Keep the Beat Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Keep the Beat Recipes Past Issues / Fall 2011 ... 65 million American adults—one in three—with high blood pressure, you have probably heard the advice, "watch your ...

  9. High blood pressure and eye disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000999.htm High blood pressure and eye disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina . The ...

  10. Polyploidy induction by hydrostatic pressure shock and embryo development of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Jun; CHANG Yaqing; WANG Zichen; SONG Jian

    2007-01-01

    The manipulation of the chromosome set for commercially valuable marine animals is important for enhancing aquacultural production. In this study, triploid and tetraploid sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus were induced by hydrostatic pressure shock, and the conditions of appropriate induction were tested with different starting times, and hydrostatic pressure intensities and durations. The highest rate of triploid induction reached 20% and that of tetraploid was 60%. In consideration of the survival rate and hatch rate, the appropriate treatment for triploid was 55 Mpa of hydrostatic pressure for 5 min at 55 min after fertilization (a.f.), while for tetraploid it was 60 Mpa for 5 min at 61 min a.f. The triploid of the sea cucumber could survive through the pelagic larval stage and attachment stage, and develop like the control group of the experiment. The tetraploid, however, could not survive the attachment stage.

  11. [Value of dynamic arterial elastance in the predication of arterial pressure response to volume loading in shock patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Mao-lei; Liu, Da-wei; Wang, Xiao-ting; Chen, Xiu-kai

    2013-05-07

    To explore the value of dynamic arterial elastance (Eadyn) in the predication of arterial pressure response to volume loading in shock patients. A total of 32 patients with pulse indicator continuous cardiac output (PICCO) monitoring at our intensive care unit from January 2011 to December 2012 were retrospectively studied. The decision of fluid replacement was based upon the presence of shock (mean arterial pressure (MAP) ≤ 65 mm Hg, systolic arterial pressure arterial pressure response to volume loading. Significantly different between MAP responders and MAP nonresponders, baseline Eadyn was an effective predictor of MAP increase after volume loading. The area under the ROC curve was 0.95 for the prediction of volume loading on MAP for Eadyn at baseline (P 0.85 predicted a MAP increase after volume administration with a sensitivity of 89.5% and a specificity of 92.3%. Baseline Eadyn may predict accurately arterial pressure response in MAP to volume loading in shock patients.

  12. High dose insulin in toxic cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holger, Joel S; Engebretsen, Kristin M; Marini, John J

    2009-04-01

    To report the successful use of high dose insulin (HDI) in previously unreported insulin dosing ranges in a patient with severe myocardial toxicity due to an amitriptyline and citalopram overdose. A 65-year-old female presented in respiratory arrest, which was followed by bradycardic pulseless electrical activity after ingesting multiple medications. After a prolonged resuscitation, the patient was maintained only on infusions of norepinephrine (40 mcg/min), vasopressin (4 units/h), insulin (80 units/h), and sodium bicarbonate. Due to a deteriorating clinical condition and limited prognosis, the insulin infusion was titrated incrementally upwards to 600 units/h (6 units/kg/h) over a 5 h time period while simultaneously completely weaning off both vasopressors. She developed brisk pulses and warm extremities, and her cardiac output nearly tripled. After 2 days of stabilization the insulin was slowly tapered, and the patient recovered. HDI as a single cardiovascular agent significantly improved clinical and cardiovascular parameters after the failure of vasopressor therapy in severe cardiovascular toxicity. Higher doses of insulin than previously recommended may be needed in toxic poisonings when severe myocardial depression is present.

  13. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure Anyone can develop high blood pressure; however, age, ... Lifestyle Habits Unhealthy lifestyle habits can raise your risk for high blood pressure, and they include: Eating too much sodium or ...

  14. Novel method for estimating the dynamic characteristics of pressure sensor in shock tube calibration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhuoran; Yan, Hu

    2015-06-01

    A shock tube is usually used to excite the dynamic characteristics of the pressure sensor used in an aircraft. This paper proposes a novel estimation method for determining the dynamic characteristic parameters of the pressure sensor. A preprocessing operation based on Grey Model [GM(1,1)] and bootstrap method (BM) is employed to analyze the output of a calibrated pressure sensor under step excitation. Three sequences, which include the estimated value sequence, upper boundary, and lower boundary, are obtained. The processing methods on filtering and modeling are used to explore the three sequences independently. The optimal estimated, upper boundary, and lower boundary models are then established. The three models are solved, and a group of dynamic characteristic parameters corresponding to the estimated intervals are obtained. A shock tube calibration test consisting of two experiments is performed to validate the performance of the proposed method. The results show that the relative errors of the dynamic characteristic parameters of time and frequency domains do not exceed 9% and 10%, respectively. Moreover, the nominal and estimated values of the parameters fall into the estimated intervals limited by the upper and lower values.

  15. A time-resolved single-pass technique for measuring optical absorption coefficients of window materials under 100 GPa shock pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Xianming; Li, Jiabo

    2008-12-01

    An experimental method was developed to perform time-resolved, single-pass optical absorption measurements and to determine absorption coefficients of window materials under strong shock compression up to approximately 200 GPa. Experimental details are described of (i) a configuration to generate an in situ dynamic, bright, optical source and (ii) a sample assembly with a lithium fluoride plate to essentially eliminate heat transfer from the hot radiator into the specimen and to maintain a constant optical source within the duration of the experiment. Examples of measurements of optical absorption coefficients of several initially transparent single crystal materials at high shock pressures are presented.

  16. Thermal fluid mixing behavior during medium break LOCA in evaluation of pressurized thermal shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jae Won; Bang, Young Seok; Seul, Kwang Won; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Thermal fluid mixing behavior during a postulated medium-size hot leg break loss of coolant accident is analyzed for the international comparative assessment study on pressurized thermal shock (PTS-ICAS) proposed by OECD-NEA. The applicability of RELAP5 code to analyze the thermal fluid mixing behavior is evaluated through a simple modeling relevant to the problem constraints. Based on the calculation result, the onset of thermal stratification is investigated using Theofanous`s empirical correlation. Sensitivity calculations using a fine node model and crossflow model are also performed to evaluate the modeling capability on multi-dimensional characteristics related to thermal fluid mixing. 6 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  17. Dynamic arterial elastance predicts mean arterial pressure decrease associated with decreasing norepinephrine dosage in septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinot, Pierre-Grégoire; Bernard, Eugénie; Levrard, Mélanie; Dupont, Hervé; Lorne, Emmanuel

    2015-01-19

    Gradual reduction of the dosage of norepinephrine (NE) in patients with septic shock is usually left to the physician's discretion. No hemodynamic indicator predictive of the possibility of decreasing the NE dosage is currently available at the bedside. The respiratory pulse pressure variation/respiratory stroke volume variation (dynamic arterial elastance (Eadyn)) ratio has been proposed as an indicator of vascular tone. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Eadyn can be used to predict the decrease in arterial pressure when decreasing the NE dosage in resuscitated sepsis patients. A prospective study was carried out in a university hospital intensive care unit. All consecutive patients with septic shock monitored by PICCO2 for whom the intensive care physician planned to decrease the NE dosage were enrolled. Measurements of hemodynamic and PICCO2 variables were obtained before/after decreasing the NE dosage. Responders were defined by a >15% decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP). In total, 35 patients were included. MAP decreased by >15% after decreasing the NE dosage in 37% of patients (n = 13). Clinical characteristics appeared to be similar between responders and nonresponders. Eadyn was lower in responders than in nonresponders (0.75 (0.69 to 0.85) versus 1 (0. 83 to 1.22), P decrease in arterial pressure, with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of 0.87 (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.72 to 0.96; P decrease in arterial pressure in response to NE dose reduction. Eadyn may constitute an easy-to-use functional approach to arterial-tone assessment, which may be helpful to identify patients likely to benefit from NE dose reduction.

  18. Development of a shock noise prediction code for high-speed helicopters - The subsonically moving shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadghighi, H.; Holz, R.; Farassat, F.; Lee, Yung-Jang

    1991-01-01

    A previously defined airfoil subsonic shock-noise prediction formula whose result depends on a mapping of the time-dependent shock surface to a time-independent computational domain is presently coded and incorporated in the NASA-Langley rotor-noise prediction code, WOPWOP. The structure and algorithms used in the shock-noise prediction code are presented; special care has been taken to reduce computation time while maintaining accuracy. Numerical examples of shock-noise prediction are presented for hover and forward flight. It is confirmed that shock noise is an important component of the quadrupole source.

  19. A pressure-transferable coarse-grained potential for modeling the shock Hugoniot of polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vipin; Peralta, Pedro; Li, Yiyang; Oswald, Jay

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the thermomechanical response of semi-crystalline polyethylene under shock compression by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a new coarse-graining scheme inspired by the embedded atom method. The coarse-graining scheme combines the iterative Boltzmann inversion method and least squares optimization to parameterize interactions between coarse-grained sites, including a many-body potential energy designed to improve the representability of the model across a wide range of thermodynamic states. We demonstrate that a coarse-grained model of polyethylene, calibrated to match target structural and thermodynamic data generated from isothermal MD simulations at different pressures, can also accurately predict the shock Hugoniot response. Analysis of the rise in temperature along the shock Hugoniot and comparison with analytical predictions from the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state are performed to thoroughly explore the thermodynamic consistency of the model. As the coarse-graining model affords nearly two orders of magnitude reduction in simulation time compared to all-atom MD simulations, the proposed model can help identify how nanoscale structure in semi-crystalline polymers, such as polyethylene, influences mechanical behavior under extreme loading.

  20. High-volume hemofiltration reduces the expression of myocardial tumor necrosis factor-alpha in septic shock pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Ping; Cheng, Xiuju; Chen, Jianghua

    2013-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in myocardium correlates with the severity of cardiac dysfunction in septic shock. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of high-volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the expression of TNF-α in myocardium in septic shock pigs. Sixteen male Landrace pigs weighing 31 ± 5 kg were randomly assigned to control group (n = 4), septic shock group (n = 6), and HVHF group (septic shock + HVHF, n = 6). All animals were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. After baseline examinations, septic shock group and HVHF group underwent induction of peritonitis. One hour later, the animals in HVHF group received treatment with HVHF and the treatment was continued for 12 h. As the control of HVHF group, the animals in septic shock group received the same support but hemofiltration. Twelve hours after HVHF therapy, all the animals were sacrificed. TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO) levels in both circulation and myocardium were measured. Compared with those of septic shock animals, the levels of cardiac output, stroke volume, and mean arterial pressure were better maintained in HVHF group. The expression of TNF-α in myocardium in HVHF group was lower than that in septic shock group (44.17 ± 18.70 vs. 92.50 ± 33.89 pg/mg protein, P = 0.015). The difference of TNF-α in circulation between HVHF group and septic shock group was no significance at different time. However, circulating NO in HVHF group was lower than that in septic shock group. These results suggest that HVHF improves hemodynamics and heart dysfunction in septic shock pigs, which may be attributed to reduction of TNF-α in myocardium but not in circulation.

  1. High-Pressure Lightweight Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard; McKechnie, Timothy; Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Returning samples of Martian soil and rock to Earth is of great interest to scientists. There were numerous studies to evaluate Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission architectures, technology needs, development plans, and requirements. The largest propulsion risk element of the MSR mission is the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). Along with the baseline solid-propellant vehicle, liquid propellants have been considered. Similar requirements apply to other lander ascent engines and reaction control systems. The performance of current state-ofthe- art liquid propellant engines can be significantly improved by increasing both combustion temperature and pressure. Pump-fed propulsion is suggested for a single-stage bipropellant MAV. Achieving a 90-percent stage propellant fraction is thought to be possible on a 100-kg scale, including sufficient thrust for lifting off Mars. To increase the performance of storable bipropellant rocket engines, a high-pressure, lightweight combustion chamber was designed. Iridium liner electrodeposition was investigated on complex-shaped thrust chamber mandrels. Dense, uniform iridium liners were produced on chamber and cylindrical mandrels. Carbon/carbon composite (C/C) structures were braided over iridium-lined mandrels and densified by chemical vapor infiltration. Niobium deposition was evaluated for forming a metallic attachment flange on the carbon/ carbon structure. The new thrust chamber was designed to exceed state-of-the-art performance, and was manufactured with an 83-percent weight savings. High-performance C/Cs possess a unique set of properties that make them desirable materials for high-temperature structures used in rocket propulsion components, hypersonic vehicles, and aircraft brakes. In particular, more attention is focused on 3D braided C/Cs due to their mesh-work structure. Research on the properties of C/Cs has shown that the strength of composites is strongly affected by the fiber-matrix interfacial bonding, and that weakening

  2. Unified Application of Vapor Screen Flow Visualization and Pressure Sensitive Paint Measurement Techniques to Vortex- and Shock Wave-Dominated Flow Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization and pressure sensitive paint (PSP) techniques were applied in a unified approach to wind tunnel testing of slender wing and missile configurations dominated by vortex flows and shock waves at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds. The off-surface cross-flow patterns using the LVS technique were combined with global PSP surface static pressure mappings to characterize the leading-edge vortices and shock waves that coexist and interact at high angles of attack. The synthesis of LVS and PSP techniques was also effective in identifying the significant effects of passive surface porosity and the presence of vertical tail surfaces on the flow topologies. An overview is given of LVS and PSP applications in selected experiments on small-scale models of generic slender wing and missile configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) and 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (8-Foot TPT).

  3. Unified Application Vapor Screen Flow Visualization and Pressure Sensitive Paint Measurement Techniques to Vortex- and Shock Wave-Dominated Flow Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2008-01-01

    Laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization and pressure sensitive paint (PSP) techniques were applied in a unified approach to wind tunnel testing of slender wing and missile configurations dominated by vortex flows and shock waves at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds. The off-surface cross-flow patterns using the LVS technique were combined with global PSP surface static pressure mappings to characterize the leading-edge vortices and shock waves that coexist and interact at high angles of attack (alpha). The synthesis of LVS and PSP techniques was also effective in identifying the significant effects of passive surface porosity and the presence of vertical tail surfaces on the flow topologies. An overview is given of LVS and PSP applications in selected experiments on small-scale models of generic slender wing and missile configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) and 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (8-Foot TPT).

  4. Superconducting phase prepared from Ta{sub 3}Si under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murao, R; Kusaba, K; Fukuoka, K; Sugiyama, K; Syono, Y [IMR, Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Kikuchi, M [Kansei Fukushi Research Center, Tohoku Fukushi University1-8-1 Kunimi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 981-8522 (Japan); Atou, T [SMC, Materials and Structures Lab. Tokyo Tech. 4259 Nagatsuta-cho Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Kikegawa, T, E-mail: r_murao@imr.tohoku.ac.j [IMSS, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    High-pressure behaviour of Ta{sub 3}Si intermetallic compound was investigated by shock compression and static compression methods. Superconducting phase with T{sub C} = 9.3 K was found in the sample shocked to 50-61 GPa, however most of the shock recovered sample indicated the starting stable phase with the Ti{sub 3}P-type structure. The new superconducting phase was not obtained from static compression up to 15 GPa and 800 {sup 0}C. Bulk modulus of Ta{sub 3}Si with the Ti{sub 3}P-type structure was determined to be K{sub 0} = 246(4) GPa. The present results suggest that a rapid phase transformation occurred during shock compression, but most of the high-pressure phase was reverted to the stable phase in the decompression process.

  5. Pressure dependence and branching ratios in the decomposition of 1-pentyl radicals: shock tube experiments and master equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Iftikhar A; Burgess, Donald R; Manion, Jeffrey A

    2012-03-22

    The decomposition and intramolecular H-transfer isomerization reactions of the 1-pentyl radical have been studied at temperatures of 880 to 1055 K and pressures of 80 to 680 kPa using the single pulse shock tube technique and additionally investigated with quantum chemical methods. The 1-pentyl radical was generated by shock heating dilute mixtures of 1-iodopentane and the stable products of its decomposition have been observed by postshock gas chromatographic analysis. Ethene and propene are the main olefin products and account for >97% of the carbon balance from 1-pentyl. Also produced are very small amounts of (E)-2-pentene, (Z)-2-pentene, and 1-butene. The ethene/propene product ratio is pressure dependent and varies from about 3 to 5 over the range of temperatures and pressures studied. Formation of ethene and propene can be related to the concentrations of 1-pentyl and 2-pentyl radicals in the system and the relative rates of five-center intramolecular H-transfer reactions and β C-C bond scissions. The 3-pentyl radical, formed via a four-center intramolecular H transfer, leads to 1-butene and plays only a very minor role in the system. The observed (E/Z)-2-pentenes can arise from a small amount of beta C-H bond scission in the 2-pentyl radical. The current experimental and computational results are considered in conjunction with relevant literature data from lower temperatures to develop a consistent kinetics model that reproduces the observed branching ratios and pressure effects. The present experimental results provide the first available data on the pressure dependence of the olefin product branching ratio for alkyl radical decomposition at high temperatures and require a value of = (675 ± 100) cm(-1) for the average energy transferred in deactivating collisions in an argon bath gas when an exponential-down model is employed. High pressure rate expressions for the relevant H-transfer reactions and β bond scissions are derived and a Rice Ramsberger

  6. Shock Detector for SURF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  7. Shock Detector for SURF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  8. Bubble cloud dynamics in a high-pressure spherical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Phillip Andrew

    A bubble cloud is a population of bubbles confined to a region within a fluid. Bubble clouds play a large role in a variety of naturally occurring phenomena and man-made applications (e.g., ocean noise, cavitation damage, sonoluminescence, ultrasonic cleaning, drug delivery, lithotripsy). It is important, therefore, to understand the behavior of bubble clouds so that their effects may be enhanced or diminished as desired. This work explores and characterizes the properties of bubble clouds nucleated inside a high-pressure spherical acoustic resonator, in connection with recent interest in acoustic inertial confinement fusion (acoustic ICF). A laser system was developed to repeatably nucleate a cloud of bubbles inside the resonator. The resulting events were then observed, primarily with schlieren imaging methods. Preliminary studies of the bubble cloud dynamics showed the sensitivity of the initial cloud to nucleation parameters including the phase of nucleation, the laser energy, and the acoustic power. After many acoustic cycles, some bubble clouds are observed to evolve into a tight cluster. The formation of these clusters correlates with initial bubble distributions which have a large cloud interaction parameter, β. Cluster dynamics are seen to be largely driven by reconverging shock waves from previous collapses reflected from the resonator's interior surface. Initial expansion of the cluster boundary is on the order of 8 mm/µs and the maximum radius approaches 3 mm. Shock pressures are estimated to be > 10 GPa at a radius of 100 µm using weak shock theory.

  9. Effect of shock pressure on the structure and superconducting properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O in explosively fabricated bulk metal-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, L. E.; Niou, C. S.; Pradhan-Advani, M.

    1991-01-01

    While it is now well established that copper-oxide-based power, or virtually any other ceramic superconductor powder, can be consolidated and encapsulated within a metal matrix by explosive consolidation, the erratic superconductivity following fabrication has posed a major problem for bulk applications. The nature of this behavior was found to arise from microstructural damage created in the shock wave front, and the residual degradation in superconductivity was demonstrated to be directly related to the peak shock pressure. The explosively fabricated or shock loaded YBa2Cu3Ox examples exhibit drastically altered rho (or R) - T curves. The deterioration in superconductivity is even more noticeable in the measurement of ac magnetic susceptibility and flux exclusion or shielding fraction which is also reduced in proportion to increasing peak shock pressure. The high frequency surface resistance (in the GHz range) is also correspondingly compromised in explosively fabricated, bulk metal-matrix composites based on YBa2Cu3O7. Transmission electron microscopy (including lattice imaging techniques) is being applied in an effort to elucidate the fundamental (microstructural) nature of the shock-induced degradation of superconductivity and normal state conductivity. One focus of TEM observations has assumed that oxygen displaced from b-chains rather than oxygen-vacancy disorder in the basal plane of oxygen deficient YBa2Cu3Ox may be a prime mechanism. Shock-wave displaced oxygen may also be locked into new positions or interstitial clusters or chemically bound to displaced metal (possibly copper) atoms to form precipitates, or such displacements may cause the equivalent of local lattice cell changes as a result of stoichiometric changes. While the shock-induced suppression of T(sub c) is not desirable in the explosive fabrication of bulk metal-matrix superconductors, it may be turned into an advantage if the atomic-scale distortion can be understood and controlled as local

  10. How Is High Blood Pressure Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or focusing on something calm or peaceful Performing yoga or tai chi Meditating Medicines Blood pressure medicines work in different ways to stop or slow some of the body’s functions that cause high blood pressure. Medicines to lower ...

  11. Pressurized thermal shock evaluation of the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, L [ed.

    1985-09-01

    An evaluation of the risk to the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 nuclear power plant due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the assistance of several other organizations. This evaluation was part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission program designed to study the PTS risk to three nuclear plants, the other two plants being Oconee Unit 1 and H.B. Robinson Unit 2. The specific objectives of the program were to (1) provide a best estimate of the frequency of a through-the-wall crack in the pressure vessel at each of the three plants, together with the uncertainty in the estimated frequency and its sensitivity to the variables used in the evaluation; (2) determine the dominant overcooling sequences contributing to the estimated frequency and the associated failures in the plant systems or in operator actions; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective measures.

  12. Recovery of entire shocked samples in a range of pressure from ~100 GPa to Hugoniot Elastic Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaki, Keita; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiro; Kondo, Tadashi; Kurosawa, Kosuke; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Shigemori, Keisuke; Arakawa, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We carried out laser shock experiments and wholly recovered shocked olivine and quartz samples. We investigated the petrographic features based on optical micrographs of sliced samples and found that each recovered sample comprises three regions, I (optically dark), II (opaque) and III (transparent). Scanning electron microscopy combined with electron back-scattered diffraction shows that there are no crystal features in the region I; the materials in the region I have once melted. Moreover, numerical calculations performed with the iSALE shock physics code suggest that the boundary between regions II and III corresponds to Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL). Thus, we succeeded in the recovery of the entire shocked samples experienced over a wide range of pressures from HEL (~ 10 GPa) to melting pressure (~ 100 GPa) in a hierarchical order.

  13. High blood pressure in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, D A; Oparil, S

    1997-01-01

    There is a sexual dimorphism in blood pressure of humans and experimental animals: males tend to have higher blood pressure than females with functional ovaries, while ovariectomy or menopause tends to abolish the sexual dimorphism and cause females to develop a "male" pattern of blood pressure. Hypertensive male laboratory animals tend to have NaCl-sensitive blood pressure, while females are NaCl resistant unless their ovaries are removed, in which case NaCl sensitivity appears. The hormonal basis of NaCl sensitivity of blood pressure and of the sexual dimorphism of hypertension remains to be defined. Synthetic estrogens and progestins, as found in oral contraceptives, tend to elevate blood pressure, while naturally occurring estrogens lower it, or have no effect. Hypertension increases cardiovascular risk in women, as well as men, although the benefits of antihypertensive treatment have been more difficult to demonstrate in women. In the population of the United States, women are more aware of their hypertension, more likely to be treated medically, and more likely to have their blood pressure controlled.

  14. Research on viscosity of metal at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Liu, F.; Ma, X.; Zhang, M.

    2016-11-01

    A new experimental technique, the flyer-impact method, is proposed in this article to investigate the viscosity coefficient of shocked metals. In this technique, a shock wave with a sinusoidal perturbation on the front is induced by the sinusoidal profile of the impact surface of the sample by use of a two-stage light-gas gun, and the oscillatory damping process of the perturbation amplitude is monitored by electric pins. The damping processes of aluminum at 78 and 101 GPa and iron at 159 and 103 GPa are obtained by this technique, which supplement the existing data by measuring the viscosity coefficient via a dynamic high-pressure method. Applying the formula of Miller and Ahrens to fit the experimental data, the shear viscosity coefficients of aluminum at 78 and 101 GPa are 1350 ± 500 and 1200 ± 500 Pa s, respectively, and those of iron at 159 and 103 GPa are 1150 ± 1000 and 4800 ± 1000 Pa s, respectively. The values measured by the flyer-impact method, approximately 103 Pa s, are consistent with those measured by Sakharov's method, while still greatly differing from those measured by static high-pressure methods. In dynamic high-pressure experiments, the shear viscosity is related to dislocation motion in the solid material, while that in static high-pressure experiments is related to the diffusion motion of atoms or molecules in liquids. Therefore, there are different physical meanings of shear viscosity in dynamic and static high-pressure experiments, and there is no comparability among these results.

  15. HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE: DOES THIS CONCERN ME?

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    To find out, the Medical Service's nurses are organising A HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE SCREENING AND PREVENTION CAMPAIGN from Monday, 26th to Thursday, 29th March 2007 at the Infirmary - Building 57 - ground floor A blood pressure test, advice, information and, if necessary, referral for specialist medical treatment will be offered to any person working on the CERN site. High blood pressure is a stealth threat to health. So come and get your blood pressure checked.

  16. HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE: DOES THIS CONCERN ME?

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    To find out, the Medical Service's nurses are organising A HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE SCREENING AND PREVENTION CAMPAIGN from Monday, 26th to Thursday, 29th March 2007 at the Infirmary - Building 57 - ground floor A blood pressure test, advice, information and, if necessary, referral for specialist medical treatment will be offered to any person working on the CERN site. High blood pressure is a silent threat to health. So come and get your blood pressure checked.

  17. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... track blood pressure readings over a period of time, the health care provider may ask you to ...

  18. Collisionless ion dynamics in the shock front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedalin, Michael

    2016-07-01

    In the vicinity of the shock front the dynamics of ions is governed by the macroscopic regular electric and magnetic field of the shock. Upon crossing the shock the thermal ions form a non-gyrotropic distribution. The pressure of these non-gyrotropic ions shapes the downstream magnetic field. High-energy ions behave in the shock front as test particles under the influence on the macroscopic fields. The reflection and transmission coefficients of high-energy ions at an oblique shock front is not sensitive to the shock structure and depends only on the global magnetic field change at the shock.

  19. Application of High Pressure in Food Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Herceg, Z; Režek Jambrak, A; Lelas, V.; Krešić, G.

    2011-01-01

    In high pressure processing, foods are subjected to pressures generally in the range of 100 – 800 (1200) MPa. The processing temperature during pressure treatments can be adjusted from below 0 °C to above 100 °C, with exposure times ranging from a few seconds to 20 minutes and even longer, depending on process conditions. The effects of high pressure are system volume reduction and acceleration of reactions that lead to volume reduction. The main areas of interest regarding high-pressure proc...

  20. Survival of fossilised diatoms and forams in hypervelocity impacts with peak shock pressures in the 1-19 GPa range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, M. J.; Harriss, K. H.; Price, M. C.; Yolland, L.

    2017-07-01

    Previously it has been shown that diatom fossils embedded in ice could survive impacts at speeds of up to 5 km s-1 and peak shock pressures up to 12 GPa. Here we confirm these results using a different technique, with diatoms carried in liquid water suspensions at impact speeds of 2-6 km s-1. These correspond to peak shock pressures of 3.8-19.8 GPa. We also report on the results of similar experiments using forams, at impact speeds of 4.67 km s-1 (when carried in water) and 4.73 km s-1 (when carried in ice), corresponding to peak shock pressures of 11.6 and 13.1 GPa respectively. In all cases we again find survival of recognisable fragments, with mean fragment size of order 20-25 μm. We compare our results to the peak shock pressures that ejecta from giant impacts on the Earth would experience if it subsequently impacted the Moon. We find that 98% of impacts of terrestrial ejecta on the Moon would have experienced peak pressures less than 20 GPa if the ejecta were a soft rock (sandstone). This falls to 82% of meteorites if the ejecta were a hard rock (granite). This assumes impacts on a solid lunar surface. If we approximate the surface as a loose regolith, over 99% of the impacts involve peak shock pressures below 20 GPa. Either way, the results show that a significant fraction of terrestrial meteorites impacting the Moon will do so with peak shock pressures which in our experiments permit the survival of recognisable fossil fragments.

  1. Effect of Pressure Gradients on the Initiation of PBX-9502 via Irregular (Mach) Reflection of Low Pressure Curved Shock Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Lawrence Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Phillip Isaac [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moro, Erik Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-28

    In the instance of multiple fragment impact on cased explosive, isolated curved shocks are generated in the explosive. These curved shocks propagate and may interact and form irregular or Mach reflections along the interaction loci, thereby producing a single shock that may be sufficient to initiate PBX-9501. However, the incident shocks are divergent and their intensity generally decreases as they expand, and the regions behind the Mach stem interaction loci are generally unsupported and allow release waves to rapidly affect the flow. The effects of release waves and divergent shocks may be considered theoretically through a “Shock Change Equation”.

  2. Metallicity of boron carbides at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekura, Haruhiko; Shirai, Koun; Yanase, Akira

    2010-03-01

    Electronic structure of semiconducting boron carbide at high pressure has been theoretically investigated, because of interests in the positive pressure dependence of resistivity, in the gap closure, and in the phase transition. The most simplest form B12(CCC) is assumed. Under assumptions of hydrostatic pressure and neglecting finite-temperature effects, boron carbide is quite stable at high pressure. The crystal of boron carbide is stable at least until a pressure higher than previous experiments showed. The gap closure occurs only after p=600 GPa on the assumption of the original crystal symmetry. In the low pressure regime, the pressure dependence of the energy gap almost diminishes, which is an exceptional case for semiconductors, which could be one of reasons for the positive pressure dependence of resistivity. A monotonous increase in the apex angle of rhombohedron suggests that the covalent bond continues to increase. The C chain inserted in the main diagonal of rhombohedral structure is the chief reason of this stability.

  3. High pressure, high strain rate material strength studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, B. A.; Arsenlis, A.; Barton, N.; Belof, J.; Cavallo, R.; Maddox, B.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S.; Rudd, R.; Comley, A.; Meyers, M.; Wark, J.

    2011-10-01

    Constitutive models for material strength are currently being tested at high pressures by comparing 2D simulations with experiments measuring the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability evolution in solid-state samples of vanadium (V), tantalum (Ta), and iron (Fe). The multiscale strength models being tested combine molecular dynamics, dislocation dynamics, and continuum simulations. Our analysis for the V experiments suggests that the material deformation at these conditions falls into the phonon drag regime, whereas for Ta, the deformation resides mainly in the thermal activation regime. Recent Fe-RT experiments suggest perturbation growth about the alpha-epsilon (bcc-hcp) phase transition threshold has been observed. Using the LLNL multiscale models, we decompose the strength as a function of strain rate into its dominant components of thermal activation, phonon drag, and work hardening. We have also developed a dynamic diffraction diagnostic technique to measure strength directly from shock compressed single crystal samples. Finally, recovery experiments allow a comparison of residual dislocation density with predictions from the multiscale model. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by LLNL Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites News & ... are consistently higher than 120/80 mmHg. Your child’s blood pressure numbers are outside average numbers for ...

  5. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Related Topics Atherosclerosis DASH Eating Plan Overweight and Obesity Smoking and Your Heart Stroke Send a link ... are consistently higher than 120/80 mmHg. Your child’s blood pressure numbers are outside average numbers for ...

  6. Is high-pressure water the cradle of life?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule [Universite de Strasbourg-3, Departement Chimie, 72 route du Rhin, 67400 Illkirch (France)

    2003-06-25

    Several theories have been proposed for the synthesis of prebiotic molecules. This letter shows that the structure of supercritical water, or high-pressure water, could trigger prebiotic synthesis and the origin of life deep in the oceans, in hydrothermal vent systems. Dimer geometries of high-pressure water may have a point of symmetry and a zero dipole moment. Consequently, simple apolar molecules found in submarine hydrothermal vent systems will dissolve in the apolar environment provided by the apolar form of the water dimer. Apolar water could be the medium which helps precursor molecules to concentrate and react more efficiently. The formation of prebiotic molecules could thus be linked to the structure of the water inside chimney nanochannels and cavities where hydrothermal piezochemistry and shock wave chemistry could occur. (letter to the editor)

  7. High-speed helicopter rotor noise - Shock waves as a potent source of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farassat, F.; Lee, Yung-Jang; Tadghighi, H.; Holz, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the problem of high speed rotor noise prediction. In particular, we propose that from the point of view of the acoustic analogy, shocks around rotating blades are sources of sound. We show that, although for a wing at uniform steady rectilinear motion with shocks the volume quadrupole and shock sources cancel in the far field to the order of 1/r, this cannot happen for rotating blades. In this case, some cancellation between volume quadrupoles and shock sources occurs, yet the remaining shock noise contribution is still potent. A formula for shock noise prediction is presented based on mapping the deformable shock surface to a time independent region. The resulting equation is similar to Formulation 1A of Langley. Shock noise prediction for a hovering model rotor for which experimental noise data exist is presented. The comparison of measured and predicted acoustic data shows good agreement.

  8. High pressure processing for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonberg-Broczek, Monika; Windyga, B; Szczawiński, J; Szczawińska, M; Pietrzak, D; Prestamo, G

    2005-01-01

    Food preservation using high pressure is a promising technique in food industry as it offers numerous opportunities for developing new foods with extended shelf-life, high nutritional value and excellent organoleptic characteristics. High pressure is an alternative to thermal processing. The resistance of microorganisms to pressure varies considerably depending on the pressure range applied, temperature and treatment duration, and type of microorganism. Generally, Gram-positive bacteria are more resistant to pressure than Gram-negative bacteria, moulds and yeasts; the most resistant are bacterial spores. The nature of the food is also important, as it may contain substances which protect the microorganism from high pressure. This article presents results of our studies involving the effect of high pressure on survival of some pathogenic bacteria -- Listeria monocytogenes, Aeromonas hydrophila and Enterococcus hirae -- in artificially contaminated cooked ham, ripening hard cheese and fruit juices. The results indicate that in samples of investigated foods the number of these microorganisms decreased proportionally to the pressure used and the duration of treatment, and the effect of these two factors was statistically significant (level of probability, P high pressure treatment than L. monocytogenes and A. hydrophila. Mathematical methods were applied, for accurate prediction of the effects of high pressure on microorganisms. The usefulness of high pressure treatment for inactivation of microorganisms and shelf-life extention of meat products was also evaluated. The results obtained show that high pressure treatment extends the shelf-life of cooked pork ham and raw smoked pork loin up to 8 weeks, ensuring good micro-biological and sensory quality of the products.

  9. CHRONOBIOLOGY OF HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornélissen, G.; Halberg, F.; Bakken, E. E.; Wang, Z.; Tarquini, R.; Perfetto, F.; Laffi, G.; Maggioni, C.; Kumagai, Y.; Homolka, P.; Havelková, A.; Dušek, J.; Svačinová, H.; Siegelová, J.; Fišer, B.

    2008-01-01

    BIOCOS, the project aimed at studying BIOlogical systems in their COSmos, has obtained a great deal of expertise in the fields of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) monitoring and of marker rhythmometry for the purposes of screening, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Prolonging the monitoring reduces the uncertainty in the estimation of circadian parameters; the current recommendation of BIOCOS requires monitoring for at least 7 days. The BIOCOS approach consists of a parametric and a non-parametric analysis of the data, in which the results from the individual subject are being compared with gender- and age-specified reference values in health. Chronobiological designs can offer important new information regarding the optimization of treatment by timing its administration as a function of circadian and other rhythms. New technological developments are needed to close the loop between the monitoring of blood pressure and the administration of antihypertensive drugs. PMID:19122770

  10. High temperature shock tube experiments and kinetic modeling study of diisopropyl ketone ignition and pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Barari, Ghazal

    2017-03-10

    Diisopropyl ketone (DIPK) is a promising biofuel candidate, which is produced using endophytic fungal conversion. In this work, a high temperature detailed combustion kinetic model for DIPK was developed using the reaction class approach. DIPK ignition and pyrolysis experiments were performed using the UCF shock tube. The shock tube oxidation experiments were conducted between 1093K and 1630K for different reactant compositions, equivalence ratios (φ=0.5–2.0), and pressures (1–6atm). In addition, methane concentration time-histories were measured during 2% DIPK pyrolysis in argon using cw laser absorption near 3400nm at temperatures between 1300 and 1400K near 1atm. To the best of our knowledge, current ignition delay times (above 1050K) and methane time histories are the first such experiments performed in DIPK at high temperatures. Present data were used as validation targets for the new kinetic model and simulation results showed fair agreement compared to the experiments. The reaction rates corresponding to the main consumption pathways of DIPK were found to have high sensitivity in controlling the reactivity, so these were adjusted to attain better agreement between the simulation and experimental data. A correlation was developed based on the experimental data to predict the ignition delay times using the temperature, pressure, fuel concentration and oxygen concentration.

  11. Interaction of a highly radiative shock with a solid obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, M.; Michel, Th.; Yurchak, R.; Michaut, C.; Albertazzi, B.; Laffite, S.; Falize, E.; Van Box Som, L.; Sakawa, Y.; Sano, T.; Hara, Y.; Morita, T.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Barroso, P.; Pelka, A.; Gregori, G.; Kodama, R.; Ozaki, N.; Lamb, D.; Tzeferacos, P.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we present the recent results obtained regarding highly radiative shocks (RSs) generated in a low-density gas filled cell on the GEKKO XII laser facility. The RS was generated by using an ablator-pusher two-layer target (CH/Sn) and a propagation medium (Xe). High velocity RSs have been generated (100-140 km/s), while limiting as much as possible the preheating produced by the corona emission. Both self-emission and visible probe diagnostics highlighted a strong emission in the shock and an electron density in the downstream gas. The RS characteristics that depend on the initial conditions are described here as well as its precursor interaction with an aluminium foil used as an obstacle. The obtained results are discussed which show a strong extension of the radiative precursor (1 mm) leading to an expansion velocity of the obstacle up to ≈30 km/s compatible to a 20 eV temperature.

  12. High Temperature and Pressure Alkaline Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank

    and oxygen with a new type of alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures and pressures. To perform measurements under high pressure and at elevated temperatures it was necessary to build a measurement system around an autoclave which could stand high temperatures up to 250 °C and pressures up to 200 bar...... as well as extremely caustic environments. Based on a literature study to identify resistant materials for these conditions, Inconel 600 was selected among the metals which are available for autoclave construction. An initial single atmosphere high temperature and pressure measurement setup was build...... comprising this autoclave. A second high temperature and pressure measurement setup was build based on experiences from the first setup in order to perform automatized measurements. The conductivity of aqueous KOH at elevated temperatures and high concentrations was investigated using the van der Pauw method...

  13. Laser Heating of Solid Matter by Light-Pressure-Driven Shocks at Ultrarelativistic Intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akli, K.U.; Hansen, S.B.; Kemp, A.J.; Freeman, R.R.; Beg, F.N.; Clark, D.C.; Chen, S.D.; Hey, D.; Hatchett, S.P.; Highbarger, K.; Giraldez, E.; Green, J.S.; Gregori, G.; Lancaster, K.L.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Norreys, P.; Patel, N.; Pasley, J.; Shearer, C.; Stephens, R.B.; Stoeckl, C.; Storm, M.; Theobald, W.; Van Woerkom, L.D.; Weber, R.; Key, M.H.

    2008-04-29

    The heating of solid targets irradiated by 5 x 10^20 W cm^-2, 0.8 ps, 1.05 um wavelength laser light is studied by x-ray spectroscopy of the K-shell emission from thin layers of Ni, Mo, and V. A surface layer is heated to ~5 keV with an axial temperature gradient of 0.6 um scale length. Images of Ni Ly sub-alpha show the hot region has <25 um diameter. These data are consistent with collisional particle-in-cell simulations using preformed plasma density profiles from hydrodynamic modeling which show that the >100 Gbar light pressure compresses the preformed plasma and dries a shock into the solid, heating a thin layer.

  14. Laser heating of solid matter by light pressure-driven shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akli, K; Hansen, S B; Kemp, A J; Freeman, R R; Beg, F N; Clark, D; Chen, S; Hey, D; Highbarger, K; Giraldez, E; Green, J; Gregori, G; Lancaster, K; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A J; Norreys, P A; Patel, N; Patel, P; Shearer, C; Stephens, R B; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Theobald, W; Van Woerkom, L; Weber, R; Key, M H

    2007-05-04

    Heating by irradiation of a solid surface in vacuum with 5 x 10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2}, 0.8 ps, 1.05 {micro}m wavelength laser light is studied by x-ray spectroscopy of the K-shell emission from thin layers of Ni, Mo and V. A surface layer is heated to {approx} 5 keV with an axial temperature gradient of 0.6 {micro}m scale length. Images of Ni Ly{sub {alpha}} show the hot region has a {approx} 25 {micro}m diameter, much smaller than {approx} 70 {micro}m region of K{sub {alpha}} emission. 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations suggest that the surface heating is due to a light pressure driven shock.

  15. Shock Tube Investigation of Pressure and Ion Sensors Used in Pulse Detonation Engine Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    is a gas which follows the equation RTP ρ= and is generally applied to gases at low temperatures and pressures ( Cengel and Boles, 2002:88). A non...ideal or real gas does not follow this equation at sufficiently high temperature or pressure ( Cengel and Boles, 2002:622). This is the case when the

  16. Application of High Pressure in Food Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herceg, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In high pressure processing, foods are subjected to pressures generally in the range of 100 – 800 (1200 MPa. The processing temperature during pressure treatments can be adjusted from below 0 °C to above 100 °C, with exposure times ranging from a few seconds to 20 minutes and even longer, depending on process conditions. The effects of high pressure are system volume reduction and acceleration of reactions that lead to volume reduction. The main areas of interest regarding high-pressure processing of food include: inactivation of microorganisms, modification of biopolymers, quality retention (especially in terms of flavour and colour, and changes in product functionality. Food components responsible for the nutritive value and sensory properties of food remain unaffected by high pressure. Based on the theoretical background of high-pressure processing and taking into account its advantages and limitations, this paper aims to show its possible application in food processing. The paper gives an outline of the special equipment used in highpressure processing. Typical high pressure equipment in which pressure can be generated either by direct or indirect compression are presented together with three major types of high pressure food processing: the conventional (batch system, semicontinuous and continuous systems. In addition to looking at this technology’s ability to inactivate microorganisms at room temperature, which makes it the ultimate alternative to thermal treatments, this paper also explores its application in dairy, meat, fruit and vegetable processing. Here presented are the effects of high-pressure treatment in milk and dairy processing on the inactivation of microorganisms and the modification of milk protein, which has a major impact on rennet coagulation and curd formation properties of treated milk. The possible application of this treatment in controlling cheese manufacture, ripening and safety is discussed. The opportunities

  17. Laser techniques in high-pressure geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Mao, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Laser techniques in conjunction with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study high-pressure properties of materials important to a wide range of problems in earth and planetary science. Spontaneous Raman scattering of crystalline and amorphous solids at high pressure demonstrates that dramatic changes in structure and bonding occur on compression. High-pressure Brillouin scattering is sensitive to the pressure variations of single-crystal elastic moduli and acoustic velocities. Laser heating techniques with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study phase transitions, including melting, under deep-earth conditions. Finally, laser-induced ruby fluorescence has been essential for the development of techniques for generating the maximum pressures now possible with the diamond-anvil cell, and currently provides a calibrated in situ measure of pressure well above 100 gigapascals.

  18. Laser techniques in high-pressure geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Mao, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Laser techniques in conjunction with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study high-pressure properties of materials important to a wide range of problems in earth and planetary science. Spontaneous Raman scattering of crystalline and amorphous solids at high pressure demonstrates that dramatic changes in structure and bonding occur on compression. High-pressure Brillouin scattering is sensitive to the pressure variations of single-crystal elastic moduli and acoustic velocities. Laser heating techniques with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study phase transitions, including melting, under deep-earth conditions. Finally, laser-induced ruby fluorescence has been essential for the development of techniques for generating the maximum pressures now possible with the diamond-anvil cell, and currently provides a calibrated in situ measure of pressure well above 100 gigapascals.

  19. Design optimization of high pressure and high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor for high sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhe; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a design method for optimizing sensitivity of piezoresistive pressure sensor in high-pressure and high-temperature environment. In order to prove the method, a piezoresistive pressure sensor (HPTSS) is designed. With the purpose of increasing sensitivity and to improve the measurement range, the piezoresistive sensor adopts rectangular membrane and thick film structure. The configuration of piezoresistors is arranged according to the characteristic of the rectangular membrane. The structure and configuration of the sensor chip are analyzed theoretically and simulated by the finite element method. This design enables the sensor chip to operate in high pressure condition (such as 150 MPa) with a high sensitivity and accuracy. The silicon on insulator wafer is selected to guarantee the thermo stability of the sensor chip. In order to optimize the fabrication and improve the yield of production, an electric conduction step is devised. Series of experiments demonstrates a favorable linearity of 0.13% and a high accuracy of 0.48%. And the sensitivity of HTPSS is about six times as high as a conventional square-membrane sensor chip in the experiment. Compared with the square-membrane pressure sensor and current production, the strength of HPTTS lies in sensitivity and measurement. The performance of the HPTSS indicates that it could be an ideal candidate for high-pressure and high-temperature sensing in real application.

  20. Design optimization of high pressure and high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor for high sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhe; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a design method for optimizing sensitivity of piezoresistive pressure sensor in high-pressure and high-temperature environment. In order to prove the method, a piezoresistive pressure sensor (HPTSS) is designed. With the purpose of increasing sensitivity and to improve the measurement range, the piezoresistive sensor adopts rectangular membrane and thick film structure. The configuration of piezoresistors is arranged according to the characteristic of the rectangular membrane. The structure and configuration of the sensor chip are analyzed theoretically and simulated by the finite element method. This design enables the sensor chip to operate in high pressure condition (such as 150 MPa) with a high sensitivity and accuracy. The silicon on insulator wafer is selected to guarantee the thermo stability of the sensor chip. In order to optimize the fabrication and improve the yield of production, an electric conduction step is devised. Series of experiments demonstrates a favorable linearity of 0.13% and a high accuracy of 0.48%. And the sensitivity of HTPSS is about six times as high as a conventional square-membrane sensor chip in the experiment. Compared with the square-membrane pressure sensor and current production, the strength of HPTTS lies in sensitivity and measurement. The performance of the HPTSS indicates that it could be an ideal candidate for high-pressure and high-temperature sensing in real application.

  1. The chemical shock tube as a tool for studying high-temperature chemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.

    1986-01-01

    Although the combustion of hydrocarbons is our primary source of energy today, the chemical reactions, or pathway, by which even the simplest hydro-carbon reacts with atmospheric oxygen to form CO2 and water may not always be known. Furthermore, even when the reaction pathway is known, the reaction rates are always under discussion. The shock tube has been an important and unique tool for building a data base of reaction rates important in the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The ability of a shock wave to bring the gas sample to reaction conditions rapidly and homogeneously makes shock-tube studies of reaction kinetics extremely attractive. In addition to the control and uniformity of reaction conditions achieved with shock-wave methods, shock compression can produce gas temperatures far in excess of those in conventional reactors. Argon can be heated to well over 10 000 K, and temperatures around 5000 K are easily obtained with conventional shock-tube techniques. Experiments have proven the validity of shock-wave theory; thus, reaction temperatures and pressures can be calculated from a measurement of the incident shock velocity. A description is given of the chemical shock tube and auxiliary equipment and of two examples of kinetic experiments conducted in a shock tube.

  2. Time-resolved detection of temperature, concentration, and pressure in a shock tube by intracavity absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the first application of intracavity absorption spectroscopy (ICAS) for monitoring species concentration, total pressure, and temperature in shock-tube experiments. ICAS with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied to time-resolved measurements of absorption spectra of shock-heated C2H2. The measurements are performed in a spectral range between 6512 and 6542 cm-1, including many absorption lines of C2H2, with a time resolution of 100 µs and an effective absorption path length of 15 m. Up to 18-times increase of the total pressure and a temperature rise of up to 1200 K have been monitored. Due to the ability of simultaneously recording many absorption lines in a broad spectral range, the presented technique can also be applied to multi-component analysis of transient single-shot processes in reactive gas mixtures in shock tubes, pulse detonation engines, or explosions.

  3. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. Characteristics, complications and therapy. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can be involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient’s mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated; penicillin or a betalactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  4. Evaluation of heart rate and blood pressure variability as indicators of physiological compensation to hemorrhage before shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Christopher G; Kramer, George C; Strauss, David G

    2015-05-01

    Individual responses to hemorrhage vary, with varying periods of compensation before the development of shock. We characterized heart rate and blood pressure variability measures during hemorrhage of 25 mL/kgBody Weight for 15 min in conscious sheep (N = 7, 14 total hemorrhages) as markers of the transition from compensated to decompensated shock using the continuous wavelet transform. Heart rate-low frequency (HR-LF) and systolic blood pressure-low frequency (SBP-LF) indices were developed to represent the change in spectral power during hemorrhage as low-frequency (0.06 - 0.15 Hz) power divided by the sum of high (0.15 - 1.0 Hz)- and very low (0.02 - 0.06 Hz) frequency power. Heart rate rose from 96.3 (22.2) beats/min (mean [SD] across all trials) to a peak of 176.0 (25.4) beats/min occurring at a minimum time of 5.3 min to a maximum of 22.1 min (11.7 [1.6] min), depending on the trial, after the start of hemorrhage. During the HR-compensated response to hemorrhage, there was elevated HR-LF and SBP-LF in five of the seven animals. In these animals, HR-LF and SBP-LF dropped to below baseline levels around the time of the peak HR. The results from this conscious-animal study suggest that HR and SBP low-frequency power rise during the compensation phase of the response to hemorrhage in conscious sheep. Use of variability monitoring could aid in describing an individual's current response to hemorrhage and anticipation of impending decompensation; however, individual differences in the response limit this potential.

  5. Sensitivity of once-shocked, weathered high explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, K.L.; Harris, B.W.

    1998-07-01

    Effects caused by stimulating once-shocked, weathered high explosives (OSW-HE) are investigated. The sensitivity of OSW-HE to mechanical stimuli was determined using standard industry tests. Some initial results are given. Pieces of OSW-HE were collected from active and inactive firing sites and from an area surrounding a drop tower at Los Alamos where skid and spigot tests were done. Samples evaluated were cast explosives or plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations containing cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), mock or inert HE [tris(beta-chloroethyl)phosphate (CEF)], barium nitrate, cyanuric acid, talc, and Kel-F. Once-shocked, weathered LX-10 Livermore explosive [HMX/Viton A, (95/5 wt %)], PBX 9011 [HMX/Estane, (90/10 wt %)], PBX 9404 [HMX/nitrocellulose, tris(beta-chloroethyl) phosphate, (94/3/3 wt %)], Composition B or cyclotol (TNT/RDX explosives), and PBX 9007 (90% RDX, 9.1% styrene, 0.5% dioctyl phthalate, and 0.45 resin) were subjected to the hammer test, the drop-weight impact sensitivity test, differential thermal analysis (DTA), the spark test, the Henkin`s critical temperature test, and the flame test. Samples were subjected to remote, wet cutting and drilling; remote, liquid-nitrogen-cooled grinding and crushing; and scanning electron microscope (SEM) surface analyses for morphological changes.

  6. Techniques in high pressure neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on the author's practical work from the last 20 years, Techniques in High Pressure Neutron Scattering is one of the first books to gather recent methods that allow neutron scattering well beyond 10 GPa. The author shows how neutron scattering has to be adapted to the pressure range and type of measurement.Suitable for both newcomers and experienced high pressure scientists and engineers, the book describes various solutions spanning two to three orders of magnitude in pressure that have emerged in the past three decades. Many engineering concepts are illustrated through examples of rea

  7. Highly trabeculated structure of the human endocardium underlies asymmetrical response to low-energy monophasic shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Adam; Robson, Matthew D.; Schneider, Jürgen; Burton, Rebecca; Plank, Gernot; Bishop, Martin J.

    2017-09-01

    Novel low-energy defibrillation therapies are thought to be driven by virtual-electrodes (VEs), due to the interaction of applied monophasic electric shocks with fine-scale anatomical structures within the heart. Significant inter-species differences in the cardiac (micro)-anatomy exist, however, particularly with respect to the degree of endocardial trabeculations, which may underlie important differences in response to low-energy defibrillation protocols. Understanding the interaction of monophasic electric fields with the specific human micro-anatomy is therefore imperative in facilitating the translation and optimisation of these promising experimental therapies to the clinic. In this study, we sought to investigate how electric fields from implanted devices interact with the highly trabeculated human endocardial surface to better understand shock success in order to help optimise future clinical protocols. A bi-ventricular human computational model was constructed from high resolution (350 μm) ex-vivo MR data, including anatomically accurate endocardial structures. Monophasic shocks were applied between a basal right ventricular catheter and an exterior ground. Shocks of varying strengths were applied with both anodal [positive right ventricle (RV) electrode] and cathodal (negative RV electrode) polarities at different states of tissue refractoriness and during induced arrhythmias. Anodal shocks induced isolated positive VEs at the distal side of "detached" trabeculations, which rapidly spread into hyperpolarised tissue on the surrounding endocardial surfaces following the shock. Anodal shocks thus depolarised more tissue 10 ms after the shock than cathodal shocks where the propagation of activation from VEs induced on the proximal side of "detached" trabeculations was prevented due to refractory endocardium. Anodal shocks increased arrhythmia complexity more than cathodal shocks during failed anti-arrhythmia shocks. In conclusion, multiple detached

  8. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, T. C.; Morgan, J. P.; Marchant, N. J.; Bolton, S. M.

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank is presented. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in a battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on-board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display.

  9. Ignition during hydrogen release from high pressure into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleszczak, P.; Wolanski, P.

    2010-12-01

    The first investigations concerned with a problem of hydrogen jet ignition, during outflow from a high-pressure vessel were carried out nearly 40 years ago by Wolanski and Wojcicki. The research resulted from a dramatic accident in the Chorzow Chemical Plant Azoty, where the explosion of a synthesis gas made up of a mixture composed of three moles of hydrogen per mole of nitrogen, at 300°C and 30 MPa killed four people. Initial investigation had excluded potential external ignition sources and the main aim of the research was to determine the cause of ignition. Hydrogen is currently considered as a potential fuel for various vehicles such as cars, trucks, buses, etc. Crucial safety issues are of potential concern, associated with the storage of hydrogen at a very high pressure. Indeed, the evidence obtained nearly 40 years ago shows that sudden rupture of a high-pressure hydrogen storage tank or other component can result in ignition and potentially explosion. The aim of the present research is identification of the conditions under which hydrogen ignition occurs as a result of compression and heating of the air by the shock wave generated by discharge of high-pressure hydrogen. Experiments have been conducted using a facility constructed in the Combustion Laboratory of the Institute of Heat Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology. Tests under various configurations have been performed to determine critical conditions for occurrence of high-pressure hydrogen ignition. The results show that a critical pressure exists, leading to ignition, which depends mainly on the geometric configuration of the outflow system, such as tube diameter, and on the presence of obstacles.

  10. High Accuracy, Miniature Pressure Sensor for Very High Temperatures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SiWave proposes to develop a compact, low-cost MEMS-based pressure sensor for very high temperatures and low pressures in hypersonic wind tunnels. Most currently...

  11. High and low strength nonsynchronized shocks given during canine ventricular tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J H; Daubert, J P; Kavanagh, K M; Harrell, F E; Ideker, R E

    1992-07-01

    Cardioversion shocks given during ventricular tachycardia may cause ventricular fibrillation or acceleration of ventricular tachycardia, or arrest the tachycardia. A recently proposed theory may explain why the former two phenomena may occur. Briefly, this theory states that potential gradient shock fields of a critical strength delivered to tissue with a critical degree of refractoriness will cause circulating wave fronts of ventricular activation ("rotors") manifest as ventricular arrhythmia. We tested this theory by delivering nonsynchronized shocks 50% higher than defibrillation threshold or 50% lower than defibrillation threshold during 275 episodes of ventricular tachycardia in eight dogs with 5- to 7-day-old myocardial infarcts. Shocks stronger than the defibrillation threshold are likely to create shock fields in the ventricles everywhere stronger than this critical value, and therefore would not generate rotors. Shocks less strong than the defibrillation threshold may create shock fields within the ventricles that include the critical value, and therefore cause rotors if given when critically refractory tissue is present. Nonsynchronized shocks were used to increase the likelihood of encountering tissue with a critical degree of refractoriness. Ventricular fibrillation or acceleration of ventricular tachycardia occurred following 83 of 138 (60%) low strength shocks and following 20 of 137 (14.6%) high strength shocks. The pooled odds ratio for induction of ventricular fibrillation or accelerated ventricular tachycardia after low strength shocks as compared to high strength shocks was 8.9. when given during ventricular tachycardia, low strength shocks are much more likely to cause ventricular fibrillation or accelerated ventricular tachycardia than are high strength shocks (P less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Experimental Results of High Pressure and High Strain Rate Tantalum Flow Stress on Omega and NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Arsenlis, A.; Barton, N.; Benedetti, L.; Huntington, C.; McNaney, J.; Orlikowski, D.; Prisbrey, S.; Remington, B.; Rudd, R.; Swift, D.; Weber, S.; Wehrenberg, C.; Comley, A.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the high pressure, high strain rate plastic deformation dynamics of materials is an area of research of high interest to planetary formation dynamics, meteor impact dynamics, and inertial confinement fusion designs. Developing predictive theoretical and computational descriptions of such systems, however, has been a difficult undertaking. We have performed many experiments on Omega, LCLS and NIF to test Ta strength models at high pressures (~ up to 4 Mbar), high strain rates (~ 107 s-1) and high strains (>30%) under ramped compression conditions using Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability properties. These experiments use plasma drive to ramp compress the sample to higher pressure without shock-melting. We also studied lattice level strength mechanisms under shocked compression using a diffraction-based technique. Our studies show that the strength mechanisms from macro to micro scales are different from the traditional strength model predictions and that they are loading path dependent. We will report the experimental results. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA273.

  13. Application of the French codes to the pressurized thermal shocks assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingya; Wang, Rong Shan; Yu, Weiwei; Lu, Feng; Zhang, Guo Dong; Xue, Fei; Chen, Zhilin [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Life Management Center, Suzhou (China); Qian, Guian [Paul Scherrer Institute, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Villigen (Switzerland); Shi, Jinhua [Amec Foster Wheeler, Clean Energy Department, Gloucester (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    The integrity of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) related to pressurized thermal shocks (PTSs) has been extensively studied. This paper introduces an integrity assessment of an RPV subjected to a PTS transient based on the French codes. In the USA, the 'screening criterion' for maximum allowable embrittlement of RPV material is developed based on the probabilistic fracture mechanics. However, in the French RCC-M and RSE-M codes, which are developed based on the deterministic fracture mechanics, there is no 'screening criterion'. In this paper, the methodology in the RCC-M and RSE-M codes, which are used for PTS analysis, are firstly discussed. The bases of the French codes are compared with ASME and FAVOR codes. A case study is also presented. The results show that the method in the RCC-M code that accounts for the influence of cladding on the stress intensity factor (SIF) may be nonconservative. The SIF almost doubles if the weld residual stress is considered. The approaches included in the codes differ in many aspects, which may result in significant differences in the assessment results. Therefore, homogenization of the codes in the long time operation of nuclear power plants is needed.

  14. High-order shock-fitted detonation propagation in high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romick, Christopher M.; Aslam, Tariq D.

    2017-03-01

    A highly accurate numerical shock and material interface fitting scheme composed of fifth-order spatial and third- or fifth-order temporal discretizations is applied to the two-dimensional reactive Euler equations in both slab and axisymmetric geometries. High rates of convergence are not typically possible with shock-capturing methods as the Taylor series analysis breaks down in the vicinity of discontinuities. Furthermore, for typical high explosive (HE) simulations, the effects of material interfaces at the charge boundary can also cause significant computational errors. Fitting a computational boundary to both the shock front and material interface (i.e. streamline) alleviates the computational errors associated with captured shocks and thus opens up the possibility of high rates of convergence for multi-dimensional shock and detonation flows. Several verification tests, including a Sedov blast wave, a Zel'dovich-von Neumann-Döring (ZND) detonation wave, and Taylor-Maccoll supersonic flow over a cone, are utilized to demonstrate high rates of convergence to nontrivial shock and reaction flows. Comparisons to previously published shock-capturing multi-dimensional detonations in a polytropic fluid with a constant adiabatic exponent (PF-CAE) are made, demonstrating significantly lower computational error for the present shock and material interface fitting method. For an error on the order of 10 m /s, which is similar to that observed in experiments, shock-fitting offers a computational savings on the order of 1000. In addition, the behavior of the detonation phase speed is examined for several slab widths to evaluate the detonation performance of PBX 9501 while utilizing the Wescott-Stewart-Davis (WSD) model, which is commonly used in HE modeling. It is found that the thickness effect curve resulting from this equation of state and reaction model using published values is dramatically more steep than observed in recent experiments. Utilizing the present fitting

  15. The Dynamics of Very High Alfvén Mach Number Shocks in Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Torbjörn; Burgess, David; Scholer, Manfred; Masters, Adam; Sulaiman, Ali H.

    2017-02-01

    Astrophysical shocks, such as planetary bow shocks or supernova remnant shocks, are often in the high or very-high Mach number regime, and the structure of such shocks is crucial for understanding particle acceleration and plasma heating, as well inherently interesting. Recent magnetic field observations at Saturn’s bow shock, for Alfvén Mach numbers greater than about 25, have provided evidence for periodic non-stationarity, although the details of the ion- and electron-scale processes remain unclear due to limited plasma data. High-resolution, multi-spacecraft data are available for the terrestrial bow shock, but here the very high Mach number regime is only attained on extremely rare occasions. Here we present magnetic field and particle data from three such quasi-perpendicular shock crossings observed by the four-spacecraft Cluster mission. Although both ion reflection and the shock profile are modulated at the upstream ion gyroperiod timescale, the dominant wave growth in the foot takes place at sub-proton length scales and is consistent with being driven by the ion Weibel instability. The observed large-scale behavior depends strongly on cross-scale coupling between ion and electron processes, with ion reflection never fully suppressed, and this suggests a model of the shock dynamics that is in conflict with previous models of non-stationarity. Thus, the observations offer insight into the conditions prevalent in many inaccessible astrophysical environments, and provide important constraints for acceleration processes at such shocks.

  16. Determination of the Chapman- Jouguet Pressure of a High Explosive from One Single Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Held

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Instead of evaluating the data of the surface velocities of adjacent metal foils of different thicknesses with reference to the high explosive charge, the shock wave velocity in a plexiglass block from one firing for one charge type was measured as a function of distance. If the high explosive charge is large enough, for example 64 mm diameter and 100 mm long, then the shock wave induced in the plexiglass gives, over the first 15 mm, a shock velocity which correlates with the detonation pressure or Chapman-Jouguet pressure. With the resolution inherent in this technique, an enhanced velocity over the first few millimeters, which would correspond to a von Neumann spike, could not be detected.

  17. [Transient high frequency nodal rhythm after a high voltage electric shock. Report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supervía, August; Del Baño, Francisco; Aguirre, Alfons; Membrilla, Estela

    2013-09-01

    Electrical shock can cause a direct myocardial damage and different types of arrhythmias, which are uncommon and occur more often when there is a high voltage exposure. We report a 19-year-old male that received a high voltage shock, falling thereafter from an altitude of four meters. On admission to the emergency room, he had second and third degree burns in the right hand and the left thigh. The electrocardiogram showed a nodal rhythm of 72 beats per minute. After four hours of monitoring, sinus rhythm returned spontaneously.

  18. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V. [Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  19. Shocks and Cool Cores: An ALMA View of Massive Galaxy Cluster Formation at High Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Kaustuv

    2017-07-01

    These slides present some recent results on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect imaging of galaxy cluster substructures. The advantage of SZ imaging at high redshifts or in the low density cluster outskirts is already well-known. Now with ALMA a combination of superior angular resolution and high sensitivity is available. One example is the first ALMA measurement of a merger shock at z=0.9 in the famous El Gordo galaxy cluster. Here comparison between SZ, X-ray and radio data enabled us to put constraints on the shock Mach number and magnetic field strength for a high-z radio relic. Second example is the ALMA SZ imaging of the core region of z=1.4 galaxy cluster XMMU J2235.2-2557. Here ALMA data provide an accurate measurement of the thermal pressure near the cluster center, and from a joint SZ/X-ray analysis we find clear evidence for a reduced core temperature. This result indicate that a cool core establishes itself early enough in the cluster formation history while the gas accumulation is still continuing. The above two ALMA measurements are among several other recent SZ results that shed light on the formation process of massive clusters at high redshifts.

  20. Verification, validation and application of NEPTUNE-CFD to two-phase Pressurized Thermal Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mérigoux, N., E-mail: nicolas.merigoux@edf.fr [Electricité de France, R& D Division, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Laviéville, J.; Mimouni, S.; Guingo, M.; Baudry, C. [Electricité de France, R& D Division, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Bellet, S., E-mail: serge.bellet@edf.fr [Electricité de France, Thermal & Nuclear Studies and Projects Division, 12-14 Avenue Dutriévoz, 69628 Villeurbanne (France)

    2017-02-15

    Nuclear Power Plants are subjected to a variety of ageing mechanisms and, at the same time, exposed to potential Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) – characterized by a rapid cooling of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) wall. In this context, NEPTUNE-CFD is developed and used to model two-phase PTS in an industrial configuration, providing temperature and pressure fields required to assess the integrity of the RPV. Furthermore, when using CFD for nuclear safety demonstration purposes, EDF applies a methodology based on physical analysis, verification, validation and application to industrial scale (V&V), to demonstrate the quality of, and the confidence in results obtained. By following this methodology, each step must be proved to be consistent with the others, and with the final goal of the calculations. To this effect, a chart demonstrating how far the validation step of NEPTUNE-CFD is covering the PTS application will be drawn. A selection of the code verification and validation cases against different experiments will be described. For results consistency, a single and mature set of models – resulting from the knowledge acquired during the code development over the last decade – has been used. From these development and validation feedbacks, a methodology has been set up to perform industrial computations. Finally, the guidelines of this methodology based on NEPTUNE-CFD and SYRTHES coupling – to take into account the conjugate heat transfer between liquid and solid – will be presented. A short overview of the engineering approach will be given – starting from the meshing process, up to the results post-treatment and analysis.

  1. A Shock Tube Study of the CO + OH Reaction Near the Low-Pressure Limit

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad

    2016-05-16

    Rate coefficients for the reaction between carbon monoxide and hydroxyl radical were measured behind reflected shock waves over 700 – 1230 K and 1.2 – 9.8 bar. The temperature/pressure conditions correspond to the predicted low-pressure limit of this reaction, where the channel leading to carbon dioxide formation is dominant. The reaction rate coefficients were inferred by measuring the formation of carbon dioxide using quantum cascade laser absorption near 4.2 µm. Experiments were performed under pseudo-first order conditions with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as the OH precursor. Using ultraviolet laser absorption by OH radicals, the TBHP decomposition rate was measured to quantify potential facility effects under extremely dilute conditions used here. The measured CO + OH rate coefficients are provided in Arrhenius form for three different pressure ranges: kCO+OH (1.2 – 1.6 bar) = 9.14 x 10-13 exp(-1265/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 kCO+OH (4.3 – 5.1 bar) = 8.70 x 10-13 exp(-1156/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 kCO+OH (9.6 – 9.8 bar) = 7.48 x 10-13 exp(-929/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 The measured rate coefficients are found to be lower than the master equation modeling results by Weston et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A, 117 (2013) 821] at 819 K and in closer agreement with the expression provided by Joshi and Wang [Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 38 (2006) 57].

  2. A Shock-Tube Study of the CO + OH Reaction Near the Low-Pressure Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Ehson F; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-06-09

    Rate coefficients for the reaction between carbon monoxide and hydroxyl radical were measured behind reflected shock waves over 700-1230 K and 1.2-9.8 bar. The temperature/pressure conditions correspond to the predicted low-pressure limit of this reaction, where the channel leading to carbon dioxide formation is dominant. The reaction rate coefficients were inferred by measuring the formation of carbon dioxide using quantum cascade laser absorption near 4.2 μm. Experiments were performed under pseudo-first-order conditions with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as the OH precursor. Using ultraviolet laser absorption by OH radicals, the TBHP decomposition rate was measured to quantify potential facility effects under extremely dilute conditions used here. The measured CO + OH rate coefficients are provided in Arrhenius form for three different pressure ranges: kCO+OH(1.2-1.6 bar) = (9.14 ± 2.17) × 10(-13) exp(-(1265 ± 190)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); kCO+OH(4.3-5.1 bar) = (8.70 ± 0.84) × 10(-13) exp(-(1156 ± 83)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); and kCO+OH(9.6-9.8 bar) = (7.48 ± 1.92) × 10(-13) exp(-(929 ± 192)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The measured rate coefficients are found to be lower than the master equation modeling results by Weston et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 821] at 819 K and in closer agreement with the expression provided by Joshi and Wang [Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 2006, 38, 57].

  3. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of beryllium at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjarlais, Michael; Knudson, Marcus

    2008-03-01

    The phase boundaries and high pressure melt properties of beryllium have been the subject of several recent experimental and theoretical studies. The interest is motivated in part by the use of beryllium as an ablator material in inertial confinement fusion capsule designs. In this work, the high pressure melt curve, Hugoniot crossings, sound speeds, and phase boundaries of beryllium are explored with DFT based quantum molecular dynamics calculations. The entropy differences between the various phases of beryllium are extracted in the vicinity of the melt curve and agree favorably with earlier theoretical work on normal melting. High velocity flyer plate experiments with beryllium targets on Sandia's Z machine have generated high quality data for the Hugoniot, bulk sound speeds, and longitudinal sound speeds. This data provides a tight constraint on the pressure for the onset of shock melting of beryllium and intriguing information on the solid phase prior to melt. The results of the QMD calculations and the experimental results will be compared, and implications for the HCP and BCC phase boundaries of beryllium will be presented.

  4. High pressure semiconductor physics I

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, R K; Paul, William; Suski, Tadeusz

    1998-01-01

    Since its inception in 1966, the series of numbered volumes known as Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. The "Willardson and Beer" Series, as it is widely known, has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. Not only did many of these volumes make an impact at the time of their publication, but they continue to be well-cited years after their original release. Recently, Professor Eicke R. Weber of the University of California at Berkeley joined as a co-editor of the series. Professor Weber, a well-known expert in the field of semiconductor materials, will further contribute to continuing the series' tradition of publishing timely, highly relevant, and long-impacting volumes. Some of the recent volumes, such as Hydrogen in Semiconductors, Imperfections in III/V Materials, Epitaxial Microstructures, High-Speed Heterostructure Devices, Oxygen in Silicon, and others promise indeed that this tra...

  5. High Blood Pressure: Medicines to Help You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... names are given for the drugs in each group.Find your drug. Then read some basic information about your kind of drug. Types of High Blood Pressure Medicines ACE Inhibitors Beta Blockers Calcium Channel Blockers ...

  6. High Blood Pressure May Hike Dementia Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_161398.html High Blood Pressure May Hike Dementia Risk New statement from American Heart Association warns ... in middle age, might open the door to dementia, the American Heart Association warns in a new ...

  7. High-pressure oxidation of ethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; G. Jacobsen, Jon; Rasmussen, Christian T.

    2017-01-01

    Ethane oxidation at intermediate temperatures and high pressures has been investigated in both a laminar flow reactor and a rapid compression machine (RCM). The flow-reactor measurements at 600–900 K and 20–100 bar showed an onset temperature for oxidation of ethane between 700 and 825 K, depending...... as well as results at elevated pressure from literature. The experimental results and the modeling predictions do not support occurrence of NTC behavior in ethane oxidation. Even at the high-pressure conditions of the present work where the C2H5 + O2 reaction yields ethylperoxyl rather than C2H4 + HO2...

  8. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1998-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  9. Elasticity of orthoenstatite at high-pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Yan, J.

    2011-12-01

    Orthoenstatite is an abundant yet complex mineral in Earth's upper mantle. Despite its abundance, the properties of orthopyroxene at high pressure remain ambiguous (e.g., Zhang et al. 2011; Jahn 2008; Kung et al. 2004). We explored select properties of a synthetic powdered orthoenstatite (Mg0.8757Fe0.13)2Si2O6 sample by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nuclear resonance inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) as a function of pressure in a neon pressure medium at 300 K. The XRD measurements were carried out at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source (Berkeley, CA), and the sample was studied up to 34 GPa. NRIXS measurements were carried out at sector 3ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Chicago, IL) in the pressure range of 3 to 17 GPa. From the raw NRIXS data, the partial phonon density of states (DOS) was derived (e.g., Sturhahn 2004). The volume (or pressure) dependence of several properties, such as the Lamb-Mössbauer factor, mean force constant, specific heat, vibrational entropy, and vibrational kinetic energy were determined from the DOS. We will discuss our results from these combined studies and the implications for Earth's upper mantle. References Zhang, D., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and Y. Xiao (2011): Local structure variations observed in orthoenstatite at high-pressures. American Mineralogist, in press. Jahn, S. (2008) High-pressure phase transitions in MgSiO3 orthoenstatite studied by atomistic computer simulation. American Mineralogist, 93(4), 528-532. Kung, J., Li, B., Uchida, T., Wang, Y., Neuville, D., and Liebermann, R. (2004) In situ measurements of sound velocities and densities across the orthopyroxene high-pressure clinopyroxene transition in MgSiO3 at high pressure. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 147(1), 27-44. Sturhahn, W. (2004): Nuclear Resonant Spectroscopy. J. Phys. Condens. Matter, 16, S497-S530.

  10. High pressure optical combustion probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, S.D.; Richards, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed a combustion probe for monitoring flame presence and heat release. The technology involved is a compact optical detector of the OH radical`s UV fluorescence. The OH Monitor/Probe is designed to determine the flame presence and provide a qualitative signal proportional to the flame intensity. The probe can be adjusted to monitor a specific volume in the combustion zone to track spatial fluctuations in the flame. The probe is capable of nanosecond time response and is usually slowed electronically to fit the flame characteristics. The probe is a sapphire rod in a stainless steel tube which may be inserted into the combustion chamber and pointed at the flame zone. The end of the sapphire rod is retracted into the SS tube to define a narrow optical collection cone. The collection cone may be adjusted to fit the experiment. The fluorescence signal is collected by the sapphire rod and transmitted through a UV transmitting, fused silica, fiber optic to the detector assembly. The detector is a side window photomultiplier (PMT) with a 310 run line filter. A Hamamatsu photomultiplier base combined with a integral high voltage power supply permits this to be a low voltage device. Electronic connections include: a power lead from a modular DC power supply for 15 VDC; a control lead for 0-1 volts to control the high voltage level (and therefore gain); and a lead out for the actual signal. All low voltage connections make this a safe and easy to use device while still delivering the sensitivity required.

  11. High-pressure oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Gersen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Methane oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures was investigated in a laminar flow reactor and in a rapid compression machine (RCM). The flow-reactor experiments were conducted at 700–900 K and 100 bar for fuel-air equivalence ratios (Φ) ranging from 0.06 to 19.7, all highly...... diluted in nitrogen. It was found that under the investigated conditions, the onset temperature for methane oxidation ranged from 723 K under reducing conditions to 750 K under stoichiometric and oxidizing conditions. The RCM experiments were carried out at pressures of 15–80 bar and temperatures of 800......–1250 K under stoichiometric and fuel-lean (Φ=0.5) conditions. Ignition delays, in the range of 1–100 ms, decreased monotonically with increasing pressure and temperature. A chemical kinetic model for high-pressure methane oxidation was established, with particular emphasis on the peroxide chemistry...

  12. Structures of Liquid Aluminium under High Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; WANG Guang-Hou; BIAN Xiu-Fang; ZHANG Lin

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out for melt A1 under constant temperature and constant pressure. The interaction between atoms is described by tight-binding many-body potentials based on the second moment approximation to the electronic density of states. The pair correlation function and the pair analysis technique are used to reveal the structural features of liquid Al under normal and high pressure. High pressure is favourable to the existence of bcc clusters 1661 and 1441, but has no effect on the fcc cluster 1421. The bond pair 1551 and 1541 with fivefold symmetry exists at high pressure. The microstructure of liquid is more similar to the non-crystalline structure than to the crystalline structure. The simulation results are supported by thex-ray experimental results.

  13. SONIC SPEED AND SHOCK WAVE IN HIGH VELOCITY AERATED FLOWS FROM HIGH HEAD DISCHARGE STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zhi-yong

    2003-01-01

    The compressible characteristics in aerated flows at the high velocity of about 50m/s were analyzed. Based on the theory of compressible the relations between the sonic speed and shock wave in high-velocity aerated flow were theoretically deduced. And comparisons with measured data were made. The theoretical and experimental results show the sonic speed in aerated flow is merely of the order of several-dozen meters per second, and its minimum value is only 20m/s, which is far much less than that in water or air alone. So high subsonic flow, supersonic flow and transonic flow as well as compression wave, shock wave and expansion wave similarly to aerodnamics may be produced in high velocity aerated flow at the speed of the order of 50m/s. Hence the influences of these compressible characteristics on high head discharge structures can not be neglected, especially on super high dams over 200m high.

  14. Pressure vessel fracture studies pertaining to a PWR LOCA-ECC thermal shock: experiments TSE-1 and TSE-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1976-09-01

    The LOCA-ECC Thermal Shock Program was established to investigate the potential for flaw propagation in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) vessels during injection of emergency core coolant following a loss-of-coolant accident. Studies thus far have included fracture mechanics analyses of typical PWRs, the design and construction of a thermal shock test facility, determination of material properties for test specimens, and two thermal shock experiments with 0.53-m-OD (21-in.) by 0.15-m-wall (6-in.) cylindrical test specimens. The PWR calculations indicated that under some circumstances crack propagation could be expected and that experiments should be conducted for cracks that would have the potential for propagation at least halfway through the wall.

  15. Diffusive Shock Acceleration of High Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    2004-01-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. A key characteristic of this statistical energization mechanism is the absence of a momentum scale; astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and even beyond, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration tim...

  16. High pressure Raman scattering of silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachadorian, Sevak; Scheel, Harald; Thomsen, Christian [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Papagelis, Konstantinos [Materials Science Department, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Colli, Alan [Nokia Research Centre, 21 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Ferrari, Andrea C, E-mail: khachadorian@physik.tu-berlin.de [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-13

    We study the high pressure response, up to 8 GPa, of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with {approx} 15 nm diameter, by Raman spectroscopy. The first order Raman peak shows a superlinear trend, more pronounced compared to bulk Si. Combining transmission electron microscopy and Raman measurements we estimate the SiNWs' bulk modulus and the Grueneisen parameters. We detect an increase of Raman linewidth at {approx} 4 GPa, and assign it to pressure induced activation of a decay process into LO and TA phonons. This pressure is smaller compared to the {approx} 7 GPa reported for bulk Si. We do not observe evidence of phase transitions, such as discontinuities or change in the pressure slopes, in the investigated pressure range.

  17. Note: A high Mach number arc-driven shock tube for turbulence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, J B; Alexander, A B; Johnson, J A

    2013-04-01

    A high Mach arc-driven shock tube has been built at the Center for Plasma Science and Technology of Florida A&M University to study shock waves. A larger apparatus with higher voltage was built to study more stable shock waves and subsequent plasmas. Initial measurements of the apparatus conclude that the desired Mach numbers can be reached using only two-thirds the maximum possible energy that the circuit can provide.

  18. High pressure-high temperature polymorphism and decomposition of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, Zbigniew A; Gupta, Yogendra M

    2013-06-27

    To elucidate the behavior of PETN at thermo-mechanical conditions relevant for shock initiation, Raman spectroscopy, and optical imaging were used to examine its static high pressure and high temperature (HP-HT) response. Experiments were performed on single crystals in a heated diamond anvil cell at pressures to 14 GPa and temperatures ranging from room temperatures to 550 K. Regarding the pressure-induced PETN-I transition to PETN-III at room temperature, our results show that nonhydrostaticity plays an important role in driving this transition. Furthermore, we found that PETN-III transforms to PETN-IV at high temperatures, and this transformation can involve lowering of molecular symmetry from C2 to C1. The HP-HT phase diagram for PETN presented here includes the melting/decomposition curve and boundaries between three PETN phases: PETN-I, PETN-III, and PETN-IV. The relevance of static compression results for shock initiation of PETN is discussed.

  19. Shock adhesion test for composite bonded assembly using a high pulsed power generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, E.; Berthe, L.; Buzaud, E.; Boustie, M.; Arrigoni, M.

    2013-07-01

    In a context of the rising use of composite assemblies in aeronautic or defense fields, the assessment of their strength is a key issue. The method developed in this study attempts to provide solutions. A shock adhesion test based on short compressive loads, obtained by a high pulsed power generator, is proposed as a proof test to ensure the quality of composite bonded assemblies. A calibrated load induces a local tensile stress able to damage the bond interface. The high pulsed power source is the GEnerateur de Pression Isentropique device (Isentropic Pressure Generator), used to generate the required stresses, with a 450 ns pulse duration to test assemblies above the mm thickness range. The understanding of the mechanisms of wave propagation and tensile stress generation within these multilayer assemblies are scientific challenges. The ability of the technique to induce a tensile stress able to disbond the laminates and the assemblies is demonstrated. This paper details the response of carbon epoxy laminates and their bonded assemblies to a shock loading near the damage threshold.

  20. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; Reiser, Sharissa; White, Melanie

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 → hν KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. We present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregate at high pressure.

  1. Effect of blood transfusion, dopamine, or normal saline on neurogenic shock secondary to acutely raised intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimifar, M; Tator, C H; Shanlin, R J; Sole, M J

    1989-06-01

    An experimental model to simulate acutely raised intracranial pressure due to a rapidly expanding intracranial space-occupying lesion was used to produce neurogenic shock. Forty-one rats in neurogenic shock (defined as a mean systemic arterial pressure (SAP) of less than 60 mm Hg) were subjected to various treatments to increase the mean SAP to a level of more than 80 mm Hg. The control group with neurogenic shock received no treatment, and the six treatment groups received infusions of: whole blood, packed cells, plasma, normal saline, dopamine, or a combination of dopamine and saline. Detrimental effects were observed after transfusion of packed cells or whole blood, which caused further deterioration of mean SAP. Although dopamine or the combination of dopamine and saline were both effective (p = 0.0001) for reversing hypotension, the combination was the most effective. If this rat paradigm correlates with human disease, these results indicate that, in the absence of hypovolemia, neurogenic shock due to acute intracranial hypertension should be treated with a combined transfusion of dopamine and normal saline, but not blood since the latter could have a detrimental effect.

  2. Bridgman's concern (shock compression science)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, R. A.

    1994-07-01

    In 1956 P. W. Bridgman published a letter to the editor in the Journal of Applied Physics reporting results of electrical resistance measurements on iron under static high pressure. The work was undertaken to verify the existence of a polymorphic phase transition at 130 kbar (13 GPa) reported in the same journal and year by the Los Alamos authors, Bancroft, Peterson, and Minshall for high pressure, shock-compression loading. In his letter, Bridgman reported that he failed to find any evidence for the transition. Further, he raised some fundamental concerns as to the state of knowledge of shock-compression processes in solids. Later it was determined that Bridgman's static pressure scale was in error, and the shock observations became the basis for calibration of pressure values in static high pressure apparatuses. In spite of the error in pressure scales, Bridgman's concerns on descriptions of shock-compression processes were perceptive and have provided the basis for subsequent fundamental studies of shock-compressed solids. The present paper, written in response to receipt of the 1993 American Physical Society Shock-Compression Science Award, provides a brief contemporary assessment of those shock-compression issues which were the basis of Bridgman's 1956 concerns.

  3. High-speed imaging of dynamic shock wave reflection phenomena

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic shock wave reflection generated by a rapidly pitching wedge in a steady supersonic free stream has been studied with numerical simulation previously. An experimental facility was developed for the investigation of these dynamic phenomena...

  4. Mechanisms of shock-induced reactions in high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which shock waves initiate chemical reactions in explosives is key to understanding their unique and defining property: the ability to undergo rapid explosive decomposition in response to mechanical stimulus. Although shock-induced reactions in explosives have been studied experimentally and computationally for decades, the nature of even the first chemical reactions that occur in response to shock remain elusive. To predictively understand how explosives respond to shock, the detailed sequence of events that occurs - mechanical deformation, energy transfer, bond breakage, and first chemical reactions - must be understood at the quantum-mechanical level. This paper reviews recent work in this field and ongoing experimental and theoretical work at Sandia National Laboratories in this important area of explosive science.

  5. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  6. High temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    the operational temperature and pressure to produce pressurized hydrogen at high rate (m3 H2·h-1·m-2 cell area) and high electrical efficiency. This work describes an exploratory technical study of the possibility to produce hydrogen and oxygen with a new type of alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures...... for immobilization of aqueous KOH solutions. Electrolysis cells with this electrolyte and metal foam based gas diffusion electrodes were successfully demonstrated at temperatures up to 250 °C at 40 bar. Different electro-catalysts were tested in order to reduce the oxygen and hydrogen overpotentials. Current...

  7. Crystal structures at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Wendel Alexander

    2000-10-01

    The diamond anvil cell (DAC) is a unique instrument that can generate pressures equivalent to those inside planetary interiors (pressures on the order of 1 million atmospheres) under sustained conditions. When combined with a bright source of collimated x-rays, the DAC can be used to probe the structure of materials in-situ at ultra-high pressures. An understanding of the high-pressure structure of materials is important in determining what types of processes may take place in the Earth at great depths. Motivated by previous studies showing that xenon becomes metallic at pressures above ˜1 megabar (100 GPa), we examined the stable structures and reactivity of xenon at pressures approaching that of the core-mantle boundary in the Earth. Our findings indicate the transformation of xenon from face-centered cubic (fcc) to hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structures is kinetically hindered at room temperature, with the equilibrium fcc--hcp phase boundary at 21 (+/-3) gigapascals, a pressure lower than was previously thought. Additionally, we find no tendency on the part of xenon to form a metal alloy with iron or platinum to at least 100 to 150 gigapascals, making it unlikely that the Earth's core serves as a reservoir for primordial xenon. Measurements of the compressibility of natural (Mg.75,Fe .25)2SiO4 gamma-spinel at pressures of the Earth's transition zone yield a pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K0 ' = 6.3 (+/-0.3). As gamma-spinel is considered to be a dominant mineral phase of the transition-zone of the Earth's mantle (400--670 km depth), the relatively high value of K0' for gamma-spinel may help explain the rapid increase with depth of seismic velocities through the transition zone. The thermodynamics, mechanisms and kinetics of pressure-induced amorphization are not well understood. We report here new studies indicating little or no entropy difference between the crystalline and glassy states of Ca(OH) 2 (portlandite). Additional work on the pressure

  8. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  9. Bulk sound velocity of porous materials at high pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿华运; 吴强; 谭华; 蔡灵仓; 经福谦

    2002-01-01

    A correction of Walsh's method for bulk sound velocity calculation for shocked porous materials is accomplishedbased on the Wu-Jing thermodynamic equation of state. The corrected bulk velocities for solid and porous sampleswith low porosities are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data published previously. On the basisof this corrected equation, the influence of thermoelectrons on the bulk velocity of shocked materials is discussed indetail at pressures of 50, 70 and 200 GPa. Some interesting phenomena are revealed, which seem to be the uniquefeatures of a dynamic-pressure-loading process and could not be found in static experiments.

  10. Research on Pressure Shock in Hydraulic System%液压系统中的压力冲击研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨斌

    2016-01-01

    Based on theoretical calculation and simulation analysis, this paper got the key factor which affect the pressure shock in valve-control hydraulic system. Then concluded how the tube length and valve open-time affect pressure shock in hydraulic system. And the conclusions were verified based on test. It showed that tube length and valve open-time affect pressure shock in hydraulic system directly. The research also showed that shortening tube length and increasing valve open-time properly can reduce pressure shock effectively. All above provide the direction for the layout and design of hydraulic system part/product, and also provide theoretical basis for optimizing hydraulic system.%通过理论计算和仿真分析,研究影响阀控液压系统压力冲击的关键因素,得出阀控液压系统中的压力冲击与管路长度、阀开启时间的关系,并进行试验验证。结果表明,管路长度、阀开启时间直接影响着阀控液压系统中的压力冲击。缩短管路长度和适当延长阀开启时间,都能有效减小阀控系统中的压力冲击。这为飞机液压系统中元部件的布局和设计提供了方向,为飞机液压系统的完善和优化提供了依据。

  11. Vacuum high-harmonic generation and electromagnetic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhl, P.; King, B.; Ruhl, H.

    2016-04-01

    > When one takes into account the presence of virtual charged states in the quantum vacuum, a nonlinear self-interaction can arise in the propagation of electromagnetic fields. This self-interaction is often referred to as `real photon-photon scattering'. When the centre-of-mass energy of colliding photons is much lower than the rest energy of an electron-positron pair, this quantum effect can be included in the classical field equations of motion as a vacuum current and charge density using the Heisenberg-Euler Lagrangian. Using analytical and numerical methods for subcritical fields, the intrinsic solution to Maxwell's equations has been found for counterpropagating probe and pump plane waves in the presence of vacuum four- and six-wave mixing. In the corresponding all-order solution for the scattered probe, a route to vacuum high-harmonic generation is identified in which a long phase length can compensate for the weakness of interacting fields. The resulting shocks in the probe carrier wave and envelope are studied for different parameter regimes and polarisation set-ups. In this special issue, we study two additional set-ups: that of a slowly varying single-cycle background to highlight the effect of an oscillating background on the probe harmonic spectrum, and that of a few-cycle probe to highlight the smoothing of the harmonic peaks produced by a wider spectrum of probe photons. We also correct sign errors in an earlier publication.

  12. Molecular dissociation and shock-induced cooling in fluid nitrogen at high densities and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radousky, H. B.; Nellis, W. J.; Ross, M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    Radiative temperatures and electrical conductivities were measured for fluid nitrogen compressed dynamically to pressures of 18-90 GPa, temperatures of 4000-14,000 K, and densities of 2-3 g/cu cm. The data show a continuous phase transition above 30 GPa shock pressure and confirm that (delta-P/delta-T)v is less than 0, as indicated previously by Hugoniot equation-of-state experiments. The first observation of shock-induced cooling is also reported. The data are interpreted in terms of molecular dissociation, and the concentration of dissociated molecules is calculated as a function of density and temperature.

  13. Numerical Simulation and Experiment for Underwater Shock Wave in Newly Designed Pressure Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shibuta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern eating habits depend in large part on the development of food processing technology. Thermal treatments are often performed in the conventional food processing, but it can cause discoloration and loss of nutrients of the food by thermal processing or treatment. On the other hand, food processing using an underwater shock wave has little influence of heat and its processing time is very short, preventing the loss of nutrients. In this research optical observation experiment and the numerical simulation were performed, in order to understand and control the behavior of the underwater shock wave in the development of the processing container using an underwater shock wave for the factory and home. In this experiment a rectangular container was used to observe the behavior of the underwater shock wave. In the experiment, the shock wave was generated by using explosive on the shock wave generation side. The shock wave, which passed through the phosphor bronze and propagated from the aluminum sidewall, was observed on the processing container side. Numerical simulation of an analogous experimental model was investigated, where LS-DYNA software was used for the numerical simulation. The comparative study of the experiment and the numerical simulation was investigated. The behavior of a precursor shock wave from the device wall was able to be clarified. This result is used for development of the device in numerical simulation.

  14. Delocalization of Electrons in Strong Insulators at High Dynamic Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Nellis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Systematics of material responses to shock flows at high dynamic pressures are discussed. Dissipation in shock flows drives structural and electronic transitions or crossovers, such as used to synthesize metallic liquid hydrogen and most probably Al2O3 metallic glass. The term “metal” here means electrical conduction in a degenerate system, which occurs by band overlap in degenerate condensed matter, rather than by thermal ionization in a non-degenerate plasma. Since H2 and probably disordered Al2O3 become poor metals with minimum metallic conductivity (MMC virtually all insulators with intermediate strengths do so as well under dynamic compression. That is, the magnitude of strength determines the split between thermal energy and disorder, which determines material response. These crossovers occur via a transition from insulators with electrons localized in chemical bonds to poor metals with electron energy bands. For example, radial extents of outermost electrons of Al and O atoms are 7 a0 and 4 a0, respectively, much greater than 1.7 a0 needed for onset of hybridization at 300 GPa. All such insulators are Mott insulators, provided the term “correlated electrons” includes chemical bonds.

  15. Curved and conformal high-pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, Paul F.; Kuczek, Andrzej E.; Zhao, Wenping

    2016-10-25

    A high-pressure vessel is provided. The high-pressure vessel may comprise a first chamber defined at least partially by a first wall, and a second chamber defined at least partially by the first wall. The first chamber and the second chamber may form a curved contour of the high-pressure vessel. A modular tank assembly is also provided, and may comprise a first mid tube having a convex geometry. The first mid tube may be defined by a first inner wall, a curved wall extending from the first inner wall, and a second inner wall extending from the curved wall. The first inner wall may be disposed at an angle relative to the second inner wall. The first mid tube may further be defined by a short curved wall opposite the curved wall and extending from the second inner wall to the first inner wall.

  16. Superconductivity from insulating elements under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Katsuya

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Even insulating molecule can become metal and superconductor by pressure with relatively high T{sub c}. • The highest T{sub c} is observed in sulfur with 17 K at 160 GPa. • Hydrogen is the best candidate of the highest T{sub c} element. - Abstract: The insulating and superconducting states would seem to have very different characteristics. Can any insulator become a superconductor? One proven method, doping an insulating material with carriers, can create itinerant states inside the gap between the conduction and valence bands. Another method is to squeeze the structure by applying pressure. Pressure can expand the bandwidth and also narrow the energy band gap. So the first step to turn an insulator into a superconductor is to make it metallic. Here we review our experimental research and results on superconductivity induced by applying pressure to insulating molecular systems such as elemental molecules.

  17. Assessment effect of central venous pressure in fluid resuscitation in the patients with shock: a multi-center retrospective research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Bo; XIANG Hu; LIANG Hui; YU Li; XU Tao; YANG Jun-hui; DU Zhao-hui

    2013-01-01

    Background Central venous pressure (CVP) and intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBVI) were used to assess the fluid status.It has previously been shown that CVP is not as accurate as ITBVI for all the shock patients.We therefore hypothesized that the change of CVP has the ability to predict fluid responsiveness in some clinical cases of shock.Methods From September 1st 2009 to September 1st 2011,sixty-three patients with shock from different Intensive Care Unit (ICU) were collected into this retrospective study.All the patients received fluid challenge strategy (infusing 300 ml hydroxyethyl starch in 20 minutes),were monitored with CVP and pulse-indicated continuous cardiac output (PICCO).The correlation between changes in cardiac index (△CI),CVP (△CVP) and ITBVI (△ITBVI) were analyzed.Fluid responsiveness was defined as an increase in CI≥10%.Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for △CVP and △ITBVI.Results For all the patients,there was no correlation between △CI and △CVP (P=0.073),but in the subgroup analysis,the correlation between △CI and △CVP was significant in those younger than 60 years old (P=-0.018) and those with hypovolemic shock (P=0.001).The difference of areas under the ROC curves of △CVP and △ITBVI were not statistically significant in the group younger than 60 years old or hypovolemic shock group (P >0.05,respectively).However,no similar results can be found in the group older than 60 years old and the other two shock type groups from ROC curves of △CVP and △ITBVI.Conclusions △CVP is not suitable for evaluating the volume status of the shock patients with fluid resuscitation regardless of their condition.However,in some ways,△CVP have the ability to predict fluid responsiveness in the younger shock patients or in the hypovolemic shock patients.

  18. Shock tubes and waves; Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Symposium, Niagara Falls, NY, July 6-9, 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treanor, C. E.; Hall, J. G.

    1982-10-01

    The present conference on shock tubes and waves considers shock tube drivers, luminous shock tubes, shock tube temperature and pressure measurement, shock front distortion in real gases, nonlinear standing waves, transonic flow shock wave turbulent boundary interactions, wall roughness effects on reflected shock bifurcation, argon thermal conductivity, pattern generation in gaseous detonations, cylindrical resonators, shock tunnel-produced high gain lasers, fluid dynamic aspects of laser-metal interaction, and the ionization of argon gas behind reflected shock waves. Also discussed are the ionization relaxation of shock-heated plasmas and gases, discharge flow/shock tube studies of singlet oxygen, rotational and vibrational relaxation, chemiluminescence thermal and shock wave decomposition of hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen azide, shock wave structure in gas-particle mixtures at low Mach numbers, binary nucleation in a Ludwieg tube, shock liquefaction experiments, pipeline explosions, the shock wave ignition of pulverized coal, and shock-initiated methane combustion.

  19. High pressure water jet cutting and stripping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, David T.; Babai, Majid K.

    1991-01-01

    High pressure water cutting techniques have a wide range of applications to the American space effort. Hydroblasting techniques are commonly used during the refurbishment of the reusable solid rocket motors. The process can be controlled to strip a thermal protective ablator without incurring any damage to the painted surface underneath by using a variation of possible parameters. Hydroblasting is a technique which is easily automated. Automation removes personnel from the hostile environment of the high pressure water. Computer controlled robots can perform the same task in a fraction of the time that would be required by manual operation.

  20. High temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    and pressures. Two measurement systems were built to perform measurements under high pressures and at elevated temperatures of up to 95 bar and 250 °C, respectively. The conductivity of aqueous KOH and aqueous KOH immobilized in a porous SrTiO3 structure were investigated at elevated temperatures and high...... the operational temperature and pressure to produce pressurized hydrogen at high rate (m3 H2·h-1·m-2 cell area) and high electrical efficiency. This work describes an exploratory technical study of the possibility to produce hydrogen and oxygen with a new type of alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures...... concentrations of the electrolyte using the van der Pauw method in combination with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Conductivity values as high as 2.9 S cm-1 for 45 wt% KOH aqueous KOH and 0.84 S cm-1 for the immobilized KOH of the same concentration were measured at 200 °C. Porous SrTiO3 was used...

  1. High pressure effects on allergen food proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkuti, Judit; Smeller, László

    2013-12-15

    There are several proteins, which can cause allergic reaction if they are inhaled or ingested. Our everyday food can also contain such proteins. Food allergy is an IgE-mediated immune disorder, a growing health problem of great public concern. High pressure is known to affect the structure of proteins; typically few hundred MPa pressure can lead to denaturation. That is why several trials have been performed to alter the structure of the allergen proteins by high pressure, in order to reduce its allergenicity. Studies have been performed both on simple protein solutions and on complex food systems. Here we review those allergens which have been investigated under or after high pressure treatment by methods capable of detecting changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of the proteins. We focus on those allergenic proteins, whose structural changes were investigated by spectroscopic methods under pressure in correlation with the observed allergenicity (IgE binding) changes. According to this criterion we selected the following allergen proteins: Mal d 1 and Mal d 3 (apple), Bos d 5 (milk), Dau c 1 (carrot), Gal d 2 (egg), Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 (peanut), and Gad m 1 (cod).

  2. High pressure effects in anaesthesia and narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; McMillan, Paul F; Greenfield, Susan A

    2006-10-01

    There is growing interest in determining the effects of high pressure on biological functions. Studies of brain processes under hyperbaric conditions can give a unique insight into phenomena such as nitrogen narcosis, inert gas anaesthesia, and pressure reversal of the effects of anaesthetic and narcotic agents. Such research may shed light on the action of anaesthetics, which remains poorly understood, and on the nature of consciousness itself. Various studies have established the behavioural response of organisms to hyperbaric conditions, in the presence or absence of anaesthetic agents. At the molecular level, X-ray crystallography has been used to investigate the incorporation of species like Xe in hydrophobic pockets within model ion channels that may account for pressure effects on neuronal transmission. New magnetic resonance imaging techniques are providing tomographic three-dimensional images that detail brain structure and function, and that can be correlated with behavioural studies and psychological test results. Such whole organ techniques are linked to the molecular scale via voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging studies on brain slices that provide time-resolved images of the dynamic formation and interconnection of inter-neuronal complexes. The VSD experiments are readily adapted to in situ studies under high pressure conditions. In this tutorial review we review the current state of knowledge of hyperbaric effects on brain processes: anaesthesia and narcosis, recent studies at the molecular level via protein crystallography at high pressure in a Xe atmosphere, and we also present some preliminary results of VSD imaging of brain slices under hyperbaric conditions.

  3. Introduction to High-Pressure Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dera, Przemyslaw

    To a common person pressure is just one of the parameters that describe a thermodynamic state. We all hear about it in everyday weather forecasts, and most of us do not associate it with anything particularly unique. Probably the most intuitive idea of the effect of high-pressure comes from movies, where submarine sinking to the bottom of the ocean is gradually crushed by the surrounding water, until its hull implodes. Why, then hundreds of scientists throughout the world spent their lifelong careers studying high-pressure phenomena? Despite all the developments in experimental technologies and instrumentation, modern scientist has very few tools that allow him or her to "grab" two atoms and bring them, in a very controllable way, closer together. Being able to achieve this task means the ability to directly probe interatomic interaction potentials and can cause transformations as dramatic as turning of a common gas into solid metal. Before the reader delves into more advanced topics described later in this book, this introductory chapter aims to explain several elementary, but extremely important concepts in high-pressure science. We will start with a brief discussion of laboratory devices used to produce pressure, address the issue of hydrostaticity, elastic and plastic compression, and will conclude with a short discussion of unique effects of anisotropic stress.

  4. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefano Orsino

    2005-03-30

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical

  5. Photophysics of organic molecules at high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean James

    1978-01-01

    The pressure dependence of emission intensities, energies, and lifetimes of several classes of organic compounds in plastic media were investigated over the range 0-140 kilobars. The fluorescence intensity of 9-anthraldehyde, 9-acetylanthracene, and 9-benzoylanthracene increases remarkably with increasing pressure, accompanied by a large red shift in the emission spectrum. For azulene and several derivatives, the efficiency of fluorescence from both the second and first excited singlet states was pressure dependent as was the relative energy of these states. The rate of internal conversion depended strongly on the energy separating the relevant states. The energy and quantum efficiency of fluorescence for fluorenone in crystalline form and in several polymeric matrices was measured as a function of pressure. The quantum yield, ranged from 0.001 at low pressure to a maximum of about 0.1 at high pressure in paraffinic plastics. Fluorescence quantum yields and phosphorescence quantum yields and lifetimes were measured for pyrazine (P) 2,6-dimethylpyrazine and tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) in PMMA over the pessure range 20-120 kbar. An additional emission, which is attributed to excimer fluorescence, was also observed for these samples and for crystalline pyrazine. The phosphorescence radiative lifetime for P and TMP was about 18 ms.

  6. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Allebrod, Frank; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 ◦C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive...... media, as well as localized sampling of gas evolved at the electrodes for gas analysis. A number of safety and engineering design challenges have been addressed. Furthermore, we present a series of electrochemical cell holders that have been constructed in order to accommodate different types of cells......, to the electrochemical characterization of high temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis cells and the use of pseudo-reference electrodes for the separation of each electrode contribution. A future perspective of various electrochemical processes and devices that can be developed with the use of the established...

  7. Blue emitting organic semiconductors under high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, Matti; Guha, Suchismita

    2016-01-01

    This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure...... and intermolecular self-organization that typically determine transport and optical emission in π-conjugated oligomers and polymers. In this context, hydrostatic pressure through diamond anvil cells has proven to be an elegant tool to control structure and interactions without chemical intervention. This has been...... and intermolecular interactions on optical excitations, electron–phonon interaction, and changes in backbone conformations. This picture is connected to the optical high pressure studies of other π-conjugated systems and emerging x-ray scattering experiments from polyfluorenes which provides a structure-property map...

  8. High pressure photophysics of organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brey, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    High pressure spectroscopic studies on several classes of organic compounds were made both in fluid solution (to 10 kbar) and in polymeric media (to 40 kbar). The first three studies were conducted in fluid solution and concern the effect of solvent viscosity on the nonradiative deactivation rates from electronically excited states. Pressure was utilized to attain high viscosities in organic solvents at room temperature. The primary experimental technique used was fluorescence emission spectroscopy. In the fourth and last study observations were made both in fluid solution and in plastic films. The focus of this study was the effect of pressure on the solvent-chromophore dispersion interaction in several polyenes and the concomitant changes in both the radiative and non-radiative rates from the excited states. Extensive use was made of fluorescence lifetime measurements and excitation spectra. 105 references.

  9. Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_163468.html Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn With February designated National Heart Month, ... physicians warns that too many Americans struggle with high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a major risk factor ...

  10. Advanced Diagnostics for High Pressure Spray Combustion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skeen, Scott A.; Manin, Julien Luc; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2014-06-01

    The development of accurate predictive engine simulations requires experimental data to both inform and validate the models, but very limited information is presently available about the chemical structure of high pressure spray flames under engine- relevant conditions. Probing such flames for chemical information using non- intrusive optical methods or intrusive sampling techniques, however, is challenging because of the physical and optical harshness of the environment. This work details two new diagnostics that have been developed and deployed to obtain quantitative species concentrations and soot volume fractions from a high-pressure combusting spray. A high-speed, high-pressure sampling system was developed to extract gaseous species (including soot precursor species) from within the flame for offline analysis by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A high-speed multi-wavelength optical extinction diagnostic was also developed to quantify transient and quasi-steady soot processes. High-pressure sampling and offline characterization of gas-phase species formed following the pre-burn event was accomplished as well as characterization of gas-phase species present in the lift-off region of a high-pressure n-dodecane spray flame. For the initial samples discussed in this work several species were identified, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); however, quantitative mole fractions were not determined. Nevertheless, the diagnostic developed here does have this capability. Quantitative, time-resolved measurements of soot extinction were also accomplished and the novel use of multiple incident wavelengths proved valuable toward characterizing changes in soot optical properties within different regions of the spray flame.

  11. Pulse shaping techniques for a high-g shock tester based on collision principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhengyong; Tang, Chuansheng; Li, Yang; Han, Junliang; Wu, Guoxiong

    2016-09-01

    Pulse shaping techniques are discussed in this paper for the practicability of a developed high-g shock tester. The tester is based on collision principle where there is a one-level velocity amplifier. A theoretical and experimental study of pulse shaping techniques is presented. A model was built and theoretical formulae were deduced for the shock peak acceleration and its duration. Then theoretical analysis and some experiments were conducted. The test results verify the validity of theoretical model and show that the shock tester can generate the expected high-g shock pulses by integrated usage of different impact velocities and pulse shapers made from different materials. This is important in practical applications where the items under test can be shown to excite specific resonances at predetermined acceleration levels using the shock tester.

  12. Electron acceleration in a nonrelativistic shock with very high Alfv\\'en Mach number

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Y; Hoshino, M

    2013-01-01

    Electron acceleration associated with various plasma kinetic instabilities in a nonrelativistic, very-high-Alfv\\'en Mach-number ($M_A \\sim 45$) shock is revealed by means of a two-dimensional fully kinetic PIC simulation. Electromagnetic (ion Weibel) and electrostatic (ion-acoustic and Buneman) instabilities are strongly activated at the same time in different regions of the two-dimensional shock structure. Relativistic electrons are quickly produced predominantly by the shock surfing mechanism with the Buneman instability at the leading edge of the foot. The energy spectrum has a high-energy tail exceeding the upstream ion kinetic energy accompanying the main thermal population. This gives a favorable condition for the ion acoustic instability at the shock front, which in turn results in additional energization. The large-amplitude ion Weibel instability generates current sheets in the foot, implying another dissipation mechanism via magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional shock structure in the very-hi...

  13. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V. [Instituto de Tecnologías y Ciencias de la Ingeniería, “Ing. H. Fernández Long,” Av. Paseo Colón 850 (1063), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Errandonea, D., E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Institut Universitari de Ciència dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, c/ Doctor Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Agouram, S. [Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de València, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  14. Dynamic behaviour and shock-induced martensite transformation in near-beta Ti-5553 alloy under high strain rate loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti-5553 alloy is a near-beta titanium alloy with high strength and high fracture toughness. In this paper, the dynamic behaviour and shock-induced martensite phase transformation of Ti-5553 alloy with alpha/beta phases were investigated. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar was employed to investigate the dynamic properties. Microstructure evolutions were characterized by Scanning Electronic Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscope. The experimental results have demonstrated that Ti-5553 alloy with alpha/beta phases exhibits various strain rate hardening effects, both failure through adiabatic shear band. Ti-5553 alloy with Widmannstatten microstructure exhibit more obvious strain rate hardening effect, lower critical strain rate for ASB nucleation, compared with the alloy with Bimodal microstructures. Under dynamic compression, shock-induced beta to alpha” martensite transformation occurs.

  15. Free Piston Double Diaphragm Shock Tube

    OpenAIRE

    OGURA, Eiji; FUNABIKI, Katsushi; SATO, Shunichi; Abe, Takashi; 小倉, 栄二; 船曳, 勝之; 佐藤, 俊逸; 安部, 隆士

    1997-01-01

    A free piston double diaphragm shock tube was newly developed for generation of high Mach number shock wave. Its characteristics was investigated for various operation parameters; such as a strength of the diaphragm at the end of the comparession tube, an initial pressure of low pressure tube, an initial pressure of medium pressure tube and the volume of compression tube. Under the restriction of fixed pressures for the driver high pressure tube (32×10^5Pa) and the low pressure tube (40Pa) in...

  16. Nanoshells as a high-pressure gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempere, Jacques; van den Broeck, Nick; Putteneers, Katrijn; Silvera, Isaac

    2012-02-01

    Nanoshells, consisting of multiple spherical layers, have an extensive list of applications, usually performing the function of a probe. We add a new application to this list in the form of a high-pressure gauge in a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC). In a DAC, where high pressures are reached by pressing two diamonds together, existing gauges fail at higher pressures because of calibration difficulties and obscuring effects in the diamonds. The nanoshell gauge does not face this issue since its optical spectrum can be engineered by altering the thickness of its layers. Furthermore their properties are measured by broad band optical transmission spectroscopy leading to a very large signal-to-noise ratio even in the multi-megabar pressure regime where ruby measurements become challenging. Theoretical calculations based on the Maxwell equations in a spherical geometry combined with the Vinet equation of state show that a three-layer geometry (SiO2-Au-SiO2) indeed has a measurable pressure-dependent optical response desirable for gauges.

  17. Diagnostics of a High Pressure Helium Microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Koleva, Ivanka; Economou, Demetre; Donnelly, Vincent

    2004-09-01

    Gas and plasma diagnostics were performed in a slot-type DC microplasma (200 microns gap) discharge at high pressures. The gas temperature in a helium discharge was estimated by adding small quantities of nitrogen (excimer. At 250 Torr pressure and 200 mA/cm2 current density, the gas temperature was Tg = 350 +/- 25 K. The measured gas temperature was almost independent (to within experimental uncertainty) of pressure (in the range of 150 Torr - 600 Torr), and current density (in the range of 100 mA/cm2 - 400 mA/cm2). These measurements were consistent with a simple heat transfer model. Spatially resolved measurements of electron temperature were also performed using trace rare gas optical emission actinometry (TRG-OES). These measurements are greatly complicated by collisional quenching at the high operating pressures. Electron density and electron temperature profiles was deduced by comparing emission intensities from the Paschen 2px (x = 1-10) manifold of Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe trace gases. Results suggested that the electron temperature peaks in the cathode sheath region, while the plasma density peaks away from the cathode sheath. A self-consistent fluid model of a DC helium microdischarge was in agreement with the experimental data. The model was used to study the dependence of discharge characteristics on operating conditions (pressure, gap spacing, current density, etc.).

  18. Teaming Up Against High Blood Pressure

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-09-04

    This podcast is based on the September 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. A team-based approach by patients, health care systems, and health care providers is one of the best ways to treat uncontrolled high blood pressure.  Created: 9/4/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/4/2012.

  19. High Pressure Inactivation of HAV within Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to be inactivated within Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by high pressure processing was evaluated. HAV was bioaccumulated within mussels to approximately 6-log10 PFU by exposure of mussels to HAV-contamina...

  20. High pressure and synchrotron radiation satellite workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, J.; Guignot, N.; Morard, G.; Mezouar, M.; Andrault, D.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Sturhahn, W.; Daniel, I.; Reynard, B.; Simionovici, A.; Sanchez Valle, C.; Martinez, I.; Kantor, I.; Dubrovinsky, I.; Mccammon, C.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Kurnosiv, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Goncharenko, I.; Loubeyre, P.; Desgreniers, S.; Weck, G.; Yoo, C.S.; Iota, V.; Park, J.; Cynn, H.; Gorelli, F.; Toulemonde, P.; Machon, D.; Merlen, A.; San Miguel, A.; Amboage, M.; Aquilanti, G.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.; Itie, J.P.; Mcmillan, P.F.; Trapananti, A.; Di Cicco, A.; Panfilis, S. de; Filipponi, A.; Kreisel, J.; Bouvier, P.; Dkhil, B.; Chaabane, B.; Rosner, H.; Koudela, D.; Schwarz, U.; Handestein, A.; Hanfland, M.; Opahle, I.; Koepernik, K.; Kuzmin, M.; Mueller, K.H.; Mydosh, J.; Richter, M.; Hejny, C.; Falconi, S.; Lundegaard, L.F.; Mcmahon, M.I; Loa, I.; Syassen, K.; Wang, X.; Roth, H.; Lorenz, T.; Farber Daniel, I.; Antonangeli Daniele, I.; Krisch, M.; Badro, J.; Fiquet, G.; Occelli, F.; Mao, W.L.; Mao, H.K.; Eng, P.; Kao, C.C.; Shu, J.F.; Hemley, R.J.; Tse, J.S.; Yao, Y.; Deen, P.P.; Paolasini, I.; Braithwaite, D.; Kernavanois, N.; Lapertot, G.; Rupprecht, K.; Leupold, O.; Ponkratz, U.; Wortmann, G.; Beraud, A.; Krisch, M.; Farber, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Aracne, C.; Zarestky, J.L.; Mcqueeney, R.; Mathon, O.; Baudelet, F.; Decremps, F.; Itie, J.P.; Nataf, I.; Pascarelli, S.; Polian, A

    2006-07-01

    The workshop is dedicated to recent advances on science at high pressure at third generation synchrotron sources. A variety of experiments using synchrotron radiation techniques including X-ray diffraction, EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), inelastic X-ray scattering, Compton scattering and Moessbauer spectroscopy of crystalline, liquid or amorphous samples, are reported. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  1. Foaming Glass Using High Pressure Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    Foam glass is a high added value product which contributes to waste recycling and energy efficiency through heat insulation. The foaming can be initiated by a chemical or physical process. Chemical foaming with aid of a foaming agent is the dominant industrial process. Physical foaming has two...... microscope above maximum foaming temperature gives a suitable foaming temperature for the remaining samples. We show that the foaming kinetics depend on the type of gas and the pressure. A critical pressure of around 20 MPa is found to give the largest expansion for all gasses. Samples are obtained with 100...

  2. Generation of shock-free pressure waves in shaped resonators by boundary driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, C; Huang, X Y; Nguyen, N T

    2007-05-01

    Investigation of high amplitude pressure oscillations generated by boundary driving in shaped resonators has been carried out both theoretically and experimentally. In the theoretical modeling, the acoustic resonance in an axisymmetric resonator is studied by the Galerkin method. The resonator is exponentially expanded and the boundary driving is provided by a piston at one end. The pressure wave forms, amplitudes, resonance frequencies, and ratio of pressures at the two ends of the resonator are calculated for various expansion flare constants and driving strengths. These results are partially compared with those generated by shaking the resonator. They are also verified in the experiment, in which an exponentially expanded resonator is connected to a speaker box functioning as the piston. The experiment is further extended to a horn-shaped resonator with a rectangular cross section. The boundary driving in this case is generated by a circular piezoelectric disk, which forms one sidewall of the resonator cavity. The characteristics of axisymmetric resonators, such as the resonance frequency and amplitude ratio of pressures at the two ends, are observed in this low aspect ratio rectangular resonator with the sidewall driving.

  3. Immediate Dose-Response Effect of High-Energy Versus Low-Energy Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on Cutaneous Microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Robert; Sorg, Heiko; Forstmeier, Vinzent; Knobloch, Karsten; Liodaki, Eirini; Stang, Felix Hagen; Mailaender, Peter; Kisch, Tobias

    2016-12-01

    Elucidation of the precise mechanisms and therapeutic options of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is only at the beginning. Although immediate real-time effects of ESWT on cutaneous hemodynamics have recently been described, the dose response to different ESWT energies in cutaneous microcirculation has never been examined. Thirty-nine Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups that received either focused high-energy shock waves (group A: total of 1000 impulses, 10 J) to the lower leg of the hind limb, focused low-energy shock waves (group B: total of 300 impulses, 1 J) or placebo shock wave treatment (group C: 0 impulses, 0 J) using a multimodality shock wave delivery system (Duolith SD-1 T-Top, Storz Medical, Tägerwilen, Switzerland). Immediate microcirculatory effects were assessed with the O2C (oxygen to see) system (LEA Medizintechnik, Giessen, Germany) before and for 20 min after application of ESWT. Cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation increased significantly higher after high-energy ESWT than after low-energy and placebo ESWT (A: 29.4% vs. B: 17.3% vs. C: 3.3%; p = 0.003). Capillary blood velocity was significantly higher after high-energy ESWT and lower after low-energy ESWT versus placebo ESWT (group A: 17.8% vs. group B: -22.1% vs. group C: -5.0%, p = 0.045). Post-capillary venous filling pressure was significantly enhanced in the high-energy ESWT group in contrast to the low-energy ESWT and placebo groups (group A: 25% vs. group B: 2% vs. group C: -4%, p = 0.001). Both high-energy and low-energy ESWT affect cutaneous hemodynamics in a standard rat model. High-energy ESWT significantly increases parameters of cutaneous microcirculation immediately after application, resulting in higher tissue oxygen saturation, venous filling pressure and blood velocity, which suggests higher tissue perfusion with enhanced oxygen saturation, in contrast to low-energy as well as placebo ESWT. Low-energy ESWT also increased tissue oxygen

  4. (Ultra high pressure homogenization for continuous high pressure sterilization of pumpable foods - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eGeorget

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial spores have a strong resistance to both chemical and physical hurdles and create a risk for food industry which has been tackled by applying high thermal intensity treatments to sterilize food. These strong thermal treatments lead to reduction of the organoleptic and nutritional properties of food and alternative are actively searched for. Innovative hurdles offer an alternative to inactivate bacterial spores. In particular, recent technological developments have enabled a new generation of high pressure homogenizer working at pressures up to 400 MPa and thus opening new opportunities for high pressure sterilization of foods. In this short review, we summarize the work conducted on (ultra-high pressure homogenization (UHPH to inactivate endospores in model and food systems. Specific attention is given to process parameters (pressure, inlet and valve temperatures. This review gathers the current state of the art and underlines the potential of UHPH sterilization of pumpable foods while highlighting the needs for future work.

  5. Ultrafast ignition with relativistic shock waves induced by high power lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shalom; Eliezer; Noaz; Nissim; Shirly; Vinikman; Pinhasi; Erez; Raicher; José; Maria; Martinez; Val

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider laser intensities greater than 1016 W cm-2where the ablation pressure is negligible in comparison with the radiation pressure.The radiation pressure is caused by the ponderomotive force acting mainly on the electrons that are separated from the ions to create a double layer(DL).This DL is accelerated into the target,like a piston that pushes the matter in such a way that a shock wave is created.Here we discuss two novel ideas.Firstly,the transition domain between the relativistic and non-relativistic laser-induced shock waves.Our solution is based on relativistic hydrodynamics also for the above transition domain.The relativistic shock wave parameters,such as compression,pressure,shock wave and particle flow velocities,sound velocity and rarefaction wave velocity in the compressed target,and temperature are calculated.Secondly,we would like to use this transition domain for shockwave-induced ultrafast ignition of a pre-compressed target.The laser parameters for these purposes are calculated and the main advantages of this scheme are described.If this scheme is successful a new source of energy in large quantities may become feasible.

  6. Zeeman Effect in Ruby at High Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Ioana

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a versatile fiber-coupled system for magneto-optical spectroscopy measurements at high pressure. The system is based on a miniature Cu-alloy Diamond Anvil Cell (from D'Anvils, Ltd) fitted with a custom-designed He gas-actuated membrane for in-situ pressure control, and coupled with a He transfer cryostat incorporating a superconducting magnet (from Quantum Designs). This system allows optical measurements (Raman, photoluminescence, reflectivity) within wide ranges of pressures (up to 100GPa), temperatures (4.2-300K) and magnetic fields (0-9T). We employ this system to examine the effect of pressure and non-hydrostatic stress on the Zeeman split d-d transitions of Cr^3+ in ruby (Al2O3: Cr^3+). We determine the effect of pressure and non-hydrostaticity on the trigonal crystal field in this material, and discuss the use of the Zeman-split ruby fluorescence as a possible probe for deviatoric stresses in diamond anvil cell experiments.

  7. High Pressure Behavior of FeOOH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, M. M.; Gleason, A. E.; Mao, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the stability and properties of simple hydroxides at high pressures and temperatures offers an important first step toward quantifying more complex hydrogen-bearing compounds relevant to the Earth's interior. We focus on iron-oxy-hydroxides because they may be an important Fe and water bearing component in the deep Earth. Goethite (α-FeOOH) transforms to a high-pressure phase, ɛ-FeOOH, which is isostructural with δ-AlOOH, a material which may transport hydrogen to the core-mantle boundary. Here we present XES spectroscopy data of powder samples of synthesized alpha-FeOOH, beta-FeOOH and gamma-FeOOH monitoring their electronic spin transition. The samples was loaded into a Beryllium gasket, where a 50 micron hole served as the sample chamber with 300 micron culet diamond paired with a beveled 150 micron diamond in a diamond-anvil cell (DAC) without a pressure transmitting medium. Pressure was determined using ruby fluorescence (Mao et al. 1978). Using the incident X-ray energy centered at 11.3 KeV from the Advanced Photon Source, beam line HPCAT 16-ID-D, we measured Fe K-β 13 emission to pressures greater than 73 GPa. For alpha-FeOOH, we saw a clear shift in the main peak to lower energy, and an increasingly diminishing K beta prime peak intensity, indicating the sample was undergoing an electronic spin transition. The K beta prime peak completely disappeared at a pressure greater than 73 GPa. Beta-FeOOH showed no evidence of the beginnings of a spin transition, while gamma- FeOOH underwent an incomplete transition.

  8. Comparison Between Surf and Multi-Shock Forest Fire High Explosive Burn Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Nicholas Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-18

    PAGOSA1 has several different burn models used to model high explosive detonation. Two of these, Multi-Shock Forest Fire and Surf, are capable of modeling shock initiation. Accurately calculating shock initiation of a high explosive is important because it is a mechanism for detonation in many accident scenarios (i.e. fragment impact). Comparing the models to pop-plot data give confidence that the models are accurately calculating detonation or lack thereof. To compare the performance of these models, pop-plots2 were created from simulations where one two cm block of PBX 9502 collides with another block of PBX 9502.

  9. Studying astrophysical collisionless shocks with counterstreaming plasmas from high power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Ryutov, D. D.; Ross, J. S.; Kugland, N. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Plechaty, C.; Pollaine, S. M.; Remington, B. A.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Morita, T.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D. H.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Pelka, A.; Liang, E.; Woolsey, N.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Grosskopf, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    Collisions of high Mach number flows occur frequently in astrophysics, and the resulting shock waves are responsible for the properties of many astrophysical phenomena, such as supernova remnants, Gamma Ray Bursts and jets from Active Galactic Nuclei. Because of the low density of astrophysical plasmas, the mean free path due to Coulomb collisions is typically very large. Therefore, most shock waves in astrophysics are "collisionless", since they form due to plasma instabilities and self-generated magnetic fields. Laboratory experiments at the laser facilities can achieve the conditions necessary for the formation of collisionless shocks, and will provide a unique avenue for studying the nonlinear physics of collisionless shock waves. We are performing a series of experiments at the Omega and Omega-EP lasers, in Rochester, NY, with the goal of generating collisionless shock conditions by the collision of two high-speed plasma flows resulting from laser ablation of solid targets using ˜1016 W/cm2 laser irradiation. The experiments will aim to answer several questions of relevance to collisionless shock physics: the importance of the electromagnetic filamentation (Weibel) instabilities in shock formation, the self-generation of magnetic fields in shocks, the influence of external magnetic fields on shock formation, and the signatures of particle acceleration in shocks. Our first experiments using Thomson scattering diagnostics studied the plasma state from a single foil and from double foils whose flows collide "head-on". Our data showed that the flow velocity and electron density were 108 cm/s and 1019 cm-3, respectively, where the Coulomb mean free path is much larger than the size of the interaction region. Simulations of our experimental conditions show that weak Weibel mediated current filamentation and magnetic field generation were likely starting to occur. This paper presents the results from these first Omega experiments.

  10. Studies on micro-structures at vapor-liquid interfaces of film boiling on hot liquid surface at arriving of a shock pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Akira; Lee, S. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    In vapor explosions, a pressure wave (shock wave) plays a fundamental role in the generation, propagation and escalation of the explosion. Transient volume change by rapid heat flow from a high temperature liquid to a low temperature volatile one and phase change generate micro-scale flow and the pressure wave. One of key issues for the vapor explosion is to make clear the mechanism to support the explosive energy release from hot drop to cold liquid. According to our observations by an Image Converter Camera, growth rate of vapor film around a hot tin drop became several times higher than that around a hot Platinum tube at the same conditions when a pressure pulse collapsed the film. The thermally induced fragmentation was followed by the explosive growth rate of the hot drop. In the previous report, we have proposed that the interface instability and fragmentation model in which the fine Taylor instability of vapor-liquid interface at the collapsing and re-growth phase of vapor film and the instability induced by the high pressure spots at the drop surface were assumed. In this study, the behavior of the vapor-liquid interface region at arrival of a pressure pulse was investigated by the CIPRIS code which is able to simulate dynamics of transient multi-phase interface regions. It is compared with the observation results. Through detailed investigations of these results, the mechanisms of the thermal fragmentation of single drop are discussed. (J.P.N.)

  11. Yoga Called Good Medicine for High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_162446.html Yoga Called Good Medicine for High Blood Pressure People who added this practice to a healthy ... elevated blood pressure] are likely to develop hypertension [high blood pressure] unless they improve their lifestyle," said study author ...

  12. Is sodium a superconductor under high pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutchton, Roxanne; Chen, Xiaojia; Wu, Zhigang

    2017-01-07

    Superconductivity has been predicted or measured for most alkali metals under high pressure, but the computed critical temperature (Tc) of sodium (Na) at the face-centered cubic (fcc) phase is vanishingly low. Here we report a thorough, first-principles investigation of superconductivity in Na under pressures up to 260 GPa, where the metal-to-insulator transition occurs. Linear-response calculations and density functional perturbation theory were employed to evaluate phonon distributions and the electron-phonon coupling for bcc, fcc, cI16, and tI19 Na. Our results indicate that the maximum electron-phonon coupling parameter, λ, is 0.5 for the cI16 phase, corresponding to a theoretical peak in the critical temperature at Tc≈1.2 K. When pressure decreases or increases from 130 GPa, Tc drops quickly. This is mainly due to the lack of p-d hybridization in Na even at 260 GPa. Since current methods based on the Eliashberg and McMillian formalisms tend to overestimate the Tc (especially the peak values) of alkali metals, we conclude that under high pressure-before the metal-to-insulator transition at 260 GPa-superconductivity in Na is very weak, if it is measurable at all.

  13. Picosecond High Pressure Gas Switch experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cravey, W.R.; Freytag, E.K.; Goerz, D.A.; Poulsen, P.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1993-08-01

    A high Pressure Gas Switch has been developed and tested at LLNL. Risetimes on the order of 200 picoseconds have been observed at 1 kHz prf and 1 atmosphere pressures. Calculations show that switching closure times on the order of tens of picoseconds can be achieved at higher pressures and electric fields. A voltage hold-off of 1 MV/cm has been measured at 10 atmospheres and several MV/cm appears possible with the HPGS. With such high electric field levels, energy storage of tens of Joules in a reasonably sized package is achievable. Initial HPGS performance has been characterized using the WASP pulse generator at LLNL. A detailed description of the switch used for initial testing is given. Switch recovery times of 1-ms have been measured at 1 atmosphere. Data on the switching uniformity, voltage hold-off recovery, and pulse repeatability, is presented. In addition, a physics switch model is described and results are compared with experimental data. Modifications made to the WASP HV pulser in order to drive the HPGS will also be discussed. Recovery times of less than 1 ms were recorded without gas flow in the switch chambers. Low pressure synthetic air was used as the switch dielectric. Longer recovery times were required when it was necessary to over-voltage the switch.

  14. Strain engineered pyrochlore at high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Turner, Katlyn M.; Park, Sulgiye; Fuentes, Antonio F.; Park, Changyong; Ewing, Rodney C.; Mao, Wendy L.

    2017-05-22

    Strain engineering is a promising method for next-generation materials processing techniques. Here, we use mechanical milling and annealing followed by compression in diamond anvil cell to tailor the intrinsic and extrinsic strain in pyrochlore, Dy2Ti2O7 and Dy2Zr2O7. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray pair distribution function analysis, and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize atomic order over short-, medium-, and long-range spatial scales, respectively, under ambient conditions. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were further employed to interrogate the material in situ at high pressure. High-pressure behavior is found to depend on the species and concentration of defects in the sample at ambient conditions. Overall, we show that defects can be engineered to lower the phase transformation onset pressure by ~50% in the ordered pyrochlore Dy2Zr2O7, and lower the phase transformation completion pressure by ~20% in the disordered pyrochlore Dy2Zr2O7. These improvements are achieved without significantly sacrificing mechanical integrity, as characterized by bulk modulus.

  15. Conversion of Dynamic High Pressures from Air to Water for a Spherical TNT Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Sharma

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical method has been applied to convert the dynamic high pressures from air-to-water for a spherical TNT charge. Standard equation of scaling law in air for TNT has been utilised to make the necessary conversions. The investigations have been made by taking into consideration the ambient pressure values for the two media. The calculations have been performed under the scaled distances to get better results. Experimental measurements using indigenous blast pressure gauge have been undertaken by detonating spherical charges of TNT under the same scaled distances in water to check the correctness of results and direct application of this method. A fairly close agreement between the theoretically computed and the experimental values of the dynamic high pressures shows the practical utility of this approach in that it enables an estimate of the experimental shock wave pressures, without conducting underwater experiments.

  16. Molecular dynamics of water at high temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodholt, John; Wood, Bernard

    1990-09-01

    There are currently no precise P-V-T data for water at pressures above 8.9 kbars and temperatures above 900°C. Many petrological processes in the lower crust and upper mantle take place under more extreme conditions, however and petrologists commonly rely on empirical equations of state such as the modified Redlich-Kwong equation (MRK) to extrapolate the low pressure data. In this study we have taken an alternative approach and attempted to simulate the P-V-T properties of water using molecular dynamics. The TIP4P intermolecular potential for H 2O ( JORGENSEN et al., 1983) has had considerable success predicting the properties of water at low temperatures and pressures up to 10 kbar ( MADURA et al., 1988). We have extended its application by making molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at a density of 1.0 g/cc from 300 to 2300 K and 0.5 to 40 kbars. The results agree with the P-V-T data of BURNHAM et al. (1969) (up to 10 kbars) with an average error of under 2%. This is a much better concordance than is obtained with any of the currently used versions of MRK. At 300 kbars and 2000 K the MD simulations predict densities within 8% of those obtained in the shock wave experiments of KORMER (1968). This is a very good agreement given the fact that water ionizes to some extent at high pressures ( MITCHELL and NELLIS, 1982) and we have made no provisions for this effect. We conclude that molecular dynamics simulations provide the possibility of estimating P-V-T properties in the upper mantle P-T regime with very good accuracy.

  17. High Pressure - High Temperature Polymorphism in Ta: Resolving an Ongoing Experimental Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkovsky, L; Chen, S P; Preston, D L; Belonoshko, A B; Rosengren, A; Mikhaylushkin, A S; Simak, S I; Moriarty, J A

    2010-04-07

    Phase diagrams of refractory metals remain essentially unknown. Moreover, there is an ongoing controversy over the high pressure (P) melting temperatures of these metals: results of diamond anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave experiments differ by at least a factor of two. From an extensive ab initio study on tantalum we discovered that the body-centered cubic phase, its physical phase at ambient conditions, transforms to another solid phase, possibly hexagonal omega phase, at high temperature (T). Hence the sample motion observed in DAC experiments is not due to melting but internal stresses accompanying a solid-solid transformation, as explained in more detail in our work. In view of our results on tantalum and previous work on molybdenum, as well as other published data, it is highly plausible that high-PT polymorphism is a general feature of Groups V and VI refractory metals.

  18. Dynamic high pressure measurements using a Fiber Bragg Grating probe and an arrayed waveguide grating spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarin, Y.; Lefrançois, A.; Magne, S.; Woirin, K.; Sinatti, F.; Osmont, A.; Luc, J.

    2016-08-01

    High pressure shock profiles are monitored using a long Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG). Such thin probe, with a diameter of typically 150 μm, can be inserted directly into targets for shock plate experiments. The shocked FBG's portion is stressed under compression, which increases its optical group index and shortens its grating period. Placed along the 2D symmetrical axis of the cylindrical target, the second effect is stronger and the reflected spectrum shifts towards the shorter wavelengths. The dynamic evolution of FBG spectra is recorded with a customized Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG) spectrometer covering the C+L band. The AWG provides 40 channels of 200-GHz spacing with a special flattop design. The output channels are fiber-connected to photoreceivers (bandwidth: DC - 400 MHz or 10 kHz - 2 GHz). The experimental setup was a symmetric impact, completed in a 110-mm diameter single-stage gas gun with Aluminum (6061T6) impactors and targets. The FBG's central wavelength was 1605 nm to cover the pressure range of 0 - 8 GPa. The FBG was 50-mm long as well as the target's thickness. The 20-mm thick impactor maintains a shock within the target over a distance of 30 mm. For the impact at 522 m/s, the sustained pressure of 3.6 GPa, which resulted in a Bragg shift of (26.2 +/- 1.5) nm, is measured and retrieved with respectively thin-film gauges and the hydrodynamic code Ouranos. The shock sensitivity of the FBG is about 7 nm/GPa, but it decreases with the pressure level. The overall spectra evolution is in good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  19. The effect of high energy shock waves focused on cortical bone: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulesar Sukul, D M; Johannes, E J; Pierik, E G; van Eijck, G J; Kristelijn, M J

    1993-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has become an accepted alternative for the management of nephrolithiasis and cholelithiasis. Direct impact of shock waves cause tear and shear forces at transition sites between tissues with divergent acoustic impedances leading to stone fragmentation. The aim of this study was to determine whether shock waves can cause cortical bone damage at all and, if so, what the relationship is, if any, between the energy density of the shock waves, the number of shock waves applied, and the resulting cortical bone damage. With the Siemens Lithostar Plus with overhead module, electromagnetic shock waves, generated under water with energy densities of 0.23, 0.33, 0.42, or 0.54 mJ/mm2, corresponding with power settings 2, 4, 6, and 8, were applied to bone specimens, i.e., of rabbit femurs and tibiae. Prior to exposure to the shock waves, the bones were mounted on a specially constructed perspex holder which could be placed in a water-filled test basin with an elastic membrane in the front through which the shock waves propagate without loss of energy. This setup made it possible not only to induce complete fractures, but also to detect the existence of a linear relationship with a Spearman rank correlation coefficient of -0.72 (P < or = 0.01) between the energy level of the shock waves and the severity of the cortical bone defects. The latter findings are especially of great importance because this means that the process can be controlled and that the cortical effects will be predictable and reproducible. This study should be considered a preliminary test concerning the effects of high energy shock wave on bone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Inspection technology for high pressure pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae H.; Lee, Jae C.; Eum, Heung S.; Choi, Yu R.; Moon, Soon S.; Jang, Jong H

    2000-02-01

    Various kinds of defects are likely to be occurred in the welds of high pressure pipes in nuclear power plants. Considering the recent accident of Zuruga nuclear power plant in Japan, reasonable policy is strongly requested for the high pressure pipe integrity. In this study, we developed the technologies to inspect pipe welds automatically. After development of scanning robot prototype in the first research year, we developed and implemented the algorithm of automatic tracking of the scanning robot along the weld line of the pipes. We use laser slit beam on weld area and capture the image using digital camera. Through processing of the captures image, we finally determine the weld line automatically. In addition, we investigated a new technology on micro systems for developing micro scanning robotic inspection of the pipe welds. The technology developed in this study is being transferred to the industry. (author)

  1. Modeling High Pressure Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    cathode discharge excimer lamps , Phys. Plasmas 7, 286 (2000). [3] RH Stark and KH Schoenbach, Direct high pressure glow discharges, J. Appl. Phys...temperature profiles in argon glow discharges, J. Appl. Phys. 88, 2234 (2000) [8] M. Moselhy, W. Shi, R. Stark, A flat glow discharge excimer radiation...MHCD acts as a plasma cathode for a third electrode (anode). Some experimental results in this geometry are available for argon and for air from the

  2. High Pressure Multicomponent Adsorption in Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1999-01-01

    We analyse adsorption of a multicomponent mixture at high pressure on the basis of the potential theory of adsorption. The adsorbate is considered as a segregated mixture in the external field produced by a solid adsorbent. we derive an analytical equation for the thickness of a multicomponent film...... close to a dew point. This equation (asymptotic adsorption equation, AAE) is a first order approximation with regard to the distance from a phase envelope....

  3. Structures of xenon oxides at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Nicholas; Pickard, Chris; Needs, Richard; Dewaele, Agnes; Loubeyre, Paul; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-03-01

    For many years, it was believed that noble gases such as xenon were entirely inert. It was only in 1962 that Bartlett first synthesized a compound of xenon. Since then, a number of other xenon compounds, including oxides, have been synthesized. Xenon oxides are unstable under ambient conditions but have been predicted to stabilize under high pressure. Here we present the results of a combined theoretical and experimental study of xenon oxides at pressures of 80-100 GPa. We have synthesized new xenon oxides at these pressures and they have been characterized with X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Calculations were performed with a density-functional theory framework. We have used the ab-initio random structure searching (AIRSS) method together with a data-mining technique to determine the stable compounds in the xenon-oxygen system in this pressure range. We have calculated structural and optical properties of these phases, and a good match between theoretical and experimental results has been obtained. Funding for computational research provided by the engineering and physical sciences research council (EPSRC; UK). Computing resources provided by Cambridge HPC and HECToR. X-ray diffraction experiments performed at ESRF.

  4. 7 CFR 58.219 - High pressure pumps and lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High pressure pumps and lines. 58.219 Section 58.219....219 High pressure pumps and lines. High pressure lines may be cleaned-in-place and shall be of such construction that dead ends, valves and the high pressure pumps can be disassembled for hand cleaning. The...

  5. Prediction of Production Power for High-pressure Hydrogen by High-pressure Water Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyakuno, Takahiro; Hattori, Kikuo; Ito, Kohei; Onda, Kazuo

    Recently the high attention for fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) is pushing to construct the hydrogen supplying station for FCEV in the world. The hydrogen pressure supplied at the current test station is intended to be high for increasing the FCEV’s driving distance. The water electrolysis can produce cleanly the hydrogen by utilizing the electricity from renewable energy without emitting CO2 to atmosphere, when it is compared to be the popular reforming process of fossil fuel in the industry. The power required for the high-pressure water electrolysis, where water is pumped up to high-pressure, may be smaller than the power for the atmospheric water electrolysis, where the produced atmospheric hydrogen is pumped up by compressor, since the compression power for water is much smaller than that for hydrogen gas. In this study the ideal water electrolysis voltage up to 70MPa and 523K is estimated referring to both the results by LeRoy et al up to 10MPa and 523K, and to the latest steam table. By using this high-pressure water electrolysis voltage, the power required for high-pressure hydrogen produced by the high-pressure water electrolysis method is estimated to be about 5% smaller than that by the atmospheric water electrolysis method, by assuming the compressor and pump efficiency of 50%.

  6. Shock wave velocity measurement in the Al2O3 under ultrahigh pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feng; Peng Xiao-Shi; Liu Shen-Ye; Li Yong-Sheng; Jiang Xiao-Hua; Ding Yong-Kun

    2011-01-01

    In indirect-drive experiment, the blank effect caused by X-rays from Hohlraum will show the dark area in time scale of optical streak camera (OSC). This blank effect, which was a serious problem in indirect-drive shock wave experiments,has been explained by the semiconductor model. The X-rays cause the band to band transition and the probe laser is absorbed by the intraband transition, which leads to a dark region in time scale of the OSC image. In the experiment,the refiectivity of shock wave front was measured to be about 50% at shock wave velocity 32 km/s and was compared to the theoretical calculations with the Drude free electron model. From the experimental data, it is found that the blank effect can be avoided at radiation temperature of 170 eV if the Al layer is thicker than 60 μm.

  7. Comparative evaluation of central venous pressure and sonographic inferior vena cava variability in assessing fluid responsiveness in septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjri Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fluid infusion, the most critical step in the resuscitation of patients with septic shock, needs preferably continuous invasive hemodynamic monitoring. The study was planned to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasonographically measured inferior vena cava collapsibility index (IVC CI in comparison to central venous pressure (CVP in predicting fluid responsiveness in septic shock. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients of septic shock requiring ventilatory support (invasive/noninvasive were included. Patients with congestive heart failure, raised intra-abdominal pressure, and poor echo window were excluded from the study. They were randomly divided into two groups based on mode of fluid resuscitation - Group I (CVP and Group II (IVC CI. Primary end-points were mean arterial pressure (MAP of ≥65 mmHg and CVP >12 mmHg or IVC CI <20% in Groups I and II, respectively. Patients were followed till achievement of end-points or maximum of 6 h. Outcome variables (pulse rate, MAP, urine output, pH, base deficit, and ScvO 2 were serially measured till the end of the study. Survival at 2 and 4 weeks was used as secondary end-point. Results: Primary end-point was reached in 31 patients (15 in Group I and 16 in Group II. Fluid infusion, by either method, had increased CVP and decreased IVC CI with resultant negative correlation between them (Pearson correlation coefficient -0.626. There was no significant difference in the amount of fluid infused and time to reach end-point in two groups. Comparison in outcome variables at baseline and end-point showed no significant difference including mortality. Conclusion: CVP and IVC CI are negatively correlated with fluid resuscitation, and both methods can be used for resuscitation, with IVC CI being noninferior to CVP.

  8. High pressure, quasi-isentropic compression experiments on the Omega laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, K; Edwards, M; Jankowski, A; Pollaine, S; Smith, R; Remington, B

    2006-05-26

    The high energy density of pulsed lasers can be used to generate shockless loading in solids to high pressures and compressions but low temperatures. We have used the Omega laser to extend the capabilities of this technique to multi-Mbar pressures and compressions approaching a factor of 2 in aluminum foils. The energy from a 3.7 ns laser pulse is used to drive a strong shock through a 200 {micro}m polystyrene disc. The disc material unloads from a high-pressure state and expands across a 300 {micro}m vacuum gap where it stagnates against the sample to produce a smooth, monotonically increasing load with rise times from a few to {approx} 20 ns. Ramped compression reasing waves having peak pressures of 14-200 GPa (0.14-2.0 Mbar) and peak compressions {rho}/{rho}{sub 0} of 1.1-2.0 were generated in the aluminum samples using laser pulse energies of 400 J to 2 kJ. Wave profiles from a series of successively thicker targets loaded to 120 GPa show the evolution of the high-pressure compression wave within the sample. The initial loading in the sample is shockless, and develops into a shock at a depth of 20-25 {micro}m. We compare these wave profiles with hydrodynamic simulations from which we extract material temperatures and plastic strain rates behind the compression wave. Limitations and future prospects for this new shockless loading technique are discussed.

  9. Operating mode of high pressure straws with high spatial resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Davkov, K I; Peshekhonov, V D; Cholakov, V D

    2013-01-01

    The article presents results of studying the operating mode of thin-walled drift tubes (straws) at flushing it with a high-pressure gas mixture, which allowed obtaining extremely high spatial resolution for straw detectors. The results of studying the radiation ageing of straws operating in this mode are also described.

  10. Modeling Study of High Pressure and High Temperature Reservoir Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varzandeh, Farhad

    to 250 °C and 2400 bar, in the deep petroleum reservoirs. Furthermore, many of these deep reservoirs are found offshore, including the North Sea and the Gulf of Mexico, making the development even more risky. On the other hand, development of these high pressure high temperature (HPHT) fields can...

  11. Pulse Radiolysis at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, Knud

    1981-01-01

    A set-up enabling pulse radiolysis measurements at high temperatures (up to 320°C) and high pressures (up to 140 bar) has been constructed in collaboration between Risö National Laboratory and Studsvik Energiteknik. The cell has been used for experiments with aqueous solutions with the purpose...

  12. Dietary spermidine for lowering high blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Andreas; Schroeder, Sabrina; Pendl, Tobias; Harger, Alexandra; Stekovic, Slaven; Schipke, Julia; Magnes, Christoph; Schmidt, Albrecht; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Dammbrueck, Christopher; Gross, Angelina S; Herbst, Viktoria; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Pietrocola, Federico; Pieber, Thomas R; Sigrist, Stephan J; Linke, Wolfgang A; Mühlfeld, Christian; Sadoshima, Junichi; Dengjel, Joern; Kiechl, Stefan; Kroemer, Guido; Sedej, Simon; Madeo, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Loss of cardiac macroautophagy/autophagy impairs heart function, and evidence accumulates that an increased autophagic flux may protect against cardiovascular disease. We therefore tested the protective capacity of the natural autophagy inducer spermidine in animal models of aging and hypertension, which both represent major risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. Dietary spermidine elicits cardioprotective effects in aged mice through enhancing cardiac autophagy and mitophagy. In salt-sensitive rats, spermidine supplementation also delays the development of hypertensive heart disease, coinciding with reduced arterial blood pressure. The high blood pressure-lowering effect likely results from improved global arginine bioavailability and protection from hypertension-associated renal damage. The polyamine spermidine is naturally present in human diets, though to a varying amount depending on food type and preparation. In humans, high dietary spermidine intake correlates with reduced blood pressure and decreased risk of cardiovascular disease and related death. Altogether, spermidine represents a cardio- and vascular-protective autophagy inducer that can be readily integrated in common diets. PMID:28118075

  13. LOW AMPLITUDE SINGLE AND MULTIPLE SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING OF LX-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Chidester, S; Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W

    2006-06-27

    Shock initiation experiments were performed on the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton binder) using single and multiple low amplitude shocks to obtain pressure history data for use in Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling parameterization. A 100 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the LX-04 explosive charges containing manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between explosive discs. In the single shock experiments, the run distances to detonation at three shock pressures showed agreement with previously published data above 3 GPa. Even longer run distances to detonation were measured using 80 mm long by 145 mm diameter LX-04 charges impacted by low velocity projectiles from a 155 mm diameter gun. The minimum shock pressure required to cause low levels of exothermic reaction were determined for these large LX-04 charge dimensions. Multiple shocks were generated as double shocks by using a flyer plate with two materials and as reflected shocks by placing a high impedance material at the rear of the explosive charge. In both cases, the first shock pressure was not high enough to cause detonation of LX-04, and the second shock pressure, which would have been sufficient to cause detonation if generated by a single shock, failed to cause detonation. Thus LX-04 exhibited shock desensitization over a range of 0.6 to 1.4 GPa. The higher shock pressure LX-04 model was extended to accurately simulate these lower pressure and multiple shock gauge records. The shock desensitization effects observed with multiple shock compressions were partially accounted for in the model by using a critical compression corresponding to a shock pressure of 1.2 GPa. This shock desensitization effect occurs at higher pressures than those of other HMX-based PBX's containing higher HMX percentages.

  14. Hardness of kamacite and shock histories of 119 meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A. V.; Gordon, R. B.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    Use of metallographic and X-ray diffraction techniques to study the shock histories of 119 iron and stony-iron meteorites, and measurement of the hardness of kamacite in these specimens and in artificially shocked-unannealed and annealed meteorite specimens. Shock increases kamacite hardness, but complications introduced by other physical and chemical properties of meteorites limit its utility as a shock indicator. About 50% of the meteorites studied show evidence for preterrestrial shock loading to pressures of greater than or equal to 130 kb, and 40% have not been shocked to such high pressures. The remaining meteorites have been heat-altered in such a way that their shock histories cannot be determined explicitly. These results, together with those obtained previously, indicate that the plurality, if not the majority, of all iron and stony-iron meteorites sampled by the earth were shocked to pressures of greater than or equal to 130 kb during preterrestrial collisions between asteroidal-sized objects.

  15. Increasing mean arterial pressure in cardiogenic shock secondary to myocardial infarction: effects on hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Pierre; Kimmoun, Antoine; Blime, Vincent; Levy, Bruno

    2014-04-01

    There are very few data regarding the effects of norepinephrine uptitration on global and regional hemodynamics in cardiogenic shock. We studied 25 patients with shock secondary to myocardial infarction successfully treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Before the inclusion, 16 of 25 patients presented a cardiac arrest in the presence of medical staff. Norepinephrine was titrated to increase mean arterial pressure (MAP) from 65 to 85 mmHg during 1 h. Swan-Ganz variables, arterial and mixed venous blood gases, lactate, and thenar near-infrared spectroscopy variables (muscle tissue oxygen saturation [StO2] and its changes during a vascular occlusion test) were measured before, 1 h after norepinephrine uptitration, and 1 h after norepinephrine downtitration. To obtain a MAP at 85 mmHg, norepinephrine was increased from 0.6 (0.28-1.2) to 1.53 µg · kg · min (0.76-2.6 µg · kg · min) (P cardiogenic shock complicated by postreperfusion disease is associated with better cardiac performance and improved microcirculatory variables.

  16. Numerical simulation of converging shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Seokjune; Abe, Kanji

    We can achieve the high pressure and high temperature state of gas if the shock wave converges stably. In order to check the stability of the converging shock wave, we introduce two kinds of perturbed initial conditions. The Euler equations of conservation form are integrated by using explicit Non-Muscl TVD finite difference scheme.

  17. Application of shock tubes to transonic airfoil testing at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Chaney, M. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    Performance analysis of a gas-driven shock tube shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers of the order of 100 million can be produced, with limitations being imposed by the structural integrity of the facility or the model. A study of flow development over a simple circular arc airfoil at zero angle of attack was carried out in a shock tube at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photography and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those produced for the same airfoil in a wind tunnel can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with properly contoured test section walls.

  18. Operation of High-Voltage Transverse Shock Wave Ferromagnetic Generator in the Open Circuit and Charging Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    FMGs are based on the transverse (when the shock wave propagates across the magnetization vector M) shock demagnetization of Nd2Fe14B hard...generators based on the transverse (when the shock wave propagates across the magnetization vector M) shock wave demagnetization of Nd2Fe14B hard...and photo of a high-voltage transverse FMG are shown in Fig. 1. It contains a hollow hard ferromagnetic cylindrical Nd2Fe14B energy-carrying

  19. High stored energy of metallic glasses induced by high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Yang, Z. Z.; Ma, T.; Sun, Y. T.; Yin, Y. Y.; Gong, Y.; Gu, L.; Wen, P.; Zhu, P. W.; Long, Y. W.; Yu, X. H.; Jin, C. Q.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2017-03-01

    Modulating energy states of metallic glasses (MGs) is significant in understanding the nature of glasses and controlling their properties. In this study, we show that high stored energy can be achieved and preserved in bulk MGs by high pressure (HP) annealing, which is a controllable method to continuously alter the energy states of MGs. Contrary to the decrease in enthalpy by conventional annealing at ambient pressure, high stored energy can occur and be enhanced by increasing both annealing temperature and pressure. By using double aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is revealed that the preserved high energy, which is attributed to the coupling effect of high pressure and high temperature, originates from the microstructural change that involves "negative flow units" with a higher atomic packing density compared to that of the elastic matrix of MGs. The results demonstrate that HP-annealing is an effective way to activate MGs into higher energy states, and it may assist in understanding the microstructural origin of high energy states in MGs.

  20. High pressure study of high-temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souliou, Sofia-Michaela

    2014-09-29

    The current thesis studies experimentally the effect of high external pressure on high-T{sub c} superconductors. The structure and lattice dynamics of several members of the high-T{sub c} cuprate and Fe-based superconductors families were investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction under well-controlled, hydrostatic high pressure and low temperature conditions. The lattice dynamics of the high-T{sub c} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} have been investigated systematically by Raman spectroscopy as a function of doping (x = 0.95, 0.75, 0.60, 0.55, and 0.45) and external pressure. Under ambient pressure conditions, in addition to the Raman modes expected from group theory, we observe new Raman active phonons upon cooling the underdoped samples, at temperatures well above the superconducting transition temperature. The doping dependence and the onset temperatures of the new Raman features suggest that they are associated with the incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) state recently discovered in underdoped cuprates using synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques. Under high pressure conditions (from 2 to 12 GPa), our Raman measurements on highly ordered underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.55} samples do not show any of the new Raman phonons seen at ambient pressure. High pressure and low temperature Raman measurements have been performed on the underdoped superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}. A clear renormalization of some of the Raman phonons is seen below T{sub c} as a result of the changes in the phonon self-energy upon the opening of the superconducting gap, with the most prominent one being that of the B{sub 1g}-like buckling phonon mode. The amplitude of this renormalization strongly increases with pressure, resembling the effect of hole doping in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}. At ∝ 10 GPa, the system undergoes a reversible pressure-induced structural phase transition to a non-centrosymmmetric structure (space group

  1. Shock tube design for high intensity blast waves for laboratory testing of armor and combat materiel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Courtney

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Shock tubes create simulated blast waves which can be directed and measured to study blast wave effects under laboratory conditions. It is desirable to increase available peak pressure from ∼1 MPa to ∼5 MPa to simulate closer blast sources and facilitate development and testing of personal and vehicle armors. Three methods are experimentally investigated to increase peak simulated blast pressure produced by an oxy-acetylene driven shock tube while maintaining suitability for laboratory studies. The first method is the addition of a Shchelkin spiral priming section which supports a deflagration to detonation transition. This approach increases the average peak pressure from 1.17 MPa to 5.33 MPa while maintaining a relevant pressure-time curve (near Friedlander waveform. The second method is a bottleneck between the driving and driven sections. Coupling a 79 mm diameter driving section to a 53 mm driven section increases the peak pressure from 1.17 MPa to 2.25 MPa. A 103 mm driving section is used to increase peak pressure to 2.64 MPa. The third method, adding solid fuel to the driving section with the oxy-acetylene, results in a peak pressure increasing to 1.70 MPa.

  2. Shock tube design for high intensity blast waves for laboratory testing of armor and combat materiel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elijah COURTNEY; Amy COURTNEY; Michael COURTNEY

    2014-01-01

    Shock tubes create simulated blast waves which can be directed and measured to study blast wave effects under laboratory conditions. It is desirable to increase available peak pressure from w1 MPa to w5 MPa to simulate closer blast sources and facilitate development and testing of personal and vehicle armors. Three methods are experimentally investigated to increase peak simulated blast pressure produced by an oxy-acetylene driven shock tube while maintaining suitability for laboratory studies. The first method is the addition of a Shchelkin spiral prim-ing section which supports a deflagration to detonation transition. This approach increases the average peak pressure from 1.17 MPa to 5.33 MPa while maintaining a relevant pressure-time curve (near Friedlander waveform). The second method is a bottleneck between the driving and driven sections. Coupling a 79 mm diameter driving section to a 53 mm driven section increases the peak pressure from 1.17 MPa to 2.25 MPa. A 103 mm driving section is used to increase peak pressure to 2.64 MPa. The third method, adding solid fuel to the driving section with the oxy-acetylene, results in a peak pressure increasing to 1.70 MPa.

  3. Menopause and High Blood Pressure: What's the Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure (hypertension) Is there a connection between menopause and high blood pressure? Answers from Shannon K. ... Tommaso, M.D. Blood pressure generally increases after menopause. Some doctors think this increase suggests that hormonal ...

  4. Collisionless shock waves in space - A very high beta structure. [solar wind measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, V.; Russell, C. T.; Means, J. D.; Greenstadt, E. W.; Scarf, F. L.; Neugebauter, M.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements from six OGO-5 particle and field experiments are used to examine the structure of the earth's bow shock during a period of extremely high beta (the ratio of plasma thermal to magnetic energy density), as determined from simultaneous measurements of the upstream plasma on board the HEOS satellite. Even though the interplanetary field is nearly perpendicular to the shock normal, the shock is extremely turbulent. Large field increases are observed up to a factor of 20 above the upstream values. Ahead of these large enhancements, smaller magnetic effects accompanied by electrostatic noise, electron heating, and ion deflection are observed for several minutes. These observations suggest that a steady-state shock may not be able to form at very high beta. Further, they show that while the magnetic energy density may be relatively unimportant in the upstream flow, it can become very significant within the shock structure, and hence the magnetic field should not be ignored in theoretical treatments of very high beta shocks.

  5. On the high-temperature combustion of n-butanol: Shock tube data and an improved kinetic model

    KAUST Repository

    Vasu, Subith S.

    2013-11-21

    The combustion of n-butanol has received significant interest in recent years, because of its potential use in transportation applications. Researchers have extensively studied its combustion chemistry, using both experimental and theoretical methods; however, additional work is needed under specific conditions to improve our understanding of n-butanol combustion. In this study, we report new OH time-history data during the high-temperature oxidation of n-butanol behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 1300-1550 K and at pressures near 2 atm. These data were obtained at Stanford University, using narrow-line-width ring dye laser absorption of the R1(5) line of OH near 306.7 nm. Measured OH time histories were modeled using comprehensive n-butanol literature mechanisms. It was found that n-butanol unimolecular decomposition rate constants commonly used in chemical kinetic models, as well as those determined from theoretical studies, are unable to predict the data presented herein. Therefore, an improved high-temperature mechanism is presented here, which incorporates recently reported rate constants measured in a single pulse shock tube [C. M. Rosado-Reyes and W. Tsang, J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, 116, 9825-9831]. Discussions are presented on the validity of the proposed mechanism against other literature shock tube experiments. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  6. High-pressure-high-temperature treatment of natural diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Royen, J V

    2002-01-01

    The results are reported of high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) treatment experiments on natural diamonds of different origins and with different impurity contents. The diamonds are annealed in a temperature range up to 2000 sup o C at stabilizing pressures up to 7 GPa. The evolution is studied of different defects in the diamond crystal lattice. The influence of substitutional nitrogen atoms, plastic deformation and the combination of these is discussed. Diamonds are characterized at room and liquid nitrogen temperature using UV-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry and photoluminescence spectrometry. The economic implications of diamond HPHT treatments are discussed.

  7. LHDAC setup for high temperature and high pressure studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Nishant N., E-mail: nnpatel@barc.gov.in; Meenakshi, S., E-mail: nnpatel@barc.gov.in; Sharma, Surinder M., E-mail: nnpatel@barc.gov.in [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    A ytterbium fibre laser (λ = 1.07 μm) based laser heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) facility has been recently set up at HP and SRPD, BARC for simultaneous high temperature and high pressure investigation of material properties. Synthesis of GaN was carried out at pressure of ∼9 GPa and temperature of ∼1925 K in a Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell (DAC) using the LHDAC facility. The retrieved sample has been characterized using our laboratory based micro Raman setup.

  8. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage,...

  9. High-pressure structural properties of tetramethylsilane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen-Xing, Qin; Xiao-Jia, Chen

    2016-02-01

    High-pressure structural properties of tetramethylsilane are investigated by synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction at pressures up to 31.1 GPa and room temperature. A phase with the space group of Pnma is found to appear at 4.2 GPa. Upon compression, the compound transforms to two following phases: the phase with space groups of P21/c at 9.9 GPa and the phase with P2/m at 18.2 GPa successively via a transitional phase. The unique structural character of P21/c supports the phase stability of tetramethylsilane without possible decomposition upon heavy compression. The appearance of the P2/m phase suggests the possible realization of metallization for this material at higher pressure. Project supported by the Cultivation Fund of the Key Scientific and Technical Innovation Project from Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 708070), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, South China University of Technology (Grant No. 2014ZZ0069), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51502189), and the Doctoral Project of Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 20132010).

  10. High-pressure Raman study of Terephthalonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, DongFei; Zhang, KeWei; Song, MingXing; Zhai, NaiCui; Sun, ChengLin; Li, HaiBo

    2017-02-01

    The in situ high-pressure Raman spectra of Terephthalonitrile (TPN) have been investigated from ambient to 12.6 GPa at room temperature. All the fundamental vibrational modes of TPN at ambient were assigned based on the first-principle calculations. A detailed Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that TPN underwent a phase transition at 5.3 GPa. The frequencies of the TPN Raman peaks increase with increasing the pressure which can be attributed to the reduction in the interatomic distances and the escalation of effective force constants. The intensity of the C-C-C ring-out-plane deformation mode increases gradually as the frequency remains almost constant during the compression which can be explained by the existence of π-π interactions in TPN molecules. Additionally, the pressure-induced structural changes of TPN on the Fermi resonance between the C ≡ N out-of-plane vibration mode and the C - CN out-of-plane vibration mode have been analyzed.

  11. Recent progress in high-pressure studies on organic conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syuma Yasuzuka and Keizo Murata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent high-pressure studies of organic conductors and superconductors are reviewed. The discovery of the highest Tc superconductivity among organics under high pressure has triggered the further progress of the high-pressure research. Owing to this finding, various organic conductors with the strong electron correlation were investigated under high pressures. This review includes the pressure techniques using the cubic anvil apparatus, as well as high-pressure studies of the organic conductors up to 10 GPa showing extraordinary temperature and pressure dependent transport phenomena.

  12. High blood pressure in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Margaret; Bluhm, Brian

    2012-04-01

    High blood pressure in children and adolescents is a growing health problem that is often overlooked by physicians. Normal blood pressure values for children and adolescents are based on age, sex, and height, and are available in standardized tables. Prehypertension is defined as a blood pressure in at least the 90th percentile, but less than the 95th percentile, for age, sex, and height, or a measurement of 120/80 mm Hg or greater. Hypertension is defined as blood pressure in the 95th percentile or greater. A secondary etiology of hypertension is much more likely in children than in adults, with renal parenchymal disease and renovascular disease being the most common. Overweight and obesity are strongly correlated with primary hypertension in children. A history and physical examination are needed for all children with newly diagnosed hypertension to help rule out underlying medical disorders. Children with hypertension should also be screened for other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia, and should be evaluated for target organ damage with a retinal examination and echocardiography. Hypertension in children is treated with lifestyle changes, including weight loss for those who are overweight or obese; a healthy, low-sodium diet; regular physical activity; and avoidance of tobacco and alcohol. Children with symptomatic hypertension, secondary hypertension, target organ damage, diabetes, or persistent hypertension despite nonpharmacologic measures should be treated with antihypertensive medications. Thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers, and calcium channel blockers are safe, effective, and well tolerated in children.

  13. Conformable pressure vessel for high pressure gas storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Lavender, Curt A.; Newhouse, Norman L.; Yeggy, Brian C.

    2016-01-12

    A non-cylindrical pressure vessel storage tank is disclosed. The storage tank includes an internal structure. The internal structure is coupled to at least one wall of the storage tank. The internal structure shapes and internally supports the storage tank. The pressure vessel storage tank has a conformability of about 0.8 to about 1.0. The internal structure can be, but is not limited to, a Schwarz-P structure, an egg-crate shaped structure, or carbon fiber ligament structure.

  14. 32-channel pyrometer with high dynamic range for studies of shocked nanothermites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    A 32-channel optical pyrometer has been developed for studying temperature dynamics of shock-initiated reactive materials with one nanosecond time resolution and high dynamic range. The pyrometer consists of a prism spectrograph which directs the spectrally-resolved emission to 32 fiber optics and 32 photomultiplier tubes and digitizers. Preliminary results show shock-initiated reactions of a nanothermite composite, nano CuO/Al in nitrocellulose binder, consists of three stages. The first stage occurred at 30 ns, right after the shock unloaded, the second stage at 100 ns and the third at 1 μs, and the temperatures ranged from 2100K to 3000K. Time-resolved emission spectra suggest hot spots formed during shock unloading, which initiated the bulk thermite/nitrocellulose reaction.

  15. Theory of high pressure hydrogen, made simple

    CERN Document Server

    Magdau, Ioan B; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-01-01

    Phase I of hydrogen has several peculiarities. Despite having a close-packed crystal structure, it is less dense than either the low temperature Phase II or the liquid phase. At high pressure, it transforms into either phase III or IV, depending on the temperature. Moreover, spectroscopy suggests that the quantum rotor behaviour disappears with pressurisation, without any apparent phase transition. Here we present a simple thermodynamic model for this behaviour based on packing atoms and molecules and discuss the thermodynamics of the phase boundaries. We also report first principles molecular dynamics calculations for a more detailed look at the same phase transitions.

  16. CDC Vital Signs: High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the MMWR Science Clips High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Out of Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... cdc.gov/GISCVH2/ High Blood Pressure and High Cholesterol Among US Adults SOURCES: National Health and Nutrition ...

  17. High Blood Pressure and Children: What Parents Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung, and Blood Institute Alternate Language URL Español High Blood Pressure and Children: What Parents Need to Know Page Content Children can have high blood pressure. Did you know that children could have high ...

  18. Shock Tube Design for High Intensity Blast Waves for Laboratory Testing of Armor and Combat Materiel

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elijah; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shock tubes create simulated blast waves which can be directed and measured to study blast wave effects under laboratory conditions. It is desirable to increase available peak pressure from ~1 MPa to ~5 MPa to simulate closer blast sources and facilitate development and testing of personal and vehicle armors. Three methods were investigated to increase peak simulated blast pressure produced by an oxy-acetylene driven shock tube while maintaining suitability for laboratory studies. The first method is the addition of a Shchelkin spiral priming section which works by increasing the turbulent flow of the deflagration wave, thus increasing its speed and pressure. This approach increased the average peak pressure from 1.17 MPa to 5.33 MPa while maintaining a relevant pressure-time curve (Friedlander waveform). The second method is a bottleneck between the driving and driven sections. Coupling a 79 mm diameter driving section to a 53 mm driven section increased the peak pressure from 1.17 MPa to 2.25 MPa. Using a 1...

  19. Method transfer from high-pressure liquid chromatography to ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography. II. Temperature and pressure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Leśko, Marek; Cavazzini, Alberto; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-07-03

    The importance of the generated temperature and pressure gradients in ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) are investigated and compared to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The drug Omeprazole, together with three other model compounds (with different chemical characteristics, namely uncharged, positively and negatively charged) were used. Calculations of the complete temperature profile in the column at UHPLC conditions showed, in our experiments, a temperature difference between the inlet and outlet of 16 °C and a difference of 2 °C between the column center and the wall. Through van't Hoff plots, this information was used to single out the decrease in retention factor (k) solely due to the temperature gradient. The uncharged solute was least affected by temperature with a decrease in k of about 5% while for charged solutes the effect was more pronounced, with k decreases up to 14%. A pressure increase of 500 bar gave roughly 5% increase in k for the uncharged solute, while omeprazole and the other two charged solutes gave about 25, 20 and 15% increases in k, respectively. The stochastic model of chromatography was applied to estimate the dependence of the average number of adsorption/desorption events (n) and the average time spent by a molecule in the stationary phase (τs) on temperature and pressure on peak shape for the tailing, basic solute. Increasing the temperature yielded an increase in n and decrease in τs which resulted in less skew at high temperatures. With increasing pressure, the stochastic modeling gave interesting results for the basic solute showing that the skew of the peak increased with pressure. The conclusion is that pressure effects are more pronounced for both retention and peak shape than the temperature effects for the polar or charged compounds in our study.

  20. High blood pressure and visual sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Alvin; Samples, John R.

    2003-09-01

    The study had two main purposes: (1) to determine whether the foveal visual sensitivities of people treated for high blood pressure (vascular hypertension) differ from the sensitivities of people who have not been diagnosed with high blood pressure and (2) to understand how visual adaptation is related to standard measures of systemic cardiovascular function. Two groups of middle-aged subjects-hypertensive and normotensive-were examined with a series of test/background stimulus combinations. All subjects met rigorous inclusion criteria for excellent ocular health. Although the visual sensitivities of the two subject groups overlapped extensively, the age-related rate of sensitivity loss was, for some measures, greater for the hypertensive subjects, possibly because of adaptation differences between the two groups. Overall, the degree of steady-state sensitivity loss resulting from an increase of background illuminance (for 580-nm backgrounds) was slightly less for the hypertensive subjects. Among normotensive subjects, the ability of a bright (3.8-log-td), long-wavelength (640-nm) adapting background to selectively suppress the flicker response of long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cones was related inversely to the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure to heart rate. The degree of selective suppression was also related to heart rate alone, and there was evidence that short-term changes of cardiovascular response were important. The results suggest that (1) vascular hypertension, or possibly its treatment, subtly affects visual function even in the absence of eye disease and (2) changes in blood flow affect retinal light-adaptation processes involved in the selective suppression of the flicker response from LWS cones caused by bright, long-wavelength backgrounds.

  1. High-pressure coal fuel processor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, M.L.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

  2. Growth enhancement effects of radish sprouts: atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation vs. heat shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarinont, T.; Amano, T.; Kitazaki, S.; Koga, K.; Uchida, G.; Shiratani, M.; Hayashi, N.

    2014-06-01

    We compare growth enhancement effects due to atmospheric air dielectric barrier discharge plasma irradiation and heat shock to seeds of radish sprouts (Raphanus sativus L.). Interactions between radicals and seeds in a short duration of 3 min. lead to the growth enhancement of radish sprouts in a long term of 7 days and the maximum average length is 3.7 times as long as that of control. The growth enhancement effects become gradually weak with time, and hence the ratio of the average length for plasma irradiation to that for control decreases from 3.7 for the first day to 1.3 for 7 day. The average length for heat shock of 60°C for 10 min. and 100°C for 3 min. is longer than that for control, and the maximum average length is 1.3 times as long as that of control. Heat shock has little contribution to the growth enhancement due to plasma irradiation, because the maximum temperature due to plasma irradiation is less than 60°C.

  3. High Pressure Hydrogen from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Typical approximations employed in first-principles simulations of high-pressure hydrogen involve the neglect of nuclear quantum effects (NQE) and the approximate treatment of electronic exchange and correlation, typically through a density functional theory (DFT) formulation. In this talk I'll present a detailed analysis of the influence of these approximations on the phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen, with the goal of identifying the predictive capabilities of current methods and, at the same time, making accurate predictions in this important regime. We use a path integral formulation combined with density functional theory, which allows us to incorporate NQEs in a direct and controllable way. In addition, we use state-of-the-art quantum Monte Carlo calculations to benchmark the accuracy of more approximate mean-field electronic structure calculations based on DFT, and we use GW and hybrid DFT to calculate the optical properties of the solid and liquid phases near metallization. We present accurate predictions of the metal-insulator transition on the solid, including structural and optical properties of the molecular phase. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by LDRD Grant No. 13-LW-004.

  4. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, Thomas C.; Rao, Pilaka P.

    1994-01-01

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  5. Stable magnesium peroxide at high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Sergey S; Zhu, Qiang; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Oganov, Artem R; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2015-09-01

    Rocky planets are thought to comprise compounds of Mg and O as these are among the most abundant elements, but knowledge of their stable phases may be incomplete. MgO is known to be remarkably stable to very high pressure and chemically inert under reduced condition of the Earth's lower mantle. However, in exoplanets oxygen may be a more abundant constituent. Here, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we show that MgO and oxygen react at pressures above 96 GPa and T = 2150 K with the formation of I4/mcm MgO2. Raman spectroscopy detects the presence of a peroxide ion (O2(2-)) in the synthesized material as well as in the recovered specimen. Likewise, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirms that the recovered sample has higher oxygen content than pure MgO. Our finding suggests that MgO2 may be present together or instead of MgO in rocky mantles and rocky planetary cores under highly oxidized conditions.

  6. Stable magnesium peroxide at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Sergey S.; Zhu, Qiang; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Oganov, Artem R.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-09-01

    Rocky planets are thought to comprise compounds of Mg and O as these are among the most abundant elements, but knowledge of their stable phases may be incomplete. MgO is known to be remarkably stable to very high pressure and chemically inert under reduced condition of the Earth’s lower mantle. However, in exoplanets oxygen may be a more abundant constituent. Here, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we show that MgO and oxygen react at pressures above 96 GPa and T = 2150 K with the formation of I4/mcm MgO2. Raman spectroscopy detects the presence of a peroxide ion (O22-) in the synthesized material as well as in the recovered specimen. Likewise, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirms that the recovered sample has higher oxygen content than pure MgO. Our finding suggests that MgO2 may be present together or instead of MgO in rocky mantles and rocky planetary cores under highly oxidized conditions.

  7. High-pressure structures of yttrium hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu-Lu; Sun, Hui-Juan; Wang, C. Z.; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the crystal structures of YH3 and YH4 at high pressure (100-250 GPa) have been explored using a genetic algorithm combined with first-principles calculations. New structures of YH3 with space group symmetries of P21/m and I4/mmm were predicted. The electronic structures and the phonon dispersion properties of various YH3 and YH4 structures at different temperatures and pressures were investigated. Among YH3 phases, the P21/m structure of YH3 was found to have a relatively high superconducting transformation temperature T c of 19 K at 120 GPa, which is reduced to 9 K at 200 GPa. Other YH3 structures have much lower T cs. Compared with YH3, the T c of the YH4 compound is much higher, i.e. 94 K at 120 GPa and 55 K at 200 GPa.

  8. High Speed Switching Micoplasma in High Pressure Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakim, Dani; Staack, David

    2012-10-01

    Micro-plasma discharges with switching times approaching 1 ns are studied at pressures from 1 to 16 atm. Applications of these devices are robust high speed switching transistors able to withstand electric interference, high temperatures and harsh environments. Measured discharge conditions at 250 psia in Nitrogen are: gas temperature 2900 K, discharge diameter ˜7 μm and electron density ˜10^17 cm-3. High speed switching is achieved by taking advantage of rapid dynamics of instabilities at high pressure and high electron density. The capacitance and inductance of the circuit also significantly affect transients. Tradeoffs are observed in switching times. By reducing capacitances from 10 pF to ˜1pF attainment of steady state conditions can be reduced from 1 us to ˜ 20 ns. However current rise times increase from 1 ns at high capacitance to 20 ns at low capacitance. A decrease in switching time with increased pressure is also observed. Also investigated are configurations with a third electrode acting as a gate or trigger and various high temperature (>2000K) materials such as platinum rhodium alloys and ceria stabilized zirconia ceramics for device fabrication.

  9. Shock Ignition: A New Approach to High Gain Targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. John; Lafortune, Kai; Divol, Laurent; Betti, Riccardo

    2008-11-01

    Shock-ignition is being studied as a future option for achieving high target gains on NIF, offering the potential for testing high yield (200MJ), reactor-relevant targets for inertial fusion energy and targets with appreciable gains at drive energies much less than 1MJ. In contrast to conventional hotspot ignition, the assembly and ignition phases are separated by imploding a high mass shell at low velocity. The assembled fuel is then separately ignited by a strong, spherical shock driven by a high intensity spike at the end of the pulse and timed to reach the center as the main fuel is stagnating. Because the implosion velocity is significantly less than that required for hotspot ignition, considerably more fuel mass can be assembled and burned for the same kinetic energy in the shell. Like fast ignition, shock ignition could achieve high gains at low drive energy, but has the advantages of requiring only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. We will discuss gain curves for shock-ignited NIF targets in both UV and green light and examine the feasibility of designs that employ indirect drive fuel assembly with direct drive shock ignition

  10. Modeling of energy transfer in hypersonic shocks using high fidelity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong

    The spectra of high-temperature, chemically reacting hypersonic flows provides the most powerful diagnostic available for testing thermochemically nonequilibrium models in re-entry conditions. Several shock tube experiments have revealed that conventional phenomenological approach can not accurately predict the internal temperature of the gas and also the corresponding radiation. In particular, large rotational nonequilibrium in strong shocks has been observed in several experiments with high peak translational temperatures. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is a particlebased simulation method that is capable of properly simulating flows with large nonequilibrium. In the experiments above, one dimensional shocks are most widely studied but they are challenging to simulate using the DSMC method due to the unsteady nature of the flows and especially for hypersonic flows with chemical reactions taking place. Therefore, efficient approaches for simulating one-dimensional shocks are developed for use in DSMC simulations. Both a shock stabilization technique and a modified DSMC unsteady sampling approach are used in simulating one dimensional, unsteady shocks. In the latter approach, a moving sampling region is used to obtain an accurate profile of the reflected shock in air. The shock number density and temperature profiles are obtained and used to calculate excitation and radiation. The Quasi-Steady-State (QSS) assumption is made in the excitation calculation where both electron impact and heavy particle impact excitation for the NO(A2sum +) and the N+2 (B2sum +u ) states are studied. The calculated NOradiation in the wavelength range o lambda = 235 +/- 7 nm for shock speeds below 7 km/s are in good agreement with the experiment, but, the predicted radiation is lower than the experiment for shock speeds above 7 km/s. In addition, the N+2 radiation in the wavelength range of lambda = 391.4 +/- 0.2 nm are in good agreement with the experimental data for

  11. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; Muramatsu, Takaki; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Pickard, Chris J; Needs, Richard J; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    The only known compound of sodium and hydrogen is archetypal ionic NaH. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. We combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formation of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials.

  12. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; Muramatsu, Takaki; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-07-01

    The only known compound of sodium and hydrogen is archetypal ionic NaH. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. We combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formation of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials.

  13. Food processing by high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kazutaka

    2017-04-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) process, as a nonthermal process, can be used to inactivate microbes while minimizing chemical reactions in food. In this regard, a HHP level of 100 MPa (986.9 atm/1019.7 kgf/cm(2)) and more is applied to food. Conventional thermal process damages food components relating color, flavor, and nutrition via enhanced chemical reactions. However, HHP process minimizes the damages and inactivates microbes toward processing high quality safe foods. The first commercial HHP-processed foods were launched in 1990 as fruit products such as jams, and then some other products have been commercialized: retort rice products (enhanced water impregnation), cooked hams and sausages (shelf life extension), soy sauce with minimized salt (short-time fermentation owing to enhanced enzymatic reactions), and beverages (shelf life extension). The characteristics of HHP food processing are reviewed from viewpoints of nonthermal process, history, research and development, physical and biochemical changes, and processing equipment.

  14. Discrepancies Between Laboratory Shock Experiments on Minerals and Natural Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carli, P. S.; Xie, Z.; Sharp, T. G.

    2009-12-01

    Numerous laboratory shock recovery experiments performed over the past 50 years have provided substantial data on the effects of shock waves on rocks and minerals. However, it has become increasingly clear that the pressure "calibrations" based on shock effects observed in these experiments are inconsistent with interpretations based on static high-pressure data. A fundamental question is whether shock pressures are somehow different from static high pressures. Fifty years ago, many journal reviewers doubted that phase transformations could take place on a sub-microsecond time scale. Shock wave workers responded by invoking "special" properties of shock compression. However, all available evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that phase transitions under shock pressure are no different from phase transitions under static high pressures. The discrepancies noted above result from the fact that the parameter space, especially shock pressure duration, accessible to shock recovery experiments is so small by comparison with natural events. Furthermore virtually all shock recovery experiments on rocks and minerals have used high impedance sample containers, with the result that the samples have been subjected to thermodynamic loading paths substantially from a natural event. Consider the case of a chondritic meteorite made up of minerals having a wide range of shock properties. In a natural shock event the transient (nano-second scale) shock pressure at the shock front can vary by as much as an order of magnitude from grain to grain or even within a single grain. There are corresponding local differences in shock temperature. Assuming a mineral grain size of about a mm, the pressure inhomogeneities will equilibrate in less than a microsecond, wheras the temperature inhomogenities will require seconds to equilibrate. Recent studies of high-pressure phases in meteorites have provided evidence for pressure durations in the range of seconds, long enough for high pressure

  15. High strength and high ductility behavior of 6061-T6 alloy after laser shock processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencalp Irizalp, Simge; Saklakoglu, Nursen

    2016-02-01

    The plastic deformation behavior of 6061-T6 alloy which was subjected to severe plastic deformation (SPD) at high strain rates during laser shock processing (LSP) was researched. In LSP-treated materials, the near surface microstructural change was examined by TEM and fracture surfaces after tensile testing were examined by SEM. An increase in strength of metallic materials brings about the decrease in ductility. In this study, the results showed that LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy exhibited both high strength and high ductility. TEM observation showed that stacking fault (SF) ribbon enlarged, deformation twins formed and twin boundary increased in LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy. This observation was an indication of stacking fault energy (SFE) decrease. Work hardening capability was recovered after LSP impacts.

  16. Rheological assessment of nanofluids at high pressure high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza

    2013-11-01

    High pressure high temperature (HPHT) fluids are commonly encountered in industry, for example in cooling and/or lubrications applications. Nanofluids, engineered suspensions of nano-sized particles dispersed in a base fluid, have shown prospective as industrial cooling fluids due to their enhanced rheological and heat transfer properties. Nanofluids can be potentially utilized in oil industry for drilling fluids and for high pressure water jet cooling/lubrication in machining. In present work rheological characteristics of oil based nanofluids are investigated at HPHT condition. Nanofluids used in this study are prepared by dispersing commercially available SiO2 nanoparticles (~20 nm) in a mineral oil. The basefluid and nanofluids with two concentrations, namely 1%, and 2%, by volume, are considered in this investigation. The rheological characteristics of base fluid and the nanofluids are measured using an industrial HPHT viscometer. Viscosity values of the nanofluids are measured at pressures of 100 kPa to 42 MPa and temperatures ranging from 25°C to 140°C. The viscosity values of both nanofluids as well as basefluid are observed to have increased with the increase in pressure. Funded by Qatar National Research Fund (NPRP 08-574-2-239).

  17. High-resolution PIV measurements of a transitional shock wave-boundary layer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giepman, R. H. M.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; van Oudheusden, B. W.

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of boundary layer transition on an oblique shock wave reflection. The Mach number was 1.7, the unit Reynolds number was 35 × 106 m-1, and the pressure ratio over the interaction was 1.35. Particle image velocimetry is used as the main flow diagnostics tool, supported by oil-flow and Schlieren visualizations. At these conditions, the thickness of the laminar boundary layer is only 0.2 mm, and seeding proved to be problematic as practically no seeding was recorded in the lower 40 % of the boundary layer. The top 60 % could, however, still be resolved with good accuracy and is found to be in good agreement with the compressible Blasius solution. Due to the effects of turbulent mixing, the near-wall seeding deficiency disappears when the boundary layer transitions to a turbulent state. This allowed the seeding distribution to be used as an indicator for the state of the boundary layer, permitting to obtain an approximate intermittency distribution for the boundary layer transition region. This knowledge was then used for positioning the oblique shock wave in the laminar, transitional (50 % intermittency) or turbulent region of the boundary layer. Separation is only recorded for the laminar and transitional interactions. For the laminar interaction, a large separation bubble is found, with a streamwise length of 96. The incoming boundary layer is lifted over the separation bubble and remains in a laminar state up to the impingement point of the shock wave. After the shock, transition starts and a turbulent profile is reached approximately 80-90 downstream of the shock. Under the same shock conditions, the transitional interaction displays a smaller separation bubble (43), and transition is found to be accelerated over the separation bubble.

  18. Potential impact of enhanced fracture-toughness data on fracture mechanics assessment of PWR vessel integrity for pressurized thermal shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, T.L.; Theiss, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is involved with the generation of enhanced fracture-initiation toughness and fracture-arrest toughness data of prototypic nuclear reactor vessel steels. These two sets of data are enhanced because they have distinguishing characteristics that could potentially impact PWR pressure vessel integrity assessments for the pressurized-thermal shock (PTS) loading condition which is a major plant-life extension issue to be confronted in the 1990's. A series of large-scale fracture-mechanics experiments have produced crack-arrest (K{sub Ia}) data with the distinguishing characteristic that the values are considerably above 220 MPA {center dot} {radical}m. The implicit limit of the ASME Code and the limit used in the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) studies. Currently, the HSST Program is planning experiments to verify and quantify for A533B steel the distinguishing characteristic of elevated the distinguishing characteristic of elevated initiation-fracture toughness for shallow flaws which has been observed for other steels. The results of the analyses indicated that application of the enhanced K{sub Ia} data does reduce the conditional probability of failure P(F{vert bar}E); however, it does not appear to have the potential to significantly impact the results of PTS analyses. The application of enhanced fracture-initiation-toughness data for shallow flaws also reduces P(F{vert bar}E), and does appear to have a potential for significantly affecting the results of PTS analyses. 19 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The high-pressure behavior of bloedite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comodi, Paola; Nazzareni, Sabrina; Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2014-01-01

    High-pressure single-crystal synchrotron X‑ray diffraction was carried out on a single crystal of bloedite [Na2Mg(SO4)24H2O] compressed in a diamond-anvil cell. The volume-pressure data, collected up to 11.2 GPa, were fitted by a second- and a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (EOS......), yielding V0 = 495.6(7) Å3 with K0 = 39.9(6) GPa, and V0 = 496.9(7) Å3, with K0 = 36(1) GPa and K′ = 5.1 (4) GPa-1, respectively. The axial moduli were calculated using a Birch-Murnaghan EOS truncated at the second order, fixing K′ equal to 4, for a and b axes and a third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS for c...... axis. The results were a0 = 11.08(1) and K0 = 56(3) GPa, b0 = 8.20(2) and K0 = 43(3) GPa, and c0 = 5.528(5), K0 = 40(2) GPa, K′ = 1.7(3) GPa-1. The values of the compressibility for a, b, and c axes are ba = 0.0060(3) GPa-1, bb = 0.0078(5) GPa-1, bc = 0.0083(4) GPa-1 with an anisotropic ratio of ba...

  20. [High blood pressure and physical exercise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosner, P; Gremeaux, V; Bosquet, L; Herpin, D

    2014-06-01

    High blood pressure is a frequent pathology with many cardiovascular complications. As highlighted in guidelines, the therapeutic management of hypertension relies on non-pharmacological measures, which are diet and regular physical activity, but both patients and physicians are reluctant to physical activity prescription. To acquire the conviction that physical activity is beneficial, necessary and possible, we can take into account some fundamental and clinical studies, as well as the feedback of our clinical practice. Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and hypertension contributes to increase this risk. Conversely, regular practice of physical activity decreases very significantly the risk by up to 60%. The acute blood pressure changes during exercise and post-exercise hypotension differs according to the dynamic component (endurance or aerobic and/or strength exercises), but the repetition of the sessions leads to the chronic hypotensive benefit of physical activity. Moreover, physical activity prescription must take into account the assessment of global cardiovascular risk, the control of the hypertension, and the opportunities and desires of the patient in order to promote good adherence and beneficial lifestyle change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Engineering Model of High Pressure Moist Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyhlík Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the moist air equation of state. There are equations of state discussed in the article, i.e. the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases, the model of an ideal mixture of real gases and the model based on the virial equation of state. The evaluation of sound speed based on the ideal mixture concept is mentioned. The sound speed calculated by the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases is compared with the sound speed calculated by using the model based on the concept of an ideal mixture of real gases. The comparison of enthalpy end entropy based on the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases and the model of an ideal mixture of real gases is performed. It is shown that the model of an ideal mixture of real gases deviates from the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases only in the case of high pressure. An impossibility of the definition of partial pressure in the mixture of real gases is discussed, where the virial equation of state is used.

  2. Multiple structure of a laser-induced underwater shock wave

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Hayasaka, Keisuke; Kameda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    The structure of a laser-induced underwater shock wave is examined. Plasma formation, shock-wave expansion, and temporal evolution of shock pressure are observed simultaneously using a combined measurement system that obtains high-resolution nanosecond-order image sequences. In contrast to a well-known spherical-shock model, these detailed measurements reveal a non-spherically-symmteric distribution of pressure peak for a wide range of experimental parameters. The structure is determined to be a collection of multiple spherical shocks originated from elongated plasmas.

  3. Rare twin linked to high-pressure phase transition in iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougherty, L.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: lmdough@lanl.gov; Gray, G.T.; Cerreta, E.K.; McCabe, R.J.; Field, R.D.; Bingert, J.F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    At approximately 13 GPa, body-centered cubic alpha-iron undergoes a fully reversible, pressure-induced phase transition into hexagonal close-packed epsilon-iron. Microstructural evidence of this phase transition has been identified in the fully reverted alpha-iron as a large number of {l_brace}3 3 2{r_brace}<113> twins found primarily as secondary twins within {l_brace}1 1 2{r_brace}<111> primary twins. The {l_brace}3 3 2{r_brace}<113> twins were produced during high-pressure shock-loading of 1018 steel at a peak pressure above the alpha-epsilon phase transition pressure. The twins were identified using electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy.

  4. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  5. A High Order Finite Difference Scheme with Sharp Shock Resolution for the Euler Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Margot; Olsson, Pelle

    1996-01-01

    We derive a high-order finite difference scheme for the Euler equations that satisfies a semi-discrete energy estimate, and present an efficient strategy for the treatment of discontinuities that leads to sharp shock resolution. The formulation of the semi-discrete energy estimate is based on a symmetrization of the Euler equations that preserves the homogeneity of the flux vector, a canonical splitting of the flux derivative vector, and the use of difference operators that satisfy a discrete analogue to the integration by parts procedure used in the continuous energy estimate. Around discontinuities or sharp gradients, refined grids are created on which the discrete equations are solved after adding a newly constructed artificial viscosity. The positioning of the sub-grids and computation of the viscosity are aided by a detection algorithm which is based on a multi-scale wavelet analysis of the pressure grid function. The wavelet theory provides easy to implement mathematical criteria to detect discontinuities, sharp gradients and spurious oscillations quickly and efficiently.

  6. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  7. Sleep Deprivation: A Cause of High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High blood pressure (hypertension) Is it true that sleep deprivation can cause high blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon ... Cirelli C, et al. Definition and consequences of sleep deprivation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 24, ...

  8. High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke Updated:Sep ... have a stroke for the first time have high blood pressure . And an irregular atrial heart rhythm — a condition ...

  9. High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about high blood pressure; Hypertension - what to ask your doctor ... problems? What medicines am I taking to treat high blood pressure? Do they have any side effects? What should ...

  10. A Nutritional Strategy for the Treatment of High Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podell, Richard N.

    1984-01-01

    Some physicians wonder if high blood pressure can be controlled without the use of drugs and their potential side effects. Current findings concerning nutrition and high blood pressure are presented. (RM)

  11. High Blood Pressure Rates Have Doubled Worldwide Since 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162069.html High Blood Pressure Rates Have Doubled Worldwide Since 1975 Most of ... News) -- The number of people worldwide with high blood pressure has nearly doubled over the past 40 years, ...

  12. Novel High Pressure Pump-on-a-Chip Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HJ Science & Technology, Inc. proposes to develop a novel high pressure "pump-on-a-chip" (HPPOC) technology capable of generating high pressure and flow rate on...

  13. DNS of High Pressure Supercritical Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Shao Teng; Raman, Venkatramanan

    2016-11-01

    Supercritical flows have always been important to rocket motors, and more recently to aircraft engines and stationary gas turbines. The purpose of the present study is to understand effects of differential diffusion on reacting scalars using supercritical isotropic turbulence. Focus is on fuel and oxidant reacting in the transcritical region where density, heat capacity and transport properties are highly sensitive to variations in temperature and pressure. Reynolds and Damkohler number vary as a result and although it is common to neglect differential diffusion effects if Re is sufficiently large, this large variation in temperature with heat release can accentuate molecular transport differences. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) for one step chemistry reaction between fuel and oxidizer are used to examine the differential diffusion effects. A key issue investigated in this paper is if the flamelet progress variable approach, where the Lewis number is usually assumed to be unity and constant for all species, can be accurately applied to simulate supercritical combustion.

  14. High-pressure structures of methane hydrate

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, H; Fujihisa, H; Sakashita, M; Katoh, E; Aoki, K; Yamamoto, Y; Nagashima, K; Yagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Three high-pressure structures of methane hydrate, a hexagonal structure (str. A) and two orthorhombic structures (str. B and str. C), were found by in situ x-ray diffractometry and Raman spectroscopy. The well-known structure I (str. I) decomposed into str. A and fluid at 0.8 GPa. Str. A transformed into str. B at 1.6 GPa, and str. B further transformed into str. C at 2.1 GPa which survived above 7.8 GPa. The fluid solidified as ice VI at 1.4 GPa, and the ice VI transformed to ice VII at 2.1 GPa. The bulk moduli, K sub 0 , for str. I, str. A, and str. C were calculated to be 7.4, 9.8, and 25.0 GPa, respectively.

  15. Urea and deuterium mixtures at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, M., E-mail: m.donnelly-2@sms.ed.ac.uk; Husband, R. J.; Frantzana, A. D.; Loveday, J. S. [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Erskine Williamson Building, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, The King’s Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom); Bull, C. L. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxford Harwell, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Klotz, S. [IMPMC, CNRS UMR 7590, Université P and M Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France)

    2015-03-28

    Urea, like many network forming compounds, has long been known to form inclusion (guest-host) compounds. Unlike other network formers like water, urea is not known to form such inclusion compounds with simple molecules like hydrogen. Such compounds if they existed would be of interest both for the fundamental insight they provide into molecular bonding and as potential gas storage systems. Urea has been proposed as a potential hydrogen storage material [T. A. Strobel et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 478, 97 (2009)]. Here, we report the results of high-pressure neutron diffraction studies of urea and D{sub 2} mixtures that indicate no inclusion compound forms up to 3.7 GPa.

  16. Simulating a high pressure die casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldak, J.; Zhou, J.; Downey, D.; Aldea, V.; Li, G.; Mocanita, M. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    High pressure die casting is simulated for parts with complex geometry such as a large automotive transmission case. The closed die is filled in approximately 40 ms, the casting cools in the closed die for approximately 40s, to open the die, eject the casting and spray the die cavity surface requires another 40s. This 3D cyclic process is simulated using the following coupled composite solvers: the energy equation in the die and in the casting with solidification; filling of the casting by a droplet or a Navier-Stokes solver, and thermal stress analysis of the casting machine, casting and die during the cycle. This thermal analysis can be done for both starting and stopping transients and for the cyclic steady state. The software enables this analysis to be done almost automatically by designers. (author)

  17. The LICPA-driven collider—a novel efficient tool for the production of ultra-high pressures in condensed media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badziak, J.; Krousky, E.; Kucharik, M.; Liska, R.

    2016-03-01

    Generation of strong shock waves for the production of Mbar or Gbar pressures is a topic of high relevance for contemporary research in various domains, including inertial confinement fusion, laboratory astrophysics, planetology and material science. The pressures in the multi-Mbar range can be produced by the shocks generated using chemical explosions, light-gas guns, Z-pinch machines or lasers. Higher pressures, in the sub-Gbar or Gbar range are attainable only with nuclear explosions or laser-based methods. Unfortunately, due to the low efficiency of energy conversion from a laser to the shock (below a few percent), multi-kJ, multi-beam lasers are needed to produce such pressures with these methods. Here, we propose and investigate a novel scheme for generating high-pressure shocks which is much more efficient than the laser-based schemes known so far. In the proposed scheme, the shock is generated in a dense target by the impact of a fast projectile driven by the laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) mechanism. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations and the measurements performed at the kilojoule PALS laser facility it is shown that in the LICPA-driven collider the laser-to-shock energy conversion efficiency can reach a very high value ~ 15-20 % and, as a result, the shock pressure ~ 0.5-1 Gbar can be produced using lasers of energy market. It would open up the possibility of conducting research in high energy-density science also in small, university-class laboratories.

  18. Effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reps, A.; Kuźmicka, M.; Wiśniewska, K.

    2008-07-01

    The research concerned the effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci, present in two cheese-making commercial inocula produced by Christian-Hansen. Water solutions of inocula were pressurized at 50-800 MPa, at room temperature, for 30-120 min. Pressurization at 50-100 MPa slightly increased or reduced the number of lactic streptococci, depending on the inoculum and pressurization time. Pressurization at 200 MPa caused a reduction in the number of streptococci by over 99.9%, whereas the pressure of 400 MPa and above almost completely inactivated streptococci. Pressurization also reduced the dynamics of microorganism growth and acidification, to the degree depending on the pressure.

  19. A pneumatic driver for shock wave production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leftwich, Megan; Mejila-Alvarez, R.; Prestridge, K.

    2011-11-01

    We are presenting a novel technique to generate shock waves in shock tube experiments. Typically this is done with a high pressure driver section that is separated from the low pressure driven section by a physical membrane. The membrane is burst at a specific pressure and a shock wave is formed. This process limits the repetition of experiments, and membrane particles must be removed from the shock tube after each experiment. The driver presented here does not contain a membrane. Instead, it uses a series of high pressure chambers and fast-acting pistons to create the pressure jump between the high pressure driver section and low pressure driven section. The entire system is controlled remotely and requires no insertion or cleanup of membranes between experiments. The system is designed to achieve shock waves exceeding Mach 3 with air as the working fluid (higher Mach numbers can be generated with other working fluids). It will allow high repetition rates, even in challenging experimental environments (such as a vertical shock tube configuration). We present results from the initial characterization of this driver system.

  20. What about African Americans and High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... whites. • Heredity —A tendency to have high blood pressure runs in families. • Age — In general, the older you get, the greater your chance of developing high blood pressure. • Sex — Men tend to develop high blood pressure ...

  1. Let's Talk about High Blood Pressure and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stroke. How does high blood pressure increase stroke risk? High blood pressure is the single most important risk factor for ... vessel ruptures over time. Who is at higher risk for HBP? People with a family history of high blood pressure African-Americans People age 35 or older People ...

  2. Metabolic Activity of Bacteria at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2008-12-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing evidence for the presence of a large number of microbes in the oceanic subsurface. Such a habitat has a very low energy input because it is deprived of light. A few meters below the sediment surface, conditions are already anoxic in most cases, sulfate reduction and/or methanogenesis becoming thus the primary respiratory reactions of organic matter. Neither the fate of methanogenesis, nor the fate of Dissimilatory Metal-Reduction (DMR) has been investigated so far as a function of pressure. For this reason, we measured experimentally the pressure limits of microbial anaerobic energetic metabolism. In practice, we measured in situ the kinetics of selenite respiration by the bacterial model Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) between 0 and 150 MPa at 30°C. MR-1 stationary-phase cells were used in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium amended with lactate as an additional electron donor and sodium selenite as an electron acceptor. In situ measurements were performed by X- ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy in both a diamond-anvil cell and an autoclave. A red precipitate of amorphous Se(0) was virtually observed at any pressure to 150 MPa. A progressive reduction of selenite Se(IV) into selenium Se(0) was also observed in the evolution of XANES spectra with time. All kinetics between 0.1 and 150 MPa can be adjusted to a first order kinetic law. MR-1 respires all available selenite up to 60 MPa. Above 60 MPa, the respiration yield decreases linearly as a function of pressure and reaches 0 at 155 ±5 MPa. This indicates that selenite respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 stops at about 155 MPa, whereas its growth is arrested at 50 MPa. Hence, the present results show that the respiration of selenium by the strain MR-1 occurs efficiently up to 60 MPa and 30°C, i.e. from the surface of a continental sediment to an equivalent depth of about 2 km, or beneath a 5-km water column and

  3. Robust and Accurate Shock Capturing Method for High-Order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Harold L.; Pampell, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    A simple yet robust and accurate approach for capturing shock waves using a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is presented. The method uses the physical viscous terms of the Navier-Stokes equations as suggested by others; however, the proposed formulation of the numerical viscosity is continuous and compact by construction, and does not require the solution of an auxiliary diffusion equation. This work also presents two analyses that guided the formulation of the numerical viscosity and certain aspects of the DG implementation. A local eigenvalue analysis of the DG discretization applied to a shock containing element is used to evaluate the robustness of several Riemann flux functions, and to evaluate algorithm choices that exist within the underlying DG discretization. A second analysis examines exact solutions to the DG discretization in a shock containing element, and identifies a "model" instability that will inevitably arise when solving the Euler equations using the DG method. This analysis identifies the minimum viscosity required for stability. The shock capturing method is demonstrated for high-speed flow over an inviscid cylinder and for an unsteady disturbance in a hypersonic boundary layer. Numerical tests are presented that evaluate several aspects of the shock detection terms. The sensitivity of the results to model parameters is examined with grid and order refinement studies.

  4. Prompt high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    CERN Document Server

    Bosnjak, Z; Dubus, G

    2008-01-01

    The prompt GRB emission is thought to arise from electrons accelerated in internal shocks propagating within a highly relativistic outflow. The launch of Fermi offers the prospect of observations with unprecedented sensitivity in high-energy (>100 MeV) gamma-rays. The aim is to explore the predictions for HE emission from internal shocks, taking into account both dynamical and radiative aspects, and to deduce how HE observations constrain the properties of the relativistic outflow. The emission is modeled by combining a time-dependent radiative code with a dynamical code giving the evolution of the physical conditions in the shocked regions.Synthetic lightcurves and spectra are compared to observations. The HE emission deviates significantly from analytical estimates, which tend to overpredict the IC component, when the time dependence and full cross-sections are included. The exploration of the parameter space favors the case where the dominant process in the BATSE range is synchrotron emission. The HE compo...

  5. Probing Hydrogen Diffusion under High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, L. E.; Klotz, S.; Strassle, T.; Saitta, M.

    2012-12-01

    The study of the microscopic mechanism governing hydrogen and hydrogen-based liquids (as water, ammonia and methane) diffusion is crucial for a variety of scientific issues spanning most of natural sciences. As an example, characterizing hydrogen diffusion in a confined medium, like in porous systems or zeolites, is fundamental in problems relating to environment, hydrogen storage and industrial applications [1]. The presence of water diffusion in the minerals of the Earth's mantle have strong incidence on the processes governing volcanic eruptions and intermediate-depth seismicity. As last example, knowing in details the microscopic dynamics of hydrogen-based simple liquids under extreme conditions is essential in order to interpret observations and develop models of planet interiors [2]. On the other hand, water and other simple hydrogen-based liquids have always been key systems in the development of modern condensed-matter physics, because of their simple electronic structure and the peculiar properties deriving from the hydrogen-bond network. Their high compressibility and chemical reactivity have made these systems very challenging to study experimentally under static high P-T conditions. In the last few years, a large effort has been undertaken by several groups around the world [2] to extend the static and dynamic techniques to high temperatures and pressures, a program in which our group has been actively involved [3-6]. However, while the structure of water and other hydrogenated liquids of geological interest, is now known up to almost 20 GPa, the study of their transport properties greatly lags behind. We have recently developed a new large-volume gasket-anvil ensemble for the Paris-Edinburgh press based on a novel toroidal design [7], which allows to perform quasi elastic neutron scattering measurements on hydrogen based liquids up to one order of magnitude higher pressures (5 GPa) respect to what was achievable with standard methods [8]. The large

  6. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  7. Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Engelke, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manner, Virginia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chellappa, Raja [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Choong - Shik [WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

    2011-01-20

    The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

  8. Shock-tube calibration of a fast-response pressure transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kung-Ming; Lu, Frank K.

    1990-01-01

    The sensitivity of a miniature fast-response piezoresistive pressure transducer determined dynamically was found to be slightly higher than that determined statically. Thus, mean pressures in a turbulent or unsteady flowfield that are measured using statically-calibrated pressure transducers would be slightly above true values. Unsteady pressure measurements to obtain space-time correlations and spectra can, however, be properly performed if the slight error is acceptable. These measurements are, obviously, subjected to limitations imposed by the bandwidth and the spatial resolution of the transducer. The noise spectrum revealed that the noise is predominantly above the transducer's resonant frequency. Filtering to improve the signal-to-noise ratio is particularly necessary when using the transducers at their low range. Transducer drift increases the signal-to-noise ratio and can adversely affect mean measurements.

  9. High-pressure superconducting state in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, A. M.; Szczȩśniak, R.; Sowińska, M. A.; Kosiacka, A. H.

    2016-10-01

    The paper determines the thermodynamic parameters of the superconducting state in the metallic atomic hydrogen under the pressure at 1 TPa, 1.5 TPa, and 2.5 TPa. The calculations were conducted in the framework of the Eliashberg formalism. It has been shown that the critical temperature is very high (in the range from 301.2 K to 437.3 K), as well as high are the values of the electron effective mass (from 3.43me to 6.88me), where me denotes the electron band mass. The ratio of the low-temperature energy gap to the critical temperature explicitly violates the predictions of the BCS theory: 2 Δ (0) /kB TC ∈ . Additionally, the free energy difference between the superconducting and normal state, the thermodynamic critical field, and the specific heat of the superconducting state have been determined. Due to the significant strong-coupling and retardation effects those quantities cannot be correctly described in the framework of the BCS theory.

  10. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy of carbon onions and nanocapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J. J.; Liu, G. H.; Wang, X. M.; Fujita, T.; Xu, B. S.; Chen, M. W.

    2009-08-01

    We report high-pressure Raman spectra of carbon onions and nanocapsules investigated by diamond anvil cell experiments. The pressure coefficient and elastic behavior of carbon onions and nanocapsules are found to be very similar to those of multiwall carbon nanotubes. Additionally, detectable structure changes, particularly the collapse of the concentric graphite structure, cannot been seen at pressures as high as ˜20 GPa, demonstrating that carbon onions and nanocapsules have significant hardness and can sustain very high pressures.

  11. [Cardiogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houegnifioh, Komlanvi Kafui; Gfeller, Etienne; Garcia, Wenceslao; Ribordy, Vincent

    2014-08-13

    Cardiogenic shock, especially when it complicates a myocardial infarction, is still associated with high mortality rate. Emergency department or first care physicians are often the first providers to assess the cardiogenic shock patient, and plays thereby a key role in achieving a timely diagnosis and treatment. This review will detail the actual physiopathology understanding of the cardiogenic shock, its diagnosis and management focusing on the care within the emergency department.

  12. High Chamber Pressure, Light Weight Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The performance liquid propellant engines can be significantly improved by increasing both combustion temperature and pressure and reducing engine weight. State of...

  13. Polyatomic gases with dynamic pressure: Maximum entropy principle and shock structure

    CERN Document Server

    Pavić-Čolić, Milana; Simić, Srboljub

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the analysis of polyatomic gases within the framework of kinetic theory. Internal degrees of freedom are modeled using a single continuous variable corresponding to the molecular internal energy. Non-equilibrium velocity distribution function, compatible with macroscopic field variables, is constructed using the maximum entropy principle. A proper collision cross section is constructed which obeys the micro-reversibility requirement. The source term and entropy production rate are determined in the form which generalizes the results obtained within the framework of extended thermodynamics. They can be adapted to appropriate physical situations due to the presence of parameters. They are also compared with the results obtained using BGK approximation. For the proposed model the shock structure problem is thoroughly analyzed.

  14. Numerical simulation of high pressure water jet impacting concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jialiang; Wang, Mengjin; Zhang, Di

    2017-08-01

    High pressure water jet technology is an unconventional concrete crushing technology. In order to reveal the mechanism of high pressure water jet impacting concrete, it built a three-dimensional numerical model of high pressure water jet impacting concrete based on fluid mechanics and damage mechanics. And the numerical model was verified by theoretical analysis and experiments. Based on this model, it studied the stress characteristics in concrete under high pressure water jet impacting at different time, and quantified the damage evolution rules in concrete along the water jet radial direction. The results can provide theoretical basis and guidance for the high pressure water jet crushing concrete technology.

  15. Computation of compressible flows with high density ratio and pressure ratio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rong-san

    2008-01-01

    The WENO method, RKDG method, RKDG method with original ghost fluid method, and RKDG method with modified ghost fluid method are applied to single-medium and two-medium air-air, air-liquid compressible flows with high density and pressure ratios. We also provide a numerical comparison and analysis for the above methods. Numerical results show that, compared with the other methods, the RKDG method with modified ghost fluid method can obtain high resolution results and the correct position of the shock, and the computed solutions are converged to the physical solutions as the mesh is refined.

  16. High pressure gas vessels for neutron scattering experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Done, R; Evans, B E; Bowden, Z A

    2010-01-01

    The combination of high pressure techniques with neutron scattering proves to be a powerful tool for studying the phase transitions and physical properties of solids in terms of inter-atomic distances. In our report we are going to review a high pressure technique based on a gas medium compression. This technique covers the pressure range up to ~0.7GPa (in special cases 1.4GPa) and typically uses compressed helium gas as the pressure medium. We are going to look briefly at scientific areas where high pressure gas vessels are intensively used in neutron scattering experiments. After that we are going to describe the current situation in high pressure gas technology; specifically looking at materials of construction, designs of seals and pressure vessels and the equipment used for generating high pressure gas.

  17. Silicon carbide resonant tuning fork for microsensing applications in high-temperature and high G-shock environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David R Myers; Kan Bun Cheng; Babak Jamshidi; Robert G Azevedo; Debbie G Senesky; Li Chen; Mehran Mehregany; Muthu B J Wijesundara; Albert P Pisano

    2012-01-01

    We present the fabrication and testing of a silicon carbide (SiC) balanced mass doublended tuning fork that survives harsh environments without compromising the device strain sensitivity and resolution bandwidth. The device features a material stack that survives corrosive environments and enables high-temperature operation. To perform hightemperature testing, a specialized setup was constructed that allows the tuning fork to be characterized using traditional silicon electronics. The tuning fork has been operated at 600°C in the presence of dry steam for short durations. This tuning fork has also been tested to 64 000 G using a hard-launch, soft-catch shock implemented with a light gas gun. However, the device still has a strain sensitivity of 66 Hz/μe and strain resolution of 0. 045 μe in a 10 kHz bandwidth. As such, this balanced-mass double-ended tuning fork can be used to create a variety of different sensors including strain gauges, accelerometers, gyroscopes, and pressure transducers. Given the adaptable fabrication process flow, this device could be useful to micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) designers creating sensors for a variety of different applications.

  18. Automated high pressure cell for pressure jump x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Nicholas J.; Gauthe, Beatrice L. L. E.; Terrill, Nick J.; Rogers, Sarah E.; Templer, Richard H.; Ces, Oscar; Seddon, John M.

    2010-06-01

    A high pressure cell for small and wide-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of soft condensed matter samples has been developed, incorporating a fully automated pressure generating network. The system allows both static and pressure jump measurements in the range of 0.1-500 MPa. Pressure jumps can be performed as quickly as 5 ms, both with increasing and decreasing pressures. Pressure is generated by a motorized high pressure pump, and the system is controlled remotely via a graphical user interface to allow operation by a broad user base, many of whom may have little previous experience of high pressure technology. Samples are loaded through a dedicated port allowing the x-ray windows to remain in place throughout an experiment; this facilitates accurate subtraction of background scattering. The system has been designed specifically for use at beamline I22 at the Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom, and has been fully integrated with the I22 beamline control systems.

  19. Automated high pressure cell for pressure jump x-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Nicholas J; Gauthe, Beatrice L L E; Terrill, Nick J; Rogers, Sarah E; Templer, Richard H; Ces, Oscar; Seddon, John M

    2010-06-01

    A high pressure cell for small and wide-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of soft condensed matter samples has been developed, incorporating a fully automated pressure generating network. The system allows both static and pressure jump measurements in the range of 0.1-500 MPa. Pressure jumps can be performed as quickly as 5 ms, both with increasing and decreasing pressures. Pressure is generated by a motorized high pressure pump, and the system is controlled remotely via a graphical user interface to allow operation by a broad user base, many of whom may have little previous experience of high pressure technology. Samples are loaded through a dedicated port allowing the x-ray windows to remain in place throughout an experiment; this facilitates accurate subtraction of background scattering. The system has been designed specifically for use at beamline I22 at the Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom, and has been fully integrated with the I22 beamline control systems.

  20. Selected studies of magnetism at high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hearne, G.R. [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Physics; Pasternak, M.P. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics and Astronomy; Taylor, R.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Most previous studies of magnetism in various compounds under extreme conditions have been conducted over a wide pressure range at room temperature or over a wide range of cryogenic temperatures at pressures below 20 GPa (200 kbar). We present some of the most recent studies of magnetism over an extended range of temperatures and pressures far beyond 20 GPa, i.e., in regions of pressure-temperature (P-T) where magnetism has been largely unexplored. Recent techniques have permitted investigations of magnetism in selected 3d transition metal compounds in regions of P-T where physical properties may be drastically modified; related effects have often been seen in selected doping studies at ambient pressures.

  1. Equation of state of unreacted high explosives at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, C-S

    1998-08-14

    Isotherms of unreacted high explosives (HMX, RDX, and PETN) have been determined to quasi-hydrostatic high pressures below 45 GPa, by using a diamond-anvil cell angle-resolved synchrotron x-ray diffraction method. The equation-of-state parameters (bulk modulus Bo, and its derivatives B' ) are presented for the 3rd-order Birch-Murnaghan formula based on the measured isotherms. The results are also used to retrieve unreacted Hugoniots in these high explosives and to develop the equations of state and kinetic models for composite high explolsivcs such as XTX-8003 and LX-04. The evidence of shear-induced chemistry of HMX in non-hydrostatic conditions is also presented.

  2. Importance of post-shock streams and sheath region as drivers of intense magnetospheric storms and high-latitude activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. J. Huttunen

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere can be very different depending on the type of solar wind driver. We have determined the solar wind causes for intense magnetic storms (Dst<-100nT over a 6-year period from the beginning of 1997 to the end of 2002, using observations by the WIND and ACE spacecraft. We have taken into consideration whether the storm was caused by the sheath region or by the following interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME. We also divided ICMEs into those having a magnetic cloud structure and those without such a structure. We found that post-shock streams and sheath regions caused the largest fraction of intense magnetic storms. We present four periods of magnetospheric activity in more detail. One of the events was caused by a magnetic cloud (10-11 August 2000 and the rest (13-14 July 2000, 8-9 June 2000 and 17-18 April 2001 by sheath regions and post-shock streams. We have used several magnetic indices to monitor the low- and high-latitude magnetospheric response to these different solar wind structures. Two of the events are interesting examples where at first strong high-latitude activity took place and the low-latitude response followed several hours later. These events demonstrate that low- and high-latitude activity do not always occur concurrently and the level of activity may be very different. According to the examples shown the evolution of the pressure-corrected Dst index was more difficult to model for a sheath region or a post-shock stream driven storm than for a storm caused by a magnetic cloud.

  3. High Pressure Laminates with Antimicrobial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Magina

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure laminates (HPLs are durable, resistant to environmental effects and good cost-benefit decorative surface composite materials with special properties tailored to meet market demand. In the present work, polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB was incorporated for the first time into melamine-formaldehyde resin (MF matrix on the outer layer of HPLs to provide them antimicrobial properties. Chemical binding of PHMB to resin matrix was detected on the surface of produced HPLs by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR. Antimicrobial evaluation tests were carried out on the ensuing HPLs doped with PHMB against gram-positive Listeria innocua and gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria. The results revealed that laminates prepared with 1.0 wt % PHMB in MF resin were bacteriostatic (i.e., inhibited the growth of microorganisms, whereas those prepared with 2.4 wt % PHMB in MF resin exhibited bactericidal activity (i.e., inactivated the inoculated microorganisms. The results herein reported disclose a promising strategy for the production of HPLs with antimicrobial activity without affecting basic intrinsic quality parameters of composite material.

  4. Spectroscopy of high pressure cesium discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Goran; Pichler, Marin

    2008-05-01

    Near UV, visible and NIR spectrum of Cs lamp has been studied in many experimental situations. We concentrate on the spectral region around resonance lines where numerous satellite bands appear. We followed the appearance of these satellite bands after the ignition. They first appear in emission, and then in absorption, due to the steady increase of cesium atom density. The origin of the satellite bands have been described ootnotetextD. Veza, R. Beuc, S. Milosevi' c and G. Pichler, Eur. Phys. J. D, 2, 45 (1998)^,ootnotetextR. Beuc, H. Skenderovi' c, T. Ban, D. Veza, G. Pichler, W. Meyer, Eur. Phys. J.D 15, 209 (2001). We observed the satellite band intensity behavior in several different burners filled with cesium and xenon. In one burner made out of crystalline sapphire we observed interesting spatial distribution of entire visible spectrum, during evolution in time after the ignition. The intensity behavior of satellite bands in the near-infrared spectral region will be used in further development of the white light source with pulsed cesium high-pressure discharge.

  5. Calibrated versus uncalibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis in monitoring cardiac output with transpulmonary thermodilution in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagt, C.; Helmi, M.; Malagon, I.; Groeneveld, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac output (CO) measurement is often required in critically ill patients. The performances of newer, less invasive techniques require evaluation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. OBJECTIVES: To compare calibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis-derived CO (COap, Vo

  6. Calibrated versus uncalibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis in monitoring cardiac output with transpulmonary thermodilution in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagt, C.; Helmi, M.; Malagon, I.; Groeneveld, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac output (CO) measurement is often required in critically ill patients. The performances of newer, less invasive techniques require evaluation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. OBJECTIVES: To compare calibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis-derived CO (COap,

  7. Calibrated versus uncalibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis in monitoring cardiac output with transpulmonary thermodilution in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagt, C.; Helmi, M.; Malagon, I.; Groeneveld, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac output (CO) measurement is often required in critically ill patients. The performances of newer, less invasive techniques require evaluation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. OBJECTIVES: To compare calibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis-derived CO (COap, Vo

  8. Functional Sub-states by High-pressure Macromolecular Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaussy, Anne-Claire; Girard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    At the molecular level, high-pressure perturbation is of particular interest for biological studies as it allows trapping conformational substates. Moreover, within the context of high-pressure adaptation of deep-sea organisms, it allows to decipher the molecular determinants of piezophily. To provide an accurate description of structural changes produced by pressure in a macromolecular system, developments have been made to adapt macromolecular crystallography to high-pressure studies. The present chapter is an overview of results obtained so far using high-pressure macromolecular techniques, from nucleic acids to virus capsid through monomeric as well as multimeric proteins.

  9. Enhanced MgB2 Superconductivity Under High Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘振兴; 靳常青; 游江洋; 李绍春; 朱嘉林; 禹日成; 李风英; 苏少奎

    2002-01-01

    We report on in situ high-pressure studies up to 1.0 GPa on the MgB2 superconductor which was high-pressure synthesized. The as-prepared sample is of high quality in terms of sharp superconducting transition (Tc) at 39K from the magnetic measurements. The in situ high-pressure measurements were carried out using a Be-Cu piston-cylinder-type instrument with mixed oil as the pressure transmitting medium which warrants a quasihydrostatic pressure environment at low temperature. The superconducting transitions were measured using the electrical conductance method. It is found that Tc increases by more than 1 K with pressure in the low-pressure range, before the Tc value decreases with the further increase of the pressure.

  10. Runaway electrons preionized diffuse discharges at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Sorokin, Dmitry A.

    2010-09-01

    Breakdown of the gaps with a non-uniform electric field filled with nitrogen and air as well as with other gases under high-voltage nanosecond pulses was investigated. It is shown that conditions of obtaining a diffuse discharge without a source of additional ionization are extended at the voltage pulse duration decreasing. A volume discharge is formed due to the gap pre-ionization by runaway electrons and X-ray quanta. At a negative polarity of the electrode with a small radius of curvature, a volume (diffuse) discharge formation is determined by pre-ionization with runaway electrons which are generated due to the electric field amplification near the cathode and in the gap. At a positive polarity of the electrode with a small radius of curvature, the X-ray radiation, generated at the runaway electrons braking at the anode and in the gap, is of great importance in a volume discharge formation. A runaway electrons preionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) has two characteristic stages. In the first stage, the ionization wave overlaps the gap during a fraction of a second. The discharge current is determined by the conductivity current in the dense plasma of the ionization wave and the displacement current in the remaining part of the gap. The second stage of the discharge can be related to the anomalous glow discharge with a high specific input power. During the second stage, the gap voltage decreases and the cathode spots formed as a result of explosive electron emission can participate in the electron emission from the cathode. At the increase of the voltage pulse duration and specific input power, the REP DD transforms into a spark discharge form. A REP DD is easily realized in various gases and at different pressures; see [1] and references in [1]. At pressure decrease was obtained the anode electrons beam current to rise (up to ~2 kA/cm2 in helium). At the REP DD, the anode is influenced by the plasma of a dense nanosecond discharge with the specific input power

  11. Imaging in (high pressure) Micromegas TPC detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzón, G.; Cebrián, S.; Castel, J.; Dafni, Th.; Galán, J.; Garza, J. G.; Irastorza, I. G.; Iguaz, F. J.; Mirallas, H.; Ruíz-Choliz, E.

    2016-11-01

    The T-REX project of the group of the University of Zaragoza includes a number of R&D and prototyping activities to explore the applicability of gaseous Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) with Micromesh Gas Structures (Micromegas) in rare event searches where the pattern recognition of the signal is crucial for background discrimination. In the CAST experiment (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) a background level as low as 0.8 × 10-6 counts keV-1 cm-2 s-1 was achieved. Prototyping and simulations promise a 105 better signal-to-noise ratio than CAST for the future IAXO (International Axion Observatory) using x-ray telescopes. A new strategy is also explored in the search of WIMPS based on high gas pressure: the TREX-DM experiment, a low energy threshold detector. In both cases, axion and WIMP searches, the image of the expected signal is quite simple: a one cluster deposition coming from the magnet bore in the case of axions and, if possible, with a tadpole form in the case of WIMPs. It is the case of double beta decay (DBD) where imaging and pattern recognition play a major role. Results obtained in Xe + trimethylamine (TMA) mixture point to a reduction in electron diffusion which improves the quality of the topological pattern, with a positive impact on the discrimination capability, as shown in TREX-ββ prototype. Microbulk Micromegas are able to image the DBD ionization signature with high quality while, at the same time, measuring its energy deposition with a resolution of at least a ~ 3% FWHM at the transition energy Qββ and even better (up to ~ 1% FWHM) as extrapolated from low energy events. That makes Micromegas-based HPXe TPC a very competitive technique for the next generation DBD experiments (as PANDAX-III). Here, it will be shown the last results of the TREX project detectors and software concerning Axions, Dark matter and double beta decay.

  12. Influence of high flux hydrogen-plasma exposure on the thermal shock induced crack formation in tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Rapp, J.; Wright, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of high flux hydrogen-plasma on the thermal shock behaviour of tungsten was investigated in a combined experiment using the linear plasma device Pilot-PSI and the electron beam facility JUDITH 1. Tungsten targets were exposed to high flux hydrogen plasma, cyclic thermal shock tests and

  13. Standardized Laboratory Test Requirements for Hardening Equipment to Withstand Wave Impact Shock in Small High Speed Craft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-06

    penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR...the risk of equipment malfunction or failure due to shock forces caused by wave impacts in high-speed craft. The engineering rationale, assumptions...procurement documents are presented. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Shock Wave slam shock test equipment operability risk reduction 16. SECURITY

  14. Evaluating piezo-electric transducer response to thermal shock from in-cylinder pressure data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosseel, E.; Sierens, R.; Baert, R.S.G.

    1999-01-01

    One of the major effects limiting the accuracy of piezo-electric transducers for performing in-cyclinder pressure measurements is their sensitivity to the cyclic thermal loading effects of the intermittent combustion process. This paper compares 5 different methods for evaluating the effect of this

  15. 10 CFR 50.61 - Fracture toughness requirements for protection against pressurized thermal shock events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Nuclear Power Plant Components,” edition and addenda and any limitations and modifications thereof as...-service or unirradiated condition, evaluated according to the procedures in the ASME Code, Paragraph NB... continue to operate without justification. (b) Requirements. (1) For each pressurized water nuclear...

  16. Thermal shock behaviour of tungsten after high flux H-plasma loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; De Temmerman, G.; Wright, G. M.

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that transient thermal shock loads induce crack networks on tungsten samples especially at low base temperatures. To achieve test conditions which are more relevant for the performance of tungsten-armoured plasma facing components in next step thermonuclear fusion devices tungsten tiles were exposed to high flux hydrogen-plasma in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI and the high heat flux ion beam test facility MARION. Subsequently, the cyclic transient heat load tests were done in the electron beam facility JUDITH 1. The induced damages after these combined tests were examined by microscopically means, profilometry and metallography. The comparison of the obtained results and damage characteristics with those obtained after thermal shock loading show that the preloading of tungsten targets with high flux hydrogen-plasma has significant influence on the thermal shock behaviour of tungsten in terms of crack distance, width, and depth as well as cracked area. Furthermore the plasma parameters, in particular pulse duration and sample temperature during loading, have strong impact on the damage pattern after thermal shock loading.

  17. Using Short Pulse Lasers to Address Frontiers in High Pressure Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildmann, K.; Springer, P.T.; Cauble, R.; Foord, M.E.; Guethlein, G.; Ng, A.; Patel, P.K.; Price, D.F.; Rogers, F.J; Wicks, S.C.

    1999-08-10

    Having laser intensities of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} yield electrical field strengths of 10{sup 12} V/cm which is comparable to the field strength at the K-shell of neon. Instant field ionization becomes part of the laser-matter interaction allowing to transfer most of the photons momenta directly onto the ions by driving an electrostatic shock through the target equivalent to pressures of several 100 Gbar. Utilization of these high-pressure conditions in form of equation of state measurements, however, strongly depends on the contrast of the femtosecond laser pulse. Currently, the Livermore USP and JanUSP lasers reach contrast values up to 10{sup 8}. This is sufficient to explore near-isochorically heated materials at moderate intensities (10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) attaining pressures around 100 Mbar.

  18. Hydraulic High Pressure Valve Controller Using the In-Situ Pressure Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Hall, Jeffery L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A hydraulic valve controller that uses an existing pressure differential as some or all of the power source for valve operation. In a high pressure environment, such as downhole in an oil or gas well, the pressure differential between the inside of a pipe and the outside of the pipe may be adequately large to drive a linear slide valve. The valve is operated hydraulically by a piston in a bore. When a higher pressure is applied to one end of the bore and a lower pressure to the other end, the piston moves in response to the pressure differential and drives a valve attached to it. If the pressure differential is too small to drive the piston at a sufficiently high speed, a pump is provided to generate a larger pressure differential to be applied. The apparatus is conveniently constructed using multiport valves, which can be rotary valves.

  19. High Toughness Light Weight Pressure Vessel Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposed is a pressure vessel with 25% better Fracture Strength over equal strength designed Fiberglass to help reduce 10 to 25% weight for aerospace use. Phase I is...

  20. Propagation Limits of High Pressure Cool Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yiguang

    2016-11-01

    The flame speeds and propagation limits of premixed cool flames at elevated pressures with radiative heat loss are numerically modelled using dimethyl ether mixtures. The primary focus is paid on the effects of pressure, mixture dilution, flame size, and heat loss on cool flame propagation. The results showed that cool flames exist on both fuel lean and fuel rich sides and thus dramatically extend the lean and rich flammability limits. There exist three different flame regimes, hot flame, cool flame, and double flame. A new flame flammability diagram including both cool flames and hot flames is obtained at elevated pressure. The results show that pressure significantly changes cool flame propagation. It is found that the increases of pressure affects the propagation speeds of lean and rich cool flames differently due to the negative temperature coefficient effect. On the lean side, the increase of pressure accelerates the cool flame chemistry and shifts the transition limit of cool flame to hot flame to lower equivalence ratio. At lower pressure, there is an extinction transition from hot flame to cool flame. However, there exists a critical pressure above which the cool flame to hot flame transition limit merges with the lean flammability limit of the hot flame, resulting in a direct transition from hot flame to cool flame. On the other hand, the increase of dilution reduces the heat release of hot flame and promotes cool flame formation. Moreover, it is shown that a smaller flame size and a higher heat loss also extend the cool flame transition limit and promote cool flame formation.